Science.gov

Sample records for ii igf-ii expression

  1. Characterization of the Igf-II Binding Site of the IGF-II/MAN-6-P Receptor Extracellular Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmroudi, Farideh

    1995-01-01

    In mammals, insulin-like growth factor II (IGF -II) and glycoproteins bearing the mannose 6-phosphate (Man -6-P) recognition marker bind with high affinity to the same receptor. The functional consequences of IGF-II binding to the receptor at the cell surface are not clear. In these studies, we sought to broaden our understanding of the functional regions of the receptor regarding its IGF -II binding site. The IGF-II binding/cross-linking domain of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor was mapped by sequencing receptor fragments covalently attached to IGF-II. Purified rat placental or bovine liver receptors were affinity-labeled, with ^{125}I-IGF-II and digested with endoproteinase Glu-C. Analysis of digests by gel electrophoresis revealed a major radiolabeled band of 18 kDa, which was purified by gel filtration chromatography followed by reverse-phase HPLC and electroblotting. Sequence analysis revealed that, the peptide S(H)VNSXPMF, located within extracellular repeat 10 and beginning with serine 1488 of the bovine receptor, was the best candidate for the IGF-II cross-linked peptide. These data indicated that residues within repeats 10-11 were important for IGF -II binding. To define the location of the IGF-II binding site further, a nested set of six human receptor cDNA constructs was designed to produce epitope-tagged fusion proteins encompassing the region between repeats 8 and 11 of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor extracellular domain. These truncated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, immunoprecipitated and analyzed for their abilities to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. All of the constructs were capable of binding/cross-linking to IGF-II, except for the 9.0-11 construct. Displacement curve analysis indicated that the truncated receptors were approximately equivalent in IGF-II binding affinity, but were of 5- to 10-fold lower affinity than full-length receptors. Sequencing of the 9.0-11 construct indicated the presence of a point mutation

  2. IGF-II Promotes Stemness of Neural Restricted Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amber N.; Schneider, Joel S.; Qin, Mei; Tyler, William A.; Pintar, John E.; Fraidenraich, Diego; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II regulate brain development and growth through the IGF type 1 receptor (IGF-1R). Less appreciated is that IGF-II, but not IGF-I, activates a splice variant of the insulin receptor (IR) known as IR-A. We hypothesized that IGF-II exerts distinct effects from IGF-I on neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) via its interaction with IR-A. Immunofluorescence revealed high IGF-II in the medial region of the subventricular zone (SVZ) comprising the neural stem cell niche, with IGF-II mRNA predominant in the adjacent choroid plexus. The IGF-1R and the IR isoforms were differentially expressed with IR-A predominant in the medial SVZ, whereas the IGF-1R was more abundant laterally. Similarly, IR-A was more highly expressed by NSPs, whereas the IGF-1R was more highly expressed by lineage restricted cells. In vitro, IGF-II was more potent in promoting NSP expansion than either IGF-I or standard growth medium. Limiting dilution and differentiation assays revealed that IGF-II was superior to IGF-I in promoting stemness. In vivo, NSPs propagated in IGF-II migrated to and took up residence in periventricular niches while IGF-I-treated NSPs predominantly colonized white matter. Knockdown of IR or IGF-1R using shRNAs supported the conclusion that the IGF-1R promotes progenitor proliferation, whereas the IR is important for self-renewal. Q-PCR revealed that IGF-II increased Oct4, Sox1, and FABP7 mRNA levels in NSPs. Our data support the conclusion that IGF-II promotes the self-renewal of neural stem/progenitors via the IR. By contrast, IGF-1R functions as a mitogenic receptor to increase precursor abundance. PMID:22593020

  3. IGF-II receptors and IGF-II-stimulated glucose transport in human fat cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, M.K.; Buchanan, C.; Raineri-Maldonado, C.; Khazanie, P.; Atkinson, S.; DiMarchi, R.; Caro, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptors have been described in rat but not in human adipocytes. In both species, IGF-II has been reported to stimulate glucose transport by interacting with the insulin receptor. In this study, we have unequivocally demonstrated the presence of IGF-II receptors in human adipocytes. 125I-labeled IGF-II specifically binds to intact adipocytes, membranes, and lectin-purified detergent solubilized extracts. Through the use of 0.5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate, 125I-IGF-II is cross-linked to a 260-kDa protein that is identified as the IGF-II receptor by displacement experiments with unlabeled IGF-II, IGF-I, and insulin and either by immunoprecipitation or by Western blot analysis with mannose 6-phosphate receptor antibodies. The concentrations of IGF-II required for half-maximal and maximal stimulation of glucose transport in human adipocytes are 35 and 100 times more than that of insulin. The possibility of IGF-II stimulating glucose transport by interacting predominantly with the insulin receptor is suggested by the following: (1) the concentration of IGF-II that inhibits half of insulin binding is only 20 times more than that of insulin; (2) the lack of an additive effect of IGF-II and insulin for maximal stimulation of glucose transport; (3) the ability of monoclonal insulin receptor antibodies to decrease glucose transport stimulated by submaximal concentrations of both IGF-II and insulin; and (4) the ability of IGF-II to stimulate insulin receptor autophosphorylation albeit at a reduced potency when compared with insulin.

  4. Effects of IGF-II on promoting proliferation and regulating nitric oxide synthase gene expression in mouse osteoblast-like cell*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-lian; Chen, Li-li; Yan, Jie; Yu, Zhong-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) on promoting cell proliferation, regulating levels of cellular nitric oxide (NO) and mRNA transcriptions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) in mouse osteoblast-like cells. Methods: Mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was selected as the effective cell of IGF-II. After the cells were treated with IGF-II at different concentrations for different time duration, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay was used to examine cell proliferation, and nitrate reductase method was applied to detect NO concentrations in cell culture supernatants and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to determine transcription levels of cellular iNOS and eNOS mRNAs. Results: After the MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with IGF-II at concentration of 1 ng/ml for 72 h, 10 and 100 ng/ml for 24, 48 and 72 h respectively, all the MTT values increased (P<0.05 or P<0.01) with obvious dosage-time dependent pattern. NO levels of the MC3T3-E1 cells treated with 100 ng/ml IGF-II for 48 h, and with 1, 10 and 100 ng/ml IGF-II for 72 h were remarkably lower than that of the normal control, respectively (P<0.05 or P<0.01). After the cells were treated with 100 ng/ml IGF-II for 48 h cellular iNOS mRNA levels were significantly decreased (P<0.01). But the levels of eNOS mRNA in the cells treated with each of the used IGF-II dosages for different time duration did not show any differences compared with the normal control (P>0.05). Conclusion: IGF-II at different concentrations could promote proliferation of mouse MC3T3-E1 cell. This cell proliferation promotion was associated with the low NO levels maintained by IGF-II. Higher concentration of IGF-II could down-regulate iNOS gene expression at the level of transcription but not affect transcription of eNOS mRNA, which might be one of the mechanisms for IGF-II

  5. Truncated forms of the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)/mannose 6-phosphate receptor encompassing the IGF-II binding site: characterization of a point mutation that abolishes IGF-II binding.

    PubMed

    Garmroudi, F; Devi, G; Slentz, D H; Schaffer, B S; MacDonald, R G

    1996-06-01

    Complete understanding of the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binding by the IGF-II/mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P) receptor requires mapping and ultimately mutational analysis of the receptor's IGF-II binding domain. Recent advances have localized the IGF-II binding site to extracytoplasmic repeats 10-11. To improve resolution of the binding site map, a nested set of epitope-tagged, truncated forms of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. The IGF-II binding properties of truncated receptors immunoprecipitated from cell lysates and conditioned media were determined by affinity cross-linking. From the largest truncated receptor, encompassing extracytoplasmic repeats 8-11 (M(r) 68 K), through the smallest, comprised primarily of repeat 11 (M(r) 23 K), all were able to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. As a group, the truncated receptors had similar affinities for IGF-II, but with relative binding affinities 5-to 10-fold lower than those of full-length receptors. A point mutation substituting threonine for isoleucine at residue 1572, located in the NH2-terminal half of repeat 11, completely abolished IGF-II binding. We conclude that repeat 11 of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor's extracytoplasmic domain contains the minimal elements required for binding and cross-linking to IGF-II, and that lle1572 and other residues within the NH2-terminal half of repeat 11 are particularly important for IGF-II interaction.

  6. IGFBP-5 regulates muscle cell differentiation by binding to IGF-II and switching on the IGF-II auto-regulation loop

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongxia; Yin, Ping; Duan, Cunming

    2008-01-01

    IGF-II stimulates both mitogenesis and myogenesis through its binding and activation of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR). How this growth factor pathway promotes these two opposite cellular responses is not well understood. We investigate whether local IGF binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) promotes the myogenic action of IGF-II. IGFBP-5 is induced before the elevation of IGF-II expression during myogenesis. Knockdown of IGFBP-5 impairs myogenesis and suppresses IGF-II gene expression. IGF-II up-regulates its own gene expression via the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. Adding IGF-II or constitutively activating Akt rescues the IGFBP-5 knockdown-caused defects. However, an IGF analogue that binds to the IGF-IR but not IGFBP has only a limited effect. When added with low concentrations of IGF-II, IGFBP-5 restores IGF-II expression and myogenic differentiation, whereas an IGF binding–deficient IGFBP-5 mutant has no effect. These findings suggest that IGFBP-5 promotes muscle cell differentiation by binding to and switching on the IGF-II auto-regulation loop. PMID:18762576

  7. Kangaroo IGF-II is structurally and functionally similar to the human [Ser29]-IGF-II variant.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-06-01

    Kangaroo IGF-II has been purified from western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum and characterised in a number of in vitro assays. In addition, the complete cDNA sequence of mature IGF-II has been obtained by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of the kangaroo IGF-II cDNA sequence with known IGF-II sequences from other species revealed that it is very similar to the human variant, [Ser29]-hIGF-II. Both the variant and kangaroo IGF-II contain an insert of nine nucleotides that encode the amino acids Leu-Pro-Gly at the junction of the B and C domains of the mature protein. The deduced kangaroo IGF-II protein sequence also contains three other amino acid changes that are not observed in human IGF-II. These amino acid differences share similarities with the changes described in many of the IGF-IIs reported for non-mammalian species. Characterisation of human IGF-II, kangaroo IGF-II, chicken IGF-II and [Ser29]-hIGF-II in a number of in vitro assays revealed that all four proteins are functionally very similar. No significant differences were observed in the ability of the IGF-IIs to bind to the bovine IGF-II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor or to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts. However, differences were observed in their abilities to bind to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) present in human serum. Kangaroo, chicken and [Ser29]-hIGF-II had lower apparent affinities for human IGFBPs than did human IGF-II. Thus, it appears that the major circulating form of IGF-II in the kangaroo and a minor form of IGF-II found in human serum are structurally and functionally very similar. This suggests that the splice site that generates both the variant and major form of human IGF-II must have evolved after the divergence of marsupials from placental mammals.

  8. Biochemical Characterization of Individual Human Glycosylated pro-Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-II and big-IGF-II Isoforms Associated with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenall, Sameer A.; Bentley, John D.; Pearce, Lesley A.; Scoble, Judith A.; Sparrow, Lindsay G.; Bartone, Nicola A.; Xiao, Xiaowen; Baxter, Robert C.; Cosgrove, Leah J.; Adams, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major embryonic growth factor belonging to the insulin-like growth factor family, which includes insulin and IGF-I. Its expression in humans is tightly controlled by maternal imprinting, a genetic restraint that is lost in many cancers, resulting in up-regulation of both mature IGF-II mRNA and protein expression. Additionally, increased expression of several longer isoforms of IGF-II, termed “pro” and “big” IGF-II, has been observed. To date, it is ambiguous as to what role these IGF-II isoforms have in initiating and sustaining tumorigenesis and whether they are bioavailable. We have expressed each individual IGF-II isoform in their proper O-glycosylated format and established that all bind to the IGF-I receptor and both insulin receptors A and B, resulting in their activation and subsequent stimulation of fibroblast proliferation. We also confirmed that all isoforms are able to be sequestered into binary complexes with several IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, and IGFBP-5). In contrast to this, ternary complex formation with IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5 and the auxillary protein, acid labile subunit, was severely diminished. Furthermore, big-IGF-II isoforms bound much more weakly to purified ectodomain of the natural IGF-II scavenging receptor, IGF-IIR. IGF-II isoforms thus possess unique biological properties that may enable them to escape normal sequestration avenues and remain bioavailable in vivo to sustain oncogenic signaling. PMID:23166326

  9. Direct actions of macronutrient components on goldfish hepatopancreas in vitro to modulate the expression of ghr-I, ghr-II, igf-I and igf-II mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, Juan Ignacio; Blanco, Ayelén Melisa; Canosa, Luis Fabián; Unniappan, Suraj

    2017-09-01

    In mammals and fish, somatic growth and metabolism are coordinated by the GH-IGF axis, composed of growth hormone (GH), growth hormone receptors I and II (GHR-I and GHR-II), and the insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II). In order to determine if dietary macronutrients regulate the hepatopancreatic expression of ghr-I, ghr-II, igf-I and igf-II independently of circulating GH, organ culture experiments were conducted. Briefly, goldfish hepatopancreas sections were incubated with different doses of glucose; L-tryptophan; oleic acid; linolenic acid (LNA); eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). After two and four hours of treatment, the expression of ghr-I, ghr-II, igf-I and igf-II mRNAs was quantified. We found that glucose and L-tryptophan globally upregulate the mRNA expression of ghr-I; ghr-II; igf-I and igf-II. Duration of exposure, and unsaturation level of fatty acids differentially modulate ghr-I, ghr-II and igf-II mRNA expression. Additionally, we found that fatty acids increase the expression of igf-I depending on incubation time and fatty acid class. In conclusion, here we present evidence for GH-independent, direct effects exerted by dietary macronutrients on GHR and IGF in goldfish hepatopancreas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. IGF-II/mannose-6-phosphate receptor signaling induced cell hypertrophy and atrial natriuretic peptide/BNP expression via Galphaq interaction and protein kinase C-alpha/CaMKII activation in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chun-Hsien; Tzang, Bor-Show; Chen, Li-Mien; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Cheng, Yi-Chang; Chen, Ling-Yun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2008-05-01

    The role played by IGF-II in signal transduction through the IGF-II/mannose-6-phosphate receptor (IGF2R) in heart tissue has been poorly understood. In our previous studies, we detected an increased expression of IGF-II and IGF2R in cardiomyocytes that had undergone pathological hypertrophy. We hypothesized that after binding with IGF-II, IGF2R may trigger intracellular signaling cascades involved in the progression of pathologically cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we used immunohistochemical analysis of the human cardiovascular tissue array to detect expression of IGF2R. In our study of H9c2 cardiomyoblast cell cultures, we used the rhodamine phalloidin staining to measure the cell hypertrophy and western blot to measure the expression of cardiac hypertrophy markers atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in cells treated with IGF-II. We found that a significant association between IGF2R overexpression and myocardial infarction. The treatment of H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells with IGF-II not only induced cell hypertrophy but also increased the protein level of ANP and BNP. Using Leu27IGF-II, an analog of IGF-II which interacts selectively with the IGF2R, to specifically activate IGF2R signaling cascades, we found that binding of Leu27IGF-II to IGF2R led to an increase in the phosphorylation of protein Kinase C (PKC)-alpha and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in a Galphaq-dependent manner. By the inhibition of PKC-alpha/CaMKII activity, we found that IGF-II and Leu27IGF-II-induced cell hypertrophy and upregulation of ANP and BNP were significantly suppressed. Taken together, this study provides a new insight into the effects of the IGF2R and its downstream signaling in cardiac hypertrophy. The suppression of IGF2R signaling pathways may be a good strategy to prevent the progression of pathological hypertrophy.

  11. Abolition of fetal breathing movements by spinal cord transection leads to reductions in fetal lung liquid volume, lung growth, and IGF-II gene expression.

    PubMed

    Harding, R; Hooper, S B; Han, V K

    1993-08-01

    Fetal breathing movements (FBM) are considered necessary for normal growth and structural maturation of the fetal lung, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The small fluctuations in lung dimensions caused by FBM have been proposed as a stimulus to lung growth, but it is equally possible that FBM act by maintaining the basal level of lung luminal volume, which is an established determinant of fetal lung growth. Our aim, therefore, was to determine the effects of abolishing FBM, while retaining the integrity of the diaphragm, on the volume and rate of production of fetal lung liquid, gene expression for IGF-II, and fetal lung growth. FBM were abolished in seven fetal sheep by high spinal cord transection at 114 +/- 1.2 d of gestation; seven intact fetuses served as controls. At 119 to 124, 125 to 130, and 131 to 136 d, we measured the volume and secretion rate of lung liquid by dye dilution. At these three age ranges, the lungs of cord-transfected fetuses contained 27 to 53% less lung liquid than controls (p = 0.004), and their rates of secretion were 65 to 138% greater (p = 0.001). At postmortem (135 +/- 0.1 d), the lungs of the cord transected fetuses contained less DNA per kg body weight and tended to be lighter and to contain less protein than controls. IGF-II gene expression in the lungs of cord-transected fetuses was significantly less than that in controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. "Big IGF-II"-induced hypoglycemia secondary to gastric adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morbois-Trabut, L; Maillot, F; De Widerspach-Thor, A; Lamisse, F; Couet, C

    2004-06-01

    Non-islet cell tumor-related hypoglycemia is a rare phenomenon. We report the case of a 63 Year-old man admitted for hemiparesia and a capillary blood glucose of 20 mg/dL. The presence of an immature form of IGF-II that can mimic the effect of insulin, namely "big IGF-II", explained this patient's hypoglycaemia. A moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the cardia with metastatic extension to the stomach and the liver was demonstrated. Octreotide failed to control the hypoglycaemia, therefore prednisolone (2 mg/kg per day) and enteral feeding prevented new episodes of severe hypoglycaemia.

  13. Association of tRNA methyltransferase NSUN2/IGF-II molecular signature with ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia-Cheng; Risch, Eric; Zhang, Meiqin; Huang, Chan; Huang, Huatian; Lu, Lingeng

    2017-08-22

    To investigate the association between NSUN2/IGF-II signature and ovarian cancer survival. Using a publicly accessible dataset of RNA sequencing and clinical follow-up data, we performed Classification and Regression Tree and survival analyses. Patients with NSUN2 (high) IGF-II (low) had significantly superior overall and disease progression-free survival, followed by NSUN2 (low) IGF-II (low), NSUN2 (high) IGF-II (high) and NSUN2 (low) IGF-II (high) (p < 0.0001 for overall, p = 0.0024 for progression-free survival, respectively). The associations of NSUN2/IGF-II signature with the risks of death and relapse remained significant in multivariate Cox regression models. Random-effects meta-analyses show the upregulated NSUN2 and IGF-II expression in ovarian cancer versus normal tissues. The NSUN2/IGF-II signature associates with heterogeneous outcome and may have clinical implications in managing ovarian cancer.

  14. Determination of circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) in swine.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, F C; Grohs, D L; Baile, C A; Campion, D R

    1988-10-01

    A heterologous radioimmunoassay system was developed for the determination of circulating IGF-II concentrations in swine. The assay utilized a monoclonal antibody against human IGF-II (Amano Intl. Ez, VA) and bovine IGF-II (Monsanto Co., MO) as the cold standard and iodinated ligand. Serial dilutions of acid-ethanol extracted normal swine sera resulted in a curve which was parallel to the bovine IGF-II standard curve. Recovery of unlabeled standard added to extracted swine sera was 101%. Neither IGF-I nor insulin were capable of cross-reacting in this assay at levels up to 100-fold excess. Using this assay, serum IGF-II levels were determined to be significantly lower when subnormal growth hormone (GH) levels existed such as in hypophysectomized swine. However, in contrast to serum IGF-I concentrations, supranormal levels of porcine GH (pGH) did not elevate serum IGF-II concentrations after 13 wk of treatment in 25 kg hogs (initial body wt). In addition, serum IGF-II levels were reduced in fasted swine, despite a significant increase in circulating GH concentrations. Thus, although normal concentrations of GH are required for maintenance of physiological levels of IGF-II in swine, the mechanism for stimulation of IGF-II secretion is less GH-dependent than IGF-I.

  15. Insulin-like Growth Factor-II (IGF-II) and IGF-II Analogs with Enhanced Insulin Receptor-a Binding Affinity Promote Neural Stem Cell Expansion*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Amber N.; Chidambaram, Shravanthi; Forbes, Briony E.; Wood, Teresa L.; Levison, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to employ genetically engineered IGF-II analogs to establish which receptor(s) mediate the stemness promoting actions of IGF-II on mouse subventricular zone neural precursors. Neural precursors from the subventricular zone were propagated in vitro in culture medium supplemented with IGF-II analogs. Cell growth and identity were analyzed using sphere generation and further analyzed by flow cytometry. F19A, an analog of IGF-II that does not bind the IGF-2R, stimulated an increase in the proportion of neural stem cells (NSCs) while decreasing the proportion of the later stage progenitors at a lower concentration than IGF-II. V43M, which binds to the IGF-2R with high affinity but which has low binding affinity to the IGF-1R and to the A isoform of the insulin receptor (IR-A) failed to promote NSC growth. The positive effects of F19A on NSC growth were unaltered by the addition of a functional blocking antibody to the IGF-1R. Altogether, these data lead to the conclusion that IGF-II promotes stemness of NSCs via the IR-A and not through activation of either the IGF-1R or the IGF-2R. PMID:24398690

  16. IGF-II promotes neuroprotection and neuroplasticity recovery in a long-lasting model of oxidative damage induced by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Martín-Montañez, E; Millon, C; Boraldi, F; Garcia-Guirado, F; Pedraza, C; Lara, E; Santin, L J; Pavia, J; Garcia-Fernandez, M

    2017-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a naturally occurring hormone that exerts neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases and ageing. Accumulating evidence suggests that the effects of IGF-II in the brain may be explained by its binding to the specific transmembrane receptor, IGFII/M6P receptor (IGF-IIR). However, relatively little is known regarding the role of IGF-II through IGF-IIR in neuroprotection. Here, using adult cortical neuronal cultures, we investigated whether IGF-II exhibits long-term antioxidant effects and neuroprotection at the synaptic level after oxidative damage induced by high and transient levels of corticosterone (CORT). Furthermore, the involvement of the IGF-IIR was also studied to elucidate its role in the neuroprotective actions of IGF-II. We found that neurons treated with IGF-II after CORT incubation showed reduced oxidative stress damage and recovered antioxidant status (normalized total antioxidant status, lipid hydroperoxides and NAD(P) H:quinone oxidoreductase activity). Similar results were obtained when mitochondria function was analysed (cytochrome c oxidase activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and subcellular mitochondrial distribution). Furthermore, neuronal impairment and degeneration were also assessed (synaptophysin and PSD-95 expression, presynaptic function and FluoroJade B® stain). IGF-II was also able to recover the long-lasting neuronal cell damage. Finally, the effects of IGF-II were not blocked by an IGF-IR antagonist, suggesting the involvement of IGF-IIR. Altogether these results suggest that, in or model, IGF-II through IGF-IIR is able to revert the oxidative damage induced by CORT. In accordance with the neuroprotective role of the IGF-II/IGF-IIR reported in our study, pharmacotherapy approaches targeting this pathway may be useful for the treatment of diseases associated with cognitive deficits (i.e., neurodegenerative disorders, depression, etc

  17. Pro- and mature IGF-II during diet-induced weight loss in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Espelund, Ulrick; Bruun, Jens Meldgaard; Richelsen, Bjørn; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Frystyk, Jan

    2005-12-01

    In normal subjects up to 10% of circulating insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) consists of pro-IGF-II. However, its regulation and biological impact remains unknown. In obese subjects, serum free and total IGF-II are increased, and we therefore investigated the impact of obesity and diet on serum pro-IGF-II. Non-diabetic, obese subjects (n = 34) with a body mass index (BMI) of 38.9 +/- 0.5 kg/m2 were subjected to 8 weeks with very low calorie diet (800 kcal/day) followed by 12 weeks with a weight-stabilizing diet. Fasting serum was collected before the study, and after 8 and 20 weeks. Pro-IGF-II was determined after acid-gel chromatography using a novel, highly specific in-house assay, free and total IGFs were measured after ultrafiltration and acid-ethanol extraction, respectively, and IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) were measured with specific immunoassays. Diet reduced BMI and fasting levels of insulin and glucose (P < 0.001). Serum pro-IGF-II was markedly reduced in obese subjects as compared with matched normal-weight controls (means and 95% confidence intervals: 93 microg/l (82-104 microg/l) versus 171 microg/l (152-192 microg/l), respectively; P < 0.001), and levels remained unchanged after the weight loss. In contrast, during the study period total and free IGF-II decreased (P < 0.05), whereas total IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 increased (P < 0.001). Serum free IGF-I remained unaltered. Cross-sectional and longitudinal correlation analyses showed that pro-IGF-II was closer and more consistently associated with IGF-I than IGF-II. This study demonstrates that pro-IGF-II is reduced in obesity, in contrast to mature IGF-II. This indicates a hitherto unrecognized link between nutrition and pro-IGF-II. In addition, our data indicate that pro-IGF-II is regulated independently of mature IGF-II.

  18. Challenge with 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) during early development persistently impairs growth, differentiation, and local expression of IGF-I and IGF-II in immune organs of tilapia.

    PubMed

    Shved, Natallia; Berishvili, Giorgi; Häusermann, Eliane; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-03-01

    The enormous expansion of world-wide aquaculture has led to increasing interest in the regulation of fish immune system. Estrogen has recently been shown to inhibit the endocrine (liver-derived) and autocrine/paracrine local insulin-like growth factor-I system in fish. In order to address the potential actions of estrogen on the IGF system in immune organs, tilapia were fed with 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2)-enriched food from 10 to 40 days post fertilization (DPF) to induce functional feminization, an approach commonly used in aquaculture. EE2-treated and control fish were sampled at 75 and 165 DPF. The expression levels of ER-alpha, IGF-I, IGF-II and growth hormone receptor (GH-R) mRNA in spleen and head kidney were determined by real-time PCR and the expressing sites of IGF-I mRNA identified by in situ hybridisation. Ratios of spleen length and weight to body length and weight were determined. At 165 DPF, the length (4.9% vs. 7.6%) and weight (0.084% vs. 0.132%) ratios were significantly lowered in EE2-treated fish and number and size of the melanomacrophage centres were considerably reduced. At 75 DPF, both in spleen and head kidney of EE2-treated fish the expression levels of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA were markedly diminished. The suppression was more pronounced for IGF-I (spleen: -12.071-fold; head kidney: -8.413-fold) than for IGF-II (spleen: -4.102-fold; head kidney: -1.342-fold). In agreement, clearly fewer leucocytes and macrophages in head kidney and spleen of EE2-treated fish contained IGF-I mRNA as shown by in situ hybridisation. ER-alpha mRNA expression in spleen was increased at 75 DPF but unchanged in head kidney. GH-R gene expression showed a mild upregulation at 165 DPF in both tissues. Thus, exposure to EE2 during early development affected distinctly the IGF system in tilapia immune organs. It led to lasting impairment of spleen growth and differentiation that can be attributed to an interaction of EE2 with IGF-I and, less pronouncedly, IGF-II

  19. Structure and functional analysis of the IGF-II/IGF2R interaction

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James; Delaine, Carlie; Zaccheo, Oliver J; Siebold, Christian; Gilbert, Robert J; van Boxel, Gijs; Denley, Adam; Wallace, John C; Hassan, A Bassim; Forbes, Briony E; Jones, E Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic development and normal growth require exquisite control of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). In mammals the extracellular region of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor has gained an IGF-II-binding function and is termed type II IGF receptor (IGF2R). IGF2R sequesters IGF-II; imbalances occur in cancers and IGF2R is implicated in tumour suppression. We report crystal structures of IGF2R domains 11–12, 11–12–13–14 and domains 11–12–13/IGF-II complex. A distinctive juxtaposition of these domains provides the IGF-II-binding unit, with domain 11 directly interacting with IGF-II and domain 13 modulating binding site flexibility. Our complex shows that Phe19 and Leu53 of IGF-II lock into a hydrophobic pocket unique to domain 11 of mammalian IGF2Rs. Mutagenesis analyses confirm this IGF-II ‘binding-hotspot', revealing that IGF-binding proteins and IGF2R have converged on the same high-affinity site. PMID:18046459

  20. Characterization of IGF-II Isoforms in Binge Eating Disorder and Its Group Psychological Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; Lelievre, Julien Yockell; Qiu, Qing; Ritchie, Kerri; Little, John; Trinneer, Anne; Barber, Ann; Chyurlia, Livia; Bissada, Hany; Gruslin, Andreé

    2013-01-01

    Intro Binge eating disorder (BED) affects 3.5% of the population and is characterized by binge eating for at least 2 days a week for 6 months. Treatment options include cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and pharmacotherapy which are associated with varied success. Little is known about the biology of BED. Since there is evidence that the insulin like growth factor system is implicated in regulation of body weight, insulin sensitivity and feeding behavior, we speculated it may be involved in BED. Methods A cross-sectional comparison was made between three groups of women: overweight with BED, overweight without BED and normal weight without BED. Women were assigned to Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy. Blood was collected before therapy, at completion and at 6months follow up for evaluation of IGF-II using Western blot. Results 97 overweight women with BED contributed to the cross-sectional comparison. The two control groups comprised 53 overweight women without BED, and 50 age matched normal weight women without BED. Obese women had significantly lower Big IGF-II than normal weight women, p = .028; Overweight women with BED had higher Mature IGF-II than normal weight women, p<.05. Big IGF-II showed a significant decreasing slope from pre- to post- to six months post-group psychological treatment, unrelated to changes in BMI (p = .008). Conclusion Levels of IGF-II isoforms differed significantly between overweight and normal weight women. Overweight women with BED display abnormal levels of circulating IGF-II isoforms. BED is characterized by elevated mature IGF-II, an isoform shown to carry significant bioactivity. This finding is not related to BMI or to changes in body weight. The results also provide preliminary evidence that BIG IGF-II is sensitive to change due to group psychological treatment. We suggest that abnormalities in IGF-II processing may be involved in the neurobiology of BED. PMID:24386136

  1. A novel two-chain IGF-II-derived peptide from purified β-cell granules.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Christina M; Phillips, Anthony R J; Cooper, Garth J S

    2010-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a potent mitogen that regulates prenatal growth and development in both humans and rodents. Its role in post-natal life is less clear although immunohistochemical studies have observed IGF-II-like immunoreactivity (IGF-II-LI) associated with insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Here we isolated secretory granules from a β-cell line, βTC6-F7, and characterized the nature of the IGF-II-LI located therein. Secretory granules were isolated from cultured mouse βTC6-F7 cells by ultracentrifugation. Granule protein content was separated by reversed-phase HPLC, and assayed for IGF-II (radioimmunoassay) prior to identification by gas-phase NH(2)-terminal sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS. Effects of glucose incorporation into muscle glycogen were determined by incubating with isolated rat soleus muscle strips. βTC6-F7 cells contained 60 ± 8 pmol of IGF-II-LI per 10⁶ cells compared to 340 ± 44 pmol insulin-LI per 10⁶ cells. IGF-II immunoreactive fractions were found to contain an IGF-II-like molecule with a molecular mass of 6847.6 Da. The protein was found to be a two-chain insulin-like product of Igf2 that corresponds to mouse des(37-40)IGF-II, which we termed 'vesiculin'. This molecule was also detectable in βTC6-F7 cells by intact-cell mass spectrometry. Mouse vesiculin evoked concentration-dependent stimulation of muscle glycogen synthesis ex vivo with an EC(50) value of 131 nM ± 1.35. Vesiculin, des(37-40)IGF-II, is a novel two-chain insulin-like hormone and the major "IGF-II-like" peptide found in purified mouse βTC6-F7 secretory granules. It stimulated ex vivo muscle glycogen synthesis with an efficacy greater than or equal to the intrinsic potency of IGF-II when compared to insulin derived from the same species. Copyright © 2010 Growth Hormone Research Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced sensitivity to IGF-II signaling links loss of imprinting of IGF2 to increased cell proliferation and tumor risk

    PubMed Central

    Kaneda, Atsushi; Wang, Chiaochun J.; Cheong, Raymond; Timp, Winston; Onyango, Patrick; Wen, Bo; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Ohlsson, Rolf; Andraos, Rita; Pearson, Mark A.; Sharov, Alexei A.; Longo, Dan L.; Ko, Minoru S. H.; Levchenko, Andre; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Loss of imprinting (LOI) of the insulin-like growth factor-II gene (IGF2), leading to abnormal activation of the normally silent maternal allele, is a common human epigenetic population variant associated with a 5-fold increased frequency of colorectal neoplasia. Here, we show first that LOI leads specifically to increased expression of proliferation-related genes in mouse intestinal crypts. Surprisingly, LOI(+) mice also have enhanced sensitivity to IGF-II signaling, not simply increased IGF-II levels, because in vivo blockade with NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-II signaling receptor, showed reduction of proliferation-related gene expression to levels half that seen in LOI(−) mice. Signal transduction assays in microfluidic chips confirmed this enhanced sensitivity with marked augmentation of Akt/PKB signaling in LOI(+) cells at low doses of IGF-II, which was reduced in the presence of the inhibitor to levels below those found in LOI(−) cells, and was associated with increased expression of the IGF1 and insulin receptor genes. We exploited this increased IGF-II sensitivity to develop an in vivo chemopreventive strategy using the azoxymethane (AOM) mutagenesis model. LOI(+) mice treated with AOM showed a 60% increase in premalignant aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation over LOI(−) mice. In vivo IGF-II blockade with NVP-AEW541 abrogated this effect, reducing ACF to a level 30% lower even than found in exposed LOI(−) mice. Thus, LOI increases cancer risk in a counterintuitive way, by increasing the sensitivity of the IGF-II signaling pathway itself, providing a previously undescribed epigenetic chemoprevention strategy in which cells with LOI are “IGF-II addicted” and undergo reduced tumorigenesis in the colon upon IGF-II pathway blockade. PMID:18087038

  3. Enhanced sensitivity to IGF-II signaling links loss of imprinting of IGF2 to increased cell proliferation and tumor risk.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Atsushi; Wang, Chiaochun J; Cheong, Raymond; Timp, Winston; Onyango, Patrick; Wen, Bo; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Ohlsson, Rolf; Andraos, Rita; Pearson, Mark A; Sharov, Alexei A; Longo, Dan L; Ko, Minoru S H; Levchenko, Andre; Feinberg, Andrew P

    2007-12-26

    Loss of imprinting (LOI) of the insulin-like growth factor-II gene (IGF2), leading to abnormal activation of the normally silent maternal allele, is a common human epigenetic population variant associated with a 5-fold increased frequency of colorectal neoplasia. Here, we show first that LOI leads specifically to increased expression of proliferation-related genes in mouse intestinal crypts. Surprisingly, LOI(+) mice also have enhanced sensitivity to IGF-II signaling, not simply increased IGF-II levels, because in vivo blockade with NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-II signaling receptor, showed reduction of proliferation-related gene expression to levels half that seen in LOI(-) mice. Signal transduction assays in microfluidic chips confirmed this enhanced sensitivity with marked augmentation of Akt/PKB signaling in LOI(+) cells at low doses of IGF-II, which was reduced in the presence of the inhibitor to levels below those found in LOI(-) cells, and was associated with increased expression of the IGF1 and insulin receptor genes. We exploited this increased IGF-II sensitivity to develop an in vivo chemopreventive strategy using the azoxymethane (AOM) mutagenesis model. LOI(+) mice treated with AOM showed a 60% increase in premalignant aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation over LOI(-) mice. In vivo IGF-II blockade with NVP-AEW541 abrogated this effect, reducing ACF to a level 30% lower even than found in exposed LOI(-) mice. Thus, LOI increases cancer risk in a counterintuitive way, by increasing the sensitivity of the IGF-II signaling pathway itself, providing a previously undescribed epigenetic chemoprevention strategy in which cells with LOI are "IGF-II addicted" and undergo reduced tumorigenesis in the colon upon IGF-II pathway blockade.

  4. Tanshinone IIA Prevents Leu27IGF-II-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Mediated by Estrogen Receptor and Subsequent Akt Activation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yueh-Shan; Wang, Hsueh-Fang; Pai, Pei-Ying; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Lai, Chao-Hung; Chung, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; HsuanDay, Cecilia; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-01-01

    IGF-IIR plays important roles as a key regulator in myocardial pathological hypertrophy and apoptosis, which subsequently lead to heart failure. Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen) is a traditional Chinese medicinal herb used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Tanshinone IIA is an active compound in Danshen and is structurally similar to 17[Formula: see text]-estradiol (E[Formula: see text]. However, whether tanshinone IIA improves cardiomyocyte survival in pathological hypertrophy through estrogen receptor (ER) regulation remains unclear. This study investigates the role of ER signaling in mediating the protective effects of tanshinone IIA on IGF-IIR-induced myocardial hypertrophy. Leu27IGF-II (IGF-II analog) was shown in this study to specifically activate IGF-IIR expression and ICI 182,780 (ICI), an ER antagonist used to investigate tanshinone IIA estrogenic activity. We demonstrated that tanshinone IIA significantly enhanced Akt phosphorylation through ER activation to inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin expression and subsequent NFATc3 nuclear translocation to suppress myocardial hypertrophy. Tanshinone IIA reduced the cell size and suppressed ANP and BNP, inhibiting antihypertrophic effects induced by Leu27IGF-II. The cardioprotective properties of tanshinone IIA that inhibit Leu27IGF-II-induced cell hypertrophy and promote cell survival were reversed by ICI. Furthermore, ICI significantly reduced phospho-Akt, Ly294002 (PI3K inhibitor), and PI3K siRNA significantly reduced the tanshinone IIA-induced protective effect. The above results suggest that tanshinone IIA inhibited cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which was mediated through ER, by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibiting Leu27IGF-II-induced calcineurin and NFATC3. Tanshinone IIA exerted strong estrogenic activity and therefore represented a novel selective ER modulator that inhibits IGF-IIR signaling to block cardiac hypertrophy.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in human brain: regional distribution of IGF II and of higher molecular mass forms

    SciTech Connect

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Schwab, M.E.; Pasi, A.; Humbel, R.E.

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-four distinct areas of human brain were analyzed for the presence of insulin-like growth factor (IGF). As reported for cerebrospinal fluid, only IGF II-like immunoreactivity, but no significant amounts of IGF I-like immunoreactivity, could be found. Upon gel permeation chromatography, two to five distinct size classes were separated on the basis of their immunoreactivity. Radioimmunoassays and a bioassay also gave results indistinguishable from those of serum IGF II. The highest amounts of IGF II-like immunoreactivity occur in the anterior pituitary. This is up to 100 times more than in most other brain regions analyzed. The higher molecular mass immunoreactive species were partially characterized. After immunoaffinity purification, the 38- and 26-kDa species are active in a bioassay. Specific IGF-binding protein activity could be shown after purification of the 38- and 26-kDa species on an IGF-affinity column. The 13-kDa species released significant amounts of 7.5-kDa material. The results are interpreted as evidence for the presence of IGF II synthesized locally in human brain.

  6. Serine 204 phosphorylation and O-β-GlcNAC interplay of IGFBP-6 as therapeutic indicator to regulate IGF-II functions in viral mediated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Waqar; Shabbiri, Khadija; Ijaz, Bushra; Asad, Sultan; Nazar, Noreen; Nazar, Shazia; Fouzia, Kiran; Kausar, Humera; Gull, Sana; Sarwar, Muhammad T; Shahid, Imaran; Hassan, Sajida

    2011-05-08

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is mainly associated with viral hepatitis B and C. Activation of cell growth stimulator IGF-II gene is observed in tumor formation especially in viral associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Elevated IGF-II levels are indicator of increased risk for cholangiocellular and hepatocellular carcinomas through over saturation of IGF-II binding capacities with IGF receptors leading to cellular dedifferentiation. In HCV, core protein is believed to trans-activate host IGF-II receptor through PKC pathway and the inhibition of tumor cell growth can be achieved by blocking IGF-II pathway either at transcriptional level or increasing its binding with IGFBPs (Insulin like growth factor proteins) at C-terminal, so that it is not available in free form. IGFBP-6 is a specific inhibitor of IGF-II actions. Affinity of IGFBPs with IGFs is controlled by post-translational modifications. Phosphorylation of IGFBPs inhibits IGFs action on target cells while O-glycosylation prevents binding of IGFBP-6 to glycosaminoglycans and cell membranes and resulting in a 10-fold higher affinity for IGF-II. O-glycosylation and phosphorylation operate the functional expression of cellular proteins, this switching on and off the protein expression is difficult to monitor in vivo. By using neural network based prediction methods, we propose that alternate O-β-GlcNAc modification and phosphorylation on Ser 204 control the binding of IGFBP-6 with IGF-II. This information may be used for developing new therapies by regulating IGFBP-6 assembly with IGF-II to minimize the risk of viral associated hepatocellular carcinoma. We can conclude that during HCV/HBV infection, O-β-GlcNAc of IGFBP-6 at Ser 204 diminish their binding with IGF-II, increase IGF-II cellular expression and promote cancer progression which can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, this site can be used for developing new therapies to control the IGF-II actions during viral infection to minimize the risk of

  7. Serine 204 phosphorylation and O-β-GlcNAC interplay of IGFBP-6 as therapeutic indicator to regulate IGF-II functions in viral mediated hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is mainly associated with viral hepatitis B and C. Activation of cell growth stimulator IGF-II gene is observed in tumor formation especially in viral associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Elevated IGF-II levels are indicator of increased risk for cholangiocellular and hepatocellular carcinomas through over saturation of IGF-II binding capacities with IGF receptors leading to cellular dedifferentiation. In HCV, core protein is believed to trans-activate host IGF-II receptor through PKC pathway and the inhibition of tumor cell growth can be achieved by blocking IGF-II pathway either at transcriptional level or increasing its binding with IGFBPs (Insulin like growth factor proteins) at C-terminal, so that it is not available in free form. IGFBP-6 is a specific inhibitor of IGF-II actions. Affinity of IGFBPs with IGFs is controlled by post-translational modifications. Phosphorylation of IGFBPs inhibits IGFs action on target cells while O-glycosylation prevents binding of IGFBP-6 to glycosaminoglycans and cell membranes and resulting in a 10-fold higher affinity for IGF-II. O-glycosylation and phosphorylation operate the functional expression of cellular proteins, this switching on and off the protein expression is difficult to monitor in vivo. By using neural network based prediction methods, we propose that alternate O-β-GlcNAc modification and phosphorylation on Ser 204 control the binding of IGFBP-6 with IGF-II. This information may be used for developing new therapies by regulating IGFBP-6 assembly with IGF-II to minimize the risk of viral associated hepatocellular carcinoma. We can conclude that during HCV/HBV infection, O-β-GlcNAc of IGFBP-6 at Ser 204 diminish their binding with IGF-II, increase IGF-II cellular expression and promote cancer progression which can lead to hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, this site can be used for developing new therapies to control the IGF-II actions during viral infection to minimize the risk of

  8. Role of IGFBP2, IGF-I and IGF-II in regulating long bone growth.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Melanie C; Meyer, Carissa; Garber, Graham; Dealy, Caroline N

    2005-12-01

    The IGF axis is important for long bone development, homeostasis and disease. The activities of IGF-I and IGF-II are regulated by IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). IGF-I and IGFBP2 are co-expressed in dynamic fashions in the developing long bones of the chick wing, and we have found that IGF-II is present in the cartilage model and surrounding perichondrium, proliferative and hypertrophic chondrocytes and developing periosteum. To gain insight into endogenous roles of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP2 in long bone development, we have overexpressed IGFBP2 in the developing skeletal elements of the embryonic chick wing in vivo, using an RCAS retroviral vector. IGFBP2 overexpression led to an obvious shortening of the long bones of the wing. We have investigated, at the cellular and molecular levels, the mechanism of action whereby IGFBP2 overexpression impairs long bone development in vivo. At an early stage, IGFBP2 excess dramatically inhibits proliferation by the chondrocytes of the cartilage models that prefigure the developing long bones. Later, IGFBP2 excess also reduces proliferation of the maturing chondrocytes and attenuates proliferation by the perichondrium/developing periosteum. IGFBP2 excess does not affect morphological or molecular indicators of chondrocyte maturation, osteoblast differentiation or cell/matrix turnover, such as expression of Ihh, PTHrP, type X collagen and osteopontin, or distribution and relative abundance of putative clast cells. We also have found that IGFBP2 blocks the ability of IGF-I and IGF-II to promote proliferation and matrix synthesis by wing chondrocytes in vitro. Together, our results suggest that the mechanism of action whereby IGFBP2 excess impairs long bone development is to inhibit IGF-mediated proliferation and matrix synthesis by the cartilage model; reduce the proliferation and progression to hypertrophy by the maturing chondrocytes; and attenuate proliferation and formation of the periosteal bony collar. These actions retard

  9. Effect of chronic thyroxine treatment on IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-binding protein expression in mammary gland and liver during pregnancy and early lactation in rats.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Roberto; Lindenbergh-Kortleve, Dicky; Neck, Johan van; Drop, Stenvert; Jahn, Graciela

    2002-05-01

    Hyperthyroidism in rats produces organ hypertrophy and increases in circulating IGF-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3. Chronic treatment with thyroxine (T(4)) during pregnancy advances parturition, blocks lactation and changes several hormone receptors in mammary gland and liver. Since IGFs are implicated in mammary and liver growth and in differentiation, we studied the effects of hyperthyroidism, induced by daily injections of T(4) (0.25 mg/kg). Using quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, the gene expression of IGF-I, IGF-II and the IGFBPs was determined in mammary gland and liver of rats at estrus and days 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy (G7, G14, G21), day 1 postpartum (L1) and 3 days after removing the litter (L4). Circulating levels of IGF-I, tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), PRL and GH were measured. T(4) treatment (HT) increased circulating T(3) save on G21, did not change serum IGF-I, increased PRL on G21 and decreased GH on L1. PRL decreased on L1 because of the absence of lactation. Hepatic IGF-I mRNA was low during pregnancy and increased on L4. HT advanced this increase to L1. In controls, liver IGFBP-3 mRNA levels decreased from G14 to G21, whereas IGFBP-4 showed an inverse pattern. HT lowered IGFBP-3 mRNA and increased IGFBP-4. Increases in mammary concentrations of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4 mRNAs were seen on G21. HT delayed these peaks to L1. Mammary IGF-II and IGFBP-2 mRNA levels were high on G7 and G14, and fell afterwards, with HT having no effects. IGFBP-5 mRNA decreased during pregnancy and increased on L1. HT increased IGFBP-5 levels in early pregnancy and on L1. IGF-I mRNA localized to connective and epithelial mammary tissue, while IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-5 mRNA was only in epithelial cells. These results imply a role for IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4 in terminal mammary development, while IGF-II and IGFBP-2 may be implicated in early growth. IGFBP-5 has been implicated in mammary apoptosis, and the HT-induced increase may play a role in the premature

  10. Free insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) in human serum.

    PubMed

    Frystyk, J; Skjaerbaek, C; Dinesen, B; Orskov, H

    1994-07-11

    Using ultrafiltration by centrifugation we have isolated the free, unbound fractions of insulin-like growth factor I and II (free IGF-I and IGF-II) in human serum. In this way near in vivo conditions could be maintained before and during isolation. The recovery was 80 to 100% in the ultrafiltrates, which contained no detectable amounts of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) as measured by Western ligand blotting and IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3 immunoassays. The concentration of free peptides was measured in two ultrasensitive non-competitive IGF-I and IGF-II time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays. We found that (i) equilibrium between free and protein-complexed IGF was strongly dependent on re-establishment of in vivo conditions (temperature, pH, ionic milieu and dilution); (ii) metabolic events (glucose load and fasting) caused significant changes in free IGF-I and IGF-II levels without concomitant changes in total circulating levels of IGFs; (iii) in 49 healthy adult subjects (20 to above 60 years) free IGF-I was inversely related to age and ranged from 950 +/- 150 ng/l (mean +/- S.E.M.) (20-30 years) to 410 +/- 70 ng/l (> 60 years). The relative percentage was, however, unchanged, being 0.38 +/- 0.02% of total IGF-I. In contrast, free IGF-II was independent of age, being 1,480 +/- 80 ng/l (approximately 0.20 +/- 0.01% of total IGF-II).

  11. IGF-II-mediated downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α in myoblast cells involves PI3K/Akt/FoxO1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoyu; Qi, Weihong; Liu, Yunzhang; Zhou, Jianfeng; Li, Yun; Rong, Xiaozhi; Lu, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) can stimulate myogenesis and is critically involved in skeletal muscle differentiation. The presence of negative regulators of this process, however, is not well explored. Here, we showed that in myoblast cells, IGF-II negatively regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression, while constitutive expression of PGC-1α induced myoblast differentiation. These results suggest that the negative regulation of PGC-1α by IGF-II may act as a negative feedback mechanism in IGF-II-induced myogenic differentiation. Reporter assays demonstrated that IGF-II suppresses the basal PGC-1α promoter activity. Blocking the IGF-II signaling pathway increased the endogenous PGC-1α levels. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PI3 kinase activity prevented the downregulation of PGC-1α but the activation of mTOR was not required for this process. Importantly, further analysis showed that forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 contributes to mediating the effects of IGF-II on PGC-1 promoter activity. These findings indicate that IGF-II reduces PGC-1α expression in skeletal muscle cells through a mechanism involving PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 but not p38 MAPK or Erk1/2 MAPK pathways.

  12. PLAG1, the main translocation target in pleomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands, is a positive regulator of IGF-II.

    PubMed

    Voz, M L; Agten, N S; Van de Ven, W J; Kas, K

    2000-01-01

    PLAG1, a novel developmentally regulated C2H2 zinc finger gene, is consistently rearranged and overexpressed in pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands with 8q12 translocations. In this report, we show that PLAG1 is a nuclear protein that binds DNA in a specific manner. The consensus PLAG1 binding site is a bipartite element containing a core sequence, GRGGC, and a G-cluster, RGGK, separated by seven random nucleotides. DNA binding is mediated mainly via three of the seven zinc fingers, with fingers 6 and 7 interacting with the core and finger 3 with the G-cluster. In transient transactivation assays, PLAG1 specifically activates transcription from its consensus DNA binding site, indicating that PLAG1 is a genuine transcription factor. Potential PLAG1 binding sites were found in the promoter 3 of the human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene. We show that PLAG1 binds IGF-II promoter 3 and stimulates its activity. Moreover, IGF-II transcripts derived from the P3 promoter are highly expressed in salivary gland adenomas overexpressing PLAG1. In contrast, they are not detectable in adenomas without abnormal PLAG1 expression nor in normal salivary gland tissue. This indicates a perfect correlation between PLAG1 and IGF-II expression. All of these results strongly suggest that IGF-II is one of the PLAG1 target genes, providing us with the first clue for understanding the role of PLAG1 in salivary gland tumor development.

  13. Mouse mutant embryos overexpressing IGF-II exhibit phenotypic features of the Beckwith–Wiedemann and Simpson–Golabi–Behmel syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Eggenschwiler, Jonathan; Ludwig, Thomas; Fisher, Peter; Leighton, Philip A.; Tilghman, Shirley M.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    In mice, the imprinted Igf2 gene (expressed from the paternal allele), which encodes a growth-promoting factor (IGF-II), is linked closely to the reciprocally imprinted H19 locus on chromosome 7. Also imprinted (expressed from the maternal allele) is the Igf2r gene on chromsome 17 encoding the type 2 IGF receptor that is involved in degradation of excess IGF-II. Double mutant embryos carrying a deletion around the H19 region and also a targeted Igf2r allele, both inherited maternally, have extremely high levels of IGF-II (7- and 11-fold higher than normal in tissues and serum, respectively) as a result of biallelic Igf2 expression (imprint relaxation by deletion of H19-associated sequence) in combination with lack of the IGF2R-mediated IGF-II turnover. This excess of IGF-II causes somatic overgrowth, visceromegaly, placentomegaly, omphalocele, and cardiac and adrenal defects, which are also features of the Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), a genetically complex human disorder associated with chromosomal abnormalities in the 11p15.5 region where the IGF2 gene resides. In addition, the double mutant mouse embryos exhibit skeletal defects and cleft palate, which are manifestations observed frequently in the Simpson–Golabi–Behmel syndrome, another overgrowth disorder overlapping phenotypically, but not genetically, with BWS. PMID:9389646

  14. Mouse mutant embryos overexpressing IGF-II exhibit phenotypic features of the Beckwith-Wiedemann and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndromes.

    PubMed

    Eggenschwiler, J; Ludwig, T; Fisher, P; Leighton, P A; Tilghman, S M; Efstratiadis, A

    1997-12-01

    In mice, the imprinted Igf2 gene (expressed from the paternal allele), which encodes a growth-promoting factor (IGF-II), is linked closely to the reciprocally imprinted H19 locus on chromosome 7. Also imprinted (expressed from the maternal allele) is the Igf2r gene on chromsome 17 encoding the type 2 IGF receptor that is involved in degradation of excess IGF-II. Double mutant embryos carrying a deletion around the H19 region and also a targeted Igf2r allele, both inherited maternally, have extremely high levels of IGF-II (7- and 11-fold higher than normal in tissues and serum, respectively) as a result of biallelic Igf2 expression (imprint relaxation by deletion of H19-associated sequence) in combination with lack of the IGF2R-mediated IGF-II turnover. This excess of IGF-II causes somatic overgrowth, visceromegaly, placentomegaly, omphalocele, and cardiac and adrenal defects, which are also features of the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), a genetically complex human disorder associated with chromosomal abnormalities in the 11p15.5 region where the IGF2 gene resides. In addition, the double mutant mouse embryos exhibit skeletal defects and cleft palate, which are manifestations observed frequently in the Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome, another overgrowth disorder overlapping phenotypically, but not genetically, with BWS.

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation.

  16. Genotypes, haplotypes and diplotypes of IGF-II SNPs and their association with growth traits in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Bai, Junjie; Hu, Yinchang; Ye, Xing; Li, Shengjie; Yu, Lingyun

    2012-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is involved in the regulation of somatic growth and metabolism in many fishes. IGF-II is an important candidate gene for growth traits in fishes and its polymorphisms were associated with the growth traits. The aim of this study is to screen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) IGF-II gene and to analyze potential association between IGF-II gene polymorphisms and growth traits in largemouth bass. Four SNPs (C127T, T1012G, C1836T and C1861T) were detected and verified by DNA sequencing in the largemouth bass IGF-II gene. These SNPs were found to organize into seven haplotypes, which formed 13 diplotypes (haplotype pairs). Association analysis showed that four individual SNPs were not significantly associated with growth traits. Significant associations were, however, noted between diplotypes and growth traits (P < 0.05). The fish with H1H3 (CTCC/CGCC) and H1H5 (CTCC/TTTT) had greater body weight than those with H1H1 (CTCC/CTCC), H1H2 (CTCC/TGTT) and H4H4 (TGCT/TGCT/) did. Our data suggest a significant association between genetic variations in the largemouth bass IGF-II gene and growth traits. IGF-II SNPs could be used as potential genetic markers in future breeding programs of largemouth bass.

  17. Inhibition of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)-dependent cell growth by multidentate pentamannosyl 6-phosphate-based ligands targeting the mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor

    PubMed Central

    Grosely, Rosslyn; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) binds M6P-capped ligands and IGF-II at different binding sites within the ectodomain and mediates ligand internalization and trafficking to the lysosome. Multivalent M6P-based ligands can cross-bridge the M6P/IGF2R, which increases the rate of receptor internalization, permitting IGF-II binding as a passenger ligand and subsequent trafficking to the lysosome, where the IGF-II is degraded. This unique feature of the receptor may be exploited to design novel therapeutic agents against IGF-II-dependent cancers that will lead to decreased bioavailable IGF-II within the tumor microenvironment. We have designed a panel of M6P-based ligands that bind to the M6P/IGF2R with high affinity in a bivalent manner and cause decreased cell viability. We present evidence that our ligands bind through the M6P-binding sites of the receptor and facilitate internalization and degradation of IGF-II from conditioned medium to mediate this cellular response. To our knowledge, this is the first panel of synthetic bivalent ligands for the M6P/IGF2R that can take advantage of the ligand-receptor interactions of the M6P/IGF2R to provide proof-of-principle evidence for the feasibility of novel chemotherapeutic agents that decrease IGF-II-dependent growth of cancer cells. PMID:27694692

  18. Current ideas on the biology of IGFBP-6: More than an IGF-II inhibitor?

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    IGFBP-6 binds IGF-II with higher affinity than IGF-I and it is a relatively specific inhibitor of IGF-II actions. More recently, IGFBP-6 has also been reported to have IGF-independent effects on cell proliferation, survival, differentiation and migration. IGFBP-6 binds to several ligands in the extracellular space, cytoplasm and nucleus. These interactions, together with activation of distinct intracellular signaling pathways, may contribute to its IGF-independent actions; for example, IGF-independent migration induced by IGFBP-6 involves interaction with prohibitin-2 and activation of MAP kinase pathways. A major challenge for the future is delineating the relative roles of the IGF-dependent and -independent actions of IGFBP-6, which may lead to the development of therapeutic approaches for diseases including cancer.

  19. Heterogeneity for IGF-II production maintained by public goods dynamics in neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Archetti, Marco; Ferraro, Daniela A; Christofori, Gerhard

    2015-02-10

    The extensive intratumor heterogeneity revealed by sequencing cancer genomes is an essential determinant of tumor progression, diagnosis, and treatment. What maintains heterogeneity remains an open question because competition within a tumor leads to a strong selection for the fittest subclone. Cancer cells also cooperate by sharing molecules with paracrine effects, such as growth factors, and heterogeneity can be maintained if subclones depend on each other for survival. Without strict interdependence between subclones, however, nonproducer cells can free-ride on the growth factors produced by neighboring producer cells, a collective action problem known in game theory as the "tragedy of the commons," which has been observed in microbial cell populations. Here, we report that similar dynamics occur in cancer cell populations. Neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer (insulinoma) cells that do not produce insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) grow slowly in pure cultures but have a proliferation advantage in mixed cultures, where they can use the IGF-II provided by producer cells. We show that, as predicted by evolutionary game theory, producer cells do not go extinct because IGF-II acts as a nonlinear public good, creating negative frequency-dependent selection that leads to a stable coexistence of the two cell types. Intratumor cell heterogeneity can therefore be maintained even without strict interdependence between cell subclones. Reducing the amount of growth factors available within a tumor may lead to a reduction in growth followed by a new equilibrium, which may explain relapse in therapies that target growth factors.

  20. IGF-II induced by hepatitis B virus X protein regulates EMT via SUMO mediated loss of E-cadherin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hye-Lin; Kwon, Taeho; Bak, In Seon; Erikson, Raymond L.; Kim, Bo Yeon; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer mortality. Prognosis of this disease largely depends on its stage. An Enlarged liver, due to dysplasia, may be a critical point in the multi-step progression to HCC. The mechanism underlying hepatomegaly in human and mouse models are poorly understood. We previously reported we observed enlarged liver in hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) expressing mice (HBx mice). Here we identify the critical role of HBx induced IGF-II in hepatomegaly in mice and abnormal cell growth in human hepatoma cells. We found that HBx induced IGF-II is essential to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through loss of E-cadherin. In mouse liver, loss of E-cadherin was mediated by post-translational regulation, at least in part, by protease and SUMOylation not by transcriptional regulation. In contrast, in hepatoma cell line (HepG2 cells) Akt signal pathway controls the mRNA expression level of EMT-related transcription factors, especially Twist, in addition to post- translational modification through SUMOylation. Thus, IGF-II-mediated loss of E-cadherin is central in developing hepatomegaly in mice and abnormal cell growth in the hepatoma cell line. HBx induced IGF-II represents a potential biomarker, which is also a therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:27486970

  1. Reptilian MPR 300 is also the IGF-IIR: cloning, sequencing and functional characterization of the IGF-II binding domain.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishna, Yadavalli; Amancha, Praveen Kumar; Siva Kumar, Nadimpalli

    2009-06-01

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II receptor binds IGF-II with high affinity. Ligands transported by the MPR 300/IGF-IIR include IGF-II and mannose 6-phosphate-modified proteins. By targeting IGF-II to lysosomal degradation, it plays a key role in the maintenance of correct IGF-II levels in the circulation and in target tissues. Although, from our studies we found homologous receptor in calotes but its functional significance was not known. We present here the first report on the calotes MPR 300/IGF-IIR binds IGF-II with K(d) of 12.02 nM; these findings provide new and strong evidence that MPR 300/IGF-IIR in Calotes versicolor binds IGFII with high affinity.

  2. Effect of IGF-II genotype and pig rearing system on the final characteristics of dry-cured Iberian hams.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Del Pulgar, J; Carrapiso, A I; Reina, R; Biasioli, F; García, C

    2013-11-01

    The effect of the IGF-II genotype (AG vs. GG) on the morphological and compositional parameters, the fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat, the odour concentration (analysed by dynamic olfactometry) and the volatile compound profile (analysed by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry) of dry-cured Iberian ham was studied for the first time, and compared to the effect of pig rearing system (high-oleic concentrated feed vs. acorn and grass). The IGF-II genotype had no effect on most variables. However, it influenced the concentration of some odorants (methanethiol and octanal), although it did not affect odour concentration. Conversely, the rearing system had a significant effect on a large number of ham variables. Results indicate a negligible effect of the IGF-II genotype on the final ham quality and confirm that the rearing system has a marked effect.

  3. Understanding the Mechanism of Insulin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Receptor Activation by IGF-II

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; Ong, Shee Chee; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Forbes, Briony E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) promotes cell proliferation and survival and plays an important role in normal fetal development and placental function. IGF-II binds both the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) and insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) with high affinity. Interestingly both IGF-II and the IR-A are often upregulated in cancer and IGF-II acts via both receptors to promote cancer proliferation. There is relatively little known about the mechanism of ligand induced activation of the insulin (IR) and IGF-1R. The recently solved IR structure reveals a folded over dimer with two potential ligand binding pockets arising from residues on each receptor half. Site-directed mutagenesis has mapped receptor residues important for ligand binding to two separate sites within the ligand binding pocket and we have recently shown that the IGFs have two separate binding surfaces which interact with the receptor sites 1 and 2. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we describe a series of partial IGF-1R and IR agonists generated by mutating Glu12 of IGF-II. By comparing receptor binding affinities, abilities to induce negative cooperativity and potencies in receptor activation, we provide evidence that residue Glu12 bridges the two receptor halves leading to receptor activation. Conclusions/Significance This study provides novel insight into the mechanism of receptor binding and activation by IGF-II, which may be important for the future development of inhibitors of its action for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22140443

  4. Placental insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and its relation to litter size in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Julienne N; Eklund, Amy; Tardif, Suzette

    2009-12-01

    The primate placenta produces a wide variety of hormones throughout gestation that regulate placental function and fetal growth. One such hormone is insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), a peptide implicated in cell division, differentiation, and amino acid transport. IGF-II concentrations were measured in 23 common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) term placentas from twin and triplet litters in order to determine whether previously described differences in fetoplacental phenotype such as placental and litter mass and placental surface area were related to differences in endocrine function. IGF-II was extracted from frozen tissue samples and measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit designed for human tissue, which was validated for marmoset placenta. IGF-II concentrations were not related to placental or litter mass, and twin and triplet placentas did not differ in total concentration. However, per individual fetus, triplets were associated with a significant 42% reduction in IGF-II concentration (P = 0.03), and IGF-II concentration per gram of fetal mass was a third lower in triplet litters. The triplet placenta exhibits a global expansion of the surface area which was contrasted by a per unit area reduction in IGF-II concentration (r = -0.75, P = 0.01), a pattern that explains why twin and triplet placentas overall did not differ in concentration. Per fetus, triplet pregnancies are associated with relatively less maternal mass, placental mass and microscopic surface area suggesting that the intrauterine growth of triplets is supported by systems that increase the efficiency of nutrient transfer. The finding that individual triplet fetuses are also associated with significantly lower IGF-II concentrations is consistent with the view that the marmoset fetoplacental unit exhibits a flexible pattern of placental allocation and metabolism. Plasticity in placental endocrine and metabolic function is likely to play an important role in the ability of the

  5. Direct demonstration of rapid insulin-like growth factor II receptor internalization and recycling in rat adipocytes. Insulin stimulates SVI-insulin-like growth factor II degradation by modulating the IGF-II receptor recycling process

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Y.; Rozek, L.M.; Czech, M.P.

    1985-08-05

    The photoactive insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II analogue 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II was synthesized and used to label specifically and covalently the Mr = 250,000 Type II IGF receptor. When rat adipocytes are irradiated after a 10-min incubation with 4-azidobenzoyl- SVI-IGF-II at 10 degrees C and immediately homogenized, most of the labeled IGF-II receptors are associated with the plasma membrane fraction, indicating that receptors accessible to the labeling reagent at low temperature are on the cell surface. However, when the photolabeled cells are incubated at 37 degrees C for various times before homogenization, labeled IGF-II receptors are rapidly internalized with a half-time of 3.5 min as evidenced by a loss from the plasma membrane fraction and a concomitant appearance in the low density microsome fraction. The steady state level of cell surface IGF-II receptors in the presence or absence of IGF-II remains constant under these conditions, demonstrating that IGF-II receptors rapidly recycle back to the cell surface at the same rate as receptor internalization. Using the above methodology, it is shown that acute insulin action: 1) increases the steady state number of cell surface IGF-II receptors; 2) increases the number of ligand-bound IGF-II receptors that are internalized per unit of time; and 3) increases the rate of cellular SVI-IGF-II degradation by a process that is blocked by anti-IGF-II receptor antibody.

