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Sample records for ii investigating f0

  1. Fluorescence F 0 of photosystems II and I in developing C3 and C 4 leaves, and implications on regulation of excitation balance.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Richard B; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Bichele, Irina; Dall'Osto, Luca; Laisk, Agu

    2014-10-01

    This work addresses the question of occurrence and function of photosystem II (PSII) in bundle sheath (BS) cells of leaves possessing NADP-malic enzyme-type C4 photosynthesis (Zea mays). Although no requirement for PSII activity in the BS has been established, several component proteins of PSII have been detected in BS cells of developing maize leaves exhibiting O2-insensitive photosynthesis. We used the basal fluorescence emissions of PSI (F 0I) and PSII (F 0II) as quantitative indicators of the respective relative photosystem densities. Chl fluorescence induction was measured simultaneously at 680 and 750 nm. In mature leaves, the F m(680)/F 0(680) ratio was 10.5 but less in immature leaves. We propose that the lower ratio was caused by the presence of a distinct non-variable component, F c, emitting at 680 and 750 nm. After F c was subtracted, the fluorescence of PSI (F 0I) was detected as a non-variable component at 750 nm and was undetectably low at 680 nm. Contents of Chls a and b were measured in addition to Chl fluorescence. The Chl b/(a + b) was relatively stable in developing sunflower leaves (0.25-0.26), but in maize it increased from 0.09 to 0.21 with leaf tissue age. In sunflower, the F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) was 0.39 ± 0.01 independent of leaf age, but in maize, this parameter was 0.65 in young tissue of very low Chl content (20-50 mg m(-2)) falling to a stable level of 0.53 ± 0.01 at Chl contents >100 mg m(-2). The values of F 0I/(F 0I + F 0II) showed that in sunflower, excitation was partitioned between PSII and PSI in a ratio of 2:1, but the same ratio was 1:1 in the C4 plant. The latter is consistent with a PSII:PSI ratio of 2:1 in maize mesophyll cells and PSI only in BS cells (2:1:1 distribution). We suggest, moreover, that redox mediation of Chl synthesis, rather than protein accumulation, regulates photosystem assembly to ensure optimum excitation balance between functional PSII and PSI. Indeed, the apparent necessity for two

  2. Analysis of the pion scalar form factor provides model independent values of f0(500) and f0(980) meson parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubnička, Stanislav; Dubničková, Anna Z.; Liptaj, Andrej

    2014-11-01

    An existence of the scalar meson f0(500) is unambiguously confirmed by the pion scalar form factor analysis. The same is concerned also of the f0(980) scalar meson, though it is placed on the tail of the elastic region to be investigated in the analysis under consideration, therefore with less precise parameters values.

  3. Do red deer stags (Cervus elaphus) use roar fundamental frequency (F0) to assess rivals?

    PubMed

    Garcia, Maxime; Charlton, Benjamin D; Wyman, Megan T; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Reby, David

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that in humans, male voices are disproportionately lower pitched than female voices, and recent studies suggest that this dimorphism in fundamental frequency (F0) results from both intrasexual (male competition) and intersexual (female mate choice) selection for lower pitched voices in men. However, comparative investigations indicate that sexual dimorphism in F0 is not universal in terrestrial mammals. In the highly polygynous and sexually dimorphic Scottish red deer Cervus elaphus scoticus, more successful males give sexually-selected calls (roars) with higher minimum F0s, suggesting that high, rather than low F0s advertise quality in this subspecies. While playback experiments demonstrated that oestrous females prefer higher pitched roars, the potential role of roar F0 in male competition remains untested. Here we examined the response of rutting red deer stags to playbacks of re-synthesized male roars with different median F0s. Our results show that stags' responses (latencies and durations of attention, vocal and approach responses) were not affected by the F0 of the roar. This suggests that intrasexual selection is unlikely to strongly influence the evolution of roar F0 in Scottish red deer stags, and illustrates how the F0 of terrestrial mammal vocal sexual signals may be subject to different selection pressures across species. Further investigations on species characterized by different F0 profiles are needed to provide a comparative background for evolutionary interpretations of sex differences in mammalian vocalizations. PMID:24386312

  4. Protective immunity induced in mice by F0 and FII antigens purified from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Diniz, S N; Reis, B S; Goes, T S; Zouain, C S; Leite, M F; Goes, A M

    2004-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis causes a chronic granulomatous mycosis prevalent in South America, and cell-mediated immunity represents the principal mode of protection against this fungal infection. We investigated whether immunization with P. brasiliensis antigens fractionated by anionic chromatography on fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) could elicit protective immunity. BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous injection of either 10 microg fractions 0 (F0), II (FII) or III (FIII) in the presence of 100 microg of Corynebacterium parvum and 1 mg of Al(OH)(3) and challenged with pathogenic P. brasiliensis strain. Mice immunized with F0 presented cellular and humoral immune responses with significant production of IFN-gamma, and high levels of IgG2a and IgG3 isotypes. Immunization with FII induced significant production of IFN-gamma and IL-10 associated with high levels of IgG1 and IgG2a. It was demonstrated that immunization with F0 or FII promoted significant decrease of organ colony-forming units (CFUs) in the lung after challenge infection without fungi dissemination to the spleen or liver. In contrast, FIII immunized mice develop a progressive disseminated disease to spleen and liver presented significant levels of INF-gamma, IL-10 or TGF-beta associated with high production of IgG1 and IgG2a with low production of IgG2b and IgG3 after challenge infection. Taken together, these findings suggest that antigens of F0 and FII are reliable vaccine candidates against the paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:14670331

  5. Searches for B meson decays to phiphi, phirho, phif_{0}(980), and f_{0}(980)f_{0}(980) final states.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-11-14

    We present the results of searches for B decays to charmless final states involving varphi, f_{0}(980), and charged or neutral rho mesons. The data sample corresponds to 384x10;{6} BB[over ] pairs collected with the BABAR detector operating at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e;{+}e;{-} collider at SLAC. We find no significant signals and determine the following 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions, including systematic uncertainties: B(B;{0}-->varphivarphi)<2.0x10;{-7}, B(B;{+}-->varphirho;{+})<30x10;{-7}, B(B;{0}-->varphirho;{0})<3.3x10;{-7}, B[B;{0}-->varphif_{0}(980)]xB[f_{0}(980)-->pi;{+}pi;{-}]<3.8x10;{-7}, and B[B;{0}-->f_{0}(980)f_{0}(980)]xB[f_{0}(980)-->pi;{+}pi;{-}]xB[f_{0}(980)-->K;{+}K;{-}]<2.3x10;{-7}. PMID:19113328

  6. Effects of hearing aid amplification on voice F0 variability in speakers with prelingual hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guo-She; Liu, Chialin; Lee, Shao-Hsuan

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the audio-vocal feedback responses of (F0) to hearing amplification in severe-to-profound prelingual hearing loss (SPHL) using power spectral analysis of F0 contour of sustained vowels. Sustained phonations of vowel/a/of seventeen participants with SPHL were acquired with and without hearing-aid amplifications. The vocal intensity was visually fed back to the participants to help controlling the vocal intensity at 65-75 dBA and 85-95 dBA. The F0 contour of the phonations was extracted and submitted to spectral analysis to measure the extent of F0 fluctuations at different frequency ranges. The results showed that both high vocal intensity and hearing-aid amplification significantly improved voice F0 control by reducing the low-frequency fluctuations (low-frequency power, LFP, 0.2-3 Hz) in F0 spectrum. However, the enhanced feedback from higher vocal intensity and/or hearing amplification was not adequate to reduce the LFP to the level of a normal hearing person. Moreover, we found significant and negative correlations between LFP and supra-threshold feedback intensity (phonation intensity - hearing threshold level) for the frequencies of 500-2000 Hz. Increased vocal intensity, as well as hearing-aid amplification, improved voice F0 control by reducing the LFP of F0 spectrum, and the subtle changes in voices could be well explored using spectral analysis of F0. PMID:23648550

  7. Effects of obstruent consonants on the F0 contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Helen M.

    2003-10-01

    When a vowel follows an obstruent consonant, the fundamental frequency in the first few tens of milliseconds of the vowel is influenced by the voicing characteristics of the consonant. The goal of the research reported here is to model this influence, with the intention of improving generation of F0 contours in rule-based speech synthesis. Data have been recorded from 10 subjects. Stops, fricatives, and the nasal /m/ were paired with the vowels /i,opena/ to form CVm syllables. The syllables mVm served as baselines with which to compare the obstruents. The target syllables were embedded in carrier sentences. Intonation was varied so that each target syllable was produced with either a high, low, or no pitch accent. Results vary among subjects, but in general, obstruent effects on F0 primarily occur when the syllable carries a high pitch. In that case, F0 is increased relative to the baseline following voiceless obstruents, but F0 closely follows the baseline following voiced obstruents. After voiceless obstruents, F0 may be increased for up to 80 ms following voicing onset. When a syllable carries a low or no pitch accent, F0 is increased slightly following all obstruents. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. DC04331.

  8. Reaction time of voluntary modulations in voice F0 during sustained pitch vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jay J.; Larson, Charles R.; Eckstein, Kathryn C.

    2002-05-01

    In an attempt to more clearly understand the neural control of voice, a reaction time study was designed to investigate how rapidly normal subjects, i.e., nontrained singers, can voluntarily increase or decrease their voice fundamental frequency (F0) during sustained vocalizations when cued with a 1000-Hz auditory tone stimulus. Results revealed that overall reaction times (RTs) (F=21.9, df=2, 150, p=0.01) for upward F0 modulations occurred faster (range: 138-176 ms) than downward responses (range: 196-234 ms). In contrast to the reaction time findings, slightly higher peak velocities were observed for downward responses compared to upward responses. Shorter RTs observed for F0 elevation are therefore possibly related to central mechanisms involved in the planning of or execution of the direction in which F0 is to be modulated instead of muscle biomechanics. The fastest RTs obtained from the present study (138 ms) are slightly longer than the reflex latencies of the initial pitch-shift reflex response (100-130 ms) [Burnett, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103 (1998)], and provide additional evidence that subjects normally respond to inadvertent changes in their voice F0 with a fast, but limited reflex, followed by a secondary voluntary response. [Research supported by NIH Grant No. DC07264.

  9. The Relationship of Vocal Loudness Manipulation to Prosodic F0 and Durational Variables in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter J.; Hughes, Deanna

    2006-01-01

    This investigation was motivated by observations that when persons with dysarthria increase loudness their speech improves. Some studies have indicated that this improvement may be related to an increase of prosodic variation. Studies have reported an increase of fundamental frequency (F0) variation with increased loudness, but there has been no…

  10. Precise determination of the f0(600) and f0(980) pole parameters from a dispersive data analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, R; Kamiński, R; Peláez, J R; de Elvira, J Ruiz

    2011-08-12

    We use our latest dispersive analysis of ππ scattering data and the very recent K(ℓ4) experimental results to obtain the mass, width, and couplings of the two lightest scalar-isoscalar resonances. These parameters are defined from their associated poles in the complex plane. The analytic continuation to the complex plane is made in a model-independent way by means of once- and twice-subtracted dispersion relations for the partial waves, without any other theoretical assumption. We find the f(0)(600) pole at (457(-13))+14))-i(279(-7)(+11)) MeV and that of the f(0)(980) at (996 ± 7)-i(25(-6)(+10)) MeV, whereas their respective couplings to two pions are 3.59(-0.13)(+0.11) and 2.3 ± 0.2 GeV. PMID:21902384

  11. Linguistic models of F0 use, physiological models of F0 control, and the issue of "mean response time".

    PubMed

    Herman, R; Beckman, M; Honda, K

    1999-01-01

    This paper evaluates "mean response time" (MRT), a method used in previous studies to relate physiological evidence (recordings of electromyographic activity in the cricothyroid and sternohyoid) to acoustic evidence (fundamental frequency). Rather than averaging over tokens before correlating these signals, we calculated the best response time (RT) for each token, and evaluated the pattern of variability across utterances. Furthermore, rather than correlating over whole utterances, we correlated electromyographic activity (EMG) to fundamental frequency (F0) only over intervals defined in terms of linguistically significant events in the F0 trace, identified using a linguistically motivated model of English intonation. Steep changes in the F0 tended to have better correlation coefficients than shallow ones, which we relate to the physiological model by noting the complex of components contributing to both signal types. Also, the distribution of lead times was easier to interpret when the two tones delimiting the analysis domain had some tight temporal relationship specified by the intonational phonology. Finally, lead times tended to vary as a function of what preceded the target rise or fall. In short, averaging over signals before analysis obscures patterns of variation in the data which may lead to new insights and to new directions for research. PMID:10845243

  12. Chandra HETG Spectroscopy of the F0 Ib Supergiant Canopus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A.; Ayres, T. R.; Osten, R. A.; Harper, G. M.

    2000-10-01

    The F0 supergiant Canopus (α Car) was observed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory on 2000 July 21 for 96 ksec using the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) and the ACIS-S detector. Canopus is the nearest supergiant star at a distance of only 96 pc and undergoing He-burning, post-M-supergiant evolution. It has a hot (107 K) corona with log Lx ~ 29.8 erg s-1, even though it has only a thin convection zone. The HETG data show a coronal emission line spectrum with the strongest lines being from Fe XVII, Ne X, and O VIII. We shall present a detailed analysis of the HETG spectra and the first accurate description of this star's coronal temperature distribution. These coronal properties will be compared with those implied by earlier ASCA, EUVE, ROSAT, and Einstein observations. This work is supported by NASA LTSA grant NAG5-3226, NASA GSRP fellowship NGT5-50241, and the Chandra Guest Observer program.

  13. Search for the a0(980)-f0(980) mixing in weak decays of Ds/Bs mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Scalar mesons a00 (980) and f0 (980) can mix with each other through isospin violating effects, and the mixing intensity has been predicted at the percent level in various theoretical models. However the mixing has not been firmed established on the experimental side to date. In this work we explore the possibility to extract the a0-f0 mixing intensity using weak decays of heavy mesons: Ds → [π0 η ,π+π- ]e+ ν, Bs → [π0 η ,π+π- ]ℓ+ℓ- and the Bs → J / ψ [π0 η ,π+π- ] decays. Based on the large amount of data accumulated by various experimental facilities including BEPC-II, LHC, Super KEKB and the future colliders, we find that the a0-f0 mixing intensity might be determined to a high precision, which will lead to a better understanding of the nature of scalar mesons.

  14. Isoliquiritigenin-Induced Differentiation in Mouse Melanoma B16F0 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Bo; Yuan, Xuan; Yang, Fan; Liu, Jinglei; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Liangliang; Wang, Yanming; Wang, Zhenhua; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutical treatment is very limited for malignant melanoma, a highly lethal disease occurs globally. Natural products derived from traditional Chinese medicine licorice are attractive in quest new treatments due to their anti-tumor activities. A new dietary flavonoid isoliquiritigenin (ISL) were thus investigated to indentify its anti-melanoma activities on mouse melanoma B16F0 cells in present study. Using biochemical and free radical biological experiments in vitro, we identified the pro-differentiated profiles of ISL and evaluated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during B16F0 cell differentiation. The data showed a strong dose-response relationship between ISL exposure and the characteristics of B16F0 differentiation in terms of morphology changes and melanogenesis. The accumulated intercellular ROS during exposure are necessary to support ISL-induced differentiation, which was proven by additional redox modulators. It was confirmed further by the relative activities of enzymes and genes modulated melanogenesis in ISL-treatments with or without ROS modulators. The tumorigenicity of ISL-treated cells was limited significantly by using the colony formation assay in vitro and an animal model assay in vivo respectively. Our research demonstrated that isoliquiritigenin is a differentiation-inducing agent, and its mechanisms involve ROS accumulation facilitating melanogenesis. PMID:23304254

  15. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a science activity in which the student investigates methods of calibration of a simple conductivity meter via a hands-on inquiry technique. Conductivity is mathematically compared to salinity using a point slope formula and graphical techniques. Sample solutions of unknown salinity are provided so that the students can sharpen their…

  16. Development and Perceptual Evaluation of Amplitude-Based F0 Control in Electrolarynx Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saikachi, Yoko; Stevens, Kenneth N.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Current electrolarynx (EL) devices produce a mechanical speech quality that has been largely attributed to the lack of natural fundamental frequency (F0) variation. In order to improve the quality of EL speech, in the present study the authors aimed to develop and evaluate an automatic F0 control scheme, in which F0 was modulated based on…

  17. Investigation of lead(II) uptake by Bacillus thuringiensis 016.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Hui; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the lead(II) biosorption mechanism of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) 016 through batch and microscopic experiments. We found that the maximum lead(II) biosorption capacity of Bt 016 was 164.77 mg/g (dry weight). The pH value could affect the biosorption of lead(II) in a large extent. Fourier transform infrared analyses and selective passivation experiments suggested that the carboxyl, amide and phosphate functional groups of Bt 016 played an important role in lead(II) biosorption. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that noticeable lead(II) precipitates were accumulated on bacterial surfaces. Further transmission electron microscopy thin section analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as selected area electron diffraction indicated that lead(II) immobilized on the bacteria could be transformated into random-shaped crystalline lead-containing minerals eventually. This work provided a new insight into lead(II) uptake of Bt, highlighting the potential of Bt in the restoration of lead(II) contaminated repositories. PMID:26271773

  18. Investigation of lead(II) uptake by Bacillus thuringiensis 016.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Hui; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the lead(II) biosorption mechanism of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) 016 through batch and microscopic experiments. We found that the maximum lead(II) biosorption capacity of Bt 016 was 164.77 mg/g (dry weight). The pH value could affect the biosorption of lead(II) in a large extent. Fourier transform infrared analyses and selective passivation experiments suggested that the carboxyl, amide and phosphate functional groups of Bt 016 played an important role in lead(II) biosorption. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that noticeable lead(II) precipitates were accumulated on bacterial surfaces. Further transmission electron microscopy thin section analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as selected area electron diffraction indicated that lead(II) immobilized on the bacteria could be transformated into random-shaped crystalline lead-containing minerals eventually. This work provided a new insight into lead(II) uptake of Bt, highlighting the potential of Bt in the restoration of lead(II) contaminated repositories.

  19. Protein Kinase C-α Interaction with F0F1-ATPase Promotes F0F1-ATPase Activity and Reduces Energy Deficits in Injured Renal Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Grażyna; Bakajsova, Diana

    2015-01-01

    We showed previously that active PKC-α maintains F0F1-ATPase activity, whereas inactive PKC-α mutant (dnPKC-α) blocks recovery of F0F1-ATPase activity after injury in renal proximal tubules (RPTC). This study tested whether mitochondrial PKC-α interacts with and phosphorylates F0F1-ATPase. Wild-type PKC-α (wtPKC-α) and dnPKC-α were overexpressed in RPTC to increase their mitochondrial levels, and RPTC were exposed to oxidant or hypoxia. Mitochondrial levels of the γ-subunit, but not the α- and β-subunits, were decreased by injury, an event associated with 54% inhibition of F0F1-ATPase activity. Overexpressing wtPKC-α blocked decreases in γ-subunit levels, maintained F0F1-ATPase activity, and improved ATP levels after injury. Deletion of PKC-α decreased levels of α-, β-, and γ-subunits, decreased F0F1-ATPase activity, and hindered the recovery of ATP content after RPTC injury. Mitochondrial PKC-α co-immunoprecipitated with α-, β-, and γ-subunits of F0F1-ATPase. The association of PKC-α with these subunits decreased in injured RPTC overexpressing dnPKC-α. Immunocapture of F0F1-ATPase and immunoblotting with phospho(Ser) PKC substrate antibody identified phosphorylation of serine in the PKC consensus site on the α- or β- and γ-subunits. Overexpressing wtPKC-α increased phosphorylation and protein levels, whereas deletion of PKC-α decreased protein levels of α-, β-, and γ-subunits of F0F1-ATPase in RPTC. Phosphoproteomics revealed phosphorylation of Ser146 on the γ subunit in response to wtPKC-α overexpression. We concluded that active PKC-α 1) prevents injury-induced decreases in levels of γ subunit of F0F1-ATPase, 2) interacts with α-, β-, and γ-subunits leading to increases in their phosphorylation, and 3) promotes the recovery of F0F1-ATPase activity and ATP content after injury in RPTC. PMID:25627689

  20. Deriving fluorometer-specific values of relative PSI fluorescence intensity from quenching of F(0) fluorescence in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Pfündel, Erhard E; Klughammer, Christof; Meister, Armin; Cerovic, Zoran G

    2013-03-01

    The effect of stepwise increments of red light intensities on pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence from leaves of A. thaliana and Z. mays was investigated. Minimum and maximum fluorescence were measured before illumination (F(0) and F(M), respectively) and at the end of each light step (F'(0) and F'(M), respectively). Calculated F'(0) values derived from F(0), F(M) and F'(M) fluorescence according to Oxborough and Baker (1997) were lower than the corresponding measured F'(0) values. Based on the concept that calculated F'(0) values are under-estimated because the underlying theory ignores PSI fluorescence, a method was devised to gain relative PSI fluorescence intensities from differences between calculated and measured F'(0). This method yields fluorometer-specific PSI data as its input data (F(0), F(M), F'(0) and F'(M)) depend solely on the spectral properties of the fluorometer used. Under the present conditions, the PSI contribution to F (0) fluorescence was 0.24 in A. thaliana and it was independent on the light acclimation status; the corresponding value was 0.50 in Z. mays. Correction for PSI fluorescence affected Z. mays most: the linear relationship between PSI and PSII photochemical yields was clearly shifted toward the one-to-one proportionality line and maximum electron transport was increased by 50 %. Further, correction for PSI fluorescence increased the PSII reaction center-specific parameter, 1/F(0) - 1/F(M), up to 50 % in A. thaliana and up to 400 % in Z. mays.

  1. Development and Perceptual Evaluation of Amplitude-Based F0 Control in Electrolarynx Speech

    PubMed Central

    Saikachi, Yoko; Stevens, Kenneth N.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Current electrolarynx (EL) devices produce a mechanical speech quality that has been largely attributed to the lack of natural fundamental frequency (F0) variation. In order to improve the quality of EL speech, in the present study the authors aimed to develop and evaluate an automatic F0 control scheme, in which F0 was modulated based on variations in the root-mean-square (RMS) amplitude of the EL speech signal. Method Recordings of declarative sentences produced by 2 male participants before and after total laryngectomy were used to develop procedures for calculating F0 contours for EL speech. Specifically, the positive linear relationship between F0 and RMS amplitude observed in pre-laryngectomy speech was used as the basis for generating an F0 contour based on the amplitude variation of EL speech. An analysis-by-synthesis approach was used to modify the F0 contour, and a perceptual experiment was conducted to examine its impact on the quality of the EL speech. Results The results of perceptual experiments showed that modulating the F0 of EL speech using a linear relationship between amplitude and frequency made it significantly more natural sounding than EL speech with constant F0. Conclusions The current study provides preliminary support for amplitude-based control of F0 in EL speech. PMID:19564438

  2. Ultraviolet Emission Lines of Si ii in Quasars: Investigating the "Si ii Disaster"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Keenan, Francis P.; Ferland, Gary J.; Ramsbottom, Catherine A.; Aggarwal, Kanti M.

    2016-07-01

    The observed line intensity ratios of the Si ii λ1263 and λ1307 multiplets to that of Si ii λ1814 in the broad-line region (BLR) of quasars are both an order of magnitude larger than the theoretical values. This was first pointed out by Baldwin et al., who termed it the “Si ii disaster,” and it has remained unresolved. We investigate the problem in the light of newly published atomic data for Si ii. Specifically, we perform BLR calculations using several different atomic data sets within the CLOUDY modeling code under optically thick quasar cloud conditions. In addition, we test for selective pumping by the source photons or intrinsic galactic reddening as possible causes for the discrepancy, and we also consider blending with other species. However, we find that none of the options investigated resolve the Si ii disaster, with the potential exception of microturbulent velocity broadening and line blending. We find that a larger microturbulent velocity (˜ 500 {km} {{{s}}}-1) may solve the Si ii disaster through continuum pumping and other effects. The CLOUDY models indicate strong blending of the Si ii λ1307 multiplet with emission lines of O i, although the predicted degree of blending is incompatible with the observed λ1263/λ1307 intensity ratios. Clearly, more work is required on the quasar modeling of not just the Si ii lines but also nearby transitions (in particular those of O i) to fully investigate whether blending may be responsible for the Si ii disaster.

  3. Accent detection is a slippery slope: Direction and rate of F0 change drives listeners’ comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Angela M.; Watson, Duane G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study tests whether listeners use F0, duration, or some combination of the two to identify the presence of an accented word in a short discourse. Participants’ eye movements to previously mentioned and new objects were monitored as participants listened to instructions to move objects in a display. The name of the target object on critical trials was resynthesized from naturally-produced utterances so that it had either high or low F0 and either long or short duration. Fixations to the new object were highest when there was a steep rise in F0. Fixations to the previously mentioned object were highest when there was a steep drop in F0. These results suggest that listeners use F0 slope to make decisions about the presence of an accent, and that F0 and duration by themselves do not solely determine accent interpretation. PMID:22096265

  4. Pion scalar form factor with correct mass and width of scalar mesons f0(500 ) and f0(980 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubnicka, Stanislav; Dubnickova, Anna Zuzana; Kamiński, Robert; Liptaj, Andrej

    2016-09-01

    Construction of the pion scalar isoscalar form factor Γπ(t ) in the elastic region, with an emphasis on the values of the S-wave isoscalar π π scattering length a00 and the quadratic pion scalar radius ⟨r2⟩sπ to be in conformity with predictions of the chiral perturbation theory, is presented. It is based on a precise S-wave isoscalar π π scattering phase shift generated by dispersive analysis of experimental data with and imposed crossing symmetry condition. The final result for values of the f0(500 ) scalar meson mass and width is mσ=(487 ±31 ) MeV ; Γσ=(542 ±60 ) MeV and for values of the f0(980 ) scalar meson mass and width is mf (980 )=(988 ±78 ) MeV ; Γf (980 )=(97 ±29 ) MeV . The f0(500 ) scalar meson parameters are compatible with the results from dispersive analyses of the BERN and MADRID/CRACOW groups to be considered now as the most reliable values of the f0(500 ) scalar meson parameters, though in presented analysis another, unusual way has been applied. The f0(980 ) meson parameters agree well with values given by the Particle Data Group.

  5. Use of B→J/ψ f0 decays to discern the qq or tetraquark nature of scalar mesons.

    PubMed

    Stone, Sheldon; Zhang, Liming

    2013-08-01

    We consider the relative decay rates of B(0) and Bs(0) mesons into a J/ψ plus a light scalar meson, either the f0(500) (σ) or the f0(980). We show that it is possible to distinguish between the quark content of the scalars being quark-antiquark or tetraquark by measuring specific ratios of decay rates. Using current data we determine the ratio of form factors in Bs(0)→J/ψf0(980) with respect to B(0)→J/ψf0(500) decays to be 0.99(-0.04)(+0.13) at a four-momentum transfer squared equal to the mass of the J/ψ meson squared. In the case where these light mesons are considered to be quark-antiquark states, we give a determination of the mixing angle between strange and light quark states of less than 29° at 90% confidence level. We also discuss the use of a similar ratio to investigate the structure of other isospin singlet states.

  6. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-0 - Outline of regulation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Outline of regulation provisions. 1.904(f)-0 Section 1.904(f)-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... which gain would not otherwise be recognized. (i) Recognition of gain to the extent of the...

  7. Perception of Mandarin Lexical Tones when F0 Information Is Neutralized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Siyun; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2004-01-01

    In tone languages, the identity of a word depends on its tone pattern as well as its phonetic structure. The primary cue to tone identity is the fundamental frequency (F0) contour. Two experiments explore how listeners perceive Mandarin monosyllables in which all or part of the F0 information has been neutralized. In Experiment 1, supposedly…

  8. Comparison of Tevatron C0 and F0 Lambertson beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    James L Crisp and Brian Fellenz

    2003-04-11

    Both the longitudinal and transverse beam impedance measurements for the Tevatron C0 and F0 lambertsons are presented. The C0 lambertsons were designed for circulating beam to travel through the 1 inch high by 6 inch wide field region. In the F0 lambertsons, circulating beam passes through the 2.5 inch high by 4 in ch wide field free region. The more recently designed F0 lambertsons have significantly less impedance than the older C0 lambertsons. Transverse impedance scales as one over the diameter of the aperture cubed. The three C0 style lambertsons were recently removed from the Tevatron. Four of the F0 lambertsons remain. Nine of the F0 style lambertsons are in the Main Injector and three more are required for Numi.

  9. Efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vad, Nikhil M; Kudugunti, Shashi K; Wang, Hezhen; Bhat, G Jayarama; Moridani, Majid Y

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show that aspirin can act as a chemopreventive agent and decrease the incidences of various cancers including melanoma. In this work, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as an antimelanoma agent in B16-F0 cells and skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor mouse model. Our findings indicate that the IC50 (48 h) for ASA in B16-F0 melanoma cells was 100 μM and that ASA caused a dose- and time-dependent GSH depletion and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c. with 1 × 10(6) B16-F0 melanoma cells. ASA (80, 100, and 150 mg/kg) was initiated on day 1 or day 7, or day 9 after cell inoculation and continued daily for 13, 7, and 5 days, respectively. Animals were weighed daily and sacrificed on day 13. The tumors were excised and weighed. The animals receiving 13 days of ASA therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 1 ± 12%, 19 ± 22%, and 50 ± 29%, respectively. Animals receiving 7 days of therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 12 ± 14%, 27 ± 14%, and 40 ± 14%, respectively. No significant tumor growth inhibition was observed with 5 days of therapy. ASA at 100 and 150 mg/kg caused significant tumor growth inhibition in C57BL/6 mice when administered for 13 and 7 days, respectively. The results obtained in this study are consistent with the recent epidemiologically based report that aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk in humans.

  10. Neural-network simulation of tonal categorization based on F0 velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Bruno; Shi, Rushen; Xu, Yi; Proulx, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Perception studies have shown that by the age of six months, infants show particular response patterns to tones in their native language. The present study focuses on how infants might develop lexical tones in Man- darin. F0 is generally considered the main cue in tone perception. However, F0 patterns in connected speech display extensive contextual variability. Since speech input to infants consists mainly of multi-word utterances, tone learning must involve processes that can effectively resolve variability. In this study we explore the Target Approximation model (Xu and Wang, 2001) which characterizes surface F0 as asymptotic movements toward underlying pitch targets defined as simple linear functions. The model predicts that it is possible to infer underlying pitch targets from the manners of F0 movements. Using production data of three of the speakers from Xu (1997), we trained a self-organizing neural network with both F0 profiles and F0 velocity profiles as input. In the testing phase, velocity profiles yielded far superior categorization than F0 profiles. The results confirm that velocity profiles can effectively abstract away from surface variability and directly reflect underlying articulatory goals. The finding thus points to one way through which infants can successfully derive at phonetic categories from adult speech.

  11. Linguistic and human effects on F(0) in a tonal dialect of Qiang.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jonathan; Chu, Man-ni; Aston, John A D; Su, Chao-yu

    2010-01-01

    While both human and linguistic factors affect fundamental frequency (F(0)) in spoken language, capturing the influence of multiple effects and their interactions presents special challenges, especially when there are strict time constraints on the data-gathering process. A lack of speaker literacy can further impede the collection of identical utterances across multiple speakers. This study employs linear mixed effects analysis to elucidate how various effects and their interactions contribute to the production of F(0) in Luobuzhai, a tonal dialect of the Qiang language. In addition to the effects of speaker sex and tone, F(0) in this language is affected by previous and following tones, sentence type, vowel, position in the phrase, and by numerous combinations of these effects. Under less than ideal data collecting conditions, a single experiment was able to yield an extensive model of F(0) output in an endangered language of the Himalayas.

  12. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s → J/ψ f0(980) at CDF

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/ψ f0(980) with J/ψ → µ+µ- and f0(980) → π+π-. Using pp̄ collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of τ(B0s → J/ψ f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψ f0(980)more » and f0(980) → π+π- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψφ and φ→K+K- to be Rf0/ψ = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the rotary motor F(0) under external electric fields across the membrane.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang-Shan; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2010-03-17

    The membrane-bound component F(0), which is a major component of the F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase, works as a rotary motor and plays a central role in driving the F(1) component to transform chemiosmotic energy into ATP synthesis. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations of b(2)-free F(0) in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer for tens of nanoseconds with two different protonation states of the cAsp-61 residue at the interface of the a-c complex in the absence of electric fields and under electric fields of +/-0.03 V/nm across the membrane. To our surprise, we observed that the upper half of the N-terminal helix of the c(1) subunit rotated about its axis clockwise by 30 degrees . An energetic analysis revealed that the electrostatic repulsion between this N-terminal helix and subunit c(12) was a major contributor to the observed rotation. A correlation map analysis indicated that the correlated motions of residues in the interface of the a-c complex were significantly reduced by external electric fields. The deuterium order parameter (S(CD)) profile calculated by averaging all the lipids in the F(0)-bound bilayer was not very different from that of the pure bilayer system, in agreement with recent (2)H solid-state NMR experiments. However, by delineating the lipid properties according to their vicinity to F(0), we found that the S(CD) profiles of different lipid shells were prominently different. Lipids close to F(0) formed a more ordered structure. Similarly, the lateral diffusion of lipids on the membrane surface also followed a shell-dependent behavior. The lipids in the proximity of F(0) exhibited very significantly reduced diffusional motion. The numerical value of S(CD) was anticorrelated with that of the diffusion coefficient, i.e., the more ordered lipid structures led to slower lipid diffusion. Our findings will help elucidate the dynamics of F(0) depending on the protonation state and electric field, and may also shed some light on the

  14. Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum Powder: Part II. Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2009-12-01

    The optimal processing parameters that are required to atomize amorphous Al were established on the basis of numerical simulations in part I of this study. In this part II, the characterization of cooling rate experienced by gas-atomized, Al-based amorphous powders was studied via experiments. An experimental investigation was implemented to validate the numerical predictions reported in part I of this study. The cooling rate experienced by the powders, for example, was experimentally determined on the basis of dendrite arm spacing correlations, and the results were compared with the numerical predictions. The experimental studies were completed using commercial Al 2024 as a baseline material and Al90Gd7Ni2Fe1 metallic glass (MG). The results showed that the cooling rate of droplets increases with decreasing particle size, with an increasing proportion of helium in the atomization gas and with increasing melt superheat. The experimental results reported in this article suggest good agreement between experiments and numerical simulations.

  15. Temperate zone sporadic-E maps /f/0/E/s/ greater than 7 MHz/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. K.

    1978-01-01

    Three maps are presented of f(0) sporadic-E greater than 7 MHz for temperate zones. During map preparation it was assumed that: (1) the geographical area would be between plus and minus 60 deg geomagnetic latitude, excluding the equatorial zone, (2) the maps would be for f(0) sporadic-E greater than 7 MHz, (3) sunspot cycle variation would be ignored, (4) one map would represent the peak sporadic-E period with a discontinuity at the geographic equator, (5) one map would represent non-peak periods with a discontinuity at the geographic equator, (6) one map would represent all twelve months with no equatorial discontinuity, and (7) previously determined coefficients for median and upper decile f(0) sporadic-E would be extrapolated to 7 MHz.

  16. The Framework for 0-D Atmospheric Modeling (F0AM) v3.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Glenn M.; Marvin, Margaret R.; Roberts, Sandra J.; Travis, Katherine R.; Liao, Jin

    2016-09-01

    The Framework for 0-D Atmospheric Modeling (F0AM) is a flexible and user-friendly MATLAB-based platform for simulation of atmospheric chemistry systems. The F0AM interface incorporates front-end configuration of observational constraints and model setups, making it readily adaptable to simulation of photochemical chambers, Lagrangian plumes, and steady-state or time-evolving solar cycles. Six different chemical mechanisms and three options for calculation of photolysis frequencies are currently available. Example simulations are presented to illustrate model capabilities and, more generally, highlight some of the advantages and challenges of 0-D box modeling.

  17. First measurement of direct $f_0(980)$ photoproduction on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglieri, Marco; De Vita, Raffaella; Szczepaniak, Adam

    2009-03-01

    We report on the results of the first measurement of exclusive $f_0(980)$ meson photoproduction on protons for $E_\\gamma=3.0 - 3.8$ GeV and $-t = 0.4-1.0$ GeV$^2$. Data were collected with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The resonance was detected via its decay in the $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ channel by performing a partial wave analysis of the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. Clear evidence of the $f_0(980)$ meson was found in the interference between $P$ and $S$ waves at $M_{\\pi^+ \\pi^-}\\sim 1$ GeV. The $S$-wave differential cross section integrated in the mass range of the $f_0(980)$ was found to be a factor of 50 smaller than the cross section for the $\\rho$ meson. This is the first time the $f_0(980)$ meson has been measured in a photoproduction experiment.

  18. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-0T - Outline of regulation provisions (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Income from Sources Without the United States § 1... entries for § 1.904(f)-1(b) through (d)(3) in § 1.904(f)-0. (d)(4) Adjustments for capital gains...

  19. Measurement of direct f0(980) photoproduction on the proton.

    PubMed

    Battaglieri, M; De Vita, R; Szczepaniak, A P; Adhikari, K P; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M J; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bibrzycki, L; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Casey, L; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Clinton, E; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Crede, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Deur, A; Dhamija, S; Dharmawardane, K V; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fersch, R; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gan, L; Garçon, M; Gasparian, A; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Glamazdin, O; Goett, J; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hakobyan, R S; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kageya, T; Kalantarians, N; Keller, D; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Konczykowski, P; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Lesniak, L; Li, Ji; Livingston, K; Lowry, M; Lu, H Y; Maccormick, M; Malace, S; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McCracken, M E; McKinnon, B; Mecking, B A; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mineeva, T; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nakagawa, I; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Paris, M; Paterson, C; Pereira, S Anefalos; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatié, F; Saini, M S; Salamanca, J; Salgado, C; Sandorfi, A; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Starostin, A; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Stepanyan, S S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Stopani, K A; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Teymurazyan, A; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yurov, M; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2009-03-13

    We report on the results of the first measurement of exclusive f_{0}(980) meson photoproduction on protons for E_{gamma}=3.0-3.8 GeV and -t=0.4-1.0 GeV2. Data were collected with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The resonance was detected via its decay in the pi;{+}pi;{-} channel by performing a partial wave analysis of the reaction gammap-->ppi;{+}pi;{-}. Clear evidence of the f_{0}(980) meson was found in the interference between P and S waves at M_{pi;{+}pi;{-}} approximately 1 GeV. The S-wave differential cross section integrated in the mass range of the f_{0}(980) was found to be a factor of about 50 smaller than the cross section for the rho meson. This is the first time the f_{0}(980) meson has been measured in a photoproduction experiment. PMID:19392104

  20. Experimental investigations of He II flows at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Sciver, Steve W.

    1991-01-01

    Fluid dynamics studies of He II at high Reynolds number (Re(d) greater than 10 exp 6) reveal characteristics which are best interpreted in terms of classical scaling relationships. In particular, the smooth tube friction factor is seen to correlate with the Von Karman-Nikuradse formulation. Also, the performance of a centrifugal pump is unchanged whether being used with He I or He II. These effects are expected to result provided the He II possesses a viscous sublayer and that the drag is determined by laminar flow within this layer. On the other hand, heat transfer in He II is substantially different from that of He I because of the unique internal convection mechanism present in this quantum fluid. These experiments are performed in the University of Wisconsin liquid helium flow facility which has unique capabilities of He II temperature, pressure and flow.

  1. Logarithmic temporal axis manipulation and its application for measuring auditory contributions in F0 control using a transformed auditory feedback procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanaga, Ryuichiro; Kawahara, Hideki

    2003-10-01

    A new parameter extraction procedure based on logarithmic transformation of the temporal axis was applied to investigate auditory effects on voice F0 control to overcome artifacts due to natural fluctuations and nonlinearities in speech production mechanisms. The proposed method may add complementary information to recent findings reported by using frequency shift feedback method [Burnett and Larson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112 (2002)], in terms of dynamic aspects of F0 control. In a series of experiments, dependencies of system parameters in F0 control on subjects, F0 and style (musical expressions and speaking) were tested using six participants. They were three male and three female students specialized in musical education. They were asked to sustain a Japanese vowel /a/ for about 10 s repeatedly up to 2 min in total while hearing F0 modulated feedback speech, that was modulated using an M-sequence. The results replicated qualitatively the previous finding [Kawahara and Williams, Vocal Fold Physiology, (1995)] and provided more accurate estimates. Relations with designing an artificial singer also will be discussed. [Work partly supported by the grant in aids in scientific research (B) 14380165 and Wakayama University.

  2. Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B-->rhoK* and B-->f0(980)K* decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-11-17

    We report searches for B-meson decays to the charmless final states rhoK* and f0(980)K* with a sample of 232x10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. We measure in units of 10(-6) the following branching fractions, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic, or upper limits are given at the 90% confidence level: B(B+-->rho0K*+)<6.1, B(B+-->rho+K*0)=9.6+/-1.7+/-1.5, B(B0-->rho-K*+)<12.0, B(B0-->rho0K*0)=5.6+/-0.9+/-1.3, B(B+-->f0(980)K*+)=5.2+/-1.2+/-0.5, and B(B0-->f0(980)K*0)<4.3. For the significant modes, we also measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization and the charge asymmetry: fL(B+-->rho+K*0)=0.52+/-0.10+/-0.04, fL(B0-->rho0K*0)=0.57+/-0.09+/-0.08, ACP(B+-->rho+K*0)=-0.01+/-0.16+/-0.02, ACP(B0-->rho0K*0)=0.09+/-0.19+/-0.02, and ACP(B+-->f0(980)K*+)=-0.34+/-0.21+/-0.03. PMID:17155673

  3. Evolution of Superconductivity in BiS2-Based Superconductor LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Takafumi; Kajitani, Joe; Omachi, Atsushi; Miura, Osuke; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu

    2015-02-01

    We have systematically investigated the crystal structure, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical resistivity of the BiS2-based superconductor LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2 (x = 0-0.7). With expanding lattice volume by Se substitution, bulk superconductivity was induced for x ≥ 0.2, and the highest Tc of 3.8 K was observed in x = 0.5 (LaO0.5F0.5BiSSe). Metallic conductivity was observed for x ≥ 0.3 in the resistivity measurement, whereas semiconducting-like behavior was observed for x ≤ 0.2. The induction of bulk superconductivity by the partial substitution of S by Se in the LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 superconductor should be positively linked to the enhancement of metallic conductivity.

  4. Investigation of copper(II) tetrafluoroborate catalysed epoxide opening

    PubMed Central

    Capes, Amy S.; Crossman, Arthur T.; Webster, Lauren A.; Ferguson, Michael A.J.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    We report the extension of the copper(II) tetrafluoroborate catalysed opening of epoxides with alcohols to include a wider variety of alcohols, a range of solvents and a method to purify the products from the reaction. PMID:22505782

  5. Non-ordinary nature of the f_0(500) resonance from its Regge trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Nebreda, J.; Londergan, J. Timothy; Pelaez, J. R.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2014-07-01

    We report our results on how to obtain the Regge trajectory of a resonance from its pole in a scattering process by imposing analytic constraints in the complex angular momentum plane. The method, suited for resonances that dominate an elastic scattering amplitude, has been applied to the {\\rho}(770) and the f_0(500) resonances. Whereas for the former we obtain a linear Regge trajectory, characteristic of ordinary quark-antiquark states, for the latter we find a non-linear trajectory with a much smaller slope at the resonance mass. Moreover, we show that if a linear trajectory with a slope of typical size is imposed for the f_0(500), the corresponding amplitude is at odds with the data. This provides a strong indication of the non-ordinary nature of the sigma meson.

  6. Simultaneous F 0-F 1 modifications of Arabic for the improvement of natural-sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ykhlef, F.; Bensebti, M.

    2013-03-01

    Pitch (F 0) modification is one of the most important problems in the area of speech synthesis. Several techniques have been developed in the literature to achieve this goal. The main restrictions of these techniques are in the modification range and the synthesised speech quality, intelligibility and naturalness. The control of formants in a spoken language can significantly improve the naturalness of the synthesised speech. This improvement is mainly dependent on the control of the first formant (F 1). Inspired by this observation, this article proposes a new approach that modifies both F 0 and F 1 of Arabic voiced sounds in order to improve the naturalness of the pitch shifted speech. The developed strategy takes a parallel processing approach, in which the analysis segments are decomposed into sub-bands in the wavelet domain, modified in the desired sub-band by using a resampling technique and reconstructed without affecting the remained sub-bands. Pitch marking and voicing detection are performed in the frequency decomposition step based on the comparison of the multi-level approximation and detail signals. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by listening tests and compared to the pitch synchronous overlap and add (PSOLA) technique in the third approximation level. Experimental results have shown that the manipulation in the wavelet domain of F 0 in conjunction with F 1 guarantees natural-sounding of the synthesised speech compared to the classical pitch modification technique. This improvement was appropriate for high pitch modifications.

  7. Pion scalar form factor and another confirmation of the existence of the f0(500 ) meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubnička, S.; Dubničková, A. Z.; Liptaj, A.

    2014-12-01

    An explicit form of the pion scalar form factor Γπ(t ) is constructed by using its phase representation and a correct description of the S-wave isoscalar π π phase shift δ00(t ) data by the parametrization of tan δ00(t ) in the absolute valued pion c.m. three-momentum q =[(t -4 mπ2)/4 ]1 /2 . This parametrization has been found starting from fully general considerations. Then a calculation of the corresponding integral in the framework of the theory of residua provides Γπ(t ) in the form of a rational function with one zero and four poles in the q variable. Investigations of the latter poles demonstrate that two of them, to be conjugate according to the imaginary axis in the q plane, clearly correspond to complex conjugate f0(500 ) meson poles on the second Riemann sheet in a momentum transfer squared t variable. Another pair of poles, also conjugate according to the imaginary axis in the q plane, can be identified with two complex conjugate poles on the second Riemann sheet in the t variable, corresponding to the f0(980 ) meson.

  8. Measurements of branching fraction, polarization, and charge asymmetry of B(+/-)-->rho(+/-)rho(0) and a search for B(+/-)-->rho(+/-)f(0)(980).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Sanchez, P Del Amo; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Lodovico, F Di; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-31

    We measure the branching fraction (B), polarization (f(L)), and CP asymmetry (A(CP)) of B(+/-)-->rho(+/-)rho(0) decays and search for the decay B(+/-)-->rho(+/-)f(0)(980) based on a data sample of 231.8 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. In B(+/-)-->rho(+/-)rho(0) decays we measure B=(16.8+/-2.2+/-2.3) x 10(-), f(L)=0.905+/-0.042(-0.027)(+0.023), and A(CP)=-0.12+/-0.13+/-0.10, and find an upper limit on the branching fraction of B(+/-)-->rho(+/-)f(0)(980)(-->pi(+)pi(-)) decays of 1.9 x 10(-6) at 90% confidence level. PMID:17280416

  9. Study of the D+s-->π- π+π+ Decay and Measurement of f0 Masses and Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-01-01

    From a sample of 848+/-44 D+s-->π- π+π+ decays, we find γ\\(D+s-->π- π+π+\\)/γ\\(D+s-->φπ+\\) = 0.245+/-0.028+0.019-0.012. Using a Dalitz plot analysis of this three body decay, we find significant contributions from the channels ρ0\\(770\\)π+, ρ0\\(1450\\)π+, f0\\(980\\)π+, f2\\(1270\\)π+, and f0\\(1370\\)π+. We also present the values obtained for masses and widths of the resonances f0\\(980\\) and f0\\(1370\\).

  10. Manipulations in the Peripheral Stalk of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae F1F0-ATP Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Amanda K.; Bostwick, Caleb J.; Cain, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae F1F0-ATP synthase peripheral stalk is composed of the OSCP, h, d, and b subunits. The b subunit has two membrane-spanning domains and a large hydrophilic domain that extends along one side of the enzyme to the top of F1. In contrast, the Escherichia coli peripheral stalk has two identical b subunits, and subunits with substantially altered lengths can be incorporated into a functional F1F0-ATP synthase. The differences in subunit structure between the eukaryotic and prokaryotic peripheral stalks raised a question about whether the two stalks have similar physical and functional properties. In the present work, the length of the S. cerevisiae b subunit has been manipulated to determine whether the F1F0-ATP synthase exhibited the same tolerances as in the bacterial enzyme. Plasmid shuffling was used for ectopic expression of altered b subunits in a strain carrying a chromosomal disruption of the ATP4 gene. Wild type growth phenotypes were observed for insertions of up to 11 and a deletion of four amino acids on a nonfermentable carbon source. In mitochondria-enriched fractions, abundant ATP hydrolysis activity was seen for the insertion mutants. ATPase activity was largely oligomycin-insensitive in these mitochondrial fractions. In addition, very poor complementation was seen in a mutant with an insertion of 14 amino acids. Lengthier deletions yielded a defective enzyme. The results suggest that although the eukaryotic peripheral stalk is near its minimum length, the b subunit can be extended a considerable distance. PMID:21257750

  11. Manipulations in the peripheral stalk of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae F1F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Welch, Amanda K; Bostwick, Caleb J; Cain, Brian D

    2011-03-25

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase peripheral stalk is composed of the OSCP, h, d, and b subunits. The b subunit has two membrane-spanning domains and a large hydrophilic domain that extends along one side of the enzyme to the top of F(1). In contrast, the Escherichia coli peripheral stalk has two identical b subunits, and subunits with substantially altered lengths can be incorporated into a functional F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase. The differences in subunit structure between the eukaryotic and prokaryotic peripheral stalks raised a question about whether the two stalks have similar physical and functional properties. In the present work, the length of the S. cerevisiae b subunit has been manipulated to determine whether the F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase exhibited the same tolerances as in the bacterial enzyme. Plasmid shuffling was used for ectopic expression of altered b subunits in a strain carrying a chromosomal disruption of the ATP4 gene. Wild type growth phenotypes were observed for insertions of up to 11 and a deletion of four amino acids on a nonfermentable carbon source. In mitochondria-enriched fractions, abundant ATP hydrolysis activity was seen for the insertion mutants. ATPase activity was largely oligomycin-insensitive in these mitochondrial fractions. In addition, very poor complementation was seen in a mutant with an insertion of 14 amino acids. Lengthier deletions yielded a defective enzyme. The results suggest that although the eukaryotic peripheral stalk is near its minimum length, the b subunit can be extended a considerable distance. PMID:21257750

  12. Regge trajectory of the f0(500) resonance from a dispersive connection to its pole

    SciTech Connect

    Nebreda, J.; Londergan, J. Timothy; Pelaez, Jose R.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2014-11-01

    We report here our results on how to obtain the Regge trajectory of a resonance from its pole in a scattering process by imposing analytic constraints in the complex angular momentum plane. The method, suited for resonances that dominate an elastic scattering amplitude, has been applied to the ρ (770) and the f0(500) resonances. Whereas for the former we obtain a linear Regge trajectory, characteristic of ordinary quark-antiquark states, for the latter we find a non-linear trajectory with a much smaller slope at the resonance mass. This provides a strong indication of the non-ordinary nature of the sigma meson.

  13. Investigation of Detergent Effects on the Solution Structure of Spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Mateus B; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2010-01-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-{beta}-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  14. Investigation of detergent effects on the solution structure of spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Mateus B.; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T.; O'Neill, Hugh

    2010-11-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-β-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  15. Comparison of voice F0 responses to pitch-shift onset and offset conditions (L)

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles R.; Burnett, Theresa A.; Bauer, Jay J.; Kiran, Swathi; Hain, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    In order to maintain a steady voice fundamental frequency (F0), it is assumed that people compare their auditory feedback pitch with an internal (memory) or external (acoustic) referent. In the present study we examined whether the internal referent is fixed or variable by comparing voice F0 responses to incorrect auditory feedback in two timing conditions. In one condition, the incorrect pitch was introduced during vocalization (ON condition). In the second, the incorrect auditory feedback pitch was presented before vocal onset and then removed during vocalization (OFF condition). These conditions were examined with pitch-shift stimuli of ±25, 100, and 200 cents. There were no differences in response latency or magnitude between the two timing conditions, indicating that for a sustained-pitch vocalization task, the internal referent is not fixed. Several alternative types of referencing are discussed, which include use of a pitch relative to that which existed at the onset of vocalization (a sample and hold strategy) and pitch velocity referencing. PMID:11785786

  16. Acoustic and perceptual effects of overall F0 range in a lexical pitch accent distinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Travis

    2002-05-01

    A speaker's overall fundamental frequency range is generally considered a variable, nonlinguistic element of intonation. This study examined the precision with which overall F0 is predictable based on previous intonational context and the extent to which it may be perceptually significant. Speakers of Tokyo Japanese produced pairs of sentences differing lexically only in the presence or absence of a single pitch accent as responses to visual and prerecorded speech cues presented in an interactive manner. F0 placement of high tones (previously observed to be relatively variable in pitch contours) was found to be consistent across speakers and uniformly dependent on the intonation of the different sentences used as cues. In a subsequent perception experiment, continuous manipulation of these same sentences between typical accented and typical non-accent-containing versions were presented to Japanese listeners for lexical identification. Results showed that listeners' perception was not significantly altered in compensation for artificial manipulation of preceding intonation. Implications are discussed within an autosegmental analysis of tone. The current results are consistent with the notion that pitch range (i.e., specific vertical locations of tonal peaks) does not simply vary gradiently across speakers and situations but constitutes a predictable part of the phonetic specification of tones.

  17. Developmental Changes in the Fundamental Frequency (f0) of Infants' Cries: A Study of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Gianluca; Venuti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Episodes of crying with higher fundamental frequency (f0) are perceived as more aversive and distressful than lower frequency cries. Besides, previous studies have speculated that in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) higher f0 may account for evoking mental states of uneasiness in the caregiver. Moreover no evidence on developmental…

  18. Photophysical investigation of palladium(II) ortho-metalated complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, C.A.; Watts, R.J. )

    1989-01-25

    Syntheses and structural characterizations of four complexes of Pd(II) with ortho-metalated 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy{sup minus}) are reported. These complexes include a parent dimer, (Pd(ppy)Cl){sub 2}, and three derivative monomers, (Pd(ppy)(bpy))Cl, (Pd(ppy)(en))Cl, and (Pd(ppy)(CO)Cl), whereby = 2,2'-bipyridine and en = ethylenediamine. Photophysical characterizations of these species indicate low-energy absorption bands ({approximately}360 nm) and emission bands at 77 K ({approximately}460 nm) that are assigned to transitions located on the ppy{sup {minus}} ligand. Some evidence for low-energy charge-transfer states is found in trends in luminescence lifetimes. 2 tabs., 5 figs., 21 refs.

  19. Nickel hydroxide electrode. 3: Thermogravimetric investigations of nickel (II) hydroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennstedt, W.; Loeser, W.

    1982-01-01

    Water contained in Ni hydroxide influences its electrochemical reactivity. The water content of alpha and beta Ni hydroxides is different with respect to the amount and bond strength. Thermogravimetric experiments show that the water of the beta Ni hydroxides exceeding the stoichiometric composition is completely removed at 160 deg. The water contained in the interlayers of the beta hydroxide, however, is removed only at higher temperatures, together with the water originating from the decomposition of the hydroxide. These differences are attributed to the formation of II bonds within the interlayers and between interlayers and adjacent main layers. An attempt is made to explain the relations between water content and the oxidizability of the Ni hydroxides.

  20. Laser spectroscopic investigation of isotope shifts in Nd II lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koczorowski, W.; Stachowska, E.; Furmann, B.; Stefańska, D.; Jarosz, A.; Krzykowski, A.; Walaszyk, A.; Szawioła, G.; Buczek, A.

    2005-04-01

    The isotope shift of 11 optical transitions in Nd II in the spectral range 420-450 nm have been recorded (in all cases but one for all pairs of even Nd isotopes). For all observed transitions the values of the field shifts, the specific mass shifts and Δ∣ ψ(0)∣ 2 have been evaluated. Using our new data, combined with data reported in earlier papers, term isotope shifts for all pairs of even Nd isotopes have been determined for 27 energy levels and for the configurations: 4 f46 s, 4 f45 d, 4 f35 d6 s and 4 f46 p as well. It is shown that configuration assignment of a level on the basis of term shift values only is in some cases not satisfactory (as e.g. of the level at 22,696 cm -1) and obviously additional information is required.

