Science.gov

Sample records for ii investigating f0

  1. On the universality of the long-/short-range separation in multiconfigurational density-functional theory. II. Investigating f0 actinide species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromager, Emmanuel; Réal, Florent; Wâhlin, Pernilla; Wahlgren, Ulf; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.

    2009-08-01

    In a previous paper [Fromager et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 074111 (2007)], some of the authors proposed a recipe for choosing the optimal value of the μ parameter that controls the long-range/short-range separation of the two-electron interaction in hybrid multiconfigurational self-consistent field short-range density-functional theory (MC-srDFT) methods. For general modeling with MC-srDFT methods, it is clearly desirable that the same universal value of μ can be used for any molecule. Their calculations on neutral light element compounds all yielded μopt=0.4 a.u. In this work the authors investigate the universality of this value by considering "extreme" study cases, namely, neutral and charged isoelectronic f0 actinide compounds (ThO2, PaO2+, UO22+, UN2, CUO, and NpO23+). We find for these compounds that μopt=0.3 a.u. but show that 0.4 a.u. is still acceptable. This is a promising result in the investigation of a universal range separation. The accuracy of the currently best MC-srDFT (μ =0.3 a.u.) approach has also been tested for equilibrium geometries. Though it performs as well as wave function theory and DFT for static-correlation-free systems, it fails in describing the neptunyl (VII) ion NpO23+ where static correlation is significant; bending is preferred at the MC-srDFT (μ =0.3 a.u.) level, whereas the molecule is known to be linear. This clearly shows the need for better short-range functionals, especially for the description of the short-range exchange. It also suggests that the bending tendencies observed in DFT for NpO23+ cannot be fully explained by the bad description of static correlation effects by standard functionals. A better description of the exchange seems to be essential too.

  2. Effect Of Calcium Chelators on the Formation and Oxidation of the Slowly Relaxing Reduced Plastoquinone Pool in Calcium-Depleted PSII Membranes. Investigation of the F0 Yield

    SciTech Connect

    Semin, B. K.; Davletshina, L. N.; Bulychev, A. A.; Ivanov, I. I.; Seibert, M.; Rubin, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    The F{sub 0} fluorescence yield in intact photosystem II (PSII), Ca-depleted PSII (PSII(-Ca/NaCl)), and Mn-depleted PSII membranes was measured before and after dim light treatment (1-2 min), using flash-probe fluorescence and fluorescence induction kinetic measurements. The value of F{sub 0} after the light treatment (F{sup '}{sub 0}) was larger than F{sub 0} in dark-adapted PSII membranes and depended on the appearance of the slowly relaxing, reduced plastoquinone pool (t{sub 1/2} = 4 min) formed during preillumination, which was not totally reoxidized before the F{sup '}{sub 0} measurement. In PSII(-Ca/NaCl) such a pool also appeared, but the F{sup '}{sub 0} yield was even higher than in intact PSII membranes. In Mn-depleted PSII membranes, the pool did not form. Interestingly, the yield of F{sup '}{sub 0} in Ca-depleted PSII membranes prepared using chelators (EGTA and citrate) or containing 5 mM EGTA was significantly lower than in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples prepared without chelators. These data indicate that chelators inhibit the reduction of QA and QB and formation of the slowly relaxing plastoquinone pool, or alternatively they increase the rate of its oxidation. Such an effect can be explained by coordination of the chelator molecule to the Mn cluster in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) membranes, rather than different amounts of residual Ca{sup 2+} in the membranes (with or without the chelator), since the remaining oxygen-evolving activity ({approx}15%) in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples did not depend on the presence of the chelator. Thus, chelators of calcium cations not only have an effect on the EPR properties of the S2 state in PSII(-Ca/NaCl) samples, but can also influence the PSII properties determining the rate of plastoquinone pool reduction and/or oxidation. The effect of some toxic metal cations (Cd, Cu, Hg) on the formation of the slowly relaxing pool in PSII membranes was also studied.

  3. Investigation of Hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) usage in Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin as a synergistic ingredient: In vitro and in vivo evaluation in mice bearing C26 colon carcinoma and B16F0 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Teymouri, Manouchehr; Farzaneh, Hamidreza; Badiee, Ali; Golmohammadzadeh, Shiva; Sadri, Kayvan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-12-01

    In this investigation, Hexadecylphosphocholine (HePC, miltefosine) was being used as a new ingredient in Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and different aspects of this integration such as its effect on doxorubicin (Dox) release and cell uptake, cytotoxicity of liposomes, in vivo distribution and half-life clearance time of Dox as well as median survival time were illustrated. The liposomal formulations were Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin containing 0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4% mole ratios of HePC (HePC-PLD) and their respective Dox-free liposomes (HePC-PLs). The cells used were colon carcinoma (C26), adriamycin-resistant breast cancer (MCF-7-ADR), and B16F0 melanoma cell lines, of which C26 and B16F0 cells were exploited for tumoring in BALB/c and C57Bl/6 mice, respectively. In most cases, increase in miltefosine percentage resulted in physically liposomal instability, increased Dox delivery and toxicity and reduced blood half-life of Dox. Overall, HePC 4% -PLD and PLD differed significantly in many respects and it was considered too toxic to be injected at the same dose (15mg Dox/ kg) as PLD. Although HePC 2% -PLD could extend the median survival time marginally in comparison to PLD, the concept of HePC- containing liposomes merits further investigation.

  4. Speaking a foreign language and its effect on F0.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Kati; Laukkanen, Anne-Maria; Aaltonen, Olli

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated whether speaking a foreign language affects the fundamental frequency (F0) of speech in 16 native Finnish and 14 native English subjects reading a text in Finnish and in English. The speech samples were analyzed for the mean and range of F0. Speaking a foreign language caused a change in F0 for the Finnish subjects, while the result was not as unambiguous for the English subjects. The change in F0 may be a result of adaptation to a certain pitch level in the foreign environment. Experience in using the foreign language did not show significant correlation to the change in F0, which suggests either individual differences in sensitivity to adaptation or difficulty in quantifying the amount of experience.