  6. The mouse insulin-like growth factor II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (IGF-II/MPR) receptor gene: Molecular cloning and genomic organization

    SciTech Connect

    Szebenyi, G.; Rotwein, P. )

    1994-01-01

    The mammalian insulin-like growth factor III/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (IGF-II/MPR) is a multifunctional protein that binds both IGF-II and ligands containing a mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker through distinct high-affinity sites. This receptor plays an integral part in lysosomal enzyme transport, has a potential role in growth factor maturation and clearance, and may mediate IGF-II-activated signal transduction through a G-protein-coupled mechanism. Recent studies have shown that production of IGF-II/MPR mRNA and protein begins in the mouse embryo soon after fertilization and have demonstrated that the receptor gene is on mouse chromosome 17 and is maternally imprinted. In this paper, the authors report the cloning and characterization of the mouse IGF-II/MPR gene. The gene is 93 kb long, is composed of 48 exons, and codes for a predicted protein of 2482 amino acids. The extracellular part of the receptor is encoded by exons 1-46, with each of 15 related repeating motifs being determined by parts of 3-5 exons. A single fibronectin type II-like element is found in exon 39. The transmembrane portion of the receptor also is encoded by exon 46, and the cytoplasmic region by exons 46-48. The positions of exon-intron splice junctions are conserved between several of the repeats in the IGF-II/MPR and the homologous extracellular region of the gene for the other known lysosomal sorting receptor, the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The gene duplications that gave rise to the modern IGF-II/MPR probably occurred before the divergence of mammals, since there is more extensive protein sequence conservation between receptors from different species than between any pair of repeating motifs within a single receptor. 55 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin on growth and abundance of mRNA for IGF-I and IGF-II in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Peterson, B C; Waldbieser, G C; Bilodeau, L

    2005-04-01

    Research was conducted to examine growth rates, circulating concentrations of IGF-I, and mRNA abundance levels of IGF-I and IGF-II in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) given recombinant bovine ST (rbST; Posilac, Monsanto Co., St. Louis MO). In the first study, juvenile catfish (5.5 +/- 0.5 g) were randomly assigned to one of three treatments: 1) sham-injected control (one needle puncture per week); 2) rbST (30 microg x g BW(-1) x wk(-1); Posilac); and 3) nonhandled control (control). At the end of the 6-wk study, the fish were weighed, measured for length, and G:F was determined. Compared with sham and control treatments, rbST-treated fish had 48% greater final BW, 14% greater total length, and 52% greater G:F (P < 0.001). In the second study, juvenile catfish (41.1 +/- 1.5 g) were assigned randomly to one of two treatments: 1) sham or 2) rbST. Eight fish per treatment were sampled on d 0, 1, 2, 7, 14, and 21 for blood, muscle, and liver. Relative expression of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA was determined by real-time PCR and plasma concentrations of IGF-I were measured using a validated fluoroimmunoassay. Circulating concentrations of IGF-I were increased (37.9 +/- 5.5 vs. 22.0 +/- 6.6 ng/mL; P < 0.05) in rbST-injected fish compared with sham-injected controls by d 14. Liver IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA was increased 4.3-and 14.4-fold, respectively, by d 1 in rbST-injected fish compared with controls (P < 0.05); however, abundance of liver IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA did not differ from controls on d 0, 2, 7, 14, and 21. Abundance of muscle IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA did not differ in rbST-injected fish compared with controls throughout the study. Results of the first study demonstrated that rbST improves growth performance of channel catfish. Results of the second study showed that the growth-promoting effects of rbST were not mediated by the expression of IGF-I or IGF-II mRNA in the muscle. Instead, the results suggest that rbST promotes growth by stimulating plasma IGF-I release

  8. High-affinity prorenin binding to cardiac man-6-P/IGF-II receptors precedes proteolytic activation to renin.

    PubMed

    Saris, J J; Derkx, F H; De Bruin, R J; Dekkers, D H; Lamers, J M; Saxena, P R; Schalekamp, M A; Jan Danser, A H

    2001-04-01

    Mannose-6-phosphate (man-6-P)/insulin-like growth factor-II (man-6-P/IgF-II) receptors are involved in the activation of recombinant human prorenin by cardiomyocytes. To investigate the kinetics of this process, the nature of activation, the existence of other prorenin receptors, and binding of native prorenin, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with recombinant, renal, or amniotic fluid prorenin with or without man-6-P. Intact and activated prorenin were measured in cell lysates with prosegment- and renin-specific antibodies, respectively. The dissociation constant (K(d)) and maximum number of binding sites (B(max)) for prorenin binding to man-6-P/IGF-II receptors were 0.6 +/- 0.1 nM and 3,840 +/- 510 receptors/myocyte, respectively. The capacity for prorenin internalization was greater than 10 times B(max). Levels of internalized intact prorenin decreased rapidly (half-life = 5 +/- 3 min) indicating proteolytic prosegment removal. Prorenin subdivision into man-6-P-free and man-6-P-containing fractions revealed that only the latter was bound. Cells also bound and activated renal but not amniotic fluid prorenin. We concluded that cardiomyocytes display high-affinity binding of renal but not extrarenal prorenin exclusively via man-6-P/IGF-II receptors. Binding precedes internalization and proteolytic activation to renin thereby supporting the concept of cardiac angiotensin formation by renal prorenin.

  9. Gene expression profiles of some cytokines, growth factors, receptors, and enzymes (GM-CSF, IFNγ, MMP-2, IGF-II, EGF, TGF-β, IGF-IIR) during pregnancy in the cat uterus.

    PubMed

    Agaoglu, Ozgecan Korkmaz; Agaoglu, Ali Reha; Guzeloglu, Aydin; Aslan, Selim; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Schäfer-Somi, Sabine

    2016-03-01

    Early pregnancy is one of the most critical periods of pregnancy, and many factors such as cytokines, enzymes, and members of the immune system have to cooperate in a balanced way. In the present study, the gene expression profiles of factors associated with pregnancy such as EGF, transforming growth factor beta, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interferon gamma, insulin-like growth factor 2, insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 were analyzed in uterine tissues of female cats. The cats were assigned to five groups: G1 (embryo positive, n = 7; 7th day after mating), G2 (after implantation, n = 7; 20th day after mating), G3 (midgestation, n = 7; 24-25th day after mating), G4 (late gestation, n = 7; 30-45th day after mating), G5 (oocyte group, n = 7; 7th day after estrus). Tissue samples from the uterus and placenta were collected after ovariohysterectomy. Relative messenger RNA levels were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All the factors examined were detected in all tissue samples. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of EGF and matrix metalloproteinase 2 in G2 than in G1 was observed (P < 0.05). Insulin-like growth factor 2 expression was higher in all groups than in G1 (P < 0.05). Upregulation of EGF during implantation was detected. The expression of interferon gamma was significantly higher in G3 than in G1 (P < 0.05). Transforming growth factor beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were constantly expressed in all groups. In conclusion, the expressions of these factors in feline uterine tissue at different stages of pregnancy might indicate that these factors play roles in the development of pregnancy such as trophoblast invasion, vascularization, implantation, and placentation.

  10. The cis-acting elements involved in endonucleolytic cleavage of the 3' UTR of human IGF-II mRNAs bind a 50 kDa protein.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1996-01-01

    Site-specific cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs requires two cis-acting elements, I and II, that are both located in the 3' untranslated region and separated by almost 2 kb. These elements can interact and form a stable RNA-RNA stem structure. In this study we have initiated the investigation of transacting factors involved in the cleavage of IGF-II mRNAs. The products of the cleavage reaction accumulate in the cytoplasm, suggesting that cleavage occurs in this cellular compartment. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we have identified a cytoplasmic protein with an apparent molecular weight of 48-50 kDa, IGF-II cleavage unit binding protein (ICU-BP), that binds to the stem structure formed by interaction of parts of the cis-acting elements I and II. The binding is resistant to high K+ concentrations and is dependent on Mg2+. In addition, ICU-BP binding is dependent on the cell density and correlates inversely with the IGM-II mRNA levels. In vivo cross-linking data show that this protein is associated with IGF-II mRNAs in vivo. PMID:8604329

  11. Effects of different dietary intake on mRNA levels of MSTN, IGF-I, and IGF-II in the skeletal muscle of Dorper and Hu sheep hybrid F1 rams.

    PubMed

    Xing, H J; Wang, Z Y; Zhong, B S; Ying, S J; Nie, H T; Zhou, Z R; Fan, Y X; Wang, F

    2014-07-24

    MSTN, IGF-І(insulin-like growth factor-І) and IGF-II (insulin-like growth factor-II) regulate skeletal muscle growth. This study investigated the effects of different dietary intake levels on skeletal muscles. Sheep was randomly assigned to 3 feeding groups: 1) the maintenance diet (M), 2) 1.4 x the maintenance diet (1.4M), and 3) 2.15 x the maintenance diet (2.15M). Before slaughtering the animals, blood samples were collected to measure plasma urea, growth hormone, and insulin concentrations. After slaughtering, the longissimus dorsi, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, gastrocnemius, soleus, and chest muscle were removed to record various parameters, including the mRNA expression levels of MSTN and IGFs, in addition to skeletal muscle fiber diameter and cross-sectional area. The result showed that as dietary intake improved, the mRNA expression levels of MSTN and IGF-II decreased, whereas IGF-Іexpression increased. The mRNA expression levels of MSTN and IGFs were significantly different in the same skeletal muscle under different dietary intake. The skeletal muscle fiber diameter and cross-sectional area increased with greater dietary intake, as observed for the mRNA expression of IGF-І; however, it contrasted to that observed for the mRNA expression of MSTN and IGF-II. In conclusion, dietary intake levels have a certain influence on MSTN and IGFs mRNA expression levels, in addition to skeletal muscle fiber diameter and cross-sectional area. This study contributes valuable information for enhancing the molecular-based breeding of sheep.

  12. The role of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in cancer: tumor suppression or garbage disposal?

    PubMed

    Scott, C D; Firth, S M

    2004-05-01

    The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor-II receptor (M6P/IGF-IIR) is an intriguing protein with multiple ligands and multiple functions. Approximately 90 - 95 % of the receptor is located intracellularly, with 5 - 10 % being on the cell surface. It has long been known to play an essential intracellular role in the transport of newly-synthesized lysosomal enzymes from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the lysosomes. More recently, however, the loss of this receptor has been described in some tumour types, suggesting that it may play a role in tumour suppression. The focus has therefore shifted to elucidating the role played by the cell surface receptor and its interaction with its diverse ligands in tumour growth and progression. The list of ligands is continuously increasing and includes growth factors such as IGF-II and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta). This review will address the question of whether the M6P/IGF-IIR plays a direct role in tumour suppression or merely plays an indirect role as a transporter for ligands designated for degradation in the lysosomes.

  13. Implication of insulin receptor A isoform and IRA/IGF-IR hybrid receptors in the aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation: role of TNF-α and IGF-II.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Escribano, Óscar; Perdomo, Liliana; Otero, Yolanda F; García-Gómez, Gema; Fernández, Silvia; Beneit, Nuria; Benito, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    To assess the role of insulin receptor (IR) isoforms (IRA and IRB) in the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) involved in the atherosclerotic process, we generated new VSMC lines bearing IR (wild-type VSMCs; IRLoxP(+/+) VSMCs), lacking IR (IR(-/-) VSMCs) or expressing IRA (IRA VSMCs) or IRB (IRB VSMCs). Insulin and different proatherogenic stimuli induced a significant increase of IRA expression in IRLoxP(+/+) VSMCs. Moreover, insulin, through ERK signaling, and the proatherogenic stimuli, through ERK and p38 signaling, induced a higher proliferation in IRA than IRB VSMCs. The latter effect might be due to IRA cells showing a higher expression of angiotensin II, endothelin 1, and thromboxane 2 receptors and basal association between IRA and these receptors. Furthermore, TNF-α induced in a ligand-dependent manner a higher association between IRA and TNF-α receptor 1 (TNF-R1). On the other hand, IRA overexpression might favor the atherogenic actions of IGF-II. Thereby, IGF-II or TNF-α induced IRA and IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) overexpression as well as an increase of IRA/IGF-IR hybrid receptors in VSMCs. More importantly, we observed a significant increase of IRA, TNF-R1, and IGF-IR expression as well as higher association of IRA with TNF-R1 or IGF-IR in the aorta from ApoE(-/-) and BATIRKO mice, 2 models showing vascular damage. In addition, anti-TNF-α treatment prevented those effects in BATIRKO mice. Finally, our data suggest that the IRA isoform and its association with TNF-R1 or IGF-IR confers proliferative advantage to VSMCs, mainly in response to TNF-α or IGF-II, which might be of significance in the early atherosclerotic process.

  14. Maternal nutrition affects the ability of treatment with IGF-I and IGF-II to increase growth of the placenta and fetus, in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Sohlström, A; Fernberg, P; Owens, J A; Owens, P C

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how administration of IGF-I and IGF-II, during early to mid pregnancy, affects maternal growth and body composition as well as fetal and placental growth, in ad libitum fed, and in moderately, chronically food restricted guinea pigs. From day 20 of gestation, mothers (3-4 months old) were infused with IGF-I, IGF-II (565 microg/day) or vehicle for 17 days and then killed on day 40 of gestation. Maternal organ weights, fetal and placental weights were assessed. Treatment with IGFs did not alter body weight gain and had small effects on body composition in the mothers. Both IGF-I and IGF-II increased fetal and placental weights in ad libitum fed dams and IGF-I increased placental weight in food restricted dams. In conclusion, treatment with IGF-I during the first half of pregnancy stimulates placental growth in both ad libitum fed and food restricted guinea pigs without affecting maternal growth while fetal growth is stimulated by IGF treatment only in ad libitum fed animals.

  15. Subcutaneous administration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II/IGF binding protein-2 complex stimulates bone formation and prevents loss of bone mineral density in a rat model of disuse osteoporosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, Cheryl A.; Johnstone, Edward W.; Turner, Russell T.; Evans, Glenda L.; John Ballard, F. John; Doran, Patrick M.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2002-01-01

    Elevated serum levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) and a precursor form of IGF-II are associated with marked increases in bone formation and skeletal mass in patients with hepatitis C-associated osteosclerosis. In vitro studies indicate that IGF-II in complex with IGFBP-2 has high affinity for bone matrix and is able to stimulate osteoblast proliferation. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex to increase bone mass in vivo. Osteopenia of the femur was induced by unilateral sciatic neurectomy in rats. At the time of surgery, 14-day osmotic minipumps containing vehicle or 2 microg IGF-II+9 microg IGFBP-2/100g body weight/day were implanted subcutaneously in the neck. Bone mineral density (BMD) measurements were taken the day of surgery and 14 days later using a PIXImus small animal densitometer. Neurectomy of the right hindlimb resulted in a 9% decrease in right femur BMD (P<0.05 vs. baseline). This loss in BMD was completely prevented by treatment with IGF-II/IGFBP-2. On the control limb, there was no loss of BMD over the 14 days and IGF-II/IGFBP-2 treatment resulted in a 9% increase in left femur BMD (P<0.05). Bone histomorphometry indicated increases in endocortical and cancellous bone formation rates and in trabecular thickness. These results demonstrate that short-term administration of the IGF-II/IGFBP-2 complex can prevent loss of BMD associated with disuse osteoporosis and stimulate bone formation in adult rats. Furthermore, they provide proof of concept for a novel anabolic approach to increasing bone mass in humans with osteoporosis.

  16. Molecular Basis for the Recognition and Cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-[alpha], and Amylin by Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2010-02-11

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-{beta}, peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intramolecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II and transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF-{alpha}) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor, respectively. Here, we used high-accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-{alpha}, amylin, reduced amylin, and amyloid-{beta} by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-{alpha} at 2.3 {angstrom} and IDE-amylin at 2.9 {angstrom}. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (amino acids 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and epidermal growth factor families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors.

  17. Isolation from human cerebrospinal fluid of a new insulin-like growth factor-binding protein with a selective affinity for IGF-II.

    PubMed

    Roghani, M; Hossenlopp, P; Lepage, P; Balland, A; Binoux, M

    1989-09-25

    In biological fluids IGF-I and IGF-II are bound to specific, high-affinity binding protein (BPs). Two human BPs have been isolated, one from serum, which is GH-dependent, the other from amniotic fluid (AF BP), and their cDNAs have recently been cloned. We report here the isolation of another, new species from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) where this BP predominates. The protein was purified to homogeneity by a four-step procedure: gel filtration, chromatofocusing, hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography. Thereafter, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gave an Mr of 34,000 (non-reduced), chromatofocusing gave an isoelectric point of 5.0m and its affinity for IGF-II (3 x 10(10) M-1) was 10 times that for IGF-I. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the first 15 residues determined in a BP preparation from the CSF of children was Leu-Ala-Pro-Gly-(/)-Gly-Gln-Gly-Val-Gln-Ala-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly. A similar sequence was found for adult CSF, apart from residues 12 and 13 (-Leu-Leu-). These are highly analogous with the sequences starting from residue 69 of the GH-dependent BP, and from residue 61 of the AF BP. The new BP isolated is therefore related to, but distinct from, the other human BPs.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II, IGF binding protein-3, and risk of colorectal cancer: a nested case-control study in the Japan Collaborative Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Sadao; Kojima, Masayo; Tokudome, Shinkan; Suzuki, Koji; Ozasa, Kotaro; Ito, Yoshinori; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II are important mitogen and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) exerts opposite effects. However, the results of epidemiological studies on cancer influence are somewhat controversial, and mainly from Western countries. In the present study, we therefore examined associations of serum IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 with colorectal cancer risk among participants in the JACC Study in Japan. After matching 3 controls to cases by sex, age, and study area, a total 101 risk sets were examined using a conditional logistic regression model adjusted for body mass index, smoking habit, alcohol consumption and family history of colorectal cancer. The odds ratios (and 95% CIs) for colorectal cancer mortality among the highest tertiles of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3, compared to the lowest tertiles were 1.01 (0.49-2.10), 1.02 (0.55- 1.91), and 1.22 (0.63-2.38), respectively. No linear trends were observed. The lack of any association was not altered after additional adjustment for mutual markers of IGF-I/IGF-II or IGFBP-3, 0.76 (0.34-1.71) for IGF-I, 0.66 (0.30-1.45) for IGF-II, and 1.11 (0.47-2.66) for IGFBP-3. Our prospective data thus indicated that there is no association of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 with colorectal cancer risk in the Japanese population. Although these markers might be etiologically significant in relation to colorectal cancer, we did not obtain evidence supporting this hypothesis.

  19. Genetic variants in IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and adiponectin genes and colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Keku, Temitope O.; Vidal, Adriana; Oliver, Shannon; Hoyo, Catherine; Hall, Ingrid J.; Omofoye, Seun; McDoom, Maya; Worley, Kendra; Galanko, Joseph; Sandler, Robert S.; Millikan, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluating genetic susceptibility may clarify effects of known environmental factors and also identify individuals at high risk. We evaluated the association of four insulin-related pathway gene polymorphisms in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) (CA)n repeat, insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-II) (rs680), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) (rs2854744), and adiponectin (APM1 rs1501299) with colon cancer risk, as well as relationships with circulating IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and C-peptide in a population-based study. Methods Participants were African Americans (231cases, 306 controls) and Whites (297 cases, 530 controls). Consenting subjects provided blood specimens, and lifestyle/diet information. Genotyping for all genes except IGF-I was performed by the 5′-exonuclease (Taqman) assay. The IGF-I (CA)n repeat was assayed by PCR, and fragment analysis. Circulating proteins were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by logistic regression. Results The IGF-I (CA)19 repeat was higher in White controls (50%) than African American controls (31%). Whites homozygous for the IGF-I (CA)19 repeat had a nearly two fold increase in risk of colon cancer (OR=1.77; 95%CI=1.15–2.73), but not African Americans (OR= 0.73, 95%CI 0.50–1.51). We observed an inverse association between the IGF-II Apa1 A-variant and colon cancer risk (OR= 0.49, 95%CI 0.28–0.88) in Whites only. Carrying the IGFBP-3 variant alleles was associated with lower IGFBP-3 protein levels, a difference most pronounced in Whites (p- trend < 0.05). Conclusions These results support an association between insulin pathway-related genes and elevated colon cancer risk in Whites but not in African Americans. PMID:22565227

  20. Fetal insulin and IGF-II contribute to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-associated up-regulation of membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) in the human feto-placental endothelium.

    PubMed

    Hiden, U; Lassance, L; Tabrizi, N Ghaffari; Miedl, H; Tam-Amersdorfer, C; Cetin, I; Lang, U; Desoye, G

    2012-10-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM)-associated hormonal and metabolic derangements in mother and fetus affect placental development and function. Indeed, in GDM, placentas are characterized by hypervascularization and vascular dysfunction. The membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) is a key player in angiogenesis and vascular expansion. Here, we hypothesized elevated placental MT1-MMP levels in GDM induced by components of the diabetic environment. Therefore, we measured placental MT1-MMP in normal vs. GDM pregnancies, identified potential functional consequences, and investigated the contribution of hyperglycemia and the insulin/IGF axis. Immunohistochemistry identified placental cell types expressing MT1-MMP. MT1-MMP was compared between normal and GDM placentas by immunoblotting. Quantitative PCR of MT1-MMP in primary feto-placental endothelial cells (fpEC) and trophoblasts isolated from both normal and GDM placentas identified the cells contributing to the GDM-associated changes. A putative MT1-MMP role in angiogenesis was determined using blocking antibodies for in vitro angiogenesis assays. Potential GDM-associated factors and signaling pathways inducing MT1-MMP up-regulation in fpEC were identified using kinase inhibitors. Total and active MT1-MMP was increased in GDM placentas (+51 and 54%, respectively, P<0.05) as a result of up-regulated expression in fpEC (2.1-fold, P=0.02). MT1-MMP blocking antibodies reduced in vitro angiogenesis up to 25% (P=0.03). Pathophysiological levels of insulin and IGF-II, but not IGF-I and glucose, stimulated MT1-MMP expression in fpEC by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signals relayed through the insulin, but not IGF-I, receptor. GDM up-regulates MT1-MMP in the feto-placental endothelium, and insulin and IGF-II contribute. This may account for GDM-associated changes in the feto-placental vasculature.

  1. Immunoassays for the measurement of IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and -3, and ICTP as indirect biomarkers of recombinant human growth hormone misuse in sport. Values in selected population of athletes.

    PubMed

    Abellan, Rosario; Ventura, Rosa; Palmi, Ilaria; di Carlo, Simonetta; Bacosi, Antonella; Bellver, Montse; Olive, Ramon; Pascual, Jose Antonio; Pacifici, Roberta; Segura, Jordi; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio; Pichini, Simona

    2008-11-04

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) -2 and -3 and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) have been proposed, among others, as indirect biomarkers of the recombinant human growth hormone misuse in sport. An extended intra- and inter-laboratory validation of commercially available immunoassays for biomarkers detection was performed. ELISA assays for total IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 (IGF-II/ELISA1: DSLabs, IGFBP-2/ELISA2: Biosource, and IGFBP-3/ELISA3: BioSource) and an EIA assay for ICTP (ICTP/EIA: Orion Diagnostica) were evaluated. The inter- and intra-laboratory precision values were acceptable for all evaluated assays (maximum imprecision of 30% and 66% were found only for the lowest quality control samples of IGF-II and IGFBP-3). Correct accuracy was obtained for all inter-laboratory immunoassays and for IGFBP-2 intra-laboratory immunoassay. The range of concentrations found in serum samples under investigation was always covered by the calibration curves of the studied immunoassays. However, 11% and 15% of the samples felt below the estimated LOQ for IGF-II and ICTP, respectively, in the zone where lower precision was obtained. Although the majority of evaluated assays showed an overall reliability not always suitable for antidoping control analysis, relatively high concordances between laboratory results were obtained for all assays. Evaluated immunoassays were used to measure serum concentrations of IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and -3 and ICTP in elite athletes of various sport disciplines at different moments of the training season; in recreational athletes at baseline conditions and finally in sedentary individuals. Serum IGF-II was statistically higher both in recreational and elite athletes compared to sedentary individuals. Elite athletes showed lower IGFBP-2 and higher IGFBP-3 concentration with respect to recreational athletes and sedentary people. Among elite athletes, serum IGFBP-3 (synchronized

  2. Effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) and season on plasma and milk insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I) and II (IGF-II) in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Collier, Robert J; Miller, M A; McLaughlin, C L; Johnson, H D; Baile, C A

    2008-07-01

    During two studies, effects of recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST) on plasma and milk IGF's in cows adapted to summer (S; 12 cows) or winter (W; 12 cows) conditions were evaluated. Each study consisted of on-farm periods (30 days) followed by climatology chamber periods (CC; 30 days). Cows were given daily injections of rbST, Sometribove, USAN (25mg/day; 6 cows each study) or saline (control; 6 cows each study). During on-farm periods, blood and milk (am and pm) samples were collected once weekly. During CC periods, blood samples were collected every 2 days and milk samples (am and pm) were collected daily. Plasma IGF-I and IGF-II were increased in cows treated with rbST. A pronounced seasonal pattern in basal and rbST-stimulated plasma IGF-I but not IGF-II was detected. Higher basal and rbST-stimulated plasma IGF-I concentrations in S occurred despite large decreases in feed intake and energy balance. Milk IGF-I and IGF-II was not affected by rbST treatment or season. Although milk IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations were unaffected by rbST treatment, total IGF-output increased due to increased milk yield. The observed seasonal patterns in plasma IGF-I may be indicative of seasonal differences in the coupling of the somatotropin-IGF axis. In particular, we failed to detect an uncoupling of the somatotropin-IGF-I axis in S despite an induced negative energy balance during thermal stress.

  3. Do Biochemical Markers and Apa I Polymorphism in IGF-II Gene Play a Role in the Association of Birth Weight and Later BMI?

    PubMed

    Wu, Junqing; Ren, Jingchao; Li, Yuyan; Wu, Yinjie; Gao, Ersheng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the mechanisms underlying the association of birth weight with later body mass index (BMI) from the biochemical markers related to metabolism and the Apa I polymorphism in IGF-II gene. A total of 300 children were selected randomly from the Macrosomia Birth Cohort in Wuxi, China. The height and weight were measured and blood samples were collected. Plasma concentrations of 8 biochemical markers were detected. Apa I polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Biochemical markers were detected for 296 subjects and 271 subjects were genotyped for the Apa I polymorphism. No association was found between birth weight and 8 biochemical markers. In boys, the BMIs of AA, AG and GG genotypes were 16.10 ± 2.24 kg/m(2), 17.40 ± 3.20 kg/m(2), 17.65 ± 2.66 kg/m(2). And there was statistical difference among the three genotypes. But in girls, there was no statistical difference. The birth weights of AA, AG and GG genotypes were 3751.13 ± 492.43 g, 3734.00 ± 456.88 g, 3782.00 ± 461.78 g. And there was no statistical difference among the three genotypes. Biochemical markers are not associated with birth weight. Apa I polymorphism may be related to childhood BMI, but it may be not associated with birth weight. Therefore, biochemical markers and Apa I polymorphism might not play a role in the association of birth weight and BMI.

  4. Associations of food and nutrient intakes with serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, TGF-b1, total SOD activity and sFas levels among middle-aged Japanese: the Japan Collaborative Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Koutatsu; Iso, Hiroyasu; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    No observational study has examined whether cancer-related biomarkers are associated with diet in Japanese. We therefore assessed sex-specific food and nutrient intakes according to serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, TGF-b1, total SOD activity and sFas levels, under a cross-sectional study of 10,350 control subjects who answered the food frequency questionnaire in the first-wave nested case-control study within the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study. For both men and women, IGF-I levels were associated with higher intakes of milk, fruits, green tea, calcium and vitamin C. IGF-II levels were associated with higher intakes of milk, yogurt, fruits and miso soup, and lower intakes of rice, coffee and carbohydrate. IGFBP-3 levels were associated with higher intakes of milk, yogurt, fruits and vitamin C, and lower intakes of rice, energy, protein, carbohydrate, sodium and polyunsaturated fatty acids. TGF-b1 levels were associated with lower intakes of coffee intakes, and higher intakes of miso soup and sodium. Total SOD activity levels were associated with lower intakes of most nutrients other than energy, carbohydrate, iron, copper, manganese, retinol equivalents, vitamin A, B2, B12, niacin, folic acid, vitamin C and fish fat. sFas levels were associated with higher intakes of manganese and folic acids. The results of the present study should help to account for findings on those biomarkers regarding risks of cancer and other lifestyle-related diseases in terms of dietary confounding as causality.

  5. Lack of association between risk of biliary tract cancer and circulating IGF (Insulin-like Growth Factor) -I, IGF-II or IGFBP-3 (IGF-binding Protein-3): A nested case-control study in a large scale cohort study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yagyu, Kiyoko; Kikuchi, Shogo; Lin, Yingsong; Ishibashi, Teruo; Obata, Yuki; Kurosawa, Michiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    Biliary tract cancer, encompassing gallbladder and bile duct cancers, has a poor prognosis, but little is known of the etiology. A nested case-control study was here conducted to evaluate the association between serum levels of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 and death from biliary tract cancer. In a large scale cohort study, 35 gallbladder and 42 bile duct cancers were observed during the follow-up. For each subject in the case group, 1-3 control subjects (228 in total) were selected randomly, matched for sex, age (as near as possible) and residential area. The subjects were divided into tertiles by circulating levels of IGF-I, IGF-II or IGFBP-3. Using conditional logistic regression, risks among the tertiles were compared adjusted for defecation, smoking and drinking habits. No remarkable differences in risks of gallbladder or bile duct cancer were observed among tertiles of IGF-I or IGF-II, and no remarkable trend was observed. Circulating IGFBP-3 showed an inverse U-shape association with gallbladder cancer and a U-shaped one with bile duct cancer. Associations between IGF-I or IGF-II and gallbladder or bile duct cancer thus were lacking or very weak. The observed U- and inverse U-shaped association of IGFBP-3 with the cancers is not suggestive of any meaningful relationships.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor II in human adrenal and pheochromocytomas and Wilms tumors: expression at the mRNA and protein level

    SciTech Connect

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Irminger, J.C.; Zapf, J.; Ziegler, W.H.; Humbel, R.E.

    1987-02-01

    Two forms of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II with molecular masses of 10 and 7.5 kDa, respectively, were found in tumor tissue from human adrenal pheochromocytomas. The tumors contained 5.3-7.1 ..mu..g of immunoreactive IGF-II per g of tissue, which is about 20 times more than in adrenal medulla. The total bioactive IGF measured by radioimmunoassay in the pheochromocytomas exceeded that in normal liver or kidney, which contained only the 7.5-kDa IGF-II species, by a factor of approx.100. By contrast, the amount of IGF-I was just measurable and did not vary significantly between tumor and normal tissue. The high amounts of IGF-II in the pheochromocytomas were not reflected, however, by a corresponding increase of mRNA. The opposite situations was found in Wilms tumors, where IGF-II content was in the same range as in nontumor tissues despite increased expression of IGF-II mRNA.

  7. Insulin-like growth factors I and II in starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus): molecular cloning and differential expression during embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongjiang; Zang, Kun; Liu, Xuezhou; Shi, Bao; Li, Cunyu; Shi, Xueying

    2015-02-01

    In order to elucidate the possible roles of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) in the embryonic development of Platichthys stellatus, their cDNAs were isolated and their spatial expression pattern in adult organs and temporal expression pattern throughout embryonic development were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay. The IGF-I cDNA sequence was 1,268 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 558 bp, which encoded 185 amino acid residues. With respect to IGF-II, the full-length cDNA was 899 bp in length and contained a 648-bp ORF, which encoded 215 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of IGF-I and IGF-II exhibited high identities with their fish counterparts. The highest IGF-I mRNA level was found in the liver for both sexes, whereas the IGF-II gene was most abundantly expressed in female liver and male liver, gill, and brain. The sex-specific and spatial expression patterns of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs are thought to be related to the sexually dimorphic growth and development of starry flounder. Both IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs were detected in unfertilized eggs, which indicated that IGF-I and IGF-II were parentally transmitted. Nineteen embryonic development stages were tested. IGF-I mRNA level remained high from unfertilized eggs to low blastula followed by a significant decrease at early gastrula and then maintained a lower level. In contrast, IGF-II mRNA level was low from unfertilized eggs to high blastula and peaked at low blastula followed by a gradual decrease. Moreover, higher levels of IGF-I mRNA than that of IGF-II were found from unfertilized eggs to high blastula, vice versa from low blastula to newly hatched larva, and the different expression pattern verified the differential roles of IGF-I and IGF-II in starry flounder embryonic development. These results could help in understanding the endocrine mechanism involved in the early development and growth of starry flounder.

  8. Prenatal cocaine exposure impairs cognitive function of progeny via insulin growth factor II epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Hou, Jing; Chen, Bo; Shao, Xue; Zhu, Ruiming; Bu, Qian; Gu, Hui; Li, Yan; Zhang, Baolai; Du, Changman; Fu, Dengqi; Kong, Jueying; Luo, Li; Long, Hailei; Li, Hongyu; Deng, Yi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2015-10-01

    Studies have showed that prenatal cocaine exposure (PCOC) can impair cognitive function and social behavior of the offspring; however, the mechanism underlying such effect is poorly understood. Insulin-like growth factor II (Igf-II), an imprinted gene, has a critical role in memory consolidation and enhancement. We hypothesized that epigenetic regulation of hippocampal Igf-II may attribute to the cognitive deficits of PCOC offspring. We used Morris water maze and open-field task to test the cognitive function in PCOC offspring. The epigenetic alteration involved in hippocampal Igf-II expression deficit in PCOC offspring was studied by determining Igf-II methylation status, DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) expressions and L-methionine level. Moreover, IGF-II rescue experiments were performed and the downstream signalings were investigated in PCOC offspring. In behavioral tests, we observed impaired spatial learning and memory and increased anxiety in PCOC offspring; moreover, hippocampal IGF-II mRNA and protein expressions were significantly decreased. Hippocampal methylation of cytosine-phospho-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides in differentially methylated region (DMR) 2 of Igf-II was elevated in PCOC offspring, which may be driven by the upregulation of L-methionine and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1. Importantly, intra-hippocampal injection of recombinant IGF-II reactivated the repressed calcium calmodulin kinase II α (CaMKIIα) and reversed cognitive deficits in PCOC offspring. Collectively, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure during pregnancy impairs cognitive function of offspring through epigenetic modification of Igf-II gene. Enhancing IGF-II signaling may represent a novel therapeutical strategy for cocaine-induced cognitive impairment.

  9. A Family of Insulin-Like Growth Factor II mRNA-Binding Proteins Represses Translation in Late Development

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jacob; Christiansen, Jan; Lykke-Andersen, Jens; Johnsen, Anders H.; Wewer, Ulla M.; Nielsen, Finn C.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is a major fetal growth factor. The IGF-II gene generates multiple mRNAs with different 5′ untranslated regions (5′ UTRs) that are translated in a differential manner during development. We have identified a human family of three IGF-II mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs) that exhibit multiple attachments to the 5′ UTR from the translationally regulated IGF-II leader 3 mRNA but are unable to bind to the 5′ UTR from the constitutively translated IGF-II leader 4 mRNA. IMPs contain the unique combination of two RNA recognition motifs and four hnRNP K homology domains and are homologous to the Xenopus Vera and chicken zipcode-binding proteins. IMP localizes to subcytoplasmic domains in a growth-dependent and cell-specific manner and causes a dose-dependent translational repression of IGF-II leader 3 –luciferase mRNA. Mouse IMPs are produced in a burst at embryonic day 12.5 followed by a decline towards birth, and, similar to IGF-II, IMPs are especially expressed in developing epithelia, muscle, and placenta in both mouse and human embryos. The results imply that cytoplasmic 5′ UTR-binding proteins control IGF-II biosynthesis during late mammalian development. PMID:9891060

  10. Higher Maternal Protein Intake during Pregnancy Is Associated with Lower Cord Blood Concentrations of Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-II, IGF Binding Protein 3, and Insulin, but Not IGF-I, in a Cohort of Women with High Protein Intake.

    PubMed

    Switkowski, Karen M; Jacques, Paul F; Must, Aviva; Hivert, Marie-France; Fleisch, Abby; Gillman, Matthew W; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Oken, Emily

    2017-07-01

    Background: Prenatal exposure to dietary protein may program growth-regulating hormones, consequently influencing early-life growth patterns and later risk of associated chronic diseases. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis is of particular interest in this context given its influence on pre- and postnatal growth and its sensitivity to the early nutritional environment.Objective: Our objective was to examine associations of maternal protein intake during pregnancy with cord blood concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), and insulin.Methods: We studied 938 mother-child pairs from early pregnancy through delivery in the Project Viva cohort. Using multivariable linear regression models adjusted for maternal race/ethnicity, education, income, smoking, parity, height, and gestational weight gain and for child sex, we examined associations of second-trimester maternal protein intake [grams per kilogram (weight before pregnancy) per day], as reported on a food frequency questionnaire, with IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and insulin concentrations in cord blood. We also examined how these associations may differ by child sex and parity.Results: Mothers were predominantly white (71%), college-educated (64%), and nonsmokers (67%). Mean ± SD protein intake was 1.35 ± 0.35 g ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ d(-1) Each 1-SD increment in second-trimester protein intake corresponded to a change of -0.50 ng/mL (95% CI: -2.26, 1.26 ng/mL) in IGF-I and -0.91 μU/mL (95% CI: -1.45, -0.37 μU/mL) in insulin. Child sex and parity modified associations of maternal protein intake with IGF-II and IGFBP-3: protein intake was inversely associated with IGF-II in girls (P-interaction = 0.04) and multiparous mothers (P-interaction = 0.05), and with IGFBP-3 in multiparous mothers (P-interaction = 0.04).Conclusions: In a cohort of pregnant women with relatively high mean protein intakes, higher intake was associated with lower concentrations of growth-promoting hormones in cord blood

  11. Expression analysis of the insulin-like growth factors I and II during embryonic and early larval development of turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haishen; Qi, Qian; Hu, Jian; Si, Yufeng; He, Feng; Li, Jifang

    2015-04-01

    The insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) are important proteins involved in fish growth and development. Here, we report the isolation of IGF-II and expression analysis of IGFs in turbot Scophthalmus maximus, aiming to clarify their function in embryonic and larval development of fish. The deduced IGF-II gene is 808 bp in full length, which encodes a protein of 219 amino acids and is 93% similar with that of Paralichthys olicaceus in amino acid sequence. The tissue abundance and the expression pattern of IGFs in a turbot at early development stages were investigated via reverse transcription-polymer chain reaction. Result showed that the IGF-I and IGF-II genes were widely expressed in tissues of S. maximus. IGF-I was detected in all tissues except intestines with the highest level in liver, while IGF-II transcript presented in all tissues except muscle. At the stages of embryonic and larval development, the mRNA levels of IGFs sharply increased from the stage of unfertilized egg to post larva, followed by a decrease with larval development. However, there was an increase in IGF-I at the embryonic stage and IGF-II at the gastrula stage, respectively. These results suggested that IGFs play important roles in cell growth and division of the turbot. Our study provides reference data for further investigation of growth regulation in turbot, which can guarantee better understanding of the physiological role that IGFs play in fish.

  12. Tissue-specific expression of insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs with distinct 5' untranslated regions

    SciTech Connect

    Irminger, J.C.; Rosen, K.M.; Humble, R.E.; Villa-Komaroff, L.

    1987-09-01

    The authors have used RNA from human hypothalamus as template for the production of cDNAs encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The prohormone coding sequence of brain IGF-II RNA is identical to that found in liver; however, the 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA has no homology to the 5' untranslated sequence of the previously reported liver cDNAs. By using hybridization to specific probes as well as a method based on the properties of RNase H, they found that the human IGF-II gene has at least three exons that encode alternative 5' untranslated regions and that are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A probe specific to the brain cDNA 5' untranslated region hybridizes to a 6.0-kilobase transcript present in placenta, hypothalamus, adrenal gland, kidney, Wilms tumor, and a pheochromocytoma. The 5' untranslated sequence of the brain cDNA does not hybridize to a 5.3-kilobase transcript found in liver or to a 5.0-kb transcript found in pheochromocytoma. By using RNase H to specifically fragment the IGF-II transcripts into 3' and 5' fragments, they found that the RNAs vary in size due to differences in the 5' end but not the 3' end.

  13. Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor II Differentially Regulate Endocytic Sorting and Stability of Insulin Receptor Isoform A*

    PubMed Central

    Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Palummo, Angela; Kletvikova, Emilia; Jiracek, Jiri; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Belfiore, Antonino; Morrione, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A) binds both insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II, although the affinity for IGF-II is 3–10-fold lower than insulin depending on a cell and tissue context. Notably, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking the IGF-IR and expressing solely the IR-A (R−/IR-A), IGF-II is a more potent mitogen than insulin. As receptor endocytosis and degradation provide spatial and temporal regulation of signaling events, we hypothesized that insulin and IGF-II could affect IR-A biological responses by differentially regulating IR-A trafficking. Using R−/IR-A cells, we discovered that insulin evoked significant IR-A internalization, a process modestly affected by IGF-II. However, the differential internalization was not due to IR-A ubiquitination. Notably, prolonged stimulation of R−/IR-A cells with insulin, but not with IGF-II, targeted the receptor to a degradative pathway. Similarly, the docking protein insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) was down-regulated after prolonged insulin but not IGF-II exposure. Similar results were also obtained in experiments using [NMeTyrB26]-insulin, an insulin analog with IR-A binding affinity similar to IGF-II. Finally, we discovered that IR-A was internalized through clathrin-dependent and -independent pathways, which differentially regulated the activation of downstream effectors. Collectively, our results suggest that a lower affinity of IGF-II for the IR-A promotes lower IR-A phosphorylation and activation of early downstream effectors vis à vis insulin but may protect IR-A and IRS-1 from down-regulation thereby evoking sustained and robust mitogenic stimuli. PMID:22318726

  14. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein Beta-2 is involved in growth hormone-regulated insulin-like growth factor-II gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously, we showed that levels of different CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) mRNAs in the liver of rainbow trout were modulated by GH and suggested that C/EBPs might be involved in GH induced IGF-II gene expression. As a step toward further investigation, we have developed monospecific poly...

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-II is produced by, signals to and is an important survival factor for the mature podocyte in man and mouse.

    PubMed

    Hale, L J; Welsh, G I; Perks, C M; Hurcombe, J A; Moore, S; Hers, I; Saleem, M A; Mathieson, P W; Murphy, A J; Jeansson, M; Holly, J M; Hardouin, S N; Coward, R J

    2013-05-01

    Podocytes are crucial for preventing the passage of albumin into the urine and, when lost, are associated with the development of albuminuria, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Podocytes have limited capacity to regenerate, therefore pro-survival mechanisms are critically important. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a potent survival and growth factor; however, its major function is thought to be in prenatal development, when circulating levels are high. IGF-II has only previously been reported to continue to be expressed in discrete regions of the brain into adulthood in rodents, with systemic levels being undetectable. Using conditionally immortalized human and ex vivo adult mouse cells of the glomerulus, we demonstrated the podocyte to be the major glomerular source and target of IGF-II; it signals to this cell via the IGF-I receptor via the PI3 kinase and MAPK pathways. Functionally, a reduction in IGF signalling causes podocyte cell death in vitro and glomerular disease in vivo in an aged IGF-II transgenic mouse that produces approximately 60% of IGF-II due to a lack of the P2 promoter of this gene. Collectively, this work reveals the fundamental importance of IGF-II in the mature podocyte for glomerular health across mammalian species.

  16. Effect of iron deficiency on the expression of insulin-like growth factor-II and its receptor in neuronal and glial cells.

    PubMed

    Morales González, E; Contreras, I; Estrada, J A

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that iron deficiency modifies the normal function of the central nervous system and alters cognitive abilities. When cellular damage occurs in the central nervous system, neuroprotective mechanisms, such as the production of neurotrophic factors, are essential in order for nervous tissue to function correctly. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF- II) is a neurotrophic factor that was recently shown to be involved in the normal functioning of cognitive processes in animal models. However, the impact of iron deficiency on the expression and function of this molecule has not yet been clarified. Mixed primary cell cultures from the central nervous system were collected to simulate iron deficiency using deferoxamine. The expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-IIR was determined with the western blot test. We observed increased expression of IGF-II, along with a corresponding decrease in the expression of IGF-IIR, in iron-deficient mixed primary cell cultures. We did not observe alterations in the expression of these proteins in isolated microglia or neuronal cultures under the same conditions. We did not detect differences in the expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR in iron-deficient cultures. In vitro iron deficiency increases the expression of IGF-II in mixed glial cell cultures, which may have a beneficial effect on brain tissue homeostasis in a situation in which iron availability is decreased. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of insulin-like growth factor II in the malignant transformation of rat liver oval cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Siegel, K; Odenthal, M; Becker, R; Oesch, F; Dienes, H P; Schirmacher, P; Steinberg, P

    1997-04-01

    Oval cells are small nonparenchymal epithelial cells that first appear in the periportal areas of the liver and thereafter invade the whole parenchyma when mice or rats are exposed to a variety of chemical carcinogens. In the present study we have analyzed the expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in the recently established oval cell line OC/CDE 22 and its malignantly transformed counterpart (the M22 cells) and the biological consequences of the constitutive expression of IGF II in oval cells. OC/CDE 22 cells do not express the above-mentioned growth factor, whereas the M22 cells do and addition of a neutralizing anti-IGF II antibody to M22 cells resulted in an almost complete proliferation stop. The presence of type 1 as well as type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptors in OC/CDE 22 and M22 cells was revealed by Northern blotting; however, only neutralizing antibodies directed against the type 1 IGF receptor were able to inhibit the proliferation of the cultured oval cells. Finally, transfection of an IGF II complementary DNA (cDNA) into OC/CDE 22 cells resulted in the release of active IGF II into the extracellular medium but not in the concomitant malignant transformation of the cells. Taken together these results show that: 1) upon transformation oval cells start producing IGF II and 2) IGF II acts on oval cells as a pure mitogen (without being per se oncogenic) via an autocrine loop involving the activation of the type 1 IGF receptor.

  18. Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II induces accelerated myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C E; James, P L; Fant, M E; Rotwein, P

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that exogenous insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) can stimulate the terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts in culture and have established a correlation between the rate and the extent of IGF-II secretion by muscle cell lines and the rate of biochemical and morphological differentiation. To investigate the hypothesis that autocrine secretion of IGF-II plays a critical role in stimulating spontaneous myogenic differentiation in vitro, we have established C2 muscle cell lines that stably express a mouse IGF-II cDNA under control of the strong, constitutively active Moloney sarcoma virus promoter, enabling us to study directly the effects of IGF-II overproduction. Similar to observations with other muscle cell lines, IGF-II overexpressing myoblasts proliferated normally in growth medium containing 20% fetal serum, but they underwent enhanced differentiation compared with controls when incubated in low-serum differentiation medium. Accelerated differentiation of IGF-II overexpressing C2 cells was preceded by the rapid induction of myogenin mRNA and protein expression (within 1 h, compared with 24-48 h in controls) and was accompanied by an enhanced proportion of the retinoblastoma protein in an underphosphrylated and potentially active form, by a marked increase in activity of the muscle-specific enzyme, creatine phosphokinase, by extensive myotube formation by 48 h, and by elevated secretion of IGF binding protein-5 when compared with controls. These results confirm a role for IGF-II as an autocrine/paracrine differentiation factor for skeletal myoblasts, and they define a model cell system that will be useful in determining the biochemical mechanisms of IGF action in cellular differentiation.

  19. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta2 is involved in growth hormone-regulated insulin-like growth factor-II gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Lo, Jay H; Chen, Thomas T

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we showed that levels of different CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) mRNAs in the liver of rainbow trout were modulated by GH and suggested that C/EBPs might be involved in GH-induced IGF-II gene expression. As a step toward further investigation, we have developed monospecific polyclonal antibodies to detect rainbow trout C/EBPalpha, -beta1, -beta2, and -delta2 isoform proteins. Injection of GH into adult rainbow trout resulted in a significant increase of C/EBPbeta1, C/EBPbeta2, and C/EBPdelta2 proteins in the liver. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that C/EBPbeta2 binds to multiple sites at the 5' promoter/regulatory region, introns, and the 3' untranslated region of the IGF-II gene. GH treatment reduced C/EBPbeta2 binding to several of these regions at 6 h after injection. The decreased occupancy of C/EBPbeta2 coincided well with an increase of histone H4 acetylation at the proximal promoter and elevation of the IGF-II mRNA level. Immunoblotting analysis showed that C/EBPbeta2 existed predominately as a truncated form in the liver, and cotransfection analysis further showed that the truncated C/EBPbeta2 acted as a negative regulator on IGF-II proximal promoter. GH treatment caused deacetylation of C/EBPbeta2 in the liver. In addition, we observed a GH-dependent interaction of C/EBPbeta2 with a complex involving histone H1. All together, these results suggest that C/EBPbeta2 was regulated at multiple levels by GH, and C/EBPbeta2 may play a suppressive role in mediating GH-induced IGF-II expression in the liver of rainbow trout.

  20. Experimental diabetes increases insulin-like growth factor I and II receptor concentration and gene expression in kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, H.; Shen-Orr, Z.; Stannard, B.; Burguera, B.; Roberts, C.T. Jr.; LeRoith, D. )

    1990-12-01

    Insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) is a mitogenic hormone with important regulatory roles in growth and development. One of the target organs for IGF-I action is the kidney, which synthesizes abundant IGF-I receptors and IGF-I itself. To study the involvement of IGF-I and the IGF-I receptor in the development of nephropathy, one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, we measured the expression of these genes in the kidney and in other tissues of the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat. The binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I to crude membranes was measured in the same tissues. We observed a 2.5-fold increase in the steady-state level of IGF-I-receptor mRNA in the diabetic kidney, which was accompanied by a 2.3-fold increase in IGF-I binding. In addition to this increase in IGF-I binding to the IGF-I receptor, there was also binding to a lower-molecular-weight material that may represent an IGF-binding protein. No change was detected in the level of IGF-I-peptide mRNA. Similarly, IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-II binding were significantly increased in the diabetic kidney. IGF-I- and IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-I and IGF-II binding returned to control values after insulin treatment. Because the IGF-I receptor is able to transduce mitogenic signals on activation of its tyrosine kinase domain, we hypothesize that, among other factors, high levels of receptor in the diabetic kidney may also be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Increased IGF-II-receptor expression in the diabetic kidney may be important for the intracellular transport and packaging of lysosomal enzymes, although a role for this receptor in signal transduction cannot be excluded. Finally, the possible role of IGF-binding proteins requires further study.

  1. Rearrangements at the 11p15 locus and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II gene in sporadic adrenocortical tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gicquel, C.; Schneid, H.; Le Bouc, Y.; Bertagna, X.; Francillard-Leblond, M.; Luton, J.P.; Girard, F.

    1994-06-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of sporadic adrenocortical tumors in adults. Because loss of heterozygosity at the 11p15 locus has been described in childhood tumors, particularly in adrenocortical tumors associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, and because insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) is a crucial regulator of fetal adrenal growth, the authors looked for structural analysis at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene expression in 23 sporadic adrenocortical adult tumors: 6 carcinomas (5 with Cushing`s syndrome and 1 nonsecreting) and 17 benign adenomas (13 with Cushing`s syndrome, 1 pure androgen secreting, and 3 nonsecreting). Twenty-one patients were informative at the 11p15 locus, and six (four carcinomas and two adenomas) of them (28.5%) exhibited 11p15 structural abnormalities in tumor DNA (five, a uniparental disomy and one, a mosaicism). In a single case that could be further studied, a paternal isodisomy was observed. Very high IGF-II mRNA contents were detected in seven tumors (30%; 5 of the 6 carcinomas and 2 of the 17 adenomas). They were particularly found in tumors with uniparental disomy at the 11p15 locus. Overall, a strong correlation existed between IGF-II mRNA contents and DNA demethylation at the IGF-II locus. These data show that genetic alterations involving the 11p15 locus were highly frequent in malignant tumors, but found only in rare adenomas. These results in combination with evidence for overexpression of IGF-II from the 11p15.5 locus suggest that abnormalities in structure and/or expression of the IGF-II gene play a role as a late event of a multistep process of tumorigenesis. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor II-producing metastatic colon cancer with recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Teramae, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Okada, Yasuyuki; Goji, Takahiro; Kitamura, Shinji; Kimura, Tetsuo; Kimura, Masako; Bando, Yoshimi; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2015-02-01

    A 45-year-old man was referred to our hospital and found to have a tubular adenocarcinoma of the descending colon with multiple liver metastases. During hospitalization, the patient suffered recurrent hypoglycemic attacks that required intravenous 50% glucose infusion. He was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH) because the colon cancer tissue obtained by biopsy was strongly stained for insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) by immunohistochemistry. He received chemotherapy with oxaliplatin, 5-FU and leucovorin (FOLFOX) plus bevacizumab (Bmab), and showed a partial response. As the metastatic lesions decreased in size, the hypoglycemic attacks gradually disappeared. Subsequently, he received outpatient chemotherapy and maintained a high quality of life for about 10 months. Western blot analysis of IGF-II in serum at the time of admission showed a high-molecular-weight form of IGF-II, which was considered to have caused hypoglycemia. This patient presents a very rare case of colorectal cancer associated with NICTH syndrome due to production of high-molecular-weight IGF-II by cancer cells. It is important to investigate IGF-II expression in cancer tissues for establishing the diagnosis of NICTH in cases with intractable hypoglycemia complicated by advanced cancer.

  3. Developmental and tissue-specific expression of a family of transcripts related to rat insulin-like growth factor II mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Soares, M B; Ishii, D N; Efstratiadis, A

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a cDNA library from the mRNA of a rat liver cell line (BRL-3A) and characterized cDNA clones encoding the protein precursor of the rat insulin-like growth factor II (pre-pro-rIGF-II). This precursor, inferred from the nucleotide sequence, consists of a signal peptide, the rIGF-II sequence, and a trailer polypeptide of unknown significance. The characterized cDNA sequence (1016 nt) is part of a 3.4 kb mRNA species. Northern analysis reveals that a probe containing the extreme 5' noncoding region hybridizes to a second RNA (1.6 kb), while a probe corresponding to the 5' noncoding region proximal to the coding region hybridizes to two other RNA species (1.75 and 1.1 kb). All four RNAs are differentially expressed in all of the neonatal tissues that were examined, while the 3.4 kb pre-pro-rIGF-II mRNA and the 1.1 kb transcript are absent from adult tissues. Images PMID:3889836

  4. Insulin-like growth factor-II and heparin are anti-apoptotic survival factors in human villous cytotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Hills, Frank A; Mehmet, Huseyin; Sullivan, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), heparin, aspirin and vitamin C on the proliferation and apoptosis of human villous cytotrophoblast from first trimester and term placentae. Villous cytotrophoblast cells were isolated from uncomplicated first trimester (n=12) and term placental tissues (n=12) using negative immunoselection with an antibody to HLA class I antigens. Cells were incubated with IGF-I, IGF-II, heparin, aspirin and vitamin C either alone, or in combination with either TNF-α/IFN-γ or staurosporine. Proliferation was determined by measurement of Ki67 expression using immunocytochemistry. Trophoblast apoptosis was determined by TUNEL staining. Finally RT-PCR was carried out to identify IGF-binding insulin receptor isoforms. Data were expressed as means±SEM. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction was used to determine if differences between groups were statistically significant. Following negative immunoselection >98% of cells were positively stained for cytokeratin 7, a marker for cytotrophoblasts, and <1% were vimentin positive. First trimester and term trophoblasts underwent spontaneous apoptosis which was inhibited by approximately 50% in the presence of IGF-II or heparin. Apoptosis was significantly increased following incubation with a combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ or staurosporine. Apoptosis was decreased to basal levels following coincubation with IGF-II or heparin. Incubation with IGFs or heparin resulted in a small, but significant increase in Ki67 expression. Insulin receptor isoform A, which binds IGF-II with high affinity, was present in all trophoblast samples tested. These results suggest that heparin and IGF-II, but not IGF-I are important regulators of villous cytotrophoblast survival in early and late pregnancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential expression of insulin-like growth factor genes in rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rotwein, P; Burgess, S K; Milbrandt, J D; Krause, J E

    1988-01-01

    A sensitive solution-hybridization assay was used to investigate the expression of genes encoding insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and -II) in the rat central nervous system (CNS). mRNAs for both IGFs are synthesized throughout the CNS of adult rats but exhibit distinct regional differences for each growth factor. IGF-I mRNA is 8-10 times more abundant in the cervical-thoracic spinal cord and in the olfactory bulb than in whole brain and is enriched 3-fold in the midbrain and cerebellum. IGF-II mRNA is minimally enriched in the medulla-pons and cerebellum but is 3-5 times less abundant in the midbrain and corpus striatum than in total brain. During CNS development the content of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs is highest at embryonic day 14 and declines by a factor of 3-4 at birth, to values found in adult brain. Embryonic neurons and glia synthesize IGF-I mRNA during short-term cell culture; only glia produce IGF-II mRNA. These observations show that IGF-I and IGF-II are differentially expressed in the developing and adult CNS and suggest that each growth factor may play a unique role in the mammalian nervous system.

  6. Purification and characterization of an insulin-like growth factor II variant from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Hampton, B; Burgess, W H; Marshak, D R; Cullen, K J; Perdue, J F

    1989-11-15

    An insulin-like growth factor II variant (IGF-II variant) was purified from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma by ion exchange, gel filtration, and reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. The amino-terminal sequence of the first 35 amino acid residues showed a replacement of Ser-29 of IGF-II with the tetrapeptide Arg-Leu-Pro-Gly of IGF-II variant. Peptides isolated and sequenced after digestion with endoproteinase Asp-N and endoproteinase Glu-C disclosed no differences with the sequence predicted from an IGF-II variant cDNA clone isolated by Jansen, M., van Shaik, F. M. A., van Tol, H., Van den Brande, J. L., and Sussenbach, J. S. (1985) FEBS Lett., 179, 243-246. The molecular ion of intact IGF-II variant was 7809.4 mass units, as measured by plasma desorption mass spectrometry. This is in close agreement with the molecular ion of 7812.8 mass units calculated from the determined sequence and indicates the entire amino acid sequence had been accounted for. Binding of IGF-II variant to purified insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors demonstrated a 2-3-fold lower affinity for this receptor compared with IGF-I or IGF-II. The dissociation constants for IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-II variant are 0.23, 0.38, and 0.80 nM, respectively. In a growth assay, the concentration of IGF-II and IGF-II variant required to stimulate the half-maximal growth of MCF-7 cells was 4 and 13 nM, respectively. Finally, the amount of IGF-II variant that can be purified by this method constitutes approximately 25% of the total IGF-II isolated from Cohn fraction IV1 of human plasma.

  7. Insulin-like growth factor II receptor is phosphorylated by a tyrosine kinase in adipocyte plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Corvera, S.; Whitehead, R.E.; Mottola, C.; Czech, M.P.

    1986-06-15

    Incorporation of /sup 32/P from (gamma-32P)ATP into tyrosine residues of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II receptor was observed in a Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of rat adipocyte plasma membranes. IGF-II receptor phosphorylation proceeded to a stoichiometry of approximately 0.5 mol of phosphate/IGF-II binding site after 10 min of incubation at 4 degrees C. A Km for ATP of 6 microM was calculated for this phosphorylation reaction. Addition of IGF-II caused an approximately 2-fold increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of the IGF-II receptor in this preparation. In contrast, phosphorylation of angiotensin II by the Triton X-100 washed membranes was not stimulated by IGF-II. Incubation of purified receptor immobilized on IGF-II agarose or of receptor-enriched low density microsomal membranes with (gamma-32P)ATP did not result in appreciable incorporation of (/sup 32/P)phosphate into the IGF-II receptor nor into exogenous substrates. These data suggest that the IGF-II receptor is not a tyrosine protein kinase capable of autophosphorylation but that it is a substrate for a tyrosine protein kinase endogenous to the adipocyte plasma membrane. The stimulatory effect of IGF-II on the tyrosine phosphorylation of its receptor may be due to a conformational change which converts the receptor to a better substrate for this tyrosine kinase.

  8. Expression of insulin-like growth factor system genes in liver and brain tissue during embryonic and post-hatch development of the turkey.

    PubMed

    Richards, Mark P; Poch, Stephen M; McMurtry, John P

    2005-05-01

    A molecular cloning strategy employing primer-directed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was devised to sequence 1300 bp of a turkey liver-derived cDNA corresponding to the complete coding region and the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II mRNA transcript (GenBank accession no. ). The turkey IGF-II gene codes for a 187 amino acid precursor protein that includes a signal peptide, the mature IGF-II hormone, and a C-terminal extension peptide comprised of 24, 67 and 96 amino acids, respectively. Turkey IGF-II showed greater than 95% sequence identity at both the nucleotide and amino acid level with chicken IGF-II. Expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF type-I receptor (IGF-IR), and IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and -5 genes was quantified relative to an internal 18S rRNA standard by RT-PCR in liver and whole brain tissue on days 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 and 26 of embryonic development, as well as at hatch (H, day 28) and at 3 weeks post-hatching (PH). Expression of liver IGF-I was low throughout embryonic development, but increased more than 8-fold by 3 weeks PH. In contrast, IGF-I was expressed in brain tissue at much higher levels than liver throughout development and this level of expression in brain increased gradually, reaching its highest point at 3 weeks PH. IGF-II was expressed at comparable levels in brain and liver tissue during embryonic development, except for transient increases in liver just prior to hatching (days 24 and 26) and at 3 weeks PH. Expression of IGF-IR declined in brain throughout development reaching its lowest level at 3 weeks PH. In liver, IGF-IR expression was lower than that of brain throughout development. An inverse relationship was observed for the expression of IGF-I and IGF-IR genes in brain, but not in liver, through 3 weeks PH. Expression of the IGFBP-2 gene increased in liver around the time of hatch (days 26-28) and declined by 3 weeks PH, whereas the level of expression of

  9. An insulin-like growth factor-II intronic variant affects local DNA conformation and ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingeng; Risch, Evan; Deng, Qian; Biglia, Nicoletta; Picardo, Elisa; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Yu, Herbert

    2013-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) may be a prognostic marker in ovarian cancer, and its intronic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4320932 has been associated with risk of the disease. We determined whether rs4320932 is associated with IGF-II expression and patient survival in ovarian cancer, and explored whether the SNP variation affects DNA conformation both in the absence of and presence of carboplatin. IGF-II genotype (rs4320932) and phenotype were analyzed in 212 primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer tissue samples with Taqman® SNP genotyping assays, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. DNA conformation was evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to analyze the SNP associations with patient survival. The C allele of rs4320932, previously associated with decreased risk of ovarian cancer development, was here associated with significantly elevated risks of relapse (Ptrend = 0.0002) and death (Ptrend = 0.0006), remaining significant in multivariate analyses. The adjusted hazard ratios were 3.05 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.47-6.37) for relapse and 3.28 (95% CI: 1.64-6.57) for death, respectively. The variant was also significantly associated with chemotherapy response, but not with other clinicopathologic variables or with IGF-II expression. DNA with genotypes TT and CC had distinct CD spectra in both the absence of and presence of carboplatin. These findings suggest that the intronic SNP rs4320932 affects patient survival and chemotherapy response via alteration of DNA conformation, but not through regulation of IGF-II expression. This novel finding may have implications in individualized medicine for the design of specific molecules targeting DNA of specific conformations.

  10. Cloning and expression of the cDNA of chicken cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, M; Ma, Z; Sly, W S

    1995-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the 8767-bp full-length cDNA for the chicken cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR), of interest because, unlike its mammalian homologs, it does not bind insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The cDNA encodes a protein of 2470 aa that includes a putative signal sequence, an extracytoplasmic domain consisting of 15 homologous repeat sequences, a 23-residue transmembrane sequence, and a 161-residue cytoplasmic sequence. Overall, it shows 60% sequence identity with human and bovine CI-MPR homologs, and all but two of 122 cysteine residues are conserved. However, it shows much less homology in the N-terminal signal sequence, in repeat 11, which is proposed to contain the IGF-II-binding site in mammalian CI-MPR homologs, and in the 14-aa residue segment in the cytoplasmic sequence that has been proposed to mediate G-protein-coupled signal transduction in response to IGF-II binding by the human CI-MPR. Transient expression in COS-7 cells produced a functional CI-MPR which exhibited mannose-6-phosphate-inhibitable binding and mediated endocytosis of recombinant human beta-glucuronidase. Expression of the functional chicken CI-MPR in mice lacking the mammalian CI-MPR should clarify the controversy over the physiological role of the IGF-II-binding site in mammalian CI-MPR homologs. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7568213

  11. Genital skin fibroblasts (GF) of patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome express higher insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2, -3 and -5 than GF of normally virilized males.

    PubMed

    Diesing, D; Elmlinger, M W; Schuett, B S; Weidemann, W; Romalo, G; Schweikert, H U; Spindler, K-D; Ranke, M B

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effects of androgens, estradiol (E2) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I on IGF-II, insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2, -3 and -5 and mRNA in genital fibroblasts (GF) from patients with complete androgen insensitivity (CAIS) and normally virilized males (C). Proteins were measured by specific RIA and Western ligand blot, and specific mRNA levels by RT-PCR normalized by GAPDH levels. Secretion of IGF-II was lowered in CAIS (p<0.001) GF and by testosterone + IGF-I in C GF. Secretion of IGFBP-2 was higher (p<0.001) in CAIS GF and IGFBP-2 mRNA levels were increased by E2 in C GF (p<0.05). E2 stimulated IGFBP-2, -3 and -5 expression in CAIS GF. CAIS GF also secreted more IGFBP-3 (p<0.001) and accumulated 3-5 times more IGFBP-5 mRNA than C GF (p<0.001). In contrast to C GF, the availability of IGF-II in CAIS GF is apparently decreased by two facts: by the decreased expression and by increased expression of IGFBP-2, -3 and -5. Furthermore, E2 and IGF-I modulate the expression of IGF-II and IGFBP in GF. This may play a role in the failure to develop male external genitals in CAIS patients. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Insulin-like growth factor II messenger ribonucleic acids are synthesized in the choroid plexus of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.A.; Brooks, P.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.; Lund, P.K.

    1988-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrating the presence of immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors in the brain suggest a role of the IGFs in the central nervous system. IGF-II has been implicated as the predominant IGF in brain of mature animals based on studies of immunoreactive peptide and of IGF-II mRNAs. To obtain information about the sites of synthesis of IGF-II in adult rat brain, a /sup 32/P-labeled 31 base long synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotide complementary in sequence to trailer peptide coding sequences in rat IGF-II mRNA (IGF-II 31 mer) was hybridized with coronal sections of fixed rat brain. The IGF-II 31 mer showed specific hybridization with the choroid plexus throughout rat brain, whereas in other brain regions, structures or cells, hybridization was not discernibly above background. These findings suggest that the choroid plexus is a primary site of synthesis of IGF-II, a probable source of IGF-II in cerebrospinal fluid, and a potential source of IGF-II for actions on target cells within the adult rat brain.

  13. Mapping of the insulin-like growth factor II binding site of the Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor by alanine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Heidi; Whittaker, Linda; Hinrichsen, Jane; Groth, Andreas; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2004-05-07

    The Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor is a physiological receptor for insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). To characterize the molecular basis of the receptor's ligand binding properties, we have examined the effects of alanine mutations of residues in the ligand binding site of the receptor on its affinity for IGF-II. The functional epitope for IGF-II comprises residues in the N-terminal L1 domain and residues at the C-terminus of the alpha subunit. Cysteine rich domain residues do not appear to be critical for IGF-II binding.