  1. Single-molecule analysis of F0F1-ATP synthase inhibited by N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide.

    PubMed

    Toei, Masashi; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-01

    N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) is a classical inhibitor of the F0F1-ATP synthase (F0F1), which covalently binds to the highly conserved carboxylic acid of the proteolipid subunit (c subunit) in F0. Although it is well known that DCCD modification of the c subunit blocks proton translocation in F0 and the coupled ATP hydrolysis activity of F1, how DCCD inhibits the rotary dynamics of F0F1 remains elusive. Here, we carried out single-molecule rotation assays to characterize the DCCD inhibition of Escherichia coli F0F1. Upon the injection of DCCD, rotations irreversibly terminated with first order reaction kinetics, suggesting that the incorporation of a single DCCD moiety is sufficient to block the rotary catalysis of the F0F1. Individual molecules terminated at different angles relative to the three catalytic angles of F1, suggesting that DCCD randomly reacts with one of the 10 c subunits. DCCD-inhibited F0F1 sometimes showed transient activation; molecules abruptly rotated and stopped after one revolution at the original termination angle, suggesting that hindrance by the DCCD moiety is released due to thermal fluctuation. To explore the mechanical activation of DCCD-inhibited molecules, we perturbed inhibited molecules using magnetic tweezers. The probability of transient activation increased upon a forward forcible rotation. Interestingly, during the termination F0F1, showed multiple positional shifts, which implies that F1 stochastically changes the angular position of its rotor upon a catalytic reaction. This effect could be caused by balancing the angular positions of the F1 and the F0 rotors, which are connected via elastic elements.

  2. Single-molecule Analysis of F0F1-ATP Synthase Inhibited by N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide*

    PubMed Central

    Toei, Masashi; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    N,N-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) is a classical inhibitor of the F0F1-ATP synthase (F0F1), which covalently binds to the highly conserved carboxylic acid of the proteolipid subunit (c subunit) in F0. Although it is well known that DCCD modification of the c subunit blocks proton translocation in F0 and the coupled ATP hydrolysis activity of F1, how DCCD inhibits the rotary dynamics of F0F1 remains elusive. Here, we carried out single-molecule rotation assays to characterize the DCCD inhibition of Escherichia coli F0F1. Upon the injection of DCCD, rotations irreversibly terminated with first order reaction kinetics, suggesting that the incorporation of a single DCCD moiety is sufficient to block the rotary catalysis of the F0F1. Individual molecules terminated at different angles relative to the three catalytic angles of F1, suggesting that DCCD randomly reacts with one of the 10 c subunits. DCCD-inhibited F0F1 sometimes showed transient activation; molecules abruptly rotated and stopped after one revolution at the original termination angle, suggesting that hindrance by the DCCD moiety is released due to thermal fluctuation. To explore the mechanical activation of DCCD-inhibited molecules, we perturbed inhibited molecules using magnetic tweezers. The probability of transient activation increased upon a forward forcible rotation. Interestingly, during the termination F0F1, showed multiple positional shifts, which implies that F1 stochastically changes the angular position of its rotor upon a catalytic reaction. This effect could be caused by balancing the angular positions of the F1 and the F0 rotors, which are connected via elastic elements. PMID:23893417

  3. Biallelic genome modification in F(0) Xenopus tropicalis embryos using the CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Ira L; Biesinger, Jacob; Xie, Xiaohui; Cho, Ken W Y

    2013-12-01

    Gene inactivation is an important tool for correlation of phenotypic and genomic data, allowing researchers to infer normal gene function based on the phenotype when the gene is impaired. New and better approaches are needed to overcome the shortfalls of existing methods for any significant acceleration of scientific progress. We have adapted the CRISPR/Cas system for use in Xenopus tropicalis and report on the efficient creation of mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tyrosinase, which is responsible for oculocutaneous albinism. Biallelic mutation of this gene was detected in the F0 generation, suggesting targeting efficiencies similar to that of TALENs. We also find that off-target mutagenesis seems to be negligible, and therefore, CRISPR/Cas may be a useful system for creating genome modifications in this important model organism.

  4. Measurements of Branching Fractions, Polarizations, and Direct CP-Violation Asymmetries in B→ρK* and B→f0(980)K* Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Grenier, P.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Chauveau, J.; Briand, H.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; John, M. J. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Panetta, J.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-11-01

    We report searches for B-meson decays to the charmless final states ρK* and f0(980)K* with a sample of 232×106 BB¯ pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. We measure in units of 10-6 the following branching fractions, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic, or upper limits are given at the 90% confidence level : B(B+→ρ0K*+)<6.1, B(B+→ρ+K*0)=9.6±1.7±1.5, B(B0→ρ-K*+)<12.0, B(B0→ρ0K*0)=5.6±0.9±1.3, B(B+→f0(980)K*+)=5.2±1.2±0.5, and B(B0→f0(980)K*0)<4.3. For the significant modes, we also measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization and the charge asymmetry: fL(B+→ρ+K*0)=0.52±0.10±0.04, fL(B0→ρ0K*0)=0.57±0.09±0.08, ACP(B+→ρ+K*0)=-0.01±0.16±0.02, ACP(B0→ρ0K*0)=0.09±0.19±0.02, and ACP(B+→f0(980)K*+)=-0.34±0.21±0.03.

  5. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  6. Investigation of resistive losses in type II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benapfl, Brendan W.

    For low-TC materials, the superconducting transition temperature (TC) is depressed by the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, one of the remarkable features of cuprate high-TC materials is that the superconducting transition is broadened by the application of a magnetic field. Tinkham presented a model for the field-dependent resistive transition of high-T C materials, arising from "phase slippage at a complicated network of channels." Coffey & Clem did not include this field-broadening effect in their sophisticated model for the field and temperature dependence of the surface resistance in type-II superconductors. From the model by Lee & Stroud, treating Josephson Junction-coupled superconducting segments, it is concluded that doped, layered superconductors are certain to have a field-broadened superconducting transition. This effect can be identified by measurements of the resistivity as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength, angle of field with respect to the crystal axis as well as with respect to an induced current density. The iron pnictide materials such as Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 (BaK122) have chemical layers with different compositions, differentiating them from elemental type-II superconductors such as niobium, and also from cuprates, by the absence of copper. Experimental data on BaK122 indicate a field-broadened transition in conjunction with a field-depressed superconducting transition temperature. In this work, techniques associated with Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy were used to measure the temperature and field-induced changes in the surface resistance of single-crystal BaK122 samples. In addition, polycrystalline foils of niobium and a NbTi (70/30) alloy were measured using the same techniques to provide comparison. Measurements were taken as a function of applied magnetic field, temperature, rf field intensity, and angle of the applied field with respect to the rf-induced current. BaK122 sample field-dependent surface

  7. Investigating Sexual Harassment Complaints--Part II: A Sample Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhler, Scott F.; Allison, Rinda Y.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an example of procedures to be followed when investigating a sexual harassment complaint in libraries. Highlights include preparation, including reviewing personnel files; interviewing the complainant, including sample questions; interviewing the alleged harasser; gathering information from other sources, including third-party witnesses;…

  8. Investigation of Damping Liquids for Aircraft Instruments : II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, M R; Keulegan, G H

    1932-01-01

    Data are presented on the kinematic viscosity, in the temperature range -50 degrees to +30 degrees C. of pure liquids and of solutions of animal oils, vegetable oils, mineral oils, glycerine, and ethylene glycol in various low freezing point solvents. It is shown that the thermal coefficient of kinematic viscosity as a function of the kinematic viscosity of the solutions of glycerine and ethylene glycol in alcohols is practically independent of the temperature and the chemical composition of the individual liquids. This is similarly true for the mineral oil group and, for a limited temperature interval, for the pure animal and vegetable oils. The efficiency of naphthol, hydroquinone, and diphenylamine to inhibit the change of viscosity of poppyseed and linseed oils was also investigated.

  9. Detailed aeromagnetic investigation of the Arctic Basin. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, P. T.; Kovacs, L. C.; Vogt, P. R.; Johnson, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques must be employed to determine the nature of the regional geologic and tectonic structure of the Arctic Basin. Magnetic measurements from aircraft are the most commonly used method. Since 1972 the U.S. Navy has been engaged in a long-term program of mapping, in relative detail, the earth's magnetic field over that portion of the Arctic Basin accessible to the P3 aircraft. A description is presented of the results of the 1977 and 1978 field efforts. The description represents a continuation of an investigation reported by Vogt et al. (1979). The efforts currently considered were directed towards understanding the nature, age, and origin of the major physiolographic features of the western Arctic Basin. Particular attention was given to the Canada and Makarov basins (Fletcher Abyssal Plain) and the Alpha Ridge. The aeromagnetic data are interpreted with respect to the theory of origin presented by Carey (1958).

  10. [Immunocomplexes in pediatrics. II: Investigation in neurological patients (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Blanco, A; Palencia, R; Solís, P; Guisasola, J A; Sánchez Villares, E

    1980-07-01

    Circulating immune complexes were investigated by polyethilene-glycol precipitation in the serum of 101 neurological patients from four months to 15 years old. The test was positive in 21 cases (20.7%) and 24 normal controls were negative. The polyethilene-glycol positive group had a lower seric C'3 than negative group [p < 0.02]. The highest positivity was found in meningoencephalitic infections with sequelae [6/6: 100%] and in cerebral atrophy or very important mental deficiency [11/30: 37%]. The polyethilene-glycol test was not correlated with seric IgG levels, neither in positive nor in negative groups. All patients were receiving anticonvulsivant treatment. The detection of circulating immune complexes may be the result of either brain tissue injury or of another immunological disturb found in epilepsy. There was no relationship between seric immunocomplexes and severity of epileptic disorders and it is not likely that they have any influence over seizures. The role played by anticonvulsivant drugs remains uncleared and further studies are needed.

  11. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Intermediary metabolism provides living cells with free energy and precursor metabolites required for synthesizing proteins, lipids, RNA and other cellular constituents, and it is highly conserved among living species. Only a fraction of cellular protein can, however, be allocated to enzymes of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool of enzymes. The catalytic efficiency is also higher for cells grown on glucose compared to galactose and ethanol, which may explain the observed differences in their growth rates. The enzyme F1F0-ATP synthase (Complex V) was found to have flux control over respiration in the model, and since it is evolutionary conserved, we expect the trade-off to occur in organisms from all kingdoms of life. PMID:26928598

  12. Recognizing the authenticity of emotional expressions: F0 contour matters when you need to know.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Matthis; Schubotz, Ricarda I; Fischer, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Authenticity of vocal emotion expression affects emotion recognition and brain activity in the so-called Theory of Mind (ToM) network, which is implied in the ability to explain and predict behavior by attributing mental states to other individuals. Exploiting the variability of the fundamental frequency (F0 contour), which varies more (higher contour) in play-acted expressions than authentic ones, we examined whether contour biases explicit categorization toward a particular authenticity or emotion category. Moreover, we tested whether contour modulates blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response in the ToM network and explored the role of task as a top-down modulator. The effects of contour on BOLD signal were analyzed by contrasting high and low contour stimuli within two previous fMRI studies that implemented emotion and authenticity rating tasks. Participants preferentially categorized higher contour stimuli as play-acted and lower contour stimuli as sad. Higher contour was found to up-regulate activation task-independently in the primary auditory cortex. Stimulus contour and task were found to interact in a network including medial prefrontal cortex, with an increase in BOLD signal for low-contour stimuli during explicit perception of authenticity and an increase for high-contour stimuli during explicit perception of emotion. Contour-induced BOLD effects appear to be purely stimulus-driven in early auditory and intonation perception, while being strongly task-dependent in regions involved in higher cognition.

  13. Iron transport by proteoliposomes containing mitochondrial F(1)F(0) ATP synthase isolated from rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kim, Misun; Song, Eunsook

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we present evidence of Fe(2+) transport by rat heart mitochondrial F(1)F(0) ATP synthase. Iron uptake by the vesicles containing the enzyme was concentration- and temperature-dependent, with an optimum temperature of 37 degrees C. Both ATP and ADP stimulated iron uptake in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas AMP, AMPPCP, and mADP did not. Inhibitors of the enzyme, oligomycin, and resveratrol similarly blocked iron transport. The iron uptake was confirmed by inhibition using specific antibodies against the alpha, beta, and c subunits of the enzyme. Interestingly, slight transport of common divalent and trivalent metal ions such as Mg(+2), Ca(+2), Mn(+2), Zn(+2), Cu(+2), Fe(+3), and Al(+3) was observed. Moreover, Cu(+2), even in the nM range, inhibited iron uptake and attained maximum inhibition of approximately 56%. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the medium exerted an opposite effect depending on the type of adenosine nucleotide, which was suppressed with ATP, but enhanced with ADP. A similarly stimulating effect of ATP and ADP with an inverse effect of Pi suggests that the activity of ATPase and ATP synthase may be associated with iron uptake in a different manner, probably via antiport of H(+). PMID:20100539

  14. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Intermediary metabolism provides living cells with free energy and precursor metabolites required for synthesizing proteins, lipids, RNA and other cellular constituents, and it is highly conserved among living species. Only a fraction of cellular protein can, however, be allocated to enzymes of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool of enzymes. The catalytic efficiency is also higher for cells grown on glucose compared to galactose and ethanol, which may explain the observed differences in their growth rates. The enzyme F1F0-ATP synthase (Complex V) was found to have flux control over respiration in the model, and since it is evolutionary conserved, we expect the trade-off to occur in organisms from all kingdoms of life. PMID:26928598

  15. Regulation of F0F1-ATPase from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by γ and ϵ Subunits Is Significant for Light/Dark Adaptation*

    PubMed Central

    Imashimizu, Mari; Bernát, Gábor; Sunamura, Ei-Ichiro; Broekmans, Martin; Konno, Hiroki; Isato, Kota; Rögner, Matthias; Hisabori, Toru

    2011-01-01

    The γ and ϵ subunits of F0F1-ATP synthase from photosynthetic organisms display unique properties not found in other organisms. Although the γ subunit of both chloroplast and cyanobacterial F0F1 contains an extra amino acid segment whose deletion results in a high ATP hydrolysis activity (Sunamura, E., Konno, H., Imashimizu-Kobayashi, M., Sugano, Y., and Hisabori, T. (2010) Plant Cell Physiol. 51, 855–865), its ϵ subunit strongly inhibits ATP hydrolysis activity. To understand the physiological significance of these phenomena, we studied mutant strains with (i) a C-terminally truncated ϵ (ϵΔC), (ii) γ lacking the inserted sequence (γΔ198–222), and (iii) a double mutation of (i) and (ii) in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Although thylakoid membranes from the ϵΔC strain showed higher ATP hydrolysis and lower ATP synthesis activities than those of the wild type, no significant difference was observed in growth rate and in intracellular ATP level both under light conditions and during light-dark cycles. However, both the ϵΔC and γΔ198–222 and the double mutant strains showed a lower intracellular ATP level and lower cell viability under prolonged dark incubation compared with the wild type. These data suggest that internal inhibition of ATP hydrolysis activity is very important for cyanobacteria that are exposed to prolonged dark adaptation and, in general, for the survival of photosynthetic organisms in an ever-changing environment. PMID:21610078

  16. Single-Site Palladium(II) Catalyst for Oxidative Heck Reaction: Catalytic Performance and Kinetic Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hui; Li, Mengyang; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Huang, Zhiliang; Sun, Yu; Luo, Zhong; Chen, Hongzhong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Zou, Ruqiang; Lei, Aiwen; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The development of organometallic single-site catalysts (SSCs) has inspired the designs of new heterogeneous catalysts with high efficiency. Nevertheless, the application of SSCs in certain modern organic reactions, such as C-C bond formation reactions, has still been less investigated. In this study, a single-site Pd(II) catalyst was developed, where 2,2'-bipyridine-grafted periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) was employed as the support of a Pd(II) complex. The overall performance of the single-site Pd(II) catalyst in the oxidative Heck reaction was then investigated. The investigation results show that the catalyst displays over 99% selectivity for the product formation with high reaction yield. Kinetic profiles further confirm its high catalytic efficiency, showing that the rate constant is nearly 40 times higher than that for the free Pd(II) salt. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals that the catalyst has remarkable lifetime and recyclability.

  17. Effect of chlorpyrifos-methyl on steroid and thyroid hormones in rat F0- and F1-generations.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang-Hee; Kim, Byung-Yong; Kang, Hwan-Goo; Ku, Hyun-Ok; Cho, Joon-Hyoung

    2006-03-15

    Chlorpyrifos-methyl (CPM) suppressed androgenic activity in Hershberger assay using castrated rats. Acute oral lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) and no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) was evaluated as 12 and 0.1 mg/kg bw, respectively, based on its major effect of cholinesterase inhibition. Also, repeated oral NOAEL was 0.1 mg/kg bw/day based on adrenal damage in rats. We investigated one-generation reproductive toxicity of CPM focusing on endocrine-disrupting effects by the administration of 1, 10 and 100 mg/kg bw/day CPM to mature SD rats (F0) through pre-mating, mating, gestation and lactation period and to their offspring (F1) until 13 weeks age via gavage. A group treated with corn oil served as vehicle control. In F0 rats, the most affected organs were adrenal glands as increased in weight at all doses of CPM in males and at 10 and 100 mg/kg CPM in females and adrenal vacuolation at CPM 10 and 100 mg/kg. The relative and absolute ovaries and the absolute seminal vesicle weights were decreased but the weights of liver, spleen or kidneys were increased at 100 mg/kg CPM. Parameters representing reproductive performances as mating ratio, gestation length and delivery index were not affected, except for decreased fertility index and numbers of implantation and born pups and a higher male sex ratio of pups at CPM 100 mg/kg. F1 pups exposed to CPM 100 mg/kg in utero and via maternal milk showed lower body weight with changes of absolute or relative weights of brain, ovary, liver, spleen and epididymis and decreased absolute not relative anogenital distance at weanling time. The time of vaginal patency and preputial separation and estrous cycling pattern of F1 rats were not impacted by CPM. After further 10 weeks oral administration until 13 weeks old, adrenal glands, brain, liver, spleen or kidneys tended to be increased, while thyroid gland, testes and ventral prostate of F1 male rats were decreased at CPM 10 or 100 mg/kg. Histopathologically

  18. Investigations of the Nature of Zn(II) -Si(II) Bonds.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Sebastian; Köppe, Ralf; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-05-17

    A series of zinc(II) silylenes was prepared by using the silylene {PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )Si. Whereas reaction of the silylene with ZnX2 (X=Cl, I) gave the halide-bridged dimers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnX(μ-X)]2 , with ZnR2 (R=Ph, Et, C6 F5 ) as reagent the monomers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnR2 ] were obtained. The stability of the complexes and the Zn-Si bond lengths clearly depend on the substitution pattern of the zinc atom. Electron-withdrawing groups stabilize these adducts, whereas electron-donating groups destabilize them. This could be rationalized by quantum chemical calculations. Two different bonding modes in these molecules were identified, which are responsible for the differences in reactivity: 1) strong polar Zn-Si single bonds with short Zn-Si distances, Zn-Si force constants close to that of a classical single bond, and strong binding energy (ca. 2.39 Å, 1.33 mdyn Å(-1) , and 200 kJ mol(-1) ), which suggest an ion pair consisting of a silyl cation with a Zn-Si single bond; 2) relatively weak donor-acceptor Zn-Si bonds with long Zn-Si distances, low Zn-Si force constants, and weak binding energy (ca. 2.49 Å, 0.89 mdyn Å(-1) , and 115 kJ mol(-1) ), which can be interpreted as a silylene-zinc adduct.

  19. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:27482602

  20. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion.

  1. Contribution of J mixing to the 5D0-7F0 transition of Eu3+ ions in several host matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masanori; Nishimura, Goro; Kushida, Takashi

    1994-06-01

    The 5D70-F0 transition mechanism has been investigated for the Eu3+ ion in two kinds of oxide glasses, polyvinyl alcohol film, and Y2O2S crystal powder, from the analysis of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra. In the case of Eu3+ in sodium silicate glass and sodium germanate glass, it has been found that the 5D70-F0 transition probability of the ions site-selected by the laser-light excitation is approximately proportional to the square of the axial second-order crystal-field parameter B20. The interpretation of this result is that the dominant mechanism of this transition in these two glasses is due to the borrowing of intensity from the 5D70-F2 (MJ=0) transition by the J-mixing effect. In the case of polyvinyl alcohol:Eu3+ and Y2O2S:Eu3+, on the other hand, the contribution of this mechanism has been found to be negligible, from the analysis of the intensity ratio between the 5D70-F0 and 5D70-F2 transitions. Furthermore, in the above two kinds of glass samples, the site-to-site variations in the energy of the 7F0 state and the mean energy of the three 7F1 Stark levels are explained well by the mixing of the 7F2 state due to the second-order crystal-field potential. To explain the above energy variations in polyvinyl alcohol:Eu3+, however, it is necessary, in addition to this effect, to take into account the mixing of the charge-transfer state and/or the J mixing due to the other components of the crystal-field potential.

  2. F+0 diuretic protocol is superior to F-15 and F+20 for nuclear renogram in children

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ramesh; Venkatsubramaniam, Dhandapani; Venkatachalapathy, Easwaramoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We compare the outcomes of three different diuretic protocols for renograms in children with hydronephrosis. Materials and Methods: Between August 2011 and July 2013, 148 diuretic renograms were performed to evaluate unilateral grade 3–4 hydronephrosis (reflux, posterior urethral valves, post-pyeloplasty status excluded). Patients were allotted into three groups based on the timing of diuretic administration: Diuretic given 15 min before (F-15), at the same time as (F + 0) and 20 min after (F + 20) radionuclide administration. Dynamic images and renogram curves were inspected to identify in each group (1) number of equivocal curves and (2) number of interrupted studies due to patient movement/discomfort/voiding. Statistical significance was determined by the Fisher exact test. Results: There was no significant difference in age/sex distribution between groups F-15 (n = 35), F + 0 (n = 38) and F + 20 (n = 75). The number of equivocal curves was significantly less in F + 0 (2/38) and F-15 (3/35) compared with F + 20 (20/75). The number of interrupted studies was significantly less in F + 0 (2/38) compared with F-15 (9/35) and F + 20 (18/75). Conclusion: The F + 0 and F-15 protocols are superior to the F + 20 protocol in reducing the number of equivocal curves, while the F + 0 protocol is superior to the other two in reducing interruptions due to patient movement or voiding. F + 0 is the diuretic protocol of choice for renogram in children. PMID:26166970

  3. Investigation of Cu(II) Binding to Bovine Serum Albumin by Potentiometry with an Ion Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jie Liu

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory project that investigates Cu(II) bind to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in an aqueous solution is developed to assist undergraduate students in gaining better understanding of the interaction of ligands with biological macromolecule. Thus, students are introduced to investigation of Cu(II) binding to BSA by potentiometry with the Cu(II)…

  4. Auditory midbrain laminar structure appears adapted to f0 extraction: further evidence and implications of the double critical bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Braun, M

    1999-03-01

    The psychoacoustic 'critical bandwidth' (CB), e.g. approximately 2.6 semitones (= 0.22 octave) at 1.5-3 kHz, is known from many spectral integration phenomena. Cat data suggest that it is represented in the inferior colliculus (IC) (Ehret and Merzenich, 1985, Science 227, 1245-1247), where it is consistently related to the fibrodendritic laminae (Schreiner and Langner, 1997, Nature 388, 383-386). The recent discovery of the CB and the double CB (2CB) in the statistics of frequency spacing of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (Braun, 1997. Hear. Res. 114, 197-203) has initiated further investigations of the novel phenomenon of 2CB. Meta-analysis of psychoacoustic valuation studies of pure-tone intervals again revealed the effects of CB and 2CB. Valuations showed a significant stepwise change with interval size: 2CB indifferent. Scrutiny of cat and human data indicated that for both species, at least in the midspectrum (1-3 kHz in humans), the tonotopic ranges within single IC laminae and the tonotopic distances between neighboring laminae may equal 1 CB (distances to second next laminae being 2CB). This unique architecture would provide the most economical neural convergence of period information from pairs of adjacent harmonic partials 3-6 of complex sound. The resulting summed postsynaptic potentials would thus contain a beat frequency equaling f0 of sound input and being detectable by the known neural behavior of characteristic periodicity response. PMID:10190753

  5. Critical state and low-field electrodynamics in LaO0.85F0.15FeAs superconductor polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, O. V.; Kholmetskii, A. L.; Mashlan, M.; Yarman, T.; Aldushchenkov, A. V.; Okunev, I. S.; Lomonosov, V. A.; Makhnach, L. V.

    2015-06-01

    The penetration of a weak magnetic field into LaO0.85F0.15FeAs polycrystalline superconductors is investigated using two mutually complementing techniques: measurement of the higher harmonics of nonlinear magnetization and the current-voltage characteristics. The dependences of the critical current density and resistivity on the temperature and magnetic field strength are determined. The results confirm the theory of the critical state in the low-field electrodynamics of a Josephson medium. The universality of this theoretical concept is demonstrated for a new class of ceramic superconductors.

  6. Enhanced transport and magnetic properties in gadolinium doped NdFeAsO0.7F0.3 superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswathy, P. M.; Anooja, J. B.; Varghese, Neson; Syamaprasad, U.

    2015-06-01

    The transport and magnetic properties of Gd doped NdFeAsO0.7F0.3 (Nd1111) samples synthesized at ambient pressures were investigated. The sample with x = 0.15 shows a maximum TC of 55.1 K and a magnetic JC of 3.4 × 103 A/cm2 at 5 K. A TC enhancement of 6.3 K and a JC enhancement by a factor of 2, is observed in the 15 % Gd doped sample as compared to the pure sample.

  7. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  8. Alternol inhibits the proliferation and induces the differentiation of the mouse melanoma B16F0 cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; Xu, Wenjuan; Hao, Wenjin; Wang, Bingsheng; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-08-01

    High malignant potential and low susceptibility to treatment are characteristics of malignant melanoma. Alternol, a novel compound purified from microbial fermentation products obtained from the bark of the yew tree, exhibits a variety of antitumor activities. Based on these findings, the aim of the present study was to extend the knowledge on the antineoplastic effect of alternol in the mouse melanoma B16F0 cell line. Alternol significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of B16F0 cells in a dose-dependent manner as detected by MTT and soft agar colony formation assays. NaOH alkaline lysis and oxidation of Dopa indicated that alternol enhanced the melanin content and tyrosinase activity of the B16F0 cells and results also showed a dose‑response relationship. Morphologic changes accompanied by extended dendrites were discovered in the B16F0 cells after treatment with alternol. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of tyrosinase, Trp1 and Trp2 were increased by alternol. Our results confirmed that alternol possesses marked antineoplastic properties against melanoma cells, indicating that this microbial fermentation product is a promising agent for the differentiation therapy of cancer. The inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation by alternol was associated with both cytotoxicity and induction of differentiation.

  9. The verbal transformation effect and the perceptual organization of speech: influence of formant transitions and F0-contour continuity.

    PubMed

    Stachurski, Marcin; Summers, Robert J; Roberts, Brian

    2015-05-01

    This study explored the role of formant transitions and F0-contour continuity in binding together speech sounds into a coherent stream. Listening to a repeating recorded word produces verbal transformations to different forms; stream segregation contributes to this effect and so it can be used to measure changes in perceptual coherence. In experiment 1, monosyllables with strong formant transitions between the initial consonant and following vowel were monotonized; each monosyllable was paired with a weak-transitions counterpart. Further stimuli were derived by replacing the consonant-vowel transitions with samples from adjacent steady portions. Each stimulus was concatenated into a 3-min-long sequence. Listeners only reported more forms in the transitions-removed condition for strong-transitions words, for which formant-frequency discontinuities were substantial. In experiment 2, the F0 contour of all-voiced monosyllables was shaped to follow a rising or falling pattern, spanning one octave. Consecutive tokens either had the same contour, giving an abrupt F0 change between each token, or alternated, giving a continuous contour. Discontinuous sequences caused more transformations and forms, and shorter times to the first transformation. Overall, these findings support the notion that continuity cues provided by formant transitions and the F0 contour play an important role in maintaining the perceptual coherence of speech.

  10. Bs0 lifetime measurement in the C P -odd decay channel Bs0→J /ψ f 0(980 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernández-Villanueva, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J /ψ π+π- with 880 ≤Mπ+π-≤1080 MeV /c2 , which is mainly a C P -odd state and dominated by the f0(980 ) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ (Bs0)=1.70 ±0.14 (stat ) ±0.05 (syst) ps . Neglecting C P violation in Bs0/B¯s0 mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH=0.59 ±0.05 (stat ) ±0.02 (syst ) ps-1 .

  11. Observation of B meson decays to ωK* and improved measurements for ωρ and ωf0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Gilman, J. D.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Rodriguez, D. M.; Thomas, E. W.; Tomassini, E. W.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Esteve, L.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    We present measurements of B meson decays to the final states ωK*, ωρ, and ωf0, where K* indicates a spin 0, 1, or 2 strange meson. The data sample corresponds to 465×106 B Bmacr pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider at SLAC. B meson decays involving vector-scalar, vector-vector, and vector-tensor final states are analyzed; the latter two shed new light on the polarization of these final states. We measure the branching fractions for nine of these decays; five are observed for the first time. For most decays we also measure the charge asymmetry and, where relevant, the longitudinal polarization fL.

  12. $$B^{0}_{s}$$ Lifetime Measurement in the CP-odd Decay Channel $$B^{0}_{s} \\to J/\\psi\\mbox{ }f_{0}(980)$$

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.

    2016-07-06

    Here, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J/ψπ+π- with 880 ≤ Mπ+π- ≤ 1080 MeV/c2, which is mainly a CP-odd state and dominated by the f0(980) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ(Bs0) = 1.70 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.05(syst) ps. Neglecting CP violation in Bs0/more » $$\\bar{B}$$0s mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH = 0.59 ± 0.05(stat) ± 0.02(syst) ps-1.« less

  13. B-meson decays to eta' rho, eta' f0, and eta' K*

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We present measurements of B-meson decays to the final states {eta}{prime} {rho}, {eta}{prime} f{sub 0}, and {eta}{prime} K*, where K* stands for a vector, scalar, or tensor strange meson. We observe a significant signal or evidence for {eta}{prime} {rho}{sup +} and all the {eta}{prime}K* channels. We also measure, where applicable, the charge asymmetries, finding results consistent with no direct CP violation in all cases. The measurements are performed on a data sample consisting of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Our results favor the theoretical predictions from perturbative QCD and QCD Factorization and we observe an enhancement of the tensor K*{sub 2} (1430) with respect to the vector K*(892) component.

  14. Investigating the air oxidation of V(II) ions in a vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamsai, Kittima; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2015-11-01

    The air oxidation of vanadium (V(II)) ions in a negative electrolyte reservoir is a major side reaction in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), which leads to electrolyte imbalance and self-discharge of the system during long-term operation. In this study, an 80% charged negative electrolyte solution is employed to investigate the mechanism and influential factors of the reaction in a negative-electrolyte reservoir. The results show that the air oxidation of V(II) ions occurs at the air-electrolyte solution interface area and leads to a concentration gradient of vanadium ions in the electrolyte solution and to the diffusion of V(II) and V(III) ions. The effect of the ratio of the electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area and the concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in an electrolyte solution is investigated. A higher ratio of electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area results in a slower oxidation reaction rate. The high concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid solution also retard the air oxidation of V(II) ions. This information can be utilized to design an appropriate electrolyte reservoir for the VRB system and to prepare suitable ingredients for the electrolyte solution.

  15. Geomagnetic modification of the mid-latitude ionosphere - Toward a strategy for the improved forecasting of f0F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrenn, G. L.; Rodger, A. S.

    1989-02-01

    An approach for modeling and forecasting the interspatial critical frequency (f0F2) at quiet and disturbed times is outlined. Statistical analyses of ionosonde data from the Argentine Islands (65 deg S) are used to define patterns for the main phase effects of midlatitude ionospheric storms. Extended to a number of stations, these could be incorporated into algorithms to permit the forecasting of maximum usable frequency for a few hours ahead and enhance the frequency management of shortwave radio communication, especially during a geomagnetic storm. Data from a complete solar cycle, 1971-1981, are used to determine the errors in the forecasts and to demonstrate that a useful advantage can be attained by this method. The rms error in f0F2 for 90,175 samples is 15.6 percent, which compares favorably with those obtained using forecasts based on quiet time values (20.4 percent) or the previous day's measurements (18 percent).

  16. Cruentaren A Binds F1F0 ATP Synthase To Modulate the Hsp90 Protein Folding Machinery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 requires the assistance of immunophilins, co-chaperones, and partner proteins for the conformational maturation of client proteins. Hsp90 inhibition represents a promising anticancer strategy due to the dependence of numerous oncogenic signaling pathways upon Hsp90 function. Historically, small molecules have been designed to inhibit ATPase activity at the Hsp90 N-terminus; however, these molecules also induce the pro-survival heat shock response (HSR). Therefore, inhibitors that exhibit alternative mechanisms of action that do not elicit the HSR are actively sought. Small molecules that disrupt Hsp90-co-chaperone interactions can destabilize the Hsp90 complex without induction of the HSR, which leads to inhibition of cell proliferation. In this article, selective inhibition of F1F0 ATP synthase by cruentaren A was shown to disrupt the Hsp90-F1F0 ATP synthase interaction and result in client protein degradation without induction of the HSR. PMID:24450340

  17. A high pressure neutron study of colossal magnetoresistant NdMnAsO(0.95)F(0.05).

    PubMed

    Wildman, E J; Tucker, M G; Mclaughlin, A C

    2015-03-25

    A high pressure neutron diffraction study of the oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 has been performed at temperatures of 290-383 K and pressures up to 8.59 GPa. The results demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic order of the Mn spins is robust to pressures of up to 8.59 GPa. TN is enhanced from 360 to 383 K upon applying an external pressure of 4.97 GPa, a rate of 4.63 K GPa(-1). NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 is shown to violate Bloch's rule which would suggest that NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 is on the verge of a localized to itinerant transition. There is no evidence of a structural transition but applied pressure tends to result in more regular As-Mn-As and Nd-O-Nd tetrahedra. The unit cell is significantly more compressible along the c-axis than the a-axis, as the interlayer coupling is weaker than the intrinsic bonds contained within NdO and MnAs slabs. PMID:25721358

  18. Absence of colossal magnetoresistance in the oxypnictide PrMnAsO0.95F0.05.

    PubMed

    Wildman, Eve J; Sher, Falak; Mclaughlin, Abbie C

    2015-03-16

    We have recently reported a new mechanism of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in electron doped manganese oxypnictides NdMnAsO1-xFx. Magnetoresistances of up to -95% at 3 K have been observed. Here we show that upon replacing Nd for Pr, the CMR is surprisingly no longer present. Instead a sizable negative magnetoresistance is observed for PrMnAsO0.95F0.05 below 35 K (MR7T (12 K) = -13.4% for PrMnAsO0.95F0.05). A detailed neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of PrMnAsO0.95F0.05 has been performed, which shows that a structural transition, Ts, occurs at 35 K from tetragonal P4/nmm to orthorhombic Pmmn symmetry. The structural transition is driven by the Pr 4f electrons degrees of freedom. The sizable -MR observed below the transition most likely arises due to a reduction in magnetic and/or multipolar scattering upon application of a magnetic field. PMID:25713929

  19. A high pressure neutron study of colossal magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, E. J.; Tucker, M. G.; Mclaughlin, A. C.

    2015-03-01

    A high pressure neutron diffraction study of the oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 has been performed at temperatures of 290-383 K and pressures up to 8.59 GPa. The results demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic order of the Mn spins is robust to pressures of up to 8.59 GPa. TN is enhanced from 360 to 383 K upon applying an external pressure of 4.97 GPa, a rate of 4.63 K GPa-1. NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 is shown to violate Bloch's rule which would suggest that NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 is on the verge of a localized to itinerant transition. There is no evidence of a structural transition but applied pressure tends to result in more regular As-Mn-As and Nd-O-Nd tetrahedra. The unit cell is significantly more compressible along the c-axis than the a-axis, as the interlayer coupling is weaker than the intrinsic bonds contained within NdO and MnAs slabs.

  20. Shrimp interferon is rather a portion of the mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase than a true alpha-interferon.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rafael Diego; Barracco, Margherita Anna

    2008-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is a multimember cytokine family commonly known by its involvement in antiviral defense. Recently (2005), an interferon-like protein (IntlP) homologue to mammalian IFN-alpha was identified for the first time in crustaceans, in the shrimp Penaeus (Marsupenaeus) japonicus. IntlP was expressed only in WSSV-resistant shrimps (but not in naïve shrimps) and was capable to induce an unspecific antiviral effect on infected fish cells. In the present paper we show that IntlP is in reality a portion of the mitochondrial F0-ATP synthase (60-73% identity with insect F0-ATP synthase beta-chain) and not a homologue of mammalian type I interferon. In our hands, sequences corresponding to IntlP/F0-ATP synthase beta-chain were equally amplified in naïve and WSSV-infected Litopenaeus vannamei and also in two wild Brazilian shrimp species. From the obtained results we assumed that type I IFN homologues have not yet been demonstrated in any shrimp or crustacean.

  1. Measurements of the branching fraction and CP-violation asymmetries in B0-->f0(980)K0S.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-02-01

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and CP-violating asymmetries in the decay B0-->f0(980)K0S. The results are obtained from a data sample of 123 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays. From a time-dependent maximum likelihood fit, we measure the branching fraction B(B0-->f0(980)(-->pi+pi-)K0)=(6.0+/-0.9+/-0.6+/-1.2)x10(-6), the mixing-induced CP violation parameter S=-1.62(+0.56)(-0.51)+/-0.09+/-0.04, and the direct CP violation parameter C=0.27+/-0.36+/-0.10+/-0.07, where the first errors are statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to model uncertainties. We measure the f0(980) mass and width to be mf0(980)=(980.6+/-4.1+/-0.5+/-4.0) MeV/c2 and Gammaf0(980)=(43(+12)(-9)+/-3+/-9) MeV/c2, respectively.

  2. Microfluidic Investigation Reveals Distinct Roles for Actin Cytoskeleton and Myosin II Activity in Capillary Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre; Théodoly, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Circulating leukocyte sequestration in pulmonary capillaries is arguably the initiating event of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a microfluidic investigation of the roles of actin organization and myosin II activity during the different stages of leukocyte trafficking through narrow capillaries (entry, transit and shape relaxation) using specific drugs (latrunculin A, jasplakinolide, and blebbistatin). The deformation rate during entry reveals that cell stiffness depends strongly on F-actin organization and hardly on myosin II activity, supporting a microfilament role in leukocyte sequestration. In the transit stage, cell friction is influenced by stiffness, demonstrating that the actin network is not completely broken after a forced entry into a capillary. Conversely, membrane unfolding was independent of leukocyte stiffness. The surface area of sequestered leukocytes increased by up to 160% in the absence of myosin II activity, showing the major role of molecular motors in microvilli wrinkling and zipping. Finally, cell shape relaxation was largely independent of both actin organization and myosin II activity, whereas a deformed state was required for normal trafficking through capillary segments. PMID:19450501

  3. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  4. Electroanalytical investigation on the interaction between 6-mercaptopurine and zinc(II), lead(II), and cadmium(II) ions in nonaqueous solvents.

    PubMed

    Cinquantini, A; Cini, R; Zanello, P

    1980-04-01

    Different electroanalytical techniques have been employed in the study of the interaction between 6-mercaptopurine and zinc(II), lead(II), and cadmium(II) ions in ethanol, dimethylformamide, and dimethylsulfoxide. The stoichiometry of the formed complexes was determined as well as their instability constants. The kinetic parameters of the electrode processes have been also evaluated.

  5. Investigation of the polarization state of dual APPLE-II undulators

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Matthew; Wang, Hongchang; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S.; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    The use of an APPLE II undulator is extremely important for providing a high-brilliance X-ray beam with the capability to switch between various photon beam polarization states. A high-precision soft X-ray polarimeter has been used to systematically investigate the polarization characteristics of the two helical APPLE II undulators installed on beamline I06 at Diamond Light Source. A simple data acquisition and processing procedure has been developed to determine the Stokes polarization parameters for light polarized at arbitrary linear angles emitted from a single undulator, and for circularly polarized light emitted from both undulators in conjunction with a single-period undulator phasing unit. The purity of linear polarization is found to deteriorate as the polarization angle moves away from the horizontal and vertical modes. Importantly, a negative correlation between the degree of circular polarization and the photon flux has been found when the phasing unit is used. PMID:26698061

  6. An investigation of the role of the H II region environment on star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Kevin Robert

    Data from the Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Two Micron All Sky Survey are used to investigate low-mass star formation in the vicinity of HII regions. The gas in H II regions is strongly affected by massive stars through their intense ultraviolet radiation and winds. The H II region environment is expected to affect the process of star formation, from triggering the collapse of cloud cores within the molecular cloud to truncating circumstellar disks in the interior of the H II region. Massive stars end their lives as supernovae, injecting freshly synthesized radionuclides and large amounts of radiant and kinetic energy into their surroundings. Most stars in the Galaxy form in such environments and recent measurements of meteorites demonstrate that the Solar System formed in this setting. The first part of this work describes a Very Large Array survey of water masers in portions of six H II regions. Previous observational studies demonstrate the link between star formation and water maser activity. This study uses high-resolution observations of water masers to pinpoint the sites of star formation in crowded or confused regions. The water maser survey identifies several sites of star formation that are very close to the ionization fronts being driven into the surrounding molecular cloud. The locations and numbers of these water masers indicate that the H II region environment may trigger the formation of protostars, but that the passage of the ionization front may play a role in prematurely terminating infall. Later evolutionary stages of star formation are characterized by infrared emission from circumstellar disks. Near-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey is used to show that stars with circumstellar disks in the star-forming region NGC 6357 cluster near ionization fronts, strongly suggesting exposure to the H II region environment rapidly (~10 4 years) evaporates circumstellar gas and dust. Hubble Space Telescope images in the

  7. Measurements of Branching Fraction, Polarization, and Charge Asymmetry of B±→ρ±ρ0 and a Search for B±→ρ±f0(980)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Sanchez, P. Del Amo; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Lodovico, F. Di; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-12-01

    We measure the branching fraction (B), polarization (fL), and CP asymmetry (ACP) of B±→ρ±ρ0 decays and search for the decay B±→ρ±f0(980) based on a data sample of 231.8×106 Υ(4S)→BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. In B±→ρ±ρ0 decays we measure B=(16.8±2.2±2.3)×10-6, fL=0.905±0.042-0.027+0.023, and ACP=-0.12±0.13±0.10, and find an upper limit on the branching fraction of B±→ρ±f0(980)(→π+π-) decays of 1.9×10-6 at 90% confidence level.

  8. Cobalt(II) complex with new terpyridine ligand: An ab initio geometry optimization investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Artur; Gorczyński, Adam; Jankowski, Piotr; Kubicki, Maciej; Patroniak, Violetta

    2010-06-01

    Structural parameters of a complex formed between Co(II), and a terpyridine ligand were investigated using the unrestricted Becke three-parameter hybrid exchange functional combined with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP) with the LANL2DZ, 6-31G(d,p), and 6-31G++(d,p) basis sets applied for geometry optimizations. The computations reveal that frequently used methods, which take into consideration primary and secondary interactions, can often be efficient in optimizing structural geometries of systems based on organic molecules and transition-metal ions.

  9. Spectroscopic investigation of the structure of complex compounds of Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) with. cap alpha. - and. beta. -diketone

    SciTech Connect

    Krymova, N.M.; Ivanov, V.E.; Ostapkevich, N.A.

    1986-11-10

    In the reactions of Cu(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) chlorides with 2,3-butanedione and 2,4-pentanedione isonicotinoylhydrazones in neutral and weakly acid media complex compounds of the addition-product type are formed, but in an alkaline medium inner-complex compounds are formed. By methods of electronic and ESR spectroscopy it was shown that the Cu(II) complex compounds have a planar-square structure, the Ni(II) complexes are octrahedral, but the Co(II) complexes have a tetrahedral or distorted tetrahedral structure. In the spectrochemical series 2,3-butanedione and 2,4-pentanedione isonicotinoylhydrazones occupy positions between water and ammonia.

  10. Photovoltaic effect in iron-based SmO0.7F0.3FeAs superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Y Liu, Z.; Y Han, M.; Chang, F. G.

    2015-06-01

    A remarkable photovoltaic effect in an iron-based SmO0.7F0.3FeAs-Ag system has been observed in the temperature range from 50 to 300 K. An interface potential exists directly from the superconductor to the metal electrode, which provides the separation force for the photo-induced electron-hole pairs. The mechanism of this interface potential is completely different below and above the superconducting transition temperature and has been discussed in terms of the proximity effect and Schottky barrier, respectively. In contrast to that found in the YBCO-Ag system, a photovoltaic effect of opposite polarity is obtained in a SmO0.7F0.3FeAs-Ag system at a normal state, consistent with the different type of charge carriers in these two superconductors. A very fast laser response (7.5 ms) may open a door to new device applications such as optical sensors.

  11. Clinical relevance of the fractal dimension of F0 perturbations computed by the box-counting method.

    PubMed

    Boek, W; Wieneke, G H; Dejonckere, P H

    1997-12-01

    The box-counting method for determining the fractal dimension (Dfj) was applied to the fundamental frequency (F0) perturbations in normal and pathological voices in order to assess its clinical value. The upper limit of these Dfj values was similar for both groups, but the distribution for pathological voices extended to lower values than for the normal voices. However, these lower values were most probably the result of one or a few outlying frequency points due to incorrect determination of the vocal period. The Dfj of normal voices were within the range of values found for randomly varying F0 values. It was concluded, that the vocal perturbations in pathological voices are also more or less randomly distributed. So, the Dfj, at that least determined with the box-counting method, do not contain clinically relevant information in addition to the traditional measures for the extent of the vocal period perturbations. An exception is special perturbation types like diplophonia. The result of the computation is very sensitive for voice breaks and vibrato and depends on the number of periods. PMID:9422278

  12. Energy-dependent transformation of the catalytic activities of the mitochondrial F0 x F1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Galkin, M A; Vinogradov, A D

    1999-04-01

    The ADP(Mg2+)-deactivated, azide-trapped F0 x F1-ATPase of coupled submitochondrial particles is capable of ATP synthesis being incapable of ATP hydrolysis and ATP-dependent delta muH+ generation [FEBS Lett. (1995) 366, 29-32]. This puzzling phenomenon was studied further. No ATPase activity of the submitochondrial particles catalyzing succinate-supported oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of azide was observed when ATP was added to the assay mixture after an uncoupler. Rapid ATP hydrolysis was detected in the same system when ATP followed by an uncoupler was added. Less than 5% of the original ATPase activity was seen when the reaction (assayed with ATP-regenerating system) was initiated by the addition of ATP to the azide-trapped coupled particles oxidizing succinate either in the presence or in the absence of the uncoupler. High ATP hydrolytic activity was revealed when the reaction was started by the simultaneous addition of the ATP plus uncoupler to the particles generating delta muH+. The energy-dependent conversion of the enzyme into latent uncoupler-activated ATPase was prevented by free ADP (Ki approximately 20 microM) and was greatly enhanced after multiple turnovers in oxidative phosphorylation. The results suggest that the catalytic properties of F0 x F1 are delta muH+-dependent which is in accord with our hypothesis on different conformational states of the enzyme participating in ATP synthesis or hydrolysis.

  13. Acetylsalicylic acid regulates MMP-2 activity and inhibits colorectal invasion of murine B16F0 melanoma cells in C57BL/6J mice: effects of prostaglandin F(2)alpha.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chin-Shaw Stella; Luo, Shue-Fen; Ning, Chung-Chu; Lin, Chien-Liang; Jiang, Ming-Chung; Liao, Ching-Fong

    2009-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that acetylsalicylic acid may reduce the risk of mortality due to colon cancers. Metastasis is the major cause of cancer death. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in tumor invasion regulation, and prostaglandin F(2)alpha (PGF(2)alpha) is a key stimulator of MMP production. Thus, we investigated whether acetylsalicylic acid regulated MMP activity and the invasion of cancer cells and whether PGF(2)alpha attenuated acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of cancer cells. Gelatin-based zymography assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the MMP-2 activity of B16F0 melanoma cells. Matrigel-based chemoinvasion assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the invasion of B16F0 cells. Acetylsalicylic acid can inhibit PGF(2)alpha synthesis and PGF(2)alpha is a key stimulator of MMP-2 production. Our data showed that PGF(2)alpha treatment attenuated the acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of B16F0 cells. In animal experiments, acetylsalicylic acid reduced colorectal metastasis of B16F0 cells in C57BL/6J mice by 44%. Our results suggest that PGF(2)alpha is a therapeutic target for metastasis inhibition and acetylsalicylic acid may possess anti-metastasis ability.

  14. Clinical, histopathologic, and genetic investigation in two large families with dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, B; Lindskog, S; Elgadi, A; Norgren, S

    2004-04-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) type II, an inherited disorder affecting dentin, has been linked to mutations in the dentin sialophosphoprotein ( DSPP) gene on chromosome 4q21. The gene product is cleaved into two dentin-specific matrix proteins, dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein. The aim of this investigation was to study genotypes and phenotypes in two affected families with special reference to clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic manifestations. Seven affected members of Family A and five of Family B were documented clinically and radiographically; 14 and 10 teeth, respectively, were available for histopathologic investigation and prepared for ground sections, which were assessed semiquantitatively for dysplastic manifestations in the dentin according to the scoring system, dysplastic dentin score (DDS). Venous blood samples were collected from six affected and ten unaffected members of Family A, and from eight affected and six unaffected members of Family B. Genomic DNA was extracted and used for sequence analyses. The two families presented with different missense mutations. An Arg68Trp missense mutation in the DSP part of the gene was revealed in all six analyzed affected individuals in Family A. This mutation was not present in any of the ten healthy members. In Family B, an Ala15Val missense mutation involving the last residue of the signal peptide was found in all eight affected but in none of the six healthy members. The clinical and radiographic disturbances and DDS were more severe in Family B. The data indicate the presence of a genotype-phenotype correlation in DI type II.

  15. Superconducting Transition Temperatures and Transport Properties of LaFe1-yRuyAsO0.89F0.11 and LaFeAsO0.89-xF0.11+x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satomi, Erika; Lee, Sang Chul; Kobayashi, Yoshiaki; Sato, Masatoshi

    2010-09-01

    The transport behaviors and superconducting transition temperatures Tc of the title systems have been experimentally studied for various x and y values. Together with results reported previously by our group, data are now available for many sets of samples of RFe1-yMyAsO0.89F0.11 with R = La and Nd and M = Co, Mn and Ru and for RFeAsO0.89-xF0.11+x. Dopings of Co and Mn atoms introduce electrons and holes into the FeAs planes, respectively. They also introduce, more or less, randomness effects. Ru atoms introduce scattering centers within the FeAs planes without changing the number of carrier electrons or holes. In contrast, F atoms introduce electron carriers, but not randomness effects or scattering centers into the FeAs planes. From these studies, we can conclude that there are two appreciable mechanisms of Tc suppression by the dopings. The disappearance of or reduction in the area of the hole Fermi surfaces around the Γ point in the reciprocal space has been clearly shown as one of the mechanisms, irrespective of whether or not doped atoms are within the conducting planes. The other mechanism is the electron localization observed for the Mn doping. The rates of the Tc suppression due to the scattering by nonmagnetic Ru and Co atoms have been found to be negligible compared with that expected from the pair breaking theory, indicating that the systems do not have the S± symmetry of the superconducting order parameter.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of nano-structured α-K5PW11(M x OH2)O39(M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II)) Keggin heteropolyacid catalyst monolayers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Bang, Yongju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Jun, Jin Oh; Song, In Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Nano-structured α-K5PW11(M x OH2)O39 (M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II)) Keggin heteropolyacids (HPAs) were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS) measurements in order to elucidate their redox property and oxidation catalysis. HPA molecules formed two-dimensional self-assembled monolayer arrays on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Furthermore, HPAs exhibited a distinctive current-voltage behavior referred to as negative differential resistance (NDR) phenomenon. The measured NDR peak voltage of HPAs was correlated with the reduction potential and the absorption edge energy determined by electrochemical method and UV-visible spectroscopy, respectively. NDR peak voltage of HPAs appeared at less negative voltage with increasing reduction potential and with decreasing UV-visible absorption edge energy. The correlations strongly suggested that NDR phenomenon was closely related to the redox property of HPAs. Vapor-phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde was carried out as a model reaction to track the oxidation catalysis of HPAs. NDR peak voltage appeared at less negative voltage with increasing yield for benzaldehyde. PMID:25958620

  17. Investigation into solar type II radio bursts recorded by CALLISTO-BR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, R. D. C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Selhorst, C. L.

    2012-04-01

    This work brings out the outcomes of investigation of two solar type II radio bursts observed on October 16, 2010 (19:12:54 UT) and on February 14, 2011 (15:27:05 UT) by CALLISTO-BR (Compound Astronomical Low frequency Low Cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory) spectrometer operating in the frequency range of 45-870 MHz. The first event comprises a burst with typical type II starting frequency and clues of partial reabsorption of the fundamental frequency band. The second one consists of a solar split-band type II radio burst with whole reabsorption of the fundamental frequency band. Both events were preceded by solar type III radio bursts. Among the physical parameters determined for the propagation of the associated shock and its region are: source speed of the order of 1127 ± 76 km s-1 and 889 ± 31 km s-1; electron number density of (5.17 ± 0.33) x 107 cm-3 and (2.46 ± 0.07) x 108cm-3; Alfvén speed of the order of 287 ± 11 km s-1 and 398 ± 911 km s-1; Mach number of 1.05 ± 0.01 and 1.12 ± 0.01; magnetic field strength of 0.95 ± 0.03 G and 2.85 ± 0.07 G; and temperature of (3.79 ± 1.02) x 107 K and (1.69 ± 0.39) x 107 K. The results, compared to those reported in the literature, are consistent. The source speed indeed outdoes the Alfvén speed with a density jump at the shock front which is suitable (< 4) for MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) shocks for both events.

  18. Measurement of the B¯(s)(0) effective lifetime in the J/ψf0(980) final state.

    PubMed

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Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-12

    The effective lifetime of the B ¯(s)(0) meson in the decay mode B¯(s)(0)→J/ψf(0)(980) is measured using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯(s)(0) mass eigenstate, Γ(H)=0.588±0.014±0.009 ps(-1). PMID:23102295

  19. Measurement of the B¯(s)(0) effective lifetime in the J/ψf0(980) final state.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-12

    The effective lifetime of the B ¯(s)(0) meson in the decay mode B¯(s)(0)→J/ψf(0)(980) is measured using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯(s)(0) mass eigenstate, Γ(H)=0.588±0.014±0.009 ps(-1).

  20. Application of rigid body mechanics to theoretical description of rotation within F0F1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Nartsissov, Yaroslav R; Mashkovtseva, Elena V

    2006-09-21

    ATP synthase catalyses the formation of ATP from ADP and P(i) and is powered by the diffusion of protons throughout membranes down the proton electrochemical gradient. The protein consists of a water-soluble F(1) and a transmembrane F(0) proton transporter part. It was previously shown that the ring of membrane subunits rotates past a fixed subunit during catalytic cycle of the enzyme. However, many parameters of this movement are still unknown. In the present study the mutual protein movement in the membrane part of F(0)F(1)-ATP syntase has been analysed within the framework of rigid body mechanics. On the base of available experimental data it was shown that electrostatic interaction of two charged amino acids residues is able to supply quite enough energy for the rotation. The initial torque, which caused the rotation, was estimated as 3.7 pN nm and for this pattern the angular movement of c subunits complex could not physically have a period less than 10(-9)s. If membrane viscosity and elastic resistance were taken into account then the time of a whole turnover could rise up to 6.3 x 10(-3)s. It is remarkable that rotation will take place only under condition when the elasticity (Young's) module of the central stalk (gamma subunit and other minor subunits) is less than 5.0 x 10(7)N/m(2). Thus, for generally accepted structural parameters of ATP synthase, two-charge electrostatic interaction model does not permit rotation of the rotor if elastic properties of the central stalk are tougher than mentioned above. In order to explain the rotation under that condition one should either suppose a shorter distance between subunit a and c subunits complex or assume interaction of more than two charged amino acids residues.