  5. Do Red Deer Stags (Cervus elaphus) Use Roar Fundamental Frequency (F0) to Assess Rivals?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maxime; Charlton, Benjamin D.; Wyman, Megan T.; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Reby, David

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that in humans, male voices are disproportionately lower pitched than female voices, and recent studies suggest that this dimorphism in fundamental frequency (F0) results from both intrasexual (male competition) and intersexual (female mate choice) selection for lower pitched voices in men. However, comparative investigations indicate that sexual dimorphism in F0 is not universal in terrestrial mammals. In the highly polygynous and sexually dimorphic Scottish red deer Cervus elaphus scoticus, more successful males give sexually-selected calls (roars) with higher minimum F0s, suggesting that high, rather than low F0s advertise quality in this subspecies. While playback experiments demonstrated that oestrous females prefer higher pitched roars, the potential role of roar F0 in male competition remains untested. Here we examined the response of rutting red deer stags to playbacks of re-synthesized male roars with different median F0s. Our results show that stags’ responses (latencies and durations of attention, vocal and approach responses) were not affected by the F0 of the roar. This suggests that intrasexual selection is unlikely to strongly influence the evolution of roar F0 in Scottish red deer stags, and illustrates how the F0 of terrestrial mammal vocal sexual signals may be subject to different selection pressures across species. Further investigations on species characterized by different F0 profiles are needed to provide a comparative background for evolutionary interpretations of sex differences in mammalian vocalizations. PMID:24386312

  6. Searches for B meson decays to phiphi, phirho, phif_{0}(980), and f_{0}(980)f_{0}(980) final states.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Zhang, L; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Li, X; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Esteve, L; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Gabareen, A M; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2008-11-14

    We present the results of searches for B decays to charmless final states involving varphi, f_{0}(980), and charged or neutral rho mesons. The data sample corresponds to 384x10;{6} BB[over ] pairs collected with the BABAR detector operating at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e;{+}e;{-} collider at SLAC. We find no significant signals and determine the following 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fractions, including systematic uncertainties: B(B;{0}-->varphivarphi)<2.0x10;{-7}, B(B;{+}-->varphirho;{+})<30x10;{-7}, B(B;{0}-->varphirho;{0})<3.3x10;{-7}, B[B;{0}-->varphif_{0}(980)]xB[f_{0}(980)-->pi;{+}pi;{-}]<3.8x10;{-7}, and B[B;{0}-->f_{0}(980)f_{0}(980)]xB[f_{0}(980)-->pi;{+}pi;{-}]xB[f_{0}(980)-->K;{+}K;{-}]<2.3x10;{-7}.

  7. Effects of hearing aid amplification on voice F0 variability in speakers with prelingual hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guo-She; Liu, Chialin; Lee, Shao-Hsuan

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the audio-vocal feedback responses of (F0) to hearing amplification in severe-to-profound prelingual hearing loss (SPHL) using power spectral analysis of F0 contour of sustained vowels. Sustained phonations of vowel/a/of seventeen participants with SPHL were acquired with and without hearing-aid amplifications. The vocal intensity was visually fed back to the participants to help controlling the vocal intensity at 65-75 dBA and 85-95 dBA. The F0 contour of the phonations was extracted and submitted to spectral analysis to measure the extent of F0 fluctuations at different frequency ranges. The results showed that both high vocal intensity and hearing-aid amplification significantly improved voice F0 control by reducing the low-frequency fluctuations (low-frequency power, LFP, 0.2-3 Hz) in F0 spectrum. However, the enhanced feedback from higher vocal intensity and/or hearing amplification was not adequate to reduce the LFP to the level of a normal hearing person. Moreover, we found significant and negative correlations between LFP and supra-threshold feedback intensity (phonation intensity - hearing threshold level) for the frequencies of 500-2000 Hz. Increased vocal intensity, as well as hearing-aid amplification, improved voice F0 control by reducing the LFP of F0 spectrum, and the subtle changes in voices could be well explored using spectral analysis of F0.

  8. Intrinsic F0 in tense and lax vowels with special reference to German.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Jørgensen, E

    1990-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to show that the observation which is the starting point for almost all attempts at explaining intrinsic fundamental frequency (intrinsic F0) in vowels, i.e. that it is correlated with vowel height (interpreted as tongue height), does not hold if short lax vowels are included, since they have a considerably lower tongue height but practically the same F0 as their corresponding tense counterparts. Section 1 contains a discussion of some explanations of intrinsic F0 and vowel height and a short exposition of its connection with other vowel features. Section 2 gives a survey of the properties of tense and lax vowels based on data from the phonetic literature. Section 3 reports on an investigation of German tense and lax front unrounded vowels, including duration, tongue height, jaw opening, vertical lip opening, formant frequencies, and F0. Section 4 contains a discussion of various possible explanations of the results.

  9. Perception of pitch location within a speaker's F0 range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorof, Douglas N.; Whalen, D. H.

    2005-04-01

    Fundamental frequency (F0) is used for many purposes in speech, but its linguistic significance is based on its relation to the speaker's range, not its absolute value. While it may be that listeners can gauge a specific pitch relative to a speaker's range by recognizing it from experience, whether they can do the same for an unfamiliar voice is an open question. The present experiment explored that question. Twenty native speakers of English (10 male, 10 female) produced the vowel /opena/ with a spoken (not sung) voice quality at varying pitches within their own ranges. Listeners then judged, without familiarization or context, where each isolated F0 lay within each speaker's range. Correlations were high both for the entire range (0.721) and for the range minus the extremes (0.609). Correlations were somewhat higher when the F0s were related to the range of all the speakers, either separated by sex (0.830) or pooled (0.848), but several factors discussed here may help account for this pattern. Regardless, the present data provide strong support for the hypothesis that listeners are able to locate an F0 reliably within a range without external context or prior exposure to a speaker's voice. .

  10. Reaction time of voluntary modulations in voice F0 during sustained pitch vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Jay J.; Larson, Charles R.; Eckstein, Kathryn C.

    2002-05-01

    In an attempt to more clearly understand the neural control of voice, a reaction time study was designed to investigate how rapidly normal subjects, i.e., nontrained singers, can voluntarily increase or decrease their voice fundamental frequency (F0) during sustained vocalizations when cued with a 1000-Hz auditory tone stimulus. Results revealed that overall reaction times (RTs) (F=21.9, df=2, 150, p=0.01) for upward F0 modulations occurred faster (range: 138-176 ms) than downward responses (range: 196-234 ms). In contrast to the reaction time findings, slightly higher peak velocities were observed for downward responses compared to upward responses. Shorter RTs observed for F0 elevation are therefore possibly related to central mechanisms involved in the planning of or execution of the direction in which F0 is to be modulated instead of muscle biomechanics. The fastest RTs obtained from the present study (138 ms) are slightly longer than the reflex latencies of the initial pitch-shift reflex response (100-130 ms) [Burnett, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103 (1998)], and provide additional evidence that subjects normally respond to inadvertent changes in their voice F0 with a fast, but limited reflex, followed by a secondary voluntary response. [Research supported by NIH Grant No. DC07264.