  14. Enhancement of Memories by Systemic Administration of Insulin-Like Growth Factor II

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Sarah A; Kohtz, Amy S; Pollonini, Gabriella; Alberini, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    To treat cognitive disorders in humans, new effective therapies that can be easily delivered systemically are needed. Previous studies showed that a bilateral injection of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) into the dorsal hippocampus of rats or mice enhances fear memories and facilitates fear extinction. Here, we report that, in mice, systemic treatments with IGF-II given before training significantly enhance the retention and persistence of several types of working, short-term and long-term memories, including fear conditioning, object recognition, object placement, social recognition, and spatial reference memory. IGF-II-mediated memory enhancement does not alter memory flexibility or the ability for new learning and also occurs when IGF-II treatment is given in concert with memory retrieval. Thus IGF-II may represent a potentially important and effective treatment for enhancing human cognitive and executive functions. PMID:24642597

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulates steroidogenesis in cultured bovine thecal cells.

    PubMed

    Spicer, L J; Voge, J L; Allen, D T

    2004-11-30

    The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) on luteinizing hormone (LH)-induced progesterone and androstenedione production by bovine thecal cells and compare it to that of insulin and IGF-I. Cells from large (>7.9 mm) bovine follicles were collected and cultured for 2 days in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. Then cells were cultured for an additional 1 or 2 days in serum-free medium with various doses of recombinant human IGF-II, bovine LH (30 ng/ml), IGF-I, and(or) insulin. Cell numbers were determined at the end of treatments via Coulter counting and used to correct steroid production data. In the presence of LH, 1-day treatment with 3-300 ng/ml of IGF-II had no significant effect on progesterone or androstenedione production, whereas 2-day treatment with 30, 100 and 300 ng/ml of IGF-II increased (P < 0.05) both progesterone and androstenedione production by 2-3-fold. The estimated effective dose of IGF-II stimulating 50% of the maximal steroidogenic response was calculated to be 25 ng/ml. In the absence of LH, 2-day treatment of IGF-I or -II had no effect on thecal androstenedione production but increased (P < 0.05) thecal progesterone production. In the presence of LH, 100 ng/ml of IGF-I increased progesterone and androstenedione production to a greater degree than did 100 ng/ml of IGF-II. Maximal effects of IGF-I and insulin on thecal steroidogenesis were similar and were not additive. Anti-IGF type I receptor antibodies attenuated (P < 0.05) the stimulatory effect of both IGF-I and IGF-II on thecal cell steroidogenesis. Use of radioligand assays demonstrated that specific receptors for (125)I-IGF-II existed in thecal cells with a 25 ng/well of IGF-II causing 50% inhibition of binding. IGF-I cross-reactivity with (125)I-IGF-II receptors averaged 3% whereas cross-reactivity of IGF-II with (125)I-IGF-I receptors averaged 114%. These results indicate that the stimulatory effects of IGF-II on

  16. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  17. The Chaperone Activity of GRP94 Toward Insulin-like Growth Factor II Is Necessary for the Stress Response to Serum Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Olga; Ahmed, Noreen T.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II is a hormone with mitogenic activity for many cell types and tissues. We demonstrate that its intracellular processing and secretion strictly depend on the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 94. GRP94 interacts physically and transiently with pro-IGF-II intermediates, and its activity is essential for secretion of active IGF-II, thus establishing IGF-II as a client of GRP94. Embryonic stem (ES) cells that lack GRP94 are hypersensitive to stress conditions such as serum deprivation and die by apoptosis because they cannot respond to the stress by producing active IGF-II. This chaperone–client interaction may explain the previously documented antiapoptotic activity of GRP94 in a number of stress responses. PMID:19158397

  18. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5 prime untranslated region from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J. ); Jansen, M. )

    1988-03-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5{prime} untranslated region (5{prime}-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A){sup +} RNA was probed with either the 5{prime}-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5{prime}-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5{prime}-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5{prime}-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5{prime}-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta.

  19. Interplay between microRNA-17-5p, insulin-like growth factor-II through binding protein-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Habashy, Danira Ashraf; El Tayebi, Hend Mohamed; Fawzy, Injie Omar; Hosny, Karim Adel; Esmat, Gamal; Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ihab

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of microRNA on insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and hence on insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) bioavailability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS Bioinformatic analysis was performed using microrna.org, DIANA lab and Segal lab softwares. Total RNA was extracted from 23 HCC and 10 healthy liver tissues using mirVana miRNA Isolation Kit. microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) expression was mimicked and antagonized in HuH-7 cell lines using HiPerFect Transfection Reagent, then total RNA was extracted using Biozol reagent then reverse transcribed into cDNA followed by quantification of miR-17-5p and IGFBP-3 expression using TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to validate the binding of miR-17-5p to the 3’UTR of IGFBP-3. Free IGF-II protein was measured in transfected HuH-7 cells using IGF-II ELISA kit. RESULTS Bioinformatic analysis revealed IGFBP-3 as a potential target for miR-17-5p. Screening of miR-17-5p and IGFBP-3 revealed a moderate negative correlation in HCC patients, where miR-17-5p was extensively underexpressed in HCC tissues (P = 0.0012), while IGFBP-3 showed significant upregulation in the same set of patients (P = 0.0041) compared to healthy donors. Forcing miR-17-5p expression in HuH-7 cell lines showed a significant downregulation of IGFBP-3 mRNA expression (P = 0.0267) and a significant increase in free IGF-II protein (P = 0.0339) compared to mock untransfected cells using unpaired t-test. Luciferase assay validated IGFBP-3 as a direct target of miR-17-5p; luciferase activity was inhibited by 27.5% in cells co-transfected with miR-17-5p mimics and the construct harboring the wild-type binding region 2 of IGFBP-3 compared to cells transfected with this construct alone (P = 0.0474). CONCLUSION These data suggest that regulating IGF-II bioavailability and hence HCC progression can be achieved through targeting IGFBP-3 via manipulating the expression of mi

  20. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and ..cap alpha..-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin.

  1. RNA-binding Protein Insulin-like Growth Factor mRNA-binding Protein 3 (IMP-3) Promotes Cell Survival via Insulin-like Growth Factor II Signaling after Ionizing Radiation*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Baisong; Hu, Yan; Brewer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces proapoptotic gene expression programs that inhibit cell survival. These programs often involve RNA-binding proteins that associate with their mRNA targets to elicit changes in mRNA stability and/or translation. The RNA-binding protein IMP-3 is an oncofetal protein overexpressed in many human malignancies. IMP-3 abundance correlates with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. As such, IMP-3 is proving to be a highly significant biomarker in surgical pathology. Among its many mRNA targets, IMP-3 binds to and promotes translation of insulin-like growth factor II (IGFII) mRNA. Our earlier studies showed that reducing IMP-3 abundance with siRNAs reduced proliferation of human K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells because of reduced IGF-II biosynthesis. However, the role of IMP-3 in apoptosis is unknown. Here, we have used IR-induced apoptosis of K562 cells as a model to explore a role for IMP-3 in cell survival. Knockdown of IMP-3 with siRNA increased susceptibility of cells to IR-induced apoptosis and led to reduced IGF-II production. Gene reporter assays revealed that IMP-3 acts through the 5′ UTR of IGFII mRNA during apoptosis to promote translation. Finally, culture of IR-treated cells with recombinant IGF-II partially reversed the effects of IMP-3 knockdown on IR-induced apoptosis. Together, these results indicate that IMP-3 acts in part through the IGF-II pathway to promote cell survival in response to IR. Thus, IMP-3 might serve as a new drug target to increase sensitivity of CML cells or other cancers to IR therapy. PMID:21757716

  2. RNA-binding protein insulin-like growth factor mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3) promotes cell survival via insulin-like growth factor II signaling after ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Baisong; Hu, Yan; Brewer, Gary

    2011-09-09

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces proapoptotic gene expression programs that inhibit cell survival. These programs often involve RNA-binding proteins that associate with their mRNA targets to elicit changes in mRNA stability and/or translation. The RNA-binding protein IMP-3 is an oncofetal protein overexpressed in many human malignancies. IMP-3 abundance correlates with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. As such, IMP-3 is proving to be a highly significant biomarker in surgical pathology. Among its many mRNA targets, IMP-3 binds to and promotes translation of insulin-like growth factor II (IGFII) mRNA. Our earlier studies showed that reducing IMP-3 abundance with siRNAs reduced proliferation of human K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells because of reduced IGF-II biosynthesis. However, the role of IMP-3 in apoptosis is unknown. Here, we have used IR-induced apoptosis of K562 cells as a model to explore a role for IMP-3 in cell survival. Knockdown of IMP-3 with siRNA increased susceptibility of cells to IR-induced apoptosis and led to reduced IGF-II production. Gene reporter assays revealed that IMP-3 acts through the 5' UTR of IGFII mRNA during apoptosis to promote translation. Finally, culture of IR-treated cells with recombinant IGF-II partially reversed the effects of IMP-3 knockdown on IR-induced apoptosis. Together, these results indicate that IMP-3 acts in part through the IGF-II pathway to promote cell survival in response to IR. Thus, IMP-3 might serve as a new drug target to increase sensitivity of CML cells or other cancers to IR therapy.

  3. Receptors for insulin-like growth factors I and II: autoradiographic localization in rat brain and comparison to receptors for insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Lesniak, M.A.; Hill, J.M.; Kiess, W.; Rojeski, M.; Pert, C.B.; Roth, J.

    1988-10-01

    Receptors for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) in rat brain were visualized using autoradiography with (125I)IGF-I. The binding of the labeled peptide was competed for fully by high concentrations of unlabeled IGF-I. At intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptide the binding of (125I)IGF-I was competed for by unlabeled IGF-I more effectively than by IGF-II or insulin, which is typical of receptors for IGF-I. Essentially every brain section shows specific binding of IGF-I, and the pattern of binding of IGF-I to its receptors correlated well with the cytoarchitectonic structures. In parallel studies we showed that (125I)IGF-II was bound to tissue sections of rat brain and that the binding was competed for by an excess of unlabeled IGF-II. However, intermediate concentrations of unlabeled peptides gave inconclusive results. To confirm that the binding of (125I)IGF-II was to IGF-II receptors, we showed that antibodies specific for the IGF-II receptor inhibited the binding of labeled IGF-II. Furthermore, the binding of the antibody to regions of the brain section, visualized by the application of (125I)protein-A, gave patterns indistinguishable from those obtained with (125I)IGF-II alone. Again, the binding was very widely distributed throughout the central nervous system, and the patterns of distribution corresponded well to the underlying neural structures. Densitometric analysis of the receptors enabled us to compare the distribution of IGF-I receptors with that of IGF-II receptors as well as retrospectively with that of insulin receptors.

  4. Insulin-like growth factor-II regulates bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jin; Sasaki, Yoko; Zhou, Liming; Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) have been found in bone extracts of several different species, and IGF-II is the most abundant growth factor stored in bone. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a noncollagenous extracellular matrix glycoprotein associated with mineralized connective tissues. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of BSP transcription by IGF-II in rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells. IGF-II (50 ng/ml) increased BSP mRNA and protein levels after 6-h stimulation, and enhanced luciferase activities of the constructs pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60), pLUC5 (-801 to +60) and pLUC6 (-938 to +60). Effects of IGF-II were inhibited by tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors, and abrogated by 2-bp mutations in cAMP response element (CRE), FGF2 response element (FRE) and homeodomain protein-binding site (HOX). The results of gel shift assays showed that nuclear proteins binding to CRE, FRE and HOX sites were increased by IGF-II (50 ng/ml) at 3 and 6 h. CREB1, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos and c-Jun antibodies disrupted the formation of the CRE-protein complexes. Dlx5 and Runx2 antibodies disrupted the FRE- and HOX-protein complex formations. These studies therefore demonstrated that IGF-II increased BSP transcription by targeting CRE, FRE and HOX elements in the proximal promoter of the rat BSP gene. Moreover, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos, c-Jun, Dlx5 and Runx2 transcription factors appear to be key regulators of IGF-II effects on BSP transcription.

  5. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human /sup 125/-I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4/sup 0/C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA/sub 1/-CA/sub 2/ and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of /sup 125/I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning.

  6. Endometrial expression of leptin receptor and members of the growth hormone-Insulin-like growth factor system throughout the estrous cycle in heifers.

    PubMed

    Sosa, C; Carriquiry, M; Chalar, C; Crespi, D; Sanguinetti, C; Cavestany, D; Meikle, A

    2010-12-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is expressed in bovine uterus during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy and is acknowledged to play an important role in regulating the development of the embryo and uterus. The leptin receptor (LEPR) is also expressed in the bovine uterus although it is not known whether its expression varies during the estrous cycle. In this study, the expression of the IGF-I and -II, the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R), GH receptor (GHR) and LEPR transcripts was determined on endometrial transcervical biopsies collected on days 0 (estrus), 5, 12 and 19 of the cow estrous cycle (n=8). The expression of mRNA was determined by RT real time PCR using ribosomal protein L19 as a housekeeping gene. It has been demonstrated for the first time that LEPR mRNA is expressed in the bovine uterus throughout the estrous cycle and that it presents a cycle-dependent variation, with higher levels observed during the luteal phase. The expression of IGF-I mRNA was greatest at estrus and day 5 (100%), and decreased on days 12 and 19 to 47% and 35% of the initial values. IGF-II mRNA increased on day 12 and decreased sharply thereafter (to one-third of day 12 values). Interestingly, IGF-1R showed the same pattern as IGF-II: increased 50% on day 12 compared to values at estrus and presented a sharp decrease on day 19. The expression of GHR transcript was greatest at estrus and on day 5 and progressively decreased thereafter. These results show that the GH-IGF system components are distinctively regulated during the estrous cycle suggesting that modulation of the IGF system may influence uterine activity during this period. The increase in the uterine sensitivity to IGFs during the late luteal phase - as demonstrated by the increased IGF-1R expression - concomitant with the increased IGF-II mRNA expression may reinforce the role of IGF-II during early pregnancy. Moreover, leptin is also likely to play roles during early embryo development.

  7. Gender-specific expression of multiple estrogen receptors, growth hormone receptors, insulin-like growth factors and vitellogenins, and effects of 17 beta-estradiol in the male tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Davis, Lori K; Pierce, Andrew L; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Sullivan, Craig V; Hirano, Tetsuya; Grau, E Gordon

    2008-05-01

    Gender-specific expression of estrogen receptors (ER alpha and ER beta), growth hormone receptors (GHR1 and GHR2), insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) and three vitellogenins (Vgs A-C) was examined in the liver, gonad, pituitary, and brain of sexually mature male, female, and 17 beta-estradiol (E2)-treated male tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Reflecting greater growth rate in male tilapia, hepatic expression of GHR1, GHR2, IGF-I and IGF-II as well as plasma IGF-I levels were higher in males than in females, whereas the expression of Vgs A-C and ER alpha was higher in females. On the other hand, expression of all genes measured was higher in the ovary than in testis. Forty eight hours after E2 injection (5 microg/g) into male fish, hepatic expression of most transcripts measured were altered to levels that were similar to those seen in females. The changes included decreased expression of GHR1, GHR2, IGF-I, and IGF-II, and increased expression of ER alpha and Vgs A-C. E2 treatment also increased Vg and decreased IGF-I in the plasma. Brain expression of ER alpha, ER beta, GHR1, and IGF-I was higher in females than in males, whereas pituitary expression of GHR2 and IGF-I was lower in females; only brain expression of GHR1 was increased by E2 treatment. These findings suggest that E2 stimulates Vg production primarily through activation of ER alpha and down-regulation of the GH/IGF-I axis, thus shifting energy from somatic growth towards vitellogenesis at the level of the liver.

  8. Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor-I and Insulin-like growth factor-II mRNAs in rate fetal and adult tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, P.K.; Moats-Staats, B.M.; Hynes, M.A.; Simmons, J.G.; Jansen, M.; D'ercole, A.J.; Van Wyk, J.J.

    1986-11-05

    Somatomedin-C or insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C/IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) have been implicated in the regulation of fetal growth and development. In the present study /sup 32/P-labeled complementary DNA probes encoding human and mouse Sm-C/IGF-I and human IGF-II were used in Northern blot hybridizations to analyze rat Sm-C/IGF-I and IGF-II mRNAs in poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from intestine, liver, lung, and brain of adult rats and fetal rats between day 14 and 17 of gestation. In fetal rats, all four tissues contained a major mRNA of 1.7 kilobase (kb) that hybridized with the human Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA and mRNAs of 7.5, 4.7, 1.7, and 1.2 kb that hybridized with the mouse Sm-C/IGF-I cDNA. Adult rat intestine, liver, and lung also contained these mRNAs but Sm-C/IGF-I mRNAs were not detected in adult rat brain. These findings provide direct support for prior observations that multiple tissues in the fetus synthesize immunoreactive Sm-C/IGF-I and imply a role for Sm-C/IGF-I in fetal development as well as postnatally. Multiple IGF-II mRNAs of estimated sizes 4.7, 3.9, 2.2, 1.75, and 1.2 kb were observed in fetal rat intestine, liver, lung, and brain. The 4.7- and 3.9-kb mRNAs were the major hybridizing IGF-II mRNAs in all fetal tissues. Higher abundance of IGF-II mRNAs in rat fetal tissues compared with adult tissues supports prior hypotheses, based on serum IGF-II concentrations, that IGF-II is predominantly a fetal somatomedin. IGF-II mRNAs are present, however, in some poly(A/sup +/) RNAs from adult rat tissues. The brain was the only tissue in the adult rat where the 4.7- and 3.9-kb IGF-II mRNAs were consistently detected. These findings suggest that a role for IGF-II in the adult rat, particularly in the central nervous system, cannot be excluded.

  9. Significance of abnormal serum binding of insulin-like growth factor II in the development of hypoglycemia in patients with non-islet-cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Daughaday, W.H.; Kapadia, M. )

    1989-09-01

    The authors reported that serum and tumor from a hypoglycemic patient with a fibrosarcoma contained insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), mostly in a large molecular form designated big IGF-II. They now describe two additional patients with non-islet-cell tumor with hypoglycemia (NICTH) whose sera contained big IGF-II. Removal of the tumor eliminated most of the big IGF-II from the sera of two patients. Because specific IGF-binding proteins modify the bioactivity of IGFs, the sizes of the endogenous IGF-binding protein complexes were determined after neutral gel filtration through Sephadex G-200. Normally about 75% of IGFs are carried as a ternary complex of 150 kDa consisting of IGF, a growth hormone (GH)-dependent IGF-binding protein, and an acid-labile complexing component. The three patients with NICTH completely lacked the 150-kDa complex. IGF-II was present as a 60-kDa complex with variable contributions of smaller complexes. In the immediate postoperative period, a 110-kDa complex appeared rather than the expected 150-kDa complex. Abnormal IGF-II binding may be important in NICTH because the 150-kDa complexes cross the capillary membrane poorly. The smaller complexes present in our patients' sera would be expected to enter interstitial fluid readily, and a 4- to 5-fold increase in the fraction of IGFs reaching the target cells would result.

  10. Increased expression of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene, IGF1R, in Wilms tumor is correlated with modulation of IGF1R promoter activity by the WT1 Wilms tumor gene product.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Re, G G; Drummond, I A; Sukhatme, V P; Rauscher, F J; Sens, D A; Garvin, A J; LeRoith, D; Roberts, C T

    1993-06-15

    Wilms tumor is a pediatric neoplasm that arises from the metanephric blastema. The expression of the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is often elevated in these tumors. Since many of the actions of IGF-II are mediated through activation of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), we have measured the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in normal kidney and in Wilms tumor samples using solution hybridization/RNase protection assays. IGF-IR mRNA levels in the tumors were 5.8-fold higher than in adjacent normal kidney tissue. Among the tumors themselves, the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in those containing heterologous stromal elements were 2-fold higher (P < 0.01) than in tumors without these elements. IGF-IR gene (designated IGF1R) expression in the tumors was inversely correlated with the expression of the Wilms tumor suppressor gene WT1, whose inactivation appears to be a key step in the etiology of Wilms tumor. Cotransfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with rat and human IGF-IR gene promoter constructs driving luciferase reporter genes and with WT1 expression vectors showed that the active WT1 gene product represses IGF-IR promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that underexpression, deletion, or mutation of WT1 may result in increased expression of the IGF-IR, whose activation by IGF-II may be an important aspect of the biology of Wilms tumor.

  11. Increased expression of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene, IGF1R, in Wilms tumor is correlated with modulation of IGF1R promoter activity by the WT1 Wilms tumor gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, H; Re, G G; Drummond, I A; Sukhatme, V P; Rauscher, F J; Sens, D A; Garvin, A J; LeRoith, D; Roberts, C T

    1993-01-01

    Wilms tumor is a pediatric neoplasm that arises from the metanephric blastema. The expression of the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is often elevated in these tumors. Since many of the actions of IGF-II are mediated through activation of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), we have measured the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in normal kidney and in Wilms tumor samples using solution hybridization/RNase protection assays. IGF-IR mRNA levels in the tumors were 5.8-fold higher than in adjacent normal kidney tissue. Among the tumors themselves, the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in those containing heterologous stromal elements were 2-fold higher (P < 0.01) than in tumors without these elements. IGF-IR gene (designated IGF1R) expression in the tumors was inversely correlated with the expression of the Wilms tumor suppressor gene WT1, whose inactivation appears to be a key step in the etiology of Wilms tumor. Cotransfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with rat and human IGF-IR gene promoter constructs driving luciferase reporter genes and with WT1 expression vectors showed that the active WT1 gene product represses IGF-IR promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that underexpression, deletion, or mutation of WT1 may result in increased expression of the IGF-IR, whose activation by IGF-II may be an important aspect of the biology of Wilms tumor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8390684

  12. Salinity and temperature variations reflecting on cellular PCNA, IGF-I and II expressions, body growth and muscle cellularity of a freshwater fish larvae.

    PubMed

    Martins, Y S; Melo, R M C; Campos-Junior, P H A; Santos, J C E; Luz, R K; Rizzo, E; Bazzoli, N

    2014-06-01

    The present study assessed the influence of salinity and temperature on body growth and on muscle cellularity of Lophiosilurus alexaxdri vitelinic larvae. Slightly salted environments negatively influenced body growth of freshwater fish larvae and we observed that those conditions notably act as an environmental influencer on muscle growth and on local expression of hypertrophia and hypeplasia markers (IGFs and PCNA). Furthermore, we could see that salinity tolerance for NaCl 4gl(-)(1) diminishes with increasing temperature, evidenced by variation in body and muscle growth, and by irregular morphology of the lateral skeletal muscle of larvae. We saw that an increase of both PCNA and autocrine IGF-II are correlated to an increase in fibre numbers and fibre diameter as the temperature increases and salinity diminishes. On the other hand, autocrine IGF-I follows the opposite way to the other biological parameters assessed, increasing as salinity increases and temperature diminishes, showing that this protein did not participate in muscle cellularity, but participating in molecular/cellular repair. Therefore, slightly salted environments may provide adverse conditions that cause some obstacles to somatic growth of this species, suggesting some osmotic expenditure with a salinity increment.

  13. Tumor Phenotype and Gene Expression during Early Mammary Tumor Development in Offspring Exposed to Alcohol in Utero

    PubMed Central

    Crismale-Gann, Catina; Stires, Hillary; Katz, Tiffany A.; Cohick, Wendie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol exposure in utero increases susceptibility to carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in adult offspring and causes tumors with a more malignant phenotype. The present study was conducted to identify changes early in tumor development that might lead to this outcome. Methods Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing 6.7% ethanol (alcohol), an isocaloric liquid diet without alcohol (pair-fed), or rat chow ad libitum (ad lib) from gestation day 7 until parturition. At birth, female progeny were cross-fostered to control dams. Pups were weaned at postnatal day (PND) 21 and fed rat chow ad libitum for the remainder of the experiment. Female offspring were administered N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 50 mg/kg body weight) on PND 50. Mammary glands were palpated weekly and offspring were euthanized at 16 weeks post-NMU injection. Results At 16 weeks post-NMU, tumor multiplicity was greater in alcohol-exposed offspring compared with control groups. Estrogen receptor-α (ER) mRNA expression was decreased in tumors from alcohol-exposed offspring and these animals developed more ER-negative tumors relative to the pair-fed group. Alcohol-exposed offspring also tended to develop more progesterone receptor (PR)-positive tumors. All tumors were HER2-negative. PR positivity was associated with higher Ki67 expression, suggesting that PR-positive tumors were more proliferative. Tumors from alcohol-exposed animals exhibited increased mRNA expression of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family members IGF-II and IGFBP-5. IGF-II and DNMT1 mRNA tended to be greater in the normal contralateral mammary glands of these animals. Conclusions These data indicate that alcohol exposure in utero may shift NMU-induced tumor development towards a more aggressive phenotype and that alterations in IGF-II expression may contribute to these changes. Additional studies should be aimed at epigenetic mechanisms that underlie IGF-II expression to further delineate

  14. Expression of growth factor and receptor mRNAs in skin epithelial cells following acute cutaneous injury.

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, H. N.; Galanopoulos, T.; Neville-Golden, J.; Kiritsy, C. P.; Lynch, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    We report that acute injury induces the expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptors in the epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. In situ hybridization analysis of skin biopsy specimens obtained after cutaneous injury in swine demonstrated the induction of the expression of transforming growth factor-alpha, its receptor, epidermal growth factor-R, acidic fibroblast growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor messenger RNAs in the skin epithelial cells of the wounded tissue. There was no significant expression in the epithelial cells of control, uninjured tissues. The expression levels were maximal during the period of active tissue repair (1 to 5 days after injury) and were totally suppressed upon the healing of the wounded tissues. In contrast, insulinlike growth factor-I, (IGF-I), IGF-I receptor, and IGF-II receptor messenger RNAs were expressed in the epithelial cells of both the control, uninjured tissues and in tissue specimens obtained after injury. There was no significant expression of IGF-II messenger RNA in the epithelial cells before or after injury. It seems that injury induces the coordinated expression of selective growth factor and growth factor receptor genes whose products contribute to the regulation of the complex processes involved in tissue repair and remodeling. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8386442

  15. Expression of the genes for insulin-like growth factors and their receptors in bone during skeletal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Roberts, C. T.; Leroith, D.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) are important regulators of skeletal growth. To determine whether the capacity to produce and respond to these growth factors changes during skeletal development, we measured the protein and mRNA levels for IGF-I, IGF-II, and their receptors (IGF-IR and IGF-IIR, respectively) in the tibia and femur of rats before and up to 28 mo after birth. The mRNA levels remained high during fetal development but fell after birth, reaching a nadir by 3-6 wk. This fall was most pronounced for IGF-II and IGF-IIR mRNA and least pronounced for IGF-I mRNA. However, after 6 wk, both IGF-I and IGF-IR mRNA levels recovered toward the levels observed at birth. In the prenatal bones, the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-II and IGF-IIR were stronger than the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-I and IGF-IR, although the content of IGF-I was three- to fivefold greater than that of IGF-II. IGF-II levels fell postnatally, whereas the IGF-I content rose after birth such that the ratio IGF-I/IGF-II continued to increase with age. We conclude that, during development, rat bone changes its capacity to produce and respond to IGFs with a progressive trend toward the dominance of IGF-I.

  16. Expression of the genes for insulin-like growth factors and their receptors in bone during skeletal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Harris, J.; Halloran, B. P.; Roberts, C. T.; Leroith, D.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) are important regulators of skeletal growth. To determine whether the capacity to produce and respond to these growth factors changes during skeletal development, we measured the protein and mRNA levels for IGF-I, IGF-II, and their receptors (IGF-IR and IGF-IIR, respectively) in the tibia and femur of rats before and up to 28 mo after birth. The mRNA levels remained high during fetal development but fell after birth, reaching a nadir by 3-6 wk. This fall was most pronounced for IGF-II and IGF-IIR mRNA and least pronounced for IGF-I mRNA. However, after 6 wk, both IGF-I and IGF-IR mRNA levels recovered toward the levels observed at birth. In the prenatal bones, the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-II and IGF-IIR were stronger than the signals for the mRNAs of IGF-I and IGF-IR, although the content of IGF-I was three- to fivefold greater than that of IGF-II. IGF-II levels fell postnatally, whereas the IGF-I content rose after birth such that the ratio IGF-I/IGF-II continued to increase with age. We conclude that, during development, rat bone changes its capacity to produce and respond to IGFs with a progressive trend toward the dominance of IGF-I.

  17. The bovine mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. The role of arginine residues in mannose 6-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Dahms, N M; Rose, P A; Molkentin, J D; Zhang, Y; Brzycki, M A

    1993-03-15

    The extracytoplasmic region of the bovine cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF-II receptor) consists of 15 homologous repeating domains, each of which is approximately 147 residues in length. The receptor contains two high affinity mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) binding sites and our recent studies (Westlund, B., Dahms, N. M., and Kornfeld, S. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 23233-23239) have localized these two binding sites to domains 1-3 and 7-11. To further define the location of the Man-6-P binding sites and to determine the role of specific arginine residues in Man-6-P binding, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create truncated soluble forms of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in conjunction with either conservative (Lys) or nonconservative (Ala) replacement of arginine residues. These mutants were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells and assayed for their ability to bind phosphomannosyl residues by affinity chromatography. Analysis of the ligand binding activity of carboxyl-terminal truncated forms of the receptor's extracytoplasmic region demonstrated that the second Man-6-P binding site is contained within domains 7-9. Substitution of Arg435 in domain 3 of the amino-terminal binding site and Arg1334 in domain 9 of the second binding site results in a dramatic loss of ligand binding activity. However, substitutions at positions 435 and/or 1334 did not affect the secretion, glycosylation, or immunoreactivity of these truncated proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that Arg435 and Arg1334 are essential components of the M6P/IGF-II receptor's high affinity Man-6-P binding sites.

  18. [Part II: Recognising facial expressions].

    PubMed

    Krolak-Salmon, P; Hénaff, M A; Bertrand, O; Vighetto, A; Mauguière, F

    2006-11-01

    In this second part, we address particularly the question of the neural mechanisms and structures involved in the recognition of facial emotional expressions that are crucial in social cognition. Emotion recognition in others can be critically impaired in some neurodegenerative and neurovascular diseases. That dysfunction sometimes correlated to disabling behavioural disorders and interpersonal communication impairment must be further understood. The results of a series of scalp and intracranial event related potential recordings, as well as recent advances in the literature, are reported. ERPs to facial emotional expressions were thus recorded in multiple subcortical and cortical areas in drug refractory epileptical patients implanted with depth electrodes. The roles of amygdala, insula and prefrontal cortex located at crossroads between perceptive analysis and emotional conceptual knowledge are particularly underlined. Altogether, these studies demonstrate that facial expressions are widely processed in space and time, some structures reacting very early and automatically, others providing a sustained reaction depending on the attention.

  19. Receptors for insulin-like growth factors I and II in rat gastrointestinal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Laburthe, M.; Rouyer-Ressard, C.; Gammeltoft, S. Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen )

    1988-03-01

    Distinct receptors for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) have been characterized in rat intestinal epithelium using {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-I and {sup 125}I-labeled IGF-II. In jejunal epithelial plasma membranes, IGF-I receptors were observed with a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 7.2 nM and a binding capacity of 0.56 pmol/mg protein. Distinct IGF-II receptors were also found with a K{sub d} of 9.5 nM and a binding capacity of 2.61 pmol/mg protein. For IGF-I receptors the following order of affinity was observed: IGF-I > IGF-II > insulin > proinsulin. IGF-II receptors recognize IGF-II with a 20-fold higher affinity than IGF-I and display no cross-reactivity with insulin and proinsulin. Affinity labeling of intestinal membranes also discriminates between the two types of receptors, revealing a radioligand-receptor complex of relative molecular weight (M{sub r}) 130,000 using {sup 125}I-IGF-I and 250,000 for {sup 125}I-IGF-II under reducing conditions. Separation of proliferative crypt cells from mature villus cells in the small intestine makes it possible to show that a gradient of IGF receptors is present along the crypt-villus axis. {sup 125}I-IGF-I and {sup 125}I-IGF-II binding is 4.0- and 1.8-fold higher in crypt cells than in villus cells, respectively. Specific {sup 125}I-IGF binding is detectable throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The level of IGF binding is similar in stomach, small intestine, and cecum, but higher values are observed in colon.

  20. Radioimmunological determination of insulinlike growth factors I and II in normal subjects and in patients with growth disorders and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Zapf, J; Walter, H; Froesch, E R

    1981-01-01

    Serum levels of immunoreactive insulinlike growth factors (IGF) I and II were determined by a modified IGF I and a new IGF II radioimmunoassay in normal children and adults, and in patients with acromegaly, isolated growth hormone deficiency, and extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia. Serum samples were gel filtered by a simple routine procedure at acidic pH to dissociate and separate IGF from the IGF carrier protein. Mean immunoreactive IGF I levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF II) were 193 +/- 58 ng/ml in normal adult subjects, 712 +/- 245 ng/ml in acromegalic patients and 24 +/- 14 ng/ml in patients with isolated growth hormone deficiency. The lack of growth hormone alone, irrespective of an otherwise normal hormonal status, appears to be responsible for the drastic decrease of IGF I levels. Oversecretion of growth hormone does not increase the levels of immunoreactive IGF II: mean levels (+/- SD; corrected for crossreactivity of IGF I) in normal and acromegalic subjects are virtually identical (647 +/- 126 and 641 +/- 189 ng/ml, respectively). Apparently, normal growth hormone levels stimulate IGF II production already maximally. However in growth hormone deficiency immunoreactive IGF II is significantly decreased (252 +/- 99 ng/ml). Thus, IGF II, like IGF I, is growth hormone dependent. But in contrast to IGF I, the growth hormone dependence of IGF II seems to become apparent only at subnormal growth hormone levels. In normal children IGF I is age dependent: it is low in newborn cord sera (51 +/- 20 ng/ml) and gradually rises into the adult range with increasing age. At the onset of and during puberty mean IGF I levels lie above prepubertal values. In contrast, IGF II levels in normal children are independent of age and pubertal stage beyond the first year of life, whereas newborns have significantly lower IGF II values. Hypoglycemia resulting from extrapancreatic tumors is not associated with increased immunoreactive IGF I or II levels. IGF I is

  1. WT1 expression is increased in primary fibroblasts derived from Dupuytren's disease tissues.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Justin; Raykha, Christina; Charles, Daevina; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Dupuytren's disease (DD) is a fibroproliferative and contractile fibrosis of the palmar fascia that, like all other heritable fibroses, is currently incurable. While DD is invariably benign, it exhibits some molecular similarities to malignant tumours, including increased levels of ß-catenin, onco-fetal fibronectin, periostin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. To gain additional insights into the pathogenesis of DD, we have assessed the expression of WT1, encoding Wilm's tumour 1, an established tumour biomarker that is syntenic with IGF2, the gene encoding IGF-II in humans. We found that WT1 expression is robustly and consistently up regulated in primary fibroblasts derived from the fibrotic palmar fascia of patients with DD (DD cells), whereas syngeneic fibroblasts derived from the macroscopically unaffected palmar fascia in these patients and allogeneic fibroblasts derived from normal palmar fascia exhibited very low or undetectable WT1 transcript levels. WT1 immunoreactivity was evident in a subset of cells in the fibrotic palmar fascia of patients with DD, but not in macroscopically unaffected palmar fascia. These findings identify WT1 expression as a novel biomarker of fibrotic palmar fascia and are consistent with the hypothesis that the pathogeneses of DD and malignant tumours have molecular similarities.

  2. Expression of insulin receptor (IR) A and B isoforms, IGF-IR, and IR/IGF-IR hybrid receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells and their role in cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beneit, N; Fernández-García, C E; Martín-Ventura, J L; Perdomo, L; Escribano, Ó; Michel, J B; García-Gómez, G; Fernández, S; Díaz-Castroverde, S; Egido, J; Gómez-Hernández, A; Benito, M

    2016-12-01

    Abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a major contributor to the development of atherosclerotic process. In a previous work, we demonstrated that the insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) and its association with the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) confer a proliferative advantage to VSMCs. However, the role of IR and IGF-IR in VSMC migration remains poorly understood. Wound healing assays were performed in VSMCs bearing IR (IRLoxP(+/+) VSMCs), or not (IR(-/-) VSMCs), expressing IRA (IRA VSMCs) or expressing IRB (IRB VSMCs). To study the role of IR isoforms and IGF-IR in experimental atherosclerosis, we used ApoE(-/-) mice at 8, 12, 18 and 24 weeks of age. Finally, we analyzed the mRNA expression of total IR, IRB isoform, IGF-IR and IGFs by qRT-PCR in the medial layer of human aortas. IGF-I strongly induced migration of the four cell lines through IGF-IR. In contrast, insulin and IGF-II only caused a significant increase of IRA VSMC migration which might be favored by the formation of IRA/IGF-IR receptors. Additionally, a specific IGF-IR inhibitor, picropodophyllin, completely abolished insulin- and IGF-II-induced migration in IRB, but not in IRA VSMCs. A significant increase of IRA and IGF-IR, and VSMC migration were observed in fibrous plaques from 24-week-old ApoE(-/-) mice. Finally, we observed a marked increase of IGF-IR, IGF-I and IGF-II in media from fatty streaks as compared with both healthy aortas and fibrolipidic lesions, favoring the ability of medial VSMCs to migrate into the intima. Our data suggest that overexpression of IGF-IR or IRA isoform, as homodimers or as part of IRA/IGF-IR hybrid receptors, confers a stronger migratory capability to VSMCs as might occur in early stages of atherosclerotic process.

  3. High-Affinity Ligand Binding by Wild-Type:Mutant Heteromeric Complexes of the Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Michelle A.; Kreiling, Jodi L.; Byrd, James C.; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) has diverse ligand-binding properties contributing to its roles in lysosome biogenesis and growth suppression. Optimal receptor binding and internalization of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-bearing ligands requires a dimeric structure leading to bivalent high-affinity binding, presumably mediated by cooperation between sites on both subunits. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binds to a single site on each monomer. It is hypothesized that IGF-II binding to cognate sites on each monomer occurs independently, but bivalent Man-6-P ligand binding requires cooperative contributions from sites on both monomers. To test this hypothesis, we co-immunoprecipitated differentially epitope-tagged soluble mini-receptors and assessed ligand binding. Pairing of wild-type and point-mutated IGF-II binding sites between two dimerized mini-receptors had no effect on the function of the contralateral binding site, indicating IGF-II binding to each side of the dimer is independent and manifests no intersubunit effects. As expected, heterodimeric receptors composed of a wild-type monomer and a mutant bearing two Man-6-P-binding knockout mutations form functional IGF-II binding sites. In contrast to prediction, such heterodimeric receptors also bind Man-6-P–based ligands with high affinity, and the amount of binding can be attributed entirely to the immunoprecipitated wild-type receptors. Anchoring of both C-terminal ends of the heterodimer produces optimal binding of both IGF-II and Man-6-P ligands. Thus, IGF-II binds independently to both subunits of the dimeric M6P/IGF2R. Although wild-type/mutant heterooligomers from readily when mixed, it appears that multivalent Man-6-P ligands bind preferentially to wild-type sites, possibly by cross-bridging receptors within clusters of immobilized receptors. PMID:19236480

  4. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  5. Endocytosis of receptor-bound insulin-like growth factor II is enhanced by mannose-6-phosphate in IM9 cells.

    PubMed

    Polychronakos, C; Piscina, R

    1988-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), and glycoproteins containing mannose 6-phosphate (M6P), bind to two different sites of the same receptor molecule (Morgan et al, Nature 329:301, 1987). To study the interactions between the two ligands on their common receptor in intact cells, we examined the effect of free M6P on IGF-II binding and endocytosis in the IM9 human lymphoblastoid cell line. M6P, up to a 3 mM concentration, had no effect on the binding of IGF-II to the cell surface receptor of intact IM9 cells at 4 degrees C. By contrast, when IM9 cells were incubated with 125I-IGF-II at 37 degrees C, 1 mM M6P increased cell-associated radioactivity by twofold. The increase was resistant to acid wash at 4 degrees C, and therefore assumed to represent endocytosed IGF-II. Acid-washable radioactivity was no different, confirming that, in intact cells, M6P does not affect IGF-II surface binding. In addition, preincubation of cells with M6P at 37 degrees C for up to 3 hours did not change the abundance of receptor on the cell surface, as measured by a subsequent 4 degrees C binding assay. We conclude that M6P causes a shift of IGF-II-occupied receptors form the cell surface to intracellular locations without affecting surface binding of this ligand in IM9 cells. The effect could be produced by the binding of M6P itself, or by the displacement of endogenous phosphomannosylated ligands.

  6. Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene expression in rat decidual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Rauscher, F J; Bondy, C

    1993-09-01

    The Wilm's tumor suppressor gene (WT1) encodes a zinc-finger containing transcription factor that is selectively expressed in the developing urogenital tract, where it is thought to play a role in the differentiation of these tissues. We have used immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization to study WT1 expression in the rat uterus during normal development and pregnancy from 0 to 20 days post coitum (p.c.). WT1 mRNA was abundant in uterine stroma from juvenile rats, but was much less abundant in uterine tissue from sexually mature rats; WT1 expression is not affected by ovariectomy or by treatment with estradiol or estradiol plus progesterone. WT1 gene was highly expressed, however, in the endometrial cells of early pregnancy. On day 6 p.c. WT1 mRNA was detected in anti-mesometrial decidual cells, and WT1 immunoreactivity was concentrated in the nuclei of these cells. All cells of fully-developed deciduoma at 7-8 days p.c. demonstrated WT1 expression. WT1 was not detected in trophoblast/placental tissues but remained abundant in the decidua basalis until parturition. The expression of WT1 was compared with insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) and its receptor in the decidual since it has been shown that IGF-II gene transcription is repressed by WT1 in vitro. However, no spatiotemporal correlation in the expression of these three genes was found in differentiation of the rat decidua. In summary, these data suggest a role for WT1 in decidualization, since its expression is activated during the differentiation of uterine stromal cells into decidual cells.

  7. Exogenous recombinant bovine growth hormone stimulates growth and hepatic IGF expression in shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Carlin M; Small, Brian C

    2015-02-01

    Sturgeon are a unique fish for physiological research as they are long-lived, slow-growing, and late-maturing. Furthermore, sturgeon growth hormones appear to share greater structural and molecular similarity with mammalian somatotropins than teleostean somatotropins. In this study, changes in insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II mRNA expression and corresponding whole-body growth and composition following 6 weeks of bi-weekly recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH) administration in shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus were evaluated. Fish were injected intraperitoneally with 240 μg rbGH/g body weight or a sesame oil sham. Hepatic IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA abundance was significantly higher (P≤0.02) in rbGH-treated fish, as were length (P<0.001) and weight gain (P<0.001). In addition, proximate whole-body analysis demonstrated a significant (P<0.05) increase in protein composition of rbGH-treated fish versus sham-treated fish. There were no significant differences in whole-body moisture, lipid, or ash between the two treatments. These results demonstrate functional roles for GH and IGFs in the promotion of lean growth within this ancient fish species and support the view that the functional effects of GH on hepatic IGF-I expression and somatic growth are conserved from chondostrean to teleostean fishes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor II receptors by growth hormone and insulin in rat adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Loennroth, P.; Assmundsson, K.; Eden, S.; Enberg, G.; Gause, I.; Hall, K.; Smith, U.

    1987-06-01

    The acute and long-term effects of growth hormone (GH) on the binding of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) were evaluated in adipose cells from hypophysectomized rats given replacement therapy with thyroxine and hydrocortisone and in cells from their sham-operated littermates. After the cells were incubated with insulin and/or GH, the recycling of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-II receptors was metabolically inhibited by treating the cells with KCN. IGF-II binding was 100 +/- 20% higher in cells from GH-deficient animals when compared with sham-operated controls. These GH-deficient cells also showed an increased sensitivity for insulin as compared with control cells (the EC/sub 50/ for insulin was 0.06 ng/ml in GH-deficient cells and 0.3 ng/ml in control cells.). However, the maximal incremental effect of insulin on IGH-II binding was reduced approx. = 27% by hypophysectomy. GH added to the incubation medium increased the number of IGF-II binding sites by 100 +/- 18% in cells from hypophysectomized animals. This increase was rapidly induced, but the time course was slower than that for the stimulatory effect of insulin. Half-maximal effect of GH on IGF-II binding was obtained at approx. = 30 ng/ml. Thus, GH added in vitro exerted a rapid insulin-like effect on the number of IGH-II receptors. GH also appears to play a regulating role for maintaining the cellular number of IGH-II receptors and, in addition, modulates the stimulatory effect of insulin on IGF-II binding.

  9. Further studies on aberrant gene expression associated with arsenic-induced malignant transformation in rat liver TRL1215 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Qian Xun; Yu, Limei; Xie Yaxiong; Boos, Jennifer; Qu Wei; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-11-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure of rat liver epithelial TRL1215 cells induced malignant transformation in a concentration-dependent manner. To further define the molecular events of these arsenic-transformed cells (termed CAsE cells), gene expressions associated with arsenic carcinogenesis or influenced by methylation were examined. Real-time RT-PCR showed that at carcinogenic concentrations (500 nM, and to a less extent 250 nM of arsenite), the expressions of {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP), Wilm's tumor protein-1 (WT-1), c-jun, c-myc, H-ras, c-met and hepatocyte growth factor, heme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione-S-transferase-{pi} and metallothionein-1 (MT) were increased between 3 to 12-fold, while expressions of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1) were essentially abolished. These changes were not significant at the non-carcinogenic concentration (125 nM), except for IGF-II. The positive cell-cycle regulators cyclin D1 and PCNA were overexpressed in CAsE cells, while the negative regulators p21 and p16 were suppressed. Western-blot confirmed increases in AFP, WT-1, cyclin D1 and decreases in p16 and p21 protein in CAsE cells. The CAsE cells over-expressed MT but the demethylating agent 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC, 2.5 {mu}M, 72 h) stimulated further MT expression. 5-Aza-deoxycytidine restored the loss of expression of p21 in CAsE cells to control levels, but did not restore the expression of p16, IGF-II, or FGFR1, indicating the loss of expression of these genes is due to factors other than DNA methylation changes. Overall, an intricate variety of gene expression changes occur in arsenic-induced malignant transformation of liver cells including oncogene activation and alterations in expression of genes critical to growth regulation.

  10. Cartilage–Specific Over-Expression of CCN Family Member 2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2/CTGF) Stimulates Insulin-Like Growth Factor Expression and Bone Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Nao; Hattori, Takako; Itoh, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Eriko; Yao, Mayumi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Previously we showed that CCN family member 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) promotes the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of growth cartilage cells in vitro. To elucidate the specific role and molecular mechanism of CCN2 in cartilage development in vivo, in the present study we generated transgenic mice overexpressing CCN2 and analyzed them with respect to cartilage and bone development. Transgenic mice were generated expressing a ccn2/lacZ fusion gene in cartilage under the control of the 6 kb-Col2a1-enhancer/promoter. Changes in cartilage and bone development were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically and also by micro CT. Primary chondrocytes as well as limb bud mesenchymal cells were cultured and analyzed for changes in expression of cartilage–related genes, and non-transgenic chondrocytes were treated in culture with recombinant CCN2. Newborn transgenic mice showed extended length of their long bones, increased content of proteoglycans and collagen II accumulation. Micro-CT analysis of transgenic bones indicated increases in bone thickness and mineral density. Chondrocyte proliferation was enhanced in the transgenic cartilage. In in vitro short-term cultures of transgenic chondrocytes, the expression of col2a1, aggrecan and ccn2 genes was substantially enhanced; and in long-term cultures the expression levels of these genes were further enhanced. Also, in vitro chondrogenesis was strongly enhanced. IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA levels were elevated in transgenic chondrocytes, and treatment of non-transgenic chondrocytes with recombinant CCN2 stimulated the expression of these mRNA. The addition of CCN2 to non-transgenic chondrocytes induced the phosphorylation of IGFR, and ccn2-overexpressing chondrocytes showed enhanced phosphorylation of IGFR. Our data indicates that the observed effects of CCN2 may be mediated in part by CCN2-induced overexpression of IGF-I and IGF-II. These findings indicate that CCN2-overexpression in

  11. Cartilage-specific over-expression of CCN family member 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) stimulates insulin-like growth factor expression and bone growth.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Nao; Hattori, Takako; Itoh, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Eriko; Yao, Mayumi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Previously we showed that CCN family member 2/connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) promotes the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of growth cartilage cells in vitro. To elucidate the specific role and molecular mechanism of CCN2 in cartilage development in vivo, in the present study we generated transgenic mice overexpressing CCN2 and analyzed them with respect to cartilage and bone development. Transgenic mice were generated expressing a ccn2/lacZ fusion gene in cartilage under the control of the 6 kb-Col2a1-enhancer/promoter. Changes in cartilage and bone development were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically and also by micro CT. Primary chondrocytes as well as limb bud mesenchymal cells were cultured and analyzed for changes in expression of cartilage-related genes, and non-transgenic chondrocytes were treated in culture with recombinant CCN2. Newborn transgenic mice showed extended length of their long bones, increased content of proteoglycans and collagen II accumulation. Micro-CT analysis of transgenic bones indicated increases in bone thickness and mineral density. Chondrocyte proliferation was enhanced in the transgenic cartilage. In in vitro short-term cultures of transgenic chondrocytes, the expression of col2a1, aggrecan and ccn2 genes was substantially enhanced; and in long-term cultures the expression levels of these genes were further enhanced. Also, in vitro chondrogenesis was strongly enhanced. IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA levels were elevated in transgenic chondrocytes, and treatment of non-transgenic chondrocytes with recombinant CCN2 stimulated the expression of these mRNA. The addition of CCN2 to non-transgenic chondrocytes induced the phosphorylation of IGFR, and ccn2-overexpressing chondrocytes showed enhanced phosphorylation of IGFR. Our data indicates that the observed effects of CCN2 may be mediated in part by CCN2-induced overexpression of IGF-I and IGF-II. These findings indicate that CCN2-overexpression in transgenic

  12. Pomelo II: finding differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Edward R; Diaz-Uriarte, Ramón

    2009-07-01

    Pomelo II (http://pomelo2.bioinfo.cnio.es) is an open-source, web-based, freely available tool for the analysis of gene (and protein) expression and tissue array data. Pomelo II implements: permutation-based tests for class comparisons (t-test, ANOVA) and regression; survival analysis using Cox model; contingency table analysis with Fisher's exact test; linear models (of which t-test and ANOVA are especial cases) that allow additional covariates for complex experimental designs and use empirical Bayes moderated statistics. Permutation-based and Cox model analysis use parallel computing, which permits taking advantage of multicore CPUs and computing clusters. Access to, and further analysis of, additional biological information and annotations (PubMed references, Gene Ontology terms, KEGG and Reactome pathways) are available either for individual genes (from clickable links in tables and figures) or sets of genes. The source code is available, allowing for extending and reusing the software. A comprehensive test suite is also available, and covers both the user interface and the numerical results. The possibility of including additional covariates, parallelization of computation, open-source availability of the code and comprehensive testing suite make Pomelo II a unique tool.

  13. Pomelo II: finding differentially expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Edward R.; Diaz-Uriarte, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Pomelo II (http://pomelo2.bioinfo.cnio.es) is an open-source, web-based, freely available tool for the analysis of gene (and protein) expression and tissue array data. Pomelo II implements: permutation-based tests for class comparisons (t-test, ANOVA) and regression; survival analysis using Cox model; contingency table analysis with Fisher's exact test; linear models (of which t-test and ANOVA are especial cases) that allow additional covariates for complex experimental designs and use empirical Bayes moderated statistics. Permutation-based and Cox model analysis use parallel computing, which permits taking advantage of multicore CPUs and computing clusters. Access to, and further analysis of, additional biological information and annotations (PubMed references, Gene Ontology terms, KEGG and Reactome pathways) are available either for individual genes (from clickable links in tables and figures) or sets of genes. The source code is available, allowing for extending and reusing the software. A comprehensive test suite is also available, and covers both the user interface and the numerical results. The possibility of including additional covariates, parallelization of computation, open-source availability of the code and comprehensive testing suite make Pomelo II a unique tool. PMID:19435879

  14. Activation of peripheral blood neutrophils and lymphocytes by human procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Vĕtvicka, V; Fusek, M

    1994-07-01

    Cathepsin D, a lysosomal aspartic proteinase, is well known to be overexpressed and secreted in the form of its zymogen by many types of human breast cancer tissues. In the cell lines derived from these tissues, cathepsin D functions as an autocrine mitogen, and it was suggested that its secretion might pose some physiological functions. Recently we have identified the presence of procathepsin D in human breast milk and similar findings were reported for bovine milk which imply also some physiological function. Thus, we have tested the influence of procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II on the expression of CD11a, CD11b, FcRI, CD62L, and HLA-DR surface determinants on neutrophils and lymphocytes. We have used procathepsin D purified from the secretions of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 and commercially available IGF II. Our results showed that both studied factors significantly influence the expression of tested surface molecules.

  15. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-03

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  16. Characterization of GHRs, IGFs and MSTNs, and analysis of their expression relationships in blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Cong; Liu, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Wei-Min; Tong, Jin-Gou; Luo, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Gao, Ze-Xia

    2014-02-10

    In order to test the hypothesis that the expression levels of GH/IGF axis genes would be negatively related to the expression of the myostatin genes in fish species, we cloned six growth regulating genes including growth hormone receptors-1/-2 (GHRs), insulin-like growth factors-I/-II (IGFs) and myostatins-a/-b (MSTNs) from blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala). The contents of mRNA transcripts for the six genes were determined in the different tissues of adult and developmental stages for the embryonic and larval periods. The results of quantitative real-time PCR showed that GHRs, IGFs and MSTNs were widely expressed in the tissues we tested, with the relatively lower expression levels in mesonephros, gonad and spleen for the six genes. The analysis of expression correlation coefficients among these six genes showed that GHR 1, GHR 2 and MSTN b were correlated with each other in adult tissues (P<0.01). For the developmental stages, GHR 1 had a similar expression pattern to GHR 2 during the examined periods, both with the highest expression levels at 160 hpf (hours post-fertilization) (P<0.05). IGF-II had higher expression levels than that of IGF-I before 400 hpf (P<0.05), while IGF-I was active after 52 hpf. The maximum of MSTN a and MSTN b mRNA levels were at 24 hpf and 400 hpf, respectively. The analysis of expression correlation coefficients showed that GHR 1, GHR 2, IGF-I, IGF-II and MSTN b were positively correlated with each other during embryonic development (P<0.01). The results from this study suggested that the relationship between GH/IGF axis genes and MSTNs was complex and not absolutely negative correlated in fish species.

  17. Dexamethasone decreases insulin-like growth factor-I and -II via a glucocorticoid receptor dependent mechanism in developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yangzheng; Famuyide, Mobolaji; Bhatt, Abhay J

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex) causes neurodegeneration in developing brain. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and -II (IGF-II) are potent neurotrophic and differentiation factors and play key roles in the regulation of growth and development of CNS. Current project evaluated the effects of Dex on IGF-I and -II in developing rat brains. Sprague-Dawley rat pups in each litter were divided into vehicle (n=230) or Dex-treated (n=234) groups. Rat pups in the Dex group received one of the 3 different regimens of i.p. Dex: tapering doses (DexTD) on postnatal days (PD) 3 to PD 6 or repeated doses on PD 4 to PD 6 or single dose on PD 6. To quantify the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) blockade effect, rat pups in the DexTD group on PD 3 and 5 received vehicle or RU486 (GR blocker, 60 mg/kg) s.c., twenty minutes prior to Dex treatment. Dex decreased the gain of body and brain weight while RU486 inhibited these effects. RU486 also prevented the DexTD-induced increase in caspase-3 activity and reduction in IGF-I and -II proteins. Compared to the vehicle, the expression of mRNA of IGF-I and -II decreased at 24 h after DexTD treatment, while RU486 prevented this decrease on IGF-II but not IGF-I. Our findings indicate that Dex via GR decreases IGF-I and -II and causes neurodegeneration in the neonatal rat brain.

  18. Molecular characterization and transcriptional regulation by GH and GnRH of insulin-like growth factors I and II in white seabream (Diplodus sargus).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Laura; Ortiz-Delgado, Juan Bosco; Manchado, Manuel

    2016-03-10

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II are key regulators of development, growth and reproduction in fish. In the present study we have cloned and characterized the cDNA and genomic sequences of IGF-I and IGF-II in the white seabream (Diplodus sargus). The igf1 and igf2 genes were encoded putatively by five and four exons, respectively. Moreover, the 5'-flanking upstream region of the igf1 gene contained highly conserved regulatory elements including HNF-1α, HNF-3β, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and the TATA box. The full-length cDNAs were 1225 and 1666 nucleotides long for igf1 and igf2, respectively. Sequence analysis identified the A-E domains as well as three spliced forms involving the E domain in exons 3-5. ORF identities were higher than 83% with respect to other fish orthologs. Expression analysis demonstrated that igf1 and its spliced forms were mostly expressed in liver, whereas the igf2 was expressed ubiquitously not detecting significant differences among the ten tissues analyzed. Hormonal treatments using the porcine GH demonstrated a sharply increase of both igf1 and igf2 mRNA levels in liver and gills at 30 min and 1h after injection. In the gonads, igf1 mRNA levels increased steadily with testis and ovary maturation. In contrast, igf2 transcript amounts were higher in immature stages (S1-S2). Hormonal treatments using GH and GnRH demonstrated that igf1 and igf2 expression were upregulated in the gonads. Overall, these data demonstrate that IGF-I and IGF-II are locally expressed in several tissues and regulated by key hormones of the somatotropic and gonadotropic axes.

  19. Expression of dynamin II in odontoblast during mouse tooth development.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Baik-Dong; Park, Jin-Ju; Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Duk; Lim, Do-Seon; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Cho, Yong-Ick; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2011-08-01

    Odontoblasts secrete a collagen-based matrix and release numerous membrane-bound matrix vesicles, which are involved in dentin formation during tooth development. Dynamin II is a GTPase protein that contributes a variety of vesicular budding events, such as endocytotic membrane fission, caveolae internalization and protein trafficking in the Golgi apparatus. However, the expression and function of dynamin II in odontoblasts has not been reported. Therefore, this study examined the expression and possible role of dynamin II in odontoblasts during tooth development and mineralization. The levels of mRNA and protein expression in MDPC23 cells were significantly high at the early stages of differentiation and then decreased gradually thereafter. Immunohistochemistry showed that dynamin II was not expressed near the region of the odontoblasts at embryonic day 17 (E17) and E21. However, dynamin II was expressed strongly in the odontoblast layer at postnatal day 1 (PN1) and decreased gradually at PN3 and PN5. In addition, at PN15 in the functional stage, the dynamin II protein was also expressed in the odontoblast process as well as adjacent to the nuclear region. In conclusion, dynamin II may be involved in the transport of vesicles containing collageneous and non-collageneous proteins for dentin formation in odontoblast, suggesting that it is a good nanomolecule as a candidate to regulate the secretion of collagen on the bone and other nano material.

  20. A Novel Approach to Identify Two Distinct Receptor Binding Surfaces of Insulin-like Growth Factor II*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Ong, Shee Chee; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Forbes, Briony E.

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the residues important for the interaction of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) with the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin, to which IGF-II is homologous, is proposed to cross-link opposite halves of the IR dimer through two receptor binding surfaces, site 1 and site 2. In the present study we have analyzed the contribution of IGF-II residues equivalent to insulin's two binding surfaces toward the interaction of IGF-II with the IGF-1R and IR. Four “site 1” and six “site 2” analogues were produced and analyzed in terms of IGF-1R and IR binding and activation. The results show that Val43, Phe28, and Val14 (equivalent to site 1) are critical to IGF-1R and IR binding, whereas mutation to alanine of Gln18 affects only IGF-1R and not IR binding. Alanine substitutions at Glu12, Asp15, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 analogues resulted in significant (>2-fold) decreases in affinity for both the IGF-1R and IR. Furthermore, taking a novel approach using a monomeric, single-chain minimized IGF-1R we have defined a distinct second binding surface formed by Glu12, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 that potentially engages the IGF-1R at one or more of the FnIII domains. PMID:19139090

  1. HTLV-1 p30II: selective repressor of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Green, Patrick L

    2004-11-24

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 pX ORF II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II whose roles are beginning to be defined in the virus life cycle. Previous studies indicate the importance of these viral proteins in the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads and persist in an animal model of HTLV-1 infection. Intriguing new studies indicate that p30II is a multifunctional regulator that differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and specifically binds and represses tax/rex mRNA nuclear export. A new study characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression using comprehensive human gene arrays. Interestingly, p30II is an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively favoring the expression of regulatory gene pathways important to T lymphocytes. These new findings suggest that HTLV-1, which is associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, uses p30II to selectively repress cellular and viral gene expression to favor the survival of cellular targets ultimately resulting in leukemogenesis.

  2. Probing Receptor Specificity by Sampling the Conformational Space of the Insulin-like Growth Factor II C-domain*

    PubMed Central

    Hexnerová, Rozálie; Křížková, Květoslava; Fábry, Milan; Sieglová, Irena; Kedrová, Kateřina; Collinsová, Michaela; Ullrichová, Pavlína; Srb, Pavel; Williams, Christopher; Crump, Matthew P.; Tošner, Zdeněk; Jiráček, Jiří; Veverka, Václav; Žáková, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factors I and II are closely related protein hormones. Their distinct evolution has resulted in different yet overlapping biological functions with insulin becoming a key regulator of metabolism, whereas insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I/II are major growth factors. Insulin and IGFs cross-bind with different affinities to closely related insulin receptor isoforms A and B (IR-A and IR-B) and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor (IGF-1R). Identification of structural determinants in IGFs and insulin that trigger their specific signaling pathways is of increasing importance in designing receptor-specific analogs with potential therapeutic applications. Here, we developed a straightforward protocol for production of recombinant IGF-II and prepared six IGF-II analogs with IGF-I-like mutations. All modified molecules exhibit significantly reduced affinity toward IR-A, particularly the analogs with a Pro-Gln insertion in the C-domain. Moreover, one of the analogs has enhanced binding affinity for IGF-1R due to a synergistic effect of the Pro-Gln insertion and S29N point mutation. Consequently, this analog has almost a 10-fold higher IGF-1R/IR-A binding specificity in comparison with native IGF-II. The established IGF-II purification protocol allowed for cost-effective isotope labeling required for a detailed NMR structural characterization of IGF-II analogs that revealed a link between the altered binding behavior of selected analogs and conformational rearrangement of their C-domains. PMID:27510031

  3. Effects of hyaluronan, BSA, and serum on bovine embryo in vitro development, ultrastructure, and gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Palasz, A T; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Beltran-Breña, P; Perez-Garnelo, S; Martinez, M F; Gutierrez-Adan, A; De la Fuente, J

    2006-12-01

    Effects of hyaluronan (HA), BSA, and FCS on in vitro development, ultrastructure, and mRNA transcription of four developmentally important genes: apoptosis (Bax), oxidative stress (SOX), growth factor (IGF-II), and cell-to-cell adhesion (Ecad) were examined. Two biological origin HA, Hylartil and Hyonate and one produced by fermentation (f-HA) MAP-5 were tested. Embryos were cultured in SOF medium with 0.4% BSA or with 0.4% BSA and 10% FCS. HA was added 96 hr post insemination (pi) to half of the embryos from each culture group. Embryo development was not affected by either HA preparation, however, hatching rates were higher in Hyalartil and MAP-5 than in control and Hyonate (P < 0.05). There was no effect of HA on number of blastocysts developed in SOF + BSA. However, more blastocysts developed in SOF + BSA + f-HA than in SOF + BSA + FCS or with BSA + FCS + f-HA. HA added to SOF + BSA, increased level of expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-II and decreased the levels of expression of BAX, SOX, and Ecad (P < 0.05). Presence of FCS increased the levels of SOX and decreased the level of IGF-II (P < 0.05) and the addition of f-HA to SOF containing FCS showed no effect on the level of transcription of any analyzed genes. The fine structure of embryos cultured with f-HA irrespective of protein sources used was clearly improved. In summary, f-HA added 96 hr pi to SOF supplemented with BSA but not FCS improved development, molecular composition and fine structure of bovine embryos.

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of insulin-like growth factor I and II in the endocrine pancreas of birds, reptiles, and amphibia.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M; Broger, I; Brun, R; Zapf, J; Maake, C

    1995-12-01

    Immunoreactive insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II) were sought in the endocrine pancreas of representative birds, reptiles, and amphibia using antisera specific for mammalian IGF-I and IGF-II and the classical islet hormones insulin (INS), glucagon (GLUC), somatostatin (SOM), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) in double immunofluorescence. Both IGF-I and IGF-II immunoreactivities were present in the endocrine pancreas of all species. IGF-II immunoreactivity was exclusively found in INS-immunoreactive (-IR) cells, indicating evolutionary conservation of the islet IGF-II system. In contrast, IGF-I immunoreactivity was distributed differently among the species and never occurred in INS-IR cells. In the anuran Xenopus laevis, IGF-I immunoreactivity was present in islet cells showing coexistence of GLUC and PP immunoreactivities. In reptiles, the lizards (Lacerta viridis, Scincus officinalis) exhibited IGF-I immunoreactivity in PP-IR and SOM-IR cells and the snakes (Psamophis leniolatum, Coluber ravergieri) in SOM-IR and GLUC-IR cells. In birds, IGF-I immunoreactivity was located either in SOM-IR cells only (Gallus g. domesticus, Streptopelia roseogrisea) or in PP-IR and SOM-IR cells (Coturnix c. japonica). Thus, the distribution patterns of islet IGF-I immunoreactivities in birds, reptiles, and amphibia are equivalent to those in mammals and most bony fish. They differ, however, from those found in cartilaginous fish, cyclostomes, and protochordates, where a total or partial coexistence of IGF-I and INS immunoreactivities has been obtained. Therefore, the divergence of IGF-I and INS seems to have occurred early in vertebrate phylogeny. Furthermore, the existence of IGF-I immunoreactivity likely is common in the islets of all vertebrates. Finally, no phylogenetic trend to concentrate IGF-I immunoreactivity in a particular islet cell type is apparent.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CCAAT/enhancer binding protein genes and their responses to induction by GH in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lo, Jay H; Chiou, Pinwen Peter; Lin, C M; Chen, Thomas T

    2007-08-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are transcription factors consisting of six isoforms and play diverse physiological roles in vertebrates. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), in addition to the reported C/EBPbeta1, we have isolated cDNA of four other isoforms, C/EBPalpha, C/EBPbeta2, C/EBPdelta1, C/EBPdelta2, from the liver. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of rainbow trout C/EBPs with those of other vertebrates revealed that C/EBP isoforms are highly conserved. The profiles of tissue-specific expression of individual C/EBP isoform mRNA, determined by quantitative real-time (RT)-PCR showed distinct patterns. Furthermore, injection of bovine GH into yearling rainbow trout resulted in a significant increase of mRNA levels of C/EBPbeta1, C/EBPbeta2, and C/EBPdelta2 but not C/EBPalpha and C/EBPdelta1 in the liver. GH-dependent increase of mRNA levels of C/EBPbeta1, C/EBPbeta2, C/EBPdelta2, and IGF-II were also confirmed by treating rainbow trout hepatoma cells expressing a goldfish GH receptor with bGH. Together with our previous findings, the results presented in this paper strengthen our previous hypothesis that GH may regulate the expression of the IGF-II gene via mediating the expression of C/EBPbeta1, C/EBPbeta2, and C/EBPdelta2 mRNA.