  1. Final Phase II Report : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L.

    2004-04-01

    District No.3. Therefore, local residents are not drinking or using the contaminated groundwater detected at the former facility. The Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory is performing the investigation at Centralia on behalf of the CCC/USDA. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these former facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite{reg_sign} environmental site characterization methodology. QuickSite is Argonne's proprietary implementation system for the expedited site characterization process. This methodology has been applied successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Nebraska and Kansas and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. Argonne's investigations are conducted with a phased approach. Phase I focuses primarily on the investigation and evaluation of geology, hydrogeology, and hydrogeochemistry to identify potential contaminant pathways at a site. Phase II focuses on delineating the contamination present in both soil and aquifers along the potential migration pathways. Phase I of Argonne's investigation was conducted in March-April 2002. The results and findings of the Phase I investigation at Centralia were reported previously (Argonne 2003). This report documents the findings of the Phase II activities at Centralia. Section 1 provides a brief history of the area, a review of the Phase I results and conclusions, technical objectives for the Phase II investigation, and a brief description of the sections contained in this report. Section 2 describes the investigative methods used during the Phase

  2. Final Phase II report : QuickSite(R) investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2003-11-01

    this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation to determine the source(s) and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to assess whether the contamination requires remedial action. The investigation at Everest is being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite{reg_sign} environmental site characterization methodology. This methodology has been applied successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and Nebraska and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. Phase I of the QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation examined the key geologic, hydrogeologic, and hydrogeochemical relationships that define potential contaminant migration pathways at Everest (Argonne 2001). Phase II of the QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation at Everest was undertaken with the primary goal of delineating and improving understanding of the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at this site and the potential source area(s) that might have contributed to this contamination. To address this goal, four specific technical objectives were developed to guide the Phase II field studies. Sampling of near-surface soils at the former Everest CCC/USDA facility that was originally planned for Phase I had to be postponed until October 2000 because of access restrictions. Viable vegetation was not available for sampling then. This period is termed the first session of Phase II

  3. Investigation into the specificity of angiotensin II-induced behavioral desensitization.

    PubMed

    Vento, Peter J; Myers, Kevin P; Daniels, Derek

    2012-02-28

    Angiotensin II (AngII) plays a key role in maintaining body fluid homeostasis. The physiological and behavioral effects of central AngII include increased blood pressure and fluid intake. In vitro experiments demonstrate that repeated exposure to AngII reduces the efficacy of subsequent AngII, and behavioral studies indicate that prior icv AngII administration reduces the dipsogenic response to AngII administered later. Specifically, rats given a treatment regimen of three icv injections of a large dose of AngII, each separated by 20 min, drink less water in response to a test injection of AngII than do vehicle-treated controls given the same test injection. The present studies were designed to test three potential explanations for the reduced dipsogenic potency of AngII after repeated administration. To this end, we tested for motor impairment caused by repeated injections of AngII, for a possible role of visceral distress or illness, and for differences in the pressor response to the final test injection of AngII. We found that repeated injections of AngII neither affected drinking stimulated by carbachol nor did they produce a conditioned flavor avoidance. Furthermore, we found no evidence that differences in the pressor response to the final test injection of AngII accounted for the difference in intake. In light of these findings, we are able to reject these three explanations for the observed behavioral desensitization, and, we suggest instead that the mechanism for this phenomenon may be at the level of the receptor.

  4. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  5. Treatment of Class II high angle malocclusions with the Herbst appliance: a cephalometric investigation.

    PubMed

    Schiavoni, R; Grenga, V; Macri, V

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the results of treatment of Class II malocclusions by using two different designs of the Herbst appliance. Cephalometric records from lateral headplates of 19 consecutively treated Class II cases were evaluated. The headplates were taken before and after the treatment stage in which the Herbst appliance was used. The patients were divided into two groups: the first group, normohypodivergent, was treated with the Herbst appliance attached to bands; the second group, hyperdivergent, was treated with the Herbst appliance attached to acrylic splints in which a high-pull headgear was also used. The results were compared between these groups and with a control group age-matched from Bolton standards to match the changes in the Herbst samples against what might be expected in case of normal growth during similar periods of time. The results of the investigation revealed the following: (1) 9 months of treatment resulted in Class I dental arch relationships in all 19 cases; (2) the Herbst appliance attached to bands did not significantly modify the vertical growth pattern of the normohypodivergent patients; and (3) in hyperdivergent patients, the use of a Herbst appliance attached to acrylic splints in conjunction with the use of a high-pull headgear allowed a better control of the vertical dimension, as assessed by the cephalometric parameters (FA, FMA, Go-Gn-SN). The clinician should be aware of the different dentofacial changes induced in the vertical plane by different designs of the Herbst appliance to better program treatment strategy.

  6. Photometric and Period Investigation of the Late F-type Overcontact Binary II UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Kreiner, J.

    2016-03-01

    II UMa is a late F-type (F5) contact binary with a close-in tertiary and a distant visual companion. According to the four-color (B V RcIc) light curves’ solutions of II UMa, it is a high fill-out (f = 86.6%) and low-mass ratio (q = 0.172) contact binary system, which indicates that it is at the late evolutionary stage of late-type tidal-locked binary stars. The masses of the primary star and secondary star are calculated to be {M}1=1.99{M}⊙ and {M}2=0.34{M}⊙ . The primary star has evolved from the zero-age main sequence, but it still appeared before the terminal-age main sequence, and the secondary star is even more evolved. Considering the mass ratio ({M}3/{M}1=0.67) obtained by spectroscopic observations, the mass of the close-in tertiary is estimated to be {M}3=1.34{M}⊙ . The period variations of the binary system are investigated for the first time. According to the observed-calculated (O-C) curve analysis, a continuous period increase at a rate of {dP}/{dt}=4.88× {10}-7 {day} {{yr}}-1 is determined. The parabolic variation in the O-C curve may be part of a cyclic period of change, or the combined period of change of a parabolic variation and a cyclic one. More instances of minimum light are needed to confirm this. The presence of the tertiary component may play an important role in the formation and evolution of this binary system by drawing angular momentum from the central system during the pre-contact stage.

  7. Structural Investigation of Zn(II) Insertion in Bayerite, an Aluminum Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Suraj Shiv Charan; Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Forano, Claude; Rees, Gregory J; Prevot, Vanessa; Hanna, John V; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-19

    Bayerite was treated under hydrothermal conditions (120, 130, 140, and 150 °C) to prepare a series of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with an ideal composition of ZnAl4(OH)12(SO4)0.5·nH2O (ZnAl4-LDHs). These products were investigated by both bulk techniques (powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis) and atomic-level techniques ((1)H and (27)Al solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy) to gain a detailed insight into the structure of ZnAl4-LDHs and sample composition. Four structural models (one stoichiometric and three different defect models) were investigated by Rietveld refinement of the PXRD data. These were assessed using the information obtained from other characterization techniques, which favored the ideal (nondefect) structural model for ZnAl4-LDH, as, for example, (27)Al magic-angle spinning NMR showed that excess Al was present as amorphous bayerite (Al(OH)3) and pseudoboehmite (AlOOH). Moreover, no evidence of cation mixing, that is, partial substitution of Zn(II) onto any of four Al sites, was observed. Altogether this study highlights the challenges involved to synthesize pure ZnAl4-LDHs and the necessity to use complementary techniques such as PXRD, elemental analysis, and solid-state NMR for the characterization of the local and extended structure of ZnAl4-LDHs. PMID:27598036

  8. Structural Investigation of Zn(II) Insertion in Bayerite, an Aluminum Hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Pushparaj, Suraj Shiv Charan; Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard; Forano, Claude; Rees, Gregory J; Prevot, Vanessa; Hanna, John V; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2016-09-19

    Bayerite was treated under hydrothermal conditions (120, 130, 140, and 150 °C) to prepare a series of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with an ideal composition of ZnAl4(OH)12(SO4)0.5·nH2O (ZnAl4-LDHs). These products were investigated by both bulk techniques (powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis) and atomic-level techniques ((1)H and (27)Al solid-state NMR, IR, and Raman spectroscopy) to gain a detailed insight into the structure of ZnAl4-LDHs and sample composition. Four structural models (one stoichiometric and three different defect models) were investigated by Rietveld refinement of the PXRD data. These were assessed using the information obtained from other characterization techniques, which favored the ideal (nondefect) structural model for ZnAl4-LDH, as, for example, (27)Al magic-angle spinning NMR showed that excess Al was present as amorphous bayerite (Al(OH)3) and pseudoboehmite (AlOOH). Moreover, no evidence of cation mixing, that is, partial substitution of Zn(II) onto any of four Al sites, was observed. Altogether this study highlights the challenges involved to synthesize pure ZnAl4-LDHs and the necessity to use complementary techniques such as PXRD, elemental analysis, and solid-state NMR for the characterization of the local and extended structure of ZnAl4-LDHs.

  9. Kinetic and spectroscopic investigation of Co{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, and N-oxalylglycine inhibition of the Fe{sup II}/{alpha}-ketoglutarate dioxygenase, TauD

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliri, Efthalia; Grzyska, Piotr K.; Hausinger, Robert P. . E-mail: hausinge@msu.edu

    2005-12-09

    Co{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, and N-oxalylglycine (NOG) are well-known inhibitors of Fe{sup II}/{alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}KG)-dependent hydroxylases, but few studies describe their kinetics and no spectroscopic investigations have been reported. Using taurine/{alpha}KG dioxygenase (TauD) as a paradigm for this enzyme family, time-dependent inhibition assays showed that Co{sup II} and Ni{sup II} follow slow-binding inhibition kinetics. Whereas Ni{sup II}-substituted TauD was non-chromophoric, spectroscopic studies of the Co{sup II}-substituted enzyme revealed a six-coordinate site (protein alone or with {alpha}KG) that became five-coordinate upon taurine addition. The Co{sup II} spectrum was not perturbed by a series of anions or oxidants, suggesting the Co{sup II} is inaccessible and could be used to stabilize the protein. NOG competed weakly (K {sub i} {approx} 290 {mu}M) with {alpha}KG for binding to TauD, with the increased electron density of NOG yielding electronic transitions for NOG-Fe{sup II}-TauD and taurine-NOG-Fe{sup II}-TauD at 380 nm ({epsilon} {sub 38} 90-105 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1}). The spectra of the NOG-bound TauD species did not change significantly upon oxygen exposure, arguing against the formation of an oxygen-bound state mimicking an early intermediate in catalysis.

  10. Global model of low-frequency chorus (fLHR<f<0.1fce) from multiple satellite observations

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Nigel P; Horne, Richard B; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M; Sicard-Piet, Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Whistler mode chorus is an important magnetospheric emission, playing a dual role in the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Chorus is typically generated in the equatorial region in the frequency range 0.1–0.8 fce, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency. However, as the waves propagate to higher latitudes, significant wave power can occur at frequencies below 0.1fce. Since this wave power is largely omitted in current radiation belt models, we construct a global model of low-frequency chorus, fLHR<f<0.1fce, using data from six satellites. We find that low-frequency chorus is strongest, with an average intensity of 200 pT2, in the prenoon sector during active conditions at midlatitudes (20°<|λm|<50°) from 4

  11. Proton conductance by the gramicidin water wire. Model for proton conductance in the F1F0 ATPases?

    PubMed Central

    Akeson, M; Deamer, D W

    1991-01-01

    The gramicidin channel contains a single strand of water molecules associated through hydrogen bonds. Previous work has shown that channels of similar size are formed by association of transmembrane alpha helices of synthetic leucine-serine peptides. Both types of channels translocate protons with considerable selectivity relative to other cations, and it has been proposed that the selectivity arises by proton "hopping" along hydrogen-bonded chains of water, whereas other cations must cross by ordinary diffusion processes. It is possible that a similar mechanism underlies proton transport in the Fo subunit of the F1F0 ATP synthase. Using the gramicidin channel as a model, we have tested whether a single strand of water is kinetically competent to translocate protons at a rate sufficient to support known rates of ATP synthesis. We found that the gramicidin channel saturates at approximately 530 pS of protonic current in 4 M HCl, more than sufficient for typical ATP synthesis rates. It follows that proton diffusion to a putative channel in Fo, rather than the channel itself, may limit ATP synthesis rates. PMID:1715764

  12. Structural investigation of PsbO from plant and cyanobacterial photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Daria; Rossmann, Maxim; Konarev, Petr V; Irrgang, Klaus-D; Saenger, Wolfram

    2011-03-18

    The manganese-stabilizing protein PsbO is associated with the luminal side of thylakoids close to the redox-active Mn(4)Ca cluster at the catalytically active site of photosystem II (PSII). PsbO is believed to increase the efficiency of oxygen evolution and to stabilize the Mn(4)Ca cluster against photoinhibition. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, we investigated the low-resolution structure of wild-type spinach PsbO and that of chimeric spinach PsbO fused with maltose-binding protein. Small-angle X-ray scattering data revealed that both proteins are monomeric in solution, and that plant and cyanobacterial PsbO have similar structures. We show a highly efficient expression system that allows recombinant production of the active wild type and the chimeric PsbO from spinach and cyanobacteria, with yields compatible with biophysical and structural studies. The binding of spinach PsbO fused with maltose-binding protein to PSII depleted of extrinsic subunits (PSII-ΔpsbO,P,Q) was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The reconstituted PSII was shown to have similar oxygen evolution rates as obtained with wild-type spinach PsbO.

  13. Vibrational dynamics of plant light-harvesting complex LHC II investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Maksym; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Rusevich, Leonid; Pieper, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from spinach was investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering (QENS and INS) at three different temperatures of 80, 160, and 285 K. QENS/INS spectra of solubilised LHC II and of the corresponding buffer solution were obtained separately and exhibit characteristic inelastic features. After subtraction of the buffer contribution, the INS spectrum of LHC II reveals a distinct Boson peak at ˜ 2.5 meV at 80 K that shifts towards lower energies if the temperature is increased to 285 K. This effect is interpreted in terms of a "softening" of the protein matrix along with the dynamical transition at ˜ 240 K. Our findings indicate that INS is a valuable method to obtain the density of vibrational states not only at cryogenic, but also at physiological temperatures.

  14. Evidence for the Synthesis of ATP by an F0F1 ATP Synthase in Membrane Vesicles from Halorubrum Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faguy, David; Lawson, Darion; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vesicles prepared in a buffer containing ADP, Mg(2+) and Pi synthesized ATP at an initial rate of 2 nmols/min/mg protein after acidification of the bulk medium (pH 8 (right arrow) 4). The intravesicular ATP concentration reached a steady state after about 30 seconds and slowly declined thereafter. ATP synthesis was inhibited by low concentrations of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and m-chlorophenylhydrazone indicating that synthesis took place in response to the proton gradient. NEM and PCMS, which inhibit vacuolar ATPases and the vacuolar-like ATPases of extreme halophiles, did not affect ATP synthesis, and, in fact, produced higher steady state levels of ATP. This suggested that two ATPase activities were present, one which catalyzed ATP synthesis and one that caused its hydrolysis. Azide, a specific inhibitor of F0F1 ATP Synthases, inhibited halobacterial ATP synthesis. The distribution of acridine orange as imposed by a delta pH demonstrated that azide inhibition was not due to the collapse of the proton gradient due to azide acting as a protonophore. Such an effect was observed, but only at azide concentrations higher than those that inhibited ATP synthesis. These results confirm the earler observations with cells of H. saccharovorum and other extreme halophiles that ATP synthesis is inconsistent with the operation of a vacuolar-like ATPase. Therefore, the observation that a vacuolar-like enzyme is responsible for ATP synthesis (and which serves as the basis for imputing ATP synthesis to the vacuolar-like ATPases of the extreme halophiles, and the Archaea in general) should be taken with some degree of caution.

  15. Measurement of CP Asymmetry in B0 -> f0 K0S, B0 → ϕK0 and B0 -> K+K-K0S Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Paul E.

    We present results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in f0(980)(-> π+π-)K^0S and B0 → K+K-K0. The measurements use a data sample consisting of approximately 209(f0(980)(-> π+π-)K^0S) and 227(B0 → K+K-K0) million B-meson pairs recorded at the ϒ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-meson Factory at SLAC. From a time-dependent maximum likelihood fit, we measure for B0 -> f0(980)(-> π+π-)K^0S: the mixing-induced CP violation parameter Sf_0 K = -0.95+0.32-0.23 (stat) ± 0.10 (syst) and the direct CP violation parameter Cf0K = -0.24 ± 0.31 (stat) ± 0.15 (syst). From a simultaneous fit to B0 -> φ K0S and B0 -> φ K0L decays, we find: Sφ K0S= -Sφ K0L = +0.50 ± 0.25 (stat)+0.07-0.04 (syst) and CϕK = 0.00 ± 0.23 (stat) ± 0.05 (syst). For B0 -> K+K-K^0S decays with B0 -> φ K0S decays excluded, we find: S{KKK( no\\ φ K0S) = -0.42 ± 0.17 (stat) ± 0.04 (syst) and C{KKK( no\\ φ K0S)} = +0.10 ± 0.14 (stat) ± 0.06 (syst). From the B0 -> K+K-K^0S decays with B0 -> φ K0S decays excluded, we extract the fraction of CP-even final states from angular moments feven = 0.89 ± 0.08 ± 0.06.

  16. The collision-induced non-adiabatic transitions from the f0 g+ state of the iodine ion-pair second tier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopyan, M. E.; Chinkova, I. Yu.; Fedorova, T. V.; Poretsky, S. A.; Pravilov, A. M.

    2004-07-01

    Non-adiabatic transitions from the f0 g+ state of the iodine ion-pair (IP) second tier induced by collision with iodine ground state molecules have been studied for the first time. The only I 2( f0g+,v f,J f limit→I2( X) F0u+,v F,J F) transition has been observed. No transitions between the states of the first and second tiers have been found. The dependences of the I 2( f0g+,v f,J f limit→I2( X) F0u+,v F,J F) transition rate constants on the vibrational vf=8-19, vF, rotational Jf≈55,85,105, JF quantum numbers, energy gaps, as well as their correlations with Franck-Condon factors (FCFs) of the initial and final levels have been studied. The principal features of the collision-induced non-adiabatic transitions in the first and second tiers are very similar.

  17. Investigations in foot shock stress of variable intensity in mice: Adaptation and role of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-08-15

    The present study investigated the stress adaptation and role of angiotensin in response to repeated exposures of electric foot shocks of varying intensity. Mice were subjected to moderate (0.5mA) or severe (1.5mA) electric foot shocks for 1h for 5 days. Stress-induced behavioral changes were assessed by actophotometer, hole board, open field and social interaction tests. The serum corticosterone levels were measured as an index of HPA axis. Telmisartan (a selective AT1 receptor blocker) was employed as a pharmacological tool. A single exposure of moderate and severe stress produced behavioral deficits and increased the corticosterone levels. The restoration of these alterations was observed in response to repeated exposures of moderate stress, while no adaptation was observed in severe foot shock stress. A single administration of telmisartan (5mg/kg) exacerbated the moderate stress-induced decrease in behavioral activity and increase in corticosterone levels on the first day of stress exposure, suggesting the anti-stress role of angiotensin. In contrast, telmisartan normalized severe stress-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations suggesting the stress inducing actions of angiotensin. Furthermore, treatment with telmisartan abolished the stress adaptive response following repeated exposures of moderate stress suggesting that angiotensin has an adaptive role. It is concluded that there is a differential adaptive response in foot shock stress depending upon the severity of stress. Angiotensin II may act as an anti-stress agent and helps to promote the adaptation during medium stress, whereas it may promote stress response during severe stress.

  18. A preliminary investigation of the Topaz II reactor as a lunar surface power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Polansky, G.F.; Houts, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    Reactor power supplies offer many attractive characteristics for lunar surface applications. The Topaz II reactor resulted from an extensive development program in the former Soviet Union. Flight quality reactor units remain from this program and are currently under evaluation in the United States. This paper examines the potential for applying the Topaz II, originally developed to provide spacecraft power, as a lunar surface power supply.

  19. Examination of the influence of the f0(975 ) and ϕ (1020) mesons on the surface gravitational redshift of the neutron star PSR J0348+0432

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xian-Feng

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the mesons f0(975 ) and ϕ (1020 ) on the surface gravitational redshift of the neutron star PSR J0348+0432 is examined in the framework of the relativistic mean field theory by choosing the suitable hyperon coupling constants. We find that compared with that without considering the mesons f0(975 ) and ϕ (1020 ) , the value range of the radius R of the neutron star PSR J0348+0432 would be changed from a narrow range 12.964 km ˜12.364 km to a wider range 12.941 km ˜11.907 km corresponding to the observation mass M =1.97 M⊙˜2.05 M⊙ . We also find that the value range of the surface gravitational redshift z of the neutron star PSR J0348+0432 changes from 0.3469 ˜0.3997 to 0.3480 ˜0.4263 corresponding to the observation mass M =1.97 M⊙˜2.05 M⊙ with the mesons f0(975 ) and ϕ (1020 ) being considered. This means that the radius R and the surface gravitational redshift z both will be constrained in a wider scope with the mesons f0(975 ) and ϕ (1020 ) being considered. We also can see that the difference of the radius and the surface gravitational redshift is not so large whether the mesons f0(975 ) and ϕ (1020 ) are considered or not. This indicates that the mesons f0(975 ) and ϕ (1020 ) do not play a major role in the massive neutron star PSR J0348+0432.

  20. Use of MHC class II tetramers to investigate CD4+ T cell responses: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Virginia; Moro, Monica; Del Mare, Sara; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2008-11-01

    MHC-class I tetramers technology enabled the characterization of peptide-specific T cells at the single cell level in a variety of studies. Several laboratories have also developed MHC-class II multimers to characterize Ag-specific CD4+ T cells. However, the generation and use of MHC-class II multimers seems more problematic than that of MHC-I multimers. We have generated HLA-DR*1101 tetramers in a versatile empty form, which can be loaded after purification with peptides of interest. We discuss the impact of critical biological and structural parameters for the optimal staining of Ag-specific CD4+ T cells using HLA-DR*1101 tetramers, such as: (i) activation state of CD4+ T cells; (ii) membrane trafficking in the target CD4+ T cells; (iii) binding characteristics of the loaded CD4 epitope. Our data indicate that reorganization of TCR on the plasma membrane upon CD4+ T cell activation, as well as an homogenous binding frame of the CD4 epitopes to the soluble HLA-DR monomer, are critical for a stable TCR/MHC-class II tetramer interaction. These factors, together with the low frequencies and affinities of specific CD4+ T cells, explain the need for in vitro expansion or ex vivo enrichment of specific T cells for the optimal visualization with MHC-class II tetramers. PMID:18612991

  1. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  2. Investigation of ionospheric precursors leading to spread F during the EQUIS II campaign on Kwajalein.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D.; Larsen, M.; Swenson, C.; Barjatya, A.; Wheeler, T.

    2005-05-01

    A sounding rocket investigation of bottom-type scattering layers, shear flow, and the factors which may precondition the equatorial F region ionosphere for postsunset instability was carried out in August, 2004 from the Roi Namur range during the EQUIS II campaign on Kwajalein Atoll. Identical experiments were performed on August 7 and 15, each comprised of the launch of an instrumented payload which measured plasma number density and vector electric field profiles along with two chemical release payloads. The latter deployed TMA trails from which vector neutral wind profiles in three locations could be deduced. Ground-based support was provided by the Altair radar, a dual-frequency radar capable of measuring both coherent and incoherent scatter. The purpose of the experiment was 1) to understand and quantify the vertical shear in the zonal plasma drift that occurs each day around sunset, 2) to understand the nature of the bottom-type scattering layers that inhabit westward-drifting strata in the bottomside F region and that serve as precursors for fully developed spread F, and 3) to understand the influence of shear flow on the postsunset ionosphere. Ground-based and in situ data confirm the presence of strong shear in the flow proceeding the emergence of spread F irregularities in both experiments. The bottom-type layers that formed exhibited properties consistent with horizontal wind-driven gradient drift instabilities growing in an inhomogeneous bottomside. Regular 30-50 km structuring similar to what has been observed recently at Jicamarca was also evident in the layers. This structuring was repeated in the spread F depletions that finally appeared. The structuring of the bottom-type layers therefore served as a telltale of the spread F irregularities to come. Moreover, the structuring may have been produced by shear instabilities as described recently by Hysell and Kudeki [2004]. Numerical modeling of the causes of the shear as well as its effects on

  3. Investigating the Conditions of the Formation of a Type II Radio Burst on 2014 January 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, W.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Ning, Z. J.; Ji, H. S.

    2016-10-01

    It is believed that type II radio bursts are generated by shock waves. In order to understand the generation conditions of type II radio bursts, we analyze the physical parameters of a shock front. The type II radio burst we selected was observed by the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) and Learmonth radio station and was associated with a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) occurring on 2014 January 8 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The evolution of the CME in the inner corona presents a double-layered structure that propagates outward. We fit the outer layer (OL) of the structure with a partial circle and divide it into seven directions from ‑45° to 45° with an angular separation of 15°. We measure the OL speed along the seven directions and find that the speed in the direction of ‑15° with respect to the central direction is the fastest. We use the differential emission measure method to calculate the physical parameters at the OL at the moment when the type II radio burst was initiated, including the temperature (T), emission measure (EM), temperature ratio ({T}d/{T}{{u}}), compression ratio (X), and Alfvén Mach number (M A). We compare the quantities X and M A to those obtained from band-splitting in the radio spectrum, and find that this type II radio burst is generated at a small region of the OL that is located at the sector in the 45° direction. The results suggest that the generation of type II radio bursts (shocks) requires larger values of X and M A rather than simply a higher speed of the disturbance.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of new water soluble Mn(II)(2) and Mg(II)(2) complexes for the substrate binding models of xylose/glucose isomerases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ayan; Bera, Manindranath

    2014-01-30

    In methanol, the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of Mn(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H(3)hpnbpda [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in the presence of NaOH, afforded a new water soluble dinuclear manganese(II) complex, [Mn2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1). Similarly, the reaction of Mg(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H3hpnbpda in the presence of NaOH, in methanol, yielded a new water soluble dinuclear magnesium(II) complex, [Mg2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)(H2O)2] (2). DFT calculations have been performed for the structural optimization of complexes 1 and 2. The DFT optimized structure of complex 1 shows that two manganese(II) centers are in a distorted square pyramidal geometry, whereas the DFT optimized structure of complex 2 reveals that two magnesium(II) centers adopt a six-coordinate distorted octahedral geometry. To understand the mode of substrate binding and the mechanistic details of the active site metals in xylose/glucose isomerases (XGI), we have investigated the binding interactions of biologically important monosaccharides d-glucose and d-xylose with complexes 1 and 2, in aqueous alkaline solution by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis, fluorescence, and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence spectra show the binding-induced gradual decrease in emission of complexes 1 and 2 accompanied by a significant blue shift upon increasing the concentration of sugar substrates. The binding modes of d-glucose and d-xylose with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for C1 and C2 carbon atoms.

  5. New Insights into the Unique Structure of the F0F1-ATP Synthase from the Chlamydomonad Algae Polytomella sp. and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    van Lis, Robert; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Groth, Georg; Atteia, Ariane

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the structure of the mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase of the colorless alga Polytomella sp. with respect to the enzyme of its green close relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. It is demonstrated that several unique features of the ATP synthase in C. reinhardtii are also present in Polytomella sp. The α- and β-subunits of the ATP synthase from both algae are highly unusual in that they exhibit extensions at their N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. Several subunits of the Polytomella ATP synthase in the range of 9 to 66 kD have homologs in the green alga but do not have known equivalents as yet in mitochondrial ATP synthases of mammals, plants, or fungi. The largest of these so-called ASA (ATP Synthase-Associated) subunits, ASA1, is shown to be an extrinsic protein. Short heat treatment of isolated Polytomella mitochondria unexpectedly dissociated the otherwise highly stable ATP synthase dimer of 1,600 kD into subcomplexes of 800 and 400 kD, assigned as the ATP synthase monomer and F1-ATPase, respectively. Whereas no ASA subunits were found in the F1-ATPase, all but two were present in the monomer. ASA6 (12 kD) and ASA9 (9 kD), predicted to be membrane bound, were not detected in the monomer and are thus proposed to be involved in the formation or stabilization of the enzyme. A hypothetical configuration of the Chlamydomonad dimeric ATP synthase portraying its unique features is provided to spur further research on this topic. PMID:17468226

  6. Pitch (F0) and formant profiles of human vowels and vowel-like baboon grunts: The role of vocalizer body size and voice-acoustic allometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendall, Drew; Kollias, Sophie; Ney, Christina; Lloyd, Peter

    2005-02-01

    Key voice features-fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies-can vary extensively between individuals. Much of the variation can be traced to differences in the size of the larynx and vocal-tract cavities, but whether these differences in turn simply reflect differences in speaker body size (i.e., neutral vocal allometry) remains unclear. Quantitative analyses were therefore undertaken to test the relationship between speaker body size and voice F0 and formant frequencies for human vowels. To test the taxonomic generality of the relationships, the same analyses were conducted on the vowel-like grunts of baboons, whose phylogenetic proximity to humans and similar vocal production biology and voice acoustic patterns recommend them for such comparative research. For adults of both species, males were larger than females and had lower mean voice F0 and formant frequencies. However, beyond this, F0 variation did not track body-size variation between the sexes in either species, nor within sexes in humans. In humans, formant variation correlated significantly with speaker height but only in males and not in females. Implications for general vocal allometry are discussed as are implications for speech origins theories, and challenges to them, related to laryngeal position and vocal tract length. .

  7. The roles of voice onset time and F0 in stop consonant voicing perception: Effects of masking noise and low-pass filtering

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Matthew B.; Chatterjee, Monita; Idsardi, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The contributions of voice onset time (VOT) and fundamental frequency (F0) were evaluated for the perception of voicing in syllable-initial stop consonants in words that were low-pass filtered and/or masked by speech-shaped noise. It was expected that listeners would rely less on VOT and more on F0 in these degraded conditions. Method Twenty young normal-hearing listeners identified modified natural speech tokens that varied by VOT and F0 in several conditions of low-pass filtering and masking noise. Stimuli included /b/-/p/ and /d/-/t/ continua that were presented in separate blocks. Identification results were modeled using mixed-effects logistic regression. Results When speech was filtered and/or masked by noise, listeners’ voicing perceptions were driven less by VOT and more by F0. Speech-shaped masking noise exerted greater effects on the /b/-/p/ contrast, while low-pass filtering exerted greater effects on the /d/-/t/ contrast, consistent with the acoustics of these contrasts. Conclusion Listeners can adjust their use of acoustic-phonetic cues in a dynamic way that is appropriate for challenging listening conditions; cues that are less influential in ideal conditions can gain priority in challenging conditions. PMID:23785185

  8. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of selenite reduction by FeII-bearing minerals.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Andreas C; Kirsch, Regina; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Zaenker, Harald; Funke, Harald; Charlet, Laurent

    2008-12-12

    The long-lived radionuclide 79Se is one of the elements of concern for the safe storage of high-level nuclear waste, since clay minerals in engineered barriers and natural aquifer sediments strongly adsorb cationic species, but to lesser extent anions like selenate (SeVIO4(2-)) and selenite (SeIVO3(2-)). Previous investigations have demonstrated, however, that SeIV and SeVI are reduced by surface-associated FeII, thereby forming insoluble Se0 and Fe selenides. Here we show that the mixed FeII/III (hydr)oxides green rust and magnetite, and the FeII sulfide mackinawite reduce selenite rapidly (< 1 day) to FeSe, while the slightly slower reduction by the FeII carbonate siderite produces elemental Se. In the case of mackinawite, both S(-II) and FeII surface atoms are oxidized at a ratio of one to four by producing a defective mackinawite surface. Comparison of these spectroscopic results with thermodynamic equilibrium modeling provides evidence that the nature of reduction end product in these FeII systems is controlled by the concentration of HSe(-); Se0 forms only at lower HSe(-) concentrations related to slower HSeO3(-) reduction kinetics. Even under thermodynamically unstable conditions, the initially formed Se solid phases may remain stable for longer periods since their low solubility prevents the dissolution required for a phase transformation into more stable solids. The reduction by Fe2+-montmorillonite is generally much slower and restricted to a pH range, where selenite is adsorbed (pH < 7), stressing the importance of a heterogeneous, surface-enhanced electron transfer reaction. Although the solids precipitated by the redox reaction are nanocrystalline, their solubility remains below 6.3 x 10(-8) M. No evidence for aqueous metal selenide colloids nor for Se sorption to colloidal phases was found. Since FeII phases like the ones investigated here should be ubiquitous in the near field of nuclear waste disposals as well as in the surrounding aquifers

  9. X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of selenite reduction by Fe II-bearing minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinost, Andreas C.; Kirsch, Regina; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Zaenker, Harald; Funke, Harald; Charlet, Laurent

    2008-12-01

    The long-lived radionuclide 79Se is one of the elements of concern for the safe storage of high-level nuclear waste, since clay minerals in engineered barriers and natural aquifer sediments strongly adsorb cationic species, but to lesser extent anions like selenate (Se VIO 42-) and selenite (Se IVO 32-). Previous investigations have demonstrated, however, that Se IV and Se VI are reduced by surface-associated Fe II, thereby forming insoluble Se 0 and Fe selenides. Here we show that the mixed Fe II/ III (hydr)oxides green rust and magnetite, and the Fe II sulfide mackinawite reduce selenite rapidly (< 1 day) to FeSe, while the slightly slower reduction by the Fe II carbonate siderite produces elemental Se. In the case of mackinawite, both S -II and Fe II surface atoms are oxidized at a ratio of one to four by producing a defective mackinawite surface. Comparison of these spectroscopic results with thermodynamic equilibrium modeling provides evidence that the nature of reduction end product in these Fe II systems is controlled by the concentration of HSe -; Se 0 forms only at lower HSe - concentrations related to slower HSeO 3- reduction kinetics. Even under thermodynamically unstable conditions, the initially formed Se solid phases may remain stable for longer periods since their low solubility prevents the dissolution required for a phase transformation into more stable solids. The reduction by Fe 2+-montmorillonite is generally much slower and restricted to a pH range, where selenite is adsorbed (pH < 7), stressing the importance of a heterogeneous, surface-enhanced electron transfer reaction. Although the solids precipitated by the redox reaction are nanocrystalline, their solubility remains below 6.3 × 10 - 8 M. No evidence for aqueous metal selenide colloids nor for Se sorption to colloidal phases was found. Since Fe II phases like the ones investigated here should be ubiquitous in the near field of nuclear waste disposals as well as in the surrounding

  10. Interacting cytoplasmic loops of subunits a and c of Escherichia coli F1F0 ATP synthase gate H+ transport to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Steed, P Ryan; Kraft, Kaitlin A; Fillingame, Robert H

    2014-11-25

    H(+)-transporting F1F0 ATP synthase catalyzes the synthesis of ATP via coupled rotary motors within F0 and F1. H(+) transport at the subunit a-c interface in transmembranous F0 drives rotation of a cylindrical c10 oligomer within the membrane, which is coupled to rotation of subunit γ within the α3β3 sector of F1 to mechanically drive ATP synthesis. F1F0 functions in a reversible manner, with ATP hydrolysis driving H(+) transport. ATP-driven H(+) transport in a select group of cysteine mutants in subunits a and c is inhibited after chelation of Ag(+) and/or Cd(+2) with the substituted sulfhydryl groups. The H(+) transport pathway mapped via these Ag(+)(Cd(+2))-sensitive Cys extends from the transmembrane helices (TMHs) of subunits a and c into cytoplasmic loops connecting the TMHs, suggesting these loop regions could be involved in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm. Here, using select loop-region Cys from the single cytoplasmic loop of subunit c and multiple cytoplasmic loops of subunit a, we show that Cd(+2) directly inhibits passive H(+) transport mediated by F0 reconstituted in liposomes. Further, in extensions of previous studies, we show that the regions mediating passive H(+) transport can be cross-linked to each other. We conclude that the loop-regions in subunits a and c that are implicated in H(+) transport likely interact in a single structural domain, which then functions in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm.

  11. Investigation of the strontium (Sr(II)) adsorption of an alginate microsphere as a low-cost adsorbent for removal and recovery from seawater.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Park, In-Su; Ryu, Taegong; Chung, Kang-Sup; Kim, Byuong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated alginate microspheres as a low-cost adsorbent for strontium (Sr(II)) removal and recovery from seawater. Alginate microspheres have demonstrated a superior adsorption capacity for Sr(II) ions (≈110 mg/g). A Freundlich isotherm model fits well with the Sr(II) adsorption of an alginate microsphere. The mechanism of Sr(II) adsorption is inferred as an ion exchange reaction with Ca(II) ions. The effects of the solution pH and co-existing ions in seawater are also investigated. Except for a pH of 1-2, Sr(II) adsorption capacity is not affected by pH. However, increasing the seawater concentration of metal cations seriously decreases Sr(II) uptake. In particular, highly concentrated (15,000 mg/L) Na(I) ions significantly interfere with Sr(II) adsorption. Sr(II) desorption was performed using 0.1 M HCl and CaCl2. Both regenerants show an excellent desorption efficiency, but the FTIR spectrum reveals that the chemical structure of the microsphere is destroyed after repeated use of HCl. Conversely, CaCl2 successfully desorbed Sr(II) without damage, and the Sr(II) adsorption capacity does not decrease after three repeated uses. The alginate microsphere was also applied to the adsorption of Sr(II) in a real seawater medium. Because of inhibition by co-existing ions, the Sr(II) adsorption capacity was decreased and the adsorption rate was retarded compared with D.I. water. Although the Sr(II) adsorption capacity was decreased, the alginate microsphere still exhibited 17.8 mg/g of Sr(II) uptake in the seawater medium. Considering its excellent Sr(II) uptake in seawater and its reusability, an alginate microsphere is an appropriate cost-effective adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Sr(II) from seawater.

  12. Contribution of lone-pairs to birefringence affected by the Pb(II) coordination environment: a DFT investigation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Qun; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Shilie; Xue, Dongfeng

    2015-09-14

    Pb(II) cations have long been associated with lone-pairs which can help to enhance the optical anisotropic birefringence. In this paper, the contribution of lead cations to birefringence has been investigated using first-principles and real-space atom-cutting methods. The results show that the contribution of lead cations to birefringence is determined by the degree of stereochemical activity, which is affected by the coordination environment of lead cations. PMID:26234398

  13. Evolutionary behaviour of AGN: Investigations on BL Lac objects and Seyfert II galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, V.

    2000-12-01

    The evolution and nature of AGN is still one of the enigmatic questions in astrophysics. While large and complete Quasar samples are available, special classes of AGN, like BL Lac objects and Seyfert II galaxies, are still rare objects. In this work I present two new AGN samples. The first one is the HRX-BL Lac survey, resulting in a sample of X-ray selected BL Lac objects. This sample results from 223 BL Lac candidates based on a correlation of X-ray sources with radio sources. The identification of this sample is 98% complete. 77 objects have been identified as BL Lac objects and form the HRX-BL Lac complete sample, the largest homogeneous sample of BL Lac objects existing today. For this sample, redshifts are now known for 62 objects (81 %). In total I present 101 BL Lac objects in the enlarged HRX-BL Lac survey, for which redshift information is available for 84 objects. During the HRX-BL Lac survey I found several objects of special interest. 1ES 1517+656 turned out to be the brightest known BL Lac object in the universe. 1ES 0927+500 could be the first BL Lac object with a line detected in the X-ray region. RX J1211+2242 is probably the the counterpart of the up to now unidentified gamma-ray source 3EG J1212+2304. Additionally I present seven candidates for ultra high frequency peaked BL Lac objects. RX J1054+3855 and RX J1153+3517 are rare high redshift X-ray bright QSO or accreting binary systems with huge magnetic fields. For the BL Lac objects I suggest an unified scenario in which giant elliptical galaxies, formed by merging events of spiral galaxies at z > 2, start as powerful, radio dominated BL Lacs. As the jet gets less powerful, the BL Lacs start to get more X-ray dominated, showing less total luminosities (for z < 1). This effect is seen in the different evolutionary behavior detected in high and low frequency cut off BL Lac objects (HBL and LBL, respectively). The model of negative evolution is supported by assumptions about the energetic effects

  14. An Investigation Of The Metallicity Dependence Of The Sn Type Ii Mn Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Sobeck, J.; Frohlich, C.; Truran, J.

    2010-01-01

    Element abundance trends over the history of our Galaxy serve as important guides in establishing relative contributions from supernovae of Types Ia and II. In particular, spectroscopic studies have revealed a deficiency of manganese (Mn) relative to the abundances of neighboring iron-peak nuclei in metal-poor stars. However, more recent analyses of the observational data have found a constant Mn/Fe abundance ratio over a wide range of metallicity and hence, contradict these previous findings. In this project, we will study the nucleosynthetic yields of Type II supernovae as a function of metallicity by parameterizing the initial properties of the shock. We will compare our results with the two distinct manganese abundance trends identified above. Once we study the metallicity dependency of Type II yields as reflected in observations at lower metallicities, we will explore the constraints this imposes on Type Ia supernova contributions to Mn in different stellar and galactic populations. We acknowledge the financial support by the National Science Foundation for the Frontier Center Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA). C.F. acknowledges an Enrico Fermi Fellowship.

  15. Theoretical investigation of exchange of N2 and H2 in sII clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Hou, Jian; Xu, Jiafang; Liu, Haiying; Li, Shujuan; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    The replacement of N2 with H2 in sII clathrate hydrates was studied through ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. From the thermodynamic analysis, we suggest that the replacement is more likely to occur in the large cages than in the small cages. H2 and N2 can coexist in the same large cage or in the different cages, forming binary H2-N2 hydrates. Simulations show that the loading capacity of H2 can reach up to ∼4.4 wt% by the replacement method, indicating that the clathrate hydrates are a promising material for hydrogen storage under moderate conditions.

  16. XRD, SEM and EXAFS investigation of cobalt (II) macro cyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath; Mishra, Niyati

    2012-06-01

    Cobalt (II) complexes were synthesis by chemical rout method. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). XRD analysis shows that sample is crystalline in nature and having particle size in the range of few micro meters, SEM is designed for studying of the surfaces of solid objects and EXAFS technique extract the local structure of complexes. The nearest neighboring atom distances commonly known as `bond length' were calculated using different methods and also compared with IFEFFIT method.

  17. Metabolism of methandrostenolone in the horse: a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric investigation of phase I and phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A R; Ridley, D D; Suann, C J

    2001-12-01

    The phase I and phase II metabolism of the anabolic steroid methandrostenolone was investigated following oral administration to a standardbred gelding. In the phase I study, metabolites were isolated from the urine by solid-phase extraction, deconjugated by acid catalysed methanolysis and converted to their O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl derivatives. GC-MS analysis indicated the major metabolic processes to be sequential reduction of the A-ring and hydroxylation at C6 and C16. In the phase II study, unconjugated, beta-glucuronidated and sulfated metabolites were fractionated and deconjugated using a combination of liquid-liquid extraction, enzyme hydrolysis, solid-phase extraction and acid catalysed methanolysis. Derivatization followed by GC-MS analysis revealed extensive conjugation to both glucuronic and sulfuric acids, with only a small proportion of metabolites occurring in unconjugated form. PMID:11817312

  18. Experimental investigation on the mechanism of chelation-assisted, copper(II) acetate-accelerated azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Gui-Chao; Guha, Pampa M; Brotherton, Wendy S; Simmons, J Tyler; Stankee, Lisa A; Nguyen, Brian T; Clark, Ronald J; Zhu, Lei

    2011-09-01

    mediating a 2-picolylazide-involved AAC reaction than the fully reduced Cu(OAc)(2). Finally, the discontinuous kinetic behavior that has been observed by us and others in copper(I/II)-mediated AAC reactions is explained by the likely catalyst disintegration during the course of a relatively slow reaction. Complementing the prior mechanistic conclusions drawn by other investigators, which primarily focus on the copper(I)/alkyne interactions, we emphasize the kinetic significance of copper(I/II)/azide interaction. This work not only provides a mechanism accounting for the fast Cu(OAc)(2)-mediated AAC reactions involving chelating azides, which has apparent practical implications, but suggests the significance of mixed-valency dinuclear copper species in catalytic reactions where two copper centers carry different functions. PMID:21809811

  19. Paleotectonic investigations of the Mississippian System in the United States: Parts I and II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; Connor, Carol Waite; Others,

    1979-01-01

    This professional paper is the fifth in a series of paleotectonic studies each covering a geologic system in the conterminous United States. Part I provides a region-by-region discussion of data concerning the Mississippian System and an explanation and documentation for the maps and sections contained in part III. Part II of the paper provides a summary of the Mississippian System, presents interregional interpretations permitted by this study, and includes sections on notable features of the system. The maps contained in the separate case as part III may be divided into two groups: (1) a sequence of factual or basic maps that shows, with a minimum of interpretation, the Mississippian System as it occurs today, and (2) interpretive maps that attempt a reasonable reconstruction of the original extent of the system, its tectonics, environment, and geography.

  20. Flight investigation of natural laminar flow on the Bellanca Skyrocket II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Obara, C. J.; Gregorek, G. M.; Hoffman, M. J.; Freuhler, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Two major concerns have inhibited the use of natural laminar flow (NLF) for viscous drag reduction on production aircraft. These are the concerns of achieveability of NLF on practical airframe surfaces, and maintainability in operating environments. Previous research in this area left a mixture of positive and negative conclusions regarding these concerns. While early (pre-1950) airframe construction methods could not achieve NLF criteria for waviness, several modern construction methods (composites for example) can achieve the required smoothness. This paper presents flight experiment data on the achieveability and maintainability of NLF on a high-performance, single-propeller, composite airplane, the Bellanca Skyrocket II. The significant contribution of laminar flow to the performance of this airplane was measured. Observations of laminar flow in the propeller slipstream are discussed, as are the effects of insect contamination on the wing. These observations have resulted in a new appreciation of the operational feasibility for achieving and maintaining NLF on modern airframe surfaces.

  1. Complex formation of Sn(II) with glycine: An IR, DTA/TGA and DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikova, Galina V.; Petrov, Alexander I.; Staloverova, Natalya A.; Samoilo, Alexander S.; Dergachev, Ilya D.; Shubin, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The novel Sn(Gly)2ṡH2O complex compound has been synthesized and characterized by TGA, IR and Raman spectroscopy. Molecular spectroscopy and ab initio simulation have given the evidence of glycine molecule being coordinated to Sn(II) as bidentate chelating ligand by oxygen atom of carboxyl group and nitrogen atom of amino group. Water molecule is bonded with amino and carboxylic groups by hydrogen bonds in the out sphere. The M06, TPSS, TPSSm, TPSSh and revTPSS density functionals have been tested for calculation of structural and vibrational data. The vibrational assignment of experimental IR and Raman and simulated spectra has been carried out. The TPSS and TPSSm density functionals and Def2-TZVP basis set have provided the most accurate results.

  2. Speech Production in Parkinson's Disease: II. Acoustic and Electropalatographic Investigation of Sentence, Word and Segment Durations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuliffe, Megan J.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Murdoch, Bruce E.

    2006-01-01

    Previous investigations employing electropalatography (EPG) have identified articulatory timing deficits in individuals with acquired dysarthria. However, this technology is yet to be applied to the articulatory timing disturbance present in Parkinson's disease (PD). As a result, the current investigation aimed to use EPG to comprehensively…

  3. Electronic structure of a new layered bismuth oxyselenide superconductor: LaO0.5F0.5BiSe2.

    PubMed

    Xia, M; Jiang, J; Niu, X H; Liu, J Z; Wen, C H P; Lu, H Y; Lou, X; Pu, Y J; Huang, Z C; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, H H; Xie, B P; Shen, D W; Feng, D L

    2015-07-22

    LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) is a new layered superconductor discovered recently, which shows the superconducting transition temperature of 3.5 K. With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we study the electronic structure of LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) comprehensively. Two electron-like bands are located around the X point of the Brillouin zone, and the outer pockets connect with each other and form large Fermi surface around Γ and M. These bands show negligible k(z) dispersion, indicating their two-dimensional nature. Based on the Luttinger theorem, the carrier concentration is about 0.53 e(-) per unit cell, close to its nominal value. Moreover, the photoemission data and the band structure calculations agree very well, and the renormalization factor is nearly 1.0, indicating the electron correlations in this material are rather weak. Our results suggest that LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) is a conventional BCS superconductor without strong electron correlations.

  4. Guidelines for conducting bulletproof workplace investigations: Part II--searches, surveillance, and other legal issues.

    PubMed

    Koen, Clifford M; Mitchell, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    A proper and thorough investigation can help avoid or successfully defend lawsuits. When conducting workplace investigations, employers must take care to conduct reasonable searches and not violate employees' rights to privacy. This article addresses privacy and other legal issues surrounding the use of various types of electronic surveillance including wiretapping, video/photography, and monitoring of e-mail. While conducting such searches, employers must be vigilant in their efforts to avoid liability for defamation and to properly document the investigation. Guidance is provided on these issues along with advice on the recommendation and/or remedial action that may result from the investigation and a checklist of additional considerations when conducting investigations resulting from harassment. PMID:22842757

  5. Competing effects of Mn and Y doping on the low-energy excitations and phase diagram of La1 -yYyFe1 -xMnxAsO0.89F0.11 iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, M.; Sanna, S.; Lamura, G.; Shiroka, T.; De Renzi, R.; Kappenberger, R.; Afrassa, M. A.; Wurmehl, S.; Wolter, A. U. B.; Büchner, B.; Carretta, P.

    2016-08-01

    Muon spin rotation (μ SR ) and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were performed to investigate the effect of Mn for Fe substitutions in La1 -yYyFe1 -xMnxAsO0.89F0.11 superconductors. While for y =0 a very low critical concentration of Mn (x =0.2 % ) is needed to quench superconductivity, as y increases the negative chemical pressure introduced by Y for La substitution stabilizes superconductivity and for y =20 % it is suppressed at Mn contents an order of magnitude larger. A magnetic phase arises once superconductivity is suppressed both for y =0 and for y =20 % . Low-energy spin fluctuations give rise to a peak in 19F NMR 1 /T1 with an onset well above the superconducting transition temperature and whose magnitude increases with x . Also the static magnetic correlations probed by 19F NMR linewidth measurements show a marked increase with Mn content. The disruption of superconductivity and the onset of the magnetic ground state are discussed in the light of the proximity of LaFeAsO0.89F0.11 to a quantum critical point.

  6. Upper Critical Field, Critical Current Density and Activation Energy of the New La1-xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2 (x = 0.2, 0.8) Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalai Selvan, Ganesan; Singh Thakur, Gohil; Manikandan, Krishnan; Uwatoko, Yoshia; Haque, Zeba; Gupta, Laxmi Chand; Ganguli, Ashok Kumar; Arumugam, Sonachalam

    2015-12-01

    Critical current density (Jc), thermal activation energy (U0), and upper critical field (Hc2) of La1-xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2 (x = 0.2, 0.8) superconductors are investigated from magnetic field dependent ρ(T) studies. The estimated upper critical field (Hc2) has low values of 1.04 T for x = 0.2 and 1.41 T for x = 0.8. These values are lower than Sm free LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 superconductor (1.9 T). The critical current density (Jc) is estimated to be 1.35 × 105 and 5.07 × 105 A/cm2 (2 K) for x = 0.2 and 0.8 respectively, using the Bean's model. The thermal activation energy (U0/kB) is 61 K for x = 0.2 and 140 K for x = 0.8 as calculated from Arrhenius plots at low magnetic field (1 T) and indicates a strong flux pinning potential which might be co-existing with applied magnetic field.

  7. Magnetotransport and thermal properties characterization of 55 K superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Amit; Pal, Anand; Singh, Saurabh; Shekhar, C.; Singh, H. K.; Awana, V. P. S.; Srivastava, O. N.

    2013-09-01

    This report fairly underlines the magneto-transport, thermal properties characterization and bulk superconductivity in the FeAs-based SmFeAsO0.85F0.1. The phase formation and structure are confirmed by Rietveld analysis of room temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Electron microscopy was employed to unravel the micro structural details, such as perfection of the lattice and the grain morphology including size and boundaries. The electrical and magnetic measurements have been carried out to confirm the bulk superconductivity and understand the nature of electrical transport in the normal and superconducting state. The intra-grain critical current density (Jc) with applied magnetic field is calculated from isothermal DC magnetization (MH) plots using conventional Bean critical state model. Superconductivity is observed at transition temperature (Tc) above 55 K without HPHT (high pressure high temperature) synthesis route. The value of Jc is found to be around 5.26 × 104 A/cm2 at 5 K in zero field. The dependence of thermally activated flux flow energy (U/kB) on the applied magnetic field has been observed. AC susceptibility measurements were performed for 55 K superconducting SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample at various amplitude of applied AC drive field and its granular nature is confirmed. The parent compound SmFeAsO is found to be magnetic with Fe spin density wave (SDW) like order below 150 K, on the other hand the F doped SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample is bulk superconducting at below 55 K. Both Fe (SDW) at 150 K for SmFeAsO and 55 K superconductivity in case of SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample has confirmed by Specific heat [Cp(T)] measurement too. Further Sm orders anti-ferro-magnetically at 4.5 K for non-superconducting and at 3.5 K for superconducting samples, also the entropy change is reduced significantly for the later than the former. Summarily complete physical property characterization for both non-superconducting SmFeAsO and 55 K superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0

  8. Investigation of HV/HR-CMOS technology for the ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Grillo, A. A.; Liang, Z.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; Seiden, A.; Volk, J.; Affolder, A.; Buckland, M.; Meng, L.; Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; McMahon, S.; Nickerson, R.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Shipsey, I.; Vigani, L.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Kanisauskas, K.; Maneuski, D.; Benoit, M.; Di Bello, F.; Caragiulo, P.; Dragone, A.; Grenier, P.; Kenney, C.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Turchetta, R.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Ehrler, F.; Peric, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Stanitzki, M.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Seidel, S.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Wang, R.; Zhang, J.; Warren, M.; Song, W.; Xiu, Q.; Zhu, H.

    2016-09-01

    ATLAS has formed strip CMOS project to study the use of CMOS MAPS devices as silicon strip sensors for the Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade. This choice of sensors promises several advantages over the conventional baseline design, such as better resolution, less material in the tracking volume, and faster construction speed. At the same time, many design features of the sensors are driven by the requirement of minimizing the impact on the rest of the detector. Hence the target devices feature long pixels which are grouped to form a virtual strip with binary-encoded z position. The key performance aspects are radiation hardness compatibility with HL-LHC environment, as well as extraction of the full hit position with full-reticle readout architecture. To date, several test chips have been submitted using two different CMOS technologies. The AMS 350 nm is a high voltage CMOS process (HV-CMOS), that features the sensor bias of up to 120 V. The TowerJazz 180 nm high resistivity CMOS process (HR-CMOS) uses a high resistivity epitaxial layer to provide the depletion region on top of the substrate. We have evaluated passive pixel performance, and charge collection projections. The results strongly support the radiation tolerance of these devices to radiation dose of the HL-LHC in the strip tracker region. We also describe design features for the next chip submission that are motivated by our technology evaluation.

  9. Photophysical and computational investigations of bis(phosphine) organoplatinum(II) metallacycles.

    PubMed

    Pollock, J Bryant; Cook, Timothy R; Stang, Peter J

    2012-06-27

    A series of endohedral and exohedral amine-functionalized ligands were synthesized and used in the construction of supramolecular D(2h) rhomboids and a D(6h) hexagon. These supramolecular polygons were obtained via self-assembly of 120° dipyridyl donors with 180° or 120° diplatinum precursors when combined in 1:1 ratios. Steady-state absorption and emission spectra were collected for each ligand and metallacycle. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations were employed to probe the nature of the observed optical transitions for the rhomboids. The emissive properties of these bis(phosphine) organoplatinum metallacycles arise from ligand-centered transitions involving π-type molecular orbitals with modest contributions from metal-based atomic orbitals. The D(2h) rhomboid self-assembled from 2,6-bis(4-pyridylethynyl)aniline and a 60° organoplatinum(II) acceptor has a low-energy excited state in the visible region and emits above 500 nm, properties which greatly differ from those of the parent 2,6-bis(4-pyridylethynyl)aniline ligand. PMID:22691193

  10. An investigation of long-distance propagation of gravity waves under CAWSES India Phase II Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, N.; Taori, A.

    2015-05-01

    Coordinated measurements of airglow features from the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region were performed at Allahabad (25.5° N, 81.9° E) and Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India to study the propagation of gravity waves in 13-27° N latitude range during the period June 2009 to May 2010 under CAWSES (Climate And Weather of Sun Earth System) India Phase II Programme. At Allahabad, imaging observations of OH broadband emissions and OI 557.7 nm emission were made using an all-sky imager, while at Gadanki photometric measurements of OH (6, 2) Meinel band and O2 (0, 1) Atmospheric band emissions were carried out. On many occasions, the nightly observations reveal the presence of similar waves at both locations. Typically, the period of observed similar waves lay in the 2.2-4.5 h range, had large phase speeds (~ 77-331 m s-1) and large wavelengths (~ 1194-2746 km). The images of outgoing long-wave radiation activity of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the high-resolution infrared images of KALPANA-1 satellite suggest that such waves possibly originated from some nearby convective sources. An analysis of their propagation characteristics in conjunction with SABER/TIMED temperature profiles and Horizontal Wind Model (HWM 2007) wind estimates suggest that the waves propagated over long distances (~ 1200-2000 km) in atmospheric ducts.

  11. Investigating the Apoptosis Ability of Ethylenediamine 8-Hydroxyquinolinato Palladium (II) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Rezaei, Elham; Kamranfar, Farzaneh; Heidari Majd, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High solubility, low renal toxicity and apoptosis-inducing ability of palladium complexes are the reasons for their synthesis. Methods: In vitro cytotoxic study of previously synthesized [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3 , was carried out on breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines and prostate cancer DU145 cell lines. DNA fragmentation indicative of apoptotic was also evaluated by TUNEL assay on DU145 cell line. Results: FT-IR spectra of final complex confirmed the existence of chelating ligands. The DU145 cells unlike the MCF-7 cells, demonstrated the significant influence of the Pd (II) complex. The IC50 values of [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3 and cisplatin on DU145 cells were 27 and 8.3 μM, respectively. Moreover, nearly 38% apoptosis was evident in DU145 cells after treatment with [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3. Conclusion: [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3 has great potential in DNA binding and induction of apoptosis; thus it can be used in the future against prostate cancer. PMID:27766230

  12. Quantum efficiency investigations of type-II InAs/GaSb midwave infrared superlattice photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Giard, E. Ribet-Mohamed, I.; Jaeck, J.; Viale, T.; Haïdar, R.; Taalat, R.; Delmas, M.; Rodriguez, J.-B.; Christol, P.; Steveler, E.; Bardou, N.; Boulard, F.