  11. Deltapsi and DeltapH are equivalent driving forces for proton transport through isolated F(0) complexes of ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Alexander; Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2008-10-01

    The membrane-embedded F(0) part of ATP synthases is responsible for ion translocation during ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. Here, we describe an in vitro system for measuring proton fluxes through F(0) complexes by fluorescence changes of the entrapped fluorophore pyranine. Starting from purified enzyme, the F(0) part was incorporated unidirectionally into phospholipid vesicles. This allowed analysis of proton transport in either synthesis or hydrolysis direction with Deltapsi or DeltapH as driving forces. The system displayed a high signal-to-noise ratio and can be accurately quantified. In contrast to ATP synthesis in the Escherichia coli F(1)F(0) holoenzyme, no significant difference was observed in the efficiency of DeltapH or Deltapsi as driving forces for H(+)-transport through F(0). Transport rates showed linear dependency on the driving force. Proton transport in hydrolysis direction was about 2400 H(+)/(s x F(0)) at Deltapsi of 120 mV, which is approximately twice as fast as in synthesis direction. The chloroplast enzyme was faster and catalyzed H(+)-transport at initial rates of 6300 H(+)/(s x F(0)) under similar conditions. The new method is an ideal tool for detailed kinetic investigations of the ion transport mechanism of ATP synthases from various organisms.

  12. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a science activity in which the student investigates methods of calibration of a simple conductivity meter via a hands-on inquiry technique. Conductivity is mathematically compared to salinity using a point slope formula and graphical techniques. Sample solutions of unknown salinity are provided so that the students can sharpen their…

  13. Development and Perceptual Evaluation of Amplitude-Based F0 Control in Electrolarynx Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saikachi, Yoko; Stevens, Kenneth N.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Current electrolarynx (EL) devices produce a mechanical speech quality that has been largely attributed to the lack of natural fundamental frequency (F0) variation. In order to improve the quality of EL speech, in the present study the authors aimed to develop and evaluate an automatic F0 control scheme, in which F0 was modulated based on…

  14. Search for the decay of a charged B meson to a charged rho meson and a f0(980) meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Zafar

    A search for the decay of B+ meson to rho +f0(980) is presented, using a sample of approximately 465 +/- 5 million BB¯ events (423.5 fb-1 of data) collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e+ e- collider at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The following upper limit for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level is obtained: B (B+ → rho+ f0) x B (f0 → pipi) < 1.2 x 10 -6, representing an improvement compared to the previous result.

  15. Antimelanogenic, Antioxidant and Antiproliferative Effects of Antrodia camphorata Fruiting Bodies on B16-F0 Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jyh-Jye; Wu, Chih-Chung; Lee, Chun-Lin; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Chen, Jin-Bor; Lee, Chu-I

    2017-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a fungus that is endemic to Taiwan, and its fruiting body has been used as a folk medicine for the prevention or treatment of diverse diseases. The present study is aimed at investigating the antimelanogenesis and antioxidation effect of the ethanolic extract of Antrodia camphorata fruiting body (EE-AC), as well as its antiproliferation effects in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Regarding antimelanogenic effects, EE-AC had effective cupric ions reducing capacity and expressed more potent inhibitory effect than kojic acid on mushroom tyrosinase activity. Moreover, EE-AC significantly inhibited cellular tyrosinase activity and the melanin content in B16-F0 cells at 12.5 μg/mL concentration without cell toxicities. Regarding antioxidant effects, EE-AC exhibited potent DPPH radical- and SOD-like-scavenging activities. Regarding antiproliferative effects, EE-AC exhibited a selective cytotoxic effect and markedly inhibited the migration ability of B16-F0 cells. EE-AC increased the population of B16-F0 cells at sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle. EE-AC also caused the increase of early apoptotic cells and chromatin condensation, which indicated the apoptotic effects in B16-F0 cells. We demonstrated that EE-AC possessed antimelanogenic, antioxidant and anti-skin cancer actions. The results would contribute to the development and application of cosmetics, healthy food and pharmaceuticals. PMID:28125738

  16. Antimelanogenic, Antioxidant and Antiproliferative Effects of Antrodia camphorata Fruiting Bodies on B16-F0 Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jyh-Jye; Wu, Chih-Chung; Lee, Chun-Lin; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Chen, Jin-Bor; Lee, Chu-I

    2017-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a fungus that is endemic to Taiwan, and its fruiting body has been used as a folk medicine for the prevention or treatment of diverse diseases. The present study is aimed at investigating the antimelanogenesis and antioxidation effect of the ethanolic extract of Antrodia camphorata fruiting body (EE-AC), as well as its antiproliferation effects in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Regarding antimelanogenic effects, EE-AC had effective cupric ions reducing capacity and expressed more potent inhibitory effect than kojic acid on mushroom tyrosinase activity. Moreover, EE-AC significantly inhibited cellular tyrosinase activity and the melanin content in B16-F0 cells at 12.5 μg/mL concentration without cell toxicities. Regarding antioxidant effects, EE-AC exhibited potent DPPH radical- and SOD-like-scavenging activities. Regarding antiproliferative effects, EE-AC exhibited a selective cytotoxic effect and markedly inhibited the migration ability of B16-F0 cells. EE-AC increased the population of B16-F0 cells at sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle. EE-AC also caused the increase of early apoptotic cells and chromatin condensation, which indicated the apoptotic effects in B16-F0 cells. We demonstrated that EE-AC possessed antimelanogenic, antioxidant and anti-skin cancer actions. The results would contribute to the development and application of cosmetics, healthy food and pharmaceuticals.

  17. F0 discrimination interference: Effects of resolved tone complexes and noise on fundamental frequency discrimination of unresolved complex tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gockel, Hedwig; Carlyon, Robert P.; Plack, Christopher J.

    2003-04-01

    F0 discrimination of a 400-ms complex tone with only unresolved components (``target'') was investigated in the absence and presence of a synchronously gated resolved complex tone (``interferer''). The target and the interferer were bandpass filtered from 1375-15000 Hz and 125-625 Hz, respectively. In a 2I-2AFC task, listeners indicated the interval containing the target with the higher pitch. The nominal F0 of the target was 88 Hz; that of the interferer was constant across the two intervals and was either 88 Hz or increased by various amounts. Although the target and interferer were in well-separated frequency regions, performance (percent correct) dropped by about 16% when the interferer's F0 was 88 Hz. The impairment was halved when the interferer's F0 was 10% higher than that of the target, and almost eliminated when it was 30% higher. Increasing the level of a 1375-Hz low-pass-filtered noise, gated synchronously with the target and the interferer (F0 equaled 88 Hz), improved performance, further demonstrating that the deterioration produced by the resolved complex was not due to peripheral masking. The results are consistent with a form of across-frequency interference at the level of pitch perception. [Work supported by EPSRC Grant GR/R65794/01.