  6. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II. Relationship to receptor and binding protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Torres, A M; Forbes, B E; Aplin, S E; Wallace, J C; Francis, G L; Norton, R S

    1995-04-28

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II in aqueous solution at pH 3.1 and 300 K has been determined from nuclear magnetic resonance data and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Structural constraints consisting of 502 NOE-derived distance constraints, 11 dihedral angle restraints, and three disulfide bridges were used as input for distance geometry calculations in DIANA and X-PLOR, followed by simulated annealing refinement and energy minimization in X-PLOR. The resulting family of 20 structures was well defined in the regions of residues 5 to 28 and 41 to 62, with an average pairwise root-mean-square deviation of 1.24 A for the backbone heavy-atoms (N, C2, C) and 1.90 A for all heavy atoms. The poorly defined regions consist of the N and C termini, part of the B-domain, and the C-domain loop. Resonances from these regions of the protein gave stronger cross peaks in two dimensional NMR spectra, consistent with significant motional averaging. The main secondary structure elements in IGF-II are alpha-helices encompassing residues 11 to 21, 42 to 49 and 53 to 59. A small anti-parallel beta-sheet is formed by residues 59 to 61 and 25 to 27, while residues 26 to 28 appear to participate in intermolecular beta-sheet formation. The structure of IGF-II in the well-defined regions is very similar to those of the corresponding regions of insulin and IGF-I. Significant differences between IGF-II and IGF-I occur near the start of the third helix, in a region known to modulate affinity for the type 2 IGF receptor, and at the C terminus. The IGF II structure is discussed in relation to its binding sites for the insulin and IGF receptors and the IGF binding proteins.

  7. Hypoglycemia in a dog with a leiomyoma of the gastric wall producing an insulin-like growth factor II-like peptide.

    PubMed

    Boari, A; Barreca, A; Bestetti, G E; Minuto, F; Venturoli, M

    1995-06-01

    A 12-year-old mixed-breed male dog was referred to the Clinica Medica Veterinaria of Bologna University for recurrent episodes of seizures due to hypoglycemia with abnormally low plasma insulin levels (18 pmol/l). Resection of a large leiomyoma (780 g) of the gastric wall resulted in a permanent resolution of the hypoglycemic episodes. Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and -II) were measured by RIA in serum before and after surgery and in tumor tissue. Results were compared to the serum concentration of 54 normal and to the tissue concentration observed in eight non-hypoglycemic dog gastric wall extracts. Before surgery, circulating immunoreactive IGF-I was 0.92 nmol/l, which is significantly lower than the control values (16.92 +/- 8.44 nmol/l, range 3.53-35.03), while IGF-II was 152 nmol/l, which is significantly higher than the control values (42.21 +/- 3.75, range 31.99-50.74). After surgery, IGF-I increased to 6.80 nmol/l while IGF-II decreased to 45.52 nmol/l. Tumor tissue IGF-II concentration was higher than normal (5.66 nmol/kg tissue as compared to a range in normal gastric wall tissue of 1.14-3.72 nmol/kg), while IGF-I was 0.08 nmol/kg tissue, which is close to the lowest normal value (range in controls, 0.08-1.18 nmol/kg). Partial characterization of IGF-II immunoreactivity extracted from tissue evidenced a molecular weight similar to that of mature IGF-II, thus excluding that peptide released by the tumor is a precursor molecule.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Expression of growth factor ligand and receptor genes in the preimplantation bovine embryo.

    PubMed

    Watson, A J; Hogan, A; Hahnel, A; Wiemer, K E; Schultz, G A

    1992-02-01

    The sensitive technique of mRNA phenotyping with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was employed to determine the patterns of gene expression for several growth factor ligand and receptor genes during bovine preimplantation development. Several thousand bovine embryos encompassing a developmental series from one-cell zygotes to hatched blastocysts were produced by the application of in vitro maturation, fertilization, and oviductal epithelial cell embryo coculture methods. Transcripts for transforming growth factor (TGF-alpha) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-A) are detectable in all preimplantation bovine stages as observed in the mouse. Transcripts for TGF-beta 2 and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-II) and the receptors for PDGF-alpha, insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II are also detectable throughout bovine preimplantation development, suggesting that these mRNAs are products of both the maternal and the embryonic genomes in the cow, whereas in the mouse they are present only following the activation of the embryonic genome at the two-cell stage. In contrast to the mouse embryo, IGF-I mRNA was detected within preimplantation bovine embryos. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a maternal message in the bovine embryo, since it is only detectable up until the eight-cell embryo stage. Bovine trophoblast protein (bTP) mRNA was detectable within day 8 bovine blastocysts. As was observed in the mouse, the transcripts for insulin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or nerve growth factor (NGF) were not detectable in any bovine embryo stage. Analyses of this type should aid the development of a completely defined culture medium for the more efficient production of preimplantation bovine embryos.

  9. Recombinant allergen Lol p II: expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tamborini, E; Brandazza, A; De Lalla, C; Musco, G; Siccardi, A G; Arosio, P; Sidoli, A

    1995-05-01

    Pollen from perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) is a major cause of type I allergies worldwide. It contains complex mixtures of proteins, among which Lol p II is a major allergen. Previously, we have reported the cloning and sequencing of Lol p II and its expression in fusion with the heavy chain of human ferritin as carrier polypeptide (Sidoli et al., 1993, J. biol. Chem. 268, 21819-21825). Here, we describe the expression, purification and characterization of a recombinant Lol p II overproduced as a non-fusion protein in the periplasm of E. coli. The recombinant allergen was expressed in high yields and was easily purified in milligram amounts. It competed with the natural Lol p II for binding to specific IgE, and it induced allergic responses in skin prick tests, indicating to be immunologically analogous to the natural protein. Biochemical analyses indicate that recombinant Lol p II is a highly stable and soluble monomeric molecule which behaves like a small globular protein.

  10. Molecular analysis of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency with hepatocardiomuscular expression

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefont, J.P.; Cepanec, C.; Leroux, J.P.

    1996-05-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency, an inherited disorder of mitochondrial long-chain fatty-acid (LCFA) oxidation, results in two distinct clinical act phenotypes, namely, an adult (muscular) form and an infantile (hepatocardiomuscular) form. The rationale of this phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. The adult form of the disease is commonly ascribed to the Ser-113-Leu substitution in CPT II. Only few data are available regarding the molecular basis of the infantile form of the disease. We report herein a homozygous A-2399-C transversion predicting a Tyr-628-Ser substitution in a CPT II-deficient infant. In vitro expression of mutant cDNA in COS-1 cells demonstrated the responsibility of this mutation for the disease. Metabolic consequences of the Ser-113-Leu and Tyr-628-Ser substitutions were studied in fibroblasts. The Tyr-628-Ser substitution (infantile form) resulted in a 10% CPT II residual activity, markedly impairing LCFA oxidation, whereas the Ser-113-Leu substitution (adult form) resulted in a 20% CPT II residual activity, without consequence on LCFA oxidation. These data show that CPT II activity has to be reduced below a critical threshold in order for LCFA oxidation in fibroblasts to be impaired. The hypothesis that this critical threshold differs among tissues could provide a basis to explain phenotypic heterogeneity of CPT II deficiency. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Alpinate Oxyphyllae Fructus Inhibits IGFII-Related Signaling Pathway to Attenuate Ang II-Induced Pathological Hypertrophy in H9c2 Cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chuan-Te; Chang, Yung-Ming; Lin, Shu-Luan; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Chen, Ray-Jade; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a very important cardiovascular disease inducer and may cause cardiac pathological hypertrophy and remodeling. We evaluated a Chinese traditional medicine, alpinate oxyphyllae fructus (AOF), for therapeutic efficacy for treating Ang II-induced cardiac hypertrophy. AOF has been used to treat patients with various symptoms accompanying hypertension and cerebrovascular disorders in Korea. We investigated its protective effect against Ang II-induced cytoskeletal change and hypertrophy in H9c2 cells. The results showed that treating cells with Ang II resulted in pathological hypertrophy, such as increased expression of transcription factors NFAT-3/p-NFAT-3, hypertrophic response genes (atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP] and b-type natriuretic peptide [BNP]), and Gαq down-stream effectors (PLCβ3 and calcineurin). Pretreatment with AOF (60-100 μg/mL) led to significantly reduced hypertrophy. We also found that AOF pretreatment significantly suppressed the cardiac remodeling proteins, metalloproteinase (MMP9 and MMP2), and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), induced by Ang II challenge. In conclusion, we provide evidence that AOF protects against Ang II-induced pathological hypertrophy by specifically inhibiting the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II/IIR-related signaling pathway in H9c2 cells. AOF might be a candidate for cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling prevention in chronic cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Characterization and expression of MHC class II alpha and II beta genes in mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyan; Tan, Shangjin; Cai, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II plays a key role in adaptive immunity by presenting foreign peptides to CD4(+) T cells and by triggering the adaptive immune response. While the structure and function of MHC class II have been well characterized in mammalian, limited research has been done on fishes. In this study, we characterized the gene structure and expression of MHC class II α (Lunar-DAA) and II β (Lunar-DAB) of mangrove red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus). Both genes shared, respectively, a high similarity and typical features with other vertebrate MHC class II α and II β. The phylogenetic analysis of the deduced peptides revealed that both Lunar-DAA and Lunar-DAB were located in the teleost subclass. Western blotting analyses indicated that both MHC class II α and II β were expressed ubiquitously in immune-related cells, tissues and organs, and that MHC class II α and II β chains existed mainly as heterodimers. While it was highly expressed in gills, thymus, head kidney (HK), spleen, head kidney macrophage and spleen leucocytes, MHC class II β chain was expressed with a low abundance in skin, intestine, stomach and heart. The highest expression of MHC class II β in thymus confirmed the conclusion that thymus is one of the primary lymphoid organs in fishes. The detection of MHC class II αβ dimers in HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes indicated that HK macrophages and spleen leucocytes play a critical role in the adaptive immunity in fishes. All these results provide valuable information for understanding the structure of MHC class II α and II β and their function in immune responses.

  13. Topoisomerase II{alpha} expression correlates with diminished disease-free survival in invasive breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, John K. . E-mail: joconno@yahoo.com; Hazard, Lisa J.; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Fischbach, Jennifer; Gaffney, David K.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Topoisomerase II{alpha} (Topo II{alpha}) plays a role in DNA replication and is the molecular target for anthracyline-based chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between Topo II{alpha} expression and survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens from 24 women with invasive breast cancer were stained for Topo II{alpha} expression. All women underwent mastectomy. Radiotherapy was given at University of Utah Department of Radiation Oncology. Of the patients, 23 (96%) received chemotherapy. The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells was compared with clinical factors and overall survival. Results: The median percentage of tumor cells expressing Topo II{alpha} was 70%. Increased Topo II{alpha} tumor expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival. Five-year disease-free survival was 100% for patients with <70% of breast cancer cells expressing Topo II{alpha} compared with 42% for patients with {>=}70% Topo II{alpha} expression (p 0.008). The level of Topo II{alpha} expression within tumor cells correlated with T stage (p = 0.008) but not with other pathologic factors. Conclusions: Increased Topo II{alpha} expression significantly correlated with diminished disease-free survival in patients with invasive breast cancer. These findings may indicate a role for Topo II{alpha} expression as a prognostic factor in breast cancer.

  14. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  15. The angiotensin II receptor 2 is expressed and mediates angiotensin II signaling in lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Königshoff, Melanie; Wilhelm, Anke; Jahn, Andreas; Sedding, Daniel; Amarie, Oana Veronica; Eul, Bastian; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Günther, Andreas; Eickelberg, Oliver; Rose, Frank

    2007-12-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a severe interstitial lung disease unresponsive to currently available therapies. In IPF, initial alveolar epithelial cell damage leads to activation of fibroblast-(myo)fibroblasts, which deposit an increased amount of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix. Angiotensin II (ANGII) signaling, mediated via angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) or type 2 (AGTR2), controls tissue remodeling in fibrosis, but the relevance of AGTR2 remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrated increased expression of AGTR1 und AGTR2 in human and rodent lung tissues from patients with IPF and mice subjected to bleomycin-induced fibrosis, respectively. Both AGTR1 und AGTR2 localized to interstitial fibroblasts. Quantitative analysis of cell surface expression in primary mouse fibroblasts revealed a significant increase of AGTR2 surface expression in fibrotic fibroblasts, whereas AGTR1 surface expression levels remained similar. ANGII treatment of normal fibroblasts led to enhanced migration and proliferation, which was abrogated after pretreatment with losartan (LOS), an AGTR1 inhibitor. In contrast, in fibrotic fibroblasts, migration and proliferation was modified only by AGTR2, but not AGTR1 inhibition (using PD123319). ANGII-induced effects were mediated via phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and p42/44, which was blocked via LOS and PD123319, respectively. Similar effects of AGTR1 and AGTR2 inhibition were observed using conditioned media of alveolar epithelial cells, a prominent source of ANGII in the lung in vivo. In summary, we conclude that ANGII signaling occurs primarily via AGTR1 in normal fibroblasts, while AGTR2-mediated effects are dominant on activated (myo)-fibroblasts, a receptor switch that may perturb epithelial-mesenchymal interaction, thereby further perpetuating fibrogenesis.

  16. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb upstream of the cleavage site, and element II, encompassing the cleavage site itself. We have identified a stable double-stranded RNA stem structure (delta G = -100 kcal/mol [418.4 kJ/mol]) that can be formed between element I and a region downstream of the cleavage site in element II. This structure is conserved among human, rat, and mouse mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the requirements for cleavage shows that the relative position of the elements is not essential for cleavage. Furthermore, the distance between the coding region and the cleavage site does not affect the cleavage reaction. Mutational analysis of the long-range RNA-RNA interaction shows that not only the double-stranded character but also the sequence of the stable RNA stem is important for cleavage. PMID:7799930

  17. Genetic complexity of regulatory mutants defective for HLA class II gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, C.; Saraiya, C.; Osterweil, Z.; Fu, Y. Ping; Lee, J.S. )

    1992-03-01

    MHC (called HLA in man) class II genes play an essential role in cell-mediated immunity. Absence of HLA class II Ag on B lymphocytes is the basis of some congenital immunodeficiencies (CID). The authors have studied CID by generating transient heterokaryons from cell lines of such patients, and report that the mutations fall into four complementation groups. In addition, fusions with the HLA class II deletion mutant 721.180 indicate that the genetic defects for each group in HLA class II expression map outside the HLA class II region. A small HLA-DRA promoter fragment is sufficient to drive expression of a reporter gene in normal B cell lines, but expression from the same construct is clearly reduced in mutant cell lines representative of all four complementation groups. This confirms earlier results that indicate defective transcription of HLA class II genes in the class II[sup [minus

  18. A highly phosphorylated subpopulation of insulin-like growth factor II/mannose 6-phosphate receptors is concentrated in a clathrin-enriched plasma membrane fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Corvera, S.; Folander, K.; Clairmont, K.B.; Czech, M.P. )

    1988-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II)/mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) receptors immunoprecipitated from purified plasma membranes of {sup 32}P-labeled rat adipocytes are markedly heterogenous in their phosphorylation state. Approximately 80% of the plasma membrane receptors are solubilized in 1% (vol/vol) Triton X-100 and are phosphorylated on serine residues at a stoichiometry of {approx} 0.1-0.2 mol of phosphate per mol of receptor. In contrast, 15-20% of the receptors are Triton X-100-insoluble and are phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues at {approx} 4 or 5 mol of phosphate per mol of receptor. This Triton X-100-insoluble membrane subfraction contains only 5% of the total plasma membrane protein and yet contains all of the clathrin heavy chain associated with plasma membrane. Based on the relative yields of protein in the detergent-insoluble material, IGF-II/Man-6-P receptors are concentrated {approx} 3-fold in this clathrin-enriched subfraction. Taken together, these results indicate that insulin decreases the phosphorylation state of a highly phosphorylated subpopulation of IGF-II/Man-6-P receptors on the plasma membrane. In addition, insulin action may prevent the concentration of these receptors in a clathrin-enriched membrane subfraction.

  19. IMP-3 promotes migration and invasion of melanoma cells by modulating the expression of HMGA2 and predicts poor prognosis in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Yi-Shuan; Liao, Yi-Hua; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chu, Chia-Ying; Ho, Bing-Ying; Hsieh, Meng-Chen; Chen, Pin-Chun; Cha, Shih-Ting; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Chang, Cheng-Chi; Chiu, Hsien-Ching; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Kuo, Min-Liang; Chu, Chia-Yu

    2015-04-01

    IGF II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP-3) has been reported to be a marker of melanoma progression. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts melanoma are incompletely understood. In this study, we investigate the clinical significance of IMP-3 in melanoma progression and also its underlying mechanisms. We found that IMP-3 expression was much higher in advanced-stage/metastatic melanomas and that it was associated with a poor prognosis (P=0.001). Univariate analysis showed that IMP-3 expression was associated with stage III/IV melanomas (odds ratio=5.40, P=0.031) and the acral lentiginous subtype (odds ratio=3.93, P=0.0034). MeWo cells with overexpression of IMP-3 showed enhanced proliferation and migration and significantly increased tumorigenesis and metastatic ability in nude mice. We further demonstrated that IMP-3 could bind and enhance the stability of the mRNA of high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2). It was also confirmed that IMP-3 had an important role in melanoma invasion and metastasis through regulating HMGA2 mRNA expression. IMP-3 expression was positively correlated with HMGA2 expression in melanoma cells and also in melanoma tissues. Our results show that IMP-3 expression is a strong prognostic factor for melanoma, especially acral lentiginous melanoma.

  20. Dammarenediol-II production confers TMV tolerance in transgenic tobacco expressing Panax ginseng dammarenediol-II synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Hyun; Han, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Yun-Soo; Huh, Gyung Hye; Choi, Yong-Eui

    2012-01-01

    Panax ginseng is one of the famous medicinal plants. Ginsenosides, a class of tetracyclic triterpene saponins, are mainly responsible for its pharmacological activity. Most ginsenosides are composed of dammarenediol-II aglycone with various sugar moieties. Dammarenediol-II synthase is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of ginsenosides. Here, we report that transgenic tobacco expressing the P. ginseng dammarenediol-II synthase gene (PgDDS) produced dammarenediol-II, and conferred resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Upon infection with TMV, lesions developed more rapidly in transgenic tobacco plants, and their size was smaller than those of wild-type plants. Transgenic tobacco plants showed a low level of both the viral titer and mRNA accumulation of TMV coat protein (CP) compared with the wild type. The production of dammarenediol-II in transgenic tobacco stimulated the expression of tobacco pathogenesis-related genes (PR1 and PR2) under both virus-untreated and -treated conditions. When the leaves of wild-type plants were inoculated with a mixture of TMV and dammarenediol-II, the leaves exhibited a reduced viral concentration and TMV-CP expression than those receiving TMV treatment alone. When the leaves of P. ginseng were infected with TMV, transcription of PgDDS was significantly increased. Transgenic P. ginseng plants harboring a β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene driven by the PgDDS promoter were constructed. The GUS expression was activated when the transgenic ginseng plants were treated with TMV. These results indicate that the medicinally important dammarenediol-II can be ectopically produced in tobacco, and the production of dammarenediol-II in tobacco plants allows them to adopt a viral defense system.

  1. WT1 expression induces features of renal epithelial differentiation in mesenchymal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hosono, S; Luo, X; Hyink, D P; Schnapp, L M; Wilson, P D; Burrow, C R; Reddy, J C; Atweh, G F; Licht, J D

    1999-01-14

    The WT1 tumor suppressor gene, implicated in hereditofamilial and sporadic Wilms' tumor, is required for normal renal development and is up-regulated during the mesenchymal-epithelial transition. NIH3T3 fibroblasts overexpressing WT1 were less proliferative, larger in size and more firmly attached to tissue culture plastic, suggesting an alteration of their state of differentiation. These cells were studied in vivo by subcutaneous injection into nude mice. The resulting tumors exhibited epithelioid histopathology and formed desmosome-like structures. Molecular analyses of these WT1 expressing fibroblasts grown in culture and in nude mice revealed significant alterations in the expression of many kidney epithelial markers. These studies indicate that WT1 expression can initiate features of a program of epithelial differentiation consistent with a prominent role for WT1 in the mesenchymal epithelial transition that occurs during renal development. Through this work we identified a number of novel target genes for the WT1 transcription factor, including uvomorulin, integrin alpha8 and perlecan, and suggest that WTI may activate the IGF-II gene, also implicated in the development of Wilms' tumor.

  2. HLA-G and MHC Class II Protein Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jesionek-Kupnicka, Dorota; Bojo, Marcin; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anna; Jabłońska, Joanna; Kalinka-Warzocha, Ewa; Kordek, Radzisław; Młynarski, Wojciech; Robak, Tadeusz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Lech-Maranda, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    The expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and HLA class II protein was studied by immunohistochemical staining of lymph nodes from 148 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and related to the clinical course of the disease. Negative HLA-G expression was associated with a lower probability of achieving a complete remission (p = 0.04). Patients with negative HLA-G expression tended towards a lower 3-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with positive expression of HLA-G (p = 0.08). When restricting the analysis to patients receiving chemotherapy with rituximab, the estimated 3-year OS rate of patients with positive HLA-G expression was 73.3 % compared with 47.5 % (p = 0.03) in those with negative expression. Patients with negative HLA class II expression presented a lower 3-year OS rate compared to subjects with positive expression (p = 0.04). The loss of HLA class II expression (p = 0.05) and belonging to the intermediate high/high IPI risk group (p = 0.001) independently increased the risk of death. HLA class II expression also retained its prognostic value in patients receiving rituximab; the 3-year OS rate was 65.3 % in patients with positive HLA class II expression versus 29.6 % (p = 0.04) in subjects that had loss of HLA class II expression. To our knowledge, for the first time, the expression of HLA-G protein in DLBCL and its association with the clinical course of the disease was demonstrated. Moreover, the link between losing HLA class II protein expression and poor survival of patients treated with immunochemotherapy was confirmed.

  3. Lack of association of progestin-induced cystic endometrial hyperplasia with GH gene expression in the canine uterus.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, H S; Okkens, A C; Mol, J A; van Garderen, E; Kirpensteijn, J; Rijnberk, A

    1997-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is produced in progestin-induced hyperplastic ductular mammary epithelia in dogs. Progestins also induce the development of cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH) in this species. The study reported here investigated whether GH gene expression could also be demonstrated in progestin-induced hyperplastic epithelium in the canine uterus. Eight beagle bitches were treated with 10 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) kg-1 body mass s.c. at intervals of 3 weeks, for a total of five times in four dogs (group I) and for a total of 13 times in the other four dogs (group II). Blood samples were collected twice during each 3 week period for measurement of plasma concentrations of GH, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-II. At the end of the series of injections uterine tissue was obtained by ovario-hysterectomy. Histological examination confirmed that CEH was present in all uteri after MPA treatment; the changes in the dogs of group I were less marked than those in group II. Immunohistochemical examination of the uterine tissues showed that immunoreactive(i) GH was present in a number of uteri with CEH. iGH was usually located in the cytoplasm of glandular epithelial cells. However, reverse transcriptase PCR using GH-specific primers failed to demonstrate mRNA encoding GH in the uterine tissue of all dogs. It is concluded that local production of GH is not involved in progestin-induced hyperplasia of uterine epithelial cells in dogs.

  4. Regulation of glomerular heparanase expression by aldosterone, angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    van den Hoven, Mabel J; Waanders, Femke; Rops, Angelique L; Kramer, Andrea B; van Goor, Harry; Berden, Jo H; Navis, Gerjan; van der Vlag, Johan

    2009-09-01

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) provides renoprotection in adriamycin nephropathy (AN), along with a decrease in overexpression of glomerular heparanase. Angiotensin II (AngII) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to regulate heparanase expression in vivo. However, it is unknown whether this is also the case for aldosterone. Therefore, we further assessed the role of aldosterone, AngII and ROS in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression. Six weeks after the induction of AN, rats were treated with vehicle (n = 8), lisinopril (75 mg/L, n = 10), spironolactone (3.3 mg/day, n = 12) or the combination of lisinopril and spironolactone (n = 14) for 12 weeks. Age-matched healthy rats served as controls (n = 6). After 18 weeks, renal heparanase and heparan sulfate (HS) expression were examined by immunofluorescence staining. In addition, the effect of aldosterone, AngII and ROS on heparanase expression in cultured podocytes was determined. Treatment with lisinopril, spironolactone or their combination significantly blunted the increased glomerular heparanase expression and restored the decreased HS expression in the GBM. Addition of aldosterone to cultured podocytes resulted in a significantly increased heparanase mRNA and protein expression, which could be inhibited by spironolactone. Heparanase mRNA and protein expression in podocytes were also significantly increased after stimulation with AngII or ROS. Our in vivo and in vitro results show that not only AngII and ROS, but also aldosterone is involved in the regulation of glomerular heparanase expression.

  5. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in canine masticatory muscle myositis.

    PubMed

    Paciello, Orlando; Shelton, G Diane; Papparella, Serenella

    2007-04-01

    Studies in human immune-mediated inflammatory myopathies have documented expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I) and class II (MHC class II) antigens on muscle fiber membranes in the presence or absence of cellular infiltration. Here we evaluate the presence and distribution of these antigens in canine masticatory muscle myositis, an immune-mediated inflammatory myopathy. Twelve samples of temporalis and masseter muscles from dogs with a clinical diagnosis of canine masticatory muscle myositis were examined by immunohistochemistry and double-immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. MHC class I and class II antigens were expressed in muscle fibers independent of inflammatory cell infiltration. Furthermore MHC class I and class II antigens were expressed on the sarcolemma and co-localized with dystrophin. Our results suggest that MHC class I and class II expression in canine masticatory muscle myositis may play a role in the initiation and maintenance of the pathological condition, rather than just a consequence of a preceding local inflammation.

  6. Functional characterization of insulin-like growth factors in an ancestral fish species, the Shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Carlin M; Bledsoe, Jacob W; Small, Brian C

    2016-09-01

    Observations from the present study provide the first characterization of the GH-IGF axis in Shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus, an ancestral fish species. An initial characterization of steady-state IGF-I and IGF-II gene expression in multiple tissues was conducted using real-time RT-qPCR. Overall, the tissues had significantly different profiles of IGF-I gene expression, with the highest IGF-I expression observed in the liver. The highest IGF-II gene expression was also observed in the liver, with minimal or no detection in muscle. A comparison between IGF-I and IGF-II expression within individual tissues revealed higher levels of IGF-II than IGF-I mRNA in the spleen, stomach and trunk kidney, and higher levels of relative IGF-I mRNA expression in the intestine and muscle. The GH-IGF axis was further elucidated by observing the effects of exogenous GH on IGF-I and IGF-II expression in liver and muscle tissue. The results revealed a significant dose-dependent response of both hepatic IGF-I and IGF-II, and muscle IGF-I mRNA expression following rbGH administration. At the highest rbGH concentration (240μg/g BW), IGF-I mRNA levels in liver and muscle peaked significantly at 48h, indicating both hepatic and muscle IGF-I expression to be stimulated by GH. Hepatic IGF-II expression was also stimulated 48h following rbGH administration. Expression of IGF-II mRNA was not inducible in the muscle. Few studies have evaluated the effects of exogenous GH on IGF expression in ancestral vertebrate species, and as such, this research provides valuable insight into the evolution of the somatotropic axis in vertebrates.

  7. Serum factors alter the extent of dephosphorylation of ligands endocytosed via the mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Mouse L-cells that contain the cation-independent (CI) mannose 6- phosphate (Man 6-P)/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptor endocytose acid hydrolases and deliver these enzymes to lysosomes. The postendocytic loss of the Man 6-P recognition marker from the cell- associated acid hydrolases was assessed by CI-Man 6-P receptor affinity chromatography. 125I-labeled acid hydrolases internalized by L-cells grown at high density were delivered to lysosomes but were not dephosphorylated. In contrast, the same 125I-labeled hydrolases internalized by L-cells maintained at low density were delivered to lysosomes and were extensively dephosphorylated. The dephosphorylation at low density required 5 h for completion suggesting that the phosphatase responsible for the dephosphorylation is located within the lysosomal compartment. Transition from the high to low density state was rapid and was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Medium substitution experiments indicated that serum factors were necessary to maintain the L-cells in the dephosphorylation-competent (low density) state, and that serum-free conditions led to a dephosphorylation-incompetent (high density) state. Addition of IGF II to cells in serum-free medium allowed acid hydrolases subsequently introduced by endocytosis to be dephosphorylated. The results indicate that the removal of the Man 6-P recognition marker from endocytosed acid hydrolases is regulated by serum factors in the growth medium, including IGF II. PMID:2549075

  8. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Type II Cochlear Afferents in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pankhuri; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; Zimmerman, Amanda; Fuchs, Paul; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase. The present study was designed to determine whether TH-driven Cre recombinase (TH-2A-CreER) provides a selective and reliable tool for identification and genetic manipulation of type II rather than type I cochlear afferents. The "TH-2A-CreER neurons" radiated from the spiral lamina, crossed the tunnel of Corti, turned towards the base of the cochlea, and traveled beneath the rows of outer hair cells. Neither the processes nor the somata of TH-2A-CreER neurons were labeled by antibodies that specifically labeled type I afferents and medial efferents. TH-2A-CreER-positive processes partially co-labeled with antibodies to peripherin, a known marker of type II afferents. Individual TH-2A-CreER neurons gave off short branches contacting 7-25 outer hair cells (OHCs). Only a fraction of TH-2A-CreER boutons were associated with CtBP2-immunopositive ribbons. These results show that TH-2A-CreER provides a selective marker for type II versus type I afferents and can be used to describe the morphology and arborization pattern of type II cochlear afferents in the mouse cochlea.

  9. Downregulation of class II transactivator (CIITA) expression by synthetic cannabinoid CP55,940.

    PubMed

    Gongora, Celine; Hose, Stacey; O'Brien, Terrence P; Sinha, Debasish

    2004-01-30

    Cannabinoid receptors are known to be expressed in microglia; however, their involvement in specific aspects of microglial immune function has not been demonstrated. Many effects of cannabinoids are mediated by two G-protein coupled receptors, designated CB1 and CB2. We have shown that the CB1 receptor is expressed in microglia that also express MHC class II antigen (J. Neuroimmunol. 82 (1998) 13-21). In our present study, we have analyzed the effect of cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 on MHC class II expression on the surface of IFN-gamma induced microglial cells by flow cytometry. CP55,940 blocked the class II MHC expression induced by IFN-gamma. It has been shown that the regulation of class II MHC genes occurs primarily at the transcriptional level, and a non-DNA binding protein, class II transactivator (CIITA), has been shown to be the master activator for class II transcription. We find that mRNA levels of CIITA are increased in IFN-gamma induced EOC 20 microglial cells and that this increase is almost entirely eliminated by the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940. These data suggests that cannabinoids affect MHC class II expression through actions on CIITA at the transcriptional level.

  10. Cell surface expression and function of an HLA class II molecule with class I domain configuration

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules were expressed with extracellular polypeptide domains reorganized to form heavy (H) and light (L) chains (alpha 1-beta 1-beta 2 and alpha 2) analogous to class I. Accurate protein folding and dimerization is demonstrated by the ability of this 3+1-DR1 construct to bind class II- restricted peptides and stimulate CD4+ T cells. Cell surface expression of a functional class II molecule consisting of H and L chains supports the validity of current class II models and affirms the evolutionary relatedness of class I/II. MHC functions that differ between class I/II may be influenced by domain configuration, and the use of domain- shifted constructs will allow examination of this possibility. PMID:8340763

  11. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    PubMed

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  12. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker12

    PubMed Central

    Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Caratelli, Sara; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Lauro, Davide; Lugli, Alessandro; Han, Junyi; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Ferrone, Cristina; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Tornillo, Luigi; Droeser, Raoul; Rossi, Piero; Attanasio, Antonio; Ferrone, Soldano; Terracciano, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s). Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ) induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1β production by monocytes. PMID:24563618

  13. Card Games and Algebra Tic Tacmatics on Achievement of Junior Secondary II Students in Algebraic Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okpube, Nnaemeka Michael; Anugwo, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the Card Games and Algebra tic-Tacmatics on Junior Secondary II Students' Achievement in Algebraic Expressions. Three research questions and three null hypotheses guided the study. The study adopted the pre-test, post-test control group design. A total of two hundred and forty (240) Junior Secondary School II students were…

  14. Effect of speed of development on mRNA expression pattern in early bovine embryos cultured in vivo or in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Rizos, D; Fair, T; Moreira, P N; Pintado, B; de la Fuente, J; Boland, M P; Lonergan, P

    2004-08-01

    Recent data have demonstrated that fast-cleaving embryos produced in vitro are more likely to develop to blastocyst stage, and that the postfertilization culture system used impacts considerably on the mRNA expression and quality of blastocysts produced. The present study is the first to investigate the relationship between the developmental speed of embryos produced in vivo or in vitro and the temporal transcription pattern. Genes related to important preimplantation events are monitored during the first 4 days of embryo development in embryos with fast or slow development. The set of genes analyzed in the present study characterizes several important physiological processes including: transport and metabolism of fructose (Glut-5), stress (SOX), mitochondrial activity and detoxification of reactive oxygen species (MnSOD), cell communication (Cx43), maternal recognition of pregnancy (IFN-tau), imprinting (IGF-II), apoptosis (Bax), growth factor binding and metabolism (IGF-IR), and oxidative stress (G6PD). Using real time PCR, we have found that for all the genes analyzed there are differences in mRNA expression between embryos with fast and slow developmental speed produced both in vitro and in vivo. Frequently, genes that may be stress induced such as SOX, MnSOD, BAX, IFtau, and G6PD were highly transcribed in in vitro produced embryos and in embryos with slow developmental speed. On the other side, transcripts from genes related with metabolism, growth, and differentiation (Glut-5, Cx 43, IGF-II, and IGF-IR) were detected in higher amounts in in vivo produced embryos and in embryos with fast developmental speed. Moreover, it is interesting to stand out that for some genetic markers (such as SOX and G6PD) there are in vivo and in vitro differences that can be observed even before materno-zygotic transition, which probably reflects a differential mRNA degradation. These transcription patterns reflects the embryonic response to the adverse in vitro culture

  15. Differential expression of HLA class II antigens on human fetal and adult lymphocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J A; Jones, D B; Evans, P R; Smith, J L

    1985-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to monomorphic determinants of the MHC class II subregion locus products: DP, DR and DQ, was used to investigate the expression of these antigens on early lymphocytes and macrophages from human fetal liver (13-20 weeks), placenta (16 weeks and term) and cord blood, in relation to the class II phenotype of cells from adult tonsil and peripheral blood. Fetal liver sections and cell suspensions showed differential expression of class II antigens. DP was expressed at a higher frequency (11.0% of nucleated cells) than DR on lymphoid cells and macrophages from fetal liver, and DQ was either absent or expressed on less than 0.3% of nucleated cells. Consistent with this finding, DP but not DR or DQ antigens were observed on vascular elements and macrophages in the villi of 16-week placenta. At term, all three subregion locus products were expressed. Adult tonsil and peripheral blood B lymphocytes expressed DP, DR and DQ antigens with similar frequency; however, DQ was expressed at a lower frequency than DP and DR on cord blood B lymphocytes. In contrast, 30-50% macrophages from cord blood and adult peripheral blood expressed DP and DR, but fewer (5% and 18%, respectively) expressed DQ. These data suggest that class II antigens are expressed in the sequence DP, DR, DQ on developing lymphocytes. A similar sequence is suggested for macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3894221

  16. Renal denervation attenuates aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology in angiotensin II-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Rui; Ruan, Cheng-Chao; Xu, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Jing; Wu, Yong-Jie; Ma, Yu; Zhu, Ding-Liang; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system interacts with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we sought to determine if renal denervation (RDN) inhibits aldosterone expression and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. Bilateral RDN or SHAM operation was performed before chronic 14-day Ang II subcutaneous infusion (200ng/kg/min) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral RDN blunted Ang II-induced hypertension and ameliorated the mesenteric vascular dysfunction. Cardiovascular hypertrophy in response to Ang II was significantly attenuated by RDN as shown by histopathology and transthoracic echocardiography. Moreover, Ang II-induced vascular and myocardial inflammation and fibrosis were suppressed by RDN with concurrent decrease in fibronectin and collagen deposition, macrophage infiltration, and MCP-1 expression. Interestingly, RDN also inhibited Ang II-induced aldosterone expression in the plasma, kidney and heart. This was associated with the reduction of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the adrenal gland. Ang II promoted aldosterone secretion which was partly attenuated by CGRP in the adrenocortical cell line, suggesting a protective role of CGRP in this model. Activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway was both inhibited by RDN especially in the heart. These results suggest that the regulation of the renal sympathetic nerve in Ang II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiological changes is likely mediated by aldosterone, with CGRP involvement. PMID:27661131

  17. Production of human type II collagen using an efficient baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Yao, Lunguang; Liang, Zhisheng; Yan, Donghua; Li, Zhuo; Huang, Yadong; Sun, Jingchen

    2016-12-01

    Human type II collagen is a macromolecular protein found throughout the human body. The baculovirus expression vector system is one of the most ideal systems for the routine production and display of recombinant eukaryotic proteins in insect, larvae, and mammalian cells. We use this system to express a full-length gene, human type II collagen cDNA (4257 bp), in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells (Sf9), Bombyx mori cells, and silkworm larvae. In this study, the expression of human type II collagen gene in both insect cells and silkworm larvae was purified by nickel column chromatography, leading to 300-kDa bands in SDS-PAGE and western blotting indicative of collagen α-chains organized in a triple-helical structure. About 1 mg/larva human type II collagen is purified from silkworm skin, which shows a putative large scale of collagen production way. An activity assay of recombinant human type II collagen expressed by silkworm larvae demonstrated that the recombinant protein has considerable bioactive properties. Scanning electron microscopy of purified proteins clearly reveals randomly distributed and pitted structures. We conclude that the baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system can be used as an efficient platform for express active human type II collagen and other complicated eukaryotic proteins.

  18. Expression of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage in a rat knee contracture model.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Ando, Akira; Chimoto, Eiichi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ichiro; Sasano, Yasuyuki; Onoda, Yoshito; Suda, Hideaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the expression patterns of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage after immobilization in a rat knee contracture model in 3 specific areas (noncontact area, transitional area, contact area). The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were rigidly immobilized at 150 degrees of flexion using screws and a rigid plastic plate. Sham-operated animals had holes drilled in the femur and the tibia and screws inserted but were not plated. The expression patterns of collagen types I and II in each area were evaluated by in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression of collagen type II in the noncontact area was decreased by ISH but appeared unchanged when examined by IHC. In the transitional and contact areas, the expression of collagen type II was initially shown to have decreased and then increased at the hypertrophic chondrocytes by ISH but appeared decreased by IHC. Quantitative PCR revealed the decreased expression of type II collagen in the contact area. Immunostaining of collagen type I was increased at the noncontact area and transitional areas. Alterations of collagen types I and II expression may also affect the degeneration of articular cartilage after immobilization and the changes were different in the three areas.

  19. Achieving stability through editing and chaperoning: regulation of MHC class II peptide binding and expression.

    PubMed

    Busch, Robert; Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Roh, Sujin; Lee, Andrew W; Harding, James J; Burster, Timo; Hornell, Tara M C; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2005-10-01

    In antigen-presenting cells (APCs), loading of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules with peptides is regulated by invariant chain (Ii), which blocks MHC II antigen-binding sites in pre-endosomal compartments. Several molecules then act upon MHC II molecules in endosomes to facilitate peptide loading: Ii-degrading proteases, the peptide exchange factor, human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM), and its modulator, HLA-DO (DO). Here, we review our findings arguing that DM stabilizes a globally altered conformation of the antigen-binding groove by binding to a lateral surface of the MHC II molecule. Our data imply changes in the interactions between specificity pockets and peptide side chains, complementing data from others that suggest DM affects hydrogen bonds. Selective weakening of peptide/MHC interactions allows DM to alter the peptide repertoire. We also review our studies in cells that highlight the ability of several factors to modulate surface expression of MHC II molecules via post-Golgi mechanisms; these factors include MHC class II-associated Ii peptides (CLIP), DM, and microbial products that modulate MHC II traffic from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this context, we discuss possible mechanisms by which the association of some MHC II alleles with autoimmune diseases may be linked to their low CLIP affinity.

  20. Increased expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs is associated with 3MC-induced mouse tumor.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shekhar; Dey, Sumit K; Das, Provas; Jana, Siddhartha S

    2011-11-01

    Administration of the chemical carcinogen, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), in the hind leg induces the progressive formation of tumors in mice within 110 days. Previous reports suggest that transformation of muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes of tumor formation. Molecular events that lead to transformation of normal cells to atypical cells are not well understood. Here, we investigate the effect of 3MC on the expression of nonmuscle myosin IIs (NM IIs) which are known to be involved in cell migration, division and adhesion. Mass spectroscopy analysis reveals that tumor tissue contains 64.5% NM II-A, 34% II-B and only 1.5% II-C of total NM IIs, whereas these three isoforms of NM IIs are undetectable by mass spectroscopy in normal tissue associated with the tumor (NTAT) from the hind leg. Quantification of heavy chain mRNAs of NM II suggests that tumor tissue contains 25.7-fold and 19.03-fold more of NM II-A and II-B, respectively, compared with NTAT. Unlike NM II-B, which is detected only after tumor formation, II-A is detectable as early as day 7 after a second dose of 3MC. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy reveals that fibroblast cells which are sparsely distributed in normal tissue are densely populated but of atypical shape in the tumor. These findings suggest that transformation of fibroblasts or non-fibroblast cells to atypical, cancerous cells is associated with increased levels of NM II-A and NM II-B expression in the 3MC-induced tumor mouse model. 3MC-induced transformation is further demonstrated in C2C12 myotubes.

  1. Interplay between polymerase II- and polymerase III-assisted expression of overlapping genes.

    PubMed

    Lukoszek, Radoslaw; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-11-15

    Up to 15% of the genes in different genomes overlap. This architecture, although beneficial for the genome size, represents an obstacle for simultaneous transcription of both genes. Here we analyze the interference between RNA-polymerase II (Pol II) and RNA-polymerase III (Pol III) when transcribing their target genes encoded on opposing strands within the same DNA fragment in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of a Pol II-dependent protein-coding gene negatively correlated with the transcription of a Pol III-dependent, tRNA-coding gene set. We suggest that the architecture of the overlapping genes introduces an additional layer of control of gene expression.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-I stimulates H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation: Dominant role of PI-3'K/Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Alexia, Catherine; Fourmatgeat, Pascal; Delautier, Daniele; Groyer, Andre . E-mail: groyer@bichat.inserm.fr

    2006-04-15

    Although hepatocytes are the primary source of endocrine IGF-I and -II in mammals, their autocrine/paracrine role in the dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis during hepatocarcinogenesis and in hepatocarcinomas (HCC) remains to be elucidated. Indeed, IGF-II and type-I IGF receptors are overexpressed in HCC cells, and IGF-I is synthesized in adjacent non-tumoral liver tissue. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of type-I IGF receptor signaling on H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation, as estimated by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation into DNA. IGF-I stimulated the rate of DNA synthesis of serum-deprived H{sub 4}II cells, stimulation being maximal 3 h after the onset of IGF-I treatment and remaining elevated until at least 6 h. The IGF-I-induced increase in DNA replication was abolished by LY294002 and only partially inhibited by PD98059, suggesting that phosphoinositol-3' kinase (PI-3'K) and to a lesser extent MEK/Erk signaling were involved. Furthermore, the 3- to 19-fold activation of the Erks in the presence of LY294002 suggested a down-regulation of the MEK/Erk cascade by PI-3'K signaling. Finally, the effect of IGF-I on DNA replication was almost completely abolished in clones of H{sub 4}II cells expressing a dominant-negative form of Akt but was unaltered by rapamycin treatment of wild-type H{sub 4}II cells. Altogether, these data support the notion that the stimulation of H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation by IGF-I is especially dependent on Akt activation but independent on the Akt/mTOR signal0009i.

  3. Histone Acetylation and the Regulation of Major Histocompatibility Class II Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Luo, Y

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are essential for processing and presenting exogenous pathogen antigens to activate CD4(+) T cells. Given their central role in adaptive immune responses, MHC class II genes are tightly regulated in a tissue- and activation-specific manner. The regulation of MHC class II gene expression involves various transcription factors that interact with conserved proximal cis-acting regulatory promoter elements, as well as MHC class II transactivator that interacts with a variety of chromatin remodeling machineries. Recent studies also identified distal regulatory elements within MHC class II gene locus that provide enormous insight into the long-range coordination of MHC class II gene expression. Novel therapeutic modalities that can modify MHC class II genes at the epigenetic level are emerging and are currently in preclinical and clinical trials. This review will focus on the role of chromatin remodeling, particularly remodeling that involves histone acetylation, in the constitutive and inducible regulation of MHC class II gene expression. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Properly timed exposure to central ANG II prevents behavioral sensitization and changes in angiotensin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Santollo, Jessica; Whalen, Philip E.; Speth, Robert C.; Clark, Stewart D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) is susceptible to rapid desensitization, but that more chronic treatments that stimulate ANG II lead to sensitization of several responses. It is unclear, however, if the processes of desensitization and sensitization interact. To test for differences in AT1R expression associated with single or repeated injections of ANG II, we measured AT1R mRNA in nuclei that control fluid intake of rats given ANG II either in a single injection or divided into three injections spaced 20 min apart. Rats given a single injection of ANG II had more AT1R mRNA in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the periventricular tissue surrounding the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) than did controls. The effect was not observed, however, when the same cumulative dose of ANG II was divided into multiple injections. Behavioral tests found that single daily injections of ANG II sensitized the dipsogenic response to ANG II, but a daily regimen of four injections did not cause sensitization. Analysis of 125I-Sar1-ANG II binding revealed a paradoxical decrease in binding in the caudal AV3V and dorsal median preoptic nucleus after 5 days of single daily injections of ANG II; however, this effect was absent in rats treated for 5 days with four daily ANG II injections. Taken together, these data suggest that a desensitizing treatment regimen prevents behavior- and receptor-level effects of repeated daily ANG II. PMID:25354729

  5. MHC II expression in the CNS after long-term demyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, B.; Aquino, D.A.; Raine, C.S.

    1995-07-01

    The ability of chronically demyelinated central nervous system (CNS) tissue to express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules has been measured in mouse spinal cord cultures exposed for 1 and 3 weeks to demyelinating anti-white matter (WM) serum. From previous studies, It was known that after 3 weeks of demyelination in vitro, such cultures are incapable of remyelination. In the present report, MHC II levels were evaluated by immunocytochemistry and by Western and Northern blots. The results have shown that after both 1 and 3 weeks of exposure to myelinotoxic anti-WM serum, the cultures retained the ability to express MHC II and this could be further upregulated by incubation with interferon {gamma} (IFN{gamma}). Control groups showed increased expression of MHC II with age. By immunocytochemistry, all groups of cultures expressed high levels of MHC II and all groups showed upregulation after IFN{gamma} treatment. Anti-WM-treated cultures demonstrated slightly higher levels of MHC II than controls. Morphologically, the MHC II expression was associated with the surface of astrocytes. Semiquantitative analysis by Western blotting confirmed the increase in class II MHC expression in the long-term treated cultures after IFN{gamma} exposure, revealing no differences between anti-WM-treated and complement-treated cultures. This was also supported by Northern blotting which showed similar mRNA levels in both groups. These findings suggest that long-term demyelinated CNS tissue still possesses the ability to interact with CD4{sup +} T cells, observations of significance to the expansion of the chronic multiple sclerosis lesion. 50 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Production and characterization of the celery mismatch endonuclease CEL II using baculovirus/silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jaeman; Fukushima, Mai; Nagata, Yudai; Fujii, Mie; Xu, Jian; Nishi, Oumi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection by nucleases has become a more important tool in clinical and biological researches. There are several kinds of single-stranded nucleases for detecting mismatched DNAs. One of them, CEL II, was isolated from Apium graveolens and cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of mismatch. High-throughput mutation scanning requires large quantity of CEL II endonuclease. Here, we demonstrate high-level expression of CEL II using silkworm-baculovirus system. The recombinant CEL II secreted in silkworm hemolymph was glycosylated and susceptible to N-glycosidase F. Additionally, larger metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) were able to replace Mg(2+) and enhanced mismatch cleavage activity of CEL II. These results indicate that the silkworm-baculovirus platform is a good alternative system to obtain the functional CEL II.

  7. Comparison of Class II HLA antigen expression in normal and carcinomatous human breast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.J.; Maurizis, J.C.; Chassagne, J.; Chollet, P.; Plagne, R.

    1985-03-01

    Class II HLA antigen expression in breast carcinoma and normal breast gland cells was compared using a method more accurate than immunofluorescence. This new method involves labeling membrane proteins with /sup 131/I and the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody with /sup 125/I. The isolation and purification of the doubly labeled (/sup 125/I-/sup 131/I) immune complex was performed by affinity chromatography and chromatofocusing successively. When the specific activity of glycoproteins is known, the amount of glycoprotein which bind specifically to the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody can be deduced. In breast carcinoma cells, 1.5 to 2% of the purified glycoproteins bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody, whereas less than 0.3% of normal breast gland cells binds. In contrast, leukemic cells, of which 80 to 90% possess Class II HLA antigens, 2 to 3% of Class II HLA glycoproteins bind specifically with the anti-Class II HLA monoclonal antibody.

  8. Expression of class II cytokine genes in children's skin.

    PubMed

    Reemann, Paula; Reimann, Ene; Suutre, Siim; Paavo, Maarjaliis; Loite, Ulvi; Porosaar, Orm; Abram, Kristi; Silm, Helgi; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli

    2014-07-01

    Immune regulation of the skin plays an important role in susceptibility and development of illnesses. The aim of our study was to localise the interleukin (IL)-10 family of cytokines, in children's skin and to determine possible age-related differences in the expression level. The mRNA expression level of IL10, IL19, IL20, IL22, IL24, IL26, IL28B, IL29 and their receptors IL10RA, IL10RB, IL20RA, IL20RB, IL22RA1, IL22RA2, IL28RA was compared in skin biopsies of children and adults and in childrens' skin cells by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry was performed to confirm the qRT-PCR findings. We found age-related differences in the expression of IL10RB, IL20, IL20RA, IL22RA1, IL22RA2, IL26 and IL28RA genes. Cell type-dependent expression of IL10 family cytokines was apparent in the skin. In addition to previously known differences in systemic immunological response of adults and children, the present results reveal differences in immune profile of adult and juvenile skin.

  9. Regional expression and androgen regulation of carbonic anhydrase IV and II in the adult rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, K; Fleming, R E; Kneer, J; Sly, W S; Rajaniemi, H

    1999-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is implicated in the acidification of epididymal fluid and thereby in the regulation of sperm maturation and motility. Among the CA isoenzymes, CA IV and II have been shown to be present in the rat epididymal duct epithelium. In the present study, we examined the expression and androgen regulation of CA IV and II mRNAs along the epididymal duct. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of CA II mRNA in all regions of the epididymis with the strongest signal in the corpus region, while CA IV mRNA was expressed predominantly in the corpus epididymidis. Three days after bilateral castration, CA IV and II mRNAs were decreased by 80-90% in the corpus epididymidis. Testosterone (T) replacement maintained the expression of CA mRNAs at 50-60% of the control levels, indicating that circulating androgens alone are not sufficient to recover the CA expression in the corpus region. However, unilateral castration did not affect the mRNA levels of CA IV and II, suggesting that factors in testicular fluid do not play a major role in the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis. Immunoblot analysis showed that CA IV protein levels decreased 3 days after castration, while T administration maintained the protein expression virtually at the precastration levels. These data demonstrate that mRNAs for CA IV and II are predominantly expressed in the corpus region of the rat epididymis and can be regulated by androgens in that region. The present data suggest that the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis by androgens contributes to the known androgen effects on epididymal acidification.

  10. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  11. Notch maintains Drosophila type II neuroblasts by suppressing expression of the Fez transcription factor Earmuff.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaosu; Xie, Yonggang; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-07-15

    Notch signaling is crucial for maintaining neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and heterogeneity; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In Drosophila, loss of Notch prematurely terminates the self-renewal of larval type II neuroblasts (NBs, the Drosophila NSCs) and transforms type II NBs into type I NBs. Here, we demonstrate that Notch maintains type II NBs by suppressing the activation of earmuff (erm) by Pointed P1 (PntP1). We show that loss of Notch or components of its canonical pathway leads to PntP1-dependent ectopic Erm expression in type II NBs. Knockdown of Erm significantly rescues the loss-of-Notch phenotypes, and misexpression of Erm phenocopies the loss of Notch. Ectopically expressed Erm promotes the transformation of type II NBs into type I NBs by inhibiting PntP1 function and expression in type II NBs. Our work not only elucidates a key mechanism of Notch-mediated maintenance of type II NB self-renewal and identity, but also reveals a novel function of Erm.

  12. Characterization of Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II expressed heterologously in Pichia pastoris for better biofinishing and biostoning.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sutanu; Basu, Asitava; Halder, Umesh Chandra; Sen, Soumitra Kumar

    2012-06-01

    The endoglucanase II of Trichoderma reesei is considered the most effective enzyme for biofinishing cotton fabrics and biostoning denim garments. However, the commercially available preparation of endoglucanase II is usually mixed with other cellulase components, especially endoglucanase I, resulting in hydrolysis and weight loss of garments during biofinishing and biostoning. We thus isolated the endoglucanase II gene from T. reesei to express this in Pichia pastoris, under the control of a methanol-inducible AOX1 promoter, to avoid the presence of other cellulase components. A highly expressible Mut(+) transformant was selected and its expression in BMMH medium was found most suitable for the production of large amounts of the recombinant protein. Recombinant endoglucanase II was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity, and functionally characterized by activity staining. The specific activity of recombinant endoglucanase II was found to be 220.57 EU/mg of protein. Purified recombinant endoglucanase II was estimated to have a molecular mass of 52.8 kDa. The increase in molecular mass was likely due to hyperglycosylation. Hyperglycosylation of recombinant endoglucanase II secreted by P. pastoris did not change the temperature or pH optima as compared to the native protein, but did result in increased thermostability. Kinetic analysis showed that recombinant endoglucanase was most active against amorphous cellulose, such as carboxymethyl cellulose, for which it also had a high affinity.

  13. Type II collagen is transiently expressed during avian cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Daniels, K J; Jensen, K L; Solursh, M

    1994-08-01

    We present new evidence of the temporal and spatial expression of type II collagen in the embryonic chick heart during the very early stages of its development. In particular, we emphasize the distribution of its mRNA and protein during valve formation. Type II collagen as well as several other fibrillar collagens (types I, III, and V) are present in stage 18 endocardial cushion mesenchymal cells. At stage 23, alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts and the cognate polypeptide colocalize in the atrioventricular valves. As development proceeds, the relative abundance of alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts decreases during the stages studied (stages 22 to 45; day 3.5 to day 19) as assayed by RNA blotting of extracts of whole hearts. Type II collagen protein was immunologically undetectable in stage 38 (day 12) hearts, although collagens I, III, and V persisted and localize in the valve regions, in the endothelial lining of the heart, and in the epicardium. In keeping with other observations of type II collagen expression in non-chondrogenic regions of a variety of vertebrate embryos, the avian heart also exhibits transient type II collagen expression.

  14. Over-expression of Topoisomerase II Enhances Salt Stress Tolerance in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    John, Riffat; Ganeshan, Uma; Singh, Badri N.; Kaul, Tanushri; Reddy, Malireddy K.; Sopory, Sudhir K.; Rajam, Manchikatla V.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerases are unique enzymes having an ability to remove or add DNA supercoils and untangle the snarled DNA. They can cut, shuffle, and religate DNA strands and remove the torsional stress during DNA replication, transcription or recombination events. In the present study, we over-expressed topoisomerase II (TopoII) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabaccum) and examined its role in growth and development as well as salt (NaCl) stress tolerance. Several putative transgenic plants were generated and the transgene integration and expression was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot analyses, and RT-PCR analysis respectively. Percent seed germination, shoot growth, and chlorophyll content revealed that transgenic lines over-expressing the NtTopoIIα-1 gene exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt (150 and 200 mM NaCl) stress. Moreover, over-expression of TopoII lead to the elevation in proline and glycine betaine levels in response to both concentrations of NaCl as compared to wild-type. In response to NaCl stress, TopoII over-expressing lines showed reduced lipid peroxidation derived malondialdehyde (MDA) generation. These results suggest that TopoII plays a pivotal role in salt stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27630644

  15. The association between chemosensitivity and Pgp, GST-π and Topo II expression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ming; Wang, Lin; Chen, Xin; Cao, Ruixue; Li, Peifeng

    2013-12-10

    To investigate the relationship between P-glycoprotein (Pgp), glutathione S-transferase π (GST-π) and topoisomerase II (Topo II) expression and human gastric cancer chemoresistance in vitro. Primary single-cell suspensions were prepared from fresh specimens of primary gastric cancer and exposed to hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), cisplatin (CDDP), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), adriamycin (ADM) and mitomycin (MMC) for 48 h. Cell metabolic activity and rate of inhibition were evaluated using tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Pgp, GST-π and Topo II expression was determined in gastric carcinoma tissue samples using immunohistochemistry. Chemosensitivity of the gastric cancer cells varied; the rates of inhibition of cells exposed to HCPT, CDDP and 5-FU were significantly higher than that of cells exposed to ADM and MMC (p < 0.05). Gastric cancer cells with Pgp expression were resistant to ADM and HCPT (p = 0.008 and p = 0.011, respectively). Cells resistant to 5-FU, CDDP and MMC had significantly higher GST-π expression (p < 0.05). Topo II expression was significantly lower in cells resistant to HCPT, ADM and MMC (p < 0.05). Pgp and GST-π expression may contribute to primary resistance of gastric cancer cells to some chemotherapeutic drugs, while Topo II expression may indicate HCPT, ADM and MMC sensitivity. Pgp, GST-π and Topo II detection and the MTT assay could be used as predictors in chemotherapeutic drug administration and for identifying drug resistance in gastric carcinoma. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/3448329111142964.

  16. [Gene expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor II in the epidermis of pathological scar].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Rui; An, Gang; Liu, Shun-Li; Wei, Feng-Cai

    2012-08-01

    To study the gene expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TbetaR II) in pathological scar. Twenty samples of pathological scar were collected from 20 burn or trauma patients hospitalized in the General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Command from 2007 to 2009. Twenty specimens of epidermal layer were obtained from the middle portion and the edge of pathological scars. Twenty normal skin specimens which were located more than 10 cm away from the lesion sites of 20 patients were collected as self-controls. Serum from 1-2 mL whole blood were obtained from each of the 20 patients for second self-control. Eight normal skin specimens from 8 patients without pathological scar, discarded from un-related operations, were also collected as negative-control. Positive expressions of TbetaR II in three different skin specimens were determined with biotin-streptavidin-peroxidase staining. Gene expressions of TbetaR II in all specimens were compared with PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and gene sequencing. Data were processed with Fisher's exact test. Positive expression of TbetaR II in pathological scar epidermis was lower than that in normal skin specimen of patients with pathological scar or normal skin specimen of patients without pathological scar, and TbetaR II was mainly located in the basal layer of epidermis. Positive expressions of TbetaR II were seldom found in acanthocytes, granular cells, and cuticle or even non-existing. No abnormality of TbetaR II was found in normal skin epidermis or serum samples of pathological scar patients or normal skin epidermis of patients without pathological scar. TbetaR II expressing in 8 specimens of epidermis of pathological scar showed abnormal electrophoresis pattern at poly A fragments hand and loss of one A base in DNA fragment (P = 0.044). There may he abnormal gene expression of TbetaR II in pathological scar epidermis. Replantation of epidermis of scar may increase the risk of scar recurrence

  17. Stably transfected adherent cancer cell models with decreased expression of 5'-nucleotidase cN-II.

    PubMed

    Bricard, Gabriel; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Machon, Christelle; Dumontet, Charles; Jordheim, Lars Petter

    2016-12-01

    The 5'-nucleotidase cN-II has been shown to be associated with the sensitivity to nucleoside analogues, the survival of cytarabine treated leukemia patients and to cell proliferation. Due to the lack of relevant cell models for solid tumors, we developed four cell lines with low cN-II expression and characterized them concerning their in vitro sensitivity to cancer drugs and their intracellular nucleotide pools. All four cell models had an important decrease of cN-II expression but did not show modified sensitivity, cell proliferation or nucleotide pools. Our cell models will be important for the study of the role of cN-II in human cancer cells.

  18. Bacterial Suppression of RNA Polymerase II-Dependent Host Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Ines; Lutay, Nataliya; Stork, Christoph; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a bacterial carrier state in the urinary tract that resembles commensalism at other mucosal sites. ABU strains often lack the virulence factors that characterize uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains and therefore elicit weak innate immune responses in the urinary tract. In addition, ABU strains are active modifiers of the host environment, which they influence by suppressing RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent host gene expression. In patients inoculated with the ABU strain E. coli 83972, gene expression was markedly reduced after 24 h (>60% of all regulated genes). Specific repressors and activators of Pol II-dependent transcription were modified, and Pol II Serine 2 phosphorylation was significantly inhibited, indicating reduced activity of the polymerase. This active inhibition included disease–associated innate immune response pathways, defined by TLR4, IRF-3 and IRF-7, suggesting that ABU strains persist in human hosts by active suppression of the antibacterial defense. In a search for the mechanism of inhibition, we compared the whole genome sequences of E. coli 83972 and the uropathogenic strain E. coli CFT073. In addition to the known loss of virulence genes, we observed that the ABU strain has acquired several phages and identified the lytic Prophage 3 as a candidate Pol II inhibitor. Intact phage particles were released by ABU during in vitro growth in human urine. To address if Prophage 3 affects Pol II activity, we constructed a Prophage 3 negative deletion mutant in E. coli 83972 and compared the effect on Pol II phosphorylation between the mutant and the E. coli 83972 wild type (WT) strains. No difference was detected, suggesting that the Pol II inhibitor is not encoded by the phage. The review summarizes the evidence that the ABU strain E. coli 83972 modifies host gene expression by inhibition of Pol II phosphorylation, and discusses the ability of ABU strains to actively create an environment that

  19. Functional expression of the signaling complex sensory rhodopsin II/transducer II from Halobacterium salinarum in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jun; Chizhov, Igor; Engelhard, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Sensory rhodopsin II, a photoreceptor from Halobacterium salinarum (HsSRII), in complex with its cognate transducer protein (HsHtrII) triggers the photophobic response via a cytoplasmic two-component signaling cascade. HsHtrII possess in addition to the HsSRII binding and the cytoplasmic domains an extracellular serine-receptor domain. Here we describe the properties of HsSRII and HsHtrII and those of various shortened transducer analogs, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. HsSRII displays the photocycle typical of archaeal photosensors with prolonged kinetics. Using an isothermal titration calorimetric analysis for this complex a dissociation constant of 1.1 microm was obtained similar to that of the corresponding transducer/receptor pair from Natronobacterium pharaonis. A shortened transducer lacking the extracellular and cytoplasmic domain is also sufficient to bind the receptor with a slightly lower affinity. The dissociation constant of serine binding to the extracellular domain was determined to be about 5 microm. This result is in line with the proposal that the extracellular domain indeed is a serine receptor.

  20. Finding regulatory modules from gene expression data II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao; Kloster, Morten; Wingreen, Ned

    2004-03-01

    We tested the Progressive Iterative Signature Algorithm (PISA) on synthetic data and on a large gene-expression data set for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. For synthetic data, the false-positive rate for identifying transcriptional modules was extremely low. For the yeast data set of 1012 experimental conditions for 6206 genes, PISA identified a large number of modules, most of which could be readily assigned to specific biological functions. These included many small modules (with as few as five genes) that could not be easily found by ISA. We compared the set of modules we found to the Gene Ontology annotation database and found many significant overlaps. The modules identified by PISA also compare favorably to experimentally and theoretically determined sets of genes regulated by individual transcription factors.

  1. Molecular cloning, expression, and evolution analysis of type II CHI gene from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Shuzhen; Wang, Jiangshan; Zhao, Chuanzhi; Guan, Hongshan; Hou, Lei; Li, Changsheng; Xia, Han; Wang, Xingjun

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone isomerase (CHI) plays critical roles in plant secondary metabolism, which is important for the interaction between plants and the environment. CHI genes are widely studied in various higher plants. However, little information about CHI genes is available in peanut. Based on conservation of CHI gene family, we cloned the peanut type II CHI gene (AhCHI II) cDNA and genome sequence. The amino acid sequence of peanut CHI II was highly homologous to type II CHI from other plant species. qRT-PCR results showed that peanut CHI II is mainly expressed in roots; however, peanut CHI I is mainly expressed in tissues with high content of anthocyanin. Gene duplication and gene cluster analysis indicated that CHI II was derived from CHI I 65 million years ago approximately. Our gene structure analysis results are not in agreement with the previous hypothesis that CHI II was derived from CHI I by the insertion of an intron into the first exon. Moreover, no positive selection pressure was found in CHIs, while, 32.1 % of sites were under neutral selection, which may lead to mutation accumulation and fixation during great changes of environment.