    2014-07-28

    We present in this paper a comparison between different type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice (T2SL) photodiodes and focal plane array (FPA) in the mid-wavelength infrared domain to understand which phenomenon drives the performances of the T2SL structure in terms of quantum efficiency (QE). Our measurements on test photodiodes suggest low minority carrier diffusion length in the “InAs-rich” design, which penalizes carriers' collection in this structure for low bias voltage and front side illumination. This analysis is completed by a comparison of the experimental data with a fully analytic model, which allows to infer a hole diffusion length shorter than 100 nm. In addition, measurements on a FPA with backside illumination are finally presented. Results show an average QE in the 3–4.7 μm window equal to 42% for U{sub bias} = −0.1 V, 77 K operating temperature and no anti-reflection coating. These measurements, completed by modulation transfer function and noise measurements, reveal that the InAs-rich design, despite a low hole diffusion length, is promising for high performance infrared imaging applications.

  13. Molecular structures, charge distributions, and vibrational analyses of the tetracoordinate Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine investigated by density functional theory in comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    The Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine have been studied with B3LYP calculations by using def2-TZVP basis set at the metal atoms and using def2-TZVP and 6-311G+(d,p) basis sets at the remaining atoms. Both basis set combinations give analogous results, which validate the use of quickly converging 6-311G+(d,p) basis set in future studies. The molecular structures, atomic charge and spin distributions, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the complexes have been calculated. The Zn, Cd and Hg complexes have been found to have distorted tetrahedral environments around the metal atoms whereas Cu complex has a square planar geometry. The NBO charge analysis have been found more accurate and less misleading compared with the Mulliken scheme. The present vibrational spectra calculations allow accurate assignment of the vibrational bands, which otherwise assigned tentatively in previous experimental-only studies.

  14. Defect investigations in InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Brianna

    InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattices are a material used for infrared detection. By adjusting the thickness of the InAs and GaSb layers, the material bandgap can be tuned to absorb photons from 3-30 mum. Compared to competing materials such as HgCdTe and InSb, InAs/GaSb superlattices are more mechanically robust, have reduced tunneling currents, and can use strain to suppress Auger recombination. In spite of these advantages, this material still faces several challenges, including low minority carrier lifetime, resulting from trap levels that cause Schockley-Read-Hall recombination. These low lifetimes lead to reduced signal-to-noise ratio and higher dark current. Therefore, increasing the lifetime is important for improving this material's performance. However, to increase the carrier lifetimes, the origin of the traps must first be understood. In this work, several key suspect causes of the "killer" defect were evaluated. A commonly explored suspect in literature, the interfaces, was studied using time-resolved photoluminescence for three different samples. This characterization method was also used to determine if the doping atom and its layer placement significantly impacted the minority carrier lifetime. There is a substantial amount of evidence that the presence of gallium, or the GaSb layer itself harbors the defect. Thus, the rest of the study focused on aspects of GaSb. Layer intermixing of the In and As atoms into the GaSb layer was studied by intentionally incorporating In and As in bulk GaSb and using photocapacitance characterization to observe any possible defect level formation. In addition, trap level formation for different GaSb growth temperatures was also explored with this characterization technique. Finally, in an attempt to reduce trap densities, GaSb was grown with an increased level of Sb monomers rather than dimers. This material was characterized using dark current density measurements and photoluminescence.

  15. Investigation of hyperfine structure of several major lines in PbI and PbII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, T. J.; Drozdowski, R.; Kwela, J.

    2005-06-01

    Hyperfine structure of several lines in neutral and singly ionized lead have been measured. The discharge tube containing metallic isotope 207Pb was used as a light source. The high resolution spectral apparatus consisted of a silver coated Fabry-Perot etalon and a grating spectrograph combined with CCD camera used as a detector. In the analysis of the spectra we used a computer simulation technique. Our experiment yields the following hyperfine splitting constants A: A(6p2 1D2)=(20.69 +/-0.21) mK, A(6p2 3P2)=(91.37+/-0.34) mK A(6p7s 1P1)=(16.45+/-0.95) mK, A(6p7s 3P1)=(293.93+/-0.56) mK, A(6p6d 3F2)=(103.22+/-0.31) mK, A(6p6d 3F3)=(69.12+/-0.28) mK, A(6p8s 3P1)=(202.04+/-0.48) mK, A(6p8p 3P1)=(224.26+/-1.37) mK, A(6p8p 3D2)=(108.02+/-1.14) mK, A(6p7d 3D1)=(-100.86+/-0.53) mK for the levels of PbI and A(6s2 7s 2S1/2)=(352.1+/-1.7) mK, A(6s2 7p 2P3/2)=(13.6+/-1.3) mK, A(6s2 7p 2P1/2)=(70.8+/-1.1) mK for the levels of Pb II. Our results are compared with recent theory and other experiments.

  16. MarsSedEx I and II: Experimental investigation of gravity effects on sedimentation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sorting of sedimentary rocks is a proxy for the environmental conditions at the time of deposition, in particular the runoff that moved and deposited the material forming the rocks. Settling of sediment is strongly influenced by the gravity of a planetary body. As a consequence, sorting of a sedimentary rock varies with gravity for a given depth and velocity of surface runoff. Theoretical considerations for spheres indicate that sorting is less uniform on Mars than on Earth for runoff of identical depth. The effects of gravity on flow hydraulics limit the use of common, semi-empirical models developed to simulate particle settling in terrestrial environments, on Mars. Assessing sedimentation patterns on Mars, aimed at identifying strata potentially hosting traces of life, is potentially affected by such uncertainties. Using first-principle approaches, e.g. through Computational Fluid Dynamics, for calculating settling velocities on other planetary bodies requires a large effort and is limited by the values of boundary conditions, e.g. the shape of the particle. The degree of uncertainty resulting from the differences in gravity on Earth and Mars was therefore tested during three reduced-gravity flights, the MarsSedEx I and II missions, conducted in November 2012 and 2013. Nine types of sediment, ranging in size, shape and density were tested in custom-designed settling tubes during parabolas of Martian gravity lasting 20 to 25 seconds. Based on the observed settling velocities, the uncertainties of empirical relationships developed on Earth to assess particle settling on Mars are discussed. In addition, the potential effects of reduced gravity on patterns of erosion, transport and sorting of sediment, including the implications for identifying strata bearing traces of past life on are examined.

  17. Thinking through Text Comprehension II: Analysis of Verbal and Investigative Repertoires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sota, Melinda; Leon, Marta; Layng, T. V. Joe

    2011-01-01

    Reading comprehension can be considered a complex human performance involving two integrated repertoires: a verbal repertoire and an investigative (generative) repertoire. This paper describes an analysis of these repertoires in terms which can ultimately inform the design of programs to teach them, using the analysis and design of Headsprout[R]…

  18. Geologic and seismologic investigations for Rocky Flats Plant. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume contains the results of a seismic refraction study of the Ralston Reservoir area, soil stratigraphic investigations, unit descriptions, an analysis of geodetic data, experimental models, seismological evaluation, a seismicity survey of the Northern Golden Fault, historical data for the November 7, 1882 earthquake, and a dendrochronology study. (ACR)

  19. Experimental investigation of aerodynamic devices for wind turbine rotational speed control: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S L

    1996-02-01

    An experimental investigation was undertaken to further evaluate and enhance the performance of an aerodynamic device for wind turbine overspeed protection and power modulation applications. The trailing-edge device, known as the Spoiler-Flap, was examined in detail during wind tunnel tests. The impact of hp length, vent angle, pivot point and chord variations on aerodynamic and hinge moment characteristics were evaluated and a best overall configuration was identified. Based on this effort, a 40% chord device with a 1% hp length and 40 degree vent angle offers improved performance potential for wind turbine applications. This specific configuration appears to offer good suction coefficient performance for both turbine power modulation and overspeed (i.e., aerodynamic braking) applications. Device hinge moment loads improved (compared to other devices investigated) in magnitude and the impact of surface roughness was found to be minimal.

  20. Theoretical Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Fe(II) Complexes at Spin-State Transitions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure relevant to low spin (LS)↔high spin (HS) transitions in Fe(II) coordination compounds with a FeN6 core are studied. The selected [Fe(tz)6]2+ (1) (tz = 1H-tetrazole), [Fe(bipy)3]2+ (2) (bipy = 2,2′-bipyridine), and [Fe(terpy)2]2+ (3) (terpy = 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine) complexes have been actively studied experimentally, and with their respective mono-, bi-, and tridentate ligands, they constitute a comprehensive set for theoretical case studies. The methods in this work include density functional theory (DFT), time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT), and multiconfigurational second order perturbation theory (CASPT2). We determine the structural parameters as well as the energy splitting of the LS–HS states (ΔEHL) applying the above methods and comparing their performance. We also determine the potential energy curves representing the ground and low-energy excited singlet, triplet, and quintet d6 states along the mode(s) that connect the LS and HS states. The results indicate that while DFT is well suited for the prediction of structural parameters, an accurate multiconfigurational approach is essential for the quantitative determination of ΔEHL. In addition, a good qualitative agreement is found between the TD-DFT and CASPT2 potential energy curves. Although the TD-DFT results might differ in some respect (in our case, we found a discrepancy at the triplet states), our results suggest that this approach, with due care, is very promising as an alternative for the very expensive CASPT2 method. Finally, the two-dimensional (2D) potential energy surfaces above the plane spanned by the two relevant configuration coordinates in [Fe(terpy)2]2+ were computed at both the DFT and CASPT2 levels. These 2D surfaces indicate that the singlet–triplet and triplet–quintet states are separated along different coordinates, i.e., different vibration modes. Our results confirm that in contrast to the case of complexes with mono- and bidentate ligands, the

  1. Cluster II Wideband (WBD) Plasma Wave Investigation Mission Operations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    This Summary of Research is being submitted to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. A summary of the significant accomplishments of the Cluster Wideband (WBD) Plasma Wave Investigation team achieved during the period of the grant, October 1,2000 through January 14, 2004, and a listing of all of the publications that resulted from work carried out under the grant is presented. Also included is a listing of the numerous public outreach activities that took place during the period of the grant in which the Cluster mission and Cluster WBD science were discussed.

  2. NMR investigation of dynamic processes in complexes of nickel(II) and zinc(II) with iminodiacetate, n-methyliminodiacetate and n-ethyliminodiacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.R.

    1985-11-01

    Analysis of oxygen-17 bulk water relaxation rates with an aqueous solution of 1:1 Ni(II):ida reveals that two rate-limiting processes are involved with solvent exchange. Analysis of carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation rates of the bis-ligand complexes with zinc(II) are used to determine molecular tumbling rates and methyl rotation rates. The carbon-13 transverse relaxation rates for the carbons in the bis-ligand complex with Ni(II) are adequately fitted to the Solomon-Bloembergen equation. Three carboxylate carbon peaks are seen with the /sup 13/C spectrum of the 1:2 Ni(II):ida complex, which coalesce into a single peak above about 360 K. The mechanism and rate of ligand exchange are determined for the complexes Zn(II)L/sub 2//sup -2/ (L = mida, eida) in aqueous solution by total lineshape analysis of the proton spectrum at 500 MHz.

  3. Effects of Ru Doping on the Transport Behavior and Superconducting Transition Temperature of NdFeAsO0.89F0.11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Satomi, Erika; Kobayashi, Yoshiaki; Sato, Masatoshi

    2010-02-01

    The transport behavior and superconducting transition temperature Tc of NdFe1-yRuyAsO0.89F0.11 have been studied for various y values. Because Ru impurities are isoelectronic to host Fe atoms, we basically expect that the number of electrons does not change with y, at least in the region of small y values. The results indicate that the rate of Tc suppression by Ru atoms is too small to be explained by the pair breaking effect of nonmagnetic impurities expected for the S± symmetry, confirming our previous results for Co doping.

  4. Optical region elemental abundance analyses of B and A stars. VI - The normal stars HR 6559 (A7 IV) and Eta Leporis (F0 IV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Abundance analyses using optical region data and fully line-blanketed model atmospheres have been performed for the sharp-lined superficially normal stars HR 6559 (A7 IV) and Eta Leporis (F0 IV), consistent with previous studies of middle B through early A type stars. HR 6559 and Eta Lep are slightly metal-weak in general. Their analyses and that of Theta Leo (A2 V) support the suggestion of Smith (1974) that sharp-lined normal A stars do not necessarily have photospheric abundances identical with those of normal middle to late B stars.

  5. Heat Transfer Investigation of Air Flow in Microtubes-Part II: Scale and Axial Conduction Effects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Kandlikar, Satish G

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, the scale effects are specifically addressed by conducting experiments with air flow in different microtubes. Three stainless steel tubes of 962, 308, and 83 μm inner diameter (ID) are investigated for friction factor, and the first two are investigated for heat transfer. Viscous heating effects are studied in the laminar as well as turbulent flow regimes by varying the air flow rate. The axial conduction effects in microtubes are experimentally explored for the first time by comparing the heat transfer in SS304 tube with a 910 μm ID/2005 μm outer diameter nickel tube specifically fabricated using an electrodeposition technique. After carefully accounting for the variable heat losses along the tube length, it is seen that the viscous heating and the axial conduction effects become more important at microscale and the present models are able to predict these effects accurately. It is concluded that neglecting these effects is the main source of discrepancies in the data reported in the earlier literature.

  6. Kinetic and thermodynamic investigations of Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption on nanoscale organo-functionalized SiO₂-Al₂O₃.

    PubMed

    Jazi, M Boroumand; Arshadi, M; Amiri, M J; Gil, A

    2014-05-15

    This paper reports the preparation of three new Schiff base ligands modified SiO2-Al2O3 mixed oxide adsorbents, and their use for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Equilibrium and kinetic models for Pb(II) and Cd(II) sorption were applied by considering the effect of the contact time, initial Pb(II) and Cd(II) concentrations, effect of temperature, and initial pH. The contact time to attain equilibrium for maximum adsorption was 120 min. These heterogeneous Schiff base ligands were found to be effective adsorbents for the removal of heavy metal ions from solution, with Si/Al-pr-NH-et-N=pyridine-2-carbaldehyde having a high adsorption capacity for Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions from aqueous solution. The adsorption of heavy metal ions has been studied in terms of pseudo-first- and -second-order kinetics, and the Freundlich, Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms models have also been used to the equilibrium adsorption data. The adsorption kinetics followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second-order equation for all systems studied, confirming chemical sorption as the rate-limiting step of adsorption mechanisms and not involving mass transfer in solution, which were confirmed by techniques of DS UV-vis and FT-IR. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were feasible, spontaneous and endothermic between 25 and 80°C. PMID:24655823

  7. Sensitivity tests of tumors to cytostatic agents. II. Investigation on human tumors.

    PubMed

    Mattern, J; Kaufmann, M; Hinderer, H; Wayss, K; Volm, M

    1975-01-01

    Certain substances which influenced nucleic acid metabolism were found to have about the same cytostatic activity on human cells when measured in tissue culture experiments (cell numbers) or in short-term cultures (3-H-uridine incorporation in cell suspensions). By treatment with a dose of cytostatics corresponding to 10 times therapeutic dose, chemosensitive tumors can be distinguished from non-responsive tumors. By using this in vitro test system to investigate the sensitivities of 100 human tumors, it is shown that 28 of these tumors were responsive to adriamycin, daunomycin and Actinomycin D. Good agreement was observed between these in vitro results and the literature data on clinical therapy using these particular substances.

  8. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  9. Clinical and mutational investigations of tyrosinemia type II in Northern Tunisia: identification and structural characterization of two novel TAT mutations.

    PubMed

    Charfeddine, C; Monastiri, K; Mokni, M; Laadjimi, A; Kaabachi, N; Perin, O; Nilges, M; Kassar, S; Keirallah, M; Guediche, M N; Kamoun, M R; Tebib, N; Ben Dridi, M F; Boubaker, S; Ben Osman, A; Abdelhak, S

    2006-06-01

    Tyrosinemia type II or Richner-Hanhart Syndrome (RHS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar keratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease is due to a deficiency of hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase (TATc), an enzyme involved in the tyrosine catabolic pathway. Because of the high rate of consanguinity this disorder seems to be relatively common among the Arab and Mediterranean populations. RHS is characterized by inter and intrafamilial phenotypic variability. A large spectrum of mutations within TATc gene has been shown to be responsible for RHS. In the present study, we report the clinical features and the molecular investigation of RHS in three unrelated consanguineous Tunisian families including 7 patients with confirmed biochemical diagnosis of tyrosinemia type II. Mutation analyses were performed and two novel missense mutations were identified (C151Y) and (L273P) within exon 5 and exon 8, respectively. The 3D-structural characterization of these mutations provides evidence of defective folding of the mutant proteins, and likely alteration of the enzymatic activity. Phenotype variability was observed even among individuals sharing the same pathogenic mutation.

  10. Investigation on aerodynamic characteristics of baseline-II E-2 blended wing-body aircraft with canard via computational simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Rizal E. M.; Ali, Zurriati; Kuntjoro, Wahyu; Wisnoe, Wirachman

    2012-06-01

    Previous wind tunnel test has proven the improved aerodynamic charasteristics of Baseline-II E-2 Blended Wing-Body (BWB) aircraft studied in Universiti Teknologi Mara. The E-2 is a version of Baseline-II BWB with modified outer wing and larger canard, solely-designed to gain favourable longitudinal static stability during flight. This paper highlights some results from current investigation on the said aircraft via computational fluid dynamics simulation as a mean to validate the wind tunnel test results. The simulation is conducted based on standard one-equation turbulence, Spalart-Allmaras model with polyhedral mesh. The ambience of the flight simulation is made based on similar ambience of wind tunnel test. The simulation shows lift, drag and moment results to be near the values found in wind tunnel test but only within angles of attack where the lift change is linear. Beyond the linear region, clear differences between computational simulation and wind tunnel test results are observed. It is recommended that different type of mathematical model be used to simulate flight conditions beyond linear lift region.

  11. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility. Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; George, Gerald L.; Gubernatis, David C.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2015-07-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previouslymore » described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.« less

  12. Congenital defect in intracellular cobalamin metabolism resulting in homocystinuria and methylmalonic aciduria. II. Biochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, E R; Wick, H; Linnell, J C; Gaull, G E; Bachmann, C; Steinmann, B

    1979-01-01

    Biochemical investigations are reported in an infant with methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria who died at 4 months of age. Postmortem analysis of liver obtained 2 weeks after the child was treated with vitamin B12 revealed deficient activity of both cobalamin dependent enzymes: N5-methyltetrahydrofolate: homocysteine methyltransferase (requiring Me-Cbl), and methylmalonyl CoA mutase (requiring Ado-Cbl). MMA-CoA mutase activity could be restored to normal in vitro by added Ado-Cbl, but MeTHF-HCy transferase activity was not significantly enhanced by addition of Me-Cbl. Though the serum total cobalamin was normal, total cobalamin in liver and kidney was abnormally low. In the kidney Me-Cbl and Ado-Cbl were disproportionally decreased whereas in the liver only Ado-Cbl was significantly reduced. This suggests that at least some of the CN-Cbl administered was converted to the coenzymes in liver which would explain the reduction of MMA- and HCy-excretion during therapy. The results show 1. that this infant suffered from a congenital defect in one of the steps of intracellular cobalamin metabolism or transport common to the synthesis of both coenzymes, 2. that life-long treatment with vitamin B12 (OH-Cbl) may be of value in similar cases, particularly if given early in the course of the disease. PMID:43301

  13. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; George, Gerald L.; Gubernatis, David C.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2015-07-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previously described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.

  14. Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100: Part II. Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Max A.; Fuchs, Gerhard E.

    2016-05-01

    Oxide bifilms are a proposed casting inclusion reported to have been observed in vacuum investment cast polycrystalline Ni-based superalloys. Ongoing research seeks to determine if current superalloy casting practices can result in the formation of oxide bifilms, and subsequently if it is possible to observe and characterize this phenomenon. The effect of casting atmosphere, turbulence, filtering, hot isostatic pressing, and heat treatment has been investigated to identify the critical parameters that have been reported to result in bifilm formation in Ni-based superalloy IN100. Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were utilized to characterize samples from each casting condition. In situ ultrahigh vacuum Auger fractography did not indicate the presence of bifilms on the fracture behavior of IN100 in any processing condition. SAM analysis identified a sulfur-enriched monolayer on the surface of dendritic casting porosity, and identified heterogeneous Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100. SEM analysis also indicated the presence of Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100, and determined that these inclusion structures consist of fine blocky external M(Ti, Mo)C carbide enveloping an internal core of alumina. HR-TEM analysis indicated that none of the oxycarbide inclusion interfaces exist as discontinuous unbound interfaces, and that the internal alumina core is an ultra-fine polycrystalline structure.

  15. Pressure-induced phase transition in La1–xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2

    DOE PAGES

    Fang, Y.; Yazici, D.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-09-15

    Electrical resistivity measurements on La1–xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2 (x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8) have been performed under applied pressures up to 2.6 GPa from 2 K to room temperature. The superconducting transition temperature Tc of each sample significantly increases at a Sm-concentration dependent pressure Pt, indicating a pressure-induced phase transition from a low-Tc to a high-Tc phase. At ambient pressure, Tc increases dramatically from 2.8 K at x = 0.1 to 5.4 K at x = 0.8; however, the Tc values at P > Pt decrease slightly with x and Pt shifts to higher pressures with Sm substitution. In the normal state,more » semiconducting-like behavior is suppressed and metallic conduction is induced with increasing pressure in all of the samples. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pressure dependence of Tc for the BiS2-based superconductors is related to the lattice parameters at ambient pressure and enable us to estimate the evolution of Tc for SmO0.5F0.5BiS2 under pressure.« less

  16. Development of a novel biosensor based on F(0)F(1)-ATPase for the detection of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone in irradiated beef.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueliang; Ha, Yiming; Yue, Jiachang; Wang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    A novel biosensor regulated by the rotator of F0F1-ATPase was developed to analyze 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) to detect γ-ray irradiated beef rapidly. The biosensor was assembled by conjugating 2-DCB monoclonal antibodies with the "rotator" ε-subunit of F0F1-ATPase within chromatophores through an ε-subunit monoclonal antibody-biotin-avidin-biotin linker. The limit of detection (LOD) of 2-DCB was approximately 10(-8) μg/mL. The recovery ratio of 2-DCB from ground beef patties ranged from 75.1% to 116.4%. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were both <15.0%. The proposed method was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with high correlation. The biosensor was used to detect 2-DCB in ground beef patties with different fat contents (10%, 20%, and 30%) irradiated at 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 kGy. The 2-DCB concentration linearly increased with the radiation dose in all the beef samples. 2-DCB concentration increased with fat levels in the three samples.

  17. Struture stability and compressibility of iron-based superconductor Nd(O0.88F0.12)FeAs under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinggeng; Wang, Luhong; Dong, Dawei; Liu, Zhiguo; Liu, Haozhe; Chen, Genfu; Wu, Dan; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Nanlin; Yu, Yong; Jin, Changqing; Guo, Quanzhong

    2008-10-22

    The high-pressure angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments on the iron-based superconductor Nd(O0.88F0.12)FeAs were performed up to 32.7 GPa at room temperature. An isostructural phase transition starts at approximately 10 GPa. When pressure is higher than 13.5 GPa, Nd(O0.88F0.12)FeAs completely transforms to a high-pressure phase, which remains the same tetragonal structure with a larger a-axis and smaller c-axis than those of the low-pressure phase. The ambient conditions isothermal bulk moduli B0 are derived as 102(2) and 245(9) GPa for the low-pressure phase and high-pressure phase, respectively. The structure analysis based on the Rietveld refinement methods shows the difference of pressure dependence of the Fe-As and Nd-(O, F) bonding distances, as well as As-Fe-As and Nd-(O, F)-Nd angles between the low-pressure phase and high-pressure phase.

  18. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Identification of Criticality in Neuronal Avalanches: II. A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of the Driven Case

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The observation of apparent power laws in neuronal systems has led to the suggestion that the brain is at, or close to, a critical state and may be a self-organised critical system. Within the framework of self-organised criticality a separation of timescales is thought to be crucial for the observation of power-law dynamics and computational models are often constructed with this property. However, this is not necessarily a characteristic of physiological neural networks—external input does not only occur when the network is at rest/a steady state. In this paper we study a simple neuronal network model driven by a continuous external input (i.e. the model does not have an explicit separation of timescales from seeding the system only when in the quiescent state) and analytically tuned to operate in the region of a critical state (it reaches the critical regime exactly in the absence of input—the case studied in the companion paper to this article). The system displays avalanche dynamics in the form of cascades of neuronal firing separated by periods of silence. We observe partial scale-free behaviour in the distribution of avalanche size for low levels of external input. We analytically derive the distributions of waiting times and investigate their temporal behaviour in relation to different levels of external input, showing that the system’s dynamics can exhibit partial long-range temporal correlations. We further show that as the system approaches the critical state by two alternative ‘routes’, different markers of criticality (partial scale-free behaviour and long-range temporal correlations) are displayed. This suggests that signatures of criticality exhibited by a particular system in close proximity to a critical state are dependent on the region in parameter space at which the system (currently) resides. PMID:24872924

  20. Identification of Criticality in Neuronal Avalanches: II. A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of the Driven Case.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Caroline; Taylor, Timothy J; Kiss, Istvan Z; Farmer, Simon F; Berthouze, Luc

    2014-01-01

    The observation of apparent power laws in neuronal systems has led to the suggestion that the brain is at, or close to, a critical state and may be a self-organised critical system. Within the framework of self-organised criticality a separation of timescales is thought to be crucial for the observation of power-law dynamics and computational models are often constructed with this property. However, this is not necessarily a characteristic of physiological neural networks-external input does not only occur when the network is at rest/a steady state. In this paper we study a simple neuronal network model driven by a continuous external input (i.e. the model does not have an explicit separation of timescales from seeding the system only when in the quiescent state) and analytically tuned to operate in the region of a critical state (it reaches the critical regime exactly in the absence of input-the case studied in the companion paper to this article). The system displays avalanche dynamics in the form of cascades of neuronal firing separated by periods of silence. We observe partial scale-free behaviour in the distribution of avalanche size for low levels of external input. We analytically derive the distributions of waiting times and investigate their temporal behaviour in relation to different levels of external input, showing that the system's dynamics can exhibit partial long-range temporal correlations. We further show that as the system approaches the critical state by two alternative 'routes', different markers of criticality (partial scale-free behaviour and long-range temporal correlations) are displayed. This suggests that signatures of criticality exhibited by a particular system in close proximity to a critical state are dependent on the region in parameter space at which the system (currently) resides. PMID:24872924

  1. A phase II study of an investigational tetravalent influenza vaccine formulation combining MF59®

    PubMed Central

    Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Nothdurft, Hans Dieter; Perona, Pamela; Borkowski, Astrid; Fragapane, Elena; Nicolay, Uwe; Clemens, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    An investigational tetravalent vaccine combining pre-pandemic, MF59®-adjuvanted A/H5N1 vaccine with non-adjuvanted, trivalent, seasonal influenza vaccine has been developed, which has the potential to be used for pre-pandemic priming and to improve levels of compliance and coverage. It is important to determine whether the safety and immunogenicity of the combination vaccine is equivalent to that of the two separate vaccines when administered concomitantly. Healthy adults (n = 601) were randomly assigned to three vaccination groups to receive either: (1) tetravalent vaccine and placebo concomitantly (in separate arms) on Day 1, followed by A/H5N1 vaccine on Day 22; (2) A/H5N1 vaccine and placebo concomitantly on Day 1, followed by tetravalent vaccine on Day 22; or (3) A/H5N1 and seasonal vaccines concomitantly on Day 1, followed by A/H5N1 vaccine on Day 22. Antibody responses were measured using single radial hemolysis (SRH), haemagglutination inhibition (HI), and microneutralization (MN) assays on Days 1, 22, and 43. Solicited adverse reactions were recorded for seven days after vaccination. Spontaneous adverse events were recorded throughout the study. The tetravalent vaccine elicited antibody titers equivalent to those for separate A/H5N1 and seasonal vaccines, and sufficient to meet the European licensure criteria against A/H5N1 and all three seasonal strains. Local and systemic reactions were mainly mild to moderate. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. These findings demonstrate that MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines had an acceptable safety profile and could be effectively administered as a tetravalent formulation, supporting the possibility of integrating pre-pandemic priming into seasonal influenza vaccination programs. PMID:24047817

  2. Identification of Criticality in Neuronal Avalanches: II. A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of the Driven Case.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Caroline; Taylor, Timothy J; Kiss, Istvan Z; Farmer, Simon F; Berthouze, Luc

    2014-01-01

    The observation of apparent power laws in neuronal systems has led to the suggestion that the brain is at, or close to, a critical state and may be a self-organised critical system. Within the framework of self-organised criticality a separation of timescales is thought to be crucial for the observation of power-law dynamics and computational models are often constructed with this property. However, this is not necessarily a characteristic of physiological neural networks-external input does not only occur when the network is at rest/a steady state. In this paper we study a simple neuronal network model driven by a continuous external input (i.e. the model does not have an explicit separation of timescales from seeding the system only when in the quiescent state) and analytically tuned to operate in the region of a critical state (it reaches the critical regime exactly in the absence of input-the case studied in the companion paper to this article). The system displays avalanche dynamics in the form of cascades of neuronal firing separated by periods of silence. We observe partial scale-free behaviour in the distribution of avalanche size for low levels of external input. We analytically derive the distributions of waiting times and investigate their temporal behaviour in relation to different levels of external input, showing that the system's dynamics can exhibit partial long-range temporal correlations. We further show that as the system approaches the critical state by two alternative 'routes', different markers of criticality (partial scale-free behaviour and long-range temporal correlations) are displayed. This suggests that signatures of criticality exhibited by a particular system in close proximity to a critical state are dependent on the region in parameter space at which the system (currently) resides.

  3. Comparative analysis of 10 small molecules binding to carbonic anhydrase II by different investigators using Biacore technology.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Leavitt, Stephanie; Bynum, Maggie A; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Wilton, Rosemarie; Qiu, Huawei; Steukers, Mieke; Wang, Siming; Bindu, Lakshman; Phogat, Sanjay; Giannetti, Anthony M; Ryan, Thomas E; Pudlak, Victoria A; Matusiewicz, Katarzyna; Michelson, Klaus M; Nowakowski, Agnes; Pham-Baginski, Anh; Brooks, Jonathan; Tieman, Bryan C; Bruce, Barry D; Vaughn, Michael; Baksh, Michael; Cho, Yun Hee; Wit, Mieke De; Smets, Alexandra; Vandersmissen, Johan; Michiels, Lieve; Myszka, David G

    2006-12-01

    In this benchmark study, 26 investigators were asked to characterize the kinetics and affinities of 10 sulfonamide inhibitors binding to the enzyme carbonic anhydrase II using Biacore optical biosensors. A majority of the participants collected data that could be fit to a 1:1 interaction model, but a subset of the data sets obtained from some instruments were of poor quality. The experimental errors in the k(a), k(d), and K(D) parameters determined for each of the compounds averaged 34, 24, and 37%, respectively. As expected, the greatest variation in the reported constants was observed for compounds with exceptionally weak affinity and/or fast association rates. The binding constants determined using the biosensor correlated well with solution-based titration calorimetry measurements. The results of this study provide insight into the challenges, as well as the level of experimental variation, that one would expect to observe when using Biacore technology for small molecule analyses.

  4. Relationship of proton motive force and the F(0)F (1)-ATPase with bio-hydrogen production activity of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: effects of diphenylene iodonium, hydrogenase inhibitor, and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, Lilit; Gabrielyan, Lilit; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-08-01

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides MDC 6521 was able to produce bio-hydrogen (H(2)) in anaerobic conditions under illumination. In this study the effects of the hydrogenase inhibitor-diphenylene iodonium (Ph(2)I) and its solvent dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) on growth characteristics and H(2) production by R. sphaeroides were investigated. The results point out the concentration dependent DMSO effect: in the presence of 10 mM DMSO H(2) yield was ~6 fold lower than that of the control. The bacterium was unable to produce H(2) in the presence of Ph(2)I. In order to examine the mediatory role of proton motive force (∆p) or the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides, the effects of Ph(2)I and DMSO on ∆p and its components (membrane potential (∆ψ) and transmembrane pH gradient), and ATPase activity were determined. In these conditions ∆ψ was of -98 mV and the reversed ∆pH was +30 mV, resulting in ∆p of -68 mV. Ph(2)I decreased ∆ψ in concentrations of 20 μM and higher; lower concentrations of Ph(2)I as DMSO had no valuable effect on ∆ψ. The R. sphaeroides membrane vesicles demonstrated significant ATPase activity sensitive to N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. The 10-20 μM Ph(2)I did not affect the ATPase activity, whereas 40 μM Ph(2)I caused a marked inhibition (~2 fold) in ATPase activity. The obtained results provide novel evidence on the involvement of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in H(2) production by R. sphaeroides. Moreover, these data indicate the role of hydrogenase and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase in ∆p generation. In addition, DMSO might increase an interaction of nitrogenase with CO(2), decreasing nitrogenase activity and affecting H(2) production.

  5. Ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) 1,2,3-triazolylidene organometallics: a preliminary investigation into the biological activity of 'click' carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Kilpin, Kelly J; Crot, Stéphanie; Riedel, Tina; Kitchen, Jonathan A; Dyson, Paul J

    2014-01-21

    Taking advantage of the facile and versatile synthetic properties of 'click' 1,2,3-triazolylidene N-heterocyclic carbenes (tzNHC's), a range of new organometallic Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes containing functionalised tzNHC ligands, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)(tzNHC)Cl2] [M = Ru(II), Os(II)], have been synthesised and fully characterised, including the X-ray crystal structure of one of the Os(II) complexes. The tzNHC ligands remain coordinated to the metal centres under relevant physiological conditions, and following binding to the model protein, ubiquitin. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the compounds towards human ovarian cancer cells is dependent on the substituent on the tzNHC ligand but is generally <50 μM and in some cases <1 μM, whilst still retaining a high degree of selectivity towards cancer cells over healthy cells (1.85 μM in A2780 ovarian cancer cells versus 435 μM in human embryonic kidney cells in one case).

  6. Investigation of Quasi-periodic Variations in Hard X-Rays of Solar Flares. II. Further Investigation of Oscillating Magnetic Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakimiec, J.; Tomczak, M.

    2012-06-01

    In our recent paper (Jakimiec and Tomczak, Solar Physics 261, 233, 2010) we investigated quasi-periodic oscillations of hard X-rays during the impulsive phase of solar flares. We have come to the conclusion that they are caused by magnetosonic oscillations of magnetic traps within the volume of hard-X-ray (HXR) loop-top sources. In the present paper we investigate four flares that show clear quasi-periodic sequences of the HXR pulses. We also describe our phenomenological model of oscillating magnetic traps to show that it can explain the observed properties of the HXR oscillations. The main results are the following: i) Low-amplitude quasi-periodic oscillations occur before the impulsive phase of some flares. ii) The quasi-periodicity of the oscillations can change in some flares. We interpret this as being due to changes of the length of oscillating magnetic traps. iii) During the impulsive phase a significant part of the energy of accelerated (non-thermal) electrons is deposited within a HXR loop-top source. iv) The quick development of the impulsive phase is due to feedback between the pressure pulses by accelerated electrons and the amplitude of the magnetic-trap oscillation. v) The electron number density and magnetic field strength values obtained for the HXR loop-top sources in several flares fall within the limits of N≈(2 - 15)×1010 cm-3, B≈(45 - 130) gauss. These results show that the HXR quasi-periodic oscillations contain important information about the energy release in solar flares.

  7. Complexation of heteroaromatic N-oxides with rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates in solution: DFT and NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2014-03-01

    Complexation of rhodium(II) tetraacetate and rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate with a set of heteroaromatic N-oxides containing additional functional groups was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and 1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in CDCl3 solutions. Chemical shifts for five N-oxides and their 1:1 adducts with rhodium tetraacetate were computed at the B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart ECP)//B3LYP/[6-31G(2d), LANL2DZ] theory level applying IEF PCM (CHCl3) solvation model and taking into account various complexation modes and conformational variety. Calculated values were used for the estimation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δadduct - δligand). The largest negative complexation shift were estimated for heteroatoms bonded to Rh, from -37 to -70 ppm (N), from -100 to -160 ppm (O in NO group), from -13 to -23 ppm (O in OCH3 group), and from -12 to -22 ppm (Cl). For the remaining heteroatoms in adducts, the corresponding Δδ values ranged from -22 to +8.2 ppm (N), from +3 to +58 ppm (O) and from +6 to +51 ppm (Cl). The Δδ(1H) usually did not exceed 1 ppm, whereas Δδ(13C) varied from ca. -1 to +7 ppm. Some trends useful for the determination of the complexation site were extracted from calculated data sets. Theoretical findings were applied to analyse experimental NMR data.

  8. A theoretical investigation on the conformation and the interaction of CHF₂OCF₂CHF₂ (desflurane II) with one water molecule.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Dipankar; Zeegers-Huyskens, Therese; Chandra, Asit K

    2013-11-01

    The conformation and the interaction of CHF₂OCF₂CHF₂ (desflurane II) with one water molecule is investigated theoretically using the ab initio MP2/aug-cc-pvdz and DFT-based M062X/6-311++G(d,p) methods. The calculations include the optimized geometries, the harmonic frequencies of relevant vibrational modes along with a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis including the NBO charges, the hybridization of the C atom and the intra- and intermolecular hyperconjugation energies. In the two most stable conformers, the CH bond of the F2HCO- group occupies the gauche position. The hyperconjugation energies are about the same for both conformers and the conformational preference depends on the interaction between the non-bonded F and H atoms. The deprotonation enthalpies of the CH bonds are about the same for both conformers, the proton affinity of the less stable conformer being 3 kcal mol−1 higher. Both conformers of desflurane II interact with water forming cyclic complexes characterized by CH…O and OH…F hydrogen bonds. The binding energies are moderate, ranging from −2.4 to −3.2 kcal mol−1 at the MP2 level. The origin of the blue shifts of the ν(CH) vibrations is analyzed. In three of the complexes, the water molecule acts as an electron donor. Interestingly, in these cases a charge transfer is also directed to the non bonded OH group of the water molecule. This effect seems to be a property of polyfluorinated ethers.

  9. Fluctuation conductivity and possible pseudogap state in FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovjov, A. L.; Omelchenko, L. V.; Terekhov, A. V.; Rogacki, K.; Vovk, R. V.; Khlybov, E. P.; Chroneos, A.

    2016-07-01

    The study of excess conductivity σ \\prime (T) in the textured polycrystalline FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15 ({T}{{c}}=11 {{K}}) prepared by the solid state synthesis is reported for the first time. The σ \\prime (T) analysis has been performed within the local pair (LP) model based on the assumption of the LPs formation in cuprate high-T c superconductors (cuprates) below the pseudogap (PG) temperature {T}* \\gg {T}{{c}}. Similarly to the cuprates, near {T}{{c}} σ \\prime (T) is adequately described by the 3D term of the Aslamasov-Larkin (AL) theory but the range of the 3D-AL fluctuations, {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, is relatively short. Above the crossover temperature {T}0≈ 11.7 {{K}} σ \\prime (T) is described by the 2D Maki-Thompson (MT) fluctuation term of the Hikami-Larkin theory. But enhanced 2D-MT fluctuation contribution being typical for the magnetic superconductors is observed. Within the LP model the PG parameter, {{{Δ }}}* (T), was determined for the first time. It is shown that {{{Δ }}}* (T) demonstrates the narrow maximum at {T}s≈ 160 {{K}} followed by the descending linear length down to {T}{SDW}={T}{NFe}≈ 133 {{K}}. Observed small {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, enlarged 2D σ \\prime (T) and linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) are considered to be the evidence of the enhanced magnetic interaction in EuFeAsO0.85F0.15. Importantly, the slop of the linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) and its length are found to be the same as it is revealed for SmFeAsO0.85. The results suggest both the similarity of the magnetic interaction processes in different Fe-pnictides and applicability of the LP model to the σ \\prime (T) analysis even in magnetic superconductors.

  10. Fluctuation conductivity and possible pseudogap state in FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovjov, A. L.; Omelchenko, L. V.; Terekhov, A. V.; Rogacki, K.; Vovk, R. V.; Khlybov, E. P.; Chroneos, A.

    2016-07-01

    The study of excess conductivity σ \\prime (T) in the textured polycrystalline FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15 ({T}{{c}}=11 {{K}}) prepared by the solid state synthesis is reported for the first time. The σ \\prime (T) analysis has been performed within the local pair (LP) model based on the assumption of the LPs formation in cuprate high-T c superconductors (cuprates) below the pseudogap (PG) temperature {T}* \\gg {T}{{c}}. Similarly to the cuprates, near {T}{{c}} σ \\prime (T) is adequately described by the 3D term of the Aslamasov–Larkin (AL) theory but the range of the 3D-AL fluctuations, {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, is relatively short. Above the crossover temperature {T}0≈ 11.7 {{K}} σ \\prime (T) is described by the 2D Maki–Thompson (MT) fluctuation term of the Hikami–Larkin theory. But enhanced 2D-MT fluctuation contribution being typical for the magnetic superconductors is observed. Within the LP model the PG parameter, {{{Δ }}}* (T), was determined for the first time. It is shown that {{{Δ }}}* (T) demonstrates the narrow maximum at {T}s≈ 160 {{K}} followed by the descending linear length down to {T}{SDW}={T}{NFe}≈ 133 {{K}}. Observed small {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, enlarged 2D σ \\prime (T) and linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) are considered to be the evidence of the enhanced magnetic interaction in EuFeAsO0.85F0.15. Importantly, the slop of the linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) and its length are found to be the same as it is revealed for SmFeAsO0.85. The results suggest both the similarity of the magnetic interaction processes in different Fe-pnictides and applicability of the LP model to the σ \\prime (T) analysis even in magnetic superconductors.

  11. A systematic investigation on biological activities of a novel double zwitterionic Schiff base Cu(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalamuthu, S.; Annaraj, B.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Double zwitterionic amino acid Schiff base, o-vanillylidene-L-histidine (OVHIS) and its copper complex (CuOVHIS) have been synthesized and characterized. CuOVHIS has distorted octahedral geometry, and OVHIS coordinates the copper ion in a tetradentate manner (N2O2). The pKa of OVHIS in aqueous solution was studied by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods. DNA binding behavior of the compounds was investigated using spectrophotometric, cyclic voltammetric, and viscosity methods. The efficacy of DNA cleaving nature was tested on pUC19 DNA. The in vitro biological activity was tested against various micro organisms. The effect of CuOVHIS on the surface feature of Escherichia coli was analyzed by SEM. DPPH assay studies revealed that CuOVHIS has higher antioxidant activity. OVHIS inhibits proliferation of HCT117 cells with half maximal inhibition (IC50) of 71.15 ± 0.67. Chelation of OVHIS with Cu(II) ion enhances the inhibition of proliferation action (IC50 = 53.14 ± 0.67).

  12. A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of a new imineoxime and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes: Synthesis, structural characterization and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Yunus; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T.; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2014-12-01

    A new imineoxime compound {(1E,2E)-(2-hydroxy-ethylimino)-naphthalene-2yl-ethanal oxime (heineoH)} and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes ([M(heineo)2]) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR, UV-vis, elemental analysis, mass spectra and X-ray single crystal diffraction. [Pt(heineo)2] was obtained as a single crystal, while [Pd(heineo)2] was synthesized as a polycrystalline powder. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the [Pt(heineo)2] indicated that the platinum(II) ion is coordinated by two heineo ligands in a distorted square-planar geometry. DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and LANL2DZ) calculations on the ligand and its complexes were carried out to correlate the geometry and vibrational and electronic properties. Additionally, heineoH is fluorescent in EtOH at room temperature, but the fluorescence is quenched in the case of the metal complexes.

  13. A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of a new imineoxime and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes: synthesis, structural characterization and spectroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yunus; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2014-12-10

    A new imineoxime compound {(1E,2E)-(2-hydroxy-ethylimino)-naphthalene-2yl-ethanal oxime (heineoH)} and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes ([M(heineo)2]) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR, UV-vis, elemental analysis, mass spectra and X-ray single crystal diffraction. [Pt(heineo)2] was obtained as a single crystal, while [Pd(heineo)2] was synthesized as a polycrystalline powder. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the [Pt(heineo)2] indicated that the platinum(II) ion is coordinated by two heineo ligands in a distorted square-planar geometry. DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and LANL2DZ) calculations on the ligand and its complexes were carried out to correlate the geometry and vibrational and electronic properties. Additionally, heineoH is fluorescent in EtOH at room temperature, but the fluorescence is quenched in the case of the metal complexes. PMID:24929321

  14. A Primary Investigation on Serum CTX-II Changes in Patients Infected with Brucellosis in Qinghai Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi Jun; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Ma, Li; Xu, Li Qing; Yang, Pei Zhen; Meng, Xian Ya; Yu, Hui Zhen; Xu, Xiao Qing; Cao, Jian Ying

    2016-03-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most widespread zoonotic diseases, with the most frequent complication being osteoarticular changes. The aim of this study was to assess the changes of C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) in patients infected with brucellosis. A total of 84 brucellosis patients and 43 volunteers were selected and divided into brucellosis vs. control groups. Serum samples were subjected to serological tests for brucellosis, and CTX-II levels in all samples were measured simultaneously with ELISA. The results showed that serum CTX-II levels in human brucellosis were higher than those of healthy controls, without a statistically significant difference, but serum CTX-II levels in male patients were significantly higher than those of female patients (P<0.05). This finding could indicate the biological changes in the cartilage and bone in human brucellosis.

  15. Theoretical investigation, biological evaluation and VEGFR2 kinase studies of metal(II) complexes derived from hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, S; Mahendiran, D; Srinivasan, T; Mohanraj, G; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of soft tripodal scorpionate ligand, sodium hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate with M(ClO4)2·6H2O [MMn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II)] in methanol leads to the cleavage of B-N bond followed by the formation of complexes of the type [M(MeimzH)4](ClO4)2·H2O (1-4), where MeimzH=methimazole. All the complexes were fully characterized by spectro-analytical techniques. The molecular structure of the zinc(II) complex (4) was determined by X-ray crystallography, which supports the observed deboronation reaction in the scorpionate ligand with tetrahedral geometry around zinc(II) ion. The electronic spectra of complexes suggested tetrahedral geometry for manganese(II) and nickel(II) complexes, and square-planar geometry for copper(II) complex. Frontier molecular orbital analysis (HOMO-LUMO) was carried out by B3LYP/6-31G(d) to understand the charge transfer occurring in the molecules. All the complexes exhibit significant antimicrobial activity against Gram (-ve) and Gram (+ve) bacterial as well as fungal strains, which are quite comparable to standard drugs streptomycin and clotrimazole. The copper(II) complex (3) showed excellent free radical scavenging activity against DPPH in all concentration with IC50 value of 30μg/mL, when compared to the other complexes. In the molecular docking studies, all the complexes showed hydrophobic, π-π and hydrogen bonding interactions with BSA. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes against human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells was assessed by MTT assay, which showed exponential responses toward increasing concentration of complexes.

  16. Investigation of irradiated rats DNA in the presence of Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, N H; Torosyan, A L; Malakyan, M; Bajinyan, S A; Haroutiunian, S G

    2016-01-01

    The new synthesized Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases were studied as a potential radioprotectors. Male albino rats of Wistar strain were exposed to X-ray whole-body irradiation at 4.8 Gy. This dose caused 30% mortality of the animals (LD30). The survival of animals exposed to radiation after preliminary administration of 10 mg/kg Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 or Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 prior to irradiation was registered about 80 and 100% correspondingly. Using spectrophotometric melting and agarose gel electrophoresis methods, the differences between the DNA isolated from irradiated rats and rats pretreated with Cu(II) chelates were studied. The fragments of DNA with different breaks were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. While, the repair of the DNA structure was observed for animals pretreated with the Cu(II) chelates. The results suggested that pretreatment of the irradiated rats with Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 and Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 compounds improves the liver DNA characteristics.

  17. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, E. J.; Mclaughlin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05–0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = −95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K–290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. PMID:26875693

  18. Nonexponential London penetration depth of FeAs-based superconducting RFeAsO(0.9)F(0.1) (R = La, Nd) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Tillman, M E; Kim, H; Tanatar, M A; Kim, S K; Kreyssig, A; Gordon, R T; Vannette, M D; Nandi, S; Kogan, V G; Bud'ko, S L; Canfield, P C; Goldman, A I; Prozorov, R

    2009-06-19

    The superconducting penetration depth lambda(T) has been measured in RFeAsO(0.9)F(0.1) (R = La, Nd) single crystals (R-1111). In Nd-1111, we find an upturn in lambda(T) upon cooling and attribute it to the paramagnetism of the Nd ions, similar to the case of the electron-doped cuprate Nd-Ce-Cu-O. After the correction for paramagnetism, the London penetration depth variation is found to follow a power-law behavior, Deltalambda_{L}(T) proportional, variantT;{2} at low temperatures. The same T2 variation of lambda(T) was found in nonmagnetic La-1111 crystals. Analysis of the superfluid density and of penetration depth anisotropy over the full temperature range is consistent with two-gap superconductivity. Based on this and on our previous work, we conclude that both the RFeAsO (1111) and BaFe(2)As(2) (122) families of pnictide superconductors exhibit unconventional two-gap superconductivity.

  19. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05.

    PubMed

    Wildman, E J; Mclaughlin, A C

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05-0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = -95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K-290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. PMID:26875693

  20. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, E. J.; McLaughlin, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05-0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = -95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K-290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom.

  1. Structure at 2175MeV in e+e-→ϕf0(980) observed via initial-state radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Sanchez, P. Del Amo; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Lodovico, F. Di; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Buono, L. Del; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; Marco, E. Di; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Groot, N. De; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-11-01

    We study the initial-state-radiation processes e+e-→K+K-π+π-γ and e+e-→K+K-π0π0γ using an integrated luminosity of 232fb-1 collected at the Υ(4S) mass with the BABAR detector at SLAC. Even though these reactions are dominated by intermediate states with excited kaons, we are able to study for the first time the cross section for e+e-→ϕ(1020)f0(980) as a function of center-of-mass energy. We observe a structure near threshold consistent with a 1-- resonance with mass m=2.175±0.010±0.015GeV/c2 and width Γ=58±16±20MeV. We observe no Y(4260) signal and set a limit of BY→ϕπ+π-·ΓeeY<0.4eV (90% confidence level), which excludes some models.

  2. Interaction between the oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein and the F0 sector of the mitochondrial adenosinetriphosphatase complex: cooperative effect of the F1 sector

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, A.; Vignais, P.V.

    1987-01-27

    Beef heart mitchondrial oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP) labeled with (/sup 14/C)-N-ethylmaleimide ((/sup 14/C)OSCP) at the only cysteine residue, Cys-118, present in the sequence. The binding parameters of (/sup 14/C)OSCP with respect to the F0 sector of submitochondrial particles largely depleted of F1 and OSCP (AUA particles) have been explored. In the absence of added F1, a limited number of high-affinity OSCP binding sites were detected in the AUA particles (20-40 pmol/mg of particles); under these conditions, the low-affinity binding sites for OSCP were essentially not saturable. Addition of F1 to the particles promoted high-affinity binding for OSCP, with an apparent Kd of 5 nM, a value 16 times lower than the Kd relative to the binding of OSCP to F1 in the absence of particles. Saturation of the F1 and OSCP binding sites of AUA particles was attained with about 200 pmol of both F1 and OSCP added per milligram of particles. The oligomycin-dependent inhibition of F1-ATPase bound to AUA particles was assayed as a function of bound OSCP. At subsaturating concentrations of F1, the dose-effect curves were rectilinear until inhibition of ATPase activity by oligomycin was virtually complete, and maximal inhibition was obtained for an OSCP to F1 ratio of 1 (mol/mol).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-01

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different.

  4. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-25

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different. PMID:24316543

  5. Chemometric investigation of complex equilibria in solution phase II: Sensitivity of chemical models for the interaction of AADH and FAH with Ni(II) in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Babu, A R; Krishna, D M; Rao, R S

    1993-12-01

    A detailed study of the species formed in the complex equilibria involving adipic acid dihydrazide (AADH)/2-furoic acid hydrazide (FAH) with Ni(II) using pH titration with glass electrode is performed. The results of modeling studies and effect of errors on the equilibrium constants of AADH/FAH with Ni(II) refined by the non-linear least squares program MINIQUAD75 are reported. Based on the expert system approach developed in our laboratory for the species formed from secondary formation data (n and n (H)), several preliminary chemical models were tested. For the four species identified (MLH, ML, ML(2)H, ML(2)), an exhaustive search of a different combination of models (15) was performed. Then other suspected minor species (ML(2)H(2), ML(3) and ML(3)H) were tested. The final best fit chemical model was found to contain ML(3)H to an extent of 3% along with the other four major species. In order to ascertain the accuracy of the stability constants and consequently distribution of the species, a detailed error analysis is attempted. As the existing least squares procedures cannot suppress the systematic errors, three-dimensional plots of the simultaneous effects of pH and TLO:TMO (1.5:1 to 5:1) on the percentage of species are drawn which are of immense use in arriving at optimum conditions for the preparation of a complex of definite stoichiometry. PMID:18965865

  6. Co-sequestration of Zn(II) and phosphate by γ-Al2O3: From macroscopic to microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuemei; Tan, Xiaoli; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-30

    Little information is available concerning co-sorbing oxyanion and metal contaminants in the environment, yet in most metal-contaminated areas, co-contamination by phosphate is common. In this study, the mutual effects of phosphate and Zn(II) on their interaction with γ-Al2O3 are investigated by batch experiments and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technique. The results show that the co-sorption of phosphate on γ-Al2O3 modifies both the extent of Zn(II) sorption and the local atomic structures of sorbed Zn(II) ions. Multiple mechanisms are involved in Zn(II) retention in the presence of phosphate, including electrostatic interaction, binary and ternary surface complexation, and the formation of Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes. At pH 6.5, type III ternary surface complexation occurs concurrently with binary Zn-alumina surface complexation at low phosphate concentrations, whereas the formation of type III ternary surface complexes is promoted as the phosphate concentration increases. With further increasing phosphate concentration, Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes are formed. At pH 8.0, Zn dominantly forms type III ternary surface complexes in the presence of phosphate. The results of this study indicate the variability of Zn complexation on oxide surface and the importance of combining macroscopic observations with XAFS capable of determining metal complex formation mechanism for ternary system. PMID:25956644

  7. Investigation and Control of "Sphere-Like" Buckminsterfullerene C60 and "Disk-Like" Copper(II) Phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAfee, Terry Richard

    Due to the growing global need for cheap, flexible, and portable electronics, numerous research groups from mechanical and electrical engineering, material science, chemistry, and physics have increasingly turned to organic electronics research over the last ˜5--10 years. Largely, the focus of researchers in this growing field have sought to obtain the next record holding device, allowing a heuristic approach of trial and error to become dominant focus of research rather than a fundamental understanding. Rather than working with the latest high performance organic semiconducting materials and film processing techniques, I have chosen to investigate and control the fundamental self-assembly interactions of organic photovoltaic thin films using simplified systems. Specifically, I focus on organic photovoltaic research using two of the oldest and well studies semiconducting materials, namely "sphere-like" electron donor material Buckminsterfullerene C60 and "disklike" electron acceptor material Copper(II) Phthalocyanine. I manufactured samples using the well-known technique of physical vapor deposition using a high vacuum chamber that I designed and built to accommodate my need of precise material deposition control, with codeposition capability. Films were characterized using microscopy and spectroscopy techniques locally at NCSU, including Atomic Force Microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, as well as at National Laboratory based synchrotron x-ray techniques, including Carbon and Nitrogen k-edge Total Electron Yield and Transmission Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, Carbon k-edge Resonant Soft x-ray Microscopy, Resonant Soft x-ray reflectivity, and Grazing Incidence Wide-Angle X-ray scattering.

  8. TECHNICAL REPORT ON TECHNOLOGICALLY ENHANCED NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM URANIUM MINING, VOLUME II: INVESTIGATION OF POTENTIAL HEALTH, GEOGRAPHIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES OF ABANDONED URANIUM MINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II investigates the potential radiogenic risks from abandoned uranium mines and evaluates which may pose the greatest hazards to members of the public and to the environment. The intent of this report is to identify who may be most likely to be exposed to wastes at small a...