  18. f_0(500), f_0(980), and a_0(980) production in the χ _{c1} → η π ^+π ^- reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei-Hong; Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, Eulogio

    2016-12-01

    We study the χ _{c1} → η π ^+ π ^- decay, paying attention to the production of f_0(500), f_0(980), and a_0(980) from the final state interaction of pairs of mesons that can lead to these three mesons in the final state, which is implemented using the chiral unitary approach. Very clean and strong signals are obtained for the a_0(980) excitation in the η π invariant mass distribution and for the f_0(500) in the π ^+ π ^- mass distribution. A smaller, but also clear signal for the f_0(980) excitation is obtained. The results are contrasted with experimental data and the agreement found is good, providing yet one more test in support of the picture where these resonances are dynamically generated from the meson-meson interaction.

  19. Superconductivity in a new layered bismuth oxyselenide: LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe₂.

    PubMed

    Krzton-Maziopa, A; Guguchia, Z; Pomjakushina, E; Pomjakushin, V; Khasanov, R; Luetkens, H; Biswas, P K; Amato, A; Keller, H; Conder, K

    2014-05-28

    We report superconductivity at T(c) ≈ 2.6 K in a new layered bismuth oxyselenide LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe2 with the ZrCuSiAs-type structure composed of alternating superconducting BiSe2 and blocking LaO layers. The superconducting properties of LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe2 were investigated by means of dc magnetization, resistivity and muon-spin rotation experiments, revealing the appearance of bulk superconductivity with a rather large superconducting volume fraction of ≈ 70% at 1.8 K.

  20. Investigation of lead(II) uptake by Bacillus thuringiensis 016.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Pan, Xiaohong; Chen, Hui; Lin, Zhang; Guan, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the lead(II) biosorption mechanism of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) 016 through batch and microscopic experiments. We found that the maximum lead(II) biosorption capacity of Bt 016 was 164.77 mg/g (dry weight). The pH value could affect the biosorption of lead(II) in a large extent. Fourier transform infrared analyses and selective passivation experiments suggested that the carboxyl, amide and phosphate functional groups of Bt 016 played an important role in lead(II) biosorption. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that noticeable lead(II) precipitates were accumulated on bacterial surfaces. Further transmission electron microscopy thin section analysis coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as well as selected area electron diffraction indicated that lead(II) immobilized on the bacteria could be transformated into random-shaped crystalline lead-containing minerals eventually. This work provided a new insight into lead(II) uptake of Bt, highlighting the potential of Bt in the restoration of lead(II) contaminated repositories.

  1. Coupling of proton flow to ATP synthesis in Rhodobacter capsulatus: F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase is absent from about half of chromatophores.

    PubMed

    Feniouk, B A; Cherepanov, D A; Junge, W; Mulkidjanian, A Y

    2001-11-01

    F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase (H(+)-ATP synthase, F(0)F(1)) utilizes the transmembrane protonmotive force to catalyze the formation of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate (P(i)). Structurally the enzyme consists of a membrane-embedded proton-translocating F(0) portion and a protruding hydrophilic F(1) part that catalyzes the synthesis of ATP. In photosynthetic purple bacteria a single turnover of the photosynthetic reaction centers (driven by a short saturating flash of light) generates protonmotive force that is sufficiently large to drive ATP synthesis. Using isolated chromatophore vesicles of Rhodobacter capsulatus, we monitored the flash induced ATP synthesis (by chemoluminescence of luciferin/luciferase) in parallel to the transmembrane charge transfer through F(0)F(1) (by following the decay of electrochromic bandshifts of intrinsic carotenoids). With the help of specific inhibitors of F(1) (efrapeptin) and of F(0) (venturicidin), we decomposed the kinetics of the total proton flow through F(0)F(1) into (i) those coupled to the ATP synthesis and (ii) the de-coupled proton escape through F(0). Taking the coupled proton flow, we calculated the H(+)/ATP ratio; it was found to be 3.3+/-0.6 at a large driving force (after one saturating flash of light) but to increase up to 5.1+/-0.9 at a smaller driving force (after a half-saturating flash). From the results obtained, we conclude that our routine chromatophore preparations contained three subsets of chromatophore vesicles. Chromatophores with coupled F(0)F(1) dominated in fresh material. Freezing/thawing or pre-illumination in the absence of ADP and P(i) led to an increase in the fraction of chromatophores with at least one de-coupled F(0)(F(1)). The disclosed fraction of chromatophores that lacked proton-conducting F(0)(F(1)) (approx. 40% of the total amount) remained constant upon these treatments.

  2. Accent detection is a slippery slope: Direction and rate of F0 change drives listeners’ comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Angela M.; Watson, Duane G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study tests whether listeners use F0, duration, or some combination of the two to identify the presence of an accented word in a short discourse. Participants’ eye movements to previously mentioned and new objects were monitored as participants listened to instructions to move objects in a display. The name of the target object on critical trials was resynthesized from naturally-produced utterances so that it had either high or low F0 and either long or short duration. Fixations to the new object were highest when there was a steep rise in F0. Fixations to the previously mentioned object were highest when there was a steep drop in F0. These results suggest that listeners use F0 slope to make decisions about the presence of an accent, and that F0 and duration by themselves do not solely determine accent interpretation. PMID:22096265

  3. Scalar meson f0(980) in heavy-meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bennich, B.; Leitner, O.; Dedonder, J.-P.; Loiseau, B.

    2009-04-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the scalar meson f0(980) is performed that relies on the quasi-two-body decays D and Ds→f0(980)P, with P=π, K. The two-body branching ratios are deduced from experimental data on D or Ds→πππ, Kmacr Kπ and from the f0(980)→π+π- and f0(980)→K+K- branching fractions. Within a covariant quark model, the scalar form factors for the transitions D and Ds→f0(980) are computed. The weak D decay amplitudes, in which these form factors enter, are obtained in the naive factorization approach assuming a q qmacr state for the scalar and pseudoscalar mesons. They allow to extract information on the f0(980) wave function in terms of u umacr , d dmacr , and s smacr pairs as well as on the mixing angle between the strange and nonstrange components. The weak transition form factors are modeled by the one-loop triangular diagram using two different relativistic approaches: covariant light-front dynamics and dispersion relations. We use the information found on the f0(980) structure to evaluate the scalar and vector form factors in the transitions D and Ds→f0(980), as well as to make predictions for B and Bs→f0(980), for the entire kinematically allowed momentum range of q2.

  4. INSPEC SDI Investigation, 1967-1969. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clague, P.

    Volume II of this five volume investigation of the INSPEC SDI system contains discussions of the following topics: (1) Composition of user and control groups and the information use habits of users and controls, (2) thesaurus development and document indexing, (3) problems of printing notification cards and assessing numbers required for each…

  5. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-0 - Outline of regulation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Outline of regulation provisions. 1.904(f)-0 Section 1.904(f)-0 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED... which gain would not otherwise be recognized. (i) Recognition of gain to the extent of the...