  2. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and -II and IGF-binding proteins-1, -2, and -3 in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus: correlation with metabolic control and height attainment.

    PubMed

    Strasser-Vogel, B; Blum, W F; Past, R; Kessler, U; Hoeflich, A; Meiler, B; Kiess, W

    1995-04-01

    The putative effects of diabetes and metabolic control on circulating levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBPs) remain controversial. In the present study, serum levels of IGF-I and IGF-II and IGFBP-1, -2, and -3 were measured in 58 patients (age, 0.8-17 yr) with treated (51 subjects) or untreated (7 subjects) insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and were compared with the levels in normal subjects. In the untreated patients IGF-I and IGF-II were decreased as compared with the healthy controls. In the treated diabetics IGF-I and IGF-II were reduced; IGFBP-2 (only in prepubertal subjects) and IGFBP-3 were increased. Furthermore, age-adjusted values of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 were lower in prepubertal than in pubertal patients. Regression analysis revealed a negative correlation between hemoglobin (Hb)A1c and standard deviation scores (SDS) of IGF-I and a positive association between HbA1c and IGFBP-1 SDS or IGFBP-2 SDS. In the treated patients HbA1c was positively related to IGFBP-1 SDS and IGFBP-2 SDS when applying simple regression analysis and to IGFBP-2 SDS when using a multiple regression model. Strong correlations were observed between height SDS and IGF-I SDS, IGF-II SDS, and IGFBP-3 SDS in prepubertal subjects who had had IDDM for at least 2 yr, but not in adolescents. Such correlations have also been found in healthy children and adolescents. In conclusion; 1) IDDM is associated with alterations of the IGF-IGFBP system, which are partially accounted for by differences in metabolic control and pubertal status; 2) the lower plasma concentrations of serum IGF-I may play a role in the pathogenesis of growth impairment of poorly controlled prepubertal, but not pubertal, children and adolescents with IDDM; and 3) in addition, a potential role of the altered IGF-IGFBP system for the development of diabetic late complications is hypothesized.

  3. Major histocompatibility complex class II antigen expression in B and T cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M E; Holgate, C S; Williamson, J M; Grigor, I; Quirke, P; Bird, C C

    1987-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study of 46 B and T cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, using monoclonal antibodies to the products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen subregions, DP, DQ, and DR, showed that most B and T cell lymphomas express these antigens. Both coordinate and non-coordinate expression of MHC class II antigens was observed, but this did not correlate with immunological phenotype, morphological grade, or proliferation index as determined by flow cytometry. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3546388

  4. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae W.; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R.; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W.; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at ∼95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days on collagen-coated dishes with or without DCI for the final 3 days. In freshly isolated cells, highly expressed genes included SFTPA/B/C, SCGB1A, IL8, CXCL2, and SFN in addition to ubiquitously expressed genes. Transcript abundance was correlated between fetal and adult cells (r = 0.88), with a subset of 187 genes primarily related to inflammation and immunity that were expressed >10-fold higher in adult cells. During control culture, expression increased for 8.1% of expressed genes and decreased for ∼4% including 118 immune response and 10 surfactant-related genes. DCI treatment promoted lamellar body production and increased expression of ∼3% of probed genes by ≥1.5-fold; 40% of these were also induced in fetal cells. Highly induced genes (≥10-fold) included PGC, ZBTB16, DUOX1, PLUNC, CIT, and CRTAC1. Twenty-five induced genes, including six genes related to surfactant (SFTPA/B/C, PGC, CEBPD, and ADFP), also had decreased expression during control culture and thus are candidates for hormonal regulation in vivo. Our results further define the adult human type II cell molecular phenotype and demonstrate that a subset of genes remains hormone responsive in cultured adult cells. PMID:20382749

  5. Methionine adenosyltransferase II beta subunit gene expression provides a proliferative advantage in human hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Chantar, Maria L; García-Trevijano, Elena R; Latasa, M Ujue; Martín-Duce, Antonio; Fortes, Puri; Caballería, Juan; Avila, Matías A; Mato, José M

    2003-04-01

    Of the 2 genes (MAT1A, MAT2A) encoding methionine adenosyltransferase, the enzyme that synthesizes S-adenosylmethionine, MAT1A, is expressed in liver, whereas MAT2A is expressed in extrahepatic tissues. In liver, MAT2A expression associates with growth, dedifferentiation, and cancer. Here, we identified the beta subunit as a regulator of proliferation in human hepatoma cell lines. The beta subunit has been cloned and shown to lower the K(m) of methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha2 (the MAT2A product) for methionine and to render the enzyme more susceptible to S-adenosylmethionine inhibition. Methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha2 and beta subunit expression was analyzed in human and rat liver and hepatoma cell lines and their interaction studied in HuH7 cells. beta Subunit expression was up- and down-regulated in human hepatoma cell lines and the effect on DNA synthesis determined. We found that beta subunit is expressed in rat extrahepatic tissues but not in normal liver. In human liver, beta subunit expression associates with cirrhosis and hepatoma. beta Subunit is expressed in most (HepG2, PLC, and Hep3B) but not all (HuH7) hepatoma cell lines. Transfection of beta subunit reduced S-adenosylmethionine content and stimulated DNA synthesis in HuH7 cells, whereas down-regulation of beta subunit expression diminished DNA synthesis in HepG2. The interaction between methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha2 and beta subunit was demonstrated in HuH7 cells. Our findings indicate that beta subunit associates with cirrhosis and cancer providing a proliferative advantage in hepatoma cells through its interaction with methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha2 and down-regulation of S-adenosylmethionine levels.

  6. Global expression for representing cohesive-energy curves. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1993-01-01

    Schlosser et al. (1991) showed that the R dependence of the cohesive energy of partially ionic solids may be characterized by a two-term energy relationship consisting of a Coulomb term arising from the charge transfer, delta-Z, and a scaled universal energy function, E*(a *), which accounts for the partially covalent character of the bond and for repulsion between the atomic cores for small R; a* is a scaled length. In the paper by Schlosser et al., the normalized cohesive-energy curves of NaCl-structure alkali-halide crystals were generated with this expression. In this paper we generate the cohesive-energy curves of several families of partially ionic solids with different crystal structures and differing degrees of ionicity. These include the CsCl-structure Cs halides, and the Tl and Ag halides, which have weaker ionic bonding than the alkali halides, and which have the CsCl and NaCl structures, respectively. The cohesive-energy-curve parameters are then used to generate theoretical isothermal compression curves for the Li, Na, K, Cs, and Ag halides. We find good agreement with the available experimental compression data.

  7. Global expression for representing cohesive-energy curves. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1993-01-01

    Schlosser et al. (1991) showed that the R dependence of the cohesive energy of partially ionic solids may be characterized by a two-term energy relationship consisting of a Coulomb term arising from the charge transfer, delta-Z, and a scaled universal energy function, E*(a *), which accounts for the partially covalent character of the bond and for repulsion between the atomic cores for small R; a* is a scaled length. In the paper by Schlosser et al., the normalized cohesive-energy curves of NaCl-structure alkali-halide crystals were generated with this expression. In this paper we generate the cohesive-energy curves of several families of partially ionic solids with different crystal structures and differing degrees of ionicity. These include the CsCl-structure Cs halides, and the Tl and Ag halides, which have weaker ionic bonding than the alkali halides, and which have the CsCl and NaCl structures, respectively. The cohesive-energy-curve parameters are then used to generate theoretical isothermal compression curves for the Li, Na, K, Cs, and Ag halides. We find good agreement with the available experimental compression data.

  8. Role of Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-Trisphosphate (PIP3) 5-Phosphatase Skeletal Muscle- and Kidney-enriched Inositol Polyphosphate Phosphatase (SKIP) in Myoblast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Ijuin, Takeshi; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are essential for the development, regeneration, and hypertrophy of skeletal muscles. IGF-II promotes myoblast differentiation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), Akt, and mTOR signaling. Here, we report that skeletal muscle- and kidney-enriched inositol polyphosphate phosphatase (SKIP) negatively regulates myogenesis through inhibition of IGF-II production and attenuation of the IGF-II-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. We also demonstrate that SKIP expression, which was markedly elevated during differentiation, was controlled by MyoD in C2C12 cells. Expression of SKIP inhibited IGF-II at the transcription level. These results indicate that SKIP regulates MyoD-mediated muscle differentiation. Silencing of SKIP increased IGF-II transcription and myoblast differentiation. Furthermore, knockdown of SKIP resulted in thick myotubes with a larger number of nuclei than that in control C2C12 cells. Taken together, these data indicate that SKIP controls the IGF-II-PI 3-kinase-Akt-mTOR auto-regulation loop during myogenesis. Our findings identify SKIP as a key regulator of muscle cell differentiation. PMID:22815484

  9. Multiple expressed MHC class II loci in salmonids; details of one non-classical region in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Harstad, Håvard; Lukacs, Morten F; Bakke, Hege G; Grimholt, Unni

    2008-01-01

    Background In teleosts, the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules reside on different linkage groups as opposed to tetrapods and shark, where the class I and class II genes reside in one genomic region. Several teleost MHC class I regions have been sequenced and show varying number of class I genes. Salmonids have one major expressed MHC class I locus (UBA) in addition to varying numbers of non-classical genes. Two other more distant lineages are also identifyed denoted L and ZE. For class II, only one major expressed class II alpha (DAA) and beta (DAB) gene has been identified in salmonids so far. Results We sequenced a genomic region of 211 kb encompassing divergent MHC class II alpha (Sasa-DBA) and beta (Sasa-DBB) genes in addition to NRGN, TIPRL, TBCEL and TECTA. The region was not linked to the classical class II genes and had some synteny to genomic regions from other teleosts. Two additional divergent and expressed class II sequences denoted DCA and DDA were also identified in both salmon and trout. Expression patterns and lack of polymorphism make these genes non-classical class II analogues. Sasa-DBB, Sasa-DCA and Sasa-DDA had highest expression levels in liver, hindgut and spleen respectively, suggestive of distinctive functions in these tissues. Phylogenetic studies revealed more yet undescribed divergent expressed MHC class II molecules also in other teleosts. Conclusion We have characterised one genomic region containing expressed non-classical MHC class II genes in addition to four other genes not involved in immune function. Salmonids contain at least two expressed MHC class II beta genes and four expressed MHC class II alpha genes with properties suggestive of new functions for MHC class II in vertebrates. Collectively, our data suggest that the class II is worthy of more elaborate studies also in other teleost species. PMID:18439319

  10. IMP-3 EXPRESSION IN BENIGN MELANOCYTIC NEVI, DYSPLASTIC NEVI AND MALIGNANT MELANOMA: PRELIMINARY FINDINGS IN BULGARIAN PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Chokoeva, A A; Ananiev, J; Wollina, U; Tana, C; Lotti, T; Cardoso, J C; Tchernev, G

    2015-01-01

    IMP-3 is generally considered as an oncofetal protein, which plays a critical role in regulation of cell proliferation via an IGF-II-dependent pathway in K562 leukemia cells. IMP-3 expression has been detected in malignancies with various origins, while its appearance in adult tissue is generally considered abnormal, with some exceptions. IMP3 is also considered a prognostic biomarker in patients with renal cell carcinoma and clear-cell type ovarian carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and in patients with poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma and uterine cervical carcinomas, testicular cancer and malignant melanoma. To our knowledge, no more than 4 PubMed-indexed studies have investigated the expression of IMP-3 in melanocytic lesions, namely its role in the differentiation between benign and malignant neoplasms. We investigated the expression of IMP-3 in a small series of benign melanocytic lesions, dysplastic nevi and melanomas, aiming to establish its significance as a marker for their distinction, comparing the results with those from the literature. IMP- 3 immunostaining was performed in 30 melanocytic lesions: 10 malignant melanomas, 10 dysplastic nevi and 10 benign melanocytic nevi. Our results revealed expression in 20% of dysplastic lesions and 40% of melanoma cases, while none of the benign nevi showed positive expression. These data contradict some of the results from other studies and raise some questions regarding the correlation between IMP- 3 and the degree of dysplasia of melanocytic nevi, as well as its potential relationship with prognostic parameters in melanoma, including tumor thickness and mitotic rate. Our results suggest that IMP-3 expression could be only an auxiliary marker for differentiation between dysplastic nevi and benign nevi, since although it is not expressed in all dysplastic lesions, staining correlates with the degree of dysplasia/atypia. It seems that IMP-3 expression is not a useful

  11. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  12. Basic Mechanisms of RNA Polymerase II Activity and Alteration of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23022618

  13. Increased hepatic expression of nitric oxide synthase type II in cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Qiu, Fa-Zu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role and effect of nitric oxide synthase type II (NOS II) in cirrhotic rats. METHODS: Expression of NOS II mRNA was detected by real time RT-PCR. The activity of nitric oxide synthase and serum levels of NO, systemic and portal hemodynamics and degrees of cirrhosis were measured with high sensitive methods. Chinese traditional medicine tetrandrine was used to treat cirrhotic rats and to evaluate the function of NO. Double-blind method was applied during the experiment. RESULTS: The concentration of NO and the activity of NOS were increased markedly at all stages of cirrhosis, and iNOSmRNA was greatly expressed. Meanwhile the portal-venous-pressure (PVP), and portal-venous-flow (PVF) were significantly increased. NO, NOS and iNOSmRNA were positively correlated to the quantity of hepatic fibrosis. Tetrandrine significantly inhibited NO production and the expression of iNOSmRNA. CONCLUSION: Increased hepatic expression of NOS II is one of the important causes of hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension. PMID:15222038

  14. Ectopic expression of HLA-DO in mouse dendritic cells diminishes MHC class II antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Fallas, Jennifer L; Tobin, Helen M; Lou, Olivia; Guo, Donglin; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Denzin, Lisa K

    2004-08-01

    The MHC class II-like molecule HLA-DM (DM) (H-2M in mice) catalyzes the exchange of CLIP for antigenic peptides in the endosomes of APCs. HLA-DO (DO) (H-2O in mice) is another class II-like molecule that is expressed in B cells, but not in other APCs. Studies have shown that DO impairs or modifies the peptide exchange activity of DM. To further evaluate the role of DO in Ag processing and presentation, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human HLA-DOA and HLA-DOB genes under the control of a dendritic cell (DC)-specific promoter. Our analyses of DCs from these mice showed that as DO levels increased, cell surface levels of A(b)-CLIP also increased while class II-peptide levels decreased. The presentation of some, but not all, exogenous Ags to T cells or T hybridomas was significantly inhibited by DO. Surprisingly, H-2M accumulated in DO-expressing DCs and B cells, suggesting that H-2O/DO prolongs the half-life of H-2M. Overall, our studies showed that DO expression impaired H-2M function, resulting in Ag-specific down-modulation of class II Ag processing and presentation.

  15. Effects of Jigsaw II Technique on Academic Achievement and Attitudes to Written Expression Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of a cooperative technique Jigsaw II (experimental group, n=42) and instructional teacher-centered teaching method (control group, n=38) on Turkish language teacher education department students' attitudes to written expression course (a course in which writing skills were taught), their academic achievement,…

  16. Effects of Jigsaw II Technique on Academic Achievement and Attitudes to Written Expression Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of a cooperative technique Jigsaw II (experimental group, n=42) and instructional teacher-centered teaching method (control group, n=38) on Turkish language teacher education department students' attitudes to written expression course (a course in which writing skills were taught), their academic achievement,…

  17. Conformational transition of DNA by dinuclear Pt(II) complexes causes cooperative inhibition of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yuta; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Komeda, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2017-06-01

    Recently, it was reported that a cationic tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear Pt(II) complex, 5-H-Y, is a promising anticancer drug candidate. Here, we investigated the effects of a series of tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear Pt(II) complexes on the higher-order structure of DNA by using fluorescence and atomic force microscopies. The results showed that these dinuclear Pt(II) complexes cause marked shrinkage on the conformation of genomic DNA. We also found highly cooperative inhibitory effects of these drugs on in vitro gene expression. The unique mechanism of action of these dinuclear Pt(II) complexes is discussed in terms of their bridging effect on DNA segments.

  18. Angiotensin II Induces Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Activating TFEB-Mediated MuRF1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Du Bois, Philipp; Pablo Tortola, Cristina; Lodka, Doerte; Kny, Melanie; Schmidt, Franziska; Song, Kunhua; Schmidt, Sibylle; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Fielitz, Jens

    2015-08-14

    Skeletal muscle wasting with accompanying cachexia is a life threatening complication in congestive heart failure. The molecular mechanisms are imperfectly understood, although an activated renin-angiotensin aldosterone system has been implicated. Angiotensin (Ang) II induces skeletal muscle atrophy in part by increased muscle-enriched E3 ubiquitin ligase muscle RING-finger-1 (MuRF1) expression, which may involve protein kinase D1 (PKD1). To elucidate the molecular mechanism of Ang II-induced skeletal muscle wasting. A cDNA expression screen identified the lysosomal hydrolase-coordinating transcription factor EB (TFEB) as novel regulator of the human MuRF1 promoter. TFEB played a key role in regulating Ang II-induced skeletal muscle atrophy by transcriptional control of MuRF1 via conserved E-box elements. Inhibiting TFEB with small interfering RNA prevented Ang II-induced MuRF1 expression and atrophy. The histone deacetylase-5 (HDAC5), which was directly bound to and colocalized with TFEB, inhibited TFEB-induced MuRF1 expression. The inhibition of TFEB by HDAC5 was reversed by PKD1, which was associated with HDAC5 and mediated its nuclear export. Mice lacking PKD1 in skeletal myocytes were resistant to Ang II-induced muscle wasting. We propose that elevated Ang II serum concentrations, as occur in patients with congestive heart failure, could activate the PKD1/HDAC5/TFEB/MuRF1 pathway to induce skeletal muscle wasting. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Microbe-microbe interactions trigger Mn(II)-oxidizing gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jinsong; Bai, Yaohui; Men, Yujie; Qu, Jiuhui

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an important metal in geochemical cycles. Some microorganisms can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides, which can, in turn, affect the global cycles of other elements by strong sorption and oxidation effects. Microbe-microbe interactions have important roles in a number of biological processes. However, how microbial interactions affect Mn(II) oxidation still remains unknown. Here, we investigated the interactions between two bacteria (Arthrobacter sp. and Sphingopyxis sp.) in a co-culture, which exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity, although neither were able to oxidize Mn(II) in isolation. We demonstrated that the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity in co-culture was most likely induced via contact-dependent interactions. The expressed Mn(II)-oxidizing protein in the co-culture was purified and identified as a bilirubin oxidase belonging to strain Arthrobacter. Full sequencing of the bilirubin oxidase-encoding gene (boxA) was performed. The Mn(II)-oxidizing protein and the transcripts of boxA were detected in the co-culture, but not in either of the isolated cultures. This indicate that boxA was silent in Arthrobacter monoculture, and was activated in response to presence of Sphingopyxis in the co-culture. Further, transcriptomic analysis by RNA-Seq, extracellular superoxide detection and cell density quantification by flow cytometry indicate induction of boxA gene expression in Arthrobacter was co-incident with a stress response triggered by co-cultivation with Sphingopyxis. Our findings suggest the potential roles of microbial physiological responses to stress induced by other microbes in Mn(II) oxidation and extracellular superoxide production.

  20. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression distinguishes two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    All mature B cells coexpress major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, I-A and I-E, which are restriction elements required for antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells. However, the expression of class II during the early stages of B cell development has been unclear. We demonstrate here that there is a difference in the expression of class II during murine B cell development in the fetal liver and adult bone marrow (BM). These differences define two distinct B cell developmental pathways. The Fetal-type (FT) pathway is characterized by pre-B and immature IgM+ B cells generated in the fetal liver which initially lack all class II expression. In contrast, the Adult-type (AT) pathway is typified by B cells developing in the adult BM which express class II molecules from the pre-B cell stage. In vitro stromal cell cultures of sorted fetal liver and adult BM pro-B cells indicated that the difference in I-A expression during B cell development is intrinsic to the progenitors. In addition, we show that FT B cell development is not restricted to the fetal liver but occurs in the peritoneal cavities, spleens, liver, and BM of young mice up to at least 1 mo of age. The AT B cell development begins to emerge after birth but is, however, restricted to the BM environment. These findings indicate that there are two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny, each of which could contribute differentially to the immune repertoire and thus the functions of B cell subsets and lineages. PMID:7913950

  1. Heterologous protein expression in Trichoderma reesei using the cbhII promoter.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanju; Wei, Dongzhi; Wang, Wei

    2013-09-01

    To express homologous or heterologous proteins in fungi, a protein expression system using the promoter of cellobiohydrolase II gene (cbhII) was constructed by generating an expression vector called pWEIIF00. The obtained vector possesses the left and right borders, a hygromycin phosphotransferase B selective marker and a strong promoter and terminator of cbhII from Trichoderma reesei. It can easily undergo random recombination. The applicability of the vector was tested by red fluorescent protein gene (DsRed2) expression detection in T. reesei Rut C30. Using this system, a recombinant Cel5A variant, N342R (Qin et al., 2008), was then selected to express in Rut-C30. Compared to that of the parent strain, integration of the N342R gene resulted in 31.09% increased carboxymethyl-cellulose-degrading (CMCase) activity at pH 5.0 and 56.06% increased activity at pH 6.0. The increased CMCase activity of the recombinant strains would be beneficial for its application uses in multiple industries. The vector constructed in this study can used in fungi to produce industrial proteins.

  2. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  3. Purkinje cells express Angiotensin II AT(2) receptors at different developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Arce, María E; Sánchez, Susana I; Aguilera, Francisco López; Seguin, Leonardo R; Seltzer, Alicia M; Ciuffo, Gladys M

    2011-02-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) binds and activates two major receptors subtypes, namely AT(1) and AT(2). In the fetus, AT(2) receptors predominate in all tissues and decline shortly after birth, being restricted to a few organs including brain. Interpretation of the function of Ang II in the cerebellum requires a thorough understanding of the localization of Ang II receptors. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the localization of Ang II AT(2) receptors in the Purkinje cell (PC) layer during development. By binding autoradiography, a clear complementary pattern of AT(1) and AT(2) binding labeled by [(125)I] Ang II was observed in young rats within the cerebellar cortex. This pattern was present at the stages P8 and P15, but not at P30 and P60, where AT(2) binding appears low and superimposed with AT(1) binding. We demonstrate that AT(2) antibodies recognized postmitotic Purkinje cells, labeling the somata of these cells at all the stages studied, from P8 to P60, suggesting that PCs express these receptors from early stages of development until adulthood. In P8 and P15 animals, we observed a clear correspondence between immunolabeling and the well-defined layer observed by binding autoradiography. Confocal analysis allowed us to discard the co-localization of AT(2) receptors with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a glial marker. Double immunolabeling allowed us to demonstrate the co-localization of Ang II AT(2) receptors with zebrin II, a specific PC marker. Since PCs are the sole output signal from the cerebellar cortex and considering the role of cerebellum in movement control, the specific receptor localization suggests a potential role for Ang II AT(2) receptors in the cerebellar function.

  4. Expression and functional properties of the Streptococcus intermedius surface protein antigen I/II.

    PubMed

    Petersen, F C; Pasco, S; Ogier, J; Klein, J P; Assev, S; Scheie, A A

    2001-07-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is associated with deep-seated purulent infections. In this study, we investigated expression and functional activities of antigen I/II in S. intermedius. The S. intermedius antigen I/II appeared to be cell surface associated, with a molecular mass of approximately 160 kDa. Northern blotting indicated that the S. intermedius NCTC 11324 antigen I/II gene was transcribed as a monocistronic message. Maximum expression was seen during the early exponential phase. Insertional inactivation of the antigen I/II gene resulted in reduced hydrophobicity during early exponential phase, whereas no effect was detected during mid- and late exponential phases. Binding to human fibronectin and laminin was reduced in the isogenic mutant, whereas binding to human collagen types I and IV and to rat collagen type I was not significant for either the wild type or the mutant. Compared to the wild type, the capacity of the isogenic mutant to induce interleukin 8 (IL-8) release by THP-1 monocytic cells was significantly reduced. The results indicate that the S. intermedius antigen I/II is involved in adhesion to human receptors and in IL-8 induction.

  5. Transgenic wheat expressing a barley class II chitinase gene has enhanced resistance against Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sanghyun; Mackintosh, Caroline A.; Lewis, Janet; Heinen, Shane J.; Radmer, Lorien; Dill-Macky, Ruth; Baldridge, Gerald D.; Zeyen, Richard J.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a devastating disease of wheat worldwide. FHB causes yield reductions and contamination of grains with trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). The genetic variation in existing wheat germplasm pools for FHB resistance is low and may not provide sufficient resistance to develop cultivars through traditional breeding approaches. Thus, genetic engineering provides an additional approach to enhance FHB resistance. The objectives of this study were to develop transgenic wheat expressing a barley class II chitinase and to test the transgenic lines against F. graminearum infection under greenhouse and field conditions. A barley class II chitinase gene was introduced into the spring wheat cultivar, Bobwhite, by biolistic bombardment. Seven transgenic lines were identified that expressed the chitinase transgene and exhibited enhanced Type II resistance in the greenhouse evaluations. These seven transgenic lines were tested under field conditions for percentage FHB severity, percentage visually scabby kernels (VSK), and DON accumulation. Two lines (C8 and C17) that exhibited high chitinase protein levels also showed reduced FHB severity and VSK compared to Bobwhite. One of the lines (C8) also exhibited reduced DON concentration compared with Bobwhite. These results showed that transgenic wheat expressing a barley class II chitinase exhibited enhanced resistance against F. graminearum in greenhouse and field conditions. PMID:18467324

  6. Differential expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (amh) and anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII) in the teleost medaka.

    PubMed

    Klüver, Nils; Pfennig, Frank; Pala, Irene; Storch, Katja; Schlieder, Marlen; Froschauer, Alexander; Gutzeit, Herwig O; Schartl, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, the anti-Müllerian hormone (Amh) is responsible for the regression of the Müllerian ducts; therefore, Amh is an important factor of male sex differentiation. The amh gene has been cloned in various vertebrates, as well as in several teleost species. To date, all described species show a sexually dimorphic expression of amh during sex differentiation or at least in differentiated juvenile gonads. We have identified the medaka amh ortholog and examined its expression pattern. Medaka amh shows no sexually dimorphic expression pattern. It is expressed in both developing XY male and XX female gonads. In adult testes, amh is expressed in the Sertoli cells and in adult ovaries in granulosa cells surrounding the oocytes, like in mammals. To better understand the function of amh, we cloned the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII) ortholog and compared its expression pattern with amh, aromatase (cyp19a1), and scp3. During gonad development, amhrII is coexpressed with medaka amh in somatic cells of the gonads and shows no sexually dimorphic expression. Only the expression level of the Amh type II receptor gene was decreased noticeably in adult female gonads. These results suggest that medaka Amh and AmhrII are involved in gonad formation and maintenance in both sexes.

  7. A Coursewriter II Function (FCALC) For the Manipulation of Numerical and Algebraic Expressions. Systems Memo Number One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Authella; And Others

    Documentation of the Coursewriter II Function FCALC is provided. The function is designed for use on the IBM 1500 instructional system and has three major applications: 1) comparison of a numeric expression in buffer 5 with a numeric expression in buffer 0; 2) comparison of an algebraic expression in buffer 5 with an algebraic expression in buffer…

  8. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression during the development of human fetal cerebral occipital lobe, cerebellum, and hematopoietic organs.

    PubMed

    Wierzba-Bobrowicz, T; Kosno-Kruszewska, E; Gwiazda, E; Lechowicz, W

    2000-01-01

    In adults, under physiological conditions proteins of the major histocompatibility complex, class II (MHC II) molecules are synthesized and then presented on the surface of the cells known under a common name as antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs), microglia, macrophages, ameboid microglia and lymphocytes B are qualified as APCs. The aim of present study was to evaluate the expression of MHC II molecules in the central nervous system (CNS) and hematopoietic organs during the fetal development. Observations were made on the cerebral occipital lobe, cerebellum, thymus, spleen and liver of 30 normal human fetuses, between 11 and 22 week of gestation (GW). Histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques were used to identify cells with expression of MHC II molecules. In the brain, MHC II molecules were detected on macrophages/ameboid microglia in meninges, choroid plexus and single cells of ramified microglia in deeper layers of the cortex and white matter. In the other organs besides macrophages and dendritic cells, MHC II molecules were also immunopositive in thymic epithelial cells, and in the spleen and liver also in other cells of stroma and lobule. The expression of MHC II molecules on so extensive population of cells, at an early stage of the fetal development, may evidence their significant involvement in histogenesis and morphogenesis. It seems that in adults the complex of MHC II with protein is originated from the foreign antigen. On the contrary, during normal fetal development the complex of MHC II with protein origins most probably from the fetus own structures.

  9. Zebrin II Is Expressed in Sagittal Stripes in the Cerebellum of Dragon Lizards (Ctenophorus sp.).

    PubMed

    Wylie, Douglas R; Hoops, Daniel; Aspden, Joel W; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Aldolase C, also known as zebrin II (ZII), is a glycolytic enzyme that is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells of the vertebrate cerebellum. In both mammals and birds, ZII is expressed heterogeneously, such that there are sagittal stripes of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+) alternating with stripes of Purkinje cells with little or no expression (ZII-). In contrast, in snakes and turtles, ZII is not expressed heterogeneously; rather all Purkinje cells are ZII+. Here, we examined the expression of ZII in the cerebellum of lizards to elucidate the evolutionary origins of ZII stripes in Sauropsida. We focused on the central netted dragon (Ctenophorus nuchalis) but also examined cerebellar ZII expression in 5 other dragon species (Ctenophorus spp.). In contrast to what has been observed in snakes and turtles, we found that in these lizards, ZII is heterogeneously expressed. In the posterior part of the cerebellum, on each side of the midline, there were 3 sagittal stripes consisting of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+) alternating with 2 sagittal stripes with weaker ZII expression (ZIIw). More anteriorly, most of the Purkinje cells were ZII+, except laterally, where the Purkinje cells did not express ZII (ZII-). Finally, all Purkinje cells in the auricle (flocculus) were ZII-. Overall, the parasagittal heterogeneous expression of ZII in the cerebellum of lizards is similar to that in mammals and birds, and contrasts with the homogenous ZII+ expression seen in snakes and turtles. We suggest that a sagittal heterogeneous expression of ZII represents the ancestral condition in stem reptiles which was lost in snakes and turtles.

  10. Aldosterone Does Not Contribute to Renal p21 Expression During the Development of Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Daisuke; Lei, Bai; Kitada, Kento; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hirohito; Deguchi, Kazushi; Masaki, Tsutomu; Minamino, Tohru; Nishiyama, Akira

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND We recently reported that aldosterone-induced cellular senescence via an increase in p21, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, in rat kidney and cultured human proximal tubular cells. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of aldosterone to the renal p21 expression and senescence during the development of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced hypertension. METHODS Mice received 1% salt in drinking water and vehicle or AngII, and were divided into five groups: 1, vehicle; 2, AngII; 3, AngII+olmesartan; 4, AngII+eplerenone; and 5, AngII+hydralazine. RESULTS Plasma aldosterone levels were increased by AngII infusion. Eplerenone further elevated the plasma aldosterone level, but olmesartan and hydralazine did not. AngII group showed significant increase in blood pressure compared to vehicle. Olmesartan and hydralazine, but not eplerenone, suppressed the AngII-salt hypertension. The increase in urinary protein excretion by AngII-salt was suppressed only by olmesartan. AngII with high salt induced a greater expression of p21 mRNA in the kidney than vehicle. Olmesartan abolished the increase in p21 expression, whereas neither eplerenone nor hydralazine affected it. AngII with high salt did not change the expression of p16, another CDK inhibitor. The mice lacking p21 showed identical changes on blood pressure and albuminuria in response to AngII with high salt compared to wild type. CONCLUSION These results suggest that aldosterone does not predominantly contribute to renal p21 expression and senescence during the development of AngII-salt hypertension, and that the increase in p21 in the kidney is not likely involved in the development of hypertension and albuminuria. PMID:22113172

  11. Increased dietary sodium alters Fos expression in the lamina terminalis during intravenous angiotensin II infusion.

    PubMed

    Bealer, Steven L; Metcalf, Cameron S; Heyborne, Ryan

    2007-03-01

    These studies examined the effects of increased dietary sodium on expression of Fos, the protein product of c-fos, in forebrain structures in the rat following intravenous infusion with angiotensin II (AngII). Animals were provided with either tap water (Tap) or isotonic saline solution (Iso) as their sole drinking fluid for 3-5 weeks prior to testing. Rats were then implanted with catheters in a femoral artery and vein. The following day, the conscious, unrestrained animals received iv infusion of either isotonic saline (Veh), AngII, or phenylephrine (Phen) for 2 h. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously throughout the procedure. Brains were subsequently processed for evaluation of Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-Li IR) in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT), the subfornical organ (SFO), and the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO). Fos-Li IR was significantly increased in the SFO and OVLT of animals consuming both Tap and Iso following AngII, but not Phen, compared to Veh infusions. Furthermore, Fos-Li IR in the MnPO was increased following AngII infusion in rats consuming a high sodium diet, but not in animals drinking Tap. These data suggest that increased dietary sodium sensitizes the MnPO neurons to excitatory input from brain areas responding to circulating AngII.

  12. Differential expression profile of long non-coding RNA in cardiomyocytes autophagy induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Yang, Fan; Xu, Ru-Ming; Zhang, Yun-Yan; Li, Yang; Liu, Su-Xuan; Zhang, Guan-Xin; Wang, Guo-Kun; Ma, Li-Ping

    2017-10-01

    Autophagy is a ubiquitous intracellular process for cellular homeostasis maintenance by recycling damaged protein and organelles. Dysregulation of cardiomyocytes autophagic activity is implicated in various heart diseases. Recent studies had demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) played crucial roles on modulation of autophagic activity. In this study, we first established an angiotensin II-induced autophagy model on neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Western blot assay confirmed that the expression of Beclin 1 and the conversion of soluble LC3-I to lipid bound LC3-II were significantly increased at 12 h after angiotensin II stimulation, but the cardiomyocytes surface area and hypertrophic markers expression had no significant change. Then microarray analysis and real-time PCR were applied to detect differentially expressed lncRNAs during cardiomyocytes autophagy. A total of 1,249 lncRNAs were determined as differentially expressed, including 700 upregulated lncRNAs and 549 downregulated lncRNAs. LncRNAs subgroup analysis showed there were 43 transcribed ultra-conserved noncoding RNAs (T-UCRs) differentially expressed in cardiomyocytes autophagy, of which 26 T-UCRs were upregulated and 17 T-UCRs were downregulated. Bioinformatics analysis further showed that 94 differentially expressed lncRNAs contained potential binding sites of miR-22, a pro-hypertrophic and pro-autophagic microRNA. Therefore, these differentially expressed lncRNAs might play critical roles in cardiomyocytes autophagy. This finding would provide an experimental basis for future investigation on ischemic heart disease. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. A new set of differentially expressed signaling genes is early expressed in coffee leaf rust race II incompatible interaction.

    PubMed

    Diola, Valdir; Brito, Giovani G; Caixeta, Eveline T; Pereira, Luiz F P; Loureiro, Marcelo E

    2013-08-01

    New races of coffee rust are overcoming resistance genes available in germplasm and cultivated cultivars and bringing recently some coffee-producing countries in severe economic challenge. The objective of this study was to identify the genes that are linked to host resistance to the major coffee rust race II. In our study, we have identified and studied a segregating population that has a single monogenic resistant gene to coffee rust. Coffee leaves of parents, resistant, and susceptible genotypes of the F2 generation plants were inoculated with pathogen spores. A differential analysis was performed by combined cDNA-AFLP and bulk segregant analysis (BSA) in pooled samples collected 48 and 72 h postinoculation, increasing the selectiveness for differential gene expression. Of 108 differential expressed genes, between 33,000 gene fragments analyzed, 108 differential expressed genes were identified in resistant plants. About 20 and 22 % of these resistant-correlated genes are related to signaling and defense genes, respectively. Between signaling genes, the major subclass corresponds to receptor and resistant homolog genes, like nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR), Pto-like, RLKs, Bger, and RGH1A, all not previously described in coffee rust responses. The second major subclass included kinases, where two mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK) are identified. Further gene expression analysis was performed for 21 selected genes by real-time PCR gene expression analysis at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postinoculation. The expression of genes involved in signaling and defense was higher at 24 and 72 h after inoculation, respectively. The NBS-LRR was the more differentially expressed gene between the signaling genes (four times more expressed in the resistant genotype), and thraumatin (PR5) was the more expressed between all genes (six times more expressed). Multivariate analysis reinforces the significance of the temporal separation of identified signaling and

  14. Cloning, soluble expression, and purification of the RNA polymerase II subunit RPB5 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chhetri, Gaurav; Ghosh, Arabinda; Chinta, Ramesh; Akhtar, Sohail; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning, expression, and single-step homogeneous purification of RNA polymerase II subunit RPB5 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. RPB5 is a 210 amino acid nuclear protein that functions as the fifth largest subunit of polymerase II and plays a central role in transcription. The gene that codes for RPB5 was generated by amplification by polymerase chain reaction. It was then inserted in the expression vector pET28a(+) under the transcriptional control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter and lac operator. BL21(DE3) Escherichia coli strain transformed with the rpb5 expression vector pET28a(+)-rpb5 accumulates large amounts of a soluble protein of about 30 kDa (25 kDa plus 5 kDa double His6-Tag at N and C-terminal). The protein was purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. RPB5 recombinant protein was further confirmed by immunoblotting with anti-His antibody. In this study, the expression and purification procedures have provided a simple and efficient method to obtain pure RPB5 in large quantities. This will provide an opportunity to study the role of S. cerevisiae RPB5 in gene expression and transcription regulation. Furthermore, it can provide additional knowledge of the interaction partners of RPB5 during various steps of transcription and gene expression.

  15. Observed surface lysine acetylation of human carbonic anhydrase II expressed in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Brian P; Lomelino, Carrie L; Salguero, Antonieta L; Driscoll, Jenna M; Pinard, Melissa A; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acetylation of surface lysine residues of proteins has been observed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), an organism that has been extensively utilized for recombinant protein expression. This post-translational modification is shown to be important in various processes such as metabolism, stress-response, transcription, and translation. As such, utilization of E. coli expression systems for protein production may yield non-native acetylation events of surface lysine residues. Here we present the crystal structures of wild-type and a variant of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA II) that have been expressed in E. coli and exhibit surface lysine acetylation and we speculate on the effect this has on the conformational stability of each enzyme. Both structures were determined to 1.6 Å resolution and show clear electron density for lysine acetylation. The lysine acetylation does not distort the structure and the surface lysine acetylation events most likely do not interfere with the biological interpretation. However, there is a reduction in conformational stability in the hCA II variant compared to wild type (∼4°C decrease). This may be due to other lysine acetylation events that have occurred but are not visible in the crystal structure due to intrinsic disorder. Therefore, surface lysine acetylation events may affect overall protein stability and crystallization, and should be considered when using E. coli expression systems. PMID:26266677

  16. Expression of SATB1, MTI/II and Ki-67 in Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Jankowska-Konsur, Alina; Kobierzycki, Christopher; Reich, Adam; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Bieniek, Andrzej; Dziegiel, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A genome organizer protein, special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1, (SATB1), was recently shown to play an important role in the development and spread of various malignancies. Metallothioneins I and II (MTI/II) are multifunctional proteins involved, among others, in cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in tumors. The role and relevance of these factors in mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, is not fully understood. The aim of the present analysis was to evaluate the expression and potential correlation of SATB1, MTI/II and Ki-67 with clinicopathological data in MF. We performed immunohistochemical analysis for SATB1, MTI/II and Ki-67 on 90 cases of MF and 19 controls (chronic benign dermatoses). The expression of SATB1 and Ki-67 was analyzed in cancer cell nuclei, whereas nuclear and cytoplasmic expressions of MTI/II were scored separately (nMT, cMT; respectively). We recorded a significantly higher expression of SATB1 and cMT in MF compared to the control group (p<0.002, p=0.04, respectively, Student's t-test). We also noted significant differences in the mean (±SD) expression of nMT and cMT in advanced MF compared to early MF, (1.4±1.3 vs. 0.9±0.9, 4.1±3.8 vs. 2.5±2.9, respectively; p=0.04 for both). Similarly, Ki-67 expression was significantly higher in advanced MF (p<0.01). The expression of SATB1, cMT and Ki-67 was significantly higher in more infiltrating skin lesions (p<0.001, p=0.08 and p<0.001, respectively). Regarding extracutaneous involvement, a higher expression of SATB1, nMT, cMT and Ki-67 was found in patients with clinical or histological involvement of lymph nodes (N1-3 vs. N0) (p<0.001, p=0.002, p<0.001 and p=0.1, respectively). A marked correlation was observed between SATB1 and Ki-67 (Spearman correlation test: r=0.53, p<0.001). No associations between SATB1, nMT and cMT expression and demographic data nor overall survival were found. Our study provides data on the differences in the

  17. Clinicopathologic Significance of Survivin Expression in Relation to CD133 Expression in Surgically Resected Stage II or III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanlu; Lee, Mi-Ra; Choi, EunHee; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2017-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells have been investigated as new targets for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment. We recently reported that CD133+ colon cancer cells showed chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil through increased survivin expression and proposed the survivin inhibitor YM155 as an effective therapy for colon cancer in an in vitro study. Here, we investigate the relationship between survivin and CD133 expression in surgically resected CRC to identify whether the results obtained in our in vitro study are applicable to clinical samples. Methods We performed immunohistochemical staining for survivin and CD133 in surgically resected tissue from 187 stage II or III CRC patients. We also comparatively analyzed apoptosis according to survivin and CD133 expression using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling. Results The results of the Mantel-Haenszel test established a linear association between nuclear survivin and CD133 expression (p = .018), although neither had prognostic significance, according to immunohistochemical expression level. No correlation was found between survivin expression and the following pathological parameters: invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, or histologic differentiation (p > .05). The mean apoptotic index in survivin+ and CD133+ tumors was higher than that in negative tumors: 5.116 ± 4.894 in survivin+ versus 4.103 ± 3.691 in survivin– (p = .044); 5.165 ± 4.961 in CD133+ versus 4.231 ± 3.812 in CD133– (p = .034). Conclusions As observed in our in vitro study, survivin expression is significantly related to CD133 expression. Survivin may be considered as a new therapeutic target for chemoresistant CRC. PMID:27989099

  18. IL-33 promotes MHC class II expression in murine mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomonobu; Egusa, Chizu; Maeda, Tatsuo; Numata, Takafumi; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs), recognized as tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic origin, are involved in cellular and pathological manifestations of allergic disorders including atopic dermatitis. IL-33, a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, activates Th2-type immune responses, and promotes the degranulation and maturation of MCs. However, it is uncertain whether IL-33 treatment induces mature mast cells to acquire the characteristics of the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage.We investigated the effect of IL-33 on the MHC class II expression and function of murine mast cells. IL-33-treated mature murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were analyzed by FACS, real-time PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and Western blotting. The morphology and degranulation activity of BMMCs and T-cell activation by BMMCs were also examined. BMMCs treated with IL-33 for 10 days induced cell surface expression of the MHC class II protein, whereas the expression of FcεRI and c-kit was not affected by IL-33. The expression of CIITA, driven from pIII and pIV, was up-regulated in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The amount of PU.1 mRNA and protein significantly increased in IL-33-treated BMMCs. The ChIP assay showed PU.1 binding to CIITA pIII, and enhanced histone acetylation due to IL-33 treatment. Syngeneic T cells were activated by co-culture with IL-33-treated BMMCs, although the expression of the co-stimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80, CD86, and PDL-1, was not detected. Mast cells express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33, probably due to enhanced recruitment of PU.1 to CIITA pIII, resulting in transactivation of CIITA and MHC class II. IL-33 is an important cytokine in allergic disorders. Mast cells have the ability to express MHC class II after prolonged exposure to IL-33 in a murine model. IL-33 holds a key to understanding the etiology of atopic dermatitis.

  19. Expression of Functional MHC Class II Molecules By a Mouse Pro-B Cell Clone

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Amanda G.; Meyer, Valérie; Ceredig, Rhodri

    1995-01-01

    We describe here the G12 pro-B cell clone that has been isolated from an IL-7 transgenic mouse. This clone has the phenotype B220+, BP-1+ , HSA +, CD43+ λ5+ , and CD25-, and has its Ig locus in a germline configuration. G12 cells spontaneously express cell-surface MHC class II molecules, although to a much lesser extent than the mature M12.4.1 B-cell lymphoma. G12 cells can process and present the native Hen Egg Lysozyme (HEL) to an MHC class II-restricted T-cell hybridoma. The efficiency of presentation is inferior to that obtained with M12.4.1 cells. This is the first report where a pro-B cell can serve as APC in an MHC class II-restricted presentation. PMID:9700358

  20. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4+ T cells. ldlr−/− syk−/− mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr−/− mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. PMID:25946330

  1. Polycistronic expression and purification of the ESCRT-II endosomal trafficking complex.

    PubMed

    Hierro, Aitor; Kim, Jaewon; Hurley, James H

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells use sophisticated mechanisms to direct protein traffic between subcellular compartments. In eukaryotic cells, transmembrane proteins are delivered for degradation in the lysosome or yeast vacuole via multivesicular bodies. The sorting of proteins into lumenal vesicles within multivesicular bodies is directed by the three ESCRT protein complexes. Here we describe the expression and purification of the ESCRT-II complex using the polycistronic expression vector pST39 developed by Tan. In a modification of Tan's procedure, Pfu polymerase amplification with overlapping oligonucleotides was used to generate the translation cassettes for subcloning into pST39 expression vector in a single step. This approach reduces the number of restriction sites and subcloning steps required to express a heterooligomeric protein complex, facilitating rapid screening of multiple complexes and complex variants for crystallization or biochemical characterization.

  2. High expression of anti-apoptotic genes in grade I and II meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Tirapelli, Daniela Pretti; Menezes, Sarah Bomfim; Franco, Indira Maynart; Lustosa, Isis Lacrose; Rodrigues, Andressa Romualdo; Novais, Paulo Cézar; Santiago, Antônio César Mendes; Peria, Fernanda Maris; Serafini, Luciano Neder; Marinho, Alexandre Magno da Nóbrega; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Tirapelli, Luís Fernando

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the expression of c-FLIP, XIAP, Bcl-2, caspase 3, 8 and 9, cytochrome c, APAF 1 and Smac/DIABLO genes related to apoptosis pathways. The gene expression was evaluated in 30 meningiomas (WHO grades I and II) and in 10 normal samples (from arachnoid tissue) through PCR-RT. The results showed higher expression of anti-apoptotic genes in meningiomas when compared to the control group, which had a low expression of pro-apoptotic genes. There is a possible block in the activation of caspases through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in meningiomas. c-FLIP modulates caspase 8 and, by inhibiting its activation due to the lack of connection with the receiver, there is a block to the FAS activation of apoptosis by its extrinsic pathway.

  3. CASME II: An Improved Spontaneous Micro-Expression Database and the Baseline Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wen-Jing; Li, Xiaobai; Wang, Su-Jing; Zhao, Guoying; Liu, Yong-Jin; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Fu, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    A robust automatic micro-expression recognition system would have broad applications in national safety, police interrogation, and clinical diagnosis. Developing such a system requires high quality databases with sufficient training samples which are currently not available. We reviewed the previously developed micro-expression databases and built an improved one (CASME II), with higher temporal resolution (200 fps) and spatial resolution (about 280×340 pixels on facial area). We elicited participants' facial expressions in a well-controlled laboratory environment and proper illumination (such as removing light flickering). Among nearly 3000 facial movements, 247 micro-expressions were selected for the database with action units (AUs) and emotions labeled. For baseline evaluation, LBP-TOP and SVM were employed respectively for feature extraction and classifier with the leave-one-subject-out cross-validation method. The best performance is 63.41% for 5-class classification. PMID:24475068

  4. Polycistronic RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNA interference based on BIC/miR-155

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kwan-Ho; Hart, Christopher C.; Al-Bassam, Sarmad; Avery, Adam; Taylor, Jennifer; Patel, Paresh D.; Vojtek, Anne B.; Turner, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a valuable tool for analysis of gene function. We have developed new RNA polymerase II expression vectors for RNAi, designated SIBR vectors, based upon the non-coding RNA BIC. BIC contains the miR-155 microRNA (miRNA) precursor, and we find that expression of a short region of the third exon of mouse BIC is sufficient to produce miR-155 in mammalian cells. The SIBR vectors use a modified miR-155 precursor stem–loop and flanking BIC sequences to express synthetic miRNAs complementary to target RNAs. Like RNA polymerase III driven short hairpin RNA vectors, the SIBR vectors efficiently reduce target mRNA and protein expression. The synthetic miRNAs can be expressed from an intron, allowing coexpression of a marker or other protein with the miRNAs. In addition, intronic expression of a synthetic miRNA from a two intron vector enhances RNAi. A SIBR vector can express two different miRNAs from a single transcript for effective inhibition of two different target mRNAs. Furthermore, at least eight tandem copies of a synthetic miRNA can be expressed in a polycistronic transcript to increase the inhibition of a target RNA. The SIBR vectors are flexible tools for a variety of RNAi applications. PMID:16614444

  5. Perinatal exposure to alcohol reduces the expression of complexins I and II.

    PubMed

    Zink, Mathias; Araç, Gülsemin; Frank, Stefanie Th; Gass, Peter; Gebicke-Härter, Peter J; Spanagel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to alcohol (PEA) induces general developmental and specific neuropsychiatric disturbances. Ethanol affects amino acid neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. We were interested in the transcriptional effects of ethanol on the expression of complexins I and II, two synaptic vesicle proteins (SVP) with relevance for cognition and memory. We exposed pregnant Wistar inbred rats (N=4) and their pups until postnatal day 8 (P8) in vapor chambers and performed in situ-hybridizations regarding complexins I and II at P8 as well as neurobehavioral testing in adult animals of the same litters. At P8, serum ethanol levels of 281+/-58 mg/dl were achieved. PEA animals presented a pronounced retardation of postnatal growth. Significantly lower expression levels of complexin I was observed in CA1, together with trends of reductions in other hippocampal and cortical regions. Complexin II was found reduced in anterior cingulate, prefrontal and fronto-parietal cortex. Adult rats of exposed litters showed worse performance in hippocampus-dependent learning (Morris water maze). The observed suppression of complexins I and II reveals disturbed synaptic plasticity and corresponds with long lasting, ethanol-induced deficits of learning and memory. Further investigations should focus on other synaptic vesicle protein genes in order to unravel the molecular basis of ethanol-induced neurocognitive disabilities.

  6. Gene expression patterns during somatic embryo development and germination in maize Hi II callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Che, Ping; Love, Tanzy M; Frame, Bronwyn R; Wang, Kan; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Howell, Stephen H

    2006-09-01

    Gene expression patterns were profiled during somatic embryogenesis in a regeneration-proficient maize hybrid line, Hi II, in an effort to identify genes that might be used as developmental markers or targets to optimize regeneration steps for recovering maize plants from tissue culture. Gene expression profiles were generated from embryogenic calli induced to undergo embryo maturation and germination. Over 1,000 genes in the 12,060 element arrays showed significant time variation during somatic embryo development. A substantial number of genes were downregulated during embryo maturation, largely histone and ribosomal protein genes, which may result from a slowdown in cell proliferation and growth during embryo maturation. The expression of these genes dramatically recovered at germination. Other genes up-regulated during embryo maturation included genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes (nucleases, glucosidases and proteases) and a few storage genes (an alpha-zein and caleosin), which are good candidates for developmental marker genes. Germination is accompanied by the up-regulation of a number of stress response and membrane transporter genes, and, as expected, greening is associated with the up-regulation of many genes encoding photosynthetic and chloroplast components. Thus, some, but not all genes typically associated with zygotic embryogenesis are significantly up or down-regulated during somatic embryogenesis in Hi II maize line regeneration. Although many genes varied in expression throughout somatic embryo development in this study, no statistically significant gene expression changes were detected between total embryogenic callus and callus enriched for transition stage somatic embryos.

  7. Skeletal muscle major histocompatibility complex class I and II expression differences in adult and juvenile dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki; Sallum, Adriana Maluf Elias; Silva, Clovis Artur; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze major histocompatibility complex expression in the muscle fibers of juvenile and adult dermatomyositis. METHOD: In total, 28 untreated adult dermatomyositis patients, 28 juvenile dermatomyositis patients (Bohan and Peter's criteria) and a control group consisting of four dystrophic and five Pompe's disease patients were analyzed. Routine histological and immunohistochemical (major histocompatibility complex I and II, StreptoABComplex/HRP, Dakopatts) analyses were performed on serial frozen muscle sections. Inflammatory cells, fiber damage, perifascicular atrophy and increased connective tissue were analyzed relative to the expression of major histocompatibility complexes I and II, which were assessed as negatively or positively stained fibers in 10 fields (200X). RESULTS: The mean ages at disease onset were 42.0±15.9 and 7.3±3.4 years in adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, respectively, and the symptom durations before muscle biopsy were similar in both groups. No significant differences were observed regarding gender, ethnicity and frequency of organ involvement, except for higher creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels in adult dermatomyositis (p<0.050). Moreover, a significantly higher frequency of major histocompatibility complex I (96.4% vs. 50.0%, p<0.001) compared with major histocompatibility complex II expression (14.3% vs. 53.6%, p = 0.004) was observed in juvenile dermatomyositis. Fiber damage (p = 0.006) and increased connective tissue (p<0.001) were significantly higher in adult dermatomyositis compared with the presence of perifascicular atrophy (p<0.001). The results of the histochemical and histological data did not correlate with the demographic data or with the clinical and laboratory features. CONCLUSION: The overexpression of major histocompatibility complex I was an important finding for the diagnosis of both groups, particularly for juvenile dermatomyositis, whereas there was lower levels of expression

  8. Cloning and expression analysis in mature individuals of two chicken type-II GnRH (cGnRH-II) genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangfei; Hu, Wei; Wang, Yaping; Zhu, Zuoyan

    2004-08-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a conservative neurodecapeptide family, which plays a crucial role in regulating the gonad development and in controlling the final sexual maturation in vertebrate. Two differing cGnRH-II cDNAs of common carp, namely cGnRH-II cDNA1 and cDNA2, were firstly cloned from the brain by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) and reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The length of cGnRH-II cDNA1 and cDNA2 was 622 and 578 base pairs (bp), respectively. The cGnRH-II precursors encoded by two cDNAs consisted of 86 amino acids, including a signal peptide, cGnRH-II decapeptide and a GnRH-associated peptide (GAP) linked by a Gly-Lys-Arg proteolytic site. The results of intron trapping and Southern blot showed that two differing cGnRH-II genes in common carp genome were further identified, and that two genes might exist as a single copy. The multi-gene coding of common carp cGnRH-II gene offered novel evidence for gene duplication hypothesis. Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, expression and relative expression levels of cGnRH-II genes were detected in five dissected brain regions, pituitary and gonad of common carp. With the exception of no mRNA2 in ovary, two cGnRH-II genes could be expressed in all the detected tissues. However, expression levels showed an apparent difference in different brain regions, pituitary and gonad. According to the expression characterization of cGnRH-II genes in brain areas, it was presumed that cGnRH-II might mainly work as the neurotransmitter and neuromodulator and also operate in the regulation for the GnRH releasing. Then, the expression of cGnRH-II genes in pituitary and gonad suggested that cGnRH-II might act as the autocrine or paracrine regulator.

  9. Knockdown of mineralocorticoid or angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus prevents angiotensin II hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aidong; Huang, Bing S; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2014-01-01

    Circulating Ang II activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) – angiotensin II (Ang II) – angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) pathway in the hypothalamus. To obtain insights into the actual neuronal projections involved, adeno-associated virus carrying small interfering RNA against either AT1aR (AAV-AT1aR-siRNA) or MR (AAV-MR-siRNA) were infused into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in Wistar rats. Intra-PVN infusion of AAV-AT1aR-siRNA or AAV-MR-siRNA decreased AT1R or MR expression in the PVN but not in the subfornical organ (SFO) or supraoptic nucleus (SON). Subcutaneous infusion of Ang II at 500 ng kg−1 min−1 for 2 weeks increased mean arterial pressure by 60–70 mmHg, and increased AT1R and MR expression in the SFO, SON and PVN. Intra-PVN AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R but not MR expression in the PVN, and MR-siRNA prevented MR but not AT1R expression in the PVN. The increases in AT1R and MR expression in both the SFO and the SON were not changed by the two AAV-siRNAs. Specific knockdown of AT1R or MR in the PVN by AAV-siRNA each prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension. Prevention of the subcutaneous Ang II-induced increase in MR but not the increase in AT1R by knockdown of MR and vice versa suggests an independent regulation of MR and AT1R expression in the PVN. Both AT1R and MR activation in the PVN play a critical role in Ang II-induced hypertension in rats. PMID:24973408

  10. Expression of functional recombinant scorpion beta-neurotoxin Css II in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T M; Quick, M W; Sakai, T T; Krishna, N R

    2000-06-01

    The gene for a beta-neurotoxin [Centruroides suffusus suffusus toxin II (Css II)] from the scorpion C. suffusus suffusus was synthesized by recursive PCR and cloned into the expression vector, pET15b. This recombinant vector was transformed into a thioredoxin mutant host bacterial cell, AD 494(DE3)pLysS, and expression was induced with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). Although the level of expression was low, the recombinant toxin was found only in the soluble fraction with no evidence for the formation of inclusion bodies as had been observed previously with other scorpion toxins. The recombinant Css II was purified by successive ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectral measurements indicate that the protein has a native structure with no indication of denatured species. The recombinant neurotoxin inhibits the uptake of [(3)H]GABA [gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)] in neuronal cells as effectively as natural beta-toxins.

  11. Differential expression of Prx I and II in mouse testis and their up-regulation by radiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keesook; Park, Ji-Sun; Kim, Yun-Jeong; Soo Lee, Yong Soo; Sook Hwang, Tae Sook; Kim, Dae-Joong; Park, Eun-Mi; Park, Young-Mee

    2002-08-16

    Testis is one of the most sensitive organs to ionizing radiation. The present study was designed to unravel the possible role of antioxidant proteins, peroxiredoxin I and II (Prx I and II) in the testis. Our results show that Prx I and II are constitutively expressed in the testis and their expression levels are decreased to some extent as the testis develops. Interestingly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed a preferential expression of Prx I and II in Leydig and Sertoli cells, respectively. Neither Prx I nor Prx II expression was obvious in the testicular germ cells including spermatogonia and spermatocytes. Ionizing radiation exerted oxidative stress on the testis and induced apoptosis primarily in the germ cells. When the irradiated testis was examined, the Prx system was found to be transiently up-regulated. Taken together, we suggest that the relative radiation-resistance of Leydig and Sertoli cells could be attributed in part to the antioxidant function of the Prx system in these cells.

  12. Characterization of the common bean uricase II and its expression in organs other than nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Capote-Maínez, N; Sánchez, F

    1997-01-01

    Uricase II is a purine metabolic enzyme highly induced in root nodules during the symbiosis established between legumes and bacteria of the genera Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium. Here we describe the characterization of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodule uricase II cDNA and show that uricase II is encoded by a single gene in the bean genome. This gene is also expressed in cotyledons, roots, and hypocotyls during bean seedling establishment, and an anti-uricase antibody recognizes the protein in different seedling organs. Uricase II has also been found in Leucaena leucocephala seedlings, suggesting that it participates during seedling establishment in legumes that do not transport ureides. A 50-kD polypeptide that is detected by the anti-uricase antibody is found in cotyledons during seedling development. This higher-molecular-mass form is also detected in developing roots and hypocotyls but not in nodules. In situ hybridization experiments in root seedlings showed uricase II transcripts in the metaxylem parenchyma cells and phloem fibers of the vascular system. PMID:9414545

  13. Characterization of the common bean uricase II and its expression in organs other than nodules.

    PubMed

    Capote-Maínez, N; Sánchez, F

    1997-12-01

    Uricase II is a purine metabolic enzyme highly induced in root nodules during the symbiosis established between legumes and bacteria of the genera Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium. Here we describe the characterization of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodule uricase II cDNA and show that uricase II is encoded by a single gene in the bean genome. This gene is also expressed in cotyledons, roots, and hypocotyls during bean seedling establishment, and an anti-uricase antibody recognizes the protein in different seedling organs. Uricase II has also been found in Leucaena leucocephala seedlings, suggesting that it participates during seedling establishment in legumes that do not transport ureides. A 50-kD polypeptide that is detected by the anti-uricase antibody is found in cotyledons during seedling development. This higher-molecular-mass form is also detected in developing roots and hypocotyls but not in nodules. In situ hybridization experiments in root seedlings showed uricase II transcripts in the metaxylem parenchyma cells and phloem fibers of the vascular system.

  14. Human peptidylarginine deiminase type II: molecular cloning, gene organization, and expression in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Akihito; Ohsawa, Takako; Asaga, Hiroaki; Akiyama, Kyoichi; Kuramoto, Masashi; Maruyama, Naoki

    2002-11-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) are posttranslational modification enzymes that convert protein arginine to citrulline residues in a calcium ion-dependent manner. Rodents have four isoforms of PAD (types I, II, III, and IV), each of which is distinct in substrate and tissue specificity. In fact, the only tissue in which all four PAD mRNAs have been detected is the epidermis. In this study, we found PAD activity in HSC-1 human cutaneous squamous carcinoma cells in vitro, and this activity increased during cultivation. Using a homology-based strategy, we cloned a full-length cDNA encoding human PAD type II. The cDNA was 2348 bp long and encoded a 665-amino-acid sequence with a predicted molecular mass of 75 kDa. The predicted protein shared 93% identity with the rat and mouse PAD type II sequence. Alignment of the amino acid sequences from both species revealed notable conservation in the C-terminal region, suggesting the presence of a functional region such as an enzyme catalytic site and/or a calcium-binding domain. Gene organization analysis established that human PAD type II on chromosome 1p35.2-p35.21 spanned more than 50 kb and contained 16 exons and 15 introns. A recombinant PAD protein subsequently produced in Escherichia coli proved to be enzymatically active, with substrate specificities similar to those of the rat PAD type II. In an immunohistochemical study of human skin, the type II enzyme was expressed by all the living epidermal layers, suggesting that PAD type II is functionally important during terminal differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes.

  15. Expression of angiotensin II receptors in the caprine ovary and improvement of follicular viability in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bruno, J B; Lima-Verde, I B; Celestino, J J H; Lima, L F; Matos, M H T; Faustino, L R; Donato, M A M; Peixoto, C A; Campello, C C; Silva, J R V; Figueiredo, J R

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate mRNA levels of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors (AGTR1 and AGTR2) in caprine follicles and to investigate the influence of ANG II on the viability and in vitro growth of preantral follicles. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to quantify AGTR1 and AGTR2 mRNA levels in the different follicular stages. For culture, caprine ovaries were collected, cut into 13 fragments and then either directly fixed for histological and ultrastructural analysis (fresh control) or placed in culture for 1 or 7 days in α-minumum essential medium plus (α-MEM+) with 0, 1, 5, 10, 50 or 100 ng/ml ANG II. Then, the fragments were destined to morphological, viability and ultrastructural analysis. The results showed that primordial follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 and AGTR2 mRNA than secondary follicles. Granulosa/theca cells from antral follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 mRNA than their respective cumulus-oocyte complex (COCs). After 7 days of culture, ANG II (10 or 50 ng/ml) maintained the percentages of normal follicles compared with α-MEM+. Fluorescence and ultrastructural microscopy confirmed follicular integrity in ANG II (10 ng/ml). In conclusion, a high expression of AGTR1 and AGTR2 is observed in primordial follicles. Granulosa/theca cells from antral follicles had higher levels of AGTR1 mRNA. Finally, 10 ng/ml ANG II maintained the viability of caprine preantral follicles after in vitro culture.

  16. Angiotensin II induces the expression of c-reactive protein via MAPK-dependent signal pathway in U937 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Liu, Juntian; Han, Chunjie; Wang, Bin; Pang, Xiaoming; Mao, Junjun

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease in the vessel wall. As an inflammatory molecule, C-reactive protein (CRP) participates in all stages of atherosclerotic process. Although angiotensin II (Ang II) can stimulate the vascular cells to produce CRP, it is unknown whether Ang II induces CRP expression in macrophages. The present study was to observe effect of Ang II on CRP production and the related signal pathway in U937 macrophages so as to provide more evidence for the proinflammatory action of Ang II. The results showed that Ang II significantly increased mRNA and protein expression of CRP in U937 macrophages in time- and concentration-dependent manners. AT(1) receptor blocker losartan blocked Ang II -induced CRP expression in mRNA and protein levels in U937 macrophages. Losartan and complex II inhibitor TIFA decreased Ang II -stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and antioxidant NAC completely abolished Ang II -induced CRP expression in U937 macrophages. The further study indicated that losartan, NAC, MEK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 obviously inhibited ERK1/2 and p38MAPK phosphorylation, and PD98059, SB203580 and NF-κB inhibitor PDTC reduced Ang II -induced mRNA and protein expression of CRP in U937 macrophages. These demonstrate that Ang II is capable of inducing CRP generation in macrophages via AT(1)-ROS-ERK1/2/p38MAPK-NF-κB signal pathway, which contributes to better understanding of the proinflammatory and proatherosclerotic actions of Ang II.

  17. Expression of PAT and NPT II proteins during the developmental stages of a genetically modified pepper developed in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Si Myung; Kim, Jae Kwang; Ryu, Tae Hun; Suh, Seok Cheol; Cho, Hyun Suk

    2010-10-27

    Estimation of the protein levels introduced in a biotechnology-derived product is conducted as part of an overall safety assessment. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to analyze phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPT II) protein expression in a genetically modified (GM) pepper plant developed in Korea. PAT and NPT II expression levels, based on both dry weight and fresh weight, were variable among different plant generations and plant sections from isolated genetically modified organism (GMO) fields at four developmental stages. PAT expression was highest in leaves at anthesis (11.44 μg/gdw and 2.17 μg/gfw) and lowest in roots (0.12 μg/gdw and 0.01 μg/gfw). NPT II expression was also highest in leaves at anthesis (17.31 μg/gdw and 3.41 μg/gfw) and lowest in red pepper (0.65 μg/gdw and 0.12 μg/gfw). In pollen, PAT expression was 0.59-0.62 μg/gdw, while NPT II was not detected. Both PAT and NPT II showed a general pattern of decreased expression with progression of the growing season. As expected, PAT and NPT II protein expression was not detectable in control pepper plants.