  9. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  10. Impact of Mercury(II) on proteinase K catalytic center: investigations via classical and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Panek, Jarosław J; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Novič, Marjana; Jezierska-Mazzarello, Aneta

    2011-02-01

    Mercury(II) has a strong affinity for the thiol groups in proteins often resulting in the disruption of their biological functions. In this study we present classical and first-principles, DFT-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a complex of Hg(II) and proteinase K, a well-known serine protease with a very broad and diverse enzymatic activity. It contains a catalytic triad formed by Asp39, His69, and Ser224, which is responsible for its biological activity. It was found previously by X-ray diffraction experiments that the presence of Hg(II) inhibits the enzymatic action of proteinase K by affecting the stereochemistry of the triad. Our simulations predict that (i) the overall structure as well as the protein backbone dynamics are only slightly affected by the mercury cation, (ii) depending on the occupied mercury site, the hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad are either severely disrupted (both bonds for mercury at site 1, and the His69-Ser224 contact for mercury at site 2) or slightly strengthened (the Asp39-His69 bond when mercury is at site 2), (iii) the network of hydrogen bonds of the catalytic triad is not static but undergoes constant fluctuations, which are significantly modified by the presence of the Hg(II) cation, influencing in turn the triad's ability to carry out the enzymatic function--these facts explain the experimental findings on the inhibition of proteinase K by Hg(II).

  11. Investigating the effect of flexible ligands on the crystal engineering of the iron(II) coordination compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti, Azizolla; Lalegani, Arash; Bruno, Giuseppe; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi

    2013-11-01

    Iron(II) coordination compounds [Fe(bib)2(NCS)2]n(1) and [Fe(bpp)(NCS)2] (2) were synthesized by using the neutral flexible bidentate N-donor ligands 1,4-bis(imidazolyl)butane (bib) and 1,3-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)propane (bpp), mono-anionic NCS- ligand and appropriate iron(II) salts. In the CdSO4 network structure of 1, the iron(II) ion lies on an inversion center and exhibits an FeN6 octahedral arrangement while, in the monomeric structure of 2, the iron(II) ion adopts an FeN4 tetrahedral geometry. In the complex 1, each μ2-bib acts as bridging ligand connecting two adjacent iron(II) ions while in the complex 2, the bpp ligand is coordinated to an iron(II) ion in a cyclic-bidentate fashion forming an eight-membered metallocyclic ring. Coordination compounds 1 and 2 have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analyses and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Thermal analysis of polymer 1 was also studied. An attempt to synthesize [Fe(bbd)(NCS)2] (3) (bbd = 1,4-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)butane) with the reaction of bbd, Fe(NH4)2(SO4)2·6H2O and KNCS was failed.

  12. Effect of high-pressure annealing on the normal-state transport of LaO0.5F0.5BiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallecchi, I.; Lamura, G.; Putti, M.; Kajitani, J.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Miura, O.; Demura, S.; Deguchi, K.; Takano, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We study normal state electrical, thermoelectrical, and thermal transport in polycrystalline BiS2-based compounds, which become superconducting by F doping on the O site. In particular, we explore undoped LaOBiS2 and doped LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 samples, prepared either with or without high-pressure annealing, in order to evidence the roles of doping and preparation conditions. The high-pressure annealed sample exhibits room temperature values of resistivity ρ around 5 mΩcm, Seebeck coefficient S around -20μV /K, and thermal conductivity κ around 1.5 W/Km, while the Hall resistance RH is negative at all temperatures and its value is -10-8 m3/C at low temperature. The sample prepared at ambient pressure exhibits RH positive in sign and five times larger in magnitude, and S negative in sign and slightly smaller in magnitude. These results reveal a complex multiband evolution brought about by high-pressure annealing. In particular, the sign inversion and magnitude suppression of RH, indicating increased electron-type carrier density in the high-pressure sample, may be closely related to previous findings about change in lattice parameters and enhancement of superconducting Tc by high-pressure annealing. As for the undoped sample, it exhibits 10 times larger resistivity, 10 times larger |S|, and 10 times larger |RH| than its doped counterpart, consistent with its insulating nature. Our results point out the dramatic effect of preparation conditions in affecting charge carrier density as well as structural, band, and electronic parameters in these systems.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of cDNAs for the gamma- and epsilon-subunits of mitochondrial F1F0 ATP synthase from the sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Morikami, A; Ehara, G; Yuuki, K; Nakamura, K

    1993-08-15

    Mitochondrial F1F0 ATP synthases purified from dicotyledonous plants contain six different subunits named alpha, beta, gamma, delta, delta', and epsilon. Our previous N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated that the gamma- and epsilon-subunits of the sweet potato mitochondrial F1 correspond to the gamma- and epsilon-subunits of animal mitochondrial F1, respectively (Kimura, T., Nakamura, K., Kajiura, H., Hattori, H., Nelson, N., and Asahi, T. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 3183-3186). A cDNA clone for the gamma-subunit of the sweet potato mitochondrial F1 was identified by oligonucleotide hybridization selection of a cDNA library, and a cDNA clone for the epsilon-subunit was isolated by reverse polymerase chain reaction and hybridization selection of a cDNA library by the polymerase chain reaction product. The 1.4-kilobase long cDNA for the gamma-subunit contained a 978-base pair open reading frame coding for a precursor for the gamma-subunit. The mature gamma-subunit is composed of 281 amino acids, and its sequence showed significantly higher similarities with the gamma-subunit of animal mitochondrial F1 and bacterial F1 compared with the gamma-subunit of chloroplast CF1 from plants. The precursor for the gamma-subunit contained N-terminal presequence of 45 amino acid residues. By contrast, the 0.46-kilobase long cDNA for the epsilon-subunit contained a coding sequence of 207-base pairs for the mature epsilon-subunit of 69 amino acid residues that is preceded by an ATG codon suggesting that the epsilon-subunit is synthesized without the cleavable presequence for mitochondrial import. The amino acid sequence of the epsilon-subunit of sweet potato mitochondrial F1 showed similarities of 25 and 36% amino acid positional identity with the epsilon-subunits of mitochondrial F1 from yeast and bovine, respectively.

  14. Mean F0 values obtained through standard phrase pronunciation compared with values obtained from the normal work environment: a study on teacher and child voices performed in a preschool environment.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Fredric; Ohlsson, Ann-Christine; Sjöholm, Jonas; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2010-05-01

    Mean fundamental frequency (F(0)) values are often used in research on vocal load. In this study, we examine how the mean F(0) differs when evaluated through pronouncing a standard phrase as compared to the mean F(0) obtained in a real work/play environment. We also examine how the F(0) values change throughout the day. The study was performed in a preschool, nine adult female preschool teachers and 11 children participated. The participants wore a digital recorder equipped with an accelerometer, which was attached to the neck. In the study, the participant first pronounced a standard phrase in a controlled environment; thereafter, the voice was recorded in the environment where both children and adults normally reside throughout the day, denoted by the work/play environment. For each participant, the procedure was repeated four times throughout the day. Analyses showed that the F(0) values of the children's and adult's voices were significantly higher when recorded in the work/play environment as compared to the controlled environment. The average difference was 36 Hz for adults and 24 Hz for children. Previous studies have shown an increase of F(0) over the day for teachers. In this study, an increase between morning and afternoon values was found amounting to 8 Hz for adults and 24 Hz for children. For the child population, this increase was statistically significant. However, the total changes over the day revealed a somewhat more complex scheme, with an increase of F(0) in the morning, a decrease during lunch, and finally an increase in the afternoon. This pattern was verified statistically for the joint child-adult population.

  15. Investigation of the photophysical and photochemical properties of peripherally tetra-substituted water-soluble zwitterionic and cationic zinc(ii) phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Senem; Durmuş, Mahmut; Yıldız, Salih Zeki

    2016-06-21

    In this study, 4-{4-[N-((3-dimethylamino)propyl)amide]phenoxy}phthalonitrile () and its zinc(ii) phthalocyanine derivative () were synthesized for the first time. 4-(N-((3-Dimethylamino)propyl)amide)phenoxy substituted zinc(ii) phthalocyanine () was converted to its water-soluble sulfobetaine (), betaine () and N-oxide () containing zwitterionic and quaternized cationic () derivatives. All newly synthesized compounds () were characterized by the combination of UV-vis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy techniques and elemental analysis. The photophysical (fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes) and photochemical (singlet oxygen quantum yields) properties were investigated in DMSO for all the synthesized zinc(ii) phthalocyanines () and in both DMSO and aqueous solutions for zwitterionic and cationic phthalocyanines () for the specification of their capability as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The binding behavior of water soluble phthalocyanines () to the bovine serum albumin protein was also examined for the determination of their transportation ability in the blood stream. PMID:27253970

  16. Investigation of the photophysical and photochemical properties of peripherally tetra-substituted water-soluble zwitterionic and cationic zinc(ii) phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Senem; Durmuş, Mahmut; Yıldız, Salih Zeki

    2016-06-21

    In this study, 4-{4-[N-((3-dimethylamino)propyl)amide]phenoxy}phthalonitrile () and its zinc(ii) phthalocyanine derivative () were synthesized for the first time. 4-(N-((3-Dimethylamino)propyl)amide)phenoxy substituted zinc(ii) phthalocyanine () was converted to its water-soluble sulfobetaine (), betaine () and N-oxide () containing zwitterionic and quaternized cationic () derivatives. All newly synthesized compounds () were characterized by the combination of UV-vis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy techniques and elemental analysis. The photophysical (fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes) and photochemical (singlet oxygen quantum yields) properties were investigated in DMSO for all the synthesized zinc(ii) phthalocyanines () and in both DMSO and aqueous solutions for zwitterionic and cationic phthalocyanines () for the specification of their capability as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The binding behavior of water soluble phthalocyanines () to the bovine serum albumin protein was also examined for the determination of their transportation ability in the blood stream.

  17. Protein Binding and the Electronic Properties of Iron(II) Complexes: An Electrochemical and Optical Investigation of Outer Sphere Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Kylie D.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Hartings, Matthew R.; Abajian, Carnie; Georganopoulou, Dimitra; Ratner, Mark A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2010-11-17

    Metalloenzymes and electron transfer proteins influence the electrochemical properties of metal cofactors by controlling the second-sphere environment of the protein active site. Properties that tune this environment include the dielectric constant, templated charge structure, van der Waals interactions, and hydrogen bonds. By systematically varying the binding of a redox-active ligand with a protein, we can evaluate how these noncovalent interactions alter the electronic structure of the bound metal complex. For this study, we employ the well-characterized avidin-biotin conjugate as the protein-ligand system, and have synthesized solvatochromic biotinylated and desthiobiotinylated iron(II) bipyridine tetracyano complexes ([Fe(BMB)(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} (1) and [Fe(DMB)(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} (2)). The binding affinities of 1 and 2 with avidin are 3.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} and 1.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}, respectively. The redox potentials of 1 and 2 (333 mV and 330 mV) shift to 193 mV and 203 mV vs Ag/AgCl when the complex is bound to avidin and adsorbed to a monolayer-coated gold electrode. Upon binding to avidin, the MLCT1 band red-shifts 20 nm for 1 and 10 nm for 2. Similarly, the MLCT2 band for 1 red-shifts 7 nm and the band for 2 red-shifts 6 nm. For comparison, the electronic properties of 1 and 2 were investigated in organic solvents, and similar shifts in the MLCT bands and redox potentials were observed. An X-ray crystal structure of 1 bound to avidin was obtained, and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze the protein environment of the protein-bound transition metal complexes. Our studies demonstrate that changes in the binding affinity of a ligand-receptor pair influence the outer-sphere coordination of the ligand, which in turn affects the electronic properties of the bound complex.

  18. Investigation of uptake and retention of atmospheric Hg(II) by boreal forest plants using stable Hg isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graydon, J.A.; St. Louis, V.L.; Hintelmann, H.; Lindberg, S.E.; Sandilands, K.A.; Rudd, J.W.M.; Kelly, C.A.; Tate, M.T.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Lehnherr, I.

    2009-01-01

    Although there is now a general consensus among mercury (Hg) biogeochemists that increased atmospheric inputs of inorganic Hg(II) to lakes and watersheds can result in increased methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, researchers still lack kinetic data describing the movement of Hg from the atmosphere, through watershed and lake ecosystems, and into fish. The use of isotopically enriched Hg species in environmental studies now allows experimentally applied new Hg to be distinguished from ambient Hg naturally present in the system. Four different enriched stable Hg(II) isotope "spikes" were applied sequentially over four years to the ground vegetation of a microcatchment at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in the remote boreal forest of Canada to examine retention of Hg(II) following deposition. Areal masses of the spikes and ambient THg (all forms of Hg in a sample) were monitored for eight years, and the pattern of spike retention was used to estimate retention of newly deposited ambient Hg within the ground vegetation pool. Fifty to eighty percent of applied spike Hg was initially retained by ground vegetation. The areal mass of spike Hg declined exponentially over time and was best described by a first-order process with constants (k) ranging between 9.7 ?? 10-4 day -1 and 11.6 ?? 10-4 day-1. Average half-life (t1/2) of spike Hg within the ground vegetation pool (??S.D.) was 704 ?? 52 days. This retention of new atmospheric Hg(II) by vegetation delays movement of new Hg(II) into soil, runoff, and finally into adjacent lakes. Ground-applied Hg(II) spikes were not detected in tree foliage and litterfall, indicating that stomatal and/or root uptake of previously deposited Hg (i.e., "recycled" from ground vegetation or soil Hg pools) were likely not large sources of foliar Hg under these experimental conditions. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Microscopic level investigation of Ni(II) sorption on Na-rectorite by EXAFS technique combined with statistical F-tests.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuemei; Yang, Shitong; Hu, Fengchun; He, Bo; Xu, Jinzhang; Tan, Xiaoli; Wang, Xiangke

    2013-05-15

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy combined with statistical F-tests is used to investigate the local atomic structures of Ni(II) adsorbed on Na-rectorite. The EXAFS analysis results of Ni(II) sorption samples indicate that the first coordination shell consists of ~6 O at the Ni-O interatomic distance (R) of ~2.04 Å. The presence of Ni backscattering at R(Ni-Ni) = 3.06 Å in the second coordination shell suggests the formation of Ni(II) precipitate. The results of F-tests show that the Ni(II) precipitate is Ni-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH). Our results demonstrate that Ni(II) ions are retained via different mechanisms depending on solution conditions. At low pH, Ni retention is controlled mainly by the outer-sphere surface complexation. With increasing pH, outer-sphere and inner-sphere surface complexation dominate Ni uptake. Furthermore, Ni surface loading increases with temperature increasing at pH 6.5 due to the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes and Ni-Al LDH. The formation of Ni-Al LDH becomes the dominate mechanism at the elevated pH and temperature. In the presence of humic substances, the sorption of Ni(II) on Na-rectorite is dominated by the formation of ternary surface complexes. These results are important to understand the physicochemical behavior of Ni(II) in the natural environment. PMID:23500786

  20. Multiple Intelligences and ESL Teaching and Learning: An Investigation in KG II Classrooms in One Private School in Beirut, Lebanon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghamrawi, Norma

    2014-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of the Multiple Intelligences Theory on vocabulary acquisition by preschoolers during English as a second language (ESL) classes in a K-12 school in Lebanon. Eighty kindergartners (KG II, aged 5 years) and eight teachers constituted the sample. The study used mixed methods, including observations of…

  1. Measurement of the ratio B (Bs0 → J / ψf0 (980)) / B (Bs0 → J / ψϕ (1020)) in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. 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T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Tikhonenko, E.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. 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D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2016-05-01

    A measurement of the ratio of the branching fractions of the Bs0 meson to J / ψf0 (980) and to J / ψϕ (1020) is presented. The J / ψ, f0 (980), and ϕ (1020) are observed through their decays to μ+μ-, π+π-, and K+K-, respectively. The f0 and the ϕ are identified by requiring |Mπ+π- - 974 MeV | < 50 MeV and |MK+K- - 1020 MeV | < 10 MeV. The analysis is based on a data sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1. The measured ratio is B(Bs0 → J / ψf0) B (f0 →π+π-)/B (Bs0 → J / ψϕ) B (ϕ →K+K-) = 0.140 ± 0.008 (stat) ± 0.023 (syst), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  2. Measurement of the ratio B (Bs0 → J / ψf0 (980)) / B (Bs0 → J / ψϕ (1020)) in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.

    2016-05-01

    A measurement of the ratio of the branching fractions of the Bs0 meson to J / ψf0 (980) and to J / ψϕ (1020) is presented. The J / ψ, f0 (980), and ϕ (1020) are observed through their decays to μ+μ-, π+π-, and K+K-, respectively. The f0 and the ϕ are identified by requiring |Mπ+π- - 974 MeV | < 50 MeV and |MK+K- - 1020 MeV | < 10 MeV. The analysis is based on a data sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1. The measured ratio is B(Bs0 → J / ψf0) B (f0 →π+π-)/B (Bs0 → J / ψϕ) B (ϕ →K+K-) = 0.140 ± 0.008 (stat) ± 0.023 (syst), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  3. The interaction of antitumor-active anthraquinones with biologically important redox couples: I. Spectrophotometric investigation of the interaction of carminic acid and mitoxantrone with the iron (II, III) and copper (I, II) redox couples.

    PubMed

    Tütem, E; Apak, R; Sözgen, K

    1996-02-01

    Studying the interaction of antitumor-active anthraquinones with biologically important redox couples is important in understanding the possible reductive or oxidative mode of metabolism of these antineoplastic agents coupled with the formation of free radicals. The interactions of such anthraquinones, i.e., carminic acid (CA) and mitoxantrone (Mx) with iron(II, III) and copper(I, II) redox couples in oxygenated and deaerated solutions, were investigated by UV-Visible and IR-spectroscopy. The superoxide radical reagent, nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), was added to the metal and anthraquinone solutions and their binary mixtures at varying pH. Formazan, the reduction product of NBT, was produced mainly as a result of Fe(II)-NBT and Fe(II)-Mx-NBT interactions. The ternary mixtures of the lower valencies of iron and copper with CA and NBT exhibited intensive charge-transfer bands in the visible region, while metal-Mx-NBT combinations did not produce such bands, possibly due to the blockage of the redox-active aminoethanolamine side-chains of Mx through coordination with the metals. Copper-Mx combinations showed an oxygen sensitivity as spectral evidence was obtained for the oxidative transformation of Mx to the cyclic primary metabolite. The results were evaluated in regard to the possible oxidative activation of the studied anthracenediones with iron and copper systems. PMID:8576709

  4. Synthesis, spectral characterization, structural investigation and antimicrobial studies of mononuclear Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes of a new potentially hexadentate N2O4 Schiff base ligand derived from salicylaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keypour, Hassan; Shayesteh, Maryam; Rezaeivala, Majid; Chalabian, Firoozeh; Elerman, Yalcin; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    A new potentially hexadentate N2O4 Schiff base ligand, H2L derived from condensation reaction of an aromatic diamine and salicylaldehyde, and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, EI-MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectra, as well as conductance measurements. It has been originated that the Schiff base ligand with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) ions form mononuclear complexes on 1:1 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry. The conductivity data confirm the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes. Also the crystal structures of the complexes [ZnL] and [CoL] have also been determined by using X-ray crystallographic technique. The Zn(II) and Co(II) complexes show a tetrahedral configuration. Electronic absorption spectra of the Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes suggest a square-planar geometry around the central metal ion. The synthesized compounds have antibacterial activity against the three Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes and also against the three Gram-negative bacteria: Salmonella paraB, Citrobacter freundii and Enterobacter aerogenes. The results showed that in some cases the antibacterial activity of complexes were more than nalidixic acid and amoxicillin as standards.

  5. Investigation of Rare-Earth Elements in the Atmosphere of the roAp Star HD 134214: Nd II, Nd III, and Gd II Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhailytskaya, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution spectra are used to investigate the abundance of rare-earth elements (REE) in the atmosphere of the magnetic, rapidly oscillating, chemically peculiar (roAp) star HD134214. The neodymium abundance is investigated using the lines of neodymium in the first and second ionization states. Disruption of ionization equilibrium REE (mismatch of the contents determined according to the lines of singly and doubly ionized atoms) is found in the atmosphere of the roAp star. Excess abundance of the rare-earth elements (relative to the Sun) is found. The results of an abundance analysis of REE and some other elements are presented. The modulus and the components Br /Bm of the magnetic field are determined.

  6. [The Belgian Nursing Minimum Data Set II (B-NMDS II) and its transfer to German hospitals: results of the first investigation phase, the translation and adaption process of the instrument].

    PubMed

    Eberl, Inge; Bartholomeyczik, Sabine

    2010-10-01

    The introduction of the DRG system in Germany showed again that there is a maintaining need in hospitals for a valid and reliable instrument that provides comparable data for necessary nursing care, costs, personnel requirements, and the quality of nursing care. The instrument should be suitable as well for nursing practice as for national health reports. It should provide founded statements for the different participants in the health system. The NMDS seems to be an instrument that could provide these complex data. Since 2006, a research project has been carried out to investigate the transfer of the Belgian B-NMDS II to German hospitals. The project is divided into two phases. The first phase comprises the translation and adaptation process of the B-NMDS II. In the second phase the data collection in the hospitals and the data analysis will be performed. In this article the methodical procedure of the first investigation phase is specified. The translation and adaptation process of the B-NMDS II is executed in a multi-level procedure.

  7. Single-Spin Asymmetry of Inclusive Neutral-Pion Production in pp{sub {up_arrow}} Interactions at 70 GeV in the Region -0.4 < x{sub F} < -0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, A.N.; Grishin, V.N.; Davidenko, A.M.; Derevshchikov, A.A.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; Mel'nik, Yu.M.; Meshchanin, A.P.; Mochalov, V.V.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Prudkoglyad, A.F.; Semenov, P.A.; Soloviev, L.F.; Solovianov, V.L.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Shestermanov, K.E.; Yakutin, A.E.; Borisov, N.S.; Matafonov, V.N.; Neganov, A.B.

    2005-11-01

    For the kinematical region specified by the inequalities -0.4 < x{sub F} < -0.1 and 0.9 < p{sub T} < 2.5 GeV/c, the results are presented that were obtained by experimentally determining the single-spin asymmetry of inclusive neutral-pion production in the reaction p + p{sub {up_arrow}} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + X at 70 GeV. According to these results, the asymmetry is close to zero in the region -0.2 < x{sub F} < -0.1 and grows in magnitude with decreasing x{sub F}, amounting to (-10.6 {+-} 3.2)% for -0.4 < x{sub F} < -0.2.

  8. Investigation of interaction between the Pt(II) ions and aminosilane-modified silica surface in heterogeneous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Waldemar; Gąsowska, Anna; Kirszensztejn, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    UV-vis spectroscopy measurements confirmed the reaction in heterogeneous system between Pt(II) ions and ethylenediamine type ligand, n-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane, immobilized at the silica surface. The formation of complexes is a consequence of interaction between the amine groups from the ligand grafted onto SiO2 and ions of platinum. A potentiometric titration technique was to determine the stability constants of complexes of Pt(II) with immobilized insoluble ligand (SG-L), on the silica gel. The results show the formation of three surface complexes of the same type (PtHSG-L, Pt(HSG-L)2, PtSG-L) with SG-L ligand, in a wide range of pH for different Debye length. The concentration distribution of the complexes in a heterogeneous system is evaluated.

  9. Single-crystal EPR investigation of Mn(II)-doped biomineral cobalt ammonium phosphate hexahydrate: a case of multiple substitutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, S.; Natarajan, B.; Mithira, S.; Velavan, K.; Rao, P. S.

    2005-08-01

    Single-crystal electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of Mn(II)-doped cobalt ammonium phosphate hexahydrate has been carried out at room temperature. The impurity shows more than 30 line pattern EPR spectra along the three crystallographic axes, suggesting the existence of more than one type of impurity ion in the host lattice. The spin Hamiltonian parameters, estimated from the three mutually orthogonal crystal rotations, are: site 1: g(xx) =1.989, g(yy) =1.994, g(zz) =1.999, A(xx) =-8.97, A(yy) =-9.52, A(zz) =-9.71 mT, D-xx =-8.09 mT, D-yy =-6.05 mT, D-zz =14.14 mT, site 2: g(xx) =1.988, g(yy) =2.009, g(zz) =2.019, A(xx) =-9.11 mT, A(yy) =-9.58 mT, A(zz) =-9.93 mT, D-xx =-6.61 mT, D-yy =-6.11 mT, D-zz =12.72 mT. The angular variation studies further reveal that the Mn(II) impurities enter the lattice substitutionally. The other Mn(II) sites which are at interstitial locations are difficult to follow due to their low intensity. The variation of zero-field splitting parameter with temperature indicates no phase transition. The observation of well-resolved Mn(II) spectrum at room temperature has been interpreted in terms of 'host spin-lattice relaxation narrowing mechanism.

  10. Comparative photo-release of nitric oxide from isomers of substituted terpyridinenitrosylruthenium(II) complexes: experimental and computational investigations.

    PubMed

    Akl, Joëlle; Sasaki, Isabelle; Lacroix, Pascal G; Malfant, Isabelle; Mallet-Ladeira, Sonia; Vicendo, Patricia; Farfán, Norberto; Santillan, Rosa

    2014-09-01

    The 4'-(2-fluorenyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (FT) ligand and its cis(Cl,Cl)- and trans(Cl,Cl)-[Ru(II)(FT)Cl2(NO)](PF6) complexes have been synthesized. Both isomers were separated by HPLC and fully characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR. The X-ray diffraction crystal structures were solved for FT (Pna21 space group, a = 34.960(4), b = 5.9306(7), c = 9.5911(10) Å), and trans(Cl,Cl)-[Ru(II)(FT)Cl2(NO)](PF6)·MeOH (P1[combining macron] space group, a = 10.3340(5), b = 13.0961(6), c = 13.2279(6) Å, α = 72.680(2), β = 70.488(2), γ = 67.090(2)°). Photo-release of NO˙ radicals occurs under irradiation at 405 nm, with a quantum yield of 0.31 and 0.10 for cis(Cl,Cl)-[Ru(II)(FT)Cl2(NO)](PF6) and trans(Cl,Cl)-[Ru(II)(FT)Cl2(NO)](PF6), respectively. This significant difference is likely due to the trans effect of Cl(-), which favors the photo-release. UV-visible spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry indicate the formation of ruthenium(iii) species as photoproducts. A density functional theory (DFT) analysis provides a rationale for the understanding of the photo-physical properties, and allows relating the weakening of the Ru-NO bond, and finally the photo-dissociation, to HOMO → LUMO excitations.

  11. Investigation of long chain omega-3 PUFAs on arterial blood pressure, vascular reactivity and survival in angiotensin II-infused Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bürgin-Maunder, Corinna S; Nataatmadja, Maria; Vella, Rebecca K; Fenning, Andrew S; Brooks, Peter R; Russell, Fraser D

    2016-02-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory vascular disease. Long chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFAs) decrease inflammation and oxidative stress in an angiotensin II-infused apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model of AAA. This study investigated the effects of LC n-3 PUFAs on blood pressure and vascular reactivity in fourteen angiotensin II-infused ApoE(-/-) male mice. Blood pressure was obtained using a non-invasive tail cuff method and whole blood was collected by cardiac puncture. Vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta was assessed using wire myography and activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was determined by immunohistochemistry. A high LC n-3 PUFA diet increased the omega-3 index and reduced the n-6 to n-3 PUFA ratio. At day 10 post-infusion with angiotensin II, there was no difference in systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure in mice fed the high or low n-3 PUFA diets. The high LC n-3 PUFA diet resulted in a non-significant trend for delay in time to death from abdominal aortic rupture. Vascular reactivity and eNOS activation remained unchanged in mice fed the high compared to the low LC n-3 PUFA diet. This study argues against direct improvement in vascular reactivity in ApoE(-/-) mice that were supplemented with n-3 PUFA for 8 weeks prior to infusion with angiotensin II.

  12. Chemical and cellular investigations of trans-ammine-pyridine-dichlorido-platinum(II), the likely metabolite of the antitumor active cis-diammine-pyridine-chorido-platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dechen; Min, Yuanzeng; Cheng, Qinqin; Shi, Hongdong; Wei, Kaiju; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni; Liu, Yangzhong

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed that the well-studied monofunctional platinum complex cis-[PtCl(NH3)2(py)](+) (cDPCP) forms DNA adducts similar to those of the trans platinum complex trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(py)] (ampyplatin, py=pyridine). Thus this latter could be the active form of cDPCP. Detailed studies on the mechanism of ampyplatin action were performed in this work. Results indicate that ampyplatin has significantly higher antiproliferative activity than cDPCP and is comparable to cisplatin. Cellular uptake experiments indicate that ampyplatin can be efficiently accumulated in A549 cancer cells. Binding of ampyplatin to DNA mainly produces monofunctional adducts; remarkably, these adducts can be recognized by the HMGB1 protein. Kinetic studies on the reaction with GMP indicate that the reactivity of ampyplatin is much lower than that of transplatin and is more similar to that of trans-[PtCl2{E-HN=C(Me)OMe}2] (trans-EE), a widely investigated antitumor active trans-oriented platinum complex. In addition, the hydrolysis of ampyplatin is significantly suppressed, whereas the hydrolysis of the mono-GMP adduct is highly enhanced. These results indicate that the mechanism of ampyplatin differs not only from that of antitumor inactive transplatin but also from that of antitumor active trans-EE and this could account for the remarkable activity of parent cDPCP.

  13. Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of isoliquiritigenin and all-trans-retinoic acid on B16F0 melanoma cells: Mechanisms profiling by RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Ming; Hao, Wenjin; Han, Jichun; Ma, Jun; Wang, Caixia; Sun, Shiguo; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-10-30

    Melanoma is a cancer that arises from melanocytes, specialized pigmented cells that are found predominantly in the skin. The incidence of malignant melanoma has significantly increased over the last decade. With the development of therapy, the survival rate of some kind of cancer has been improved greatly. But the treatment of melanoma remains unsatisfactory. Much of melanoma's resistance to traditional chemotherapy is believed to arise intrinsically, by virtue of potent growth and cell survival-promoting genetic alteration. Therefore, significant attention has recently been focused on differentiation therapy, as well as differentiation inducer compounds. In previous study, we found isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural product extracted from licorice, could induce B16F0 melanoma cell differentiation. Here we investigated the transcriptional response of melanoma differentiation process induced by ISL and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Results showed that 390 genes involves in 201 biochemical pathways were differentially expressed in ISL treatment and 304 genes in 193 pathways in RA treatment. Differential expressed genes (DGEs, fold-change (FC)≥10) with the function of anti-proliferative and differentiation inducing indicated a loss of grade malignancy characteristic. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis indicated glutathione metabolism, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathway were the top three relative pathway perturbed by ISL, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was the most important pathway in RA treatment. In the analysis of hierarchical clustering of DEGs, we discovered 72 DEGs involved in the process of drug action. We thought Cited1, Tgm2, Xaf1, Cd59a, Fbxo2, Adh7 may have critical role in the differentiation of melanoma. The evidence displayed herein confirms the critical role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melanoma pathobiology and provides evidence for future targets in the

  14. Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of isoliquiritigenin and all-trans-retinoic acid on B16F0 melanoma cells: Mechanisms profiling by RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Ming; Hao, Wenjin; Han, Jichun; Ma, Jun; Wang, Caixia; Sun, Shiguo; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-10-30

    Melanoma is a cancer that arises from melanocytes, specialized pigmented cells that are found predominantly in the skin. The incidence of malignant melanoma has significantly increased over the last decade. With the development of therapy, the survival rate of some kind of cancer has been improved greatly. But the treatment of melanoma remains unsatisfactory. Much of melanoma's resistance to traditional chemotherapy is believed to arise intrinsically, by virtue of potent growth and cell survival-promoting genetic alteration. Therefore, significant attention has recently been focused on differentiation therapy, as well as differentiation inducer compounds. In previous study, we found isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural product extracted from licorice, could induce B16F0 melanoma cell differentiation. Here we investigated the transcriptional response of melanoma differentiation process induced by ISL and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Results showed that 390 genes involves in 201 biochemical pathways were differentially expressed in ISL treatment and 304 genes in 193 pathways in RA treatment. Differential expressed genes (DGEs, fold-change (FC)≥10) with the function of anti-proliferative and differentiation inducing indicated a loss of grade malignancy characteristic. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis indicated glutathione metabolism, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathway were the top three relative pathway perturbed by ISL, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was the most important pathway in RA treatment. In the analysis of hierarchical clustering of DEGs, we discovered 72 DEGs involved in the process of drug action. We thought Cited1, Tgm2, Xaf1, Cd59a, Fbxo2, Adh7 may have critical role in the differentiation of melanoma. The evidence displayed herein confirms the critical role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melanoma pathobiology and provides evidence for future targets in the

  15. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II). PMID:27255311

  16. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II).

  17. Theoretical investigation of hydrogen bonding between water and platinum(II): an atom in molecule (AIM) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Guiqiu; Chen, Dezhan

    2012-02-01

    Recently, Rizzato et al. [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 7440 (2010)] [1] reported a hydrogen-bonding-like interaction between a water molecule and a d8 metal ion (PtII) based on neutron diffraction, and provided the first crystallographic evidence for this interaction. We studied the hydrogen bonding of the O-H ... Pt interaction theoretically using atoms in molecule (AIM) and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) in the crystallographic geometries. The method used density functional theory (DFT) with the hybrid B3LYP function. For platinum atoms, we used the Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-Double-Zeta (LANL2DZ) basis set, and for the other atoms we used 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Criteria based on a topological analysis of the electron density were used in order to characterize the nature of interactions in the complexes. The main purpose of the present work is to provide an answer to the following questions: Why can a filled d orbital of square-planar d8 metal ions such as platinum(II) also act as hydrogen-bond acceptors? Can a study based on the electron charge density answer this question? A good correlation between the density at the intermolecular bond critical point and the energy interaction was found. The interaction is mainly closed-shell and there is some charge transfer in this system.

  18. Measurement of CP Asymmetry in B0 ---> F0 K0(S), B0 ---> Phi K0 And B0 ---> K+ K- K0(S) Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kutter, Paul E.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-04-11

    The authors present results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in f{sub 0}(980)({yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup 0}. The measurements use a data sample consisting of approximately 209(f{sub 0}(980)({yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sub S}{sup 0}) and 227(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup 0}) million B-meson pairs recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-meson Factory at SLAC.

  19. Surfactant-copper(II) Schiff base complexes: synthesis, structural investigation, DNA interaction, docking studies, and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipraba, Jagadeesan; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Solomon, Rajadurai Vijay; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Dhivya, Rajakumar; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2015-01-01

    A series of surfactant-copper(II) Schiff base complexes (1-6) of the general formula, [Cu(sal-R2)2] and [Cu(5-OMe-sal-R2)2], {where, sal=salicylaldehyde, 5-OMe-sal=5-methoxy- salicylaldehyde, and R2=dodecylamine (DA), tetradecylamine (TA), or cetylamine (CA)} have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic, ESI-MS, and elemental analysis methods. For a special reason, the structure of one of the complexes (2) was resolved by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and it indicates the presence of a distorted square-planar geometry in the complex. Analysis of the binding of these complexes with DNA has been carried out adapting UV-visible-, fluorescence-, as well as circular dichroism spectroscopic methods and viscosity experiments. The results indicate that the complexes bind via minor groove mode involving the hydrophobic surfactant chain. Increase in the length of the aliphatic chain of the ligands facilitates the binding. Further, molecular docking calculations have been performed to understand the nature as well as order of binding of these complexes with DNA. This docking analysis also suggested that the complexes interact with DNA through the alkyl chain present in the Schiff base ligands via the minor groove. In addition, the cytotoxic property of the surfactant-copper(II) Schiff base complexes have been studied against a breast cancer cell line. All six complexes reduced the visibility of the cells but complexes 2, 3, 5, and 6 brought about this effect at fairly low concentrations. Analyzed further, but a small percentage of cells succumbed to necrosis. Of these complexes (6) proved to be the most efficient aptotoxic agent.

  20. Surfactant-copper(II) Schiff base complexes: synthesis, structural investigation, DNA interaction, docking studies, and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipraba, Jagadeesan; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam; Solomon, Rajadurai Vijay; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Dhivya, Rajakumar; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2015-01-01

    A series of surfactant-copper(II) Schiff base complexes (1-6) of the general formula, [Cu(sal-R2)2] and [Cu(5-OMe-sal-R2)2], {where, sal=salicylaldehyde, 5-OMe-sal=5-methoxy- salicylaldehyde, and R2=dodecylamine (DA), tetradecylamine (TA), or cetylamine (CA)} have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic, ESI-MS, and elemental analysis methods. For a special reason, the structure of one of the complexes (2) was resolved by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and it indicates the presence of a distorted square-planar geometry in the complex. Analysis of the binding of these complexes with DNA has been carried out adapting UV-visible-, fluorescence-, as well as circular dichroism spectroscopic methods and viscosity experiments. The results indicate that the complexes bind via minor groove mode involving the hydrophobic surfactant chain. Increase in the length of the aliphatic chain of the ligands facilitates the binding. Further, molecular docking calculations have been performed to understand the nature as well as order of binding of these complexes with DNA. This docking analysis also suggested that the complexes interact with DNA through the alkyl chain present in the Schiff base ligands via the minor groove. In addition, the cytotoxic property of the surfactant-copper(II) Schiff base complexes have been studied against a breast cancer cell line. All six complexes reduced the visibility of the cells but complexes 2, 3, 5, and 6 brought about this effect at fairly low concentrations. Analyzed further, but a small percentage of cells succumbed to necrosis. Of these complexes (6) proved to be the most efficient aptotoxic agent. PMID:24854148

  1. Structural investigation of mM Ni(II) complex isomers using transmission XAFS: the significance of model development.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Tauhidul; Chantler, Christopher T; Cheah, Mun Hon; Tantau, Lachlan J; Tran, Chanh Q; Best, Stephen P

    2015-11-01

    High-accuracy transmission XAFS determined using the hybrid technique has been used to refine the geometries of bis(N-n-propyl-salicylaldiminato) nickel(II) (n-pr Ni) and bis(N-i-propyl-salicylaldiminato) nickel(II) (i-pr Ni) complexes which have approximately square planar and tetrahedral metal coordination. Multiple-scattering formalisms embedded in FEFF were used for XAFS modelling of the complexes. Here it is shown that an IFEFFIT-like package using weighting from experimental uncertainty converges to a well defined XAFS model. Structural refinement of (i-pr Ni) was found to yield a distorted tetrahedral geometry providing an excellent fit, χr(2) = 2.94. The structure of (n-pr Ni) is best modelled with a distorted square planar geometry, χr(2) = 3.27. This study demonstrates the insight that can be obtained from the propagation of uncertainty in XAFS analysis and the consequent confidence which can be obtained in hypothesis testing and in analysis of alternate structures ab initio. It also demonstrates the limitations of this (or any other) data set by defining the point at which signal becomes embedded in noise or amplified uncertainty, and hence can justify the use of a particular k-range for one data set or a different range for another. It is demonstrated that, with careful attention to data collection, including the correction of systematic errors with statistical analysis of uncertainty (the hybrid method), it is possible to obtain reliable structural information from dilute solutions using transmission XAFS data. PMID:26524313

  2. Investigation of simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) on dried Chlorella vulgaris from binary metal mixtures: Application of multicomponent adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Aksu, Z.; Acikel, U.; Kutsal, T.

    1999-02-01

    Although the biosorption of single metal ions to various kinds of microorganisms has been extensively studied and the adsorption isotherms have been developed for only the single metal ion situation, very little attention has been given to the bioremoval and expression of adsorption isotherms of multimetal ions systems. In this study the simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) to Chlorella vulgaris from a binary metal mixture was studied and compared with the single metal ion situation in a batch stirred system. The effects of pH and single- and dual-metal ion concentrations on the equilibrium uptakes were investigated. In previous studies the optimum biosorption pH had been determined as 4.0 for copper(II) and as 2.0 for chromium(VI). Multimetal ion biosorption studies were performed at these two pH values. It was observed that the equilibrium uptakes of copper(II) or chromium(VI) ions were changed due to the biosorption pH and the presence of other metal ions. Adsorption isotherms were developed for both single- and dual-metal ions systems at these two pH values, and expressed by the mono- and multicomponent Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. Model parameters were estimated by nonlinear regression. It was seen that the adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to the competitive Freundlich model in the concentration ranges studied.

  3. Use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and esterification to investigate Cr(III) and Ni(II) ligands in alfalfa biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Tiemann, K.J.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Gamez, G.; Dokken, K.; Sias, S.; Renner, M.W.; Furenlid, L.R.

    1999-01-01

    Previously performed studies have shown that alfalfa shoot biomass can bind an appreciable amount of nickel(II) and chromium(III) ions from aqueous solution. Direct and indirect approaches were applied to study the possible mechanisms involved in metal binding by the alfalfa biomass. The direct approach involves investigations of the metal-bound alfalfa shoot biomass by X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis (XANES and EXAFS). Results from these studies suggest that nickel(II) and chromium(III) binding mostly occurs through coordination with oxygen ligands. Indirect approaches consist of chemical modification of carboxylate groups that have been shown to play an important role in metal binding to the alfalfa biomass. An appreciable decrease in metal binding resulted after acidic methanol esterification of the biomass, indicating that carboxyl groups are entailed in the metal binding by the alfalfa biomass. In addition, base hydrolysis of the alfalfa biomass increased the binding of these metals, which further indicates that carboxyl groups play an important role in the binding of these metal ions from solution. Therefore, by combining two different techniques, their results indicate that carboxylate groups are the major ligands responsible for the binding of nickel(II) and chromium(III) by alfalfa biomass.

  4. Cobalt(II)-Based Single-Ion Magnets with Distorted Pseudotetrahedral [N2O2] Coordination: Experimental and Theoretical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Ziegenbalg, Sven; Hornig, David; Görls, Helmar; Plass, Winfried

    2016-04-18

    The synthesis and magnetic properties of cobalt(II) complexes with sterically demanding Schiff-base ligands are reported. The compounds [Co(L(Br))2] (1) and [Co(L(Ph))2]·CH2Cl2 (2·CH2Cl2) are obtained by the reaction of cobalt(II) acetate with the ligands HL(Br) and HL(Ph) in a dichloromethane/methanol mixture. 1 and 2 crystallize in the space groups P21212 and P1̅, respectively. X-ray diffraction studies revealed mononuclear constitution of both complexes. For 1, relatively short intermolecular Co-Co distances of 569 pm are observed. In compound 2, a hydrogen-bonded dichloromethane molecule is present, leading to a solvent aggregate with remarkable thermal stability for which desolvation is taking place between 150 and 210 °C. Magnetic measurements were performed to determine the zero-field-splitting (ZFS) parameter D for both complexes. Frequency-dependent susceptibility measurements revealed slow magnetic relaxation behavior with spin-reversal barriers of 36 cm(-1) for 1 and 43 cm(-1) for 2 at an applied external field of 400 Oe. This observation is related to an increasing distortion of the pseudotetrahedral coordination geometry for complex 2. These distortions can be decomposed in two major contributions. One is the elongation effect described by the parameter ϵT, which is the ratio of the averaged obtuse and acute bond angles. The other effect is related to a twisting distortion of the chelate coordination planes at the cobalt center. A comparison with literature examples reveals that the elongation effect seems to govern the overall magnetic behavior in pseudotetrahedral complexes with two bidentate chelate ligands. Ab initio calculations for complexes 1 and 2 using the CASPT2 method show strong splitting of the excited (4)T2 term, which explains the observed strong ZFS. Spin-orbit calculations with the RASSI-SO method confirm the single-molecule-magnet behavior because only small transversal elements are found for the lowest Kramers doublet for both

  5. Investigation the effect of lattice angle on the band structure in 3D phononic crystals with rhombohedral(II) lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryadoust, M.; Salehi, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the propagation of acoustic waves in the phononic crystals (PC) of 3D with rhombohedral(II) lattice is studied theoretically. The PC are constituted of nickel spheres embedded in epoxy. The calculations of the band structure and density of states are performed with the plane wave expansion method in the irreducible part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). In this study, we analyze the dependence of the band structures inside (the complete band gap width) and outside the complete band gap (negative refraction of acoustic wave) on the lattice angle in the irreducible part of the first BZ. Also the effect of lattice angle has been analyzed on the band structure of the () and (122) planes. Then, the equifrequency surface is calculated for the high symmetry point in the [111] and [100] directions. The results show that the maximum width of AEBG (0.022) in the irreducible part of the BZ of RHL2 is formed for (105∘) and no AEBG is found for γ > 150∘. Also, the maximum of the first and second AEBG width are 0.1076 and 0.0523 for γ = 133∘ in the () plane and the maximum of the first and second AEBG width are 0.1446 and 0.0998 for γ = 113∘ in the (122) plane. In addition, we have found that frequencies in which negative refraction occurs is constant for all lattice angles.

  6. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B -> rho0 K* and B -> f0(980) K* decays

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    We present measurements of the branching fractions, longitudinal polarization, and direct CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} and B{sup +} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} with a sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} with a significance of 5.3{sigma} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +}) = (4.6 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, the longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.78 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03, and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = 0.31 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03. We observe B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +}) x {Beta}(f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (4.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = -0.15 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03. The first uncertainty quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  8. Investigating Students' Mental Models and Knowledge Construction of Microscopic Friction. II. Implications for Curriculum Design and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corpuz, Edgar D.; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Our previous research showed that students' mental models of friction at the atomic level are significantly influenced by their macroscopic ideas. For most students, friction is due to the meshing of bumps and valleys and rubbing of atoms. The aforementioned results motivated us to further investigate how students can be helped to improve their…

  9. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS. VOLUME II. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LYNN, FRANK

    THE APPENDIXES FOR "AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, FINAL REPORT, VOLUME I" (VT 004 006) INCLUDE (1) TWO LETTERS FROM PLANT ENGINEERS STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, (2) A DESCRIPTION OF THE MAINTENANCE TRAINING SURVEY, A SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE,…

  10. An Investigation of the Ranger V-770-8 Engine Installation for the Edo XOSE-1 Airplane II : Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennard, John S.

    1945-01-01

    Investigations were made to determine the cowling and cooling characteristics of the Ranger V-770-8 engine installation in an observation seaplane. Final cowl configurations possessed ample engine and oil-cooler pressure drops for cooling in the critical normal-power climb condition with any of the three baffle configurations tested. The indicated critical Mach number of the cowling was found to be 0.70 as determined by the pressure on the lower lip of the inlet.

  11. Investigation of the difficulties associated with the use of lead telluride and other II - IV compounds for thin film thermistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclennan, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The fabrication of thermistors was investigated for use as atmospheric temperature sensors in meteorological rocket soundings. The final configuration of the thin film thermistor is shown. The composition and primary functions of the six layers of the sensor are described. A digital controller for thin film deposition control is described which is capable of better than .1 A/sec rate control. The computer program modules for digital control of thin film deposition processing are included.

  12. Does [TcF(CO)5] exist? The crystal and molecular structure of [Tc(CO)3(OH)0.49F0.51]4·[Tc(CO)5(BF4)].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, E S; Gurzhiy, V V; Tyupina, M Yu; Miroslavov, A E; Sidorenko, G V; Lumpov, A A

    2016-05-17

    Technetium pentacarbonyl fluoride [TcF(CO)5] was prepared for the first time by reaction of [TcI(CO)5] with solid AgF in a dichloromethane solution at -23 °C. Low temperature crystallization of the resulting compound in a glass vial yielded an unusual complex [Tc(CO)3(OH)0.49F0.51]4·[Tc(CO)5(BF4)] characterized by single crystal XRD. PMID:27108652

  13. Mitochondria-dependent reactive oxygen species-mediated programmed cell death induced by 3,3'-diindolylmethane through inhibition of F0F1-ATP synthase in unicellular protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Ganguly, Agneyo; BoseDasgupta, Somdeb; Das, Benu Brata; Pal, Churala; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2008-11-01

    Mitochondria are the principal site for the generation of cellular ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. F0F1-ATP synthase, a complex V of the electron transport chain, is an important constituent of mitochondria-dependent signaling pathways involved in apoptosis. In the present study, we have shown for the first time that 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), a DNA topoisomerase I poison, inhibits mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase of Leishmania donovani and induces programmed cell death (PCD), which is a novel insight into the mechanism in protozoan parasites. DIM-induced inhibition of F0F1-ATP synthase activity causes depletion of mitochondrial ATP levels and significant stimulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Because DeltaPsi(m) is the driving force for mitochondrial ATP synthesis, loss of DeltaPsi(m) results in depletion of cellular ATP level. The loss of DeltaPsi(m) causes the cellular ROS generation and in turn leads to the oxidative DNA lesions followed by DNA fragmentation. In contrast, loss of DeltaPsi(m) leads to release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and subsequently activates the caspase-like proteases, which lead to oligonucleosomal DNA cleavage. We have also shown that mitochondrial DNA-depleted cells are insensitive to DIM to induce PCD. Therefore, mitochondria are necessary for cytotoxicity of DIM in kinetoplastid parasites. Taken together, our study indicates for the first time that DIM-induced mitochondrial dysfunction by inhibition of F0F1-ATP synthase activity leads to PCD in Leishmania spp. parasites, which could be exploited to develop newer potential therapeutic targets. PMID:18703668

  14. Pressure-induced phase transitions and correlation between structure and superconductivity in iron-based superconductor Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinggeng; Liu, Haozhe; Ehm, Lars; Dong, Dawei; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingqing; Hu, Wanzheng; Wang, Nanlin; Jin, Changqing

    2013-07-15

    High-pressure angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments on iron-based superconductor Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs were performed up to 54.9 GPa at room temperature. A tetragonal to tetragonal isostructural phase transition starts at about 13.9 GPa, and a new high-pressure phase has been found above 33.8 GPa. At pressures above 19.9 GPa, Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs completely transforms to a high-pressure tetragonal phase, which remains in the same tetragonal structure with a larger a-axis and smaller c-axis than those of the low-pressure tetragonal phase. The structure analysis shows a discontinuity in the pressure dependences of the Fe-As and Ce-(O, F) bond distances, as well as the As-Fe-As and Ce-(O, F)-Ce bond angles in the transition region, which correlates with the change in T(c) of this compound upon compression. The isostructural phase transition in Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs leads to a drastic drop in the superconducting transition temperature T(c) and restricts the superconductivity at low temperature. For the 1111-type iron-based superconductors, the structure evolution and following superconductivity changes under compression are related to the radius of lanthanide cations in the charge reservoir layer.

  15. Component Performance Investigation of J71 Type II Turbines V - Internal Flow Conditions of J71 Type IIA Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schum, Harold J.; Davison, Elmer H.; Petrash, Donald A.

    1955-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the J71 Type IIA turbine was conducted at the equivalent design speed and work output. The design stagework distribution was closely approached, although the design vector diagram was not attained. Efficiencies of 0.904, 0.851, and 0.806 were obtained for the first, second, and third stages, respectively. Losses occurred near the hub and tip for all three rotors. The third-stage losses, however, were significantly greater than those of either the first or second stage.

  16. Investigations in Time and of Space Using the FIRST Survey: Radio Source Variability and the Evolution of FR II Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan

    than with Friedmann models. These earlier results can be attributed to a combination of selection effects, sample definition problems, and inconsistencies in analysis. However, some recent and more successful analyses have still failed to distinguish among different Friedmann models. A catalog of ∼ 680 FR II quasars was constructed from the FIRST sources with redshifts taken from the SDSS spectroscopic QSO catalog and a similar sized sample from the SDSS photometric QSO catalog which are the largest quasar compilations to date. Using statistical analyses, no evidence for intrinsic evolution of sizes with redshift is found. A static Euclidean model for the universe is clearly ruled out. However, new degeneracies between parameters in the multi-dimensional χ2-surface are found which can only be resolved with additional, independent information. Notable differences are found between the spectroscopic and photometric samples raising questions about the nature and origin of these populations.

  17. Mechanical energy dissipation induced by sloshing and wave breaking in a fully coupled angular motion system. II. Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouscasse, B.; Colagrossi, A.; Souto-Iglesias, A.; Cercos-Pita, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    In Paper I of this series [B. Bouscasse, A. Colagrossi, A. Souto-Iglesias, and J. L. C. Pita, "Mechanical energy dissipation induced by sloshing and wave breaking in a fully coupled angular motion system. I. Theoretical formulation and numerical investigation," Phys. Fluids 26, 033103 (2014)], a theoretical and numerical model for a driven pendulum filled with liquid was developed. The system was analyzed in the framework of tuned liquid dampers and hybrid mass liquid dampers (HMLD) theory. In this paper, in order to measure the energy dissipation resulting from shallow water sloshing, an experimental investigation is conducted. Accurate evaluations of energy transfers are obtained through the recorded kinematics of the system. A set of experiments is conducted with three different liquids: water, sunflower oil, and glycerine. Coherently with the results of Paper I, the energy dissipation obtained when the tank is filled with water can mainly be explained by the breaking waves. For all three liquids, the effects of varying the external excitation amplitude are discussed.

  18. Research on air sprays and unique foam application methods. Phase II report. Laboratory investigation of foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of air sprays and foam systems for dust control on longwall double-drum shearer faces. Laboratory testing has been conducted using foam systems and promising results have been obtained. Upon Bureau approval, underground testing will be scheduled to assess the effectiveness of foam systems under actual operating conditions. Laboratory testing of air sprays is being conducted at present. This report presents the results of the laboratory testing of foam systems. Specifically, the results obtained on the evaluation of selected foaming agents are presented, the feasibility investigation of flushing foam through the shearer-drum are demonstrated, and conceptual layout of the foam system on the shearer is discussed. The laboratory investigation of the selected foaming agents reveal that the Onyx Microfoam, Onyx Maprosyl and DeTer Microfoam foaming agents have higher expansion ratios compared to the others tested. Flushing foam through the shearer drum is entirely feasible and could be a viable technique for dust suppression on longwall faces.

  19. An Investigation of Glutathione-Platinum(II) Interactions by Means of the Flow Injection Analysis Using Glassy Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Zitka, Ondrej; Huska, Dalibor; Krizkova, Sona; Adam, Vojtech; Chavis, Grace J.; Trnkova, Libuse; Horna, Ales; Hubalek, Jaromir; Kizek, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Despite very intensive research in the synthesising of new cytostatics, cisplatin is still one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs. Therefore, an investigation of interactions of cisplatin with different biologically important amino acids, peptides and proteins is very topical. In the present paper, we utilized flow injection analysis coupled with electrochemical detection to study and characterize the behaviour of various forms of glutathione (reduced glutathione – GSH, oxidized glutathione – GSSG and S-nitroso glutathione – GSNO). The optimized conditions were as follows: mobile phase consisted of acetate buffer (pH 3) with a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. Based on results obtained we chose 850 mV as the optimal potential for detection of GSH and 1,100 mV as the optimal potential for detection of GSSG and GSNO. The detection limits of GSH, GSSG and GSNO were 100 pg mL-1, 50 ng mL-1 and 300 pg mL-1, respectively. Further, the optimized technique was used for investigation of interactions between cisplatin and GSH. We were able to observe the interaction between GSH and cisplatin via decrease in the signal corresponding to glutathione. Moreover, we evaluated the formation of the complex by spectrometry. The spectrometric results obtained were in good agreement with electrochemical ones.

  20. Statistical investigation of simulated intestinal fluid composition on the equilibrium solubility of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs.

    PubMed

    Khadra, Ibrahim; Zhou, Zhou; Dunn, Claire; Wilson, Clive G; Halbert, Gavin

    2015-01-25

    A drug's solubility and dissolution behaviour within the gastrointestinal tract is a key property for successful administration by the oral route and one of the key factors in the biopharmaceutics classification system. This property can be determined by investigating drug solubility in human intestinal fluid (HIF) but this is difficult to obtain and highly variable, which has led to the development of multiple simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) recipes. Using a statistical design of experiment (DoE) technique this paper has investigated the effects and interactions on equilibrium drug solubility of seven typical SIF components (sodium taurocholate, lecithin, sodium phosphate, sodium chloride, pH, pancreatin and sodium oleate) within concentration ranges relevant to human intestinal fluid values. A range of poorly soluble drugs with acidic (naproxen, indomethacin, phenytoin, and piroxicam), basic (aprepitant, carvedilol, zafirlukast, tadalafil) or neutral (fenofibrate, griseofulvin, felodipine and probucol) properties have been investigated. The equilibrium solubility results determined are comparable with literature studies of the drugs in either HIF or SIF indicating that the DoE is operating in the correct space. With the exception of pancreatin, all of the factors individually had a statistically significant influence on equilibrium solubility with variations in magnitude of effect between the acidic and basic or neutral compounds and drug specific interactions were evident. Interestingly for the neutral compounds pH was the factor with the second largest solubility effect. Around one third of all the possible factor combinations showed a significant influence on equilibrium solubility with variations in interaction significance and magnitude of effect between the acidic and basic or neutral compounds. The least number of significant media component interactions were noted for the acidic compounds with three and the greatest for the neutral compounds at seven

  1. Spouted bed electrowinning of zinc: Part II. Investigations of the dynamics of particles in large thin spouted beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, A.; Evans, J. W.; Salas-Morales, Juan Carlos

    1997-02-01

    The behavior of particles in thin spouted beds, mostly equipped with draft tubes, has been investigated. Three apparatuses have been used: a laboratory-scale cylindrical bed, a 2-m-tall “flat” (rectangular cross section) bed and a 2-m-wide flat bed, the last equipped with multiple draft tubes. Most of the results were obtained on the tall bed. Minimum spouting flow rate, pressure distribution, particle velocities, and solid circulation rates were determined as a function of bed geometry (including draft tube dimensions and position). Observations were made of the direction of liquid flow in the bed outside the draft tube and of the occurrence of zones in the bed where the particles appeared stationary. The wide bed was used to determine that there is a maximum separation between draft tubes beyond which particles cannot be kept in motion across the whole width of the bed.