  6. Perception of Mandarin Lexical Tones when F0 Information Is Neutralized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Siyun; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2004-01-01

    In tone languages, the identity of a word depends on its tone pattern as well as its phonetic structure. The primary cue to tone identity is the fundamental frequency (F0) contour. Two experiments explore how listeners perceive Mandarin monosyllables in which all or part of the F0 information has been neutralized. In Experiment 1, supposedly…

  7. Perception of relative location of F0 within the speaking range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorof, Douglas N.; Whalen, D. H.

    2003-10-01

    It has been argued that intrinsic fundamental frequency (IF0) is an automatic consequence of vowel production [Whalen et al., J. Phon. 27, 125-142 (1999)], yet speakers do not adjust F0 so as to overcome IF0. It may be that so adjusting F0 would distort information about F0 range-information important to the interpretation of F0. Therefore, a speech production/perception experiment was designed to determine whether listeners can perceive position within a speaker-specific F0 range on the basis of isolated tokens. Ten male and ten female adult native speakers of US English were recorded speaking (not singing) the vowel /a/ on eight different pitches spaced throughout speaker-specific ranges. Recordings were randomized across speakers. Naive listeners made pitch-magnitude estimates of the location of F0 relative to each speaker's range. Preliminary results show correlations between estimated and actual location within the range. Adjusting F0 to compensate for IF0 differences between vowels would seem to obscure voice quality in such a way as to make it difficult for the listener to recover relative F0, requiring a greater perceptual adjustment than simply normalizing for IF0. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. DC02717.

  8. Use of B→J/ψ f0 decays to discern the qq or tetraquark nature of scalar mesons.

    PubMed

    Stone, Sheldon; Zhang, Liming

    2013-08-09

    We consider the relative decay rates of B(0) and Bs(0) mesons into a J/ψ plus a light scalar meson, either the f0(500) (σ) or the f0(980). We show that it is possible to distinguish between the quark content of the scalars being quark-antiquark or tetraquark by measuring specific ratios of decay rates. Using current data we determine the ratio of form factors in Bs(0)→J/ψf0(980) with respect to B(0)→J/ψf0(500) decays to be 0.99(-0.04)(+0.13) at a four-momentum transfer squared equal to the mass of the J/ψ meson squared. In the case where these light mesons are considered to be quark-antiquark states, we give a determination of the mixing angle between strange and light quark states of less than 29° at 90% confidence level. We also discuss the use of a similar ratio to investigate the structure of other isospin singlet states.

  9. Comparison of Tevatron C0 and F0 Lambertson beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    James L Crisp and Brian Fellenz

    2003-04-11

    Both the longitudinal and transverse beam impedance measurements for the Tevatron C0 and F0 lambertsons are presented. The C0 lambertsons were designed for circulating beam to travel through the 1 inch high by 6 inch wide field region. In the F0 lambertsons, circulating beam passes through the 2.5 inch high by 4 in ch wide field free region. The more recently designed F0 lambertsons have significantly less impedance than the older C0 lambertsons. Transverse impedance scales as one over the diameter of the aperture cubed. The three C0 style lambertsons were recently removed from the Tevatron. Four of the F0 lambertsons remain. Nine of the F0 style lambertsons are in the Main Injector and three more are required for Numi.

  10. Neural-network simulation of tonal categorization based on F0 velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Bruno; Shi, Rushen; Xu, Yi; Proulx, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Perception studies have shown that by the age of six months, infants show particular response patterns to tones in their native language. The present study focuses on how infants might develop lexical tones in Man- darin. F0 is generally considered the main cue in tone perception. However, F0 patterns in connected speech display extensive contextual variability. Since speech input to infants consists mainly of multi-word utterances, tone learning must involve processes that can effectively resolve variability. In this study we explore the Target Approximation model (Xu and Wang, 2001) which characterizes surface F0 as asymptotic movements toward underlying pitch targets defined as simple linear functions. The model predicts that it is possible to infer underlying pitch targets from the manners of F0 movements. Using production data of three of the speakers from Xu (1997), we trained a self-organizing neural network with both F0 profiles and F0 velocity profiles as input. In the testing phase, velocity profiles yielded far superior categorization than F0 profiles. The results confirm that velocity profiles can effectively abstract away from surface variability and directly reflect underlying articulatory goals. The finding thus points to one way through which infants can successfully derive at phonetic categories from adult speech.

  11. The archaeal cofactor F0 is a light-harvesting antenna chromophore in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Glas, Andreas F; Maul, Melanie J; Cryle, Max; Barends, Thomas R M; Schneider, Sabine; Kaya, Emine; Schlichting, Ilme; Carell, Thomas

    2009-07-14

    Archae possess unique biochemical systems quite distinct from the pathways present in eukaryotes and eubacteria. 7,8-Dimethyl-8-hydroxy-5deazaflavin (F(0)) and F(420) are unique deazaflavin-containing coenzyme and methanogenic signature molecules, essential for a variety of biochemical transformations associated with methane biosynthesis and light-dependent DNA repair. The deazaflavin cofactor system functions during methane biosynthesis as a low-potential hydrid shuttle F(420)/F(420)H(2). In DNA photolyase repair proteins, the deazaflavin cofactor is in the deprotonated state active as a light-collecting energy transfer pigment. As such, it converts blue sunlight into energy used by the proteins to drive an essential repair process. Analysis of a eukaryotic (6-4) DNA photolyase from Drosophila melanogaster revealed a binding pocket, which tightly binds F(0). Residues in the pocket activate the cofactor by deprotonation so that light absorption and energy transfer are switched on. The crystal structure of F(0) in complex with the D. melanogaster protein shows the atomic details of F(0) binding and activation, allowing characterization of the residues involved in F(0) activation. The results show that the F(0)/F(420) coenzyme system, so far believed to be strictly limited to the archael kingdom of life, is far more widespread than anticipated. Analysis of a D. melanogaster extract and of a DNA photolyase from the primitive eukaryote Ostreococcus tauri provided direct proof for the presence of the F(0) cofactor also in higher eukaryotes.

  12. Predictions for ηc → ηπ+π- producing f0(500), f0(980) and a0(980)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debastiani, V. R.; Liang, Wei-Hong; Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, E.

    2017-03-01

    We perform calculations for the ηc → ηπ+π- decay using elements of SU(3) symmetry to see the weight of different trios of pseudoscalars produced in this decay, prior to the final state interaction of the mesons. After that, the interaction of pairs of mesons, leading finally to ηπ+π-, is done using the chiral unitary approach. We evaluate the π+π- and πη mass distributions and find large and clear signals for f0 (500), f0 (980) and a0 (980) excitation. The reaction is similar to the χc1 → ηπ+π-, which has been recently measured at BESIII and its implementation and comparison with these predictions will be very valuable to shed light on the nature of the low mass scalar mesons.