  18. Expression of glutamate transporter subtypes during normal human corticogenesis and type II lissencephaly.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akiko; Takashima, Sachio; Yokoo, Hideaki; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Wada, Keiji; Iwaki, Toru

    2005-03-31

    Glutamate transporters are thought to have an important role in central nervous system (CNS) development. We investigated the expression of the sodium-dependent high-affinity glutamate transporters EAAT1, EAAT2, and EAAT3 in 11 human autopsied cases without neurological disorders and in four cases with type II lissencephaly including Walker Warburg's syndrome (WWS) and Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), both of which are classified as migration disorders of the human brain. Expression of glutamate transporter subtypes was differentially regulated during normal human corticogenesis. Although EAAT1 and EAAT2 were mainly localized to the cortical astrocytes in the postnatal brain, EAAT1 was enriched in the proliferative zones and radial glia from 13 gestational weeks (GW) to 20 GW. EAAT2 was abundant in the intermediate zone until 23 GW, and transiently expressed in the radial fibers of the transitional form of radial glia into mature astrocytes as well as partly in the corticofugal axonal bundles. EAAT3 immunoreactivity was robust in the apical dendrites of the pyramidal neurons in the marginal zone and cortical plate during corticogenesis, and decreased postnatally. In the individuals with type II lissencephaly, glutamate transporters were expressed in the extrusion of neuroglial tissue. Bundles of EAAT2-immunoreactive radial fibers were prominent in the specimens at 20 GW. Thus, glutamate transporters are differentially regulated during normal and impaired corticogenesis. Altered glutamate transporter expression in type II lissencephaly suggests that glutamate metabolism is involved in the formation of the normal cortex and contributes to the disorganized cortex seen in migration disorders.

  19. β-Catenin Expression Pattern in Stage I and II Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gamallo, Carlos; Palacios, José; Moreno, Gema; Calvo de Mora, Jorge; Suárez, Asunción; Armas, Alvaro

    1999-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression pattern of β-catenin has been correlated with β-catenin gene mutations, clinicopathological features, and disease outcome in 69 stage I and II ovarian carcinomas. β-Catenin expression was localized in the nuclei, in addition to the cytoplasm and membrane, in 11 tumors (16%): nine endometrioid carcinomas with widespread nuclear expression and two serous carcinomas with focal nuclear expression. The remaining 58 carcinomas (84%) only had membranous β-catenin expression. All but one of the endometrioid carcinomas with nuclear β-catenin expression had considerable squamous metaplasia, and five of these cases had large areas of endometrioid tumor of low malignant potential. In addition, β-catenin nuclear expression was observed in atypical epithelial cells in endometriotic glands adjacent to an endometrioid carcinoma. Sequencing was performed on 25 tumors and corresponding normal tissue: all 13 endometrioid tumors as well as 12 carcinomas of other histological types (four serous, two clear cell, two mucinous, and two mixed). There were oncogenic mutations in the phosphorylation sequence for GSK-3β in exon 3 of the β-catenin gene in seven endometrioid carcinomas with β-catenin nuclear expression. Three mutations affected codon 32 (D32G, D32Y, and D32Y), one affected codon 33 (S33C), two affected codon 37 (S37C and S37F), and one affected codon 41 (T41A). No mutations were observed in the other 18 carcinomas analyzed, comprising two endometrioid and two serous carcinomas with β-catenin nuclear expression, and 14 carcinomas of different histological types with only membranous expression. In the univariate and multivariate survival analyses, β-catenin nuclear expression was selected as an indicator of good prognosis, because no patient whose tumor expressed β-catenin in the nuclei showed relapses or died, in contrast to the 19 relapses and deaths among patients with tumors that only had β-catenin membranous expression

  20. Recombinant expressions of sweet plant protein mabinlin II in Escherichia coli and food-grade Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenliang; Xia, Qiyu; Yao, Jing; Fu, Shaoping; Guo, Jianchun; Hu, Xinwen

    2015-04-01

    Sweet plant proteins, which are safe, natural, low-calorie sweeteners, may be suitable replacements for sugars in the food and beverage industries. Mabinlin II, a sweet plant protein, shows the most pronounced heat stability and acid resistance of any of the six known types of plant sweet proteins. However, mabinlin II is difficult to extract from the Capparis masaikai plant, which is itself becoming increasingly scarce. This limits the use of naturally acquired mabinlin II. In this study, recombinant mabinlin II proteins were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli and in food-grade Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins MBL-BH (containing the B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) and MBL-ABH (containing the A- and B-chains of mabinlin II downstream fused with His-tag) were expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies. They were then purified and renatured. The refolded MBL-BH was found to be 100 times sweeter than sucrose by weight, but it was not heat-stable. Refolded MBL-ABH was neither sweet nor heat-stable. Recombinant mabinlin II proteins were secreted and expressed intracellularly in food-grade L. lactis, in which the concentrated cell samples and culture medium samples were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analysis with anti-mabinlin II polyclonal antibody. This study demonstrated that the single B chain of mabinlin II has a sweet taste. The recombinant mabinlin II proteins have been successfully expressed in food-grade L. lactis, which is a crucial step in the production of mabinlin II through microorganism expression systems.

  1. Four disulfide-bridged scorpion beta neurotoxin CssII: heterologous expression and proper folding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Georgina; Garcia, Blanca I; Schiavon, Emanuele; Ortiz, Ernesto; Cestele, Sandrine; Wanke, Enzo; Possani, Lourival D; Corzo, Gerardo

    2007-08-01

    The gene of the four disulfide-bridged Centruroides suffusus suffusus toxin II was cloned into the expression vector pQE30 containing a 6His-tag and a FXa proteolytic cleavage region. This recombinant vector was transfected into Escherichia coli BL21 cells and expressed under induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG). The level of expression was 24.6 mg/l of culture medium, and the His tagged recombinant toxin (HisrCssII) was found exclusively in inclusion bodies. After solubilization the HisrCssII peptide was purified by affinity and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The reverse-phase HPLC profile of the HisrCssII product obtained from the affinity chromatography step showed several peptide fractions having the same molecular mass of 9392.6 Da, indicating that HisrCssII was oxidized forming several distinct disulfide bridge arrangements. The multiple forms of HisrCssII after reduction eluted from the column as a single protein component of 9400.6 Da. Similarly, an in vitro folding of the reduced HisrCssII generated a single oxidized component of HisrCssII, which was cleaved by the proteolytic enzyme FXa to the recombinant CssII (rCssII). The molecular mass of rCssII was 7538.6 Da as expected. Since native CssII (nCssII) is amidated at the C-terminal residue whereas the rCssII is heterologously expressed in the format of free carboxyl end, there is a difference of 1 Da, when comparing both peptides (native versus heterologously expressed). Nevertheless, they show similar toxicity when injected intracranially into mice, and both nCssII and rCssII show the typical electrophysiological properties of beta-toxins in Na(v)1.6 channels, which is for the first time demonstrated here. Binding and displacement experiments conducted with radiolabelled CssII confirms the electrophysiological results. Several problems associated with the heterologously expressed toxins containing four disulfide bridges are discussed.

  2. Molecular cloning of partial cDNAs for rat DNA topoisomerase II isoforms and their differential expression in brain development.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, K; Tsutsui, K; Okada, S; Watanabe, M; Shohmori, T; Seki, S; Inoue, Y

    1993-09-05

    cDNA segments for DNA topoisomerase II were amplified from rat brain RNA after reverse transcription by the polymerase chain reaction, using degenerate oligonucleotide primers deduced from the conserved regions of topoisomerase II of higher eukaryotes. The cDNA product from a successful amplification was homogeneous in length but heterogeneous in sequence. Restriction mapping of the cloned cDNA fragments revealed that they consisted of two distinct sequence groups. DNA sequencing of representative clones from each group, designated A and B, showed that they are highly homologous to cDNAs of human topoisomerase II isoforms, alpha and beta, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicated that the transcript level for rat topoisomerase II alpha was high in embryonic brain and in the cerebellum of 2-day newborns, followed by rapid decrease to a undetectable level at 4 weeks after birth. In contrast, rat topoisomerase II beta transcript was present throughout the embryonic and postnatal stages. In the developing cerebellum, cells expressing topoisomerase II alpha were confirmed exclusively to the outer mitotic zone of the external granular layer, whereas the transcript of topoisomerase II beta was detected over the entire cortical region. These results clearly indicate that the isoform alpha is expressed only in proliferating cells. The differential expression of topoisomerase II isozymes was also observed among developed tissues. Therefore, the isozymes are most likely to be involved in the following different physiological processes: topoisomerase II alpha in cell proliferation, and topoisomerase II beta in some processes unrelated to cell proliferation.

  3. cN-II expression predicts survival in patients receiving gemcitabine for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Mackey, John R; Isaac, Sylvie; Trédan, Olivier; Souquet, Pierre Jean; Pérol, Maurice; Cass, Carol; Dumontet, Charles

    2005-09-01

    Resistance to gemcitabine is likely to be multifactorial and could involve a number of mechanisms involved in drug penetration, metabolism and targeting. In vitro studies of resistant human cell lines have confirmed that human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1)-deficient cells display resistance to gemcitabine. Overexpression of certain nucleotidases, such as cN-II, has also been frequently shown in gemcitabine-resistant models. In this study, we applied immunohistochemical methods to assess the protein abundance of cN-II, hENT1, human concentrative nucleoside transporter 3 (hCNT3) and deoxycitidine kinase (dCK) in malignant cells in from 43 patients with treatment-naïve locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All patients subsequently received gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. Response to chemotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were correlated with abundance of these proteins. Among the 43 samples, only 7 (16%) expressed detectable hENT1, with a low percentage of positive cells, 18 expressed hCNT3 (42%), 36 (86%) expressed cN-II and 28 (66%) expressed dCK. In univariate analysis, only cN-II expression levels were correlated with overall survival. None of the parameters were correlated with freedom from progression survival nor with response. Patients with low levels of expression of cN-II (less than 40% positively stained cells) had worse overall survival than patients with higher levels of cN-II expression (6 months and 11 months, respectively). In a multivariate analysis taking into account age, sex, weight loss, stage and immunohistochemical results, cN-II was the only predictive factor associated with overall survival. This study suggests that cN-II nucleotidase expression levels identify subgroups of NSCLC patients with different outcomes under gemcitabine-based therapy. Larger prospective studies are warranted to confirm the predictive value of cN-II in these patients.

  4. Macrophages Polarized by Expression of ToxoGRA15II Inhibit Growth of Hepatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanling; Poppoe, Faustina; Chen, Jian; Yu, Li; Deng, Fang; Luo, Qingli; Xu, Yuanhong; Cai, Yihong; Shen, Jilong

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that tumor-associated macrophages are deeply involved in the hepatocellular carcinoma proliferation and account for the large proportion of infiltrated cells in tumor tissues and play a major role in promotion of tumor growth. On the other hand, studies have demonstrated that Toxoplasma gondii virulence-associated molecule of dense granule protein (ToxoGRA15II) tends to induce classically activated macrophages (M1) differentiation. Thus, we explored the M1 induced by ToxoGRA15II in vitro and its inhibitory impact on the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of hepatic carcinoma in murine model. Here, we constructed recombinant plasmid of pegfp-gra15II and subsequently ligate it to lentivirus (Lv) vector, with which RAW264.7 was transfected. The results showed that the transfected macrophages were polarized to M1. Coculture of the M1 with Hepa1-6 cells showed a remarkable inhibition of migration and invasion of the tumor cells and decreased expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2 without notable apoptosis of Hepa1-6 cells. Subsequently, ToxoGRA15II-polarized macrophages inoculated to tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were seen in both spleen and tumor tissues, and tumor growth was sharply restricted. Particularly, interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression, which is closely associated with the cancer malignant behaviors, was significantly dampened in tumor tissues. In addition, expression of TNF-α and IL-12 mRNAs was increased, whereas IL-6 and interleukin-10 mRNAs were downregulated in splenocytes. Our results indicate that the effector molecule of ToxoGRA15II may induce macrophage polarization to M1 that has a restrictive effect on tumor growth via its related cytokines profile in tumor and spleen tissues. Besides, ToxoGRA15II, due to its early activation of specified cell population and non-toxicity to mammalians, has a potential value for a novel therapeutic strategy of enhancing host innate immunity against tumor

  5. Expression and phosphorylation of delta-CaM kinase II in cultured Alzheimer fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cavazzin, Chiara; Bonvicini, Cristian; Nocera, Annachiara; Racchi, Marco; Kasahara, Jiro; Tardito, Daniela; Gennarelli, Massimo; Govoni, Stefano; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2004-10-01

    Dysregulation of calcium homeostasis is among the major cellular alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II), one of the major effectors regulating neuronal responses to changes in calcium fluxes, in cultured skin fibroblasts from subjects with sporadic AD. We found, by using PCR and Western analysis, that human fibroblasts express the delta-isoform of this kinase, and that CaM kinase II is the major Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase in these cells. Protein expression level of the kinase was not significantly different in AD fibroblasts. However, the total activity of the kinase (stimulated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin) was significantly reduced in AD cell lines, whereas Ca(2+)-independent activity was significantly enhanced. The percent autonomy of the kinase (%Ca(2+)-independent/Ca(2+)-dependent activity) in AD cell lines was 62.8%, three-fold the corresponding percentage in control fibroblasts. The abnormal calcium-independent activity was not due to enhanced basal autophosphorylation of Thr(287). The observed abnormalities, if present in brain tissue, may be implicated either in dysfunction of neuroplasticity and cognitive functions or in dysregulation of cell cycle.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 expression is down-regulated by angiotensin II and under hypertension in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Alba, Gonzalo; El Bekay, Rajaa; Chacón, Pedro; Reyes, M Edith; Ramos, Eladio; Oliván, Josefina; Jiménez, Juan; López, José M; Martín-Nieto, José; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a peptide hormone able to elicit a strong production of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils. In this work, we have addressed whether expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, becomes altered in these cells upon Ang II treatment or under hypertension conditions. In neutrophils from healthy and hypertensive subjects, induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein expression with a parallel increase in enzyme activity took place upon treatment with 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-PGJ2 (15dPGJ2). However, Ang II prevented HO-1 synthesis by normal neutrophils in vitro, and HO-1 expression was depressed in neutrophils from hypertensive patients in comparison with cells from healthy subjects. In addition, Ang II treatment led to a reduced HO-1 enzyme activity to levels similar to those found in neutrophils from hypertensive patients. NO donors reversed the inhibition of 15dPGJ2-dependent HO-1 expression in neutrophils from hypertensive patients, and conversely, inhibition of inducible NO synthase (NOS2) activity counteracted the stimulatory effect of 15dPGJ2 on HO-1 expression in normal human neutrophils. Moreover, Ang II canceled 15dPGJ2-dependent induction of NOS2 mRNA synthesis. Present findings indicate that down-regulation of HO-1 expression in neutrophils from hypertensive subjects is likely exerted through the inhibition of NOS2 expression. Additionally, they underscore the potential usefulness of NO donors as new, therapeutic agents against hypertension.

  7. MHC class II expression and potential antigen-presenting cells in the retina during experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Deborah A; Dewispelaere, Rémi; Foucart, Vincent; Caspers, Laure E; Defrance, Matthieu; Bruyns, Catherine; Willermain, François

    2017-07-18

    Controversy exists regarding which cell types are responsible for autoantigen presentation in the retina during experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) development. In this study, we aimed to identify and characterize the retinal resident and infiltrating cells susceptible to express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II during EAU. EAU was induced in C57BL/6 mice by adoptive transfer of autoreactive lymphocytes from IRBP1-20-immunized animals. MHC class II expression was studied by immunostainings on eye cryosections. For flow cytometry (FC) analysis, retinas were dissected and enzymatically digested into single-cell suspensions. Three MHC class II(+) retinal cell populations were sorted by FC, and their RNA processed for RNA-Seq. Immunostainings demonstrate strong induction of MHC class II expression in EAU, especially in the inner retina at the level of inflamed vessels, extending to the outer retinal layers and the subretinal space in severely inflamed eyes. Most MHC class II(+) cells express the hematopoietic marker IBA1. FC quantitative analyses demonstrate that MHC class II induction significantly correlates with disease severity and is associated with upregulation of co-stimulatory molecule expression. In particular, most MHC class II(hi) cells express co-stimulatory molecules during EAU. Further phenotyping identified three MHC class II(+) retinal cell populations: CD45(-)CD11b(-) non-hematopoietic cells with low MHC class II expression and CD45(+)CD11b(+) hematopoietic cells with higher MHC class II expression, which can be further separated into Ly6C(+) and Ly6C(-) cells, possibly corresponding to infiltrating macrophages and resident microglia. Transcriptome analysis of the three sorted populations leads to a clear sample clustering with some enrichment in macrophage markers and microglial cell markers in Ly6C(+) and Ly6C(-) cells, respectively. Functional annotation analysis reveals that both hematopoietic cell populations are more competent in

  8. Impact of PTEN on the expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF-binding proteins in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Ho-Keun; Kim, Sun-Young; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Kim, Chan-Young; Yang, Doo-Hyun; Oh, Youngman; Lee, Dae-Yeol . E-mail: leedy@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2005-05-13

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated or deleted in a variety of human cancers including human gastric cancer. PTEN functions primarily as a lipid phosphatase and plays a key role in the regulation of the PI3 kinase/Akt pathway, thereby modulating cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, the IGF system plays an important role in cell proliferation and cell survival via the PI3 kinase/Akt and MAP kinase pathways in many cancer cells. To characterize the impact of PTEN on the IGF-IGFR-IGFBP axis in gastric cancer, we overexpressed PTEN using an adenovirus gene transfer system in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells, SNU-484 and SNU-663, which lack PTEN. Overexpression of PTEN inhibited serum-induced as well as IGF-I-induced cell proliferation as compared to control cells. PTEN overexpression resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of IGF-I, -II, and IGF-IR. Interestingly, amongst the six IGFBPs, only IGFBP-3 was upregulated by PTEN, whereas IGFBP-4 and -6 were reduced. The IGFBP-3 promoter activity assay and Western immunoblotting demonstrate that PTEN regulates IGFBP-3 at the transcriptional level. In addition, the PI3 kinase inhibitor, LY294002, upregulates IGFBP-3 expression but downregulates IGF-I and IGF-II, indicating that PTEN controls IGFBP-3 and IGFs by an Akt-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that PTEN may inhibit antiapoptotic IGF actions not only by blocking the IGF-IGFR-induced Akt activity, but also by regulating expression of components of the IGF system, in particular, upregulation of IGFBP-3, which is known to exert antiproliferative effects through IGF-dependent and IGF-independent mechanisms in cancer cells.

  9. Active suppression of major histocompatibility complex class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latron, F.; Maffei, A.; Scarpellino, L.; Bernard, M.; Accolla, R.S. ); Jotterand-Bellomo, M. ); Strominger, J.L. )

    1988-04-01

    Constitutive expression of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is acquired very early in B-cell ontogeny and is maintained up to the B-cell blast stage. Terminal differentiation in plasma cells is, however, accompanied by a loss of class II gene expression. In B cells this gene system is under the control of several loci encoding transacting factors with activator function, one of which, the aIr-1 gene product, operates across species barriers. In this report human class II gene expression is shown to be extinguished in somatic cell hybrids between the human class II-positive B-cell line Raji and the mouse class-II negative plasmacytoma cell line P3-U1. Since all murine chromosomes are retained in these hybrids and no preferential segregation of a specific human chromosome is observed, the results are compatible with the presence of suppressor factors of mouse origin, operating across species barriers and inhibiting class II gene expression. Suppression seems to act at the level of transcription or accumulation of class II-specific mRNA, since no human, and very few murine, class II transcripts are detectable in the hybrids.

  10. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions.

  11. Expression and potential role of ErbB receptors in type II endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, Georgios; Adonakis, Georgios; Liava, Anna; Ravazoula, Panagiota; Decavalas, Georgios

    2013-06-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. Based on clinical and pathological features, endometrial cancer is classified into two types. The aim of our study was to describe the expression and the potential clinical role of ErbB receptors in Greek patients with type II endometrial cancer. Between 1991 and 2008, 10 women with histologically confirmed type II endometrial cancer were referred to the Department of Gynecologic Oncology of the University of Patras Medical School. Tissue specimens from endometrial lesions were immunostained for EGFR, ErbB-2, ErbB-3 and ErbB-4. For EGFR, 5 cases were positive (50%) and 5 cases were negative. For ErbB-2, 9 cases were positive (90%) and 1 case was negative. For ErbB-3, all cases were positive. For ErbB-4, 7 cases were positive (70%) and 3 cases were negative. Also for all ErbB receptors, 5 cases were positive (50%). During follow up, 3 patients died from their disease. All of them had papillary serous endometrial cancer and 2 of them were positive for all ErbB receptors. Although our study was based on a small number of cases, it is obvious that we had high expression levels of ErbB receptors in patients with type II endometrial cancer. Also the majority of patients with dismal outcome were positive for all ErbB receptors. This is very important, as ErbB-targeted therapies may be clinically active as adjuvant therapy in well-defined subgroups of type II EC patients with EGFR and ErbB-2 overexpression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression, purification and characterization of enoyl-ACP reductase II, FabK, from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Hevener, Kirk E.; Mehboob, Shahila; Boci, Teuta; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E.

    2012-10-25

    The rapid rise in bacterial drug resistance coupled with the low number of novel antimicrobial compounds in the discovery pipeline has led to a critical situation requiring the expedient discovery and characterization of new antimicrobial drug targets. Enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis pathway, FAS-II, are distinct from their mammalian counterparts, FAS-I, in terms of both structure and mechanism. As such, they represent attractive targets for the design of novel antimicrobial compounds. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase II, FabK, is a key, rate-limiting enzyme in the FAS-II pathway for several bacterial pathogens. The organism, Porphyromonas gingivalis, is a causative agent of chronic periodontitis that affects up to 25% of the US population and incurs a high national burden in terms of cost of treatment. P. gingivalis expresses FabK as the sole enoyl reductase enzyme in its FAS-II cycle, which makes this a particularly appealing target with potential for selective antimicrobial therapy. Herein we report the molecular cloning, expression, purification and characterization of the FabK enzyme from P. gingivalis, only the second organism from which this enzyme has been isolated. Characterization studies have shown that the enzyme is a flavoprotein, the reaction dependent upon FMN and NADPH and proceeding via a Ping-Pong Bi-Bi mechanism to reduce the enoyl substrate. A sensitive assay measuring the fluorescence decrease of NADPH as it is converted to NADP{sup +} during the reaction has been optimized for high-throughput screening. Finally, protein crystallization conditions have been identified which led to protein crystals that diffract x-rays to high resolution.

  13. Expressions of irisin and urotensin II and their relationships with blood pressure in patients with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Jie; Xie, Qian; Tang, Chao-Shu; Zhang, Ai-Hua

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study are to observe irisin and urotensin II (UII) levels in serum and placenta in normal pregnant and preeclamptic women and investigate the relationship between expressions irisin and UII, and their association with blood pressure. A total of 67 pregnant subjects were recruited, including 31 healthy and 36 preeclamptic pregnant women. Serum irisin and UII concentrations were measured. Expressions of fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) (irisin precursor) and UII in placenta specimens were performed. There was no significant difference of serum irisin levels between severe preeclamptic (SPE)) patients, mild preeclamptic (MPE) patients and normal controls, while serum UII was significantly higher in preeclamptic women than normal pregnancy. There was no relationship between serum UII and irisin levels. In patients with preeclampsia, serum irisin was negatively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure(r = -0.350, P = 0.004, r = -0.307, P = 0.011), while serum UII was positively associated with systolic blood pressure (r = 0.291, P = 0.031). Serum irisin, UII, urinary protein level, BMI and serum creatinine were the independent determinants of blood pressure in preeclampsia by multiple regression analysis. Protein expression of FNDC5 and UII was upregulated in placenta of patients with SPE and positively correlated with systolic blood pressure and urinary protein level. We firstly verify that serum irisin and placental irisin precursor expressions have differently correlated with blood pressure. Expressions of irisin and urotensin II have relationships with blood pressure in patients with preeclampsia.

  14. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II expression in motor neurons: effect of axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lund, L M; McQuarrie, I G

    1997-11-20

    Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent (CaM) protein kinase II isoforms are present in the nervous system in high amounts, many aspects of in vivo expression, localization, and function remain unexplored. During development, CaM kinase IIalpha and IIbeta are differentially expressed. Here, we examined CaM kinase II isoforms in Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic motor neurons before and after axotomy. We cut the L4-5 spinal nerves unilaterally and exposed the proximal nerve stumps to a fluoroprobe, to retrogradely label the neurons of origin. Anti-CaM kinase IIbeta antibody showed immunoreactivity in motor neurons, which decreased to low levels by 4 days after axotomy. We found a similar response by in situ hybridization with riboprobes. The decrease in expression of mRNA and protein was confined to fluorescent motor neurons. For CaM kinase IIalpha, in situ hybridization showed that the mRNA was in sciatic motor neurons, with a density unaffected by axotomy. However, these neurons were also enlarged, suggesting an up-regulation of expression. Northern blots confirmed an mRNA increase. We were unable to find CaM kinase IIalpha immunoreactivity before or after axotomy in sciatic motor neuron cell bodies, suggesting that CaM kinase IIalpha is in the axons or dendrites, or otherwise unavailable to the antibody. Using rats with crush lesions, we radiolabeled axonal proteins being synthesized in the cell body and used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with Western blots to identify CaM kinase IIalpha as a component of slow axonal transport. This differential regulation and expression of kinase isoforms suggests separate and unique intracellular roles. Because we find CaM kinase IIbeta down-regulates during axonal regrowth, its role in these neurons may be related to synaptic transmission. CaM kinase IIalpha appears to support axonal regrowth.

  15. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFNγ mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFNγ in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFNγ, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFNγ but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds.

  16. Identification of Type II Interferon Receptors in Geese: Gene Structure, Phylogenetic Analysis, and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Qi, Yulin; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    Interferon γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) and IFNGR2 are two cell membrane molecules belonging to class II cytokines, which play important roles in the IFN-mediated antiviral signaling pathway. Here, goose IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were cloned and identified for the first time. Tissue distribution analysis revealed that relatively high levels of goose IFNγ mRNA transcripts were detected in immune tissues, including the harderian gland, cecal tonsil, cecum, and thymus. Relatively high expression levels of both IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 were detected in the cecal tonsil, which implicated an important role of IFNγ in the secondary immune system of geese. No specific correlation between IFNγ, IFNGR1, and IFNGR2 expression levels was observed in the same tissues of healthy geese. IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed different expression profiles, although they appeared to maintain a relatively balanced state. Furthermore, the agonist R848 led to the upregulation of goose IFNγ but did not affect the expression of goose IFNGR1 or IFNGR2. In summary, trends in expression of goose IFNγ and its cognate receptors showed tissue specificity, as well as an age-related dependency. These findings may help us to better understand the age-related susceptibility to pathogens in birds. PMID:26345454

  17. Zebrin II / aldolase C expression in the cerebellum of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox).

    PubMed

    Aspden, Joel W; Armstrong, Carol L; Gutierrez-Ibanez, Cristian I; Hawkes, Richard; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Kohl, Tobias; Graham, David J; Wylie, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Aldolase C, also known as Zebrin II (ZII), is a glycolytic enzyme that is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells of the vertebrate cerebellum. In both mammals and birds, ZII is expressed heterogeneously, such that there are sagittal stripes of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+), alternating with stripes of Purkinje cells with little or no expression (ZII-). The patterns of ZII+ and ZII- stripes in the cerebellum of birds and mammals are strikingly similar, suggesting that it may have first evolved in the stem reptiles. In this study, we examined the expression of ZII in the cerebellum of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). In contrast to birds and mammals, the cerebellum of the rattlesnake is much smaller and simpler, consisting of a small, unfoliated dome of cells. A pattern of alternating ZII+ and ZII- sagittal stripes cells was not observed: rather all Purkinje cells were ZII+. This suggests that ZII stripes have either been lost in snakes or that they evolved convergently in birds and mammals.

  18. Gene expression caused by alkylating agents and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fram, R J; Crockett, J; Volkert, M R

    1988-09-01

    Previous work has demonstrated heterogeneous effects of methylating agents on induction of DNA damage inducible genes in Escherichia coli. These studies employed E. coli mutants that have fusions of the lac operon to genes induced by treatment with sublethal levels of alkylating agents. These mutants were selected from random insertions of the Mu-dl (Apr lac) phage by screening for induction of beta-galactosidase activity in the presence of methylmethanesulfonate or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The current report extends these findings by analyzing gene expression caused by mechlorethamine, chloroethylnitrosoureas and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). The results demonstrate heterogeneous effects by these agents on gene expression. While 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea induces alkA, other nitrosoureas, mechlorethamine, and cis-DDP do not cause expression of this gene. Further, while all nitrosoureas caused expression of aidC, mechlorethamine and cis-DDP did not. Lastly, cis-DDP caused marked expression of a sulA fusion mutant while not inducing any of the other E. coli fusion mutants.

  19. Zebrin II / Aldolase C Expression in the Cerebellum of the Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox)

    PubMed Central

    Aspden, Joel W.; Armstrong, Carol L.; Gutierrez-Ibanez, Cristian I.; Hawkes, Richard; Iwaniuk, Andrew N.; Kohl, Tobias; Graham, David J.; Wylie, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Aldolase C, also known as Zebrin II (ZII), is a glycolytic enzyme that is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells of the vertebrate cerebellum. In both mammals and birds, ZII is expressed heterogeneously, such that there are sagittal stripes of Purkinje cells with high ZII expression (ZII+), alternating with stripes of Purkinje cells with little or no expression (ZII-). The patterns of ZII+ and ZII- stripes in the cerebellum of birds and mammals are strikingly similar, suggesting that it may have first evolved in the stem reptiles. In this study, we examined the expression of ZII in the cerebellum of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). In contrast to birds and mammals, the cerebellum of the rattlesnake is much smaller and simpler, consisting of a small, unfoliated dome of cells. A pattern of alternating ZII+ and ZII- sagittal stripes cells was not observed: rather all Purkinje cells were ZII+. This suggests that ZII stripes have either been lost in snakes or that they evolved convergently in birds and mammals. PMID:25692946

  20. Complementary and dynamic type II cadherin expression associated with development of the primate visual system.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Nambu, Sanae; Oka, Mariko; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    The middle temporal visual area (MT, also known as V5) is a visual association area that is particularly evolved in the primate brain. The MT receives input from the primary visual area (V1), constitutes part of the dorsal visual pathway, and plays an essential role in processing motion. Connections between the MT and V1 in the primate brain are formed after birth, and are related to the maturation of visual system. However, it remains to be determined what molecular mechanisms control the formation and maturation of the visual system. Cadherins are transmembrane proteins, originally isolated as cell adhesion molecules, which have multiple roles in synapse formation and function. To investigate potential involvement of cadherins in development of the primate visual system, we examined type II cadherin expression (cadherin-6, -8, -12) in cortical and thalamic visual areas of pre- and postnatal brains of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). In the prenatal brain, cadherin-6 was dominantly expressed in the pulvino-MT pathway whereas cadherin-8 was dominant in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN)-V1 pathway. During postnatal development, there was a downregulation of cadherin-6 and upregulation of cadherin-8 expression in the MT. The timing of this cadherin exchange preceded the development of V1-MT connections. Our results suggest the possibility that changes in cadherin expression are involved in the development of the primate visual system, and that a switch in cadherin expression may be a general mechanism to control neural plasticity of highly cognitive abilities.

  1. HtrA3 stromal expression is correlated with tumor budding in stage II colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Forse, Catherine L; Rahimi, Mahdi; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Assarzadegan, Naziheh; Dawson, Heather; Grin, Andrea; Kennedy, Erin; O'Connor, Brenda; Messenger, David E; Riddell, Robert H; Kirsch, Richard; Karagiannis, George S

    2017-08-01

    Tumor budding is a well-established adverse prognostic factor in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). It may represent a form of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. High-temperature requirement A3 (HtrA3) is an inhibitor of the bone morphogenetic protein pathway, the suppression of which has been linked to EMT. Since HtrA3 is highly expressed in the desmoplastic stroma at the CRC invasive front, we sought to evaluate the relationship between tumor budding and HtrA3 expression in 172 stage II CRC resection specimens. All tumors were evaluated for tumor budding, with the highest budding slide selected for pan-keratin (CK) and HtrA3 immunohistochemistry. Representative areas of tumor core and invasive front, including budding and non-budding areas, were marked on CK stained slides, and then evaluated on HtrA3 stained slides. HtrA3 expression in tumor cells (tHtrA3) and peritumoral stroma (sHtrA3) was assessed for staining percentage and intensity (the product yielding a final score). Tumors with high-grade tumor budding (HGTB) showed increased expression of sHtrA3 in budding areas compared to non-budding areas at the invasive front (P<0.001). In addition, sHtrA3 expression at the invasive front was significantly higher in HGTB tumors compared to minimally budding tumors (P<0.05). tHtrA3 expression at the invasive front was significantly associated with high histological grade (P<0.05). Higher sHtrA3 expression in the tumor core (but not invasive front) was significantly associated with decreased 5-year overall survival on univariate analysis (P<0.05), but not multivariate analysis. HtrA3 expression in the peritumoral stroma of patients with stage II CRC is associated with HGTB and may be a novel marker of poor outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence and expression of a Sulfolobus solfataricus gene encoding a class II fumarase.

    PubMed

    Colombo, S; Grisa, M; Tortora, P; Vanoni, M

    1994-01-03

    Fumarase catalyzes the interconversion of L-malate and fumarate. A Sulfolobus solfataricus fumarase gene (fumC) was cloned and sequenced. Typical archaebacterial regulatory sites were identified in the region flanking the fumC open reading frame. The fumC gene encodes a protein of 438 amino acids (47,899 Da) which shows several significant similarities with class II fumarases from both eubacterial and eukariotic sources as well as with aspartases. S. solfataricus fumarase expressed in Escherichia coli retains enzymatic activity and its thermostability is comparable to that of S. solfataricus purified enzyme despite a 11 amino acid C-terminal deletion.

  3. Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter Transcription Factor II Regulates Renin Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression. PMID:22645148

  4. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II regulates renin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sandra; Roeser, Marc; Lachmann, Peter; Ishii, Sumiyashi; Suh, Jae Mi; Harlander, Sabine; Desch, Michael; Brunssen, Coy; Morawietz, Henning; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2012-07-13

    This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of the orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) in the regulation of renin gene expression. COUP-TFII colocalized with renin in the juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, which are the main source of renin in vivo. Protein-DNA binding studies demonstrated that COUP-TFII binds to an imperfect direct repeat COUP-TFII recognition sequence (termed hereafter proxDR) in the proximal renin promoter. Because cAMP signaling plays a central role in the control of the renin gene expression, we suggested that COUP-TFII may modulate this cAMP effect. Accordingly, knockdown of COUP-TFII in the clonal renin-producing cell lines As4.1 and Calu-6 diminished the stimulation of the renin mRNA expression by cAMP agonists. In addition, the mutation of the proxDR element in renin promoter reporter gene constructs abrogated the inducibility by cAMP. The proxDR sequence was found to be necessary for the function of a proximal renin promoter cAMP-response element (CRE). Knockdown of COUP-TFII or cAMP-binding protein (CREB), which is the archetypal transcription factor binding to CRE, decreased the basal renin gene expression. However, the deficiency of COUP-TFII did not further diminish the renin expression when CREB was knocked down. In agreement with the cell culture studies, mutant mice deficient in COUP-TFII have lower renin expression than their control strain. Altogether our data show that COUP-TFII is involved in the control of renin gene expression.

  5. Angiotensin II increases CTGF expression via MAPKs/TGF-{beta}1/TRAF6 pathway in atrial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Jun; Liu, Xu; Wang, Quan-xing; Tan, Hong-wei; Guo, Meng; Jiang, Wei-feng; Zhou, Li

    2012-10-01

    The activation of transforming growth factor-{beta}1(TGF-{beta}1)/Smad signaling pathway and increased expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) induced by angiotensin II (AngII) have been proposed as a mechanism for atrial fibrosis. However, whether TGF{beta}1/non-Smad signaling pathways involved in AngII-induced fibrogenetic factor expression remained unknown. Recently tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6)/TGF{beta}-associated kinase 1 (TAK1) has been shown to be crucial for the activation of TGF-{beta}1/non-Smad signaling pathways. In the present study, we explored the role of TGF-{beta}1/TRAF6 pathway in AngII-induced CTGF expression in cultured adult atrial fibroblasts. AngII (1 {mu}M) provoked the activation of P38 mitogen activated protein kinase (P38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2(ERK1/2) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). AngII (1 {mu}M) also promoted TGF{beta}1, TRAF6, CTGF expression and TAK1 phosphorylation, which were suppressed by angiotensin type I receptor antagonist (Losartan) as well as p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190), ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059) and JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Meanwhile, both TGF{beta}1 antibody and TRAF6 siRNA decreased the stimulatory effect of AngII on TRAF6, CTGF expression and TAK1 phosphorylation, which also attenuated AngII-induced atrial fibroblasts proliferation. In summary, the MAPKs/TGF{beta}1/TRAF6 pathway is an important signaling pathway in AngII-induced CTGF expression, and inhibition of TRAF6 may therefore represent a new target for reversing Ang II-induced atrial fibrosis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPKs/TGF{beta}1/TRAF6 participates in AngII-induced CTGF expression in atrial fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF{beta}1/TRAF6 participates in AngII-induced atrial fibroblasts proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 may represent a new target for reversing Ang II-induced atrial fibrosis.

  6. Type II SOCS as a feedback repressor for GH-induced Igf1 expression in carp hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Xiao, Jia; He, Mulan; Ma, Ani; Wong, Anderson O L

    2016-05-01

    Type II suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) serve as feedback repressors for cytokines and are known to inhibit growth hormone (GH) actions. However, direct evidence for SOCS modulation of GH-induced insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression is lacking, and the post-receptor signaling for SOCS expression at the hepatic level is still unclear. To shed light on the comparative aspects of SOCS in GH functions, grass carp was used as a model to study the role of type II SOCS in GH-induced Igf1 expression. Structural identity of type II SOCS, Socs1-3 and cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (Cish), was established in grass carp by 5'/3'-RACE, and their expression at both transcript and protein levels were confirmed in the liver by RT-PCR and LC/MS/MS respectively. In carp hepatocytes, GH treatment induced rapid phosphorylation of JAK2, STATs, MAPK, PI3K, and protein kinase B (Akt) with parallel rises in socs1-3 and cish mRNA levels, and these stimulatory effects on type II SOCS were shown to occur before the gradual loss of igf1 gene expression caused by prolonged exposure of GH. Furthermore, GH-induced type II SOCS gene expression could be negated by inhibiting JAK2, STATs, MEK1/2, P38 (MAPK), PI3K, and/or Akt respectively. In CHO cells transfected with carp GH receptor, over-expression of these newly cloned type II SOCS not only suppressed JAK2/STAT5 signaling with GH treatment but also inhibited GH-induced grass carp Igf1 promoter activity. These results, taken together, suggest that type II SOCS could be induced by GH in the carp liver via JAK2/STATs, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt cascades and serve as feedback repressors for GH signaling and induction of igf1 gene expression.

  7. Decreased monocyte class II MHC expression following major abdominal surgery in children is related to operative stress.

    PubMed

    McHoney, M; Klein, N J; Eaton, S; Pierro, A

    2006-04-01

    Monocyte class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression is necessary for antigen presentation and stimulation of T-cells. The aim of this study was to correlate monocyte class II MHC response to operative stress in children and the possible influence of cytokines in the postoperative period. We studied 21 children undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Operative stress score (OSS) was calculated. Monocyte class II MHC expression was measured preoperatively, immediately after surgery, 24 and 48 h postoperatively, using flow cytometry. Class II MHC is expressed as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of monocytes expressing MHC (mean +/- SD). Cytokine levels (interleukins 1ra, 6, and 10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) were also measured. Data between time points were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. There was an immediate postoperative decrease in class II MHC expression, with lowest levels 24 h postoperatively (preoperative 50 +/- 23.6, 24 h 18.2 +/- 9.4, P < 0.0001 vs. preoperative). At 48 h there was partial recovery in class II MHC, but levels were still significantly lower than preoperative (23.9 +/- 11.1, P < 0.001). The degree of monocyte depression was related to the magnitude of operative stress. Patients who had OSS <10 displayed some recovery in expression at 48 h 25.5 +/- 11.1), whereas in patients with OSS > or = 10 (severe surgical stress), expression further decreased at 48 h (MFI 14.0 +/- 0.1). There was an elevation of interleukin-1ra in the immediate postoperative period in both groups. There was no elevation in the other cytokines. Abdominal surgery in children decreases monocyte MHC expression. Class II MHC depression was related to magnitude of surgical trauma, implying that more severe immuneparesis follows surgery of greater magnitude. This may predispose to postoperative infection.

  8. Ammonia upregulates kynurenine aminotransferase II mRNA expression in rat brain: a role for astrocytic NMDA receptors?

    PubMed

    Obara-Michlewska, Marta; Tuszyńska, Paulina; Albrecht, Jan

    2013-06-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT-II) is the astrocytic enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of kynurenic acid (KYNA), an endogenous inhibitor of the α7-nicotinic receptor and the NMDA receptor (NMDAr). A previous study demonstrated an increase of KYNA synthesis in the brain of rats with thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute liver failure. Here we show that TAA administration increases KAT-II expression in the rat cerebral cortex and the effect is mimicked in cerebral cortical astrocytes in culture treated with high (5 mM) concentration of ammonia. KAT-II expression in control and TAA-treated rats was increased by NMDAr antagonist memantine, and the effects of TAA and memantine appeared additive. In astrocytes, the NMDAr antagonist MK-801 raised KAT-II expression as well, while NMDA added alone had no effect. Glutamate decreased KAT-II mRNA level, which was attenuated by MK-801. The results suggest that stimulation of KAT-II expression during hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with a partial inactivation of astrocytic NMDAr by ammonia.

  9. Expression of human group II PLA2 in transgenic mice results in epidermal hyperplasia in the absence of inflammatory infiltrate.

    PubMed Central

    Grass, D S; Felkner, R H; Chiang, M Y; Wallace, R E; Nevalainen, T J; Bennett, C F; Swanson, M E

    1996-01-01

    Group II PLA2 has been implicated in inflammatory processes in both man and other animals and has been shown to be involved in inflammatory conditions, such as arthritis and sepsis. Transgenic mice expressing the human group II PLA2 gene have been generated using a 6.2-kb genomic fragment. These mice express the group II PLA2 gene abundantly in liver, lung, kidney, and skin, and have serum PLA2 activity levels approximately eightfold higher than nontransgenic littermates. The group II PLA2 transgenic mice reported here exhibit epidermal and adnexal hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and almost total alopecia. The chronic epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis seen in these mice is similar to that seen in a variety of dermatopathies, including psoriasis. However, unlike what is seen with these dermatopathies, no significant inflammatory-cell influx was observed in the skin of these animals, or in any other tissue examined. These mice provide an important tool for examining group II PLA2 expression, and for determining the role of group II PLA2 in normal and disease physiology. They serve as an in vivo model for identifying inhibitors of group II PLA2 activity and gene expression. PMID:8636402

  10. Progesterone receptor induces bcl-x expression through intragenic binding sites favoring RNA polymerase II elongation

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, Paola Y.; Nacht, A. Silvina; Alló, Mariano; Rocha-Viegas, Luciana; Ballaré, Cecilia; Soronellas, Daniel; Castellano, Giancarlo; Zaurin, Roser; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.; Beato, Miguel; Vicent, Guillermo P.; Pecci, Adali

    2013-01-01

    Steroid receptors were classically described for regulating transcription by binding to target gene promoters. However, genome-wide studies reveal that steroid receptors-binding sites are mainly located at intragenic regions. To determine the role of these sites, we examined the effect of progestins on the transcription of the bcl-x gene, where only intragenic progesterone receptor-binding sites (PRbs) were identified. We found that in response to hormone treatment, the PR is recruited to these sites along with two histone acetyltransferases CREB-binding protein (CBP) and GCN5, leading to an increase in histone H3 and H4 acetylation and to the binding of the SWI/SNF complex. Concomitant, a more relaxed chromatin was detected along bcl-x gene mainly in the regions surrounding the intragenic PRbs. PR also mediated the recruitment of the positive elongation factor pTEFb, favoring RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation activity. Together these events promoted the re-distribution of the active Pol II toward the 3′-end of the gene and a decrease in the ratio between proximal and distal transcription. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which PR regulates gene expression by facilitating the proper passage of the polymerase along hormone-dependent genes. PMID:23640331

  11. Stress-induced alterations in interferon production and class II histocompatibility antigen expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Cunnick, J. E.; Armfield, A. V.; Wood, P. G.; Rabin, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mild electric foot-shock has been shown to be a stressor that can alter immune responses. Male Lewis rats were exposed to one session of 16 5.0-s 1.6-mA foot-shocks. Production of interferon-gamma by splenocytes in response to concanavalin-A was decreased in spleens from the shocked rats compared to control spleens. Spleen cells from rats treated with nadolol, a peripherally acting beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, and then shocked, showed dose-dependent attenuation of the suppression of interferon-gamma production. This suggests that catecholamines mediate shock-induced suppression of interferon-gamma production. The percentage of splenic mononuclear cells expressing class II histocompatibility (Ia) antigens on their surfaces from spleens of shocked rats was determined by flow cytometry. Significantly decreased class II positive mononuclear cells were present in the spleens of shocked rats in comparison to the spleens of control rats. This may reflect an alteration of cell trafficking or decreased production of class II antigens.

  12. Induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells in a cultured cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Scott, G.G.

    1994-11-01

    The functions of pulmonary type II cells, such as synthesis of pulmonary surfactant and metabolism of inhaled xenobiotics, can be studied in primary isolates of lung cells. However, isolated type II cells, when cultured, quickly lose the phenotypic expressions characteristics of type II cells, including surfactant lipid and protein synthesis and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity. A cultured cell line that maintained expression of type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous for the study of such functions as surfactant synthesis and secretion. Such a cell line would allow generation of a large number of homogeneous cells for study. The purpose of the current study was to induce markers of differentiated type II cells in a cultured cell line to facilitate studies of factors that control surfactant synthesis and secretion.

  13. Class II transactivator-induced MHC class II expression in pancreatic cancer cells leads to tumor rejection and a specific antitumor memory response.

    PubMed

    Ekkirala, Chaitanya Ramesh; Cappello, Paola; Accolla, Roberto S; Giovarelli, Mirella; Romero, Irene; Garrido, Cristina; Garcia-Lora, Angel Miguel; Novelli, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    The loss of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classes I and II is a well-known mechanism by which cancer cells are able to escape from immune recognition. In this study, we analyzed the expression of antigen processing and presenting molecules in 2 cell lines derived from mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and the effects of the re-expression of MHC class II on PDA rejection. The PDA cell lines were analyzed for the expression of MHC class I, II, and antigen-processing molecules by flow cytometry or polymerase chain reaction. We generated stable PDA-MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) cells and injected them into syngeneic mice. The CD4 and CD8 T-cell role was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Murine PDA cell lines were negative for MHC and antigen-processing molecules, but their expression was restored by exogenous interferon-γ. CIITA-tumor cells were rejected in 80% to 100% of injected mice, which also developed long-lasting immune memory. In vitro assays and immunohistochemical analyses revealed the recruitment of T effector cells and CD8 T cells into the tumor area. Overall, these data confirm that immunotherapy is a feasible therapeutic approach to recognize and target an aggressive cancer such as PDA.

  14. Angiotensin II stimulates expression of the chemokine RANTES in rat glomerular endothelial cells. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Ziyadeh, F N; Thaiss, F; Tomaszewski, J; Caron, R J; Wenzel, U; Zahner, G; Helmchen, U; Stahl, R A

    1997-01-01

    Glomerular influx of monocytes/macrophages (M/M) occurs in many immune- and non-immune-mediated renal diseases. The mechanisms targeting M/M into the glomerulus are incompletely understood, but may involve stimulated expression of chemokines. We investigated whether angiotensin II (ANG II) induces the chemokine RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells of the rat and in vivo. ANG II stimulated mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells. The ANG II-induced RANTES protein was chemotactic for human monocytes. Surprisingly, the ANG II-stimulated RANTES expression was transduced by AT2 receptors because the AT2 receptor antagonists PD 123177 and CGP-42112A, but not an AT1 receptor blocker, abolished the induced RANTES synthesis. Intraperitoneal infusion of ANG II (500 ng/h) into naive rats for 4 d significantly stimulated glomerular RANTES mRNA and protein expression compared with solvent-infused controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed induction of RANTES protein mainly in glomerular endothelial cells and small capillaries. Moreover, ANG II- infused animals exhibited an increase in glomerular ED-1- positive cells compared with controls. Oral treatment with PD 123177 (50 mg/liter drinking water) attenuated the glomerular M/M influx without normalizing the slightly elevated systolic blood pressure caused by ANG II infusion, suggesting that the effects on blood pressure and RANTES induction can be separated. We conclude that the vasoactive peptide ANG II may play an important role in glomerular chemotaxis of M/M through local induction of the chemokine RANTES. The observation that the ANG II- mediated induction of RANTES is transduced by AT2 receptors may influence the decision as to which substances might be used for the therapeutic interference with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:9276721

  15. Theileria-mediated constitutive expression of the casein kinase II-alpha subunit in bovine lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Shayan, P; Ahmed, J S

    1997-01-01

    Theileria-infected cells are induced to undergo a transformation that is reversible, since their proliferation is inhibited after elimination of the schizonts by the theilericidal drug buparvaquone. The molecular mechanisms of the transformation remain unknown. The experiments described in the present report deal with the role of casein kinase (CK) II, a serine/threonine protein kinase, in the permanent proliferation of the parasitized cells and show that the CK II-alpha subunit is expressed in both T. annulata- and T. parva-infected cells and that its expression is closely related to the presence of the parasites in the host-cell cytoplasm. Thus, elimination of the schizonts by buparvaquone leads to the inhibition of CK II-alpha subunit mRNA expression without affecting the expression of actin. Cells treated with 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) are inhibited in a dose-dependent manner from under-going DNA synthesis as measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation and from expressing CK II. Furthermore, a host-cell-specific CK II-alpha antisense inhibits DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. In the present study, 6 microM antisense reduced [3H]-thymidine incorporation by Theileria-infected bovine cells to about 50%. Using a primer derived from T. parva CK II, we detected a parasite-specific CK II mRNA in T. parva-infected cell lines. Interestingly. DRB also inhibited the expression of the parasite-specific CK II. However, to date we have not detected a target sequence for this primer in T. annulata schizonts.

  16. Defective MHC class II expression in an MHC class II deficiency patient is caused by a novel deletion of a splice donor site in the MHC class II transactivator gene.

    PubMed

    Peijnenburg, A; Van den Berg, R; Van Eggermond, M J; Sanal, O; Vossen, J M; Lennon, A M; Alcaïde-Loridan, C; Van den Elsen, P J

    2000-01-01

    MHC class II deficiency patients are mutated for transcription factors that regulate the expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes. Four complementation groups (A-D) are defined and the gene defective in group A has been shown to encode the MHC class II transactivator (CIITA). Here, we report the molecular characterization of a new MHC class II deficiency patient, ATU. Cell fusion experiments indicated that ATU belongs to complementation group A. Subsequent mutation analysis revealed that the CIITA mRNA lacked 84 nucleotides. This deletion was the result of the absence of a splice donor site in the CIITA gene of ATU. As a result of this novel homozygous genomic deletion, ATU CIITA failed to transactivate MHC class II genes. Furthermore, this truncated CIITA of ATU did not display a dominant negative effect on CIITA-mediated transactivation of various isotypic MHC class II promoters.

  17. Cinnamaldehyde enhances Nrf2 nuclear translocation to upregulate phase II detoxifying enzyme expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Yu-Ling; Wu, Mei-Li; Chuang, Show-Mei

    2011-05-11

    Cinnamaldehyde has been demonstrated to stimulate glutathione production and the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes in HepG2 cells. The mechanism underlying this cinnamaldehyde-mediated gene expression relies on Nrf2 transcriptional activity. Therefore, the molecular signaling events in cinnamaldehyde-mediated detoxifying enzyme expression were further investigated in this study. Cinnamaldehyde activated ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK signaling pathways, but not the p38 MAP kinase pathway, subsequently leading to Nrf2 nuclear translocation and eventually increasing phase II enzyme expression. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt, or JNK pathways attenuated Nrf2 nuclear translocation and phase II enzyme expression. Depletion of Nrf2 by small RNA interference (si-RNA) showed that the protein levels of phase II enzymes were no longer induced by cinnamaldehyde. A luciferase reporter assay and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) also demonstrated that cinnamaldehyde-activated signaling resulted in the increased transcriptional activity of Nrf2 through binding to the ARE4 enhancer sequence. Altogether, these data suggest that ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK pathways activated by cinnamaldehyde collectively control Nrf2 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, leading to the increase of phase II enzyme expression. Application of an appropriate chemopreventive agent such as cinnamaldehyde could potentially be an alternative strategy for cancer chemoprevention.

  18. CD44v6 expression in patients with stage II or stage III sporadic colorectal cancer is superior to CD44 expression for predicting progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, LH; Lin, QL; Wei, J; Huai, YL; Wang, KJ; Yan, HY

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently, it is difficult to predict the prognosis of patients exhibiting stage II or stage III colorectal cancer (CRC) and to identify those patients most likely to benefit from aggressive treatment. The current study was performed to examine the clinicopathological significance of CD44 and CD44v6 protein expression in these patients. Study design: We retrospectively investigated 187 consecutive patients who underwent surgery with curative intent for stage II to III CRC from 2007 to 2013 in the Beijing Civil Aviation Hospital. CD44 and CD44v6 protein expression levels were determined using immunohistochemistry and compared to the clinicopathological data. Results: Using immunohistochemical detection, CD44 expression was observed in 108 (57.75%) of the CRC patients; and its detection was significantly associated with greater invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, angiolymphatic invasion, and a more advanced pathological tumor-lymph node-metastasis (TNM) stage. CD44v6 expression was observed in 135 (72.19%) of the CRC patients; and its expression was significantly associated with a poorly differentiated histology, greater invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, angiolymphatic invasion, and a more advanced pathological TNM stage. Expression of CD44v6 was higher than that of CD44 in stage II and stage III sporadic CRC. Conclusion: CD44v6 is a more useful marker for predicting a poor prognosis in stage II and stage III sporadic CRC as compared to CD44. PMID:25755763

  19. Regulation of somatic growth and gene expression of the GH-IGF system and PRP-PACAP by dietary lipid level in early juveniles of a teleost fish, the pejerrey (Odontesthes bonariensis).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Kraemer, Mauricio Néstor; Canosa, Luis Fabián

    2012-05-01

    Growth and mRNA levels of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its related peptide (PRP), and the system controlled by the growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) were analyzed in pejerrey fry fed with graded levels of dietary lipids: 10% (L10), 13% (L13) and 21% (L21). First, the full sequence of pejerrey PRP-PACAP was obtained by RT-PCR, using primers based on conserved fragments of teleosts PACAP sequences. The growth of the fish at 83 days after hatching (dah) and the GH mRNA levels were not significantly affected by the dietary treatment. Conversely, PRP-PACAP expression significantly decreased with increasing dietary lipids (L10 > L21). While GH receptor (GHR)-I and IGF-I transcripts did not differ among groups, GHR-II transcripts decreased in group L21. IGF-II expression apparently followed the same trend. These results in combination with the lower expression of the anorexigenic PRP-PACAP in fish fed diet L21 and the correlation analysis evidencing a particularly fine tuning of the GH-IGF system in group L13, suggest that this diet may cover the energy demands for growing pejerrey from 27 dah onwards. Our results show for first time in fish a differential response of PRP-PACAP transcripts to dietary manipulations, and confirm the sensitivity of the pejerrey GH-IGF system to changes in diet composition despite the lack of (or in advance to) a clear response of somatic growth.

  20. A comparison of the antigen-presenting capabilities of class II MHC-expressing human lung epithelial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A C; Zhang, J G; Moy, J V; Ali, S; Kirby, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human lung alveolar epithelial cells constitutively express class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Human lung microvascular endothelial and small airway epithelial cells can be induced to express class II MHC by stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. The levels of class II MHC on lung epithelial and endothelial cells were comparable to those seen on an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell line. However, the costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2 were not expressed. The ability of the class II MHC expressing human lung parenchymal cells to present alloantigen to CD4+ T lymphocytes was investigated. Freshly isolated human alveolar epithelial cells (type II pneumocytes) and monolayers of interferon-gamma-stimulated small airway epithelial and lung microvascular endothelial cells were co-cultured with allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes and proliferation determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. A clear difference was observed between effects of the epithelial and endothelial cells on CD4+ T-lymphocyte activation. Alveolar and small airway epithelial cells failed to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes whereas lung microvascular endothelial cells did stimulate proliferation. This difference could not be explained by the levels of class II MHC or the lack of B7-1 and B7-2 solely. Microvascular endothelial cells, and not alveolar or small airway epithelial cells, possess B7-independent costimulatory pathways. PMID:9301537

  1. NELF-mediated stalling of Pol II can enhance gene expression by blocking promoter-proximal nucleosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Nechaev, Sergei; Lee, Chanhyo; Ghosh, Saikat Kumar B.; Collins, Jennifer B.; Li, Leping; Gilmour, David S.; Adelman, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The Negative Elongation Factor (NELF) is a transcription regulatory complex that induces stalling of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) during early transcription elongation and represses expression of several genes studied to date, including Drosophila Hsp70, mammalian proto-oncogene junB, and HIV RNA. To determine the full spectrum of NELF target genes in Drosophila, we performed a microarray analysis of S2 cells depleted of NELF and discovered that NELF RNAi affects many rapidly inducible genes involved in cellular responses to stimuli. Surprisingly, only one-third of NELF target genes were, like Hsp70, up-regulated by NELF-depletion, whereas the majority of target genes showed decreased expression levels upon NELF RNAi. Our data reveal that the presence of stalled Pol II at this latter group of genes enhances gene expression by maintaining a permissive chromatin architecture around the promoter-proximal region, and that loss of Pol II stalling at these promoters is accompanied by a significant increase in nucleosome occupancy and a decrease in histone H3 Lys 4 trimethylation. These findings identify a novel, positive role for stalled Pol II in regulating gene expression and suggest that there is a dynamic interplay between stalled Pol II and chromatin structure. PMID:18628398

  2. Arterial and venous endothelia display differential functional fractalkine (CX3CL1) expression by angiotensin-II.

    PubMed

    Rius, Cristina; Piqueras, Laura; González-Navarro, Herminia; Albertos, Fernando; Company, Chantal; López-Ginés, Concha; Ludwig, Andreas; Blanes, Jose-Ignacio; Morcillo, Esteban J; Sanz, Maria-Jesus

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) promotes the interaction of mononuclear cells with arterioles and neutrophils with postcapillary venules. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this dissimilar response, the involvement of fractalkine (CX(3)CL1) was explored. Enhanced CX(3)CL1 expression was detected in both cremasteric arterioles and postcapillary venules 24 hours after Ang-II intrascrotal injection. Arteriolar leukocyte adhesion was the unique parameter significantly reduced (83%) in animals lacking CX(3)CL1 receptor (CX(3)CR1). Human umbilical arterial and venous endothelial cell stimulation with 1 μmol/L Ang-II increased CX(3)CL1 expression, yet neutralization of CX(3)CL1 activity only significantly inhibited Ang-II-induced mononuclear cell-human umbilical arterial endothelial cell interactions (73%) but not with human umbilical venous endothelial cells. The use of small interfering RNA revealed the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-α in Ang-II-induced CX(3)CL1 upregulation and mononuclear cell arrest. Nox5 knockdown with small interfering RNA or pharmacological inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB also abolished these responses. Finally, when human umbilical arterial endothelial cells were costimulated with Ang-II, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ, CX(3)CL1 expression and mononuclear cell adhesiveness were more pronounced than when each stimulus was provided alone. These results suggest that Ang-II induces functional CX(3)CL1 expression in arterial but not in venous endothelia. Thus, targeting endothelial CX(3)CL1-mononuclear leukocyte CX(3)CR1 interactions may constitute a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of Ang-II-associated cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Increased hexokinase II expression in the renal glomerulus of mice in response to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D.; Sollome, James J.; Regan, Suzanne; Cardinal, Trevor R.; Hoying, James B.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2007-10-01

    Epidemiological studies link arsenic exposure to increased risks of cancers of the skin, kidney, lung, bladder and liver. Additionally, a variety of non-cancerous conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease have been associated with chronic ingestion of low levels of arsenic. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms by which arsenic exerts its effects remain elusive. Here we report increased renal hexokinase II (HKII) expression in response to arsenic exposure both in vivo and in vitro. In our model, HKII was up-regulated in the renal glomeruli of mice exposed to low levels of arsenic (10 ppb or 50 ppb) via their drinking water for up to 21 days. Additionally, a similar effect was observed in cultured renal mesangial cells exposed to arsenic. This correlation between our in vivo and in vitro data provides further evidence for a direct link between altered renal HKII expression and arsenic exposure. Thus, our data suggest that alterations in renal HKII expression may be involved in arsenic-induced pathological conditions involving the kidney. More importantly, these results were obtained using environmentally relevant arsenic concentrations.

  4. Heterologous expression of cellobiohydrolase II (Cel6A) in maize endosperm.

    PubMed

    Devaiah, Shivakumar Pattada; Requesens, Deborah Vicuna; Chang, Yeun-Kyung; Hood, Kendall R; Flory, Ashley; Howard, John A; Hood, Elizabeth E

    2013-06-01

    The technology of converting lignocellulose to biofuels has advanced swiftly over the past few years, and enzymes are a significant constituent of this technology. In this regard, cost effective production of cellulases has been the focus of research for many years. One approach to reach cost targets of these enzymes involves the use of plants as bio-factories. The application of this technology to plant biomass conversion for biofuels and biobased products has the potential for significantly lowering the cost of these products due to lower enzyme production costs. Cel6A, one of the two cellobiohydrolases (CBH II) produced by Hypocrea jecorina, is an exoglucanase that cleaves primarily cellobiose units from the non-reducing end of cellulose microfibrils. In this work we describe the expression of Cel6A in maize endosperm as part of the process to lower the cost of this dominant enzyme for the bioconversion process. The enzyme is active on microcrystalline cellulose as exponential microbial growth was observed in the mixture of cellulose, cellulases, yeast and Cel6A, Cel7A (endoglucanase), and Cel5A (cellobiohydrolase I) expressed in maize seeds. We quantify the amount accumulated and the activity of the enzyme. Cel6A expressed in maize endosperm was purified to homogeneity and verified using peptide mass finger printing.

  5. Increased hexokinase II expression in the renal glomerulus of mice in response to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Pysher, Michele D.; Sollome, James J.; Regan, Suzanne; Cardinal, Trevor R.; Hoying, James B.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies link arsenic exposure to increased risks of cancers of the skin, kidney, lung, bladder and liver. Additionally, a variety of non-cancerous conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease have been associated with chronic ingestion of low levels of arsenic. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms by which arsenic exerts its effects remain elusive. Here we report increased renal hexokinase II (HKII) expression in response to arsenic exposure both in vivo and in vitro. In our model, HKII was up-regulated in the renal glomeruli of mice exposed to low levels of arsenic (10 ppb or 50 ppb) via their drinking water for up to 21 days. Additionally, a similar effect was observed in cultured renal mesangial cells exposed to arsenic. This correlation between our in vivo and in vitro data provides further evidence for a direct link between altered renal HKII expression and arsenic exposure. Thus, our data suggest that alterations in renal HKII expression may be involved in arsenic-induced pathological conditions involving the kidney. More importantly, these results were obtained using environmentally relevant arsenic concentrations. PMID:17643460

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  7. [Effect of the insulation layer of tissue-engineering scaffold on collagen type II expression in the neo-cartilage].

    PubMed

    DA, Hu; Mu, Yunjing; Wang, Wenyong

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of the insulation layer in the tissue-engineering composite osteochondral scaffolds on collagen type II expression in the neo-cartilage. Chondral phases of insulation layer-free or insulation layer-containing biphasic scaffolds were seeded with autogeneic chondrocyte-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Then, the biphasic scaffolds-cells constructs were implanted into osteochondral defects of rabbits' knees. The expression of type II collagen in the tissue-engineering cartilages was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting at 3 and 6 months after surgery, respectively. Moreover, the mRNA expression of collagen type II was also detected by qRT-PCR. The expression of the collagen type II at both protein and mRNA levels in tissue-engineering neo-cartilages generated by the insulation layer-containing biphasic scaffold were significantly higher than those by the insulation layer-free biphasic scaffold in vivo (P<0.05). After the insulation layer is added into the osteochondral composite scaffold, the collagen type II expression in the tissue-engineering neo-cartilage can be significantly enhanced.

  8. Differential expression of secretogranin II and chromogranin A genes in the female rat pituitary through sexual maturation and estrous cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Anouar, Y.; Duval, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Secretogranin II (SgII) is a protein of pituitary secretory granules released by LHRH-stimulated gonadotrope cells. Estrogens and androgens are modulators of SgII release. Experiments were performed to determine the regulation of expression of the SgII gene in the female rat pituitary, during sexual maturation and according to the estrous cycle. Age- and cycle-related changes in SgII mRNA content were estimated through cytoplasmic slot blot; SgII content was determined by western blotting; maturation of the protein was controlled through (35S)sulfate labeling. Variations in chromogranin A (CgA), another protein of secretory granules, were analyzed in the same experimental conditions to assess the specificity of SgII regulation. The pituitary SgII concentration increased between days 7 and 21 (2.2-fold) and then declined to the initial 7-day-old value. Simultaneously, the CgA concentration went through a maximum between days 14 and 21 and then strongly dropped to barely detectable levels in the adult pituitary. The SgII mRNA concentration followed roughly the same pattern as the protein. Moreover, the sulfation level remained constant between days 14 and 60. These results demonstrated a regulatory mechanism operating, during sexual maturation, on the SgII gene and not on the protein processing or on storage/release steps. In the 4-day cycling females, the pituitary SgII mRNA and protein contents were the lowest during estrus. They then increased to their highest values in diestrus II. Moreover, the sulfation level of SgII was significantly higher during estrus than during any other stage. Due to its low content level, variations in pituitary CgA could not be demonstrated during the cycle.