  2. Year 6 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring and Phase II Source Investigation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2004-04-02

    The Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, encompasses the property of the former United Heckathorn pesticide packaging plant and the adjacent waterway, Lauritzen Channel. The site was used from 1945 to 1966 by several operators to produce various agricultural chemicals. The site was placed on the National Priorities List of Superfund sites in 1990, which resulted in the removal of pesticide-contaminated soil from the upland portion of the site and dredging the marine portion of the site. Post-remediation marine monitoring and associated studies conducted through 2002 indicate that the contamination in the channel continues to pose a significant risk to biota and human health. This report documents continued marine monitoring and source investigation studies conducted in 2003.

  3. Saturn’s icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P. D.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R. M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper ( Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/ F continua at 0.55 μm, 1.822 μm and 3.547 μm, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  4. The clouds of Venus. II - An investigation of the influence of coagulation on the observed droplet size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    An approximate numerical technique is used to investigate the influence of coagulation, sedimentation and turbulent motions on the observed droplet size distribution in the upper layers of the Venus clouds. If the cloud mass mixing ratio is less than 0.000001 at 250 K or the eddy diffusivity throughout the cloud is greater than 1,000,000 sq cm per sec, then coagulation is unimportant. In this case, the observed droplet size distribution is the initial size distribution produced by the condensation of the droplets. It is found that all cloud models with droplet formation near the cloud top (e.g., a photochemical model) must produce the observed droplet size distribution by condensation without subsequent modification by coagulation. However, neither meteoritic or surface dust can supply sufficient nucleating particles to account for the observed droplet number density. If the cloud droplets are formed near the cloud bottom, the observed droplet size distribution can be produced solely by the interaction of coagulation and dynamics; all information about the initial size distribution is lost. If droplet formation occurs near the cloud bottom, the lower atmosphere of Venus is oxidizing rather than reducing.

  5. Investigations of quantum efficiency in type-II InAs/GaSb very long wavelength infrared superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochao; Jiang, Dongwei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Wang, Dongbo; Yu, Qingjiang; Zhao, Liancheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the quantum efficiency (QE) of InAs/GaSb T2SL very long wavelength Infrared (VLWIR) photodetectors with 50% cutoff of 12.7 μm. Due to the small depletion width and similar absorption coefficient in the T2SL material system, the minority-carrier diffusion length was determined as the key element to improve the QE of VLWIR T2SL photodetectors. The minority-carrier diffusion length was estimated by a comparison of the experimental data with the Hovel model. Our result suggest that the short hole diffusion length (Lh ∼ 520 nm) and the large its ratio to the width of this region (xn/Lh) are considered against the photo-excited carrier collection in the T2SL photodetectors. In addition, the influence of surface recombination velocity (Sh) on the QE of the T2SL photodetectors is also studied. The change of QE with Sh is not so significant due to the relatively low absorption coefficient and short hole diffusion length in our photodetector.

  6. Chromosomal investigations of the Usubuchi sarcoma. II. Chromosomal alteration of the stem line cells revealed by differential staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Obara, Y; Sasaki, M; Shibasaki, Y; Okubo, M

    1982-11-01

    Stem line cells of the Usubuchi sarcoma (US) were karyologically investigated by means of G-, C-, and N-banding methods in ten samples from the 1,923rd to 2,081st transfer generations, with special attention to the structural alteration of marker-1 chromosome. The US cells showed wide variations in chromosome constitution and number, while the modal number of chromosomes was consistently 64 in all the generations examined. The chromosome constitutions varied widely even in cells with the modal number. In the early stage (1,923rd to 1,936th generations) the US contained two major stem lines characterized by marker combinations such as 1-2-3-4(1)-4(3)-8 and 2-3-4(1)-4(2)-4(3)-8, occurring with nearly similar frequency. From the middle to later transfer stages (from the 2,004th to the 2,081st generations), the 1-2-3-4(1)-4(3)-8 stem line rapidly declined and finally disappeared. In contrast, the 2-3-4(1)-4(2)-4(3)-8 line became a predominant part of the stem line. The G- and C-banding and population analyses of the stem line cells strongly suggested that marker 4(2) might have been derived from marker 1 by a deletion of the distal half of its long arm. The US studied contained a few stem lines and various types of sublines, each karyologically characteristic. G-Banding analysis revealed various types of intra- and interchromosomal rearrangements probably due to occasional chromosomal mutations either in markers or in nonmarkers in both stem lines and sublines. It seems likely that the stem line cells of the US are not always stable, but rather variable, in their chromosome makeup during the course of multiplication and successive transfers.

  7. [Qualitative and quantitative investigations on testicular tissue using the semithin slide technic in patients with oligozoospermia. II. Results].

    PubMed

    Eckmann, B; Schütte, B

    1982-01-01

    In 150 patients with oligozoospermia a testis biopsy of both testes was performed. In 76% the patients were 25-35 years old. Most of them had a sperm count less than or equal to 8.1 million/ml ejaculate (in the group of 0.3-1.1 million spermatozoa/ml ejaculate 32%, in the group of 1.2-8.1 million spermatozoa/ml ejaculate 43.3%, and in the group of 8.2-20.0 million spermatozoa/ml ejaculate 26.5%). The tissue of the testis was examined by the semithin slide technique. This method was preferred instead of the routinely used paraffin slide technique, because is semithin slides the different cells of the spermatogenesis as well as its pathological forms can be classified nearly to the limit of resolving power under a light microscope. Examples of histological pictures were given. In a statistical study especially the connection between tubules wall and cells of the spermatogenesis was examined. The tubule diameter which might influence the relation of the number of cells/tubule wall was connected. For all germ cells it could be observed, that the number of patients with the various germ cells decreased with thickening of the tubule wall. In this collective the high number of patients with a reduced number of spermatogonia was remarkable, as well as the number of patients with degenerating spermatocytes I degree and with pathological spermatids. These spermatids had especially abnormalities of the acrosom and of the nucleus. Furthermore the investigations revealed that the number of the germ cells in the tubules increase with higher spermatozoa density. But in the all cases the various numbers of this material showed only tendencies but no statistical significances.

  8. Synthesis, crystal structure and investigation of mononuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a new carboxylate rich tripodal ligand and their interaction with carbohydrates in alkaline aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Christopher D.; Pedraza, Mayra; Arman, Hadi; Fan, Hua-Jun; Schilling, Eduardo Luiz; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Musie, Ghezai T.

    2016-01-01

    A new carboxylate rich asymmetric tripodal ligand, N-[2-carboxybenzomethyl]-N-[carboxymethyl]-β-alanine (H3camb), and its di-copper(II), (NH4)2[1]2, and di-zinc(II), ((CH3)4 N)2[2]2, complexes have been synthesized as carbohydrate binding models in aqueous solutions. The ligand and complexes have been fully characterized using several techniques, including single crystal X-ray diffraction. The interactions of (NH4)2[1]2 and ((CH3)4 N)2[2]2 with D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose and xylitol in aqueous alkaline media were investigated using UV–Vis and 13C-NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. The molar conductance, NMR and ESI–MS studies indicate that the complexes dissociate in solution to produce the respective complex anions, 1− and 2−. Complexes 1− and 2− showed chelating ability towards the naturally abundant and biologically relevant sugars, D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose, and xylitol. The complex ions bind to one molar equivalent of the sugars, even in the presence of stoichiometric excess of the substrates, in solution. Experimentally obtained spectroscopic data and computational results suggest that the substrates bind to the metal center in a bidentate fashion. Apparent binding constant values, pKapp, between the complexes and the substrates were determined and a specific mode of substrate binding is proposed. The pKapp and relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculated Gibbs free energy values indicate that D-mannose displayed the strongest interaction with the complexes. Syntheses, characterizations, detailed substrate binding studies using spectroscopic techniques, single crystal X-ray diffraction and geometry optimizations of the complex-substrates with DFT calculations are also reported. PMID:25969174

  9. Investigation of copper(II) binding to the protein precursor of Non-Amyloid-Beta Component of Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Francis; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The Non-Amyloid-Beta Component Precursor (NACP) is a natively unfolded synaptic protein that is implicated in Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases. Its aggregation into fibrillar structures is accelerated by the binding of copper(II). Experimental studies suggest that the dominant copper binding site is located at the histidine residue in NACP. Based on this evidence we assembled a model fragment of the binding site and used DFT to analyze the conformational details of the most probable binding motifs. We investigated the overall conformational effects with classical MD by constraining the copper binding site to the most energetically favorable geometry obtained from the DFT calculations. These results are compared and contrasted with those of the unbound NACP.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and DFT-Based Investigation of a Novel Trinuclear Singly-Chloro-Bridged Copper(II)-1-Vinylimidazole Complex.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Zuhal; Demir, Serkan; Andaç, Ömer; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    A novel trinuclear copper(II) complex [Cu3(μ-Cl)2Cl4(1-Vim)6] with monodentate 1-vinylimidazole (1-Vim) and chloro ligands has been prepared and experimentally characterized by elemental analysis, thermogravimetry (TGA, DTG, DTA), X-ray single crystal diffractometry, TOF-MS and FT-IR spectroscopies. The electronic and structural properties of the complex were further investigated by DFT/TD-DFT methods. Density functional hybrid method (B3LYP) was applied throughout the calculations. The calculated UV-Vis results based on TD-DFT approach were simulated and compared with experimental spectrum. Based on the data obtained, DFT calculations have been found in reasonable accordance with experimental data. PMID:27640392

  11. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  12. Enhancement of Tc in BiS2-based superconductors NdO0.7F0.3BiS2 by substitution of Pb for Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demura, S.; Fujisawa, Y.; Otsuki, S.; Ishio, R.; Takano, Y.; Sakata, H.

    2015-12-01

    We succeed in enhancement of a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) for NdO0.7F0.3BiS2 single crystal by partial substitution of Pb for Bi. The Tc increases with increasing Pb concentration until 6%. The maximum Tczero is 5.6 K, which is the highest value among BiS2-based based superconductors synthesized under an ambient pressure. Pb substitution for Bi induces lattice shrinkage along the c-axis. These results reflect that superconductivity in this system is responsive to the lattice strain.

  13. Investigation of p-side contact layers for II-VI compound semiconductor optical devices fabricated on InP substrates by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Shingo; Nomura, Ichirou; Shiraishi, Tomohiro; Kishino, Katsumi

    2015-09-01

    N-doped p-type ZnTe and ZnSeTe contact layers were investigated to evaluate which is more suitable for use in II-VI compound semiconductor optical devices on InP substrates. Contact resistances (Rc) between the contact layers and several electrode materials (Pd/Pt/Au, Pd/Au, and Au) were measured by the circular transmission line model (c-TLM) method using p-n diode samples grown on InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The lowest Rc (6.5×10-5 Ω cm2) was obtained in the case of the ZnTe contact and Pd/Pt/Au electrode combination, which proves that the combination is suitable for obtaining low Rc. Yellow light-emitting diode devices with a ZnTe and ZnSeTe p-contact layer were fabricated by MBE to investigate the effect of different contact layers. The devices were characterized under direct current injections at room temperature. Yellow emission at around 600 nm was observed for each device. Higher emission intensity and lower slope resistance were obtained for the device with the ZnTe contact layer and Pd/Pt/Au electrode compared with other devices. These device performances are ascribed to the low Rc of the ZnTe contact and Pd/Pt/Au electrode combination.

  14. Investigation of the interactions between Pt(II) and Pd(II) derivatives of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin and G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Navin C; Mendoza, Oscar; Nicoludis, John M; Ruan, Thomas; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Yatsunyk, Liliya A

    2016-04-01

    G-quadruplexes are non-canonical DNA structures formed by guanine-rich DNA sequences that are implicated in cancer and aging. Understanding how small molecule ligands interact with quadruplexes is essential both to the development of novel anticancer therapeutics and to the design of new quadruplex-selective probes needed for elucidation of quadruplex biological functions. In this work, UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopies, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) melting assays, and resonance light scattering were used to investigate how the Pt(II) and Pd(II) derivatives of the well-studied 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP4) interact with quadruplexes formed by the human telomeric DNA, Tel22, and by the G-rich sequences from oncogene promoters. Our results suggest that Pt- and PdTMPyP4 interact with Tel22 via efficient π-π stacking with a binding affinity of 10(6)-10(7) M(-1). Under porphyrin excess, PtTMPyP4 aggregates using Tel22 as a template; the aggregates reach maximum size at [PtTMPyP4]/[Tel22] ~8 and dissolve at [PtTMPyP4]/[Tel22] ≤ 2. FRET assays reveal that both porphyrins are excellent stabilizers of human telomeric DNA, with stabilization temperature of 30.7 ± 0.6 °C for PtTMPyP4 and 30.9 ± 0.4 °C for PdTMPyP4 at [PtTMPyP4]/[Tel22] = 2 in K(+) buffer, values significantly higher as compared to those for TMPyP4. The porphyrins display modest selectivity for quadruplex vs. duplex DNA, with selectivity ratios of 150 and 330 for Pt- and PdTMPyP4, respectively. This selectivity was confirmed by observed 'light switch' effect: fluorescence of PtTMPyP4 increases significantly in the presence of a variety of DNA secondary structures, yet the strongest effect is produced by quadruplex DNA. PMID:26748794

  15. Kinetic investigation on the oxidation of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) by oxone: the effect of BSA-SDS interaction.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Harasit Kumar; Kundu, Arjama; Balti, Subrata; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2012-07-15

    The kinetic investigations of oxidation of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) by oxone have been studied spectrophotometrically in phosphate buffer medium of pH 6.8, temperature 308 K, and ionic strength 0.25 mol L(-1). The reactions were also carried out in presence of globular transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) having isoelectric point 4.9, anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and their mixtures. The critical aggregation concentration (CAC) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS in presence of BSA have been determined using conductivity and kinetic measurement techniques. The secondary structure of BSA was examined by Circular Dichroism (CD) measurement at 308 K. The helix nature of BSA decreases with increase of SDS concentration. The effect of pH on rate in presence of BSA is opposite to its absence, and the effect of urea on rate in presence of BSA indicates the denaturation of BSA. The results depict that amphiphile SDS interacts with BSA and different molecular events, for example, specific binding, cooperative binding, protein unfolding, and micelle formation act. Activation parameters of the reaction in different environments have been determined.

  16. Investigation of the EPR parameters and local structures for Cu2+ in Bis(L-asparaginato) M(II) catalysts (M=Zn, Cd, Mg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua-Ming, Zhang; Shao-Yi, Wu; Min-Quan, Kuang; Zhi-Hong, Zhang

    2012-07-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters (g factors and hyperfine structure constants) for Cu2+ in Bis(L-asparaginato) M(II) catalysts (M=Zn, Cd, Mg) are theoretically investigated using the high order perturbation formulas of these parameters for 3d9 ions in orthorhombically elongated octahedra. Ligand orbital and spin-orbit coupling contributions are included from the cluster approach in view of strong covalency. The ligand octahedra (i.e., [CuO4N2]12- clusters) are found to experience axial and perpendicular local bond length variations Δ (≈0.19-0.25 Å) and δ (≈0.12-0.14 Å) due to the Jahn-Teller effect and size mismatch, which are dissimilar to those of host M2+ sites in pure compounds. The theoretical EPR parameters based on the above local structures show good agreement with the observed values, and some improvements are achieved as compared with those in the previous work. The local structures of these centers are discussed.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and investigation of the photophysical and photochemical properties of highly soluble novel metal-free, zinc(II), and indium(III) phthalocyanines substituted with 2,3,6-trimethylphenoxy moieties.

    PubMed

    Gürel, Ekrem; Pişkin, Mehmet; Altun, Selçuk; Odabaş, Zafer; Durmuş, Mahmut

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of metal-free, zinc(II), and indium(III)acetate phthalocyanines substituted with 2,3,6-trimethylphenoxy groups at the peripheral and non-peripheral positions. The photophysical (fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes) and photochemical (singlet oxygen generation and photodegradation under light irradiation) properties of these novel phthalocyanines and unsubstituted zinc(II) and indium(III)acetate phthalocyanines were investigated in dimethylformamide solution. The effects of the types of substituents and their positions and the variety of central metal ions on the phthalocyanine core on their spectroscopic, photophysical and photochemical properties were also determined. The studied 2,3,6-trimethylphenoxy substituted metal-free, zinc(II) and indium(III)acetate phthalocyanines especially indium(III)acetate derivatives exhibited appropriate photophysical and photochemical properties such as high singlet oxygen generation and these phthalocyanines can be potential Type II photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy in cancer applications.

  18. Study of the electronic and magnetic properties as a function of isoelectronic substitution in SmFe(1-x)RuxAsO0.85F0.15.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, L; Al-Zein, A; Moretti Sala, M; Joseph, B; Iadecola, A; Bendele, M; Martinelli, A; Palenzona, A; Putti, M; Monaco, G

    2014-02-12

    We have studied the electronic and magnetic properties of SmFe(1-x)RuxAsO0.85F0.15 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.25, 0.33, 0.5) by high-resolution x-ray absorption and x-ray emission spectroscopy. The local Fe magnetic moment (μ) tends to decrease for a small Ru substitution, but it shows a clear increase with further substitution. It appears that impurity scattering prevails in reducing the μ with small Ru substitution due to an extended Ru d-band. A nanoscale phase separation, that decouples the FeAs layers from the spacer layers, drives the increase of μ at higher Ru substitution. The results provide important information on nanoscale phase separation due to isoelectronic substitution in the active layers of iron-based 1111-superconductors and its effect on the local magnetic properties.

  19. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of LaCa0.143 (4)O0.857 (4)F0.143 (4)Bi0.857 (4)S2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongtie; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Dong; Cai, Chuanbing; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of lithium dibarium calcium oxide fluoride di­sulfide are reported. LaCa0.143 (4)O0.857 (4)F0.143 (4)Bi0.857 (4)S2 crystallizes in the tetra­gonal space group P4/nmm. The structure exhibits disorder of the Ca2+ and Bi3+ cations, and the O2− and F− anions. The structure is composed of a stacking of [(O,F)2La2] layers and double [(Bi,Ca)S2] layers. Magnetic property measurements indicate a very small magnetization at 300 K and the existence of weak ferromagnetism at 2 K. PMID:27308056

  20. Structural characterization of C-S-H and C-A-S-H samples-Part II: Local environment investigated by spectroscopic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Renaudin, Guillaume; Russias, Julie; Leroux, Fabrice; Cau-dit-Coumes, Celine; Frizon, Fabien

    2009-12-15

    Spectroscopic studies ({sup 1}H, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopy) have been used to characterize three series of C-S-H samples (0.8investigations indicate that the main part of the Al atoms is readily incorporated into the interlayer region of the C-S-H structure. Al atoms are mainly inserted as four-fold coordinated aluminates in the dreierketten silicate chain (either in bridging or paired tetrahedra) at low Ca/Si ratio. Four-fold aluminates are progressively replaced by six-fold coordinated aluminates located into the interlayer region of the C-S-H structure and bonded to silicate chains. Investigation of the hydrogen bonding in C-S-H indicates that the main part of the hydrogen bonds is intra-main layer, and thus explains the low stacking cohesion of the C-S-H structure leading to its nanometric crystal size and the OD character of the tobermorite like structures. - Graphical abstract: The insertion of aluminum atoms into the C-S-H structure has been investigated by spectroscopic analyses ({sup 27}Al and {sup 1}H MAS NMR and Raman). The previously determined structural continuity, when increasing the C/S ratio from the C-S-H(I) type to the C-S-H(II) type, has been confirmed even in the presence of aluminum.

  1. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation at Savannah is being conducted in phases. This approach is being used by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase I of the Savannah program was conducted in October-November 2007 and January 2008 (Argonne 2007a, 2008). This site-specific Work Plan provides a brief summary of the Phase I findings and the results of groundwater level monitoring that has been ongoing since completion of the Phase I study and also outlines technical objectives, investigation tasks, and investigation methods for Phase II of the site characterization at Savannah.

  2. An ab initio investigation of the interactions involving the aromatic group of the set of fluorinated N-(4-sulfamylbenzoyl)benzylamine inhibitors and human carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Cui, Guanglei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2007-05-24

    In this work we investigate the interactions that occur between the aromatic portion of the set of fluorinated N-(4-sulfamylbenzoyl)benzylamine (SBB) inhibitors and two residues of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II (HCAII), namely Phe-131 and Pro-202. Calculations were carried out at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and the counterpoise scheme of Boys and Bernardi was employed to account for the basis set superposition error. The most striking result obtained here is that the SBB phenyl ring interacts at least as strongly with the proline pyrrolidine ring as with the phenylalanine phenyl ring, which is surprising because aromatic-aromatic interactions have long been thought to be particularly favorable in protein and protein-ligand structure. Comparison of the MP2 binding energies to those obtained with the Hartree-Fock method indicates that the attraction between the proline pyrrolidine ring and the SBB phenyl ring is largely attributable to dispersion forces. These favorable interactions between pyrrolidine and phenyl rings may have important implications in protein structure because there is potential for proline residues to interact with phenylalanine residues in a fashion analogous to that seen here. A preliminary protein data bank search indicates that the proline-phenylalanine contacts are about 40% as common as those between two phenylalanines. It is also found here that the number and pattern of fluorine substituents on the SBB phenyl ring is much less important in determining the SBB-HCAII binding energy than the relative geometric configuration of the interacting pairs.

  3. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-01

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb=(7.6±0.21)×10(5)) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2±0.11)×10(6)M(-1). Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules.

  4. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-01

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298 K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb = (7.6 ± 0.21) × 105) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298 K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2 ± 0.11) × 106 M- 1. Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules.

  5. Dietary methoxychlor exposure modulates splenic natural killer cell activity, antibody-forming cell response and phenotypic marker expression in F0 and F1 generations of Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    White, K L; Germolec, D R; Booker, C D; Hernendez, D M; McCay, J A; Delclos, K B; Newbold, R R; Weis, C; Guo, T L

    2005-02-14

    Methoxychlor, a chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide, is a persistent environmental contaminant that has been identified in human reproductive tissues. Methoxychlor has been shown to be estrogenic in both in vivo and in vitro studies. As an endocrine disrupter, it may have the potential to adversely affect endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems in animals. The present study evaluated methoxychlor's immunotoxic potential in F0 (dams) and F1 generations of Sprague Dawley rats exposed to an isoflavone-free diet containing methoxychlor at concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 ppm. In dams, exposure to methoxychlor from gestation day 7 to postpartum day 51 (65 days total exposure) produced a significant increase in the NK activity (1000 ppm) and the percentages of T cells (1000 ppm), helper T cells (1000 ppm) and macrophages (100 and 1000 ppm). In contrast, a decrease in the numbers of splenocytes and B cells was observed at the 100 and 1000 ppm concentrations. In F1 males, exposure to methoxychlor gestationally, lactationally and through feed from postnatal day 22-64 (78 days total exposure) produced an increase in the spleen IgM antibody-forming cell response to sheep red blood cells (100 and 1000 ppm) and the activity of NK cells (1000 ppm). However, there was a decrease in the terminal body weight (1000 ppm), spleen weight (1000 ppm), thymus weight (100 and 1000 ppm), and the numbers of splenocytes (1000 ppm), B cells (100 and 1000 ppm), cytotoxic T cells (1000 ppm) and NK cells (100 and 1000 ppm). In F1 females, exposure to methoxychlor produced a decrease in the terminal body weight (1000 ppm) and the percentages of cytotoxic T cells (10, 100 and 1000 ppm). These results demonstrate that developmental and adult dietary exposure to methoxychlor modulates immune responses in Sprague Dawley rats. Immunological changes were more pronounced in the F1 generation male rats that were exposed during gestation and postpartum, when compared to the F0 and F1 generation

  6. Structural investigation of 5,10-A2B2-type porphyrins: palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of 5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Senge, Mathias O; Zawadzka, Monika

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato]palladium(II), [Pd(C34H22Br2N4)], and [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato](methanol)zinc(II), [Zn(C34H22Br2N4)(CH4O)], reveals a small but localized influence of the bromine residues on the conformation of the macrocycle. A comparison of the 5,10-dibromo substituent pattern with literature data for 5,15-dibromoporphyrins shows similar in-plane distortions in both but a different mix of out-of-plane distortion modes for the different regiochemical arrangements.

  7. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  8. Poisoning effect of Mn in LaFe1-xMnxAsO0.89F0.11: Unveiling a quantum critical point in the phase diagram of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerath, F.; Bonfà, P.; Sanna, S.; Prando, G.; De Renzi, R.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Carretta, P.

    2014-04-01

    A superconducting-to-magnetic transition is reported for LaFeAsO0.89F0.11 where a per-thousand amount of Mn impurities is dispersed. By employing local spectroscopic techniques like muon spin rotation (μSR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) on compounds with Mn contents ranging from x =0.025% to x =0.75%, we find that the electronic properties are extremely sensitive to the Mn impurities. In fact, a small amount of Mn as low as 0.2% suppresses superconductivity completely. Static magnetism, involving the FeAs planes, is observed to arise for x >0.1% and becomes further enhanced upon increasing Mn substitution. Also a progressive increase of low-energy spin fluctuations, leading to an enhancement of the NQR spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1, is observed upon Mn substitution. The analysis of T1-1 for the sample closest to the crossover between superconductivity and magnetism (x =0.2%) points toward the presence of an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point around that doping level.

  9. First determination of f +(0)| V us | from a combined analysis of τ → Kπν τ decay and πK scattering with constraints from K ℓ3 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Véronique

    2014-06-01

    We perform a combined analysis of τ → Kπν τ decay and πK scattering with constraints from K ℓ3 data using a N/ D approach that fulfills requirements from unitarity and analyticity. We obtain a good fit of the I = 1/2 πK amplitude in the P wave using the LASS data above the elastic region while in this region data are generated via Monte Carlo using the FOCUS results based on D ℓ4 decay. The spectrum and branching ratio of τ → Kπν τ constrained by K ℓ3 decays are also well reproduced leading to f +(0)| V us | = 0 .2163±0 .0014. Furthermore, we obtain the slope of the vector form factor λ + = (25 .56 ± 0 .40) × 10-3 while the value of the scalar form factor at the Callan-Treiman point is ln C = 0 .2062 ± 0 .0089. Given the experimental precision our results are compatible with the Standard Model.

  10. Atomic resolution imaging of oxygen atoms close to heavy atoms by HRTEM and ED, using the superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 as an example.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumei; Ge, Binghui; Che, Guangcan

    2015-04-01

    Imaging of light atoms has always been a challenge in high-resolution electron microscopy. Image resolution is mainly limited by lens aberrations, especially the spherical aberration of the objective lens. Image deconvolution could correct for the image distortion by lens aberrations and restore the structure projection, the resolution of which is limited by the information limit of the microscope. Electron diffraction unrestricted by lens aberrations could overcome this resolution limit. Here we show a combination of electron diffraction and image deconvolution to reveal simultaneously the atomic columns of O and considerably heavier Sm at a very close distance (1.17 Å) in iron-based superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 using a conventional 200 kV electron microscope. The approach used here, starting from an image and an electron diffraction pattern, has an advantage for those radiation-sensitive samples. Besides, it can be applied to simultaneously imaging light and heavy atoms, even though they have a big difference in atomic number and a much smaller atomic distance than the microscope resolution.

  11. Investigation of the molecular nature of low-molecular-mass cobalt(II) ions in isolated osteoarthritic knee-joint synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Silwood, Christopher J L; Chikanza, Ian C; Tanner, K Elizabeth; Shelton, Julia C; Bowsher, John G; Grootveld, Martin

    2004-06-01

    High field 1H NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that addition of Co(II) ions to osteoarthritic knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) resulted in its complexation by a range of biomolecules, the relative efficacies of these complexants/chelators being citrate > histidine - threonine > glycine - glutamate - glutamine - phenylalanine tyrosine > formate > lactate > alanine > valine > acetate > pyruvate > creatinine, this order reflecting the ability of these ligands to compete for the available Co(II) in terms of (1) thermodynamic equilibrium constants for the formation of their complexes and (2) their SF concentrations. Since many of these SF Co(II) complexants (e.g. histidinate) serve as powerful *OH scavengers, the results acquired indicate that any of this radical generated from the Co(II) source in such complexes via Fenton or pseudo-Fenton reaction systems will be "site-specifically" scavenged. The significance of these observations with regard to cobalt toxicity and the in vivo corrosion of cobalt-containing metal alloy joint prostheses (e.g. CoCr alloys) is discussed.

  12. Oxygen Radical Scavenger Activity, EPR, NMR, Molecular Mechanics and Extended-Hückel Molecular Orbital Investigation of the Bis(Piroxicam)Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Cini, R; Pogni, R; Basosi, R; Donati, A; Rossi, C; Sabadini, L; Rollo, L; Lorenzini, S; Gelli, R; Marcolongo, R

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen radical scavenger activity (ORSA) of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] (HPir = Piroxicam = 4-hydroxy -2- methyl -N-2- pyridyl -2H- 1,2-benzothiazine -3- carboxamide 1,1-dioxide) was determined by chemiluminescence of samples obtained by mixing human neutrophils (from healthy subjects) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (DMF = N,N -dimethylformammide) in DMSO/GLY/PBS (2:1:2, v/v) solution (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide, GLY = 1,2,3-propantriol, PBS = Dulbecco's buffer salt solution). The ratio of the residual radicals, for the HPir (1.02.10(-4)M) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (1.08.10(-5)M)/HPir (8.01.10-(-5)M) systems was higher than 12 (not stimulated) [excess of piroxicam was added (Cu/Pir molar ratio approximately 1:10) in order to have most of the metal complexed as bischelate]. In contrast, the ratio of residual radicals for the CuCl(2) (1.00.10(-5)M) and [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] (1.08.10(-5)M)/Hpir (8.01.10(-5)M)system was 5. The [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)] compound is therefore a stronger radical scavenger than either HPir or CuCl(2). A molecular mechanics (MM) analysis of the gas phase structures of neutral HPir, its zwitterionic (HPir(+-)) and anionic (Pir(-)) forms, and some Cu(II)-piroxicam complexes based on X-ray structures allowed calculation of force constants. The most stable structure for HPir has a ZZZ conformation similar to that found in the Cu(II) (and Cd(II) complexes) in the solid state as well as in the gas phase. The structure is stabilized by a strong H bond which involves the N(amide)-H and O(enolic) groups. The MM simulation for the [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] complex showed that two high repulsive intramolecular contacts exist between a pyridyl hydrogen atom of one Pir(-) molecule with the O donor of the other ligand. These interactions activate a transition toward a pseudo-tetrahedral geometry, in the case the apical ligands are removed. On refluxing a suspension of [Cu(II)(Pir)(2)(DMF)(2)] in acetone a brown microcystalline solid with the Cu(Pir)(2).0.5DMF

  13. Kinetic and X-ray crystallographic investigations on carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, IX and XII of a thioureido analog of SLC-0111.

    PubMed

    Lomelino, Carrie L; Mahon, Brian P; McKenna, Robert; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    SLC-0111 (4-(4-fluorophenylureido)-benzenesulfonamide) is the first carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) IX inhibitor to reach phase I clinical trials as an antitumor/antimetastatic agent. Here we report a kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study of a congener of SLC-0111 which incorporates a thioureido instead of ureido linker between the two aromatic rings as inhibitor of four physiologically relevant CA isoforms. Similar to SLC-0111, the thioureido derivative was a weak hCA I and II inhibitor and a potent one against hCA IX and XII. X-ray crystallography of its adduct with hCA II and comparison of the structure with that of other five hCA II-sulfonamide adducts belonging to the SLC-0111 series, afforded us to understand the particular inhibition profile of the new sulfonamide. Similar to SLC-0111, the thioureido sulfonamide primarily interacted with the hydrophobic side of the hCA II active site, with the tail participating in van der Waals interactions with Phe131 and Pro202, in addition to the coordination of the deprotonated sulfonamide to the active site metal ion. On the contrary, the tail of other sulfonamides belonging to the SLC-0111 series (2-isopropyl-phenyl; 3-nitrophenyl) were orientated towards the hydrophilic half of the active site, which was correlated with orders of magnitude better inhibitory activity against hCA II, and a loss of selectivity for the inhibition of the tumor-associated CAs.

  14. A combined experimental and DFT/TD-DFT investigation of structural, electronic, and cation-induced switching of photophysical properties of bimetallic Ru(II) and Os(II) complexes derived from imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid and 2,2'-bipyridine.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal; Karmakar, Srikanta; Saha, Debasish; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2013-06-17

    Experimental results coupled with computational studies were utilized to investigate the structural and electronic properties of mixed-ligand bimetallic ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) complexes of composition [(bpy)2M(Imdc)M(bpy)2](+) [M = Ru(II) (1) and M = Os(II) (2)], where H3Imdc = imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine. The X-ray crystal structures of both the bimetallic complexes were determined which showed that compound 1 crystallizes in monoclinic form with space group P2(1)/c, while 2 is obtained in orthorhombic form with the space group Pca2(1). The optimized geometrical parameters for the complexes computed both in the gas phase and in solution are reported and compared with the single-crystal X-ray data. The absorption spectra, redox behaviors, and luminescence properties of the complexes were thoroughly investigated. The complexes display very intense, ligand-centered absorption bands in the UV and moderately intense MLCT bands in the visible regions. While the Ru(II) complex displays moderately strong luminescence, the corresponding Os(II) complex does not luminesce at room temperature. Both the bimetallic complexes show two successive one-electron reversible metal-centered oxidations. The effect of alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations on the absorption and emission spectral behavior of the complexes has also been studied in detail. As compared to the luminescence intensities and the quantum yields of the free complexes, those of the complexes were enhanced substantially in the presence of selective cations showing cation-induced molecular switching behaviors. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) studies provide insight into the nature of the ground and excited states with resulting detailed assignments of the orbitals involved in absorption and emission transitions. In particular, the blue-shifts of the absorption and emission bands in the presence of cations are also reproduced by our

  15. Chelation behavior of various flavonols and transfer of flavonol-chelated zinc(II) to alanylaspartic dipeptide: A PCM/DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasarawan, Nuttawisit; Thipyapong, Khajadpai; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2016-03-01

    Alanylaspartic dipeptide (AlaAsp) and zinc(II)-flavonol complex could represent a metal-binding site in proteins and a metal-ion releasing agent, respectively. Chelation of zinc(II) by either AlaAsp or flavonol ligands in aqueous solution has been examined using DFT methods with polarizable continuum model (PCM/DFT). Coordination geometry, complexation stoichiometry, coordination bond strength, preferable metal-binding site on ligands and effect of water coordination on the stability of complexes have been addressed. In several cases, the long-range corrected density functional CAM-B3LYP allows the most accurate prediction of both structural and spectroscopic data. The preferential transfer of flavonol-chelated zinc(II) to AlaAsp under solvation is attainable through the ligand-exchange reaction. The energy barrier of such reaction is significantly dependent on the degree of hydrogen bonding within the transition state. In summary, either hydroxylation or methoxylation at particular positions on the 3-hydroxyflavone backbone significantly affects the reactivity of flavonol chelates in the metal-ion transfer.

  16. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation for the Level of Conjugation in Carbazole-Based Precursors and Their Mono-, Di-, and Polynuclear Pt(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Al-Balushi, Rayya A; Haque, Ashanul; Jayapal, Maharaja; Al-Suti, Mohammed K; Husband, John; Khan, Muhammad S; Koentjoro, Olivia F; Molloy, Kieran C; Skelton, Jonathan M; Raithby, Paul R

    2016-07-01

    A series of trimethylsilyl-protected monoalkynes (Me3SiC≡C-R) and bis-alkynes (Me3 SiC≡C-R-C≡CSiMe3) incorporating carbazole spacer groups (R = carbazole-2-yl, carbazole-3-yl, carbazole-2,7-diyl, N-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole-2,7-diyl, carbazole-3,6-diyl, N-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole-3,6-diyl), together with the corresponding terminal monoalkynes (H-C≡C-R) and bis-alkynes (H-C≡C-R-C≡C-H), have been synthesized and characterized. The CuI-catalyzed dehydrohalogenation reaction between trans-[(Ph)(Et3P)2PtCl], trans-[(Et3P)2PtCl2], and trans-[(P(n)Bu3)2PtCl2] and the terminal alkynes in (i)Pr2NH/CH2Cl2 affords a series of Pt(II) mono- and diynes, while the dehydrohalogenation polycondensation reactions with trans-[(P(n)Bu3)2PtCl2] under similar reaction conditions yields four Pt(II) poly-ynes of the form trans-[(P(n)Bu3)2Pt-C≡C-R-C≡C-]n. The acetylide-functionalized carbazole ligands and the mono-, di-, and polynuclear Pt(II) σ-acetylide complexes have been characterized spectroscopically, with a subset analyzed using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Pt(II) mono-, di-, and poly-ynes incorporating the carbazole spacers are soluble in common organic solvents, and solution absorption spectra show a consistent red-shift between the 2- and 2,7- as well as 3- and 3,6-carbazole complexes. Computational modeling is used to explain the observed spectral shifts, which are related to the enhanced electronic delocalization in the latter systems. These results also indicate that the inclusion of carbazole-2,7-diyl units into rigid-rod organometallic polymers should enhance electronic transport along the chains. PMID:27284807

  17. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH4)2S2O8 for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Ye, Gang; Chen, Jing; Lv, Dachao; Wang, Jianchen

    2015-12-01

    Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH4)2S2O8 as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in Csbnd O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  18. The clinical investigation of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) schrad fruit in treatment of Type II diabetic patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Huseini, H Fallah; Darvishzadeh, F; Heshmat, R; Jafariazar, Z; Raza, Mohsin; Larijani, B

    2009-08-01

    Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad fruit is an herbal medicine used by traditional herbalists for the treatment of diabetes in Iran. To determine its efficacy and toxicity, a 2 month clinical trial was conducted in 50 type II diabetic patients. Two groups of 25 each under standard antidiabetic therapy, received 100 mg C. colocynthis fruit capsules or placebos three times a day, respectively. The patients were visited monthly and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglyceride, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine levels were determined at the beginning and after 2 months. The results showed a significant decrease in HbA1c and fasting blood glucose levels in C. colocynthis treated patients. Other serological parameters levels in both the groups did not change significantly. No notable gastrointestinal side effect was observed in either group. In conclusion, C. colocynthis fruit treatment had a beneficial effect on improving the glycemic profile without severe adverse effects in type II diabetic patients. Further clinical studies are recommended to evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of C. colocynthis in diabetic patients.

  19. Structure, stability, and photoluminescence in the anti-perovskites Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F (0≤x≤1)

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Eirin; Avdeev, Maxim; Blom, Douglas A.; Gahrs, Casey J.; Green, Robert L.; Hamaker, Christopher G.; Vogt, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    Single-phase ordered oxyfluorides Na{sub 3}WO{sub 4}F, Na{sub 3}MoO{sub 4}F and their mixed members Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F can be prepared via facile solid state reaction of Na{sub 2}MO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O (M=W, Mo) and NaF. Phases produced from incongruent melts are metastable, but lower temperatures allow for a facile one-step synthesis. In polycrystalline samples of Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F, the presence of Mo stabilizes the structure against decomposition to spinel phases. Photoluminescence studies show that upon excitation with λ=254 nm and λ=365 nm, Na{sub 3}WO{sub 4}F and Na{sub 3}MoO{sub 4}F exhibit broad emission maxima centered around 485 nm. These materials constitute new members of the family of self-activating ordered oxyfluoride phosphors with anti-perovskite structures which are amenable to doping with emitters such as Eu{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: Directed synthesis of the ordered oxyfluorides Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F (0≤x≤1) has shown that a complete solid solution is attainable and provides the first example of photoluminescence in these materials. - Highlights: • Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F is a complete solid solution with hexagonal anti-perovskite structure. • The presence of even small amounts of Mo stabilizes the structure against decomposition. • Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F has broad emissions centered ≈485 nm (λ{sub ex}=254 nm and λ{sub ex}=365 nm). • These materials constitute a new family of self-activated oxyfluoride phosphors. • Na{sub 3}W{sub 1−x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4}F materials are amenable to doping with emitters such as Eu{sup 3+}.

  20. Measurement of W-boson polarization in top-quark decay using the full CDF Run II data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Walsh, K.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-02-01

    We measure the polarization of W bosons from top-quark (t) decays into final states with a charged lepton and jets, tt¯→W+bW-b¯→ℓνbqq¯'b¯, using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7fb-1. A model-independent method simultaneously determines the fraction of longitudinal (f0) and right-handed (f+) W bosons to yield f0=0.726±0.066(stat)±0.067(syst) and f+=-0.045±0.044(stat)±0.058(syst) with a correlation coefficient of -0.69. Additional results are presented under various standard model assumptions. No significant discrepancies with the standard model are observed.

  1. The investigation of the solvent effect on coordination of nicotinato ligand with cobalt(II) complex containing tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, Koray; Karakaş, Duran

    2014-11-01

    The electronic structure of [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion are optimized by using density functional theory (DFT) method with mix basis set. Where (ntb) represents tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine ligand and (nic) is the anion of nicotinic acids. Six different fields, vacuum, chloroform, butanonitrile, methanol, water and formamide solvents are used in these calculations. The calculated structural parameters indicate that (nic) ligand coordinates to cobalt(II) containing (ntb) ligand with one oxygen atom in butanonitrile, methanol, water and formamide solvents but coordinates with two oxygen atoms in vacuum. These results are supported with IR, UV and 1H NMR spectra. According to the calculated results, the geometry of [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion is distorted octahedral in vacuum while the geometry is distorted square pyramidal in the all other solvents. Distorted octahedral [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion have not been synthesized as experimentally and it is predicted with computational chemistry methods.

  2. Investigation of the Transformation of Uranium under Iron-Reducing Conditions: Reduction of UVI by Biogenic FeII/FeIII Hydroxide (Green Rust)

    SciTech Connect

    Edward O’Loughlin; Michelle Scherer; Kenneth Kemner; Shelly Kelly

    2004-03-17

    The research we are proposing addresses fundamental aspects of the effects of coupled biotic and abiotic processes on U speciation in subsurface environments where Fe redox cycling is significant. The long-term objective of this research is to evaluate whether reduction of U{sup VI} by biogenic GRs is a significant immobilization mechanism in subsurface environments. Our preliminary experiments have shown that biogenic GRs can reduce U{sup VI} to U{sup IV}; however, little is known about how biogeochemical conditions (such as pH, U concentration, carbonate concentration, and the presence of cocontaminants) and GR composition affect the rate and products of U{sup VI} reduction by GRs. It is also unclear which biogeochemical conditions favor formation of GR over other non-reactive Fe-bearing biomineralization products from the reduction of Fe{sup III} by DIRB. To address these issues, the following objectives are proposed: (1) Identify the geochemical conditions that favor the formation of biogenic GRs from the reduction of Fe{sup III} oxyhydroxides by DIRB (e.g., Shewanella and Geobacter species). (2) Characterize the chemical composition of biogenic GRs (e.g., Fe{sup II}:Fe{sup III} ratios and interlayer anions) and the effects of compositional variability on the rate and extent of U{sup VI} reduction. (3) Evaluate the effects of variations in geochemical conditions--particularly pH, U concentration, carbonate concentration, the presence of organic ligands, and the presence of reducible co-contaminants--both on the kinetics of U{sup VI} reduction by biogenic GR and on the composition of U-bearing mineral phases. Particular attention will be given to examining geochemical conditions relevant to conditions at DOE field sites. (4) Determine the potential for coupling the reduction of Fe{sup III} by DIRB to the reduction of U{sup VI} via biogenic Fe{sup II} species (including biogenic GRs). The objectives outlined above will be achieved by testing the following

  3. Synthesis, spectral investigation and catalytic aspects of entrapped VO(IV) and Cu(II) complexes into the supercages of zeolite-Y.

    PubMed

    Modi, Chetan K; Gade, Bhagyashree G; Chudasama, Jiten A; Parmar, Digvijay K; Nakum, Haresh D; Patel, Arun L

    2015-04-01

    VO(IV) and Cu(II) complexes with Schiff base ligand derived from 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-formyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (PMFP) and 2-amino phenol have been synthesized as their neat and entrapped complexes into the supercages of zeolite-Y. The compounds were characterized by chemical analysis (ICP-OES and elemental), electronic and/or UV reflectance spectra, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction patterns, SEMs, BET and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. All the prepared catalysts were tested on the liquid phase limonene oxidation reaction, using 30% H2O2 as an oxidant. Limonene glycol, carveol, carvone and limonene 1,2-epoxide were the main products obtained. It was observed that zeolite-Y entrapped complexes exhibited higher catalytic activity than neat complexes. The catalysts undergo no metal leaching and can be easily recovered and reused. The use of inexpensive catalyst and oxidant are significant practical advantages of this environmentally friendly process.

  4. Internal structure of copper(II)-phthalocyanine thin films on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates investigated by grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brieva, A. C.; Jenkins, T. E.; Jones, D. G.; Stroessner, F.; Evans, D. A.; Clark, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    The internal structure of copper(II)-phthalocyanine (CuPc) thin films grown on SiO{sub 2}/Si by organic molecular beam deposition has been studied by grazing incidence x-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and atomic force microscopy. The electronic density profile is consistent with a structure formed by successive monolayers of molecules in the {alpha} form with the b axis lying in the substrate surface plane. The authors present an electronic density profile model of CuPc films grown on SiO{sub 2}/Si. The excellent agreement between the model and experimental data allows postdeposition monitoring of the internal structure of the CuPc films with the nondestructive GIXR technique, providing a tool for accurate control of CuPc growth on silicon-based substrates. In addition, since the experiments have been carried out ex situ, they show that these structures can endure ambient conditions.

  5. Synthesis, spectral investigation and catalytic aspects of entrapped VO(IV) and Cu(II) complexes into the supercages of zeolite-Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Chetan K.; Gade, Bhagyashree G.; Chudasama, Jiten A.; Parmar, Digvijay K.; Nakum, Haresh D.; Patel, Arun L.

    2015-04-01

    VO(IV) and Cu(II) complexes with Schiff base ligand derived from 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-formyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (PMFP) and 2-amino phenol have been synthesized as their neat and entrapped complexes into the supercages of zeolite-Y. The compounds were characterized by chemical analysis (ICP-OES and elemental), electronic and/or UV reflectance spectra, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction patterns, SEMs, BET and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. All the prepared catalysts were tested on the liquid phase limonene oxidation reaction, using 30% H2O2 as an oxidant. Limonene glycol, carveol, carvone and limonene 1,2-epoxide were the main products obtained. It was observed that zeolite-Y entrapped complexes exhibited higher catalytic activity than neat complexes. The catalysts undergo no metal leaching and can be easily recovered and reused. The use of inexpensive catalyst and oxidant are significant practical advantages of this environmentally friendly process.

  6. Some Investigations of the General Instability of Stiffened Metal Cylinders II : Preliminary Tests of Wire-braced Specimens and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    This is the second of a series of reports covering an investigation of the general instability problem by the California Institute of Technology. The first five reports of this series cover investigations of the general instability problem under the loading conditions of pure bending and were prepared under the sponsorship of the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The succeeding reports of this series cover the work done on other loading conditions under the sponsorship of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  7. Investigation of the Effect of Some Optically Active Imine Compounds on the Enzyme Activities of hCA-I and hCA-II under In Vitro Conditions: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Tektas, Osman; Akkemik, Ebru; Baykara, Haci

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase (hCA; EC 4.2.1.1) are used as medicines for many diseases. Therefore, they are very important. In this study, a known series of Schiff bases were synthesized and their effects on the activities of hCA-I and hCA-II, which are cytosolic isoenzymes of carbonic anhydrase, were investigated under in vitro conditions. The synthesized compounds (H1, H2, H3, and H4) were found to cause inhibition on enzyme activities of hCA-1 and hCA-II. IC50 values of H1, H2, H3, and H4 compounds were 140, 88, 201, and 271 μM for hCA-I enzyme activity and 134, 251, 79, and 604 μM for hCA-II enzyme activity, respectively. The synthesized Schiff bases were characterized by several methods, including (1) H NMR, FT-IR, elemental analysis, and polarimetric measurements. Correlation coefficient square values (R(2) ) of comparison of the theoretical and experimental (1) H NMR shifts for H1, H2, H3, and H4 compounds were found as 0.9781, 0.9814, 0.9758, and 0.8635, respectively. PMID:26762592

  8. Investigation of the Effect of Some Optically Active Imine Compounds on the Enzyme Activities of hCA-I and hCA-II under In Vitro Conditions: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Tektas, Osman; Akkemik, Ebru; Baykara, Haci

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase (hCA; EC 4.2.1.1) are used as medicines for many diseases. Therefore, they are very important. In this study, a known series of Schiff bases were synthesized and their effects on the activities of hCA-I and hCA-II, which are cytosolic isoenzymes of carbonic anhydrase, were investigated under in vitro conditions. The synthesized compounds (H1, H2, H3, and H4) were found to cause inhibition on enzyme activities of hCA-1 and hCA-II. IC50 values of H1, H2, H3, and H4 compounds were 140, 88, 201, and 271 μM for hCA-I enzyme activity and 134, 251, 79, and 604 μM for hCA-II enzyme activity, respectively. The synthesized Schiff bases were characterized by several methods, including (1) H NMR, FT-IR, elemental analysis, and polarimetric measurements. Correlation coefficient square values (R(2) ) of comparison of the theoretical and experimental (1) H NMR shifts for H1, H2, H3, and H4 compounds were found as 0.9781, 0.9814, 0.9758, and 0.8635, respectively.

  9. N.m.r. and e.p.r. investigation of the interaction of copper(II) and glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine, a growth-modulating tripeptide from plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Laussac, J P; Haran, R; Sarkar, B

    1983-01-01

    Interaction of Cu(II) and Gly-His-Lys, a growth-modulating tripeptide from plasma, was investigated by 13C- and 1H-n.m.r. and e.p.r. spectroscopy. The n.m.r. line-broadening was interpreted in terms of major and minor species formed as a function of pH. The results indicate that the n.m.r. line-broadening is due to the presence of minor species in rapid exchange and not due to the major species in solution, which has a large tau M. It is concluded that the technique of 13C- and 1H-n.m.r. line broadening, caused by paramagnetic Cu(II) ion, should be undertaken with caution, since the method may not be useful for obtaining structural information on the major species. The e.p.r. spectra over a wide pH range are almost entirely due to similarly co-ordinating species. Starting at pH 5.5, the narrowest absorption near 340 mT shows superhyperfine structure, which comes out sharply in the pH region 6.0-9.6. The spectra in this pH range showed the seven lines of nitrogen superhyperfine splitting, indicating clearly the co-ordination of three nitrogen atoms to Cu(II). The e.p.r. parameters in the medium pH range, A parallel = 19.5 mT and g parallel = 2.21, fit well with the contention that Cu(II) is ligated to Gly-His-Lys through one oxygen atom and three nitrogen atoms in a square-planar configuration. PMID:6303307

  10. N.m.r. and e.p.r. investigation of the interaction of copper(II) and glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine, a growth-modulating tripeptide from plasma.

    PubMed

    Laussac, J P; Haran, R; Sarkar, B

    1983-02-01

    Interaction of Cu(II) and Gly-His-Lys, a growth-modulating tripeptide from plasma, was investigated by 13C- and 1H-n.m.r. and e.p.r. spectroscopy. The n.m.r. line-broadening was interpreted in terms of major and minor species formed as a function of pH. The results indicate that the n.m.r. line-broadening is due to the presence of minor species in rapid exchange and not due to the major species in solution, which has a large tau M. It is concluded that the technique of 13C- and 1H-n.m.r. line broadening, caused by paramagnetic Cu(II) ion, should be undertaken with caution, since the method may not be useful for obtaining structural information on the major species. The e.p.r. spectra over a wide pH range are almost entirely due to similarly co-ordinating species. Starting at pH 5.5, the narrowest absorption near 340 mT shows superhyperfine structure, which comes out sharply in the pH region 6.0-9.6. The spectra in this pH range showed the seven lines of nitrogen superhyperfine splitting, indicating clearly the co-ordination of three nitrogen atoms to Cu(II). The e.p.r. parameters in the medium pH range, A parallel = 19.5 mT and g parallel = 2.21, fit well with the contention that Cu(II) is ligated to Gly-His-Lys through one oxygen atom and three nitrogen atoms in a square-planar configuration. PMID:6303307

  11. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes. PMID:22025275

  12. Copper(II) complexes with naringenin and hesperetin: cytotoxic activity against A 549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and investigation on the mode of action.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Lenka V; Gouvea, Ligiane R; Sousa, Anna C; Albuquerque, Ronniel M; Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; de Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Louro, Sonia R W; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2016-02-01

    Copper(II) complexes [Cu(H2O)2 (L1)(phen)](ClO4) (1) and [Cu(H2O)(L2)(phen)](ClO4) (2) (HL1 = naringenin; HL2 = hesperetin) were obtained, in which an anionic flavonoid ligand is attached to the metal center along with 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) as co-ligand. Complexes (1) and (2) were assayed for their cytotoxic activity against A549 lung carcinoma and against normal lung fibroblasts (LL-24) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). We found IC50 = 16.42 µM (1) and IC50 = 5.82 µM (2) against A549 tumor cells. Complexes (1) and (2) exhibited slight specificity, being more cytotoxic against malignant than against non-malignant cells. 1 and 2 induced apoptosis on A549 cells in a mitochondria-independent pathway, and showed antioxidant activity. The antioxidant effect of the complexes could possibly improve their apoptotic action, most likely by a PI3K-independent reduction of autophagy. Complexes (1) and (2) interact in vitro with calf thymus DNA by an intercalative binding mode. EPR data indicated that 1 and 2 interact with human serum albumin (HSA) forming mixed ligand species.

  13. Assessment of photosystem II thermoluminescence as a tool to investigate the effects of dehydration and rehydration on the cyclic/chlororespiratory electron pathways in wheat and barley leaves.

    PubMed

    Bürling, Kathrin; Ducruet, Jean-Marc; Cornic, Gabriel; Hunsche, Mauricio; Cerovic, Zoran G

    2014-06-01

    Thermoluminescence emission from wheat leaves was recorded under various controlled drought stress conditions: (i) fast dehydration (few hours) of excised leaves in the dark (ii) slow dehydration (several days) obtained by withholding watering of plants under a day/night cycle (iii) overnight rehydration of the slowly dehydrated plants at a stage of severe dessication. In fast dehydrated leaves, the AG band intensity was unchanged but its position was shifted to lower temperatures, indicating an activation of cyclic and chlororespiratory pathways in darkness, without any increase of their overall electron transfer capacity. By contrast, after a slow dehydration the AG intensity was strongly increased whereas its position was almost unchanged, indicating respectively that the capacity of cyclic pathways was enhanced but that they remained inactivated in darkness. Under more severe dehydration, the AG band almost disappeared. Rewatering caused its rapid bounce significantly above the control level. No significant differences in AG emission could be found between the two drought-sensitive and drought-tolerant wheat cultivars. The afterglow thermoluminescence emission in leaves provides an additional tool to follow the increased capacity and activation of cyclic electron flow around PSI in leaves during mild, severe dehydration and after rehydration.

  14. Use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to compare antihypertensive efficacy and safety of two angiotensin II receptor antagonists, losartan and valsartan. Losartan Trial Investigators.