  13. No indication of f0(1370) in ππ phase shift analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The scalar meson f0(1370)—indicated in particular in the low energy pp¯→3 body reactions—is a crucial element in certain schemes of the scalar meson spectroscopy including glueballs. The most definitive results can be obtained from elastic and inelastic ππ phase shift analyses using the constraints from unitarity where the discrete ambiguities can be identified and resolved. We reconsider the phase shift analyses for π+π-→π+π-, π0π0, KK¯, ηη. While a clear resonance signal for f0(1500) in the resp. Argand diagrams is seen in all channels above a large "background" from f0(600) there is no clear signal of a second resonance "f0(1370)" in this mass range in any reaction, at the level of ˜10% branching ratio into ππ.

  14. A study of the γ ^*-f0(980) transition form factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, P.

    2017-02-01

    The γ ^*-f0(980) transition form factors are calculated within the QCD factorization framework. The f_0-meson is assumed to be mainly generated through its sbar{s} Fock component. The corresponding spin wave function of the f0(980) meson is constructed and, combined with a model light-cone wave function for this Fock component, used in the calculation of the form factors. In the real-photon limit the results for the transverse form factor are compared to the large momentum-transfer data measured by the BELLE collaboration recently. It turns out that, for the momentum-transfer range explored by BELLE, the collinear approximation does not suffice, power corrections to it, modeled as quark transverse moment effects, seem to be needed. Mixing of the f_0 with the σ (500) is also briefly discussed.

  15. Precise determination of the f0(500) and f0(980) parameters in dispersive analysis of the ππ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Robert; Garcia-Martin, R.; Pelaez, J. R.; Ruiz de Elvira, J.

    2013-01-01

    Use of the new and precise dispersive equations with imposed crossing symmetry condition to solve the long-standing puzzle in the parameters of the f0(500), as well as the f0(980) is presented. This puzzle is finally being settled thanks to analyzes carried out during the last years [J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D86, (2012) 010001]. In this report we show how our very recent dispersive data analysis allowed for a precise and model independent determination of the amplitudes for the S, P, D and F waves [R. Garcia-Martin, R. Kaminski, J. R. Pelaez, J. Ruiz de Elvira and F.J. Yndurain, Phys. Rev. D83, (2011) 074004; R. Garcia-Martin, R. Kamiński, J.R. Pelaez and J. Ruiz de Elvira, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, (2011) 072001; R. Kamiński, Phys. Rev. D83, (2011) 076008]. Especially we present that the analytic continuation of once subtracted dispersion relations for the S 0 wave to the complex energy plane leads to very precise results for the f0(500) pole: √{s}=457-13+14-i279-7+11 MeV and for the f0(980) pole: √{s}=996±7-i25-6+10 MeV. We also mention on first (or one of the first) practical application of presented dispersion relations in refitting and in significant improving of the ππ S-wave amplitudes below 1000 MeV.

  16. Isospin breaking and f0(980)-a0(980) mixing in the η(1405) → π0f0(980) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceti, F.; Liang, W. H.; Oset, E.; Wu, J. J.; Zou, B. S.

    2014-06-01

    We make a theoretical study of the η(1405) → π0f0(980) and η(1405) → π0a0(980) reactions to determine the isospin violation and the mixing of the f0(980) and a0(980) resonances. We make use of the chiral unitary approach where these two resonances appear as dynamically generated by the meson-meson interaction provided by chiral Lagrangians. We obtain a very narrow shape for the f0(980) production in agreement with a BES experiment. As to the amount of isospin violation, assuming constant vertices for the primary η(1405) → π0KK̅ and η(1405) → π0π0η production, we find results which are much smaller than found in the experimental BES paper. The problem is solved by using the primary production driven by η' → K*K̅ followed by K∗→ Kπ. Thus, we can predict absolute values for the ratio Γ(π0,π+π-)/Γ(π0,π0η) which are in fair agreement with experiment.

  17. Anisotropy in SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, A.; Nayak, P.

    2013-06-01

    The high temperature superconductors in the mixed state rounding superconducting transition temperature have been explained by using anisotropic London theory as well as GL-equation. Due to strong overlapping of vortices at higher fields the super electron density varies in space and London theory fails to explain. For lower critical field with in London limit and temperature close to transition, GL-approach with phenomenological mass tensor can be approximated for studying mixed state behavior. Expressing bare penetration depth λ into effective penetration depth λeff such as λeff2=λ2/f2 = λ2/1-b;f = 1-b and b = ba/Bc2, the high field behavior can be observed using 3D-anisotropic London theory by incorporating vortex overlapping. FeAs superconductors have distinguishing macroscopic properties such as an enormous upper critical field with low superconducting anisotropy and that leads the investigation of topology in the microscopic length scale. Particularly, the variation of specific heat as well as entropy in SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 has been verified by the GL-theory in London limit with vortex overlapping correction and found satisfactory result with the experimental findings.

  18. Contrast harmonic detection with chirp excitation in 3f0 transmit phasing.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Wang, Hong-Wei; Chiu, Yi-Yuan

    2008-10-01

    The method of third harmonic (3f0 transmit phasing is capable of providing effective tissue background suppression for contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) improvement in harmonic imaging. With the additional 3f0 transmit signal to generate both the frequency-sum and the frequency-difference components of harmonic signal, the tissue suppression is achieved when the two components are opposite in phase and mutually cancel out. One major problem in 3f0 transmit phasing is the limited signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) due to the constraint on transmit amplitude. Chirp excitation can be applied in contrast harmonic imaging to enhance the SNR with minimal destruction of the microbubbles. In this paper, the effect of chirp waveform in combination with the 3f0 transmit phasing was studied using both in-vitro experiments and simulations. Our results indicate that, though the chirp transmit pulse can increase the SNR of harmonic imaging in 3f0 transmit phasing (3 dB, p < 0.001), it suffers from degraded tissue harmonic suppression and thus provides less CTR improvement as compared to a conventional pulse. The spectral mismatch between the frequency-sum and the frequency-difference components of tissue harmonic signal is particularly evident in the off-center region of second harmonic band, leading to significant residue tissue background. Consequently, with the chirp waveform, the improvement of CTR decreases from 9.5 dB to 5.9 dB (p < 0.0006) and thus a tradeoff exists between the SNR improvement and the CTR improvement in 3f0 transmit phasing.