  9. Serum insulin-like growth factors I and II, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and risk of breast cancer in the Japan Collaborative Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sakauchi, Fumio; Nojima, Masanori; Mori, Mitsuru; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Sadao; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei

    2009-12-01

    The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study) was planned in the late 1980s as a large-scale cohort study of persons in various areas of Japan. In the present study, we conducted a nested case-control study and examined associations of breast cancer risk with serum levels of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II), as well as insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), among women who participated in the JACC Study and donated blood at the baseline. Sixty-three women who died or suffered from breast cancer were examined. Two or three controls were selected to match each case for age at recruitment and the study area. Controls were alive and not diagnosed as having breast cancer at the diagnosis date of the cases. Associations between the serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3 and breast cancer risk were evaluated using a conditional logistic regression model. In premenopausal Japanese women, IGF-I showed a marginal negative dose-dependent association with the breast cancer risk (trend P= 0.08), but any link disappeared on taking into account IGFBP-3 (trend P= 0.47), which was likely to be inversely associated with the risk. In postmenopausal women, IGFBP-3 showed a marginal dose-dependent association with the risk (trend P= 0.06). Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  10. Recombinant expression and characterization of L-asparaginase II from a moderately thermotolerant bacterial isolate.

    PubMed

    Vidya, Jalaja; Pandey, Ashok

    2012-07-01

    A moderately thermotolerant bacterium belonging to Enterobacteriaceae, which can grow at 44.5 °C, was isolated from cow dung; L-asparaginase II gene was isolated by PCR, cloned, and expressed in pET 20b with pelB leader sequence and 6× Histidine tag at the C-terminal end. The active protein from the soluble sonicated fraction was purified through nickel affinity chromatography. After characterization, the purified protein showed optimum activities at a temperature of 37 °C and in a buffer system of pH 6 to 7. The enzyme exhibited thermostability at 50 °C with a 33% and 28% of activity retention after 45 and 60 min. The kinetic parameters for the enzyme were calculated from Lineweaver-Burk plot, and K(m) and V(max) were 0.89 mM and 0.18 U/mg, respectively.

  11. Association of Campylobacter pylori with induced expression of class II transplantation antigens on gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Engstrand, L; Scheynius, A; Påhlson, C; Grimelius, L; Schwan, A; Gustavsson, S

    1989-01-01

    Campylobacter pylori was identified with immunoperoxidase staining and a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against C. pylori in gastric biopsy specimens from 24 patients with gastritis. C. pylori was not found in gastric biopsy specimens from six subjects with histologically normal mucosa. The monoclonal antibody, which was reactive with a surface protein of approximately 20 kilodaltons, was found to be specific for C. pylori, and the immunoperoxidase staining proved to be more sensitive and rapid than culture in detecting the organism. In the tissue specimens where C. pylori was detected with the monoclonal antibody, there was a strong expression of class II transplantation antigens on the epithelial cells and an increased number of T lymphocytes. These findings indicate that C. pylori may initiate local immune responses. Images PMID:2645211

  12. Supernatants of human leukocytes contain mediator, different from interferon gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    In this report, data are presented on the regulation of MHC class II antigen expression by a mediator present in supernatants of human mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC-SN), and which is different from IFN-gamma. The capacity of supernatants to induce antigen expression did not correspond to titers of IFN-gamma. Removal of IFN-gamma using either dialysis against pH 2 or neutralizing mAb against human IFN-gamma did not abrogate the MHC class II antigen expression-inducing capacity of MLC-SN when tested on adenocarcinoma cell lines, kidney epithelial cells, and fibroblasts in vitro in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Therefore, supernatants of human leukocytes contain a mediator, different from IFN-gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens. Dose-response studies revealed that the mediator is produced after allogeneic and lectin stimulation of human leukocytes, and by unstimulated leukocytes. Activation of leukocytes resulted in increased titers of the mediator. The mediator markedly enhances expression of both HLA-DR and HLA-DQ antigens, whereas IFN-gamma had a similar effect on HLA-DR antigens, and only a minor effect on HLA-DQ antigens. Interaction of the mediator and IFN-gamma resulted in a potentiating effect of these two factors on MHC class II antigen expression. Biochemical analysis revealed a mediator, distinguishable by FPLC from IL-1, IL-2, and human IFN-gamma, and which has a molecular mass of 32 kD. PMID:2941512

  13. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of Capra hircus Golgi α-Mannosidase II.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfei; Zhang, Jiangye; Lai, Bi; Zhao, Ying; Li, Qinfan

    2015-11-01

    Golgi α-mannosidase II (GMII), a key glycosyl hydrolase in the N-linked glycosylation pathway, has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the genesis and development of cancer. In this study, we cloned cDNA-encoding Capra hircus GMII (chGMII) and expressed it in Pichia pastoris expression system. The chGMII cDNA contains an open reading frame of 3432 bp encoding a polypeptide of 1144 amino acids. The deduced molecular mass and pI of chGMII was 130.5 kDa and 8.04, respectively. The gene expression profile analysis showed GMII was the highest expressed gene in the spleen. The recombinant chGMII showed maximum activity at pH 5.4 and 42 °C and was activated by Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Ca(2+), and Mn(2+) and strongly inhibited by Co(2+), Cu(2+), and EDTA. By homology modeling and molecular docking, we obtained the predicted 3D structure of chGMII and the probable binding modes of chGMII-GnMan5Gn, chGMII-SW. A small cavity containing Tyr355 and zinc ion fixed by residues Asp290, His176, Asp178, and His570 was identified as the active center of chGMII. These results not only provide a clue for clarifying the catalytic mechanism of chGMII but also lay a theoretical foundation for subsequent investigations in the field of anticancer therapy for mammals.

  14. Expression of alpha subunit of alpha glucosidase II in adult mouse brain regions and selective organs

    PubMed Central

    Anji, Antje; Miller, Hayley; Raman, Chandrasekar; Phillips, Mathew; Ciment, Gary; Kumari, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Alpha glucosidase II (GII), a resident of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and an important enzyme in folding of nascent glycoproteins, is heterodimeric consisting of alpha (GIIα) and beta (GIIβ) subunits. The catalytic GIIα subunit with the help of mannose 6-phosphate receptor homology (MRH) domain of GIIβ sequentially hydrolyzes two α-1-3-linked glucose residues in the 2nd step of N-linked oligosaccharide-mediated protein folding. The soluble GIIα subunit is retained in the ER through its interaction with the HDEL-containing GIIβ subunit. N-glycosylation and correct protein folding is crucial for protein stability, trafficking, and cell surface expression of several proteins in the brain. Alterations in N-glycosylation lead to abnormalities in neuronal migration and mental retardation, various neurodegenerative diseases, and invasion of malignant gliomas. Inhibitors of GII are used to inhibit cell proliferation and migration in a variety of different pathologies such as viral infection, cancer and diabetes. In spite of the widespread usage of GIIα inhibitory drugs and the role of GIIα in brain function little is known about its expression in brain and other tissues. Here, we report generation of a highly specific chicken antibody to GIIα subunit and its characterization by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation using cerebral cortical extracts. Using this antibody we show that the GIIα protein is highly expressed in testis, kidney, and lung, with the least amount in heart. GIIα polypeptide levels in whole brain were comparable to spleen. However, higher expression of GIIα protein was detected in cerebral cortex reflecting its continuous requirement in correct folding of cell surface proteins. PMID:25131991

  15. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II from Sitophilus zeamais.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chang-Liang; Wang, Jing-Bo; Wu, Hua; Liu, Jia-Yu; Ma, Zhi-Qing; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2016-09-30

    Cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX II) containing a dual core CuA active site is one of the core subunits of mitochondrial Cytochrome c oxidase (Cco), which plays a significant role in the physiological process. In this report, the full-length cDNA of COXII gene was cloned from Sitophilus zeamais, which had an open reading frame (ORF) of 684 bp encoding 227 amino acids residues. The predicted COXII protein had a molecular mass of 26.2 kDa with pI value of 6.37. multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sitophilus zeamais COXII had high sequence identity with the COXII of other insect species. The gene was subcloned into the expression vector pET-32a, and induced by isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in E. coli Transetta (DE3) expression system. Finally the recombinant COXII with 6-His tag was purified using affinity chromatography with Ni(2+)-NTA agarose. Western Blotting (WB) showed the recombinant protein was about 44 kD, and the concentration of fusion protein was 50 μg/mL. UV-spectrophotometer and infrared spectrometer analysis showed that recombinant COXII could catalyze the oxidation of substrate Cytochrome C (Cyt c), and influenced by allyl isothiocyanate (AITC). By using molecular docking method, It was found that a sulfur atom of AITC structure could form a length of 2.9 Å hydrogen bond with Leu-31. These results suggested that tag-free COXII was functional and one of the action sites of AITC, which will be helpful to carry out a point mutation in binding sites for the future research.

  16. MCP-1 expression by rat type II alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Paine, R; Rolfe, M W; Standiford, T J; Burdick, M D; Rollins, B J; Strieter, R M

    1993-05-15

    Recruitment and activation of mononuclear phagocytes are potentially critical regulatory events for control of pulmonary inflammation. Located at the boundary between the alveolar airspace and the interstitium, alveolar epithelial cells are ideally situated to regulate the recruitment and activation of mononuclear phagocytes through the production of cytokines in response to inflammatory stimulation from the alveolar space. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the production of monocyte chemotactic polypeptide-1 (MCP-1), a protein that is chemotactic for and that activates monocytes, by rat type II alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture. Immunocytochemical staining using anti-murine JE, an antibody recognizing rat MCP-1, demonstrated cell-associated MCP-1 Ag throughout the monolayer. The intensity of staining was increased in response to IL-1 beta. When type II epithelial cells formed a tight monolayer on a filter support, there was polar secretion of MCP-1 Ag into the apical compartment by both control and IL-1-stimulated cells as measured by specific MCP-1 ELISA. Northern blot analysis revealed that IL-1 and TNF-alpha stimulated MCP-1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, whereas dexamethasone blocked MCP-1 expression by cells stimulated with IL-1. In contrast to previous results using transformed epithelial cell lines, MCP-1 mRNA was induced in these primary cultures directly by stimulation with LPS. These data suggest that alveolar epithelial cells may have an important and previously unrecognized role in the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory processes in the lung by recruiting and activating circulating monocytes through the production of MCP-1.

  17. Differences in type II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoform expression between rat preadipocytes and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Serazin-Leroy, V; Morot, M; de Mazancourt, P; Giudicelli, Y

    2001-11-26

    Adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity is low in preadipocyte membranes when compared to adipocytes. Under conditions promoting inhibition of adipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity by Gpp(NH)p, a stable GTP analog, a paradoxical increase in preadipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity was obtained. In order to explain this contradiction, expression of types II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoforms was compared in adipocytes and undifferentiated preadipocytes both by western blots and by a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Type II, IV, V and VI mRNAs and proteins were present in both adipocytes and preadipocytes. However, in undifferentiated preadipocytes, expression of type II mRNA and protein were significantly higher whereas expression of type IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase mRNAs and proteins were significantly weaker than in adipocytes. In late differentiated preadipocytes, the adenylyl cyclase subtype mRNA expression pattern was intermediary between the undifferentiated and the full differentiation states except for type IV which remained weakly expressed. Moreover, one of the representative regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS protein), RGS4, was less expressed in undifferentiated preadipocyte membranes and cytosol extracts, which contrasts with adipocytes where RGS4 is clearly expressed. Thus, the preferential expression of type II adenylyl cyclase (G(betagamma) subunit-stimulated) in preadipocytes might explain why Gpp(NH)p elicits stimulation of adenylyl cyclase under conditions designed to promote inhibition. Conversely, the preferential expression of type V and VI adenylyl cyclases and the slightly higher expression of type IV adenylyl cyclase in adipocytes could contribute to explain the elevated total catalytic activity observed in mature fat cells compared to their precursor cells.

  18. Effects of early overnutrition on the renal response to Ang II and expression of RAAS components in rat renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Granado, M; Amor, S; Fernández, N; Carreño-Tarragona, G; Iglesias-Cruz, M C; Martín-Carro, B; Monge, L; García-Villalón, A L

    2017-07-08

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of early overnutrition (EON) on the expression of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) components in renal cortex, renal arteries and renal perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT), as well as the vascular response of renal arteries to Angiotensin II (Ang II). On birth day litters were adjusted to twelve (L12-control) or three (L3-overfed) pups per mother. Half of the animals were sacrificed at weaning (21 days old) and the other half at 5 months of age. Ang II-induced vasoconstriction of renal artery segments increased in young overfed rats and decreased in adult overfed rats. EON decreased the gene expression of angiotensinogen (Agt), Ang II receptors AT1 and AT2 and eNOS in renal arteries of young rats, while it increased the mRNA levels of AT-2 and ET-1 in adult rats. In renal PVAT EON up-regulated the gene expression of COX-2 and TNF-α in young rats and the mRNA levels of renin receptor both in young and in adult rats. On the contrary, Ang II receptors mRNA levels were downregulated at both ages. Renal cortex of overfed rats showed increased gene expression of Agt in adult rats and of AT1 in young rats. However the mRNA levels of AT1 were decreased in the renal cortex of overfed adult rats. EON is associated with alterations in the vascular response of renal arteries to Ang II and changes in the gene expression of RAAS components in renal tissue. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells

  20. Aberrant MHC class II expression in mouse joints leads to arthritis with extraarticular manifestations similar to rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Satoshi; Ota, Shusuke; Sekine, Chiyoko; Tada, Toyohiro; Otsuka, Takanobu; Okamoto, Takashi; Sønderstrup, Grete; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2006-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with certain MHC class II molecules. To clarify the role of these determinants in RA, we generated the D1CC transgenic mouse that expressed genes involved in antigen processing and presentation by the MHC class II pathway in joints. The class II transactivator, which was transcribed from the rat collagen type II promoter and enhancer, directed the expression of these genes. In D1CC mice congenic for the H-2q (DBA/1) background, small amounts of bovine collagen type II in adjuvant induced reproducibly an inflammatory arthritis resembling RA. Importantly, these stimuli had no effect in DBA/1 mice. Eighty-nine percent of D1CC mice developed chronic disease with joint swelling, redness, and heat in association with synovial proliferation as well as pannus formation and mononuclear infiltration of synovial membranes. Granulomatous lesions resembling rheumatoid nodules and interstitial pneumonitis also were observed. As in patients with RA, anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were detected during the inflammatory stage. Finally, joints in D1CC mice displayed juxtaarticular demineralization, severe joint space narrowing, and erosions, which led to ankylosis, but without the appearance of osteophytes. Thus, aberrant expression of MHC class II in joints facilitates the development of severe erosive inflammatory polyarthritis, which is very similar to RA. PMID:16980409

  1. Metallothionein-I/II Knockout Mice Aggravate Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Peroxiredoxin 3 Expression in Thyroid after Excessive Iodide Exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Wang, Lingyan; Duan, Qi; Lin, Laixiang; Ahmed, Mohamed; Wang, Tingting; Yao, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    We aim to figure out the effect of metallothioneins on iodide excess induced oxidative stress in the thyroid. Eight-week-old MT-I/II knockout (MT-I/II KO) mice and background-matched wild-type (WT) mice were used. Mitochondrial superoxide production and peroxiredoxin (Prx) 3 expression were measured. In in vitro study, more significant increases in mitochondrial superoxide production and Prx 3 expression were detected in the MT-I/II KO groups. In in vivo study, significantly higher concentrations of urinary iodine level were detected in MT-I/II KO mice in 100 HI group. Compared to the NI group, there was no significant difference existing in serum thyroid hormones level in either groups (P > 0.05), while the mitochondrial superoxide production was significantly increased in 100 HI groups with significantly increased LDH activity and decreased relative cell viability. Compared to WT mice, more significant changes were detected in MT-I/II KO mice in 100 HI groups. No significant differences were detected between the NI group and 10 HI group in both the MT-I/II KO and WT mice groups (P > 0.05). Iodide excess in a thyroid without MT I/II protection may result in strong mitochondrial oxidative stress, which further leads to the damage of thyrocytes.

  2. Metallothionein-I/II Knockout Mice Aggravate Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Peroxiredoxin 3 Expression in Thyroid after Excessive Iodide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Wang, Lingyan; Duan, Qi; Lin, Laixiang; Ahmed, Mohamed; Wang, Tingting; Yao, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We aim to figure out the effect of metallothioneins on iodide excess induced oxidative stress in the thyroid. Methods. Eight-week-old MT-I/II knockout (MT-I/II KO) mice and background-matched wild-type (WT) mice were used. Mitochondrial superoxide production and peroxiredoxin (Prx) 3 expression were measured. Results. In in vitro study, more significant increases in mitochondrial superoxide production and Prx 3 expression were detected in the MT-I/II KO groups. In in vivo study, significantly higher concentrations of urinary iodine level were detected in MT-I/II KO mice in 100 HI group. Compared to the NI group, there was no significant difference existing in serum thyroid hormones level in either groups (P > 0.05), while the mitochondrial superoxide production was significantly increased in 100 HI groups with significantly increased LDH activity and decreased relative cell viability. Compared to WT mice, more significant changes were detected in MT-I/II KO mice in 100 HI groups. No significant differences were detected between the NI group and 10 HI group in both the MT-I/II KO and WT mice groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Iodide excess in a thyroid without MT I/II protection may result in strong mitochondrial oxidative stress, which further leads to the damage of thyrocytes. PMID:26101557

  3. Production of Recombinant Trichoderma reesei Cellobiohydrolase II in a New Expression System Based on Wickerhamomyces anomalus

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rincón, Dennis J.; Duque, Ivonne; Osorio, Erika; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.

    2017-01-01

    Cellulase is a family of at least three groups of enzymes that participate in the sequential hydrolysis of cellulose. Recombinant expression of cellulases might allow reducing their production times and increasing the low proteins concentrations obtained with filamentous fungi. In this study, we describe the production of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) in a native strain of Wickerhamomyces anomalus. Recombinant CBHII was expressed in W. anomalus 54-A reaching enzyme activity values of up to 14.5 U L−1. The enzyme extract showed optimum pH and temperature of 5.0–6.0 and 40°C, respectively. Enzyme kinetic parameters (KM of 2.73 mM and Vmax of 23.1 µM min−1) were between the ranges of values reported for other CBHII enzymes. Finally, the results showed that an enzymatic extract of W. anomalus 54-A carrying the recombinant T. reesei CBHII allows production of reducing sugars similar to that of a crude extract from cellulolytic fungi. These results show the first report on the use of W. anomalus as a host to produce recombinant proteins. In addition, recombinant T. reesei CBHII enzyme could potentially be used in the degradation of lignocellulosic residues to produce bioethanol, based on its pH and temperature activity profile. PMID:28951785

  4. Production of Recombinant Trichoderma reesei Cellobiohydrolase II in a New Expression System Based on Wickerhamomyces anomalus.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rincón, Dennis J; Duque, Ivonne; Osorio, Erika; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Quevedo-Hidalgo, Balkys

    2017-01-01

    Cellulase is a family of at least three groups of enzymes that participate in the sequential hydrolysis of cellulose. Recombinant expression of cellulases might allow reducing their production times and increasing the low proteins concentrations obtained with filamentous fungi. In this study, we describe the production of Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) in a native strain of Wickerhamomyces anomalus. Recombinant CBHII was expressed in W. anomalus 54-A reaching enzyme activity values of up to 14.5 U L(-1). The enzyme extract showed optimum pH and temperature of 5.0-6.0 and 40°C, respectively. Enzyme kinetic parameters (KM of 2.73 mM and Vmax of 23.1 µM min(-1)) were between the ranges of values reported for other CBHII enzymes. Finally, the results showed that an enzymatic extract of W. anomalus 54-A carrying the recombinant T. reesei CBHII allows production of reducing sugars similar to that of a crude extract from cellulolytic fungi. These results show the first report on the use of W. anomalus as a host to produce recombinant proteins. In addition, recombinant T. reesei CBHII enzyme could potentially be used in the degradation of lignocellulosic residues to produce bioethanol, based on its pH and temperature activity profile.

  5. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Photoreaction cycle of phoborhodopsin (sensory rhodopsin II) from Halobacterium salinarum expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dai, Gang; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Ikeda, Yoichi; Tamogami, Jun; Kikukawa, Takashi; Kamo, Naoki; Iwasa, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    Phoborhodopsin (pR; also called sensory rhodopsin II, SRII) is a photoreceptor of negative phototaxis of halobacteria. The studies of photochemical properties of this pigment are not many because the amount of the pigment is small and the stability is low. Recently an expression system of phoborhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum (called salinarum phoborhodopsin, spR; also HsSRII) in Escherichia coli and purification method has been developed (Mironova et al. [2005] FEBS Lett., 579, 3147-3151), which enables detailed studies on the photochemical properties of spR. In the present work, the photoreaction cycle of E. coli-expressed spR was studied by low-temperature spectroscopy and flash photolysis. Formations of K-, M-, O-like intermediates and P480 were reconfirmed as reported previously. New findings are as follows. (1) The K-like intermediate (P500) was a mixture of two photoproducts. (2) Formation of L-like intermediate (P482) was observed by low-temperature spectroscopy and flash photolysis at room temperature. (3) On long irradiation of spR at 20 degrees C, formation of a new photoproduct P370 was observed and it decayed to the original spR in the dark with a decay half time of 190 min. Based on these results the similarities and dissimilarities between spR and ppR are discussed.

  7. Urotensin-II receptor is over-expressed in colon cancer cell lines and in colon carcinoma in humans.

    PubMed

    Federico, Alessandro; Zappavigna, Silvia; Romano, Marco; Grieco, Paolo; Luce, Amalia; Marra, Monica; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Stiuso, Paola; D'Armiento, Francesco Paolo; Vitale, Giovanni; Tuccillo, Concetta; Novellino, Ettore; Loguercio, Carmela; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Urotensin (U)-II receptor (UTR) has been previously reported to be over-expressed in a number of tumours. Whether UTR-related pathway plays a role in colon carcinogenesis is unknown. We evaluated UTR protein and mRNA expression in human epithelial colon cancer cell lines and in normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyps and colon cancer. U-II protein expression was assessed in cancer cell lines. Moreover, we evaluated the effects of U-II(4-11) (an UTR agonist), antagonists and knockdown of UTR protein expression through a specific shRNA, on proliferation, invasion and motility of human colon cancer cells. Cancer cell lines expressed U-II protein and UTR protein and mRNA. By immunohistochemistry, UTR was expressed in 5-30% of epithelial cells in 45 normal controls, in 30-48% in 21 adenomatous polyps and in 65-90% in 48 colon adenocarcinomas. UTR mRNA expression was increased by threefold in adenomatous polyps and eightfold in colon cancer, compared with normal colon. U-II(4-11) induced a 20-40% increase in cell growth while the blockade of the receptor with specific antagonists caused growth inhibition of 20-40%. Moreover, the knock down of UTR with a shRNA or the inhibition of UTR with the antagonist urantide induced an approximately 50% inhibition of both motility and invasion. UTR appears to be involved in the regulation of colon cancer cell invasion and motility. These data suggest that UTR-related pathway may play a role in colon carcinogenesis and that UTR may function as a target for therapeutic intervention in colon cancer. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  8. Effect of preservation solutions UW and EC on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase II and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II genes in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sulikowski, Tadeusz; Domanski, Leszek; Zietek, Zbigniew; Adler, Grażyna; Pawlik, Andrzej; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz; Ostrowski, Marek

    2012-01-30

    Matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases play an important role in the regulation of mesangial cell proliferation and may be involved in ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Preservation solutions are thought to diminish the ischemic injury and appropriate choice of the solution should guarantee a better graft function and good prognosis for graft survival. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of preservation solutions UW and EC on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase II and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase II genes in rat kidney. The study was carried out on Wistar rat kidneys divided into 3 groups: kidneys perfused with 0.9% NaCl (control group), with UW, and with EC preservation solution. The results show an enhancement of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 gene expression after 12 min of cold ischemia. This increase was more expressed in kidneys preserved with UW solution in comparison with kidneys perfused with EC solution and 0.9% NaCl. After 24 h of cold ischemia the expression of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 genes in kidney perfused with UW solution decreased, while in kidneys perfused with EC it was increased. After warm ischemia the MMP-2 and TIMP-2 gene expression increased, whereas it was significantly lower in kidneys perfused with EC solution.

  9. Immunostimulated Arginase II Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Reduces Nitric Oxide Production and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, Maria M.; Nuthakki, Sushma; Cui, Hongmei; Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D.

    2017-01-01

    Increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and subsequent local cytotoxicity to mucosal epithelial cells has been proposed as a putative mechanism involved in the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) metabolize L-arginine to either nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase (NOS) or to L-ornithine and urea by arginase. L-ornithine is the first step in polyamine synthesis important for cell proliferation, while NO production can lead to apoptosis. We hypothesized that in IECs immunostimulation increases both NOS and arginase expression, and that arginase activity mitigates NO production and apoptosis. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (rIEC-6) were immunostimulated by either incubation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone for 24 h or by incubation with conditioned media (CM) for 24 h. CM was obtained from RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) treated with LPS (E. coli 0127:B8; 1 μg/ml) for 4 h. The rIEC-6 stimulated with LPS or with CM had significantly higher levels of inducible NOS (iNOS) protein, NO production, and arginase II protein than did the control cells. Direct LPS stimulation of rIEC-6 produced a less robust increase in iNOS expression and NO (represented as nitrite percent of control) than did CM stimulation. Inhibition of arginase using Nω hydroxyl-L-arginine (NOHA) further increased stimulated NO production in rIEC-6. Viable cell numbers were significantly lower in CM stimulated cells after 24 h than in controls, and inhibition of arginase activity with NOHA resulted in a further significant decrease in viable cell numbers. We conclude that immunostimulated arginase expression of rIEC-6 cells tempers cytokine-induced iNOS-derived NO production and apoptosis. PMID:28299311

  10. Immunostimulated Arginase II Expression in Intestinal Epithelial Cells Reduces Nitric Oxide Production and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Talavera, Maria M; Nuthakki, Sushma; Cui, Hongmei; Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D

    2017-01-01

    Increased production of nitric oxide (NO) and subsequent local cytotoxicity to mucosal epithelial cells has been proposed as a putative mechanism involved in the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) metabolize L-arginine to either nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthase (NOS) or to L-ornithine and urea by arginase. L-ornithine is the first step in polyamine synthesis important for cell proliferation, while NO production can lead to apoptosis. We hypothesized that in IECs immunostimulation increases both NOS and arginase expression, and that arginase activity mitigates NO production and apoptosis. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (rIEC-6) were immunostimulated by either incubation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone for 24 h or by incubation with conditioned media (CM) for 24 h. CM was obtained from RAW 264.7 cells (a macrophage cell line) treated with LPS (E. coli 0127:B8; 1 μg/ml) for 4 h. The rIEC-6 stimulated with LPS or with CM had significantly higher levels of inducible NOS (iNOS) protein, NO production, and arginase II protein than did the control cells. Direct LPS stimulation of rIEC-6 produced a less robust increase in iNOS expression and NO (represented as nitrite percent of control) than did CM stimulation. Inhibition of arginase using N(ω) hydroxyl-L-arginine (NOHA) further increased stimulated NO production in rIEC-6. Viable cell numbers were significantly lower in CM stimulated cells after 24 h than in controls, and inhibition of arginase activity with NOHA resulted in a further significant decrease in viable cell numbers. We conclude that immunostimulated arginase expression of rIEC-6 cells tempers cytokine-induced iNOS-derived NO production and apoptosis.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor I and II preserve myocardial structure in postinfarct swine

    PubMed Central

    Kotlyar, A; Vered, Z; Goldberg, I; Chouraqui, P; Nas, D; Fridman, E; Chen-Levy, Z; Fytlovich, S; Sangiorgi, G; Spagnoli, L; Orlandi, A; Savion, N; Eldar, M; Scheinowitz, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II improve myocardial function after coronary occlusion in different animal models.
OBJECTIVES—To investigate the mechanism of improved myocardial function after administration of IGF-I or IGF-II in acute myocardial infarction.
METHODS—Female pigs (mean (SD) weight 25 (5) kg) were subjected to acute myocardial infarction by microembolisation with 75-150 µm affigel blue beads. The beads contained and slowly released 150 µg/pig of IGF-I (n = 6), IGF-II (n = 6), or pig albumin (n = 6). Echocardiography, perfusion imaging, and haemodynamic measurements were performed before infarction and during four weeks after infarction. Regional wall motion of different left ventricular segments was scored semiquantitatively on the basis of a three point scoring system, from normal = 0 to dyskinesia = 3. Serum cardiac troponin I concentration was measured before, immediately after, and three hours after the infarct. Excised hearts were analysed for actin, desmin, blood vessel density, and DNA laddering within the infarct, border, and normal myocardial areas.
RESULTS—Myocardial function of the infarct related area improved significantly during the four weeks of follow up in both the IGF groups (p = 0.01). Myocardial perfusion, heart rate, and blood pressure were similar in all the animals during the study. Treated animals had lower serum cardiac troponin I concentration (p = 0.001), more actin in the border area (p = 0.01) and infarct area (p = 0.0001), and reduced DNA laddering in the infarct area compared with the controls (p < 0.05). IGF groups had more blood vessels in the border area (p = 0.04) and the infarct area (p = 0.003).
CONCLUSIONS—Both types of IGF improved myocardial function and the improvement was associated with preservation of myocardial structure. IGF-I was more effective than IGF-II.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; growth factors; ventricular function

  12. Effects of ANG II type 1 and 2 receptors on oxidative stress, renal NADPH oxidase, and SOD expression.

    PubMed

    Chabrashvili, Tina; Kitiyakara, Chagriya; Blau, Jonathan; Karber, Alex; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2003-07-01

    Oxidative stress accompanies angiotensin (ANG) II infusion, but the role of ANG type 1 vs. type 2 receptors (AT1-R and AT2-R, respectively) is unknown. We infused ANG II subcutaneously in rats for 1 wk. Excretion of 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha (8-Iso) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) were related to renal cortical mRNA abundance for subunits of NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutases (SODs) using real-time PCR. Subsets of ANG II-infused rats were given the AT1-R antagonist candesartan cilexetil (Cand) or the AT2-R antagonist PD-123,319 (PD). Compared to vehicle (Veh), ANG II increased 8-Iso excretion by 41% (Veh, 5.4 +/- 0.8 vs. ANG II, 7.6 +/- 0.5 pg/24 h; P < 0.05). This was prevented by Cand (5.6 +/- 0.5 pg/24 h; P < 0.05) and increased by PD (15.8 +/- 2.0 pg/24 h; P < 0.005). There were similar changes in MDA excretion. Compared to Veh, ANG II significantly (P < 0.005) increased the renal cortical mRNA expression of p22phox (twofold), Nox-1 (2.6-fold), and Mn-SOD (1.5-fold) and decreased expression of Nox-4 (2.1-fold) and extracellular (EC)-SOD (2.1-fold). Cand prevented all of these changes except for the increase in Mn-SOD. PD accentuated changes in p22phox and Nox-1 and increased p67phox. We conclude that ANG II infusion stimulates oxidative stress via AT1-R, which increases the renal cortical mRNA expression of p22phox and Nox-1 and reduces abundance of Nox-4 and EC-SOD. This is offset by strong protective effects of AT2-R, which are accompanied by decreased expression of p22phox, Nox-1, and p67phox.

  13. Hypoxia and high glucose upregulate AT1 receptor expression and potentiate ANG II-induced proliferation in VSM cells.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Chhinder P; Kanwar, Yashpal S; Sahai, Atul

    2003-03-01

    We examined the effect of hypoxia and high glucose (HG) on ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor expression and proliferation in cultured vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Exposure of quiescent cells to hypoxia in a serum-free DME-Ham's F-12 medium for 6-24 h induced a progressive increase in AT(1) mRNA expression. Exposure of cells to 24 h of hypoxia also resulted in a significant increase in ANG II receptor binding as assessed with (125)I-labeled ANG II. Treatment with ANG II (1 microM) for 24 h under normoxic conditions caused an approximately 1.5-fold increase in both DNA synthesis and cell number, which was enhanced to approximately 3.0-fold under hypoxic conditions. An AT(1) receptor antagonist (losartan, 10 microM) blocked the ANG II-induced increase in DNA synthesis under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Incubations in HG medium (25 mM) for 12-24 h under normoxic conditions induced an approximately 2.5-fold increase in AT(1) mRNA levels, which was markedly enhanced by hypoxia to approximately 5.5-fold at 12 h and approximately 8.5-fold at 24 h. ANG II under HG-normoxic conditions caused a complete downregulation of AT(1) expression, which was prevented by hypoxia. These results demonstrate an upregulation of AT(1) receptor expression by hypoxia and HG in cultured VSM cells and suggest a mechanism for enhanced ANG II-induced VSM cell proliferation and the development of atherosclerosis in diabetes.

  14. miR-802 regulates human angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Sarah E.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Martin, Mickey M.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2010-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II) can regulate intestinal fluid and electrolyte transport and control intestinal wall muscular activity. Ang II is also a proinflammatory mediator that participates in inflammatory responses such as apoptosis, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling; accumulating evidence suggests that this hormone may be involved in gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation and carcinogenesis. Ang II binds to two distinct G protein-coupled receptor subtypes, the AT1R and AT2R, which are widely expressed in the GI system. Together these studies suggest that Ang II-AT1R/-AT2R actions may play an important role in GI tract physiology and pathophysiology. Currently it is not known whether miRNAs can regulate the expression of the human AT1R (hAT1R) in the GI system. PCR and in situ hybridization experiments demonstrated that miR-802 was abundantly expressed in human colon and intestine. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-802 could directly interact with the bioinformatics-predicted target site harbored within the 3′-untranslated region of the hAT1R mRNA. To validate that the levels of miR-802 were physiologically relevant in the GI system, we demonstrated that miR-802 “loss-of-function” experiments resulted in augmented hAT1R levels and enhanced Ang II-induced signaling in a human intestinal epithelial cell line. These results suggest that miR-802 can modulate the expression of the hAT1R in the GI tract and ultimately play a role in regulating the biological efficacy of Ang II in this system. PMID:20558762

  15. Angiotensin II regulates brain (pro)renin receptor expression through activation of cAMP response element-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Wencheng; Liu, Jiao; Hammond, Sean L; Tjalkens, Ronald B; Saifudeen, Zubaida; Feng, Yumei

    2015-07-15

    We reported that brain (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression levels are elevated in DOCA-salt-induced hypertension; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. To address whether ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling is involved in this regulation, we implanted a DOCA pellet and supplied 0.9% saline as the drinking solution to C57BL/6J mice. Sham pellet-implanted mice that were provided regular drinking water served as controls. Concurrently, mice were intracerebroventricularly infused with the AT1R blocker losartan, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 3 wk. Intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan or captopril attenuated DOCA-salt-induced PRR mRNA elevation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role for ANG II/AT1R signaling in regulating PRR expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. To test which ANG II/AT1R downstream transcription factors were involved in PRR regulation, we treated Neuro-2A cells with ANG II with or without CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) or AP-1 (activator protein-1) inhibitors, or CREB siRNA. CREB and AP-1 inhibitors, as well as CREB knockdown abolished ANG II-induced increases in PRR levels. ANG II also induced PRR upregulation in primary cultured neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ANG II treatment increased CREB binding to the endogenous PRR promoter in both cultured neurons and hypothalamic tissues of DOCA-salt hypertensive mice. This increase in CREB activity was reversed by AT1R blockade. Collectively, these findings indicate that ANG II acts via AT1R to upregulate PRR expression both in cultured cells and in DOCA-salt hypertensive mice by increasing CREB binding to the PRR promoter.

  16. Angiotensin II regulates brain (pro)renin receptor expression through activation of cAMP response element-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; Liu, Jiao; Hammond, Sean L.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Saifudeen, Zubaida

    2015-01-01

    We reported that brain (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression levels are elevated in DOCA-salt-induced hypertension; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. To address whether ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling is involved in this regulation, we implanted a DOCA pellet and supplied 0.9% saline as the drinking solution to C57BL/6J mice. Sham pellet-implanted mice that were provided regular drinking water served as controls. Concurrently, mice were intracerebroventricularly infused with the AT1R blocker losartan, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 3 wk. Intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan or captopril attenuated DOCA-salt-induced PRR mRNA elevation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role for ANG II/AT1R signaling in regulating PRR expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. To test which ANG II/AT1R downstream transcription factors were involved in PRR regulation, we treated Neuro-2A cells with ANG II with or without CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) or AP-1 (activator protein-1) inhibitors, or CREB siRNA. CREB and AP-1 inhibitors, as well as CREB knockdown abolished ANG II-induced increases in PRR levels. ANG II also induced PRR upregulation in primary cultured neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ANG II treatment increased CREB binding to the endogenous PRR promoter in both cultured neurons and hypothalamic tissues of DOCA-salt hypertensive mice. This increase in CREB activity was reversed by AT1R blockade. Collectively, these findings indicate that ANG II acts via AT1R to upregulate PRR expression both in cultured cells and in DOCA-salt hypertensive mice by increasing CREB binding to the PRR promoter. PMID:25994957

  17. Differentiation of high-risk stage I and II colon tumors based on evaluation of CAV1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kitowska, Agnieszka; Wesserling, Martyna; Seroczynska, Barbara; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Ronowska, Anna; Peksa, Rafal; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2015-09-01

    Several molecular markers are currently being investigated for their prognostic or predictive value in colorectal cancer. One of the genes proposed, as a potential molecular marker in CRC is CAV1. The level of CAV1 expression was investigated in low-stage (I and II TNM) colon cancers using Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemistry. The level of CAV1 expression increased in tumors characterized by greater depths of invasiveness. The CAV1 expression level detected in tumors with a depth of invasion at stage T4 was significantly higher compared to that in T2 (P = 0.01) and T3 (P = 0.003) lesions. The length of a patient's survival depended on CAV1 expression level; the 10-year survival rate for patients with elevated expression of CAV1 was ∼59% compared with 91% for patients with reduced or unchanged expression of CAV1 (P = 0.007). The overall survival rate of patients with T3 + T4 lesions was significantly lower (P = 0.006) for patients with tumor displaying elevated CAV1 expression compared with patients with reduced or unchanged CAV1 expression. Evaluation of CAV1 expression offers valuable prognostic information for patients with colorectal cancer, and could be used to select patients with stage I or II disease, who are at increased risk of unfavorable outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. C-terminal Src Kinase Gates Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Fasciclin II Expression at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Ashlyn M.; Brusich, Douglas J.; Frank, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Forms of homeostatic plasticity stabilize neuronal outputs and promote physiologically favorable synapse function. A well-studied homeostatic system operates at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). At the NMJ, impairment of postsynaptic glutamate receptor activity is offset by a compensatory increase in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We aim to elucidate how this process operates on a molecular level and is preserved throughout development. In this study, we identified a tyrosine kinase-driven signaling system that sustains homeostatic control of NMJ function. We identified C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk) as a potential regulator of synaptic homeostasis through an RNAi- and electrophysiology-based genetic screen. We found that Csk loss-of-function mutations impaired the sustained expression of homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ, without drastically altering synapse growth or baseline neurotransmission. Muscle-specific overexpression of Src Family Kinase (SFK) substrates that are negatively regulated by Csk also impaired NMJ homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic Csk-YFP can support homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ when expressed either in the muscle or in the nerve. However, only muscle-expressed Csk-YFP was able to localize to NMJ structures. By immunostaining, we found that Csk mutant NMJs had dysregulated expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule homolog Fasciclin II (FasII). By immunoblotting, we found that levels of a specific isoform of FasII were decreased in homeostatically challenged GluRIIA mutant animals–but markedly increased in Csk mutant animals. Additionally, we found that postsynaptic overexpression of FasII from its endogenous locus was sufficient to impair synaptic homeostasis, and genetically reducing FasII levels in Csk mutants fully restored synaptic homeostasis. Based on these data, we propose that Csk and its SFK substrates impinge upon homeostatic control of NMJ function by regulating

  19. Increased activity and expression of Ca2+-dependent NOS in renal cortex of ANG II-infused hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    CHIN, SO YEON; PANDEY, KAILASH N.; SHI, SHANG-JIN; KOBORI, HIROYUKI; MORENO, CAROL; NAVAR, L. GABRIEL

    2008-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) exerts a greater modulatory influence on renal cortical blood flow in ANG II-infused hypertensive rats compared with normotensive rats. In the present study, we determined nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities and protein levels in the renal cortex and medulla of normotensive and ANG II-infused hypertensive rats. Enzyme activity was determined by measuring the rate of formation of l-[14C]citrulline from l-[14C]arginine. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the regional expression of endothelial (eNOS), neuronal (nNOS), and inducible (iNOS) isoforms in the renal cortex and medulla of control and ANG II-infused rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared by the infusion of ANG II at a rate of 65 ng/min via osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously for 13 days and compared with sham-operated rats. Systolic arterial pressures were 127 ± 2 and 182 ± 3 mmHg in control (n = 13) and ANG II-infused rats (n = 13), respectively. The Ca2+-dependent NOS activity, expressed as picomoles of citrulline formed per minute per gram wet weight, was higher in the renal cortex of ANG II-infused rats (91 ± 11) than in control rats (42 ± 12). Likewise, both eNOS and nNOS were markedly elevated in the renal cortex of the ANG II-treated rats. In both groups of rats, Ca2+-dependent NOS activity was higher in the renal medulla than in the cortex; however, no differences in medullary NOS activity were observed between the groups. Also, no differences in medullary eNOS levels were observed between the groups; however, medullary nNOS was decreased by 45% in the ANG II-infused rats. For the Ca2+-independent NOS activities, the renal cortex exhibited a greater activity in the control rats (174 ± 23) than in ANG II-infused rats (101 ± 10). Similarly, cortical iNOS was greater by 47% in the control rats than in ANG II-treated rats. No differences in the activity were found for the renal medulla between the groups. There was

  20. Gene silencing of endothelial von Willebrand Factor attenuates angiotensin II-induced endothelin-1 expression in porcine aortic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dushpanova, Anar; Agostini, Silvia; Ciofini, Enrica; Cabiati, Manuela; Casieri, Valentina; Matteucci, Marco; Del Ry, Silvia; Clerico, Aldo; Berti, Sergio; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Expression of endothelin (ET)-1 is increased in endothelial cells exposed to angiotensin II (Ang II), leading to endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disorders. Since von Willebrand Factor (vWF) blockade improves endothelial function in coronary patients, we hypothesized that targeting endothelial vWF with short interference RNA (siRNA) prevents Ang II-induced ET-1 upregulation. Nearly 65 ± 2% silencing of vWF in porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAOECs) was achieved with vWF-specific siRNA without affecting cell viability and growth. While showing ET-1 similar to wild type cells at rest, vWF-silenced cells did not present ET-1 upregulation during exposure to Ang II (100 nM/24 h), preserving levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity similar to wild type. vWF silencing prevented AngII-induced increase in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX) activity and superoxide anion (O2−) levels, known triggers of ET-1 expression. Moreover, no increase in O2− or ET-1 levels was found in silenced cells treated with AngII or NOX-agonist phorbol ester (PMA 5 nM/48 h). Finally, vWF was required for overexpression of NOX4 and NOX2 in response to AngII and PMA. In conclusion, endothelial vWF knockdown prevented Ang II-induced ET-1 upregulation through attenuation of NOX-mediated O2− production. Our findings reveal a new role of vWF in preventing of Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27443965

  1. Expression of synaptogyrin-1 in T1R2-expressing type II taste cells and type III taste cells of rat circumvallate taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Takeshi; Toyono, Takashi; Seta, Yuji; Kitou, Ayae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyoshima, Kuniaki

    2013-09-01

    Synaptogyrins are conserved components of the exocytic apparatus and function as regulators of Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis. The synaptogyrin family comprises three isoforms: two neuronal (synaptogyrin-1 and -3) and one ubiquitous (synaptogyrin-2) form. Although the expression patterns of the exocytic proteins synaptotagmin-1, SNAP-25, synaptobrevin-2 and synaptophysin have been elucidated in taste buds, the function and expression pattern of synaptogyrin-1 in rat gustatory tissues have not been determined. Therefore, we examined the expression patterns of synaptogyrin-1 and several cell-specific markers of type II and III cells in rat gustatory tissues. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction assays and immunoblot analysis revealed the expression of synaptogyrin-1 mRNA and its protein in circumvallate papillae. In fungiform, foliate and circumvallate papillae, the antibody against synaptogyrin-1 immunolabeled a subset of taste bud cells and intra- and subgemmal nerve processes. Double-labeling experiments revealed the expression of synaptogyrin-1 in most taste cells immunoreactive for aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and the neural cell adhesion molecule. A subset of synaptogyrin-1-immunoreactive taste cells also expressed phospholipase Cβ2, gustducin, or sweet taste receptor (T1R2). In addition, most synaptogyrin-1-immunoreactive taste cells expressed synaptobrevin-2. These results suggest that synaptogyrin-1 plays a regulatory role in transmission at the synapses of type III cells and is involved in exocytic function with synaptobrevin-2 in a subset of type II cells in rat taste buds.

  2. Changes in insulin-like growth factor-I and -II associated with fat but not lean mass in early old age.

    PubMed

    Bann, David; Holly, Jeff M P; Lashen, Hany; Hardy, Rebecca; Adams, Judith; Kuh, Diana; Ong, Ken K; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

    2015-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that insulin-like growth factors-I and II (IGF-I and II) decline during late midlife and that greater declines are related to higher fat mass and lower lean mass. A total of 1,542 men and women in a British birth cohort study had IGF-I and II measured by immunoassay of blood samples at age 53 and/or 60-64 years. Fat mass, android:gynoid fat ratio, and appendicular lean mass were measured at 60-64 years using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Associations between changes in IGF-I or II and body composition outcomes were examined using conditional change linear regression models. Mean IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations were lower at 60-64 than at 53 years, by 12.8% for IGF-I and by 12.5% for IGF-II. Larger declines in either IGF-I or II were associated with higher fat mass at 60-64 years. Although higher IGF-I at 53 years was associated with higher lean mass, there was little evidence linking changes in IGF-I or II to lean mass. The findings suggest that IGF-I and II concentrations decline with age, and greater declines are associated with higher fat mass levels. These results provide some evidence for the suggested roles of IGF-I and II in regulating fat mass but not lean mass in older age. © 2015 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  3. Structure, expression and function of Allomyces arbuscula CDP II (metacaspase) gene.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Mukti; Cattaneo, Arlette; Hugh, Séverine; Pawlowski, Jan; Cox, Jos A

    2010-06-01

    Allomyces arbuscula, a primitive chytridiomycete fungus, has two Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine proteases, the CDP I and CDP II. We have cloned and analyzed the nucleotide sequence of CDP II gene and domain structure of the protein. Blast analysis of the sequence has shown that the protein belongs to a newly described member of caspase superfamily protein, the metacaspase, a CD clan of C14 family cysteine protease, we hence-forth name it as AMca 2 (Allomyces metacaspase 2). Southern hybridization studies have shown that the gene exists in a single copy per genome. The transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization has confirmed our previous results that the protein is developmentally regulated, i.e. present in active growth phase but disappears during nutritional stress which also induces reproductive differentiation, indicating that the protein promotes cell growth, not death. The recombinant gene product expressed in Escherichiacoli has all the catalytic properties of native enzyme, i.e. sensitivity to protease inhibitors and substrate specificity. There is an absolute requirement of Ca(2+) for the activation of catalytic activity and the presence of R residue at the cleavage site (P1 position) in the substrate. The presence of a second basic residue, either R or K, in the P2 position strongly inhibits the catalytic activity which is stimulated by the presence of P and to a lesser extent G at this site. Peptide substrates with D at the cleavage site are not recognised and therefore not cleaved. The enzyme activity is inhibited by EDTA-EGTA, cysteine protease inhibitors and a specific peptide inhibitor Ac GVRCHCL TFA, but not by E64, although a potent inhibitor of cysteine proteases.

  4. Expression of growth-related genes in muscle during fasting and refeeding of juvenile Atlantic halibut, Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ørjan; Fernandes, Jorge M O; Solberg, Christel; Johnston, Ian A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a fasting-refeeding protocol to investigate the expression of growth-related genes during the transition between catabolic and anabolic states in Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.). Juveniles of approximately 950 g were maintained at ambient temperature (5-8 degrees C) until the 1st of May, then fasted for two months and refed for two months at 7.7-8.0 degrees C under continuous low light. Fast epaxial myotomal muscle was sampled at -64 d (days), -38 d, 0 d (start of refeeding), 3 d, 7 d, 14 d, 30 d and 60 d. Average body mass was unchanged over the fasting period but increased by 24.4% following 60 d refeeding. qPCR was used to analyse the stability of expression of five potential reference genes (Eef2, Fau, 18SrRNA, Actb and Tubb2) with GeNorm and Normfinder. Expression of the growth-related genes, cathepsin B (ctsb), cathepsin D (ctsd), insulin-like growth factor-I and II (IGF-I and II) and insulin-like growth factor-I receptor 1a (IGF-IRa) was normalised using the geometric average of the two most stable housekeeping genes, Fau and 18SrRNA. IGF-I mRNA showed a transient 2.6-fold increase in abundance with refeeding at 7 d whilst transcripts for IGF-II and IGF-IRa were elevated during fasting and decreased 3.8-fold and 3-fold between the 0 d and 3 d samples respectively. Ctsb expression increased between -64 d and 0 d and then decreased approximately 10-fold by 14 d refeeding. In contrast, ctsd was relatively unaffected by the fasting-refeeding cycle, showing a modest (approximately 35%) transient decrease in expression between the 0 d and 30 d refeeding samples. It was concluded that the experimental protocol adopted and housekeeping genes identified were suitable for investigating the catabolic-anabolic transition in halibut skeletal muscle.

  5. Cloning, expression and characterization of recombinant sweet-protein thaumatin II using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Tamaki, Shinobu; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Wada, Ritsuko; Fujita, Yuki; Mehta, Alka; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2004-03-30

    Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting protein, was secreted by the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The mature thaumatin II gene was directly cloned from Taq polymerase-amplified PCR products by using TA cloning methods and fused the pPIC9K expression vector that contains Saccharomyces cerevisiae prepro alpha-mating factor secretion signal. Several additional amino acid residues were introduced at both the N- and C-terminal ends by genetic modification to investigate the role of the terminal end region for elicitation of sweetness in the thaumatin molecule. The secondary and tertiary structures of purified recombinant thaumatin were almost identical to those of the plant thaumatin molecule. Recombinant thaumatin II elicited a sweet taste as native plant thaumatin II; its threshold value of sweetness to humans was around 50 nM, which is the same as that of plant thaumatin II. These results demonstrate that the functional expression of thaumatin II was attained by Pichia pastoris systems and that the N- and C-terminal regions of the thaumatin II molecule do not -play an important role in eliciting the sweet taste of thaumatin. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Selective abrogation of major histocompatibility complex class II expression on extrahematopoietic cells in mice lacking promoter IV of the class II transactivator gene.

    PubMed

    Waldburger, J M; Suter, T; Fontana, A; Acha-Orbea, H; Reith, W

    2001-08-20

    MHC class II (MHCII) molecules play a pivotal role in the induction and regulation of immune responses. The transcriptional coactivator class II transactivator (CIITA) controls MHCII expression. The CIITA gene is regulated by three independent promoters (pI, pIII, pIV). We have generated pIV knockout mice. These mice exhibit selective abrogation of interferon (IFN)-gamma-induced MHCII expression on a wide variety of non-bone marrow-derived cells, including endothelia, epithelia, astrocytes, and fibroblasts. Constitutive MHCII expression on cortical thymic epithelial cells, and thus positive selection of CD4(+) T cells, is also abolished. In contrast, constitutive and inducible MHCII expression is unaffected on professional antigen-presenting cells, including B cells, dendritic cells, and IFN-gamma-activated cells of the macrophage lineage. pIV(-/-) mice have thus allowed precise definition of CIITA pIV usage in vivo. Moreover, they represent a unique animal model for studying the significance and contribution of MHCII-mediated antigen presentation by nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in health and disease.

  7. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical.

  8. Presence of specific MHC Class II expressed alleles associates with clinical disease in ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) infected sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A genetic tool hypothesized to predict which OPPV infected sheep will progress to debilitating clinical disease is MHC Class II Ovis aries (Ovar)-DRB1. Previously, fifteen Ovar-DRB1 beta 1 expressed alleles were identified in a ewe-lamb flock of 32 originating from an Idaho flock using RT-PCR, clon...

  9. Phenolic Compounds from Fermented Berry Beverages Modulated Gene and Protein Expression To Increase Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic β-Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michelle H; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2016-03-30

    Berries are a rich source of bioactive phenolic compounds that are able to bind and inhibit the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), a current target for type-2 diabetes therapy. The objectives were to determine the role of berry phenolic compounds to modulate incretin-cleaving DPP-IV and its substrate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, and genes and proteins involved in the insulin secretion pathway using cell culture. Anthocyanins (ANC) from 50% blueberry-50% blackberry (Blu-Bla) and 100% blackberry (Bla) fermented beverages at 50 μM cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents increased (p < 0.05) glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells (iNS-1E) both when applied directly and following simulated absorption through Caco-2 cells (by 233 and 100 μIU insulin/mL, respectively). ANC 50%Blu-Bla and ANC 100%Bla upregulated the gene for incretin hormone GLP-1 (fold-change 3.0 ± 1.4 and 2.0 ± 0.3, respectively) and genes in the insulin secretory pathway including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (iGF1R, 2.3 ± 0.6 and 1.6 ± 0.3, respectively), and increased (p < 0.05) the protein expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-II), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-2 and 3), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in iNS-1E cells. Taken together, anthocyanins, predominantly delphinidin-3-arabinoside, from fermented berry beverages have the potential to modulate DPP-IV and its substrate GLP-1, to increase insulin secretion, and to upregulate expression of mRNA of insulin-receptor associated genes and proteins in pancreatic β-cells.

  10. Cloning, expression, and immunological characterization of recombinant Lolium perenne allergen Lol p II.

    PubMed

    Sidoli, A; Tamborini, E; Giuntini, I; Levi, S; Volonté, G; Paini, C; De Lalla, C; Siccardi, A G; Baralle, F E; Galliani, S

    1993-10-15

    The molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding for an isoallergenic form of Lol p II, a major rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen allergen, was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification on mRNA extracted from pollen. The amino acid sequence derived from the cDNA was truncated by 4 and 5 residues at the NH2- and COOH-terminal ends, respectively, and differed only in one position from that previously reported. This cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli by fusion to the carboxyl terminus of the human ferritin H-chain. The molecule was produced in high yields as a soluble protein and was easily purified. The protein retains the multimeric quaternary structure of ferritin, and it exposes on the surface the allergenic moiety, which can be recognized in Western blotting and in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments by specific IgE from allergic patients. The recombinant allergen was used to analyze the sera of 26 patients allergic to L. perenne compared with control sera. The results were in good agreement with the values obtained with the radioallergosorbent test assay. In addition, histamine release experiments in whole blood from an allergic patient and skin prick tests showed that the recombinant allergen retains some of the biological properties of the natural compound. These findings indicate that the availability of homogeneous recombinant allergens may be useful for the development of more specific diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Moreover, this expression system may be of more general interest for producing large amounts of soluble protein domains in E. coli.

  11. Hyperinsulinemia: effect on cardiac mass/function, angiotensin II receptor expression, and insulin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, Anne-Maj; Bollano, Entela; Mobini, Reza; Larsson, Britt-Mari; Omerovic, Elmir; Fu, Michael; Waagstein, Finn; Holmäng, Agneta

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the association between hyperinsulinemia and cardiac hypertrophy, we treated rats with insulin for 7 wk and assessed effects on myocardial growth, vascularization, and fibrosis in relation to the expression of angiotensin II receptors (AT-R). We also characterized insulin signaling pathways believed to promote myocyte growth and interact with proliferative responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors, and we assessed myocardial insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and p110 alpha catalytic and p85 regulatory subunits of phospatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, MEK, ERK1/2, and S6 kinase-1 (S6K1). Left ventricular (LV) geometry and performance were evaluated echocardiographically. Insulin decreased AT1a-R mRNA expression but increased protein levels and increased AT2-R mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser374/Tyr989), MEK1/2 (Ser218/Ser222), ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), S6K1 (Thr421/Ser424/Thr389), Akt (Thr308/Thr308), and PI3K p110 alpha but not of p85 (Tyr508). Insulin increased LV mass and relative wall thickness and reduced stroke volume and cardiac output. Histochemical examination demonstrated myocyte hypertrophy and increases in interstitial fibrosis. Metoprolol plus insulin prevented the increase in relative wall thickness, decreased fibrosis, increased LV mass, and improved function seen with insulin alone. Thus our data demonstrate that chronic hyperinsulinemia decreases AT1a-to-AT2 ratio and increases MEK-ERK1/2 and S6K1 pathway activity related to hypertrophy. These changes might be crucial for increased cardiovascular growth and fibrosis and signs of impaired LV function.

  12. Hydrogen Production by a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Strain with Inducible Expression of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Batyrova, Khorcheska; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cy6Nac2.49 is a genetically modified algal strain that activates photosynthesis in a cyclical manner, so that photosynthesis is not active constitutively in the presence of oxygen, but is turned on only in response to a metabolic trigger (anaerobiosis). Here, we further investigated hydrogen production by this strain comparing it with the parental wild-type strain under photoheterotrophic conditions in regular tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) medium with a 10-h:14-h light/dark regime. Unlike the wild-type, whose level of H2 production remained low during illumination, H2 production in the mutant strain increased gradually with each subsequent light period, and by the final light period was significantly higher than the wild-type. The relatively low Photosystem II (PSII) activity of the mutant culture was shown by low fluorescence yield both in the dark (Fv/Fm) and in the light (δF/Fm’) periods. Measurement of oxygen evolution confirmed the low photosynthetic activity of the mutant cells, which gradually accumulated O2 to a lesser extent than the wild-type, thus allowing the mutant strain to maintain hydrogenase activity over a longer time period and to gradually accumulate H2 during periods of illumination. Therefore, controllable expression of PSII can be used to increase hydrogen production under nutrient replete conditions, thus avoiding many of the limitations associated with nutrient deprivation approaches sometimes used to promote hydrogen production. PMID:28300765

  13. Type II cytokeratin gene expression is indicative of early cell differentiation in the chick embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Charlebois, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    Embryonic development in vertebrates appears to involve a series of inductive tissue interactions that lead to regional specializations, which eventually become elaborated in the basic body plan of the embryo. The inductive interactions leading to early regionalization of the embryo are often particularly difficult to evaluate because of the absence of available morphological or biochemical evidence that such events have occurred. In the 36 hour chick embryo, the regional subdivision of the early ectoderm is evidence by a marked lens-forming bias in the head ectoderm, which is absent in the presumptive dorsal epidermis of the trunk region. As a strategy for isolating genes whose differential expression might reflect this regional subdivision, a cDNA library from 36 hour embryos was prepared and screened for differential hybridization to ({sup 32}P)cDNA probes synthesized using template RNA isolated from 36 hour head ectoderm and trunk ectoderm. A cDNA clone (T4) was isolated which hybridizes to transcripts present at much higher levels in trunk ectoderm than in head ectoderm. Partial nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of this clone indicate that it represents a gene encoding a type II cytokeratin. The distribution of transcripts complementary to the T4 probe was evaluated in early embryos using RNA gel blot analysis and in situ hybridization to tissue sections.

  14. Hydrogen Production by a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Strain with Inducible Expression of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Batyrova, Khorcheska; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2017-03-16

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cy6Nac2.49 is a genetically modified algal strain that activates photosynthesis in a cyclical manner, so that photosynthesis is not active constitutively in the presence of oxygen, but is turned on only in response to a metabolic trigger (anaerobiosis). Here, we further investigated hydrogen production by this strain comparing it with the parental wild-type strain under photoheterotrophic conditions in regular tris-acetate-phosphate (TAP) medium with a 10-h:14-h light/dark regime. Unlike the wild-type, whose level of H₂ production remained low during illumination, H₂ production in the mutant strain increased gradually with each subsequent light period, and by the final light period was significantly higher than the wild-type. The relatively low Photosystem II (PSII) activity of the mutant culture was shown by low fluorescence yield both in the dark (Fv/Fm) and in the light (δF/Fm') periods. Measurement of oxygen evolution confirmed the low photosynthetic activity of the mutant cells, which gradually accumulated O₂ to a lesser extent than the wild-type, thus allowing the mutant strain to maintain hydrogenase activity over a longer time period and to gradually accumulate H₂ during periods of illumination. Therefore, controllable expression of PSII can be used to increase hydrogen production under nutrient replete conditions, thus avoiding many of the limitations associated with nutrient deprivation approaches sometimes used to promote hydrogen production.

  15. Augmentation of angiotensinogen expression in the proximal tubule by intracellular angiotensin II via AT1a/MAPK/NF-кB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, H.; Li, Xiao C.; Satou, R.; Katsurada, A.; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Long-term angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion significantly increases ANG II levels in the kidney through two major mechanisms: AT1 receptor-mediated augmentation of angiotensinogen (AGT) expression and uptake of circulating ANG II by the proximal tubules. However, it is not known whether intracellular ANG II stimulates AGT expression in the proximal tubule. In the present study, we overexpressed an intracellular cyan fluorescent ANG II fusion protein (Ad-sglt2-ECFP/ANG II) selectively in the proximal tubule of rats and mice using the sodium and glucose cotransporter 2 (sglt2) promoter. AGT mRNA and protein expression in the renal cortex and 24-h urinary AGT excretion were determined 4 wk following overexpression of ECFP/ANG II in the proximal tubule. Systolic blood pressure was significantly increased with a small antinatriuretic effect in rats and mice with proximal tubule-selective expression of ECFP/ANG II (P < 0.01). AGT mRNA and protein expression in the cortex were increased by >1.5-fold and 61 ± 16% (P < 0.05), whereas urinary AGT excretion was increased from 48.7 ± 5.7 (n = 13) to 102 ± 13.5 (n = 13) ng/24 h (P < 0.05). However, plasma AGT, renin activity, and ANG II levels remained unaltered by ECFP/ANG II. The increased AGT mRNA and protein expressions in the cortex by ECFP/ANG II were blocked in AT1a-knockout (KO) mice. Studies in cultured mouse proximal tubule cells demonstrated involvement of AT1a receptor/MAP kinases/NF-кB signaling pathways. These results indicate that intracellular ANG II stimulates AGT expression in the proximal tubules, leading to increased AGT formation and secretion into the tubular fluid, which contributes to ANG II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26864937

  16. Urotensin II increases foam cell formation by repressing ABCA1 expression through the ERK/NF-κB pathway in THP-1 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Jian-Feng; Tang, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Min; Li, Yuan; Chen, Kong; Zeng, Meng-Ya; Yao, Feng; Xie, Wei; Zheng, Xi-Long; Zeng, Gao-Feng; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • U II reduces cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. • U II decreases the expression of ABCA1. • Inhibition of the ERK/NF-κB pathway reduces U II effects on ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. - Abstract: Objective: Foam cell formation in the arterial wall plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Recent studies showed that Urotensin II (U II) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of human U II on ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and the underlying mechanism in THP-1 macrophages. Methods and results: Cultured THP-1 macrophages were treated with U II, followed by measuring the intracellular lipid contents, cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 levels. The results showed that U II dramatically decreased ABCA1 levels and impaired cholesterol efflux. However, the effects of U II on ABCA1 protein expression and cellular cholesterol efflux were partially reversed by inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, suggesting the potential roles of ERK1/2 and NF-κB in ABCA1 expression, respectively. Conclusion: Our current data indicate that U II may have promoting effects on the progression of atherosclerosis, likely through suppressing ABCA1 expression via activation of the ERK/NF-κB pathway and reducing cholesterol efflux to promote macrophage foam cell formation.

  17. High expression of miR-181c as a predictive marker of recurrence in stage II colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Nobuyoshi; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kojima, Motohiro; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Saito, Norio; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A standard treatment for stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) is surgical resection without adjuvant chemotherapy. However, the recurrence rate of these patients is approximately 20%. To date, there are no robust biomarkers suitable for predicting recurrence in stage II CRC patients. In this study, microRNAs (miRNAs) extracted from CRC tissues were examined for a possible biomarker to predict recurrence in stage II CRC patients. RESULTS From the comprehensive analysis, 15 miRNAs were selected as candidates for further study. Regarding let-7a, -7d, -7e, miR-23c, -26b, -128a, -151-5p, and -181c, recurrence rates in training cohort patients with higher expression of these miRNAs isolated from their frozen tissues samples were significantly higher than those with lower expression (P < 0.05). According to multivariate analysis, the higher expression of miR-181c was detected as an independent predictive factor of recurrence (P = 0.001, OR: 9.43, 95% CI: 2.57–34.48). Results were similar in miR-181c extracted from FFPE tissues obtained from the training cohort (P = 0.003, OR: 7.46, 95% CI: 1.97–28.57). In the validation cohort using FFPE tissues, the recurrence rate in patients with higher miR-181c expression was significantly higher than those with lower miR-181c expression (P < 0.001). MATERIAL AND METHODS Comprehensive analysis using a highly sensitive miRNA chip was initially performed to select candidate miRNAs associated with recurrence. Candidate miRNAs were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR using RNA from frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. CONCLUSIONS Higher expression of miR-181c may be a useful recurrence predictor of stage II CRC patients. PMID:28036302

  18. Regulation of Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Gene Expression in the Adrenal Medulla by Acute and Repeated Immobilization Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nostramo, Regina; Tillinger, Andrej; Saavedra, Juan M.; Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Varunkumar; Serova, Lidia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Sabban, Esther L.