    PubMed

    Monterroso, V H; Rodriguez Chavez, V; Carbajal, E T; Vogel, D R; Aroca Martinez, G J; Garcia, L H; Cuevas, J H; Lara Teran, J; Hitzenberger, G; Leao Neves, P; Middlemost, S J; Dumortier, T; Bunt, A M; Smith, R D

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of losartan and valsartan were evaluated in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Blood pressure responses to once-daily treatment with either losartan 50 mg (n = 93) or valsartan 80 mg (n = 94) for 6 weeks were assessed through measurements taken in the clinic and by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Both drugs significantly reduced clinic sitting systolic (SiSBP) and diastolic blood pressure (SiDBP) at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Maximum reductions from baseline in SiSBP and SiDBP on 24-hour ABPM were also significant with the two treatments. The reduction in blood pressure was more consistent across patients in the losartan group, as indicated by a numerically smaller variability in change from baseline on all ABPM measures, which achieved significance at peak (P = .017) and during the day (P = .002). In addition, the numerically larger smoothness index with losartan suggested a more homogeneous antihypertensive effect throughout the 24-hour dosing interval. The antihypertensive response rate was 54% with losartan and 46% with valsartan. Three days after discontinuation of therapy, SiDBP remained below baseline in 73% of losartan and 63% of valsartan patients. Both agents were generally well tolerated. Losartan, but not valsartan, significantly decreased serum uric acid an average 0.4 mg/dL at week 6. In conclusion, once-daily losartan 50 mg and valsartan 80 mg had similar antihypertensive effects in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Losartan produced a more consistent blood pressure-lowering response and significantly lowered uric acid, suggesting potentially meaningful differences between these two A II receptor antagonists.

  15. Copper(II) complexes with tridentate N-(benzoyl)-N‧-(salicylidine)-hydrazine and monodentate N-heterocycles: Investigations of intermolecular interactions in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sunirban; Pal, Samudranil

    2005-10-01

    Ternary copper(II) complexes having the general formula [Cu(bhs)(hc)], with a tridentate Schiff base, N-(benzoyl)- N'-(salicylidine)-hydrazine (H 2bhs) and monodentate N-heterocycles (hc=3,5-dimethylpyrazole, pyrazole, imidazole, and pyridine), are described. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic and cryomagnetic measurements and X-ray crystallography. Analytical data, infrared and electronic spectral features and molar conductivity values are consistent with the proposed molecular formula and the +2 oxidation state of the metal ion in these complexes. Cryomagnetic and EPR spectral measurements showed weak antiferromagnetic spin-exchange in all four complexes. In each complex, the metal ion is in N 2O 2 square-plane constituted by the phenolate-O, the imine-N, and the deprotonated amide-O donor bhs 2- and the sp 2 N-donor neutral heterocycle. In the solid state, the complexes having 3,5-dimethylpyrazole, imidazole, and pyridine as the heterocyclic ligand, exist as centrosymmetric dimeric species due to weak apical coordination of the metal bound phenolate-O. On the other hand, only one of the two molecules present in the asymmetric unit of the complex containing pyrazole forms the centrosymmetric dimeric species due to weak apical coordination of the metal bound amide-O. In the crystal lattice, intermolecular π-π, C-H⋯π, C-H⋯N, O-H⋯N and N-H⋯O interactions involving the complex and the solvent molecules lead to one- and two-dimensional supramolecular structures.

  16. Individual Differences and Learner Control II: Investigation of Control Over Pictorial Mediators in Computer-Assisted Instruction. AFHRL-TR-74-30. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Wilson A.; And Others

    The reported research was designed to investigate the impact of learner control on performance and anxiety in a computer assisted instruction task. This, the third phase of a project, substituted pictorial mediators for mnemonic devices as the facilitating variable in an instruction program on edible plants. Four experimental groups were formed…

  17. Tyrosinaemia II.

    PubMed

    Colditz, P B; Yu, J S; Billson, F A; Rogers, M; Molloy, H F; O'Halloran, M; Wilcken, B

    1984-08-18

    Four cases of tyrosinaemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome) are reported. This syndrome consists of corneal erosions, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, and sometimes mental retardation. Presentation with photophobia and dendritic corneal ulceration or circumscribed palmoplantar keratoderma should alert the physician to the possible diagnosis of tyrosinaemia II. Early diagnosis is important, as the clinical picture can be modified by dietary restriction.

  18. A computational mechanistic investigation of hydrogen production in water using the [Rh(III)(dmbpy)2Cl2](+)/[Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+)/ascorbic acid photocatalytic system.

    PubMed

    Kayanuma, Megumi; Stoll, Thibaut; Daniel, Chantal; Odobel, Fabrice; Fortage, Jérôme; Deronzier, Alain; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle

    2015-04-28

    We recently reported an efficient molecular homogeneous photocatalytic system for hydrogen (H2) production in water combining [Rh(III)(dmbpy)2Cl2](+) (dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) as a H2 evolving catalyst, [Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and ascorbic acid as a sacrificial electron donor (Chem. - Eur. J., 2013, 19, 781). Herein, the possible rhodium intermediates and mechanistic pathways for H2 production with this system were investigated at DFT/B3LYP level of theory and the most probable reaction pathways were proposed. The calculations confirmed that the initial step of the mechanism is a reductive quenching of the excited state of the Ru photosensitizer by ascorbate, affording the reduced [Ru(II)(bpy)2(bpy˙(-))](+) form, which is capable, in turn, of reducing the Rh(III) catalyst to the distorted square planar [Rh(I)(dmbpy)2](+) species. This two-electron reduction by [Ru(II)(bpy)2(bpy˙(-))](+) is sequential and occurs according to an ECEC mechanism which involves the release of one chloride after each one-electron reduction step of the Rh catalyst. The mechanism of disproportionation of the intermediate Rh(II) species, much less thermodynamically favoured, cannot be barely ruled out since it could also be favoured from a kinetic point of view. The Rh(I) catalyst reacts with H3O(+) to generate the hexa-coordinated hydride [Rh(III)(H)(dmbpy)2(X)](n+) (X = Cl(-) or H2O), as the key intermediate for H2 release. The DFT study also revealed that the real source of protons for the hydride formation as well as the subsequent step of H2 evolution is H3O(+) rather than ascorbic acid, even if the latter does govern the pH of the aqueous solution. Besides, the calculations have shown that H2 is preferentially released through an heterolytic mechanism by reaction of the Rh(III)(H) hydride and H3O(+); the homolytic pathway, involving the reaction of two Rh(III)(H) hydrides, being clearly less favoured. In parallel to this

  19. Investigating Superoxide Transfer through a μ-1,2-O2 Bridge between Nonheme Ni(III)-Peroxo and Mn(II) Species by DFT Methods to Bridge Theoretical and Experimental Views.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Bin; Cho, Jaeheung; Shaik, Sason; Nam, Wonwoo

    2014-07-17

    Previously, a fast unprecedented O2(•-) transfer reaction has been observed experimentally when adding a Mn(II) complex into a solution containing a Ni(III)-peroxo complex. Due to the fast reaction rate, no intermediates were observed. We have investigated this reaction with density functional theory (DFT) and show that DFT is unusually problematic in reproducing the correct spin state for the investigated Ni(III)-peroxo complex, something which calls for examination of all previous Ni-dioxygen studies. Surprisingly, the BP86 functional is shown to yield energies more in agreement with known experiments than B3LYP. The calculations reveal for the first time an intermediate structure in a complete O2(•-) transfer reaction, shown here to be a short-lived bridging Ni-(μ-1,2-O2)-Mn structure. PMID:26277812

  20. Altitude Test Chamber Investigation of Performance of a 28-inch Ram-jet Engine II : Effects of Gutter Width and Blocked Area on Operating Range and Combustion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillito, T B; Jones, W L; Kahn, R W

    1950-01-01

    Altitude-test-chamber investigation of effects of flame-holder blocked area and gutter width on performance of 28-inch diameter ram jet at simulated flight Mach number of 2.0 for altitudes from 40,000 to 55,000 feet was conducted at NACA Lewis laboratory. Ten flame holders investigated covered gutter widths from 1.00 to 2.50 inches and blocked areas from 40.5 to 62.0 percent of combustion-chamber area. Gutter width did not appreciably affect combustion efficiency. Increase in blocked area from 40 to 62 percent resulted in 5- to 10-percent increase in combustion efficiency. Increasing gutter width resulted in improvement in fuel-air-ratio operating range.

  1. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task: Phase II. Quarterly technical progress report for quarter ending December 29, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, N.; Bunyan, S.; Sipperly, B.

    1980-02-01

    A sulfur hexaflouride plasma etch was investigated as a possible surface treatment to improve the performance of the cell, the Radiation Technology Infrared Furnace was qualified for use in the process sequence, and work was initiated on junction clean up by laser scribing through the junction. An evaluation of the minority carrier diffusion length of silicon crystals received from various vendors was also included in this quarters activities. Results are presented and discussed.

  2. Performance of remedial response, activities at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites (REM II) remedial investigation first operable unit, Rocky Mountain Arsenal Offpost R1/fS site

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.J.

    1986-12-01

    The objective of this remedial investigation (RI) is to evaluate, as part of the first operable unit for site remediation, the nature and extent of contamination as it relates to the existing public water supply wells operated by the South Adams County Water and Sanitation District. A public health endangerment assessment was conducted to identify compounds which could pose a significant health threat. These investigations have identified ground water as the major migration pathway. The six volatile organic chemicals of primary concern are 1,1-DCE, 1,1-DCLE, t-1,2-DCE, 1,1,1-TCE, TRClE, and TClEE. A comprehensive investigation analysis was conducted to (1) characterize the hydrogeologic system and (2) quantify the ground water flow and containment transport processes. A three dimensional ground water flow and containment transfer model was developed and calibrated on a preliminary basis to aid in projection of future TRClE concentrations. This first operable unit RI report is not in intended to address the identity of contributing sources or their relative contributions to the contamination.

  3. Investigation into untripped rollover of light vehicles in the modified fishhook and the sine manoeuvres, part II: effects of vehicle inertia property, suspension and tyre characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guang-Ming; Zhang, Nong; Du, Hai-Ping

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, as a continuation of part I of [N. Zhang, G.M. Dong, and H.P. Du, Investigation into untripped rollover of light vehicles in the modified fishhook and the sine manoeuvres, part I: vehicle modelling, roll and yaw instability, Veh. Syst. Dyn. 46 (2008), pp. 271-293], detailed parametric studies are conducted and compared between the fishhook and sine manoeuvres using the presented nine-degree-of-freedom vehicle model, in order to understand the rollover resistance capability of a light passenger vehicle with various parameters. First, effects of driving conditions are studied in the two manoeuvres. Secondly, effects of suspension characteristics are studied, in which the influence of suspension spring stiffness and shock absorber damping, anti-roll bar is discussed. Thirdly, effects of vehicle inertia properties, such as moment of inertia of vehicle sprung mass, sprung mass weight and location of centre of gravity, are investigated. Finally, effects of tyre characteristics are also investigated by altering the scaling factor λ Fz0. An in-depth understanding has been gained on the significant effects of key system parameters on the kinetic performance of vehicles under the fishhook and the sine manoeuvres. Parametric studies show that the combination of step input (fishhook) and frequency input gives a clear indication of the vehicle dynamic stability during cornering.

  4. EPR and HYSCORE investigation of the electronic structure of the model complex Mn(imidazole)6: exploring Mn(II)-imidazole binding using single crystals.

    PubMed

    García-Rubio, Inés; Angerhofer, Alexander; Schweiger, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    The electronic structure of the Mn(II)-imidazole binding was studied by EPR spectroscopy using the model complex Mn(Im)(6) diluted in a single crystal of Zn(Im)(6)Cl(2).4(H(2)O). The second rank zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor (D tensor) of the two sites, a and b, present in the crystal was determined by measuring the orientation patterns of the echo-detected EPR spectra in three different planes at 10K (D(a)=-106, D(b)=-118, E(a)=-17, E(b)=-22x10(-4)cm(-1). Euler angles with respect to the crystal habitus: alpha(a)=13 degrees , beta(a)=76 degrees , gamma(a)=108.5 degrees , alpha(b)=14 degrees , beta(b)=73.5 degrees , gamma(b)=103.5 degrees ). The contribution of cubic ZFS terms to the spectrum allowed us to determine the orientation of the N-Mn-N directions of the complex as well (Euler angles in the D tensor reference frame alpha=100 degrees , beta=23 degrees , gamma=0 degrees , both centers having the same orientation). The hyperfine interactions with (14)N were explored by HYSCORE spectroscopy. The correlation patterns and modulation amplitudes in the 2D experiments were studied for different electron spin transitions and orientations of the crystal. Signals of three different pairs of nitrogens were found. The results were analyzed considering that the N-Mn binding directions are principal directions of the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole tensor of (14)N. All three pairs of nitrogens were found to be almost equivalent with an isotropic contribution of A(iso) approximately 3.2MHz and an almost axial anisotropic coupling of 2T approximately 1.1MHz along the N-Mn bonding direction. The nuclear quadrupole principal values are 1.5MHz along the bonding direction, -0.6MHz in the direction perpendicular to the imidazole plane, and -0.9MHz in the direction perpendicular to both. PMID:17055309

  5. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  6. Cz-Silicon Produced from Solar-Grade and Recycled Materials. Part II: Investigating Performances of Solar Cell Produced from Solar-Grade Cz-Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes; Di Sabtino, Marisa; Juel, Mari; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-03-01

    This paper is the second of two, investigating the properties of P-type Cz-silicon materials and solar cells produced with recycled silicon and Elkem Solar Silicon (ESS) materials. While the focus on the first work was on the bulk properties and grown defects of the material, the current study focuses on the solar cell performances. In the processing of the solar cells, the phosphorous diffusion process was optimized to improve the bulk properties and thus to maximize the final solar cell characteristics. Results from the characterization of material defects suggest that the performances of the experimental ingots are limited by the activated grown-in defects, which should be strictly controlled during crystal growth and solar cell processing. The solar cells produced from the investigated ingots showed efficiency values up to 18.5 pct and fill factor values up to 79 pct, comparable to conventional silicon produced from poly silicon. Solar cells produced from mixed recycled and ESS material exhibit a better performance than 100 pct recycled material. Boron and oxygen concentration levels and net doping level showed a concurrent effect on light-induced degradation (LID). Appropriate compensation was finally demonstrated to be an efficient way to improve solar cells efficiency of Cz-silicon produced from recycled silicon, even though higher dopant concentration incurred relatively faster LID.

  7. Study of applied magnetic field magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters with particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo collision. II. Investigation of acceleration mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Haibin; Cheng Jiao; Liu Chang; York, Thomas M.

    2012-07-15

    The particle-in-cell method previously described in paper (I) has been applied to the investigation of acceleration mechanisms in applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. This new approach is an alternative to magnetohydrodynamics models and allows nonlocal dynamic effects of particles and improved transport properties. It was used to model a 100 kW, steady-state, applied-field, argon magnetoplasmadynamic thruster to study the physical acceleration processes with discharge currents of 1000-1500 A, mass flow rates of 0.025-0.1 g/s and applied magnetic field strengths of 0.034-0.102 T. The total thrust calculations were used to verify the theoretical approach by comparison with experimental data. Investigations of the acceleration model offer an underlying understanding of applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, including the following conclusions: (1) swirl acceleration mechanism is the dominant contributor to the plasma acceleration, and self-magnetic, Hall, gas-dynamic, and swirl acceleration mechanisms are in an approximate ratio of 1:10:10:100; (2) the Hall acceleration produced mainly by electron swirl is insensitive to the change of externally applied magnetic field and shows only slight increases when the current is raised; (3) self-magnetic acceleration is normally negligible for all cases, while the gas-dynamic acceleration contribution increases with increasing applied magnetic field strength, discharge current, and mass flow rate.

  8. Investigation of the behavior of ruthenium in chloride melts. II. Reaction of ruthenium with chlorine-oxygen mixtures, and formation of ruthenium oxychlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Burnaeva, A.A.; Kazantsev, G.N.; Korshunov, I.A.; Kryukova, A.I.; Skiba, O.V.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents studies of the reactions in KCl-RuCl/sub 3/ system with an O/sub 2/-Cl/sub 2/ gas mixture of variable composition. The dependences of the ruthenium concentration in a melt on the composition of the gas mixture, the temperature, and the reaction time have been found. The presence of the oxide RuO2 in the reaction products has been demonstrated. Investigation has been made of the possibility of forming ruthenium oxychlorides in systems containing RuCl/sub 3/ and RuO2, on reacting them with gas mixtures of various composition, containing HCl, H/sub 2/O, NH/sub 4/Cl. The presence of oxychlorides in the reaction products was not proved.

  9. An Investigation of Adherence to Diagnostic Criteria, Revisited: Clinical Diagnosis of the DSM-IV/DSM-5 Section II Personality Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morey, Leslie C; Benson, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    In an initial investigation by Morey and Ochoa (1989), adherence to DSM-III personality disorder diagnostic criteria was examined as an agreement rate between clinician (global) diagnoses and diagnoses algorithmically generated from DSM-III criteria rules. Morey and Ochoa (1989) findings suggested significant clinician-criterion diagnostic incongruity, a result that cross-validated in a DSM-III-R replication performed by Blashfield and Herkov (1996). The current study examined such adherence, utilizing DSM-IV decision rules, in a national sample of 337 clinicians and their target patients. The results of the current study are largely consistent with the earlier findings, with clinician-criterion agreement rates comparable to those commonly reported for interdiagnostician reliability. Ramifications for the future of personality disorder diagnostic classification are discussed.

  10. Neuropsychological functioning in children and adolescents with restrictive-type anorexia nervosa: an in-depth investigation with NEPSY-II.

    PubMed

    Calderoni, Sara; Muratori, Filippo; Leggero, Chiara; Narzisi, Antonio; Apicella, Fabio; Balottin, Umberto; Carigi, Tiziana; Maestro, Sandra; Fabbro, Franco; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the neuropsychological functioning of patients with anorexia nervosa restrictive type (AN-r), but results are conflicting. Here we compared the neuropsychological profile of 23 female children and adolescents with AN-r and of 46 typical controls (aged 9-16 years) using the second edition of the NEPSY (a Developmental Neuropsychology Assessment) neuropsychological battery. AN-r patients presented subtle cognitive flexibility impairments in audiomotor responses (p = .033). Conversely, superior performance in verbal fluency (p = .024) and memory (p = .034) was observed only in AN-r patients with an associated unipolar mood disorder. This profile of marginally impaired and enhanced performance was independent from illness duration and starvation degree, suggesting that it may preexist and represent a vulnerability factor for the disease onset.

  11. A metal-ion NMR investigation of the antibiotic facilitated transport of monovalent cations through the walls of phospholipid vesicles. II. Sulfur-33 NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Buster, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    A technique has been developed to investigate the antibiotic facilitated transmembrane transport of monovalent cations using {sup 23}Na and {sup 7}Li Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The initial portion of this thesis outlines the production and characterization of a model lipid system amenable to the NMR detection of cation transport. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) have been prepared from a 4:1 mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The presence of the anionic chemical shift reagent dysprosium (III) tripolyphosphate, either inside or outside of the vesicles, allows for the spectroscopic separation of the NMR resonances arising from the inter- and extravesicular cation pools. The cation transporting properties of the channel-forming pentadecapeptide, gramicidin D, have been studied using the NMR technique.

  12. Analysis and evaluation of a biomedical polycarbonate urethane tested in an in vitro study and an ovine arthroplasty model. Part II: in vivo investigation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Smith, Nigel; Jones, Eric; Finch, Dudley S; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2005-02-01

    The polyurethane (PU) elastomer Corethane 80A (Corvita) is being considered as the acetabular bearing material in a novel total replacement hip joint. Its biostability was investigated in vitro (Analysis and evaluation of a biomedical polycarbonate urethane tested in an in vitro study and an ovine arthroplasty model. Part I: material selection and evaluation, Biomaterials, in press) together with three other commercially available biomedical PUs: Pellethane 2363-80A (DOW Chemical), a polyhexamethylene oxide based PU, PHMO-PU (CSIRO, not supplied as a commercial product) and ChronoFlex AL-80A (CardioTech). From the in vitro studies, Corethane 80A displayed the best overall resistance to hydrolysis, ESC, MIO and calcification, followed by ChronoFlex 80A and PHMO-PU, with Pellethane 80A being the least stable. Building on the in vitro investigation, the follow-up in vivo study (reported here) assessed Corethane 80A as the bearing layer in a prototype compliant layer acetabular cup, in a fully functioning ovine total hip arthoplasty (THA) model. PU degradation in the retrieved cups was analysed using a range of analytical and physical-testing methods including mechanical testing, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The Corethane 80A functioned well in the THA model, with the bearing surfaces of the retrieved hip cups showing no significant evidence of biodegradation or wear damage after 3 years in vivo. The findings in this study provide compelling evidence for the biostability and effectiveness of acetabular cups incorporating a Corethane 80A compliant bearing layer. PMID:15282141

  13. Analysis and evaluation of a biomedical polycarbonate urethane tested in an in vitro study and an ovine arthroplasty model. Part II: in vivo investigation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Smith, Nigel; Jones, Eric; Finch, Dudley S; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth

    2005-02-01

    The polyurethane (PU) elastomer Corethane 80A (Corvita) is being considered as the acetabular bearing material in a novel total replacement hip joint. Its biostability was investigated in vitro (Analysis and evaluation of a biomedical polycarbonate urethane tested in an in vitro study and an ovine arthroplasty model. Part I: material selection and evaluation, Biomaterials, in press) together with three other commercially available biomedical PUs: Pellethane 2363-80A (DOW Chemical), a polyhexamethylene oxide based PU, PHMO-PU (CSIRO, not supplied as a commercial product) and ChronoFlex AL-80A (CardioTech). From the in vitro studies, Corethane 80A displayed the best overall resistance to hydrolysis, ESC, MIO and calcification, followed by ChronoFlex 80A and PHMO-PU, with Pellethane 80A being the least stable. Building on the in vitro investigation, the follow-up in vivo study (reported here) assessed Corethane 80A as the bearing layer in a prototype compliant layer acetabular cup, in a fully functioning ovine total hip arthoplasty (THA) model. PU degradation in the retrieved cups was analysed using a range of analytical and physical-testing methods including mechanical testing, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The Corethane 80A functioned well in the THA model, with the bearing surfaces of the retrieved hip cups showing no significant evidence of biodegradation or wear damage after 3 years in vivo. The findings in this study provide compelling evidence for the biostability and effectiveness of acetabular cups incorporating a Corethane 80A compliant bearing layer.

  14. On the Dynamical Evolution of H II Regions: An Investigation of the Ionized Component of W4, a Galactic Chimney Candidate. I. Kinematics and Dynamics in the Latitude Range 0° <= b <= 3°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagrois, Dominic; Joncas, Gilles

    2009-02-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometry was used to obtain an Hα survey of the most emissive part of W4, a giant superbubble/H II region located in the Perseus arm. Presented by Normandeau and colleagues as an H I cavity aiming away from the Galactic plane, the void has been morphologically interpreted as a Galactic chimney candidate in interaction with the Galactic corona. We present the kinematical results of nearly five million Hα spectra obtained in the southern portion of the nebula (0° <= b <= 3°). Many small-scale radial velocity gradients are detected in the embedded ionized component and are attributed to the photoionization of dense, mostly molecular, fragments found either in or at the periphery of the expanding supershell. The mean local standard of rest radial velocity associated with our Hα survey is found at -42.565 ± 5.204 (1σ) km s-1, redshifted by roughly 5 km s-1 from the molecular material found in the vicinity of the large superbubble. Investigation of the Hα line-width measurements has shown W4-south to fall in a transient regime between low velocity dispersions characteristic of small-size Galactic H II regions and supersonic line widths associated with supergiant extragalactic structures. The overall kinematics of W4-south is best explained with the Champagne model for the dynamical evolution of H II regions where at least 10 independent gas flows crisscross the nebula. For the first time, a Champagne flow is seen coming to an end within a nebula, mingling with the surrounding ionized gas. The nature (molecular versus atomic) of the neutral material, prone to erosion, is critical as it leads to much different kinematical interpretations. W4-south appears as a text book example of the last stage in the life of a giant molecular cloud complex.

  15. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  16. Influence of the solvent on the self-assembly of a modified amyloid beta peptide fragment. II. NMR and computer simulation investigation.

    PubMed

    Hamley, I W; Nutt, D R; Brown, G D; Miravet, J F; Escuder, B; Rodríguez-Llansola, F

    2010-01-21

    The conformation of a model peptide AAKLVFF based on a fragment of the amyloid beta peptide Abeta16-20, KLVFF, is investigated in methanol and water via solution NMR experiments and molecular dynamics computer simulations. In previous work, we have shown that AAKLVFF forms peptide nanotubes in methanol and twisted fibrils in water. Chemical shift measurements were used to investigate the solubility of the peptide as a function of concentration in methanol and water. This enabled the determination of critical aggregation concentrations. The solubility was lower in water. In dilute solution, diffusion coefficients revealed the presence of intermediate aggregates in concentrated solution, coexisting with NMR-silent larger aggregates, presumed to be beta-sheets. In water, diffusion coefficients did not change appreciably with concentration, indicating the presence mainly of monomers, coexisting with larger aggregates in more concentrated solution. Concentration-dependent chemical shift measurements indicated a folded conformation for the monomers/intermediate aggregates in dilute methanol, with unfolding at higher concentration. In water, an antiparallel arrangement of strands was indicated by certain ROESY peak correlations. The temperature-dependent solubility of AAKLVFF in methanol was well described by a van't Hoff analysis, providing a solubilization enthalpy and entropy. This pointed to the importance of solvophobic interactions in the self-assembly process. Molecular dynamics simulations constrained by NOE values from NMR suggested disordered reverse turn structures for the monomer, with an antiparallel twisted conformation for dimers. To model the beta-sheet structures formed at higher concentration, possible model arrangements of strands into beta-sheets with parallel and antiparallel configurations and different stacking sequences were used as the basis for MD simulations; two particular arrangements of antiparallel beta-sheets were found to be stable, one

  17. Self assembling monolayers of dialkynyl bridged Pd(II) thiols obtained by thermally induced multilayer desorption: Thermal and chemical stability investigated by SR-XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Fratoddi, I.; Bondino, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Russo, M. V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2012-02-01

    Self assembling monolayers (SAMs) of organometallic thiols trans-[HS-Pd(PBu3)2-SH], trans-[HS-Pd(PBu3)2(-Ctbnd C-C6H5)] and trans,trans-[HS-Pd(PBu3)2(-Ctbnd C-C6H4-C6H4-Ctbnd C-Pd(PBu3)2-SH] on gold were obtained from the corresponding multilayers through thermally induced desorption. Temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) measurements were carried out on the heated multilayers during the annealing process, in order to investigate the thermal and chemical stability of the systems. SAMs of the same organometallic thiols were also obtained by rinsing the thick films with appropriate solvents. SR-XPS was used to ascertain that the molecular and electronic structure of the two series of SAMs are not influenced by the rinsing or thermal desorption process, i.e. both strategies allow for obtaining well ordered monolayers of organometallic thiols.

  18. X-ray diffraction investigation of two mesomorphic copper(II) complexes of tetra-4-[(4-alkoxycarbonyl)phenyleneoxy]phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnova, A. I.; Usol'tseva, N. V.

    2006-03-15

    The mesomorphism and supramolecular structure of two homologues of copper tetra-4-[(4-alkoxycarbonyl)phenyleneoxyl]phthalocyanines are investigated using optical polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction. It is revealed that both homologues, which contain four and nine carbon atoms in aliphatic fragments of the lateral substituents, exhibit thermotropic columnar mesomorphism with a hexagonal arrangement of ordered columns (Col{sub ho}). A change in the length of the aliphatic fragment has no noticeable effect on the mesophase type and leads only to variations in the parameters of the hexagonal lattice formed by the columns. The glass transition temperature of the homologue with n = 4 (T{sub g} = 88 deg. C) is considerably lower than that of the homologue with n = 9 (T{sub g} = 88 deg. C). It is established that the introduction of the cyclic fragment into the lateral substituent substantially affects the type of column packing as compared to the copper tetra-4-[(n-alkoxy)carbonyl]phthalocyanines studied in our earlier works. The assumption is made that this difference is associated, in particular, with the specific features of the penetration of the lateral substituents of the adjacent columns either in the presence or in the absence of the cyclic fragment in the lateral substituent.

  19. The dynamics and pinning of single vortices in type-II superconductors investigated using a scanning SQUID-on-tip microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embon, Lior; Anahory, Yonathan; Suhov, Alex; Halbertal, Dorri; Cuppens, Jo; Yakovenko, Anton; Uri, Aviram; Myasoedov, Yuri; Rappaport, Michael; Huber, Martin; Gurevich, Alex; Zeldov, Eli

    The electromagnetic properties of superconductors, particularly their ability to carry non-dissipative currents, are governed by the dynamics of quantized magnetic vortices and their pinning due to material defects. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the complex physics of vortex matter, the behavior of vortices driven by current through a potential created in an actual material is still not well understood, mostly due to the scarcity of adequate experimental tools. Using a novel scanning SQUID-on-tip microscope we have investigated the controlled dynamics of vortices in Pb films with sub-Angstrom sensitivity to vortex displacement. Using the ability to trace vortex trajectories on nanometer scales, we measured, for the first time, the fundamental dependence of the elementary pinning force of multiple defects on the vortex displacement, revealing a far more complex behavior than has previously been recognized. Our results indicate the importance of thermal fluctuations even at 4.2 K, and of the vital role of small and seemingly un-important ripples in the pinning potential. These give new insights into the mechanisms of magnetic relaxation and electromagnetic response of superconductors.

  20. Studies on the lipase-induced degradation of lipid-based drug delivery systems. Part II - Investigations on the mechanisms leading to collapse of the lipid structure.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Martin; McGoverin, Cushla M; Gordon, Keith C; Winter, Gerhard; Rades, Thomas; Myschik, Julia; Strachan, Clare J

    2013-08-01

    It has recently been found that lipid composition appears to have a major influence on the rate of lipase-induced degradation of lipid-based extended release drug delivery systems (microparticles, compressed implants and extrudated implants). Previously, we have found that during lipase incubation, depending on the lipid used, lipidic extrudates can lose their physical strength and collapse generating lipid particles in the μm-range. The aim of this study was to characterise the processes leading to collapse of solid lipid-based drug delivery systems during in vitro lipase incubation. Compressed lipid implants were used as model systems. Free fatty acids (FFA) generated in the incubation experiments were derivatised and subsequently analysed via reversed phase-HPLC in order to characterise the degradation behaviour of single lipid components (glyceryltrilaurate (D112), glyceryltrimyristate (D114), glyceryltripalmitate (D116) and glyceryltristearate (D118)) used for the preparation of compressed lipid implants. Further, Raman spectroscopy/microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron and light microscopy were used to investigate the physical and chemical changes in the implants upon lipase incubation. This study revealed that the lipid component D112 plays a major role in the degradation and erosion processes occurring during lipase incubation of lipid implants. The production of D112/lauric acid mixtures, with a melting point below human body temperature, leads to lipid matrices melting and losing their physical integrity.

  1. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. II. INVESTIGATING MASS-DENSITY PROFILE EVOLUTION IN THE SLACS+BELLS STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENS SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Shu Yiping; Arneson, Ryan A.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Schlegel, David J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wake, David A.; Connolly, Natalia; Maraston, Claudia; Weaver, Benjamin A.

    2012-09-20

    We present an analysis of the evolution of the central mass-density profile of massive elliptical galaxies from the SLACS and BELLS strong gravitational lens samples over the redshift interval z Almost-Equal-To 0.1-0.6, based on the combination of strong-lensing aperture mass and stellar velocity-dispersion constraints. We find a significant trend toward steeper mass profiles (parameterized by the power-law density model with {rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}) at later cosmic times, with magnitude d < {gamma} > /dz = -0.60 {+-} 0.15. We show that the combined lens-galaxy sample is consistent with a non-evolving distribution of stellar velocity dispersions. Considering possible additional dependence of <{gamma} > on lens-galaxy stellar mass, effective radius, and Sersic index, we find marginal evidence for shallower mass profiles at higher masses and larger sizes, but with a significance that is subdominant to the redshift dependence. Using the results of published Monte Carlo simulations of spectroscopic lens surveys, we verify that our mass-profile evolution result cannot be explained by lensing selection biases as a function of redshift. Interpreted as a true evolutionary signal, our result suggests that major dry mergers involving off-axis trajectories play a significant role in the evolution of the average mass-density structure of massive early-type galaxies over the past 6 Gyr. We also consider an alternative non-evolutionary hypothesis based on variations in the strong-lensing measurement aperture with redshift, which would imply the detection of an 'inflection zone' marking the transition between the baryon-dominated and dark-matter halo-dominated regions of the lens galaxies. Further observations of the combined SLACS+BELLS sample can constrain this picture more precisely, and enable a more detailed investigation of the multivariate dependences of galaxy mass structure across cosmic time.

  2. Investigation of combinatorial coevaporated thin film Cu2ZnSnS4 (II): Beneficial cation arrangement in Cu-rich growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, E. A.; Du, H.; Hlaing OO, W. M.; Teeter, G.; Scarpulla, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) is an earth-abundant semiconductor with potential for economical photovoltaic power generation at terawatt scales. In this work, we use Raman scattering to investigate phase coexistence in combinatorial CZTS thin films grown at 325 or 470 °C. The surface of the samples grown at 325 °C is rough except for a prominent specularly reflective band near and along the ZnS-Cu2SnS3 (CTS) tie line in the Cu-Zn-Sn-S quaternary phase diagram. All structurally incoherent secondary phases (SnS2, CuS) exist only as surface phases or are embedded as separate grains, whereas the structurally coherent secondary phase CTS coexists with CZTS in the dense underlying film. In films grown at 325 °C, which are kinetically trapped by the low growth temperature, a change is observed in Cu and Sn site occupancy, evidenced by the shift from cubic-CTS in the Cu-rich region (Cu/Sn > 2) to more tetragonal-CTS in the Sn-rich region (Cu/Sn < 2). For CZTS samples grown at 470 °C, CTS is not observed and regions grown under excess Sn flux are more disordered than Cu-rich regions evidenced by broader CZTS A mode peaks. Therefore, increasing Sn chemical potential results in more CZTS lattice disorder, suggesting, with other evidence, the formation of Sn antisite defects. In contrast, the CZTS A mode breadth is insensitive to Zn richness suggesting that excess Zn does not induce significant disorder within the CZTS lattice. We postulate that initially growing CZTS films Cu-rich (Cu/Sn > 2) results in higher cation ordering meaning fewer antisite defects.

  3. Spectroscopic, structural and magnetic investigations of iron(II) complexes based on 1-isopropyl- and 1-isobutyl-substituted tetrazole ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Nader; Stelzl, Julia; Weinberger, Peter; Molnar, Gabor; Bousseksou, Azzedine; Kubel, Frank; Mereiter, Kurt; Boca, Roman; Linert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Two partly new [Fe(intz)6](BF4)2 complexes with n = 3 and 4 (i3tz = 1-isopropyl-1H-tetrazole, i4tz = 1-isobutyl-1H-tetrazole) were synthesized and characterised by X-ray powder diffraction, magnetic susceptibility measurements, vibrational, electronic and 57Fe–Mößbauer spectroscopy as well as DSC. The [Fe(i3tz)6](BF4)2 complex was re-investigated and shows an incomplete spin transition at Tc ∼ 109 K, while the [Fe(i4tz)6](BF4)2 features a complete but rather gradual spin transition with T½ = 223 K. In the lack of suitable crystals of [Fe(intz)6](BF4)2 with n = 3 and 4, we synthesized crystals of [Ni(intz)6](BF4)2 with n = 3 and 4, determined their X-ray crystal structures, and proved them to be homeotypic with the respective Fe-complexes by X-ray powder diffraction. DSC measurements showed an endothermic peak for the [Fe(i3tz)6](BF4)2 around T = 260 K not corresponding to a spin transition and suggesting a structural phase transition at this temperature. A well-developed peak at Tp = 225 K matches the spin-transition temperature T½ = 223 K for [Fe(i4tz)6](BF4)2. PMID:23564970

  4. Labile Cu(I) catalyst/spectator Cu(II) species in copper-catalyzed C-C coupling reaction: operando IR, in situ XANES/EXAFS evidence and kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan; Zhang, Guanghui; Ke, Jie; Zhang, Heng; Miller, Jeffrey T; Kropf, Arthur J; Lei, Aiwen

    2013-01-01

    Insights toward the Cu-catalyzed C-C coupling reaction were investigated through operando IR and in situ X-ray absorption near-edge structure/extended X-ray absorption fine structure. It was found that the Cu(I) complex formed from the reaction of CuI with β-diketone nucleophile was liable under the cross-coupling conditions, which is usually considered as active catalytic species. This labile Cu(I) complex could rapidly disproportionate to the spectator Cu(II) and Cu(0) species under the reaction conditions, which was an off-cycle process. In this copper-catalyzed C-C coupling reaction, β-diketone might act both as the substrate and the ligand. PMID:23214954

  5. Investigating Team Cohesion in COCOMO II.2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowdeal-Carden, Betty A.

    2013-01-01

    Software engineering is team oriented and intensely complex, relying on human collaboration and creativity more than any other engineering discipline. Poor software estimation is a problem that within the United States costs over a billion dollars per year. Effective measurement of team cohesion is foundationally important to gain accurate…

  6. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  7. Mod II engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Albert E.; Huang, Shyan-Cherng

    1987-01-01

    The testing of a prototype of an automotive Stirling engine, the Mod II, is discussed. The Mod II is a one-piece cast block with a V-4 single-crankshaft configuration and an annular regenerator/cooler design. The initial testing of Mod II concentrated on the basic engine, with auxiliaries driven by power sources external to the engine. The performance of the engine was tested at 720 C set temperature and 820 C tube temperature. At 720 C, it is observed that the power deficiency is speed dependent and linear, with a weak pressure dependency, and at 820 C, the power deficiency is speed and pressure dependent. The effects of buoyancy and nozzle spray pattern on the heater temperature spread are investigated. The characterization of the oil pump and the operating cycle and temperature spread tests are proposed for further evaluation of the engine.

  8. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  9. BORE II

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  10. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  11. Fabrication of TiO2-NTs and TiO2-NTs covered honeycomb lattice and investigation of carrier densities in I-/I3- electrolyte by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Evrim; Yazıcı, Birgül

    2015-12-01

    The TiO2 nanotubes (NTs) were produced by one-step (1S) and two-step (2S) anodization technique. Effects of various anodization potential and times on the growth of TiO2-NTs were investigated by using Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM). The crystal structure of the electrodes was determined with X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD). The most suitable potential and time for TiO2-NTs obtained by both of anodization methods were found to be 21 V and 4 h. XRD results indicated that 2S anodization technique provided better crystallinity. The electrochemical behaviors of the electrodes in acetonitrile electrolyte contained I-/I3- were examined by utilizing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) techniques. Electrochemical results showed that 2S anodization technique increases the carrier densities (ND) value of TiO2-NTs, and flat band potential is shifted by 50 mV to more negative values.

  12. Annex II technical documentation assessed.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, A W; Roszek, B; van Tienhoven, E A E; Geertsma, R E; Boumans, R T; Kraus, J J A M

    2005-12-01

    Annex II of the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is used frequently by manufacturers to obtain CE-marking. This procedure relies on a full quality assurance system and does not require an assessment of the individual medical device by a Notified Body. An investigation into the availability and the quality of technical documentation for Annex II devices revealed severe shortcomings, which are reported here. PMID:16419921

  13. Mechanism of Interaction of Al3+ with the Proteins Composition of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Hasni, Imed; Yaakoubi, Hnia; Hamdani, Saber; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Carpentier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of Al3+on photosystem II (PSII) electron transport was investigated using several biophysical and biochemical techniques such as oxygen evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence induction and emission, SDS-polyacrylamide and native green gel electrophoresis, and FTIR spectroscopy. In order to understand the mechanism of its inhibitory action, we have analyzed the interaction of this toxic cation with proteins subunits of PSII submembrane fractions isolated from spinach. Our results show that Al 3+, especially above 3 mM, strongly inhibits oxygen evolution and affects the advancement of the S states of the Mn4O5Ca cluster. This inhibition was due to the release of the extrinsic polypeptides and the disorganization of the Mn4O5Ca cluster associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. This fact was accompanied by a significant decline of maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) together with a strong damping of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. The energy transfer from light harvesting antenna to reaction centers of PSII was impaired following the alteration of the light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII). The latter result was revealed by the drop of chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra at low temperature (77 K), increase of F0 and confirmed by the native green gel electrophoresis. FTIR measurements indicated that the interaction of Al 3+ with the intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of PSII induces major alterations of the protein secondary structure leading to conformational changes. This was reflected by a major reduction of α-helix with an increase of β-sheet and random coil structures in Al 3+-PSII complexes. These structural changes are closely related with the functional alteration of PSII activity revealed by the inhibition of the electron transport chain of PSII. PMID:25806795

  14. Adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), and As(V) on bacterially produced metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2004-07-01

    The adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II) and As(V) onto bacterially produced metal sulfide (BPMS) material was investigated using a batch equilibrium method. It was found that the sulfide material had adsorptive properties comparable with those of other adsorbents with respect to the specific uptake of a range of metals and, the levels to which dissolved metal concentrations in solution can be reduced. The percentage of adsorption increased with increasing pH and adsorbent dose, but decreased with increasing initial dissolved metal concentration. The pH of the solution was the most important parameter controlling adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and As(V) by BPMS. The adsorption data were successfully modeled using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Desorption experiments showed that the reversibility of adsorption was low, suggesting high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. The mechanism of adsorption for the divalent metals was thought to be the formation of strong, inner-sphere complexes involving surface hydroxyl groups. However, the mechanism for the adsorption of As(V) by BPMS appears to be distinct from that of surface hydroxyl exchange. These results have important implications to the management of metal sulfide sludge produced by bacterial sulfate reduction.

  15. Adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions by cross-linking chitosan/rectorite nano-hybrid composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixuan; Chen, Yufei; Zhang, Qiuyun; Guo, Xingmei; Peng, Yanni; Xiao, Huijuan; Chen, Xiaocheng; Luo, Jiwen

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan/rectorie (CTS/REC) nano-hybrid composite microsphere was prepared by changing the proportion of CTS/REC with 2:1, 3:1 and 4:1. Compared with the pure cross-linking chitosan microsphere, the nano-hybrid composite microsphere was proved to have better sorption capacity of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II), especially 2:1(CTS/REC-1). The adsorption behavior of the microsphere of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) was investigated in single and binary metal systems. In single system, the equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) followed the Langmuir model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative values of (ΔG) suggested that the adsorption process was spontaneous. In binary system, the combined action of the metals was found to be antagonistic and the metal sorption followed the order of Cu(II)>Cd(II)>Ni(II). The regeneration studies indicated that EDTA desorbed Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) from cross-linking microspheres better than HCl. The FT-IR and XPS spectra showed that coordination bonds were formed between Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) and the nitrogen atoms of cross-linking CTS/REC nano-hybrid composite microspheres. PMID:26076634

  16. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  17. Structural investigation of a high-affinity MnII binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme by EPR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Effects of neomycin B on metal-ion binding.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Olav; Fritscher, Jörg; Kisseleva, Natalja; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th; Prisner, Thomas F

    2003-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and density functional theory methods were used to study the structure of a single, high-affinity Mn(II) binding site in the hammerhead ribozyme. This binding site exhibits a dissociation constant Ke of 4.4 microM in buffer solutions containing 1 M NaCl, as shown by titrations monitored by continuous wave (cw) EPR. A combination of electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) and hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) experiments revealed that the paramagnetic manganese(II) ion in this binding site is coupled to a single nitrogen atom with a quadrupole coupling constant kappa of 0.7 MHz, an asymmetry parameter eta of 0.4, and an isotropic hyperfine coupling constant of Aiso(14N)=2.3 MHz. All three EPR parameters are sensitive to the arrangement of the Mn(II) ligand sphere and can therefore be used to determine the structure of the binding site. A possible location for this binding site may be at the G10.1, A9 site found to be occupied by Mn(II) in crystals (MacKay et al., Nature 1994, 372, 68 and Scott et al., Science 1996, 274, 2065). To determine whether the structure of the binding site is the same in frozen solution, we performed DFT calculations for the EPR parameters, based on the structure of the Mn(II) site in the crystal. Computations with the BHPW91 density function in combination with a 9s7p4d basis set for the manganese(II) center and the Iglo-II basis set for all other atoms yielded values of kappa(14N)=+0.80 MHz, eta=0.324, and Aiso(14N)=+2.7 MHz, in excellent agreement with the experimentally obtained EPR parameters, which suggests that the binding site found in the crystal and in frozen solution are the same. In addition, we demonstrated by EPR that Mn(II) is released from this site upon binding of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin B (Kd=1.2 microM) to the hammerhead ribozyme. Neomycin B has previously been shown to inhibit the catalytic activity of this ribozyme (Uhlenbeck et al., Biochemistry

  18. Mass spectrometry and potentiometry studies of Pb(II)-, Cd(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes.

    PubMed

    Furia, Emilia; Aiello, Donatella; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Tagarelli, Antonio; Thangavel, Hariprasad; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2014-01-21

    Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes were investigated by potentiometric and different mass spectrometric (MS) methodologies. Laser desorption mass spectrometry has provided both the composition and structure of metal-cystine complexes according to the speciation models proposed on the basis of the potentiometric data. Detection of neutral complexes was achieved by protonation or electrochemical reduction during mass spectrometric experiments. The redox activity of metal-cystine complexes was confirmed by laser desorption and charge transfer matrix assisted laser assisted MS experiments, which allowed us to observe the formation of complexes with a reduction of cystine. The stoichiometry of Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes was defined by observing the isotopic pattern of the investigated compound. The results suggest that interaction occurs through the carboxylate group of the ligand.

  19. REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE APPOINTED BY THE MINISTER FOR EDUCATION AND SCIENCE TO INVESTIGATE THE PROPOSAL TO ESTABLISH A COLLEGE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION AT BATHURST. VOLUMES I AND II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    VOLUME I OF THIS STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A COLLEGE OF ADVANCED EDUCATION IN BATHURST, AUSTRALIA, CONTAINS THE TEXT OF THE RESEARCH, ARGUMENTS, AND PROPOSALS. THE APPENDIXES IN VOLUME II INCLUDE THE AMPLIFYING CHARTS, TABLES, QUESTIONNAIRES, SURVEY RESULTS, ETC. THIS PROPOSED COLLEGE DIFFERS IN CONCEPT FROM THE USUAL AMERICAN…

  20. Solid phase extraction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol loaded Amberlite XAD-1180.

    PubMed

    Tokalioğlu, Serife; Yilmaz, Vedat; Kartal, Senol

    2009-05-01

    A new method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions in various matrices was proposed. The method is based on the adsorption and chelation of the metal ions on a column containing Amberlite XAD-1180 resin impregnated with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) reagent prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effect of pH, type, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume, flow rates of sample and elution solutions, and interfering ions have been investigated. The optimum pH for simultaneous retention of all the metal ions was 9. Eluent for quantitative elution was 20 ml of 2 mol l(-1) HNO(3). The optimum sample and eluent flow rates were found as 4 ml min(-1), and also sample volume was 500 ml, except for Mn (87% recovery). The sorption capacity of the resin was found to be 0.77, 0.41, 0.57, and 0.30 mg g(-1) for Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), and Mn(II), respectively. The preconcentration factor of the method was 200 for Cu(II), 150 for Pb(II), 100 for Cd(II) and Ni(II), and 50 for Mn(II). The recovery values for all of the metal ions were > or = 95% and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were < or = 5.1%. The detection limit values were in the range of 0.03 and 1.19 microg l(-1). The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysing the certified reference materials (TMDA 54.4 fortified lake water and GBW 07605 tea samples) and the recovery studies. This procedure was applied to the determination of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) in waste water and lake water samples.

  1. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial Investigating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara Smallpox Vaccine (MVA-BN®) in 56-80-Year-Old Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Hay, Christine M.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Marbury, Thomas C.; Wagner, Eva; Kreitmeir, Eva; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Young, Philip; Nichols, Richard; Meyer, Thomas P.; Weigl, Josef; Virgin, Garth; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Chaplin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® is a live, highly attenuated, viral vaccine under advanced development as a non-replicating smallpox vaccine. In this Phase II trial, the safety and immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® (MVA) was assessed in a 56–80 years old population. Methods MVA with a virus titer of 1 x 108 TCID50/dose was administered via subcutaneous injection to 56–80 year old vaccinia-experienced subjects (N = 120). Subjects received either two injections of MVA (MM group) or one injection of Placebo and one injection of MVA (PM group) four weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events (AE), focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings and safety laboratories. Solicited AEs consisted of a set of pre-defined expected local reactions (erythema, swelling, pain, pruritus, and induration) and systemic symptoms (body temperature, headache, myalgia, nausea and fatigue) and were recorded on a memory aid for an 8-day period following each injection. The immunogenicity of the vaccine was evaluated in terms of humoral immune responses measured with a vaccinia-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) before and at different time points after vaccination. Results Vaccinations were well tolerated by all subjects. No serious adverse event related to MVA and no case of myopericarditis was reported. The overall incidence of unsolicited AEs was similar in both groups. For both groups immunogenicity responses two weeks after the final vaccination (i.e. Visit 4) were as follows: Seroconversion (SC) rates (doubling of titers from baseline) in vaccine specific antibody titers measured by ELISA were 83.3% in Group MM and 82.8% in Group PM (difference 0.6% with 95% exact CI [-13.8%, 15.0%]), and 90.0% for Group MM and 77.6% for Group PM measured by PRNT (difference 12.4% with 95% CI of [-1.1%, 27.0%]). Geometric mean titers (GMT) measured by ELISA two weeks after

  2. Synthesis, characterization and spectroscopy studying of some metal complexes of a new Schiff base ligand; X-ray crystal structure, NMR and IR investigation of a new dodecahedron Cd(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Rezaeivala, Majid; Khalili, Maryam; Notash, Behrouz; Karimi, Javad

    2016-12-01

    Some new [Cd(H2L1)(NO3)]ClO4 (1), [Mn(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (2), [Ni(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (3) and [Cu(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (4) complexes were prepared by the reaction of a Schiff base ligand and M (II) metal ions in equimolar ratios (M = Cd, Mn, Ni and Cu). The ligand H2L1 was synthesized by reaction of 2-[2-(3-formyl phenoxy)propoxy]benzaldehyde and ethanol amine and characterized by IR, 1H,13C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The synthesized complexes were characterized with IR and elemental analysis in all cases and 1H, 13C NMR, and X-ray in the case of Cd(II) complex. The X-ray crystal structure of compound 1 showed that all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of Schiff base ligand (N2O4) and a molecule of nitrate with two donor oxygen atom have been coordinated to the metal ion and the Cd(II) ion is in an eight-coordinate environment that is best described as a distorted dodecahedron geometry.

  3. Probing outflows in z = 1 ∼ 2 galaxies through Fe II/Fe II* multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuping; Giavalisco, Mauro; Guo, Yicheng

    2014-10-01

    We report on a study of the 2300-2600 Å Fe II/Fe II* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.6 as probes of galactic-scale outflows. We extracted a mass-limited sample of 97 galaxies at z ∼ 1.0-2.6 from ultra-deep spectra obtained during the GMASS spectroscopic survey in the GOODS South field with the Very Large Telescope and FORS2. We obtain robust measures of the rest equivalent width of the Fe II absorption lines down to a limit of W{sub r} > 1.5 Å and of the Fe II* emission lines to W{sub r} > 0.5 Å. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [O II] emission line, we find that both the Fe II and Mg II absorption lines are blueshifted, indicating that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the Fe II gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of Mg II. We investigate the variation of Fe II line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that Fe II lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the Fe II lines relative to the Mg II doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended Fe II* emission in two-dimensional stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for Fe II absorption lie close (3 ∼ 4 kpc) to the disks of galaxies. We show that the Fe II/Fe II* multiplets offer unique probes of the kinematic structure of galactic outflows.

  4. Investigations on transgenerational epigenetic response down the male line in F2 pigs.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Martin; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Gutzwiller, Andreas; Bee, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the nutritional effects on carcass traits, gene expression and DNA methylation in a three generation Large White pig feeding experiment. A group of experimental (E) F0 boars were fed a standard diet supplemented with high amounts of methylating micronutrients whereas a control group (C) of F0 boars received a standard diet. These differentially fed F0 boars sired F1 boars which then sired 60 F2 pigs. Carcass traits were compared between 36 F2 descendants of E F0 boars and 24 F2 descendants of C F0 boars. The two F2 offspring groups differed with respect to backfat percentage (P = 0.03) and tended to differ with respect to adipose tissue (P = 0.09), fat thickness at the 10(th) rib (P = 0.08) and at the croup (P = 0.09) as well as percentages of shoulder (P = 0.07). Offspring from the experimental F0 boars had a higher percentage of shoulder and were leaner compared to the control group. Gene expression profiles showed significant twofold differences in mRNA level between 8 C F2 offspring and 8 E F2 offspring for 79, 64 and 53 genes for muscle, liver and kidney RNA, respectively. We found that in liver and muscle respective pathways of lipid metabolism and metabolic pathway were over-represented for the differentially expressed genes between these groups. A DNA methylation analysis in promoters of differentially expressed genes indicated a significant difference in DNA methylation at the IYD gene. If these responses on carcass traits, gene expression and DNA methylation withstand verification and can indeed be attributed to transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, it would open up pioneering application in pork production and would have implications for human health.

  5. 48 CFR 22.406-8 - Investigations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Construction 22.406-8 Investigations. Conduct labor standards investigations when available information... Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, to obtain— (i) Investigation and enforcement instructions; or (ii... disclosing material obtained from Labor Department files, other than computations of back wages...

  6. Mostly Plants. Individualized Biology Activities on: I. Investigating Bread Mold; II. Transpiration; III. Botany Project; IV. Collecting/Preserving/Identifying Leaves; [and] V. Student Science Laboratory Write-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Paul R.

    Individualized biology activities for secondary students are presented in this teaching guide. The guide is divided into five sections: (1) investigating bread mold; (2) investigating transpiration; (3) completing a botany project; (4) collecting, preserving, and identifying leaves; and (5) writing up science laboratory investigations. The…

  7. DichotomY IdentitY: Euler-Bernoulli Numbers, Sets-Multisets, FD-BE Quantum-Statistics, 1 /f0 - 1 /f1 Power-Spectra, Ellipse-Hyperbola Conic-Sections, Local-Global Extent: ``Category-Semantics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, G.-C.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Seminal Apostol[Math.Mag.81,3,178(08);Am.Math.Month.115,9,795(08)]-Rota[Intro.Prob. Thy.(95)-p.50-55] DichotomY equivalence-class: set-theory: sets V multisets; closed V open; to Abromowitz-Stegun[Hdbk.Math.Fns.(64)]-ch.23,p.803!]: numbers/polynomials generating-functions: Euler V Bernoulli; to Siegel[Schrodinger Cent.Symp.(87); Symp.Fractals, MRS Fall Mtg.,(1989)-5-papers!] power-spectrum: 1/ f {0}-White V 1/ f {1}-Zipf/Pink (Archimedes) HYPERBOLICITY INEVITABILITY; to analytic-geometry Conic-Sections: Ellipse V (via Parabola) V Hyperbola; to Extent/Scale/Radius: Locality V Globality, Root-Causes/Ultimate-Origins: Dimensionality: odd-Z V (via fractal) V even-Z, to Symmetries/(Noether's-theorem connected)/Conservation-Laws Dichotomy: restored/conservation/convergence=0- V broken/non-conservation/divergence=/=0: with asymptotic-limit antipodes morphisms/ crossovers: Eureka!!!; "FUZZYICS"=''CATEGORYICS''!!! Connection to Kummer(1850) Bernoulli-numbers proof of FLT is via Siegel(CCNY;1964) < (1994)[AMS Joint Mtg. (2002)-Abs.973-60-124] short succinct physics proof: FLT = Least-Action Principle!!!

  8. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles impregnated on apple pomace to enhanced adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chand, Piar; Pakade, Yogesh B

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and impregnated onto apple pomace surface (HANP@AP) for efficient removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from water. HANP@AP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and surface area analysis. Batch sorption studies were carried out to investigate the influence of different parameters as amount of dose (g), pH, time (min), and initial concentration (mg L(-1)) on adsorption process. Experimental kinetic data followed pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium data well fitted to Langmuir adsorption model with maximum adsorption capacities of 303, 250, and 100 mg g(-1) for Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions, respectively. Competitive adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions in presences of each other was studied to evaluate the removal efficiency of HANP@AP against multi metal-loaded water. HANP@AP was successfully applied to real industrial wastewater with 100 % removal of all three metal ions even at high concentration. HANP@AP could be recycled for four, four, and three cycles in case of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II), respectively. The study showed that HANP@AP is fast, cost effective, and environmental friendly adsorbent for removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from real industrial wastewater.

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal analysis and electrical conductivity studies of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) vitamin B2 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Moussa, Mohamed A. A.; Mohamed, Soha F.

    2011-05-01

    Riboflavin (RF) complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) were successfully synthesized. Structures of metal complexes obtained were confirmed and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, and infrared spectra. DC electrical conductivity measurements indicated that the alkaline earth metal (II) complexes of RF ligand are non-electrolytes. Elemental analysis of chelates suggest that the metal(II) ligand ratio is 1:2 with structure formula as [M(RF) 2( X) 2]· nH 2O. Infrared assignments clearly show that RF ligand coordinated as a bidentate feature through azomethine nitrogen of pyrazine ring and C dbnd O of pyrimidine-2,4-dione. Thermal analyses of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) complexes were investigated using (TG/DSC) under atmospheric nitrogen between 30 and 800 °C. The surface morphology of the complexes was studied by SEM. The electrical conductivities of RF and its metal complexes were also measured with DC electrical conductivity in the temperature range from room to 483 K.