  19. Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum Powder: Part II. Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2009-12-01

    The optimal processing parameters that are required to atomize amorphous Al were established on the basis of numerical simulations in part I of this study. In this part II, the characterization of cooling rate experienced by gas-atomized, Al-based amorphous powders was studied via experiments. An experimental investigation was implemented to validate the numerical predictions reported in part I of this study. The cooling rate experienced by the powders, for example, was experimentally determined on the basis of dendrite arm spacing correlations, and the results were compared with the numerical predictions. The experimental studies were completed using commercial Al 2024 as a baseline material and Al90Gd7Ni2Fe1 metallic glass (MG). The results showed that the cooling rate of droplets increases with decreasing particle size, with an increasing proportion of helium in the atomization gas and with increasing melt superheat. The experimental results reported in this article suggest good agreement between experiments and numerical simulations.

  20. First measurement of direct $f_0(980)$ photoproduction on the proton

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglieri, Marco; De Vita, Raffaella; Szczepaniak, Adam

    2009-03-01

    We report on the results of the first measurement of exclusive $f_0(980)$ meson photoproduction on protons for $E_\\gamma=3.0 - 3.8$ GeV and $-t = 0.4-1.0$ GeV$^2$. Data were collected with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The resonance was detected via its decay in the $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ channel by performing a partial wave analysis of the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. Clear evidence of the $f_0(980)$ meson was found in the interference between $P$ and $S$ waves at $M_{\\pi^+ \\pi^-}\\sim 1$ GeV. The $S$-wave differential cross section integrated in the mass range of the $f_0(980)$ was found to be a factor of 50 smaller than the cross section for the $\\rho$ meson. This is the first time the $f_0(980)$ meson has been measured in a photoproduction experiment.

  1. The Scalar Resonances a0/f0(980) at COSY

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, M.

    2006-02-11

    Fundamental properties of the scalar resonances a0/f0(980), like their masses, widths and couplings to KK-bar, are poorly known. In particular, precise knowledge of the latter quantity would be of great importance since it can be related to the KK-bar content of these resonances.An experimental program is under way at COSY-Juelich aiming at the extraction of the isospin violating a0/f0 mixing amplitude {lambda} which is in leading order proportional to the product of the coupling constants of the a0 and f0 to kaons. a0/f0 production is studied in pp, pn and dd interactions, both for the KK-bar and the {pi}{eta}/{pi}{pi} decays, using the ANKE and WASA spectrometers. The latter will be available for measurements at COSY in 2007.As a first step, isovector KK-bar production has been measured in the reaction pp {yields} dK+K-bar0. The data reveal dominance of the a{sub 0}{sup +} channel, thus demonstrating the feasibility of scalar meson studies at COSY. Analyses of KK-bar- and K-bard-FSI effects yield the corresponding scattering lengths, a(KK-bar)I=1 = -(0.02 {+-} 0.03) - i(0.61 {+-} 0.05) fm and vertical bar Re a(K-bard) vertical bar {<=}1.3 fm, Im a(K-bard){<=}1.3 fm.

  2. Cloning, sequence analysis and expression of the F1F0-ATPase beta-subunit from wine lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Martin; Uermösi, Christina; Fehlmann, Marc; Krieger, Sibylle

    2003-09-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the genes encoding the F1F0-ATPase beta-subunit from Oenococcus oeni, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides, Pediococcus damnosus, Pediococcus parvulus, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus hilgardii were determined. Their deduced amino acid sequences showed homology values of 79-98%. Data from the alignment and ATPase tree indicated that O. oeni and L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides formed a group well-separated from P. damnosus and P. parvulus and from the group comprises L. brevis and L. hilgardii. The N-terminus of the F1F0-ATPase beta-subunit of O. oeni contains a stretch of additional 38 amino acid residues. The catalytic site of the ATPase beta-subunit of the investigated strains is characterized by the two conserved motifs GGAGVGKT and GERTRE. The amplified atpD coding sequences were inserted into the pCRT7/CT-TOPO vector using TA-cloning strategy and transformed in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses confirmed that O. oeni has an ATPase beta-subunit protein which is larger in size than the corresponding molecules from the investigated strains.

  3. Logarithmic temporal axis manipulation and its application for measuring auditory contributions in F0 control using a transformed auditory feedback procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanaga, Ryuichiro; Kawahara, Hideki

    2003-10-01

    A new parameter extraction procedure based on logarithmic transformation of the temporal axis was applied to investigate auditory effects on voice F0 control to overcome artifacts due to natural fluctuations and nonlinearities in speech production mechanisms. The proposed method may add complementary information to recent findings reported by using frequency shift feedback method [Burnett and Larson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112 (2002)], in terms of dynamic aspects of F0 control. In a series of experiments, dependencies of system parameters in F0 control on subjects, F0 and style (musical expressions and speaking) were tested using six participants. They were three male and three female students specialized in musical education. They were asked to sustain a Japanese vowel /a/ for about 10 s repeatedly up to 2 min in total while hearing F0 modulated feedback speech, that was modulated using an M-sequence. The results replicated qualitatively the previous finding [Kawahara and Williams, Vocal Fold Physiology, (1995)] and provided more accurate estimates. Relations with designing an artificial singer also will be discussed. [Work partly supported by the grant in aids in scientific research (B) 14380165 and Wakayama University.

  4. Non-ordinary nature of the f_0(500) resonance from its Regge trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Nebreda, J.; Londergan, J. Timothy; Pelaez, J. R.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2014-07-01

    We report our results on how to obtain the Regge trajectory of a resonance from its pole in a scattering process by imposing analytic constraints in the complex angular momentum plane. The method, suited for resonances that dominate an elastic scattering amplitude, has been applied to the {\\rho}(770) and the f_0(500) resonances. Whereas for the former we obtain a linear Regge trajectory, characteristic of ordinary quark-antiquark states, for the latter we find a non-linear trajectory with a much smaller slope at the resonance mass. Moreover, we show that if a linear trajectory with a slope of typical size is imposed for the f_0(500), the corresponding amplitude is at odds with the data. This provides a strong indication of the non-ordinary nature of the sigma meson.

  5. Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B-->rhoK* and B-->f0(980)K* decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-11-17

    We report searches for B-meson decays to the charmless final states rhoK* and f0(980)K* with a sample of 232x10(6) BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. We measure in units of 10(-6) the following branching fractions, where the first error quoted is statistical and the second systematic, or upper limits are given at the 90% confidence level: B(B+-->rho0K*+)<6.1, B(B+-->rho+K*0)=9.6+/-1.7+/-1.5, B(B0-->rho-K*+)<12.0, B(B0-->rho0K*0)=5.6+/-0.9+/-1.3, B(B+-->f0(980)K*+)=5.2+/-1.2+/-0.5, and B(B0-->f0(980)K*0)<4.3. For the significant modes, we also measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization and the charge asymmetry: fL(B+-->rho+K*0)=0.52+/-0.10+/-0.04, fL(B0-->rho0K*0)=0.57+/-0.09+/-0.08, ACP(B+-->rho+K*0)=-0.01+/-0.16+/-0.02, ACP(B0-->rho0K*0)=0.09+/-0.19+/-0.02, and ACP(B+-->f0(980)K*+)=-0.34+/-0.21+/-0.03.