    2012-01-01

    While the Renin-Angiotensin System is important for adrenomedullary responses to stress, the involvement of specific angiotensin II receptor subtypes is unclear. We examined gene expression changes of angiotensin II type 1A (AT1A) and type 2 (AT2) receptors in rat adrenal medulla in response to immobilization stress (IMO). AT2 receptor mRNA levels decreased immediately after a single 2 h IMO. Repeated IMO also decreased AT2 receptor mRNA levels, but the decline was more transient. AT1A receptor mRNA levels were unaltered with either single or repeated IMO, although binding was increased following repeated IMO. These effects of stress on angiotensin II receptor expression may alter catecholamine biosynthesis, as tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase mRNA levels in PC12 cells are decreased with angiotensin II treatment in the presence of ZD7155 (AT1 receptor antagonist), or with CGP42112 (AT2 receptor agonist) treatment. Involvement of stress-triggered activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) or sympatho-adrenal axis in AT2 receptor downregulation was examined. Cultured cells treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone displayed a transcriptionally-mediated decrease in AT2 receptor mRNA levels. However, glucocorticoids are not required for the immediate stress-triggered decrease in AT2 receptor gene expression, as demonstrated in corticotropin-releasing hormone knockout (CRH KO) mice and hypophysectomized rats, although they can regulate basal gene expression. cAMP and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) also reduced AT2 receptor gene expression and may mediate this response. Overall, the effects of stress on adrenomedullary AT1A and AT2 receptor expression may contribute to allostatic changes, such as regulation of catecholamine biosynthesis. PMID:22911895

  19. Partial plasma cell differentiation as a mechanism of lost major histocompatibility complex class II expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Sarah T; Vanpatten, Kristie A; Fernandez, Diane R; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Garsha, Karl E; Glinsmann-Gibson, Betty J; Grogan, Thomas M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Rimsza, Lisa M

    2012-02-09

    Loss of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression is associated with poor patient outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). As MHC II molecules are lost with plasmacytic differentiation in normal cells, we asked whether MHC II loss in DLBCL is associated with an altered differentiation state. We used gene expression profiling, quantum dots, and immunohistochemistry to study the relationship between MHC II and plasma cell markers in DLBCL and plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Results demonstrate that MHC II(-) DLBCL immunophenotypically overlap with PBL and demonstrate an inverse correlation between MHC II and plasma cell markers MUM1, PRDM1/Blimp1, and XBP1s. In addition, MHC II expression is significantly higher in germinal center-DLBCL than activated B cell-DLBCL. A minor subset of cases with an unusual pattern of mislocalized punctate MHC II staining and intermediate levels of mRNA is also described. Finally, we show that PBL is negative for MHC II. The results imply a spectrum of MHC II expression that is more frequently diminished in tumors derived from B cells at the later stages of differentiation (with complete loss in PBL). Our observations provide a possible unifying concept that may contribute to the poor outcome reported in all MHC II(-) B-cell tumors.

  20. Molecular cloning of the cowpea leghemoglobin II gene and expression of its cDNA in Escherichia coli. Purification and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Peter, R; Moran, J F; Sarath, G; Luan, P; Klucas, R V

    1997-01-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) nodules contain three leghemoglobins (LbI, LbII, and LbIII) that are encoded by at least two genes. We have cloned and sequenced the gene that encodes for LbII (lbII), the most abundant Lb in cowpea nodules, using total DNA as the template for PCR. Primers were designed using the sequence of the soybean lbc gene. The lbII gene is 679 bp in length and codes for a predicted protein of 145 amino acids. Using sequences of the cowpea lbII gene for the synthesis of primers and total nodule RNA as the template, we cloned a cDNA for LbII into a constitutive expression vector (pEMBL19+) and then expressed it in Escherichia coli. Recombinant LbII (rLbII) and native LbII (nLbII) from cowpea nodules were purified to homogeneity using standard techniques. Properties of rLbII were compared with nLbII by partially sequencing the proteins and by sodium dodecyl sulfate- and isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, western-blot analysis using anti-soybean Lba antibodies, tryptic and chymotryptic mapping, and spectrophotometric techniques. The data showed that the structural and spectral characteristics of rLbII and nLbII were similar. The rLbII was reversibly oxygenated/deoxygenated, showing that it is a functional hemoglobin. PMID:9193085

  1. The influence of maternal nutrition on expression of genes responsible for adipogenesis and myogenesis in the bovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Jennings, T D; Gonda, M G; Underwood, K R; Wertz-Lutz, A E; Blair, A D

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether altered maternal energy supply during mid-gestation results in differences in muscle histology or genes regulating fetal adipose and muscle development. In total, 22 Angus cross-bred heifers (BW=527.73±8.3 kg) were assigned randomly to the three dietary treatments providing 146% (HIGH; n=7), 87% (INT; n=7) or 72% (LOW; n=8) of the energy requirements for heifers from day 85 to day 180 of gestation. Fetuses were removed via cesarean section at day 180 of gestation and longissimus muscle (LM) and subcutaneous fat were collected and prepared for analysis of gene expression. Samples from the LM and semitendinosus (ST) were evaluated for muscle fiber diameter, area and number. The right hind limb was dissected and analyzed to determine compositional analysis. Fetal growth and muscle histology characteristics of the LM and ST were similar among treatments. Preadipocyte factor-1 expression was up-regulated in fetal LM (P<0.05) of HIGH fetuses as compared with INT, whereas LOW fetuses showed increased CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (C/EBP-β) expression in LM as compared with INT (P<0.05). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γand C/EBP-α did not differ as a result of dietary treatment in LM or subcutaneous fat samples. There was a tendency for increased expression of fatty acid synthase in LM of LOW fetuses as compared with INT (P<0.10). Myogenin was more highly expressed (P<0.05) in LM of the LOW fetuses, whereas μ-calpain expression was increased in the HIGH treatment compared with INT. A tendency for increased expression of IGF-II was observed for both LOW and HIGH fetuses compared with INT (P<0.10). Expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase, myoblast determination protein 1, myogenic factor 5, myogenic regulatory factor-4, m-calpain, calpastatin, IGF-I and myostatin was similar between treatments. Collectively, these results suggest that fetal growth characteristics are not affected by the level of maternal

  2. Localization and expression profile of Group I and II Activators of G-protein Signaling in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Pressly, Jeffrey D.; Arnett, Joanna; Regner, Kevin R.; Park, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Activators of G-protein Signaling (AGS) are a family of accessory proteins that were discovered as modulators of heterotrimeric G-protein subunits. The primary aim of the present study was to localize Group I and II AGS proteins and determine the renal expression profile using immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively, during normal and injured states of the kidney. Group I AGS1 was found to be predominantly localized to the proximal tubule, Group II AGS3 and AGS5 were exclusively localized to the distal tubular segments, and Group II AGS6 was ubiquitously expressed in every nephron segment of the rodent kidney. In rat kidneys following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), Group I AGS1 mRNA was dramatically increased after 24 hours by 5-fold (P<0.05), whereas Group II AGS3 and AGS4 mRNA was significantly decreased at the same time point (P<0.05). No significant change in the transcript levels were detected at other time points for any of the AGS genes between control and IRI groups. In polycystic diseased kidneys, mRNA levels for AGS3, AGS4 and AGS6 was significantly increased (P<0.05) by 75–80% in PCK rat kidneys. The identification of Group I and II AGS mRNA and protein in the kidney may provide insight into the potential mechanism of action during normal and varying states of renal disease or injury. PMID:25533045

  3. Localization and expression of spermadhesin PSP-I/PSP-II subunits in the reproductive organs of the boar.

    PubMed

    García, E M; Vázquez, J M; Parrilla, I; Ortega, M D; Calvete, J J; Sanz, L; Martínez, E A; Roca, J; Rodríguez-Martínez, H

    2008-08-01

    The epithelial localization and expression of the spermadhesin PSP-I and PSP-II subunits were determined in the testis, ductus epididymes (caput, corpus and cauda), seminal vesicles and bulbourethral glands of mature boars, using immunohistochemical, western blotting and RT-PCR methods. Immunohistochemistry showed positive labelling for PSP-I and PSP-II antibodies in the epithelium of seminal vesicles in all males tested. Positive immunolabelling, but with variable intensity, was also present in the epididymal epithelium (caput, corpus and cauda), although varying largely among segments and boars. Immunoreactivity was nearly or completely absent in the seminiferous epithelium and the bulbourethral gland, although SDS-PAGE and western blotting revealed the presence of PSP-I and PSP-II immunoreactive bands in all the tissue extracts, including the testis and the bulbourethral gland. mRNA amplification by RT-PCR using primers specific for PSP-I and PSP-II showed a trend similar to that observed for western blotting, i.e. intensity variation between tissues (even between segments of the same epididymis) and among boars. Our results indicate that the seminal vesicles are the main source of PSP-I and PSP-II spermadhesins, although epididymal segments, testis and the bulbourethral gland also participate in the expression of both proteins.

  4. Expression and purification of recombinant HTLV-I/-II linear epitopes antigen and its application for screening of suspected patients.

    PubMed

    Faramarzi, Roxana; Dolatabadi, Samaneh

    2017-02-01

    The linear epitopes of gp46-I, gp46-II, gp21 and p19 are used in diagnosis of HTLV-I/-II infections. The aims of this study was to obtain high-level expression and purification of recombinant antigen (RA) containing these epitopes. Large-scale preparation of such antigen probably worths for diagnostic purpose. The synthetic DNA encoding RA was synthesized and over-expressed as soluble in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Expression and distribution of the His-GST-RA protein were evaluated using SDS-PAGE. The soluble RA was purified utilizing Ni-NTA agarose beads under native conditions and was concentrated by ultra filtration. Using 20 sera specimens from HTLV infected patients, the antigenicity of the purified protein was confirmed in ELISA and western blotting analysis. SDS-PAGE revealed that the purified protein was more than 90% pure. The final yield was approximately 25 mg per liter of culture medium. ELISA results showed that RA could specifically bind to anti-HTLV-I/-II antibodies in infected sera. RA could be a candidate for HTLV-I/-II screening and the strategy presented in this study could be used for easy production of this diagnostic protein.

  5. Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Decreases Transforming Growth Factor-β Type II Receptor Expression and Function in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui-Lin; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), via its receptors, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and plays an important role in the development of renal tubulointersitial fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R), which mediates beneficial renal physiological functions, has received attention as a prospective therapeutic target for renoprotection. In this study, we investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of AT2R on the TGF-β receptor II (TGF-βRII) expression and function in human proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Here, we show that the AT2R agonist CGP42112A decreased TGF-βRII protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in HK-2 cells. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was blocked by the AT2R antagonists PD123319 or PD123177. Stimulation with TGF-β1 enhanced EMT in HK-2 cells, which was prevented by pre-treatment with CGP42112A. One of mechanisms in this regulation is associated with the increased TGF-βRII degradation after activation of AT2R. Furthermore, laser confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed that AT2R and TGF-βRII colocalized in HK-2 cells. AT2R and TGF-βRII coimmunoprecipitated and this interaction was increased after AT2R agonist stimulation for 30 min. The inhibitory effect of the AT2R on TGF-βRII expression was also blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, indicating that nitric oxide is involved in the signaling pathway. Taken together, our study indicates that the renal AT2R regulates TGF-βRII expression and function via the nitric oxide pathway, which may be important in the control of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  6. [Eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3-HERG transfection inhibits angiotensin II induced neonatal rabbit ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-hui; Cui, Chang-cong; Li, Yu; Huang, Chen

    2009-10-01

    To explore the effects of eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3-HERG transfection on angiotensin II (Ang II) induced myocyte hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rabbit ventricular myocytes. Neonatal rabbit ventricular myocytes and eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3-HERG transfected ventricular myocytes were cultured in Dulbecco's-modified Eagle medium (DMEM), containing 1% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 6 h, then stimulated with Ang II (10(-7) mol/L) for 48 h. Control ventricular myocytes were cultured in Dulbecco's-modified Eagle medium (DMEM), containing 1% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 54 h. At 6 and 54 h, myocyte hypertrophic parameters including myocyte volume, total protein content and membrane capacitance, action potential duration (APD) and Calcineurin (CaN) activity were measured. Compared to control myocytes, APD at 90% repolarization (APD(90)) was prolonged by 19.8% (P < 0.01), without signs of myocyte hypertrophy at 6 h post Ang II stimulation, APD(90) was prolonged by 22.1% (P < 0.01), myocyte volume, total protein content and membrane capacitance and CaN activity were significantly increased by 40.4%, 40.4%, 38.2% and 114.7% respectively (all P < 0.01) at 48 h after Ang II stimulation. HERG gene transfection upregulated I(HERG) tail current (3.6-fold higher than I(Kr)-rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current, P < 0.01). HERG gene transfection also accelerated and repolarization and a shortened APD(90) and inhibited myocyte hypertrophy and CaN activation induced by Ang II. Ang II induced prolongation of APD(90) is directly associated with myocyte hypertrophy by increasing the Ca(2+) influx and resulting in the increment of intracellular Ca(2+) and activation of CaN reaction pathway.

  7. Transplantation of bone marrow genetically engineered to express proinsulin II protects against autoimmune insulitis in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, James; Clements, Warren; Field, Judith; Nasa, Zeyad; Lock, Peter; Yap, Felicia; Toh, Ban-Hock; Alderuccio, Frank

    2006-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T-cell-dependent autoimmune disease resulting from destructive inflammation (insulitis) of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells. Transgenic expression of proinsulin II by a MHC class II promoter or transfer of bone marrow from these transgenic mice protects NOD mice from insulitis and diabetes. We assessed the feasibility of gene therapy in the NOD mouse as an approach to treat T1D by ex vivo genetic manipulation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with proinsulin II followed by transfer to recipient mice. HSCs were isolated from 6-8-week-old NOD female mice and transduced in vitro with retrovirus encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and either proinsulin II or control autoantigen. Additional control groups included mice transferred with non-manipulated bone marrow and mice which did not receive bone marrow transfer. EGFP-sorted or non-sorted HSCs were transferred into pre-conditioned 3-4-week-old female NOD mice and insulitis was assessed 8 weeks post-transfer. Chimerism was established in all major lymphoid tissues, ranging from 5-15% in non-sorted bone marrow transplants to 20-45% in EGFP-sorted bone marrow transplants. The incidence and degree of insulitis was significantly reduced in mice receiving proinsulin II bone marrow compared to controls. However, the incidence of sialitis in mice receiving proinsulin II bone marrow and control mice was not altered, indicating protection from insulitis was antigen specific. We show for the first time that ex vivo genetic manipulation of HSCs to express proinsulin II followed by transplantation to NOD mice can establish molecular chimerism and protect from destructive insulitis in an antigen-specific manner.

  8. Expression of a secretory α-glucosidase II from Apis cerana indica in Pichia pastoris and its characterization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background α–glucosidase (HBGase) plays a key role in hydrolyzing α-glucosidic linkages. In Apis mellifera, three isoforms of HBGase (I, II and III) have been reported, which differ in their nucleotide composition, encoding amino acid sequences and enzyme kinetics. Recombinant (r)HBGase II from A. cerana indica (rAciHBGase II) was focused upon here due to the fact it is a native and economic honeybee species in Thailand. The data is compared to the two other isoforms, AciHBGase I and III from the same bee species and to the three isoforms (HBGase I, II and III) in different bee species where available. Results The highest transcript expression level of AciHBGase II was found in larvae and pupae, with lower levels in the eggs of A. cerana indica but it was not found in foragers. The full-length AciHBGase II cDNA, and the predicted amino acid sequence it encodes were 1,740 bp and 579 residues, respectively. The cDNA sequence was 90% identical to that from the HBGase II from the closely related A. cerana japonica (GenBank accession # NM_FJ752630.1). The full length cDNA was directionally cloned into the pPICZαA expression vector in frame with a (His)6 encoding C terminal tag using EcoRI and KpnI compatible ends, and transformed into Pichia pastoris. Maximal expression of the rAciHBGase II–(His)6 protein was induced by 0.5% (v/v) methanol for 96 h and secreted into the culture media. The partially purified enzyme was found to have optimal α-glucosidase activity at pH 3.5 and 45°C, with > 80% activity between pH 3.5–5.0 and 40–55°C, and was stabile (> 80% activity) at pH 4–8 and at < 25–65°C. The optimal substrate was sucrose. Conclusions Like in A. mellifera, there are three isoforms of AciHBGase (I, II and III) that differ in their transcript expression pattern, nucleotide sequences and optimal enzyme conditions and kinetics. PMID:23419073

  9. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

  10. Differentially Expressed MicroRNAs in Meningiomas Grades I and II Suggest Shared Biomarkers with Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    El-Gewely, Mohamed Raafat; Andreassen, Morten; Walquist, Mari; Ursvik, Anita; Knutsen, Erik; Nystad, Mona; Coucheron, Dag H.; Myrmel, Kristin Smistad; Hennig, Rune; Johansen, Steinar D.

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas represent the most common primary tumors of the central nervous system, but few microRNA (miRNA) profiling studies have been reported so far. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries generated from two human meningioma biopsies WHO grades I (benign) and II (atypical) were compared to excess dura controls. Nineteen differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by RT-qPCR using tumor RNA from 15 patients and 5 meninges controls. Tumor suppressor miR-218 and miR-34a were upregulated relative to normal controls, however, miR-143, miR-193b, miR-451 and oncogenic miR-21 were all downregulated. From 10 selected putative mRNA targets tested by RT-qPCR only four were differentially expressed relative to normal controls. PTEN and E-cadherin (CDH1) were upregulated, but RUNX1T1 was downregulated. Proliferation biomarker p63 was upregulated with nuclear localization, but not detected in most normal arachnoid tissues. Immunoreactivity of E-cadherin was detected in the outermost layer of normal arachnoids, but was expressed throughout the tumors. Nuclear Cyclin D1 expression was positive in all studied meningiomas, while its expression in arachnoid was limited to a few trabecular cells. Meningiomas of grades I and II appear to share biomarkers with malignant tumors, but with some additional tumor suppressor biomarkers expression. Validation in more patients is of importance. PMID:26950155

  11. Changes in hepatic phase I and phase II biotransformation enzyme expression and glutathione levels following atrazine exposure in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Arthur D; Breckenridge, Charles B; Yi, Kun D; Sawhney Coder, Pragati; Wanders, Desiree; Judd, Robert L; Foradori, Chad D

    2017-10-05

    1. To determine the effects of repeated atrazine (ATR) treatment on hepatic phase I and II enzymes, adult female rats were treated with vehicle or 100 mg/kg of ATR for 1, 2, 3 or 4 days. Glutathione-s-transferases (GST) mRNA expression, protein levels (mu, pi, alpha, omega), and activity (cytosolic and microsomal), along with bioavailable glutathione (GSH) were assayed. 2. GST expression, concentrations and activity were increased, along with GSH levels, in animals treated with ATR for 3 and 4 days. 3. A subsequent study was performed with animals treated with vehicle, 6.5, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day for 4, 8 or 14 days. Expression of hepatic phase I CYP 450 enzymes was evaluated in conjugation with GST expression, protein and activity. Nineteen of the 45 CYP enzymes assayed displayed increased mRNA levels after eight days of treatment in animals treated with 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. After 14 days of treatment, all CYP expression levels returned to control levels except for CYP2B2, CYP2B3, CYP2C7, CYP2C23, CYP2E1, CYP3A9, CYP4A3 and CYP27A1, which remained elevated. 4. Results indicate that there may be a habituation or adaptation of liver phase I and phase II expression following repeated ATR treatment.

  12. Characterization of a novel human type II epithelial keratin K1b, specifically expressed in eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Langbein, Lutz; Rogers, Michael A; Praetzel, Silke; Cribier, Bernard; Peltre, Bernard; Gassler, Nikolaus; Schweizer, Jürgen

    2005-09-01

    In this study, we show that a novel human type II epithelial keratin, K1b, is exclusively expressed in luminal duct cells of eccrine sweat glands. Taking this luminal K1b expression as a reference, we have used antibodies against a plethora of epithelial keratins to systematically investigate their expression in the secretory globule and the two-layered sweat duct, which was divided into the intraglandular, intradermal, and intraepidermal (acrosyringium) segments, the latter being further subdivided into the sweat duct ridge and upper intraepidermal duct. We show that (i) each of the eccrine sweat gland tissue compartments expresses their own keratin patterns, (ii) the peripheral and luminal duct layers exhibit a sequential keratin expression, with both representing self-renewing cell layers, (iii) the intradermal duct and the sweat duct ridge display hitherto unknown length variations, and (iv) out of all cell layers, the luminal cell layer is the most robust layer and expresses the highest number of keratins, these being concentrated at the apical side of the cells to form the cuticle. We provide evidence that the cellular and intercellular properties of the peripheral and the luminal layers reflect adaptations to different functions.

  13. In Vitro Expression of the Extracellular Matrix Components Aggrecan, Collagen Types I and II by Articular Cartilage-Derived Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schneevoigt, J; Fabian, C; Leovsky, C; Seeger, J; Bahramsoltani, M

    2017-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of hyaline cartilage is perfectly suited to transmit articular pressure load to the subchondral bone. Pressure is transferred by a high amount of aggrecan-based proteoglycans and collagen type II fibres in particular. After any injury, the hyaline cartilage is replaced by fibrocartilage, which is low in proteoglycans and contains collagen type I predominantly. Until now, long-term results of therapeutic procedures including cell-based therapies like autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) lead to a replacement tissue meeting the composition of fibrocartilage. Therefore, it is of particular interest to discover how and to what extent isolation and in vitro cultivation of chondrocytes affect the cells and their expression of ECM components. Hyaline cartilage-derived chondrocytes were cultivated in vitro and observed microscopically over a time period of 35 days. The expression of collagen type I, collagen type II and aggrecan was analysed using RT-qPCR and Western blot at several days of cultivation. Chondrocytes presented a longitudinal shape for the entire cultivation period. While expression of collagen type I prevailed within the first days, only prolonged cultivation led to an increase in collagen type II and aggrecan expression. The results indicate that chondrocyte isolation and in vitro cultivation lead to a dedifferentiation at least to the stage of chondroprogenitor cells.

  14. Selective development of CD4+ T cells in transgenic mice expressing a class II MHC-restricted antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaye, J; Hsu, M L; Sauron, M E; Jameson, S C; Gascoigne, N R; Hedrick, S M

    1989-10-26

    T lymphocytes are predisposed to recognition of foreign protein fragments bound to cell-surface molecules encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). There is now compelling evidence that this specificity is a consequence of a selection process operating on developing T lymphocytes in the thymus. As a result of this positive selection, thymocytes that express antigen receptors with a threshold affinity for self MHC-encoded glycoproteins preferentially emigrate from the thymus and seed peripheral lymphoid organs. The specificity for both foreign antigen and MHC molecules is imparted by the alpha and beta chains of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR). Two other T-cell surface proteins, CD4 and CD8, which bind non-polymorphic regions of class II and class I MHC molecules respectively, are also involved in these recognition events and play an integral role in thymic selection. In order to elucidate the developmental pathways of class II MHC-restricted T cells in relation to these essential accessory molecules, we have produced TCR-transgenic mice expressing a receptor specific for a fragment of pigeon cytochrome c and the Ek (class II MHC) molecule. The transgenic TCR is expressed on virtually all T cells in mice expressing Ek. The thymuses of these mice contain an abnormally high percentage of mature CD4+CD8- cells. In addition, the peripheral T-cell population is almost exclusively CD4+, demonstrating that the MHC specificity of the TCR determines the phenotype of T cells during selection in the thymus.

  15. Role of MHC class II expressing CD4+ T cells in proteolipid protein(91-110)-induced EAE in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Ashutosh; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella

    2006-12-01

    MHC class II molecules play a central role in the control of adaptive immune responses through selection of the CD4(+) T cell repertoire in the thymus and antigen presentation in the periphery. Inherited susceptibility to autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and IDDM are associated with particular MHC class II alleles. Advent of HLA transgenic mice has helped us in deciphering the role of particular HLA DR and DQ class II molecules in human autoimmune diseases. In mice, the expression of class II is restricted to professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, in humans, class II is also expressed on T cells, unlike murine T cells. We have developed new humanized HLA class II transgenic mice expressing class II molecules not only on APC but also on a subset of CD4(+) T cells. The expression of class II on CD4(+) T cells is inducible, and class II(+) CD4(+) T cells can present antigen in the absence of APC. Further, using EAE, a well-established animal model of MS, we tested the functional significance of these class II(+) CD4(+) T cells. DR3.AEo transgenic mice were susceptible to proteolipid protein(91-110)-induced EAE and showed CNS pathology accompanied by widespread inflammation and demyelination seen in human MS patients, suggesting a role for class II(+) CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis.

  16. Insulin Receptor Isoform Variations in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Claire M.; Zielinska, H. A.; Wang, Jing; Jarrett, Caroline; Frankow, A.; Ladomery, Michael R.; Bahl, Amit; Rhodes, Anthony; Oxley, Jon; Holly, Jeff M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Men who develop prostate cancer (PCa) increasingly have one of the co-morbidities associated with a Western lifestyle that are characterized by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and increased expression of insulin-like growth factors-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II. Each have been associated with poor prognosis and more aggressive cancers that exhibit increased metabolism and increased glucose uptake. The insulin receptor (IR) has two splice isoforms IR-A and IR-B: IR-A has a higher affinity for IGF-II comparable to that for insulin, whereas the IR-B isoform predominantly just binds to insulin. In this study, we assessed alterations in the IR-A and IR-B isoform ratio and associated changes in cell proliferation and migration of PCa cell lines following exposure to altered concentrations of glucose and treatment with IGF-II and insulin. We observed that where IR-B predominated insulin had a greater effect on migration than IGF-II and IGF-II was more effective when IR-A was the main isoform. With regard to proliferation IGF-II was more effective than insulin regardless of which isoform was dominant. We assessed the abundance of the IR isoforms both in vivo and in vitro and observed that the majority of the tissue samples and cell lines expressed more IR-A than IR-B. Alterations in the isoforms in response to changes in their hormonal milieu could have a profound impact on how malignant cells behave and play a role in promoting carcinogenesis. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying changes in alternative splicing of the IR may provide additional targets for future cancer therapies. PMID:27733843

  17. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of diverse Pin-II proteinase inhibitor genes in Capsicum annuum Linn.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Giri, Ashok P; Kumar, Pavan; Gupta, Vidya S

    2009-08-01

    Pin-II type proteinase inhibitor (PI) genes were cloned from fruit and stem tissues of Capsicum annuum L. var Phule Jyoti using primers designed from reported CanPI gene sequence (AF039398). In total, 21 novel CanPIs, members of the Pin-II PI family, were identified in the study, with three isoforms of 1-inhibitory repeat domain (IRD), eight isoforms of 2-IRD, three isoforms of 3-IRD, five isoforms of 4-IRD and two partial CanPI sequences. Most of the sequences showed variation (2 to 20%) in the deduced AA sequences which were pronounced close to the reactive site loop. Expression patterns of CanPIs in the fruit and stem tissues of mature C. annuum plants were shown to vary qualitatively and quantitatively using semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression analysis. In the fruit tissue, CanPIs with different IRDs (from 1 to 4) were expressed simultaneously. In stem tissue, 1- and 2-IRD CanPIs were strongly expressed along moderate expression of 3- and 4-IRD genes. Analysis of CanPI protein activity showed a range of active forms across the tissues. CanPI expression was differentially up-regulated upon wounding and insect attack. Although infestation by aphids (Myzus persicae) and lepidopteran pests (Spodoptera litura) specifically induced 4-IRD CanPIs, virus-infected leaves did not affect CanPI expression. Analysis of CanPI protein activity indicated that the up-regulation in CanPI expression was not always correlated with increase in PI activity. Our results demonstrated that CanPI expression is regulated spatially, temporally as well as qualitatively and quantitatively.

  18. Angiotensin II activates the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway and induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression in rat endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Florencia; Sacerdoti, Flavia; De León, Romina; Gentile, Teresa; Canellada, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, plays a role in the process of uterine decidualization and blastocyst attachment. On the other hand, overexpression of COX-2 is involved in the proliferation of the endometrial tissue during endometriosis. Deregulation of the renin-angiotensin-system plays a role in the pathophysiology of endometriosis and pre-eclampsia. Angiotensin II increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration by targeting phospholypase C-gamma in endometrial stromal cells (ESC). A key element of the cellular response to Ca(2+) signals is the activity of the Ca(2+)- and calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. Our first aim was to study whether angiotensin II stimulated Cox-2 gene expression in rat ESC and to analyze whether calcineurin activity was involved. In cells isolated from non-pregnant uteri, COX-2 expression--both mRNA and protein--was induced by co-stimulation with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PIo), as well as by angiotensin II. Pretreatment with the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A inhibited this induction. We further analyzed the role of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in the induction of Cox-2 gene expression in non-pregnant rat ESC. Cyclosporin A abolished NFATc1 dephosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. Cyclosporin A also inhibited the transcriptional activity driven by the Cox-2 promoter. Exogenous expression of the peptide VIVIT -specific inhibitor of calcineurin/NFAT binding- blocked the activation of Cox-2 promoter and the up-regulation of COX-2 protein in these cells. Finally we analyzed Cox-2 gene expression in ESC of early-pregnant rats. COX-2 expression--both mRNA and protein--was induced by stimulation with PIo as well as by angiotensin II. This induction appears to be calcineurin independent, since it was not abrogated by cyclosporin A. In conclusion, angiotensin II induced Cox-2 gene expression by activating the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway in endometrial stromal

  19. CS-27IDH1/2 MUTATIONS INFLUENCE ZEB1 EXPRESSION IN GRADES II AND III GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Nesvick, Cody; Zhang, Chao; Montgomery, Blake; Lee, Michaela; Yang, Chunzhang; Wang, Herui; Merrill, Marsha; Heiss, John; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cell program that crucially regulates polarity and enhances invasion in normal epithelia and carcinomas. It has been recently demonstrated that EMT-promoting transcription factors (EMT-TFs) also govern cell invasion in glioblastoma, but the role of these proteins in lower-grade gliomas has not yet been investigated. We investigated the impact of EMT-TF expression on overall survival in World Health Organization (WHO) grades II and III gliomas using the National Cancer Institute Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasis Data (REMBRANDT) and Cancer Genome Atlas Network Lower-Grade Glioma (CGAN LGG) datasets. Surprisingly, while expression of EMT-promoting transcription factors were generally associated with a decrease in overall survival, high ZEB1 expression was associated with an increase in overall survival in both datasets (log-rank test on all grade II and III gliomas: for REMBRANDT, median overall survival (OS) 54.2 months ZEB1-high vs. 19.6 months ZEB1-low, p = 0.0016; for CGAN, median OS 134.3 months ZEB1-high vs. 63.6 months ZEB1-low, p = 0.0038). Mutations in the genes coding for Isocitrate Dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) are found in 85-90% of grades II and III gliomas and confer a favorable prognosis in these tumors. Using the CGAN LGG dataset, we found that ZEB1 is upregulated in IDH1/2-mutant versus IDH1/2-wild type tumors (unpaired t-test on all grade II and III gliomas: t = 10.292, p < 0.0001). Moreover, IDH1/2-mutant gliomas express lower levels of genes that are suppressed by ZEB1 including MIR200B and MIR200C (unpaired t-test on all grade II and III gliomas: p < 0.0001 for both targets). We further validated these findings in an independent set of 37 grade II and III gliomas using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. These findings reveal that ZEB1 not only has an unexpected prognostic significance in grades II and III gliomas but also may play an important role in IDH1

  20. Alternative Sigma Factor Over-Expression Enables Heterologous Expression of a Type II Polyketide Biosynthetic Pathway in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David Cole; Conway, Kyle R.; Pearce, Nelson; Villegas-Peñaranda, Luis Roberto; Garza, Anthony G.; Boddy, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterologous expression of bacterial biosynthetic gene clusters is currently an indispensable tool for characterizing biosynthetic pathways. Development of an effective, general heterologous expression system that can be applied to bioprospecting from metagenomic DNA will enable the discovery of a wealth of new natural products. Methodology We have developed a new Escherichia coli-based heterologous expression system for polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters. We have demonstrated the over-expression of the alternative sigma factor σ54 directly and positively regulates heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline biosynthetic gene cluster in E. coli. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that σ54 promoters are present in nearly 70% of polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide biosynthetic pathways. Conclusions We have demonstrated a new mechanism for heterologous expression of the oxytetracycline polyketide biosynthetic pathway, where high-level pleiotropic sigma factors from the heterologous host directly and positively regulate transcription of the non-native biosynthetic gene cluster. Our bioinformatics analysis is consistent with the hypothesis that heterologous expression mediated by the alternative sigma factor σ54 may be a viable method for the production of additional polyketide products. PMID:23724102

  1. Peptidoglycan-mediated IL-8 expression in human alveolar type II epithelial cells requires lipid raft formation and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Cheon, In Su; Woo, Sang Su; Kang, Seok-Seong; Im, Jintaek; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chung, Dae Kyun; Park, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyun

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major sepsis-causing Gram-positive bacterium, invades pulmonary epithelial cells and causes lung diseases. In the lung, alveolar type II epithelial cells play an important role in innate immunity by secreting chemokines and antimicrobial peptides upon bacterial infection whereas type I cells mainly function in gas-exchange. In this study, we investigated the ability of S. aureus peptidoglycan (PGN) to induce expression of a chemokine, IL-8, in a human alveolar type II epithelial cell line, A549. PGN induces IL-8 mRNA and protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Supplementation of soluble CD14 further enhanced the PGN-induced IL-8 expression. Interestingly, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was inhibited by nystatin, a specific inhibitor for lipid rafts, but not by chlorpromazine, a specific inhibitor for clathrin-coated pits. Furthermore, PGN-induced IL-8 expression was attenuated by inhibitors for MAP kinases such as ERK, p38 kinase, and JNK/SAPK, whereas no inhibitory effect was observed by inhibitors for reactive oxygen species or protein kinase C. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrates that PGN increased the DNA binding of the transcription factors, AP-1 and NF-kappaB while minimally, NF-IL6, all of which are involved in the transcription of IL-8. Taken together, these results suggest that PGN induces IL-8 expression in a CD14-enhanced manner in human alveolar type II epithelial cells, through the formation of lipid rafts and the activation of MAP kinases, which ultimately leads to activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB, and NF-IL6.

  2. The distribution and expression of the two isoforms of DNA topoisomerase II in normal and neoplastic human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Turley, H.; Comley, M.; Houlbrook, S.; Nozaki, N.; Kikuchi, A.; Hickson, I. D.; Gatter, K.; Harris, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    In mammalian cells, there are two isoforms of DNA topoisomerase II, designated alpha (170-kDa form) and beta (180-kDa form). Previous studies using cell lines have shown that the topoisomerase IIalpha and beta isoforms are differentially regulated during the cell cycle and in response to changes in growth state. Moreover, both isoforms can act as targets for a range of anti-tumour drugs. Here, we have analysed the normal tissue distribution in humans of topoisomerase IIalpha and beta using isoform-specific antibodies. In addition, we have studied expression of these isoforms in 69 primary tumour biopsies, representative either of tumours that are responsive to topoisomerase II-targeting drugs (breast, lung, lymphoma and seminoma) or of those that show de novo drug resistance (colon). Topoisomerase IIalpha was expressed exclusively in the proliferating compartments of all normal tissues, and was detectable in both the cell nucleus and cytoplasm. In biologically aggressive or rapidly proliferating tumours (e.g. high-grade lymphomas and seminomas), there was a high level of topoisomerase IIalpha, although expression was still detectable in colon tumours, indicating that expression of this isoform is not sufficient to explain the intrinsic drug resistance of colon tumours. Topoisomerase IIbeta was expressed ubiquitously in vivo and was localized in both the nucleoli and the nucleoplasm. This isoform was present in quiescent cell populations, but was expressed at a generally higher level in all tumours and proliferating cells than in normal quiescent tissues. We conclude that topoisomerase IIalpha is a strict proliferation marker in normal and neoplastic cells in vivo, but that topoisomerase IIbeta has a much more general cell and tissue distribution than has topoisomerase IIalpha. The apparent up-regulation of topoisomerase IIbeta in neoplastic cells has implications for the response of patients to anti-tumour therapies that include topoisomerase II-targeting drugs

  3. Hypoxia induces arginase II expression and increases viable human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell numbers via AMPKα1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianjing; Nelin, Leif D; Chen, Bernadette

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation is one of the hallmark features of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. With only supportive treatment options available for this life-threatening disease, treating and preventing the proliferation of PASMCs is a viable therapeutic option. A key promoter of hypoxia-induced increases in the number of viable human PASMCs is arginase II, with attenuation of viable cell numbers following pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA knockdown of the enzyme. Additionally, increased levels of arginase have been demonstrated in the pulmonary vasculature of patients with pulmonary hypertension. The signaling pathways responsible for the hypoxic induction of arginase II in PASMCs, however, remain unknown. Hypoxia is a recognized activator of AMPK, which is known to be expressed in human PASMCs (hPASMCs). Activation of AMPK by hypoxia has been shown to promote cell survival in PASMCs. In addition, pharmacologic agents targeting AMPK have been shown to attenuate chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The present studies tested the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced arginase II expression in hPASMCs is mediated through AMPK signaling. We found that pharmacologic inhibitors of AMPK, as well as siRNA knockdown of AMPKα1, prevented hypoxia-induced arginase II. The hypoxia-induced increase in viable hPASMC numbers was also prevented following both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA knockdown of AMPK. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of AMPK induced arginase II protein expression and viable cells numbers in hPASMCs. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  5. Bare lymphocyte syndrome. Consequences of absent class II major histocompatibility antigen expression for B lymphocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed Central

    Clement, L T; Plaeger-Marshall, S; Haas, A; Saxon, A; Martin, A M

    1988-01-01

    The bare lymphocyte syndrome is a rare combined immunodeficiency disorder associated with the absence of class I and/or class II major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens. Although it has been inferred that the immune deficiency is a consequence of disordered MHC-restricted interactions among otherwise normal cells, the biological capabilities and differentiation of B lymphocytes deficient in class II MHC antigens have not been rigorously analyzed. We have examined the phenotypic and functional attributes of B cells with absent class II MHC antigens. Our data demonstrate that these B cells are intrinsically defective in their responses to membrane-mediated activation stimuli. In addition, virtually all the B cells had phenotypic evidence of arrested differentiation at an immature stage. Finally, these B cells also failed to express the C3d-EBV receptor normally present on all B lymphocytes. These data indicate that class II MHC molecules are vital participants in early events of the B cell activation cascade, and that other non-MHC membrane molecules may also be absent as a consequence of either arrested differentiation or as a result of the basic defect affecting the expression of MHC membrane antigens. PMID:3257764

  6. p120-Catenin Expressed in Alveolar Type II Cells Is Essential for the Regulation of Lung Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Chignalia, Andreia Z.; Vogel, Stephen M.; Reynolds, Albert B.; Mehta, Dolly; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Malik, Asrar B.; Liu, Yuru

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of the lung alveolar epithelial barrier is required for the gas exchange and is important for immune regulation. Alveolar epithelial barrier is composed of flat type I cells, which make up approximately 95% of the gas-exchange surface, and cuboidal type II cells, which secrete surfactants and modulate lung immunity. p120-catenin (p120; gene symbol CTNND1) is an important component of adherens junctions of epithelial cells; however, its function in lung alveolar epithelial barrier has not been addressed in genetic models. Here, we created an inducible type II cell–specific p120-knockout mouse (p120EKO). The mutant lungs showed chronic inflammation, and the alveolar epithelial barrier was leaky to 125I-albumin tracer compared to wild type. The mutant lungs also demonstrated marked infiltration of inflammatory cells and activation of NF-κB. Intracellular adhesion molecule 1, Toll-like receptor 4, and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were all up-regulated. p120EKO lungs showed increased expression of the surfactant proteins Sp-B, Sp-C, and Sp-D, and displayed severe inflammation after pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with wild type. In p120-deficient type II cell monolayers, we observed reduced transepithelial resistance compared to control, consistent with formation of defective adherens junctions. Thus, although type II cells constitute only 5% of the alveolar surface area, p120 expressed in these cells plays a critical role in regulating the innate immunity of the entire lung. PMID:25773174

  7. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II regulates nuclear receptor, myogenic, and metabolic gene expression in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Lisa M; Wang, Shu-Ching Mary; Eriksson, Natalie A; Myers, Stephen A; Murray, Lauren A; Muscat, George E O

    2011-02-24

    We demonstrate that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) mRNA is more abundantly expressed (than COUP-TFI mRNA) in skeletal muscle C2C12 cells and in (type I and II) skeletal muscle tissue from C57BL/10 mice. Consequently, we have utilized the ABI TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) platform to analyze gene expression changes specifically attributable to ectopic COUP-TFII (relative to vector only) expression in muscle cells. Utilizing a TLDA-based platform and 5 internal controls, we analyze the entire NR superfamily, 96 critical metabolic genes, and 48 important myogenic regulatory genes on the TLDA platform utilizing 5 internal controls. The low density arrays were analyzed by rigorous statistical analysis (with Genorm normalization, Bioconductor R, and the Empirical Bayes statistic) using the (integromics) statminer software. In addition, we validated the differentially expressed patho-physiologically relevant gene (identified on the TLDA platform) glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4). We demonstrated that COUP-TFII expression increased the steady state levels of Glut4 mRNA and protein, while ectopic expression of truncated COUP-TFII lacking helix 12 (COUP-TFΔH12) reduced Glut4 mRNA expression in C2C12 cells. Moreover, COUP-TFII expression trans-activated the Glut4 promoter (-997/+3), and ChIP analysis identified selective recruitment of COUP-TFII to a region encompassing a highly conserved SP1 binding site (in mouse, rat, and human) at nt positions -131/-118. Mutation of the SpI site ablated COUP-TFII mediated trans-activation of the Glut4 promoter. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in skeletal muscle cells, COUP-TFII regulates several nuclear hormone receptors, and critical metabolic and muscle specific genes.

  8. Impaired expression and function of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R; Otalora, Luis F Pacheco; Arshadmansab, Massoud F; Herrera, Berenice; Francisco, Sebastian; Ermolinsky, Boris S

    2008-11-13

    Group II metabotropic (mGlu II) receptor subtypes mGlu2 and mGlu3 are important modulators of synaptic plasticity and glutamate release in the brain. Accordingly, several pharmacological ligands have been designed to target these receptors for the treatment of neurological disorders characterized by anomalous glutamate regulation including epilepsy. In this study, we examine whether the expression level and function of mGlu2 and mGlu3 are altered in experimental epilepsy by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and extracellular recordings. A down-regulation of mGlu2/3 protein expression at the mossy fiber pathway was associated with a significant reduction in mGlu2/3 protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats. Moreover, a reduction in mGlu2 and mGlu3 transcripts levels was noticed as early as 24 h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and persisted during subsequent "latent" and chronic periods. In addition, a significant impairment of mGlu II-mediated depression of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses was detected in chronically epileptic rats. Application of mGlu II agonists (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) induced a significant reduction of the fEPSP amplitude in control rats, but not in chronic epileptic rats. These data indicate a long-lasting impairment of mGlu2/3 expression that may contribute to abnormal presynaptic plasticity, exaggerate glutamate release and hyperexcitability in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  9. Impaired expression and function of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R.; Otalora, Luis F. Pacheco; Arshadmansab, Massoud F.; Herrera, Berenice; Francisco, Sebastian; Ermolinsky, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Group II metabotropic (mGlu II) receptor subtypes mGlu2 and mGlu3 are important modulators of synaptic plasticity and glutamate release in the brain. Accordingly, several pharmacological ligands have been designed to target these receptors for the treatment of neurological disorders characterized by anomalous glutamate regulation including epilepsy. In this study, we examine whether the expression level and function of mGlu2 and mGlu3 are altered in experimental epilepsy by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and extracellular recordings. A down-regulation of mGlu2/3 protein expression at the mossy fiber pathway was associated with a significant reduction in mGlu2/3 protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats. Moreover, a reduction in mGlu2 and mGlu3 transcripts levels was noticed as early as 24h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and persisted during subsequent “latent” and chronic periods. In addition, a significant impairment of mGlu II-mediated depression of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses was detected in chronically epileptic rats. Application of mGlu II agonists (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) induced a significant reduction of the fEPSP amplitude in control rats, but not in chronic epileptic rats. These data indicate a long-lasting impairment of mGlu2/3 expression that may contribute to abnormal presynaptic plasticity, exaggerate glutamate release and hyperexcitability in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:18804094

  10. Topoisomerase II α Status in Renal Medullary Carcinoma: Immuno-Expression and Gene Copy Alterations of a Potential Target of Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Albadine, Roula; Wang, Wenle; Brownlee, Noel A.; Toubaji, Antoun; Billis, Athanase; Argani, Perdram; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Garvin, A. Julian; Cousi, Rima; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Pavlovich, Christian; Netto, George J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Renal medullary carcinoma is an aggressive renal neoplasm without currently available effective therapy to our knowledge. Topoisomerase II α is a gyrase involved in cell proliferation, and DNA maintenance and repair. Topoisomerase II α is a target of inhibiting agents such as anthracyclines. Triggered by a recent response to topoisomerase II α inhibitors in a patient with renal medullary carcinoma, we evaluated topoisomerase II α expression in relation to the proliferation index and topoisomerase II α gene copy number status in a larger series of patients with renal medullary carcinoma. Materials and Methods Archival tissues from 14 renal medullary carcinomas were retrieved from our 3 institutions. Immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibodies for topoisomerase II α and Ki67. The percent of cells with positive nuclear staining was assessed in the highest area of expression for each marker. A previously suggested greater than 5% cutoff was used for topoisomerase II α over expression. The topoisomerase II α gene copy number was evaluated using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Locus specific topoisomerase II α gene and chromosome 17 centromere probes were used. The total number of topoisomerase II α and chromosome 17 centromere signals was counted in 150 cells per tumor and a topoisomerase II α-to-chromosome 17 centromere signal ratio was calculated in each tumor. A topoisomerase II α-to-chromosome 17 centromere ratio of 2.0 or greater and less than 0.8 was used as a cutoff for amplification and deletion, respectively. The percent of tumor cells with polysomic, eusomic or monosomic chromosome 17 status was also determined. Results On immuno-expression analysis topoisomerase II α immunohistochemistry was technically inconclusive in 1 renal medullary carcinoma. Topoisomerase II α was over expressed in 11 of 13 renal medullary carcinomas (85%) (median 50%, range 1% to 80%). As expected, a high Ki67 proliferation index was noted

  11. Over-expressed copper/zinc superoxide dismutase localizes to mitochondria in neurons inhibiting the angiotensin II-mediated increase in mitochondrial superoxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Shumin; Case, Adam J; Yang, Rui-Fang; Schultz, Harold D; Zimmerman, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is the main effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease by exerting its effects on an array of different cell types, including central neurons. AngII intra-neuronal signaling is mediated, at least in part, by reactive oxygen species, particularly superoxide (O2 (•-)). Recently, it has been discovered that mitochondria are a major subcellular source of AngII-induced O2 (•-). We have previously reported that over-expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a mitochondrial matrix-localized O2 (•-) scavenging enzyme, inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling. Interestingly, over-expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), which is believed to be primarily localized to the cytoplasm, similarly inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling and provides protection against AngII-mediated neurogenic hypertension. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that CuZnSOD over-expression in central neurons localizes to mitochondria and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling by scavenging mitochondrial O2 (•-). Using a neuronal cell culture model (CATH.a neurons), we demonstrate that both endogenous and adenovirus-mediated over-expressed CuZnSOD (AdCuZnSOD) are present in mitochondria. Furthermore, we show that over-expression of CuZnSOD attenuates the AngII-mediated increase in mitochondrial O2 (•-) levels and the AngII-induced inhibition of neuronal potassium current. Taken together, these data clearly show that over-expressed CuZnSOD in neurons localizes in mitochondria, scavenges AngII-induced mitochondrial O2 (•-), and inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling.

  12. Suppressed expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 mRNA in the endometrium: a molecular mechanism associating endometrial cancer with its risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rutanen, E M; Nyman, T; Lehtovirta, P; Ammälä, M; Pekonen, F

    1994-11-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is thought to function as a mediator of steroid hormone actions in the endometrium. IGFs (IGF-I and IGF-II) are also potent mitogens in endometrial cancer. The biological actions of IGFs are modulated by specific binding proteins (IGFBP)--6 cloned and sequenced so far--which may either inhibit or enhance the effects of IGF at the cellular level. In the endometrium, IGFBP-1 gene expression is stimulated by progesterone and inhibited by insulin, while IGFBP-1 inhibits the mitogenic action of IGF-I. In this study, we used a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to investigate IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, IGFBP-4, IGFBP-5 and IGFBP-6 gene expression in endometrial cancer tissues. Endometrial cancer tissue samples were collected from 20 women (aged 54-79 yrs) with stage I to II well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma. Samples of normal endometrium (n = 14) obtained from women undergoing tubal ligation in various phases of the menstrual cycle, and normal early-pregnancy endometrium (decidua) were studied for comparison. In endometrial cancer tissues, the IGFBP-1 mRNA was undetectable or minimally expressed when studied by RT-PCR. The mean (+ SD) levels of IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-5 mRNAs in endometrial cancer tissues did not differ from those in normal endometrium, in which no cyclic variation was observed, suggesting that the genes encoding IGFBP-2, IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-5 are not hormonally regulated in the endometrium. The IGFBP-6 mRNA expression showed a significant cyclic variation in normal endometrium, with low levels in late-proliferative and early- to mid-secretory phases and high expression in late-secretory and early-proliferative phases. In endometrial cancer tissues, the mean IGFBP-6 mRNA level was similar to that in cycling endometrium during the peri-ovulatory period. In summary, a continuous stimulation of the endometrial epithelial cells by IGFs with suppressed IGFBP-1 expression

  13. Heterologous expression of human carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II in yeast: A model for the molecular analysis of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Cavadini, P.; Invernizzi, F.; Baratta, S.

    1994-09-01

    The CPT enzyme system, which is composed of two distinct mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins (CPT I and CPT II), provides the mechanism whereby long-chain fatty acids are transferred from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix to undergo {beta}-oxidation. Here, we report the development of an expression system for investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in CPT II deficiency and, potentially, other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects. To explore yeast as an expression system, we introduced a cDNA encoding the entire human CPT II precursor into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression was programmed by using an inducible galactose operon promoter (GAL1). Following induction, human CPT II was expressed at high levels, with activity 4- to 16-fold greater than in human fibroblasts. Levels of expression paralleled those of respiration, being higher in cells grown on a nonfermentable carbon source than in those grown on glucose. Immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled transformed cells demonstrated that human CPT II expressed in yeast was targeted to mitochondria with correct proteolytic processing of its 25-residue mitochondrial leader sequence. Preliminary results on the expression of a number of mutant CPT II alleles associated with different clinical phenotypes demonstrated the value of this system for examining the functional consequences of disease-causing mutations and investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with CPT II deficiency.

  14. Clinical significance of high-Km 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II) mRNA expression in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Sugawara, Takeshi; Oyake, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Toshiyuki; Aoki, Yusei; Tsukushi, Yasuhiko; Onodera, Shima; Ito, Shigeki; Murai, Kazunori; Ishida, Yoji

    2007-10-01

    We analyzed cytosolic high-Km 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II) and deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) mRNA expression in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). At diagnosis, the cN-II mRNA expression of patients was higher than that of healthy volunteers, but the dCK mRNA expression showed no significant difference. Patients with ara-C-containing chemotherapies whose BMMNC showed a high level of cN-II expression (greater than the median value) had shorter median overall survival (15 months versus 22 months, p<0.01) and shorter median post-chemotherapy survival (10 months versus 16 months, p=0.012). These data suggest that the expression level of cN-II mRNA might be a prognostic factor of high-risk MDS.

  15. Quantitative analysis of the concentrations of IGFs and several IGF-binding proteins in a large fibrous abdominal tumor and the circulation of a patient with hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Jaap; van de Hoef, Wouter; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2015-05-06

    The syndrome of nonislet cell tumor induced hypoglycemia (NICTH) represent extreme cases of excessive expression and production of incompletely processed high-molecular-mass pro-IGF-II forms (big IGF-II) by an often large tumor. Tumor-derived big IGF-II is responsible for enhanced insulin-like effects in the body through complicated mechanisms, leading to hypoglycemia. Case studies on NICTH usually focus on measurements of diagnostic parameters in the circulation of patients. Some studies have also reported on qualitative immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue, in particular with respect to the expression of IGF-II at the mRNA or protein level. However, quantitative data on the concentrations of IGFs and IGFBPs in tumor specimen causing NICTH, in relation to their corresponding plasma levels are lacking. Such an analysis would provide an estimate of the total potential of (big) IGF-II retained by the tumor and more insight in the relative levels of different IGFBPs and their origin in the circulation, that is, systemically induced by tumor related factors or directly tumor-derived. Here we investigated quantitatively the levels of IGFs and IGFBPs in a large, 1.76 kg weighing, solitary fibrous tumor from a typical case of NICTH using highly specific immunometric assays. Besides a high level of big IGF-II, patient's plasma also contained increased levels of both IGFBP-2 and -6 which declined after removal of the tumor. These IGFBPs have a higher affinity for (pro-) IGF-II than IGF-I and exhibit intrinsic IGF-independent bioactivities. Tumor tissue contained high amounts of big IGF-II and IGFBP-6, exceeding that in patient's circulation many-fold. A relatively low tumor content of IGFBP-2 was found suggesting that the preoperative high levels in plasma were attributable to systemic mechanisms. The background literature and possible implications of these findings are briefly discussed. Based on the present results we postulate that tumor tissue is not the source

  16. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  17. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  18. miR-34a Modulates Angiotensin II-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy by Direct Inhibition of ATG9A Expression and Autophagic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Ye, Jing; Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; You, Xiangyu; Liu, Benrong; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by thickening myocardium and decreasing in heart chamber volume in response to mechanical or pathological stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. This study investigated altered miRNA expression and autophagic activity in pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was used and confirmed by heart morphology, induction of cardiomyocyte autophagy, altered expression of autophagy-related ATG9A, LC3 II/I and p62 proteins, and decrease in miR-34a expression. The in vitro data showed that in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by Ang II, miR-34a expression was downregulated, whereas ATG9A expression was up-regulated. Moreover, miR-34a was able to bind to ATG9A 3′-UTR, but not to the mutated 3′-UTR and inhibited ATG9A protein expression and autophagic activity. The latter was evaluated by autophagy-related LC3 II/I and p62 levels, TEM, and flow cytometry in rat cardiomyocytes. In addition, ATG9A expression induced either by treatment of rat cardiomyocytes with Ang II or ATG9A cDNA transfection upregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in both morphology and expression of hypertrophy-related genes (i.e., ANP and β-MHC), whereas knockdown of ATG9A expression downregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, miR-34a antagonized Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy, whereas inhibition of miR-34a expression aggravated Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy (such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy-related ANP and β-MHC expression and cardiomyocyte morphology). This study indicates that miR-34a plays a role in regulation of Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity. PMID:24728149

  19. An epigenetic auto-feedback loop regulates TGF-β type II receptor expression and function in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lin; Yuan, Guandou; Datta, Arunima; Buckhaults, Phillip; Datta, Pran K.

    2015-01-01

    The downregulation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) expression and function plays a pivotal role in the loss of the TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor function that contributes to lung cancer progression. The aberrant expression of miRNAs has been shown to be involved in the regulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Our current study involving miRNA microarray, northern blot and QRT-PCR analysis shows an inverse correlation between miR-20a and TβRII expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and cell lines. Stable expression of miR-20a downregulates TβRII in lung epithelial cells which results in an inhibition of TGF-β signaling and attenuation of TGF-β-induced cell growth suppression and apoptosis. Stable knock down of miR-20a increases TβRII expression and inhibits tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells in vivo. Oncogene c-Myc promotes miR-20a expression by activating its promoter leading to downregulation of TβRII expression and TGF-Δ signaling. MiR-145, which is upregulated by TGF-β, inhibits miR-20a expression by targeting c-Myc and upregulates TβRII expression. These correlations among miRNAs and cellular proteins are supported by TCGA public database using NSCLC specimens. These results suggest a novel mechanism for the loss of TβRII expression and TGF-β-induced tumor suppressor functions in lung cancer through a complex auto-feedback loop TGF-β/miR-145/c-Myc/miR-20a/TβRII. PMID:26356817

  20. Tea polyphenols regulate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit expression and ameliorate angiotensin II-induced hyperpermeability in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chen-Jiang; Xu, Jin-Wen; Ikeda, Katsumi; Takahashi, Kyoko; Nara, Yasuo; Yamori, Yukio

    2003-10-01

    Out-of-control reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling is one of the key events in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and essential hypertension. We observed that tea polyphenols decreased the production of ROS via regulation of the protein expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase in bovine carotid artery endothelial cells (BCAECs). Both green tea polyphenols (GTP) and black tea polyphenols (BTP) down-regulated the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits p22phox and p67phox while up-regulating catalase expression (p < 0.05, respectively). Pre-treatment with GTP or BTP for 24 h significantly decreased the superoxide anion level (p < 0.05) and permeable fluorescence intensities in Ang II-stimulated BCAECs. A decrease in cell permeability was also observed by pre-treatment with diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI) or vitamin E (p < 0.05, respectively). The result demonstrates that tea polyphenols alleviate angiotensin (Ang) II-induced hyperpermeability mainly by decreasing ROS production. Our results suggest that tea polyphenols regulate ROS-related protein expression and may be beneficial in preventing endothelial cell dysfunction and development of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension.

  1. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Hausner, Georg

    2016-01-01

    In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495) within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) small ribosomal subunit (rns) gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF) encoded within a group I intron (mS1247). This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase). Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo) in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2) stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase. PMID:26909494

  2. Decreased expression of human class II antigens on monocytes from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Increased expression with interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Heagy, W; Kelley, V E; Strom, T B; Mayer, K; Shapiro, H M; Mandel, R; Finberg, R

    1984-01-01

    The expression of HLA-DR (a class II histocompatibility antigen) on monocytes isolated from the peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was investigated by the use of dual fluorescent staining and cytofluorometry. In animal models the absence of class II positive monocytes is linked to a failure of T cells to respond to antigens. We now report that patients with AIDS have a paucity of HLA-DR+ monocytes. The percentage of HLA-DR+ monocytes among eight normal individuals ranged from 49.3 to 95.0%+, and only one individual had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes. HLA-DR expression on monocytes from homosexual male patients with lymphadenopathy was similar to that of normal subjects (range, 58.0 to 97.4%+). In contrast, seven of nine patients with AIDS had less than 50% HLA-DR+ monocytes (range, 13.4 to 78.8%+). The in vitro incubation of monocytes from AIDS patients with cloned human interferon-gamma resulted in an increase of the expression of HLA-DR to near normal levels. PMID:6439741

  3. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates expression of arginase II but not inducible nitric-oxide synthase in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Liu, Yusen; Nelin, Leif D

    2015-01-23

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been shown to participate in iNOS induction following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, while the role of MAPKs in the regulation of arginase remains unclear. We hypothesized that different MAPK family members are involved in iNOS and arginase expression following LPS stimulation. LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells exhibited increased protein and mRNA levels for iNOS, arginase I, and arginase II; although the induction of arginase II was more robust than that for arginase I. A p38 inhibitor completely prevented iNOS expression while it only attenuated arginase II induction. In contrast, a MEK1/2 inhibitor (ERK pathway) completely abolished arginase II expression while actually enhancing iNOS induction in LPS-stimulated cells. Arginase II promoter activity was increased by ∼4-fold following LPS-stimulation, which was prevented by the ERK pathway inhibitor. Arginase II promoter activity was unaffected by a p38 inhibitor or JNK pathway interference. Transfection with a construct expressing a constitutively active RAS mutant increased LPS-induced arginase II promoter activity, while transfection with a vector expressing a dominant negative ERK2 mutant or a vector expressing MKP-3 inhibited the arginase II promoter activity. LPS-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production was increased following siRNA-mediated knockdown of arginase II and decreased when arginase II was overexpressed. Our results demonstrate that while both the ERK and p38 pathways regulate arginase II induction in LPS-stimulated macrophages, iNOS induction by LPS is dependent on p38 activation. These results suggest that differential inhibition of the MAPK pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy to regulate macrophage phenotype.

  4. Effect of angiotensin II infusion on rhythmic clock gene expression and local renin-angiotensin system in the aorta of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Herichova, I; Zsoldosova, K; Vesela, A; Zeman, M

    2014-07-01

    Endogenous daily rhythms in physiology are regulated by the circadian system consisting of the central and peripheral components. The renin-angiotensin system, involved predominantly in water balance and blood pressure control, exerts 24 h rhythmicity in many of its parameters. The present study is aimed to study possible interactions between these two control systems. We analyzed effects induced by angiotensin II administration on clock gene expression in the aorta of rat and an ability of angiotensin II to influence the local tissue renin-angiotensin system. Angiotensin II was infused in a dose of 100 ng/kg/min by subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 28 days to male Wistar rats. Gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Angiotensin II administration resulted in an increase in blood pressure, heart weight/body weight index, and water intake in comparison with controls. We observed a significant phase advance in per2 and npas2 mRNA rhythms and decreased mesor of npas2 rhythmic expression in the aorta of angiotensin II-treated rats compared to control. Angiotensin II administration did not influence daily pattern and level of at1 mRNA expression. The ratio ace/ace2 showed a rhythmic pattern in the aorta of control rats with peak levels in the dark period. Angiotensin II infusion influenced clock gene expression and diminished a daily rhythm in ace/ace2 mRNA ratio indicating modulatory effect of angiotensin II on tissue renin-angiotensin system in the aorta.

  5. Ectopic expression of the agouti gene in transgenic mice causes obesity, features of type II diabetes, and yellow fur.

    PubMed

    Klebig, M L; Wilkinson, J E; Geisler, J G; Woychik, R P

    1995-05-23

    Mice that carry the lethal yellow (Ay) or viable yellow (Avy) mutation, two dominant mutations of the agouti (a) gene in mouse chromosome 2, exhibit a phenotype that includes yellow fur, marked obesity, a form of type II diabetes associated with insulin resistance, and an increased susceptibility to tumor development. Molecular analyses of these and several other dominant "obese yellow" a-locus mutations suggested that ectopic expression of the normal agouti protein gives rise to this complex pleiotropic phenotype. We have now tested this hypothesis directly by generating transgenic mice that ectopically express an agouti cDNA clone encoding the normal agouti protein in all tissues examined. Transgenic mice of both sexes have yellow fur, become obese, and develop hyperinsulinemia. In addition, male transgenic mice develop hyperglycemia by 12-20 weeks of age. These results demonstrate conclusively that the ectopic agouti expression is responsible for most, if not all, of the phenotypic traits of the dominant, obese yellow mutants.

  6. Looping Mediated Interaction between the Promoter and 3′ UTR Regulates Type II Collagen Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jash, Arijita; Yun, Kangsun; Sahoo, Anupama; So, Jae-Seon; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major component of articular cartilage and is mainly synthesized by chondrocytes. Repeated sub-culturing of primary chondrocytes leads to reduction of type II collagen gene (Col2a1) expression, which mimics the process of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Although the functional importance of Col2a1 expression has been extensively investigated, mechanism of transcriptional regulation during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is still unclear. In this study, we have investigated the crosstalk between cis-acting DNA element and transcription factor on Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the potential regulatory regions in the Col2a1 genomic locus. Among them, promoter and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) showed highly accessible chromatin architecture with enriched recruitment of active chromatin markers in primary chondrocytes. 3′ UTR has a potent enhancer function which recruits Lef1 (Lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1) transcription factor, leading to juxtaposition of the 3′ UTR with the promoter through gene looping resulting in up-regulation of Col2a1 gene transcription. Knock-down of endogenous Lef1 level significantly reduced the gene looping and subsequently down-regulated Col2a1 expression. However, these regulatory loci become inaccessible due to condensed chromatin architecture as chondrocytes dedifferentiate which was accompanied by a reduction of gene looping and down-regulation of Col2a1 expression. Our results indicate that Lef1 mediated looping between promoter and 3′ UTR under the permissive chromatin architecture upregulates Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. PMID:22815835

  7. Transcriptome-wide effects of inverted SINEs on gene expression and their impact on RNA polymerase II activity.

    PubMed

    Tajaddod, Mansoureh; Tanzer, Andrea; Licht, Konstantin; Wolfinger, Michael T; Badelt, Stefan; Huber, Florian; Pusch, Oliver; Schopoff, Sandy; Janisiw, Michael; Hofacker, Ivo; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-10-25

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) represent the most abundant group of non-long-terminal repeat transposable elements in mammalian genomes. In primates, Alu elements are the most prominent and homogenous representatives of SINEs. Due to their frequent insertion within or close to coding regions, SINEs have been suggested to play a crucial role during genome evolution. Moreover, Alu elements within mRNAs have also been reported to control gene expression at different levels. Here, we undertake a genome-wide analysis of insertion patterns of human Alus within transcribed portions of the genome. Multiple, nearby insertions of SINEs within one transcript are more abundant in tandem orientation than in inverted orientation. Indeed, analysis of transcriptome-wide expression levels of 15 ENCODE cell lines suggests a cis-repressive effect of inverted Alu elements on gene expression. Using reporter assays, we show that the negative effect of inverted SINEs on gene expression is independent of known sensors of double-stranded RNAs. Instead, transcriptional elongation seems impaired, leading to reduced mRNA levels. Our study suggests that there is a bias against multiple SINE insertions that can promote intramolecular base pairing within a transcript. Moreover, at a genome-wide level, mRNAs harboring inverted SINEs are less expressed than mRNAs harboring single or tandemly arranged SINEs. Finally, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which inverted SINEs can impact on gene expression by interfering with RNA polymerase II.

  8. High-efficiency type II cell-enhanced green fluorescent protein expression facilitates cellular identification, tracking, and isolation.

    PubMed

    Vanderbilt, Jeff N; Gonzalez, Robert F; Allen, Lennell; Gillespie, AnneMarie; Leaffer, David; Dean, Willow B; Chapin, Cheryl; Dobbs, Leland G

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in virtually all type II (TII) alveolar epithelial cells. The CBG mouse (SPC-BAC-EGFP) contains a bacterial artificial chromosome modified to express EGFP within the mouse surfactant protein (SP)-C gene 3' untranslated region. EGFP mRNA expression is limited to the lung. EGFP fluorescence is both limited to and exhibited by all cells expressing pro-SP-C; fluorescence is uniform throughout all lobes of the lung and does not change as mice age. EGFP(+) cells also express SP-B but do not express podoplanin, a type I (TI) cell marker. CBG mice show no evidence of lung disease with aging. In 3 hours, TII cells can be isolated in >99% purity from CBG mice by FACS; the yield of 3.7 ± 0.6 × 10(6) cells represents approximately 25 to 60% of the TII cells in the lung. By FACS analysis, approximately 0.9% of TII cells are in mitosis in uninjured lungs; after bleomycin injury, 4.1% are in mitosis. Because EGFP fluorescence can be detected for >14 days in culture, at a time that SP-C mRNA expression is essentially nil, this line may be useful for tracking TII cells in culture and in vivo. When CBG mice are crossed to transgenic mice expressing rat podoplanin, TI and TII cells can be easily simultaneously identified and isolated. When bred to other strains of mice, EGFP expression can be used to identify TII cells without the need for immunostaining for SP-C. These mice should be useful in models of mouse pulmonary disease and in studies of TII cell biology, biochemistry, and genetics.

  9. Selective C1 Lesioning Slig