  10. Comparison of TcPO II and StO II using the blood oxygen dissociation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Leigh P.; Makhratchev, Marina; Yarbrough, Amy; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Mao, Jian-min

    2006-02-01

    It is well known that the relation between the partial pressure of oxygen in blood (PO II) and the hemoglobin oxygen saturation in blood (SO II) is given by the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve. In this study, we investigate if a similar relation exists in tissue. The PO II in tissue was approximated by the transcutaneous partial pressure of oxygen (TcPO II) measured by TCM3 TM Transcutanous pO II/pCO II Monitoring System; and the SO II in tissue (StO II) was measured by ODISsey TM Tissue Oximeter. The study showed that the TcPO II versus StO II relation is similar to the dissociation curve in blood, as expected.

  11. The telmisartan renoprotective study from incipient nephropathy to overt nephropathy--rationale, study design, treatment plan and baseline characteristics of the incipient to overt: angiotensin II receptor blocker, telmisartan, Investigation on Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy (INNOVATION) Study.

    PubMed

    Makino, H; Haneda, M; Babazono, T; Moriya, T; Ito, S; Iwamoto, Y; Kawamori, R; Takeuchi, M; Katayama, S

    2005-01-01

    We planned the INNOVATION study to determine whether telmisartan, an angiotensin-2-receptor blocker, delays the progression of renal disease from incipient nephropathy to overt nephropathy in hypertensive or normotensive Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The INNOVATION study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Eligible patients must have incipient nephropathy (defined as a urinary albumin to creatinine ratio of 100-300 mg/g creatinine) and a serum creatinine concentration of < 1.5 mg/dl for men and < 1.3 mg/dl for women. Patients who need treatment with angiotensin II receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are excluded. Eligible patients are randomly assigned to three groups: telmisartan titrated to 40 mg; telmisartan titrated to 80 mg; or placebo. The primary endpoint is the time from baseline visit to first detection of overt nephropathy (defined by a urinary albumin to creatinine ratio that is > 300 mg/g creatinine and 30% higher than the baseline on at least two consecutive visits). A total of 1855 patients have been enrolled from 160 study centres. In 527 randomized patients (28.4% of the enrolled patients), mean (SD) urinary albumin to creatinine ratio and serum creatinine concentration at baseline were 173.3 (47.2) mg/g creatinine and 0.78 (0.19) mg/dl. Sixty-eight per cent of the patients had hypertension at baseline. Mean (SD) systolic and diastolic blood pressures at baseline were 137.1 (14.6) and 77.5 (10.3) mmHg. The INNOVATION study will determine whether telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, provides clinical benefits in hypertensive or normotensive patients with diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial evaluation of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pt(II) and Pd(II) sulfonylhydrazone complexes; 2D-QSAR analysis of Ni(II) complexes of sulfonylhydrazone derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbek, Neslihan; Alyar, Saliha; Alyar, Hamit; Şahin, Ertan; Karacan, Nurcan

    2013-05-01

    Copper(II), nickel(II), platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes with 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-N-methylpropanesulfonylhydrazone (nafpsmh) derived from propanesulfonic acid-1-methylhydrazide (psmh) were synthesized, their structure were identified, and antimicrobial activity of the compounds was screened against three Gram-positive and three Gram-negative bacteria. The results of antimicrobial studies indicate that Pt(II) and Pd(II) complexes showed the most activity against all bacteria. The crystal structure of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-N-methylpropanesulfonylhydrazone (nafpsmh) was also investigated by X-ray analysis. A series of Ni(II) sulfonyl hydrazone complexes (1-33) was synthesized and tested in vitro against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Their antimicrobial activities were used in the QSAR analysis. Four-parameter QSAR models revealed that nucleophilic reaction index for Ni and O atoms, and HOMO-LUMO energy gap play key roles in the antimicrobial activity.

  13. EDTA functionalized silica for removal of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Barakat, M A; Daza, Y A; Woodcock, H L; Kuhn, J N

    2013-10-15

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) functionalized silica adsorbent has been synthesized using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxylsilane (APTES) as a bridging link between silanol groups (SiOH) of silica and carboxylic group of EDTA. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis confirmed the grafting of EDTA onto the silica. The synthesized EDTA-silica was investigated as an adsorbent for removal of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of solution pH, initial solution concentration, and contact time were studied. The removal of metal ions increased with the increase in solution pH, contact time and concentration. The maximum equilibrium time was found to be 45min for all three metal ions. Kinetics studies revealed that the adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) onto EDTA-silica followed the pseudo-second order kinetics and film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion mechanism were involved. Adsorption equilibrium data were well fitted to Langmuir isotherm model and maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) was 79.36, 74.07 and 67.56mg g(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic results reveal that the removal of metals onto EDTA-silica was endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  14. Competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on carbonaceous nanofibers: A spectroscopic and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangxue; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-08-01

    The competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the uniform carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated in binary/ternary-metal systems. The pH-dependent sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs was independent of ionic strength, indicating that inner-sphere surface complexation dominated sorption Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs. The maximum sorption capacities of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs in single-metal systems at a pH 5.5±0.2 and 25±1°C were 3.84 (795.65mg/g), 3.21 (204.00mg/g) and 2.67 (156.70mg/g)mmol/g, respectively. In equimolar binary/ternary-metal systems, Pb(II) exhibited greater inhibition of the sorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II), demonstrating the stronger affinity of CNFs for Pb(II). The competitive sorption of heavy metals in ternary-metal systems was predicted quite well by surface complexation modeling derived from single-metal data. According to FTIR, XPS and EXAFS analyses, Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were specifically adsorbed on CNFs via covalent bonding. These observations should provide an essential start in simultaneous removal of multiple heavy metals from aquatic environments by CNFs, and open the doorways for the application of CNFs. PMID:27108273

  15. Results of Expedicion Humana. I. Analysis of HLA class II (DRB1-DQA1-DPB1) alleles and DR-DQ haplotypes in nine Amerindian populations from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, E A; Keyeux, G; Bernal, J E; Rhodas, M C; Erlich, H A

    1996-09-01

    HLA class II variation was analyzed in nine Native American populations of Colombia using PCR/SSOP typing methods. Under the auspices of the Expedition Humana, approximately 30 unrelated native Colombia Indian samples each from the Tule (NW Pacific Coast), Kogui (Sierra Nevada). Ijka (Sierra Nevada), Ingano (Amazonas), Coreguaje (Amazonas), Nukak (Amazonas), Waunana (Pacific), Embera (Pacific) and Sikuani (Northeastern Plains) were collected and analyzed at the DRBI, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci. The number of different DRB1, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 alleles in the Colombian Indians is markedly reduced in comparison with neighboring African Colombian populations, which exhibit a very high degree of class II variability, as discussed in an accompanying paper. In the Colombian Amerindian groups, DR2 (DRB1*1602), DR4 (DRB1*0407, *0404, *0403 AND *0411), DR6 (DRB1*1402) and DR8 (DRB1*0802) comprise > 95% of all DRB1 alleles. We also found an absence of DR3 in all populations, and DR1, DR7 and DR9 allelic groups were either very rare or absent. Each Colombian Amerindian population has a predominant DRB1 allele (f = approximately 0.22-0.65) and DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotype. Several novel DR-DQ haplotypes were also found. At the DPB1 locus, DPB1*0402 (f = 0.28-0.82), *1401 (f = 0.03-0.45), and *3501 (f = 0.03-0.27), were the three most prevalent alleles, each population maintaining one of these three alleles as the predominant (f > 0.26) DPB1 allele. The reduction of diversity for the HLA class II alleles in the Colombian Indians is suggestive of a population bottleneck during the colonization of the Americans, with little to no subsequent admixture with neighboring African Colombian populations in the last approximately 300 years. PMID:8896175

  16. Syntheses and magnetostructural investigations on Kuratowski-type homo- and heteropentanuclear coordination compounds [MZn4Cl4(L)6] (M(II) = Zn, Fe, Co, Ni, or Cu; L = 5,6-dimethyl-1,2,3-benzotriazolate) represented by the nonplanar K(3,3) graph.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shyam; Tonigold, Markus; Speldrich, Manfred; Kögerler, Paul; Weil, Matthias; Volkmer, Dirk

    2010-08-16

    Homo- and heteropentanuclear coordination compounds [MZn(4)Cl(4)(L)(6)] (M(II) = Zn, Fe, Co, Ni, or Cu; L = 5,6-dimethyl-1,2,3-benzotriazolate) were prepared containing mu(3)-bridging N-donor ligands (1,2,3-benzotriazolate), which are structurally related to the fundamental secondary building unit of Metal-organic Framework Ulm University-4 (MFU-4). The unique topology of these T(d)-symmetrical compounds is characterized by the nonplanar K(3,3) graph, introduced into graph theory by the mathematician Casimir Kuratowski in 1930. The following "Kuratowski-type" compounds were investigated by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis: [MZn(4)Cl(4)(Me(2)bta)(6)].2DMF (M(II) = Zn, Fe, Co, and Cu; DMF = N,N'-dimethylformamide) and [MZn(4)Cl(4)(Me(2)bta)(6)].2C(6)H(5)Br (M(II) = Co and Ni; C(6)H(5)Br = bromobenzene). The mu(3)-bridging benzotriazolate ligands span the edges of an imaginary tetrahedron, in the center of which a redox-active octahedrally coordinated M(II) ion is placed. Four Zn(II) ions are located at the corners of the coordination units. Each Zn center is bound to a monodentate Cl(-) anion and three N-donor atoms stemming from different benzotriazolate ligands. The fact that open-shell redox-active M(II) ions can be introduced selectively into the central octahedral coordination sites is unambiguously proven by a combination of magnetic measurements, UV-vis spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry analysis. The phase purity of all compounds was checked by powder X-ray diffractometry, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The electronic spectra and magnetic properties of the compounds are in complete agreement with their structures determined from single-crystal data. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that all compounds possess a high thermal stability up to 673 K. The pentanuclear compounds retain their structural integrity in solution, as evidenced by time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis

  17. A bioanalytical investigation on the exquisitely strong in vitro potency of the EGFR-DNA targeting type II combi-molecule ZR2003 and its mitigated in vivo antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Golabi, Nahid; Brahimi, Fouad; Huang, Ying; Rachid, Zakaria; Qiu, Qiyu; Larroque-Lombard, Anne-Laure; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J

    2011-11-01

    ZR2003 is a type II of combi-molecule designed to target DNA and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) without requirement for hydrolysis. In human tumour cell lines cultured as monolayers, it showed 6.5-35 fold greater activity than Iressa. Further evaluation in 3D organ-like multilayer aggregates showed that it could block proliferation at submicromolar level. However, despite the superior potency of ZR2003 over Iressa in vitro, its activity xenograft models was not significantly different from that of Iressa. To rationalize these results, we determined the tumour concentration of both ZR2003 and Iressa in vivo and more importantly in vitro in multicellular aggregates. The results showed that in A431 and 4T1 xenografts, the level of ZR2003 absorbed in the tumours were consistently 2-fold less than those generated by Iressa. Likewise, in the multicellular aggregates model, the penetration of ZR2003 was consistently lower than Iressa. In serum containing media, the level of extractable or free ZR2003 was also inferior to those of Iressa. The results from this bioanalytical study, suggest that the discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo potency of ZR2003 when compared with Iressa, may be imputed to its significantly lower tumour concentration.

  18. Comparative investigation of GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II and InP/InGaAs type-I doped-channel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Jung-Hui; Chiang, Te-Kuang; Chiang, Chung-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Min

    2015-02-15

    DC performance of GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II and InP/InGaAs type-I doped-channel field-effect transistors (DCFETs) is demonstrated and compared by two-dimensional simulated analysis. As compared with the traditional InP/InGaAs DCFET, the GaAsSb/InGaAs DCFET exhibits a higher drain current of 8.05 mA, a higher transconductance of 216.24 mS/mm, and a lower gate turn-on voltage of 0.25 V for the presence of a relatively large conduction band discontinuity (ΔE{sub c} ≈ 0.4 eV) at GaAsSb/InGaAs heterostructure and the formation of two-dimensional electron gas in the n{sup +}-InGaAs doping channel. However, due to the tunneling effect under large gate-to-source bias, it results in considerably large gate leakage current in the GaAsSb/InGaAs DCFET.

  19. FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-26

    FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) II ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE II - Cirrus Home Page FIRE II - Cirrus Mission Summaries ...

  20. Recycled chitosan nanofibril as an effective Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) ionic chelating agent: adsorption and desorption performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dagang; Li, Zehui; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zhenxuan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-10-13

    Mechanically disassembled chitosan nanofibrils were prepared and used as metal ion chelating agents. Structure and morphology of nanofibrils were investigated and ionic adsorption or desorption performance were validated to establish related fitting models. In single metal ion solution, the saturated adsorption capacities of Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Ni(II) were 168.66, 118.00 and 60.85, 143.67, and 63.32 mg/g, respectively. In ternary metal ion solution, Cu(II) was more competitive to be adsorbed than Pb(II) and Cd(II) and its removal could arrive at 60%. Ions adsorbed by nanofibrils could be released by EDTA and the recovery could keep above 70% after 3 sorption-desorption cycles. Hence, renewable and recyclable nanofibrillar chitosan exhibited a great promising application in metal treatments attributed to its high adsorption capacity and chelation efficiency.

  1. An Observational and modeling strategy to investigate the impact of remote sources on local air quality: A Houston, Texas case study from the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS II)

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, W. W.; Pierce, R.; Sparling, L. C.; Osterman, G.; McCann, K.; Fischer, M. L.; Rappengluck, B.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Kittaka, C.; Evans, K.; Biraud, S.; Lefer, Barry; Andrews, A.; Oltmans, S.

    2010-01-05

    Quantifying the impacts of remote sources on individual air quality exceedances remains a significant challenge for air quality forecasting. One goal of the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS II) was to assess the impact of distant sources on air quality in east Texas. From 23-30 August 2006, retrievals of tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) from NASA’s Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) reveal the transport of CO from fires in the United States Pacific Northwest to Houston, Texas. This transport occurred behind a cold front and contributed to the worst ozone exceedance period of the summer in the Houston area. We present supporting satellite observations from the NASA A-Train constellation of the vertical distribution of smoke aerosols and CO. Ground-based in situ CO measurements in Oklahoma and Texas track the CO plume as it moves south and indicate mixing of the aloft plume to the surface by turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer and convection during the day. Ground-based aerosol speciation and lidar observations do not find appreciable smoke aerosol transport for this case. However, MODIS aerosol optical depths and model simulations indicate some smoke aerosols were transported from the Pacific Northwest through Texas to the Gulf of Mexico. Chemical transport and forward trajectory models confirm the three major observations: (1) the AIRS envisioned CO transport, (2) the satellite determined smoke plume height, and (3) the timing of the observed surface CO increases. Further, the forward trajectory simulations find two of the largest Pacific Northwest fires likely had the most significant impact.

  2. Environmental crimes at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Facility. Documents before the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    On Thursday, September 17, 1992, and on Friday, September 18, 1992, the Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, hearing testimony on the Rocky Flats Nuclear Facility, requested certain information and documentation that was deferred. This written statement is provided in response to the requested information from Special Agent Jon Lipsky by the Subcommittee during Mr. Lipsky's testimony.

  3. Solar Ca II K Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  4. Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions by olive cake.

    PubMed

    Doyurum, Sabriye; Celik, Ali

    2006-11-01

    The removal of heavy metals from wastewater using olive cake as an adsorbent was investigated. The effect of the contact time, pH, temperature, and concentration of adsorbate on adsorption performance of olive cake for Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were examined by batch method. Adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) in aqueous solution onto olive cake was studied in single component. After establishing the optimum conditions, elution of these ions from the adsorbent surface was also examined. The optimum sorption conditions were determined for two elements. Maximum desorption of the Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were found to be 95.92 and 53.97% by 0.5M HNO(3) and 0.2M HCl, respectively. The morphological analysis of the olive cake was performed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:16806680

  5. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  6. Competitive adsorption of copper(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and zinc(II) onto basic oxygen furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yongjie; Hou, Haobo; Zhu, Shujing

    2009-02-15

    Polluted and contaminated water can often contain more than one heavy metal species. It is possible that the behavior of a particular metal species in a solution system will be affected by the presence of other metals. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) onto basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF slag) in single- and multi-element solution systems as a function of pH and concentration, in a background solution of 0.01M NaNO(3). In adsorption edge experiments, the pH was varied from 2.0 to 13.0 with total metal concentration 0.84mM in the single element system and 0.21mM each of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) in the multi-element system. The value of pH(50) (the pH at which 50% adsorption occurs) was found to follow the sequence Zn>Cu>Pb>Cd in single-element systems, but Pb>Cu>Zn>Cd in the multi-element system. Adsorption isotherms at pH 6.0 in the multi-element systems showed that there is competition among various metals for adsorption sites on BOF slag. The adsorption and potentiometric titrations data for various slag-metal systems were modeled using an extended constant-capacitance surface complexation model that assumed an ion-exchange process below pH 6.5 and the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes at higher pH. Inner-sphere complexation was more dominant for the Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) systems.

  7. Formation of layered Fe(II)-Al(III)-hydroxides during reaction of Fe(II) with aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Evert J

    2012-05-01

    The reactivity of aqueous Fe(II) with aluminum oxide in anoxic solutions was investigated with batch kinetic experiments combined with Fe K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to characterize Fe(II) sorption products. Formation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-layered double hydroxides with an octahedral sheet structure similar to nikischerite (NaFe(II)(6) Al(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(18) (H(2)O)(12)) was observed within a few hours during sorption at pH 7.5 and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations of 1-3 mM. These Fe(II) phases are composed of brucite-like Fe(II)(OH)(2) sheets with partial substitution of Al(III) for Fe(II), charge balanced by anions coordinated along the basal planes. Their fast rate of formation suggests that these previously unrecognized Fe(II) phases, which are structurally and compositionally similar to green rust, may be an important sink of Fe(II) in suboxic and anoxic geochemical environments, and impact the fate of structurally compatible trace metals, such as Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), as well as redox-reactive species including Cr(VI) and U(VI). Further studies are required to assess the thermodynamics, formation kinetics, and stability of these Fe(II) minerals under field conditions. PMID:22409244

  8. Kinetic investigation of human dipeptidyl peptidase II (DPPII)-mediated hydrolysis of dipeptide derivatives and its identification as quiescent cell proline dipeptidase (QPP)/dipeptidyl peptidase 7 (DPP7).

    PubMed

    Maes, Marie-Berthe; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Gilany, Kambiz; Senten, Kristel; Van der Veken, Pieter; Leiting, Barbara; Augustyns, Koen; Scharpé, Simon; De Meester, Ingrid

    2005-03-01

    The presence of DPPII (dipeptidyl peptidase II; E.C. 3.4.14.2) has been demonstrated in various mammalian tissues. However, a profound molecular and catalytic characterization, including substrate selectivity, kinetics and pH-dependence, has not been conducted. In the present study, DPPII was purified from human seminal plasma to apparent homogeneity with a high yield (40%) purification scheme, including an inhibitor-based affinity chromatographic step. The inhibitor lysyl-piperidide (K(i) approximately 0.9 microM at pH 5.5) was chosen, as it provided a favourable affinity/recovery ratio. The human enzyme appeared as a 120 kDa homodimer. Mass spectrometric analysis after tryptic digestion together with a kinetic comparison indicate strongly its identity with QPP (quiescent cell proline dipeptidase), also called dipeptidyl peptidase 7. pH profiles of both kcat and kcat/K(m) clearly demonstrated that DPPII/QPP possesses an acidic and not a neutral optimum as was reported for QPP. Kinetic parameters of the human natural DPPII for dipeptide-derived chromogenic [pNA (p-nitroanilide)] and fluorogenic [4Me2NA (4-methoxy-2-naphthylamide)] substrates were determined under different assay conditions. DPPII preferred the chromogenic pNA-derived substrates over the fluorogenic 4Me2NA-derived substrates. Natural human DPPII showed high efficiency towards synthetic substrates containing proline at the P1 position and lysine at P2. The importance of the P1' group for P2 and P1 selectivity was revealed, explaining many discrepancies in the literature. Furthermore, substrate preferences of human DPPII and dipeptidyl peptidase IV were compared based on their selectivity constants (kcat/K(m)). Lys-Pro-pNA (k(cat)/K(m) 4.1x10(6) s(-1) x M(-1)) and Ala-Pro-pNA (kcat/K(m) 2.6x10(6) s(-1) x M(-1)) were found to be the most sensitive chromogenic substrates for human DPPII, but were less selective than Lys-Ala-pNA (kcat/K(m) 0.4x10(6) s(-1) x M(-1)).

  9. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  10. Angiotensin II receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Yee, Daniel K; Fluharty, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II plays a key role in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. To correct body fluid deficits that occur during hypovolaemia, an animal needs to ingest both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is not surprising that angiotensin II, which is synthesized in response to hypovolaemia, acts centrally to increase both water and NaCl intake. Here, we review findings relating to the properties of angiotensin II receptors that give rise to changes in behaviour. Data are described to suggest that divergent signal transduction pathways are responsible for separable behavioural responses to angiotensin II, and a hypothesis is proposed to explain how this divergence may map onto neural circuits in the brain.

  11. Watershed Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Investigating local watersheds presents middle school students with authentic opportunities to engage in inquiry and address questions about their immediate environment. Investigation activities promote learning in an investigations interdisciplinary context as students explore relationships among chemical, biological, physical, geological, and…

  12. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines. II - Analysis of Turbine Performance of the 19B-8 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Richard P.; Suozzi, Frank L.

    1947-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the turbine in the 19B-8 jet propulsion engine were determined from an investigation of the complete engine in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The investigation covered a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet and flight Mach numbers from 0.05 to 0.46 for various tail-cone positions over the entire operable range of engine speeds. The characteristics of the turbine are presented as functions of the total-pressure ratio across the turbine and the turbine speed and the gas flow corrected to NACA standard atmospheric conditions at sea level. The effect of changes in altitude, flight Mach number, and tail-cone position on turbine performance is discussed. The turbine efficiency with the tail cone in varied from a maximum of 80.5 percent to minimum of 75 percent over a range of engine speeds from 7500 to 17,500 rpm at a flight Mach number of 0.055. Turbine efficiency was unaffected by changes in altitude up to 15,000 feet but was a function of tail-cone position and flight Mach number. Decreasing the tail-pipe-nozzle outlet area 21 percent reduced the turbine efficiency between 2 and 4.5 percent. The turbine efficiency increased between 1.5 and 3 percent as the flight Mach number changed from 0.055 to 0.297.

  13. Forensics Investigator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Career Profiles Forensics Investigator Overview Description Forensic science technicians investigate crimes by collecting and analyzing physical evidence. Often, they specialize in areas such as ...

  14. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  15. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  16. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  17. DNA methyltransferase inhibitor CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zirong; Jin, Guorong; Lin, Shuibin; Lin, Xiumei; Gu, Yumei; Zhu, Yujuan; Hu, Chengbin; Zhang, Qingjiong; Wu, Lizi; Shen, Huangxuan

    2012-06-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibits myogenic differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors and structural proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDA-II inhibited proliferation and migration of C2C12 myoblasts. -- Abstract: CDA-II (cell differentiation agent II), isolated from healthy human urine, is a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor. Previous studies indicated that CDA-II played important roles in the regulation of cell growth and certain differentiation processes. However, it has not been determined whether CDA-II affects skeletal myogenesis. In this study, we investigated effects of CDA-II treatment on skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation, migration and proliferation. We found that CDA-II blocked differentiation of murine myoblasts C2C12 in a dose-dependent manner. CDA-II repressed expression of muscle transcription factors, such as Myogenin and Mef2c, and structural proteins, such as myosin heavy chain (Myh3), light chain (Mylpf) and MCK. Moreover, CDA-II inhibited C1C12 cell migration and proliferation. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that CDA-II inhibits growth and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells, suggesting that the use of CDA-II might affect skeletal muscle functions.

  18. Structure-composition-luminescence correlations in Sr{sub 2.5-3x/2}Ba{sub 0.5}Sm{sub x}Al{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 4}F (0.001{<=}x, y{<=}0.1) oxyfluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangmoon

    2012-02-15

    Luminescent materials composed of Sr{sub 2.5-3x/2}Ba{sub 0.5}Sm{sub x}Al{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 4}F (0.001{<=}x, y{<=}0.1) were prepared by the solid-state reaction method. After the replacement of Sr{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions by Sm{sup 3+} and In{sup 3+} ions in Sr{sub 2.5}Ba{sub 0.5}AlO{sub 4}F host structure, a novel charge-transfer band centered around 304 nm shifted from 240 nm is monitored; moreover, sharp and well-resolved emission peaks in the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub J} transitions of the Sm{sup 3+} activator are observed. The diverse excitation and emission photoluminescence spectra of Sr{sub 2.5-3x/2}Ba{sub 0.5}Sm{sub x}Al{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 4}-{alpha}F1-{delta} (0.001{<=}x, y{<=}0.1) phosphors originated by the charge-transfer of the host to the Sm{sup 3+} activator, the f-f transitions in the Sm{sup 3+} ions, and the defect-induced self-activation are also introduced. - Graphical abstract: After the replacement of Sr{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions by Sm{sup 3+} and In{sup 3+} ions in Sr{sub 2.5}Ba{sub 0.5}AlO{sub 4}F host structure, a novel charge-transfer band centered around 304 nm shifted from 240 nm is monitored; moreover, sharp and well-resolved emission peaks in the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub J} transitions of the Sm{sup 3+} activator are observed (Figure, Left). The diverse excitation and emission photoluminescence spectra of Sr{sub 2.5-3x/2}Ba{sub 0.5}Sm{sub x}Al{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 4}-{alpha}F1-{delta} (0.001{<=}x, y{<=}0.1) phosphors originated by the charge-transfer of the host to the Sm{sup 3+} activator, the f-f transitions in the Sm{sup 3+} ions, and the defect-induced self-activation are also introduced. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong and well-resolved emitting peaks are monitored in Sm{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluoride phosphors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diverse excitation and emission spectra of the oxyfluoride phosphors originated from Sm{sup 3+} activator and the defect-induced self

  19. Coronal type II bursts and interplanetary type II bursts: Distinct shock drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana, G. S.

    2012-02-01

    We study solar radio type II bursts combining with Wind/WAVES type II bursts and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The aim of the present work is to investigate the effectiveness of shocks to cause type II bursts in the solar corona and the interplanetary space. We consider the following findings. The distribution of the cessation heights of type II emission is confined to a rather narrow range of height than the distribution of the heights of start frequencies. This is suggestive of the presence of a gradient for the Alfvén speed from the heliocentric height of ˜1.4 solar radii. The range of the kinetic energy of CMEs associated with coronal type II emission taken together with the suggested computation method and the Alfvén speed gradient, indicates the limit to the height up to which type II emission could be expected. This height is ˜2 solar radii from the center of the Sun. Further, the large time gap between the cessation time and heights of coronal type II emission and the commencement time and heights of most of the IP type II bursts do not account for the difference between the two heights and the average shock speed. Also, there is clear difference in the magnitude of the kinetic energies and the distinct characteristics of the CMEs associated with coronal and IP type II bursts. Hence, we suggest that in most instances the coronal type II bursts and IP type II bursts occur due to distinct shocks. We also address the question of the origin of type II bursts and discuss the possible explanation of observed results.

  20. [Investigations on the correlation between vinyl chloride (VCM)-uptake and excretion of its metabolites by 15 VCM-exposed workers. II. Measurements of the urinary excretion of the vcm-metabolite thiodiglycolic acid ].

    PubMed

    Heger, M; Müller, G; Norpoth, K

    1982-01-01

    Fifteen workers employed in a PVC producing plant were investigated concerning their individual vinyl chloride (VCM) exposure and the urinary excretion of the VCM metabolite thiodiglycolic acid (TdGA). The urine concentrations found were in the range 0.94-20.4 microgram/ml. These could be compared with exposure data calculated from VCM air analyses performed by personal air sampling and corrected with respect to the exposure times of the workers. The amounts of TdGA excreted within 24 h were correlated with the effective VCM body concentrations calculated from the exposure data as mean values for 12 h periods (Spearman coefficient P=alpha less than 0.005). This correlation resembles a function of the Michaelis-Menten type. It could be shown that during short exposure periods of less than 5 min, the metabolite formation in relation to the exposure data was lower than during longer periods of exposure although, as would be expected, there were some fluctuations of the exposure level. Therefore, the VCM body concentrations could not normally reach steady state values.

  1. Observations of the structure and vertical transport of the polar upper ionosphere with the EISCAT VHF radar. II - First investigations of the topside O(+) and H(+) vertical ion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jian; Blanc, Michel; Alcayde, Denis; Barakat, Abdullah R.; Fontanari, Jean; Blelly, Pierre-Louis; Kofman, Wlodek

    1992-01-01

    EISCAT VHF radar was used to investigate the vertical flows of H(+) and O(+) ions in the topside high-latitude ionosphere. The radar transmitted a single long pulse to probe the ionosphere from 300 to 1200 km altitude. A calculation scheme is developed to deduce the H(+) drift velocity from the coupled momentum equations of H(+), O(+), and the electrons, using the radar data and a neutral atmosphere model. The H(+) vertical drift velocity was expressed as a linear combination of the different forces acting on the plasma. Two nights, one very quiet, one with moderate magnetic activity, were used to test the technique and to provide a first study of the morphology and orders of magnitudes of ion outflow fluxes over Tromso. O(+) vertical flows were found to be downward or close to zero most of the time in the topside ionosphere; they appeared to be strongly correlated with magnetic activity during the disturbed night. H(+) topside ion fluxes were always directed upward, with velocity reaching 500-1000 m/s. A permanent outflow of H(+) ions is inferred.

  2. Investigations of the effect of the non-manganese metal in heterometallic-oxido cluster models of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II: lanthanides as substitutes for calcium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Heng; Takase, Michael K; Agapie, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    We report the syntheses and electrochemical properties of nine new clusters ([LLnMn(IV)3O4(OAc)3(DMF)n](+) (Ln = La(3+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Tb(3+), Dy(3+), Yb(3+), and Lu(3+), n = 2 or 3)) supported by a ligand (L(3-)) based on a 1,3,5-triarylbenzene motif appended with alkoxide and pyridine donors. All complexes were obtained by metal substitution of Ca(2+) with lanthanides upon treatment of previously reported LMn3CaO4(OAc)3(THF) with Ln(OTf)3. Structural characterization confirmed that the clusters contain the [LnMn3O4] cubane motif. The effect of the redox-inactive centers on the electronic properties of the Mn3O4 cores was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. A linear correlation between the redox potential of the cluster and the ionic radii or pKa of the lanthanide metal ion was observed. Chemical reduction of the LMn(IV)3GdO4(OAc)3(DMF)2 cluster with decamethylferrocene, resulted in the formation of LGdMn(IV)2Mn(III)O4(OAc)3(DMF)2, a rare example of mixed-valence [MMn3O4] cubane. The lanthanide-coordinated ligands can be substituted with other donors, including water, the biological substrate. PMID:25521310

  3. In vitro photosensitization of tumour cell enzymes by photofrin II administered in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, S. L.; Murant, R. S.; Chazen, M. D.; Kelly, M. E.; Hilf, R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of injected Photofrin II, a preparation enriched in hydrophobic dihaematoporphyrin ethers and esters, to photosensitize selected mitochondrial and cytosolic enzymes during illumination in vitro was examined. Preparations of R3230AC mammary tumours, obtained at designated times after a single dose of Photofrin II, displayed a time-dependent photosensitivity. Maximum inhibition of mitochondrial enzymes occurred at 24 hours post-treatment, whereas no inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme, pyruvate kinase, was observed over the 168 hour time course. At the selected 24 hour time point, mitochondrial enzyme photosensitisation was found to be drug dose (5.25 mg kg-1 Photofrin II) and light dose dependent, the rank order of inhibition being cytochrome c oxidase greater than F0F1 ATPase greater than succinate dehydrogenase greater than NADH dehydrogenase. We conclude that porphyrin species contained in Photofrin II accumulate in mitochondria of tumour cells in vivo and produce maximum photosensitisation at 24-72 hours after administration to tumour-bearing animals. The time course observed here with Photofrin II is similar to that seen previously with the more heterogenous haematoporphyrin derivative preparation in this in vivo-in vitro model. PMID:2547413

  4. Molecular mechanisms of the biological activity of the anticancer drug elesclomol and its complexes with Cu(II), Ni(II) and Pt(II).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arun A; Patel, Daywin; Wu, Xing; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2013-09-01

    The bis(thiohydrazide) amide elesclomol has extremely potent antiproliferative activity and is currently in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. Elesclomol strongly binds copper and may be exerting its cell growth inhibitory effects by generating copper-mediated oxidative stress. Nickel(II) and platinum(II) complexes of elesclomol were synthesized and characterized in order to investigate if these biologically redox inactive metal complexes could also inhibit cell growth. The nickel(II)-elesclomol and platinum(II) elesclomol complexes were 34- and 1040-fold less potent than the copper(II)-elesclomol complex towards human leukemia K562 cells. These results support the conclusion that a redox active metal is required for elesclomol to exert its cell growth inhibitory activity. Copper(II)-elesclomol was also shown to efficiently oxidize ascorbic acid at physiological ascorbic acid concentrations. Reoxidation of the copper(I) thus produced would lead to production of damaging reactive oxygen species. An X-ray crystallographic structure determination of copper(II)-elesclomol showed that it formed a 1:1 neutral complex with a distorted square planar structure. The kinetics and equilibria of the competition reaction of the strong copper(II) chelator TRIEN with copper(II)-elesclomol were studied spectrophotometrically under physiological conditions. These results showed elesclomol bound copper(II) with a conditional stability constant 24-fold larger than TRIEN. A log stability constant of 24.2 was thus indirectly determined for the copper(II)-elesclomol complex.

  5. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C. ); Standley, V. ); Voss, S.S. ); Haskin, E. )

    1993-01-10

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  6. Mn K-Edge XANES and Kβ XES Studies of Two Mn–Oxo Binuclear Complexes: Investigation of Three Different Oxidation States Relevant to the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Hendrik; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Robblee, John H.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Girerd, Jean-Jacques; Sauer, Kenneth; Klein, Melvin P.; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2014-01-01

    Two structurally homologous Mn compounds in different oxidation states were studied to investigate the relative influence of oxidation state and ligand environment on Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and Mn Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (Kβ XES). The two manganese compounds are the di-μ-oxo compound [L′2MnIIIO2MnIVL′2](ClO4)3, where L′ is 1,10-phenanthroline (Cooper, S. R.; Calvin, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1977, 99, 6623–6630) and the linear mono-μ-oxo compound [LMnIIIOMnIIIL](ClO4)2, where L− is the monoanionic N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N′-salicylidene-1,2-diaminoethane ligand (Horner, O.; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, E.; Charlot, M. F.; Tchertanov, L.; Guilhem, J.; Mattioli, T. A.; Boussac, A.; Girerd, J.-J. Inorg. Chem. 1999, 38, 1222–1232). Preparative bulk electrolysis in acetonitrile was used to obtain higher oxidation states of the compounds: the MnIVMnIV species for the di-μ-oxo compound and the MnIIIMnIV and MnIVMnIV species for the mono-μ-oxo compound. IR, UV/vis, EPR, and EXAFS spectra were used to determine the purity and integrity of the various sample solutions. The Mn K-edge XANES spectra shift to higher energy upon oxidation when the ligand environment remains similar. However, shifts in energy are also observed when only the ligand environment is altered. This is achieved by comparing the di-μ-oxo and linear mono-μ-oxo Mn–Mn moieties in equivalent oxidation states, which represent major structural changes. The magnitude of an energy shift due to major changes in ligand environment can be as large as that of an oxidation-state change. Therefore, care must be exercised when correlating the Mn K-edge energies to manganese oxidation states without taking into account the nature of the ligand environment and the overall structure of the compound. In contrast to Mn K-edge XANES, Kβ XES spectra show less dependence on ligand environment. The Kβ1,3 peak energies are comparable for the di-μ-oxo and mono

  7. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

    MedlinePlus

    Sipple syndrome; MEN II; Pheochromocytoma - MEN II; Thyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma; Parathyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma ... The cause of MEN II is a defect in a gene called RET. This defect causes many tumors to appear in the same ...

  8. Determination of Pb(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Co(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry in food and water samples after preconcentration by coprecipitation with Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Tufekci, Mehmet; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Elvan, Hamide; Ozdes, Duygu; Soylak, Mustafa; Duran, Celal

    2013-02-01

    A new, simple, and rapid separation and preconcentration procedure, for determination of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions in environmental real samples, has been developed. The method is based on the combination of coprecipitation of analyte ions by the aid of the Mo(VI)-diethyldithiocarbamate-(Mo(VI)-DDTC) precipitate and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations. The effects of experimental conditions like pH of the aqueous solution, amounts of DDTC and Mo(VI), standing time, centrifugation rate and time, sample volume, etc. and also the influences of some foreign ions were investigated in detail on the quantitative recoveries of the analyte ions. The preconcentration factors were found to be 150 for Pb(II), Zn(II) and Co(II), and 200 for Cd(II) ions. The detection limits were in the range of 0.1-2.2 μg L(-1) while the relative standard deviations were found to be lower than 5 % for the studied analyte ions. The accuracy of the method was checked by spiked/recovery tests and the analysis of certified reference material (CRM TMDW-500 Drinking Water). The procedure was successfully applied to seawater and stream water as liquid samples and baby food and dried eggplant as solid samples in order to determine the levels of Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), and Co(II) ions. PMID:22527456

  9. Sorption behavior of Pb(II) and Cd(II) on iron ore slime and characterization of metal ion loaded sorbent.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, M; Rout, K; Mohapatra, B K; Anand, S

    2009-07-30

    The present investigation evaluates the sorption effectiveness of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions on iron ore slime (IOS) obtained from Jindal Steel Ltd., Vijayanagaram, India. The sorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics for both the cations. Pb(II) and Cd(II) sorption increased with the increase in pH from 2 to 4.5. The sorption data fitted well to Freundlich model as compared to Langmuir model. Synergistic effect of Pb(II) and Cd(II) on their sorption on IOS sample showed that Pb(II) sorption increases in presence of Cd(II) whereas Cd(II) sorption decreases. Presence of chloride or sulphate resulted in increased Pb(II) sorption but adversely affected Cd(II) sorption. The XRD patterns of Pb(II) adsorbed on IOS sample showed disappearance of some silica peaks and shifting of hematite peaks corresponding to 104 and 110 plane. For Cd(II) sorbed IOS sample, only peak shift for hematite of 104 and 110 plane was observed. Shifting of IR bands indicated that the Pb(II) sorption occurred through an inner sphere mechanism where as Cd(II) sorption occurred through outer sphere mechanism. EPMA studies showed that Pb(II) form a uniform thin layer and Cd(II) concentrate only on iron oxide phase. Regeneration and stability data on metal ion loaded IOS sample has been included.

  10. Enhanced removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by composites of mesoporous carbon stabilized alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weichun; Tang, Qiongzhi; Wei, Jingmiao; Ran, Yajun; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    A novel adsorbent of mesoporous carbon stabilized alumina (MC/Al2O3) was synthesized through one-pot hard-templating method. The adsorption potential of MC/Al2O3 for Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution was investigated compared with the mesoporous carbon. The results indicated the MC/Al2O3 showed excellent performance for Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal, the adsorption capacity reached 49.98 mg g-1 for Cd(II) with initial concentration of 50 mg L-1 and reached 235.57 mg g-1 for Pb(II) with initial concentration of 250 mg L-1, respectively. The kinetics data of Cd(II) adsorption demonstrated that the Cd(II) adsorption rate was fast, and the removal efficiencies with initial concentration of 10 and 50 mg L-1 can reach up 99% within 5 and 20 min, respectively. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model could describe the kinetics of Cd(II) adsorption well, indicating the chemical reaction was the rate-controlling step. The mechanism for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption by MC/Al2O3 was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and the results indicated that the excellent performance for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption of MC/Al2O3 was mainly attributed to its high surface area and the special functional groups of hydroxy-aluminum, hydroxyl, carboxylic through the formation of strong surface complexation or ion-exchange. It was concluded that MC/Al2O3 can be recognized as an effective adsorbent for removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution.

  11. Network II Database

    1994-11-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database.

  12. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. It leads to problems with blood clotting (coagulation). Factor II is also known as prothrombin. ... blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or ...

  13. Amino-functionalized core-shell magnetic mesoporous composite microspheres for Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulin; Liang, Song; Wang, Juntao; Yu, Shuili; Wang, Yilong

    2013-04-01

    Amino-functionalized Fe3O4@mesoporous SiO2 core-shell composite microspheres NH2-MS in created in multiple synthesis steps have been investigated for Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption. The microspheres were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, zeta potential measurements and vibrating sample magnetometer. Batch adsorption tests indicated that NH2-MS exhibited higher adsorption affinity toward Pb(II) and Cd(II) than MS did. The Langmuir model could fit the adsorption isotherm very well with maximum adsorption capacity of 128.21 and 51.81 mg/g for Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively, implying that adsorption processes involved monolayer adsorption. Pb(II) and Cd(II) adsorption could be well described by the pseudo second-order kinetics model, and was found to be strongly dependent on pH and humic acid. The Pb(II)- and Cd(II)-loaded microspheres were effectively desorbed using 0.01 mol/L HCl or EDTA solution. NH2-MS have promise for use as adsorbents in the removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) in wastewater treatment processes. PMID:23923794

  14. Characterization of Schizothorax prenanti cgnrhII gene: fasting affects cgnrhII expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Yuan, D; Zhou, C; Lin, F; Chen, H; Wu, H; Wei, R; Xin, Z; Liu, J; Gao, Y; Chen, D; Yang, S; Pu, Y; Li, Z

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the role of chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone II (cgnrhII) in feeding regulation was investigated in Schizothorax prenanti. First, the full-length S. prenanti cgnrhII cDNA consisted of 693 bp with an open reading frame of 261 bp encoding a protein of 86 amino acids. Next, cgnrhII was widely expressed in the central and peripheral tissues. Last, there were significant changes in cgnrhII mRNA expression in the fasted group compared to the fed group in the S. prenanti hypothalamus during 24 h fasting (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the cgnrhII gene expression presented a significant decrease in the fasted group compared with the fed group (P < 0.05) on days 3, 5 and 7, after re-feeding, there was no significant changes in cgnrhII mRNA expression level between refed and fed group on day 9 (P > 0.05). Thus, the results suggest that cGnRH II expression is influenced by fasting and the gene may be involved in feeding regulation in S. prenanti.

  15. Adsorption characteristics of Cu(II) and Pb(II) onto expanded perlite from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ahmet; Tuzen, Mustafa; Citak, Demirhan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-09-01

    The adsorption characteristics of Cu(II) and Pb(II) onto expanded perlite (EP) from aqueous solution were investigated with respect to the changes in pH of solution, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature of solution. For the adsorption of both metal ions, the Langmuir isotherm model fitted to equilibrium data better than the Freundlich isotherm model. Using the Langmuir model equation, the monolayer adsorption capacity of EP was found to be 8.62 and 13.39 mg/g for Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions, respectively. Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm model was also applied to the equilibrium data and the mean free energies of adsorption were found as 10.82 kJ/mol for Cu(II) and 9.12 kJ/mol for Pb(II) indicating that the adsorption of both metal ions onto EP was taken place by chemical ion-exchange. Thermodynamic functions, the change of free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) of adsorption were also calculated for each metal ions. These parameters showed that the adsorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions onto EP was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic at 20-50 degrees C. Experimental data were also evaluated in terms of kinetic characteristics of adsorption and it was found that adsorption process for both metal ions followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  16. RTNS-II: irradiations at the Rotating Target Neutron Source-II. 1983 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This is the second annual report summarizing irradiation experiments and operations at RTNS-II. It covers calendar year 1983 and includes reports on all irradiations, non-fusion as well as fusion, and on utilization of Monbusho's transmission electron microscope (TEM) a RTNS-II. Each summary article has been submitted by the investigator and has been altered only to meet the style and format requirements of this report.

  17. Coping with investigators and investigations.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D O; Fee, M K

    1991-09-01

    Most businesses in highly regulated industries like health care are likely to face an investigation at some point. By knowing ahead of time how to properly respond to investigators' requests and by exercising caution during the investigation, health care agencies can minimize the potential damage.

  18. Defective adenosylcobalamin synthesis in a case of transcobalamin II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Linnell, J C; Quadros, E V; Elliott, P G; Malleson, P

    1980-01-01

    Cobalamin metabolism has been investigated in a new case of transcobalamin II (TC II) deficiency. Using the chromatobioautographic technique, an abnormal distribution of cobalamins was detected in the child's erythrocytes and reduced synthesis of adenosylcobalamin but not of methylcobalamin in cultured fibroblasts. These results suggest that there may be a close link between TC II-mediated cobalamin transport and intracellular synthesis of adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl). PMID:6775148

  19. Synthesis, characterization, DFT and biological studies of isatinpicolinohydrazone and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gammal, O. A.; Rakha, T. H.; Metwally, H. M.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    Isatinpicolinohydrazone (H2IPH) and its Zn(II), Cd(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized and investigated using physicochemical techniques viz. IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis spectrometric methods and magnetic moment measurements. The investigation revealed that H2IPH acts as binegative tetradentate in Zn(II), neutral tridentate in Cd(II) and as neutral bidentate towards Hg(II) complex. Octahedral geometry is proposed for all complexes. The bond length, bond angle, chemical reactivity, energy components (kcal/mol), binding energy (kcal/mol) and dipole moment (Debyes) for all the title compounds were evaluated by DFT and also MEP for the ligand is shown. Theoretical infrared intensities of H2IPH and also the theoretical electronic spectra of the ligand and its complexes were calculated. The thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. The in vitro antibacterial studies of the complexes proved them as growth inhibiting agents. The DDPH antioxidant of the compounds have been screened. Antitumor activity, carried out in vitro on human mammary gland (breast) MCF7, have shown that Hg(II) complex exhibited potent activity followed by Zn(II), Cd(II) complexes and the ligand.

  20. Mechanism of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions sorption from aqueous solutions by macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasović, Aleksandra B.; Ekmeščić, Bojana M.; Sandić, Zvjezdana P.; Ranđelović, Danijela V.; Mozetič, Miran; Vesel, Alenka; Onjia, Antonije E.

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions sorption from aqueous solutions by macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (PGME) functionalized by reaction of the pendant epoxy groups with diethylene triamine (PGME-deta) was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) were used for the determination of surface morphology of the copolymer particles. The sorption behavior of heavy metals Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions sorption was investigated in batch static experiments under non-competitive conditions at room temperature (298 K). The obtained results were fitted to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic model. The kinetics studies showed that Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) sorption obeys the pseudo-second-order model under all investigated operating conditions with evident influence of pore diffusion.

  1. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  2. Synthesis, structural elucidation and carbon dioxide adsorption on Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate (II) Prussian blue analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lugo, F.; Polanco, R.

    2016-11-01

    In the course of the last years hexacyanoferrates have been widely studied; even though, the adsorption properties of Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II) (labelled here Zn-HII) have not been thoroughly considered. In addition, soft porous crystals, i.e., adsorbents that display structural flexibility have been, as well, extensively studied, however this property has not been reported for Zn (II) hexacyanoferrate(II). In this regard, the key questions addressed here were the synthesis and structural characterization of Zn-HII together with the investigation of their low (up to 1 bar) and high pressure (up to 30 bar) adsorption properties, to found if these materials show structural flexibility. Then, to attain the anticipated goals, structural characterizations were made with: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), simultaneously, with the investigation of the adsorption of carbon dioxide. As a result of the research process we concluded that the Zn-HII displayed Fm barm space group framework. Besides, the carbon dioxide adsorption investigation demonstrated the presence of the framework expansion effect together with an extremely high adsorption heat, properties that could be useful for the use of Zn(II) hexacyanoferrate(II) as an excellent adsorbent.

  3. Fragrance contact dermatitis: a worldwide multicenter investigation (Part II).

    PubMed

    Larsen, W; Nakayama, H; Fischer, T; Elsner, P; Frosch, P; Burrows, D; Jordan, W; Shaw, S; Wilkinson, J; Marks, J; Sugawara, M; Nethercott, M; Nethercott, J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of responses to selected fragrance materials in patients who were fragrance sensitive. 178 patients were evaluated in 8 centers worldwide with a fragrance mix (FM) and 20 other fragrance materials. Reaction to the fragrance mixture (FM) occurred in 78.7% of the subjects. Substances reacting at a rate of 2% or higher included jasmine absolute, geranium oil bourbon, l-citronellol, spearmint oil, 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-gamma-2-benzopyran, omega-6-hexadecenlactone, dimethyltetrahydrobenzaldehyde (isomer mixture), and alpha-amylcinnamaldehyde. These chemicals should be furthur evaluated to corroborate their allergenicity. We are constantly looking for new fragrance allergens to extend the diagnostic capability of the fragrance mix (FM).

  4. Investigating Student Ideas about Cosmology II: Composition of the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coble, Kim; Nickerson, Melissa D.; Bailey, Janelle M.; Trouille, Laura E.; Cochran, Geraldine L.; Camarillo, Carmen T.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2013-01-01

    Continuing our work from a previous study (Coble et al. 2013), we examine undergraduates' ideas on the composition of the Universe as they progress through a general education astronomy integrated lecture and laboratory course with a focus on active learning. The study was conducted over five semesters at an urban minority-serving…

  5. Investigating the Marine Environment and Its Resources, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Violetta F.

    This is the second of two volumes comprising a resource unit designed to help students become more knowledgeable about the marine environment and its resources. Included in this volume are discussions of changes in the human and marine environment, human needs, marine resources, living marine resources, marine transportation, marine energy…

  6. Investigation of the Performance of Commercial Batteries; Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Arthur; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a project that involves determining, by coulometry, the energy output of different types and makes of 1.5-volt AA cells as a function of EMF and time. Involves measuring the volume of hydrogen gas collected at the cathode from the reduction of hydrogen ions in aqueous sulfuric acid by a current produced by the discharge of an AA battery.…

  7. Dengue haemorrhagic fever in Cuba. II. Clinical investigations.

    PubMed

    Guzman, M G; Kouri, G P; Bravo, J; Soler, M; Vazquez, S; Santos, M; Villaescusa, R; Basanta, P; Indan, G; Ballester, J M

    1984-01-01

    Clinical and serological studies were carried out on 114 patients admitted to hospital in Havana, Cuba with Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS). Serological confirmation of dengue was obtained in 90% of cases, with 5% of cases primary and 95% secondary. Fever, haemorrhagic manifestations, vomiting and headache were the most frequent signs and symptoms. Among haemorrhagic manifestations, petechiae and vaginal bleeding were reported in a larger number of patients. 21 patients presented shock and, of these, 20 were secondary infections. The disease appeared more frequently in white persons and in women. The aetiopathogenicity of the syndromes is discussed. 95% of the cases could be explained on the basis of the secondary infection hypothesis.

  8. Central effects of angiotensin II, its fragment and analogues.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, V P; Klousha, V E; Petkov, V D; Markovska, V L; Svirskis, S V; Mountsinietse, R K; Anouans, Z E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the octapeptide angiotensin II (AT II), its fragment Ile8 AT3-8 and the analogues Sar1 Ala8 AT II, Ala8 AT II and Ile8 AT II were studied with respect to: the level of biogenic amines (DA, 5-HT and their metabolites HVA and 5-HIAA) in the forebrain; the behaviour of the animals--haloperidol catalepsy, apomorphine stereotypy, unconditioned jumping reaction (UJR), convulsive threshold. Good correlation was found between the biochemical and behavioural effects. The fragment of AT II where phenylalanine is substituted at the C-terminal by Ile reduces the haloperidol-increased content of HVA, potentiates apomorphine stereotypy and reduces catalepsy, whereas the AT II analogues (where the C-terminal phenylalanine is substituted by Ala, and the N-terminal--by Sar) potentiate the effect of haloperidol increasing the HVA content, reduce apomorphine stereotypy and potentiate catalepsy; saralasine independently applied induces brief catalepsy; AT II, its fragment and analogues inhibit UJR, in combination with amphetamine and PTZ this effect becomes deeper; the duration of hexobarbital sleep is increased. The peptides investigated increase the convulsive threshold. The results show that the hexapeptide fragment has preserved the effects of AT II, whereas in the analogues (with changed C- and N-terminals) they are changed. The results obtained may be explained with the modulating influence of AT II-receptors on the DA-ergic receptors in the brain structures with which AT II and its fragment and analogues enter in contact.

  9. Reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by magnetite.

    PubMed

    Wiatrowski, Heather A; Das, Soumya; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Ilton, Eugene S; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2009-07-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a highly toxic element, and its contamination of groundwater presents a significant threat to terrestrial ecosystems. Understanding the geochemical processes that mediate mercury transformations in the subsurface is necessary to predict its fate and transport. In this study, we investigated the redox transformation of mercuric Hg (Hg[II]) in the presence of the Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed valence iron oxide mineral magnetite. Kinetic and spectroscopic experiments were performed to elucidate reaction rates and mechanisms. The experimental data demonstrated that reaction of Hg(II) with magnetite resulted in the loss of Hg(II) and the formation of volatile elemental Hg (Hg[0]). Kinetic experiments showed that Hg(II) reduction occurred within minutes, with reaction rates increasing with increasing magnetite surface area (0.5 to 2 m2/L) and solution pH (4.8 to 6.7), and decreasing with increasing chloride concentration (10(-6) to 10(-2) mol/L). Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis of reacted magnetite samples revealed a decrease in Fe(II) content, corresponding to the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the magnetite structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy detected the presence of Hg(II) on magnetite surfaces, implying that adsorption is involved in the electron transfer process. These results suggest that Hg(II) reaction with solid-phase Fe(II) is a kinetically favorable pathway for Hg(II) reduction in magnetite-hearing environmental systems.

  10. Fire investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  11. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  12. Systematic downgrading for investigating ``naturalness'' in synthesized singing using STRAIGHT: A high quality VOCODER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Hideki

    2002-05-01

    Conceptual simplicity of the classical channel VOCODER provides a powerful means for systematic investigations on perceptual effects of speech related physical parameters when combined with modern computational power and signal processing theories. A modern version of channel VOCODER, STRAIGHT [Kawahara et al., Speech Commun. 27, 187-207 (1999)], which is also an extension to pitch-synchronous analysis and synthesis, generates naturally sounding resynthesized speech from the analyzed smooth time-frequency surface and source parameters such as F0. This high-quality resynthesis enables close investigations on naturalness deterioration as a function of feature modifications in the decomposed parameter domain; for example, detailed shape of a F0 trajectory, underlying parameters to determine F0 trajectory dynamics, group delay alignment of excitation pulses and aperiodicity/periodicity ratio of the excitation source and so on. One of potential advantages of this strategy is based on the fact that our perceptual function is highly nonlinear. The other source of advantage is virtually an independent parameter set which allows precise control of parameter deviations from the original analysis results. An overview of recent findings and modification demonstrations will be presented. [Work supported by CREST grant of Japanese Science and Technology Corporation.

  13. Prosody and informativity: A cross-linguistic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Iris Chuoying

    This dissertation aims to extend our knowledge of prosody -- in particular, what kinds of information may be conveyed through prosody, which prosodic dimensions may be used to convey them, and how individual speakers differ from one another in how they use prosody. Four production studies were conducted to examine how various factors interact with one another in shaping the prosody of an utterance and how prosody fulfills its multi-functional role. Experiments 1 explores the interaction between two types of informativity, namely information structure and information-theoretic properties. The results show that the prosodic consequences of new-information focus are modulated by the focused word's frequency, whereas the prosodic consequences of corrective focus are modulated by the focused word's probability in the context. Furthermore, f0 ranges appear to be more informative than f0 shapes in reflecting informativity across speakers. Specifically, speakers seem to have individual 'preferences' regarding f0 shapes, the f0 ranges they use for an utterance, and the magnitude of differences in f0 ranges by which they mark information-structural distinctions. In contrast, there is more cross-speaker validity in the actual directions of differences in f0 ranges between information-structural types. Experiments 2 and 3 further show that the interaction found between corrective focus and contextual probability depends on the interlocutor's knowledge state. When the interlocutor has no access to the crucial information concerning utterances' contextual probability, speakers prosodically emphasize contextually improbable corrections, but not contextually probable corrections. Furthermore, speakers prosodically emphasize the corrections in response to contextually probable misstatements, but not the corrections in response to contextually improbable misstatements. In contrast, completely opposite patterns are found when words' contextual probability is shared knowledge between