  6. Simultaneous F 0-F 1 modifications of Arabic for the improvement of natural-sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ykhlef, F.; Bensebti, M.

    2013-03-01

    Pitch (F 0) modification is one of the most important problems in the area of speech synthesis. Several techniques have been developed in the literature to achieve this goal. The main restrictions of these techniques are in the modification range and the synthesised speech quality, intelligibility and naturalness. The control of formants in a spoken language can significantly improve the naturalness of the synthesised speech. This improvement is mainly dependent on the control of the first formant (F 1). Inspired by this observation, this article proposes a new approach that modifies both F 0 and F 1 of Arabic voiced sounds in order to improve the naturalness of the pitch shifted speech. The developed strategy takes a parallel processing approach, in which the analysis segments are decomposed into sub-bands in the wavelet domain, modified in the desired sub-band by using a resampling technique and reconstructed without affecting the remained sub-bands. Pitch marking and voicing detection are performed in the frequency decomposition step based on the comparison of the multi-level approximation and detail signals. The performance of the proposed technique is evaluated by listening tests and compared to the pitch synchronous overlap and add (PSOLA) technique in the third approximation level. Experimental results have shown that the manipulation in the wavelet domain of F 0 in conjunction with F 1 guarantees natural-sounding of the synthesised speech compared to the classical pitch modification technique. This improvement was appropriate for high pitch modifications.

  7. Robust F0 Estimation Using ELS-Based Robust Complex Speech Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Keiichi; Kinjo, Tatsuhiko

    Complex speech analysis for an analytic speech signal can accurately estimate the spectrum in low frequencies since the analytic signal provides spectrum only over positive frequencies. The remarkable feature makes it possible to realize more accurate F0 estimation using complex residual signal extracted by complex-valued speech analysis. We have already proposed F0 estimation using complex LPC residual, in which the autocorrelation function weighted by AMDF was adopted as the criterion. The method adopted MMSE-based complex LPC analysis and it has been reported that it can estimate more accurate F0 for IRS filtered speech corrupted by white Gauss noise although it can not work better for the IRS filtered speech corrupted by pink noise. In this paper, robust complex speech analysis based on ELS (Extended Least Square) method is introduced in order to overcome the drawback. The experimental results for additive white Gauss or pink noise demonstrate that the proposed algorithm based on robust ELS-based complex AR analysis can perform better than other methods.

  8. Functional asymmetry of the F(0) motor in bacterial ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Wiedenmann, Alexander; Dimroth, Peter; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2009-04-01

    F(1)F(0) ATP synthases use the electrochemical potential of H(+) or Na(+) across biological membranes to synthesize ATP by a rotary mechanism. In bacteria, the enzymes can act in reverse as ATP-driven ion pumps creating the indispensable membrane potential. Here, we demonstrate that the F(0) parts of a Na(+)- and H(+)-dependent enzyme display major asymmetries with respect to their mode of operation, reflected by the requirement of approximately 100 times higher Na(+) or H(+) concentrations for the synthesis compared with the hydrolysis of ATP. A similar asymmetry is observed during ion transport through isolated F(0) parts, indicating different affinities for the binding sites in the a/c interface. Together with further data, we propose a model that provides a rationale for a differential usage of membrane potential and ion gradient during ATP synthesis as observed experimentally. The functional asymmetry might also reflect an important property of the ATP synthesis mechanism in vivo. In Escherichia coli, we observed respiratory chain-driven ATP production at pH 7-8, while P-site pH values < 6.5 were required for ATP synthesis in vitro. This discrepancy is discussed with respect to the hypothesis that during respiration lateral proton diffusion could lead to significant acidification at the membrane surface.

  9. Sociological effects on vocal aging: Age related F0 effects in two languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Kyoko

    2005-04-01

    Listeners can estimate the age of a speaker fairly accurately from their speech (Ptacek and Sander, 1966). It is generally considered that this perception is based on physiologically determined aspects of the speech. However, the degree to which it is due to conventional sociolinguistic aspects of speech is unknown. The current study examines the degree to which fundamental frequency (F0) changes due to advanced aging across two language groups of speakers. It also examines the degree to which the speakers associate these changes with aging in a voice disguising task. Thirty native speakers each of English and Japanese, taken from three age groups, read a target phrase embedded in a carrier sentence in their native language. Each speaker also read the sentence pretending to be 20-years younger or 20-years older than their own age. Preliminary analysis of eighteen Japanese speakers indicates that the mean and maximum F0 values increase when the speakers pretended to be younger than when they pretended to be older. Some previous studies on age perception, however, suggested that F0 has minor effects on listeners' age estimation. The acoustic results will also be discussed in conjunction with the results of the listeners' age estimation of the speakers.

  10. Superconductivity phase diagram of Se-substituted CeO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu; Hiroi, Takafumi; Miura, Osuke

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effects of Se substitution on the lattice constants and superconducting properties of CeO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2. With increasing Se concentration, the a lattice constant increased, while the c lattice constant did not show any significant increase between x = 0.1 and x = 0.5. Bulk superconductivity was observed in samples with x = 0.2-0.4, and the superconducting transition temperature was the highest at x = 0.3. The obtained superconductivity phase diagram was compared to those of LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2 and NdO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2.

  11. Regge trajectory of the f0(500) resonance from a dispersive connection to its pole

    SciTech Connect

    Nebreda, J.; Londergan, J. Timothy; Pelaez, Jose R.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2014-11-01

    We report here our results on how to obtain the Regge trajectory of a resonance from its pole in a scattering process by imposing analytic constraints in the complex angular momentum plane. The method, suited for resonances that dominate an elastic scattering amplitude, has been applied to the ρ (770) and the f0(500) resonances. Whereas for the former we obtain a linear Regge trajectory, characteristic of ordinary quark-antiquark states, for the latter we find a non-linear trajectory with a much smaller slope at the resonance mass. This provides a strong indication of the non-ordinary nature of the sigma meson.

  12. Peak effect and superconducting properties of SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.; Cui, Y. J.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, L.; Cheng, C. H.; Sorrell, C.; Zhao, Y.

    2008-11-01

    Ta-sheathed SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 superconducting wires with Tc = 52.5 K have been fabricated using the powder-in-tube (PIT) method and the superconducting properties of the wires have been investigated. The wires exhibit a very large intragrain critical current density at a temperature below 30 K. A peak effect with maximal Jc = 0.6 MA cm-2 at 10 K under 6 T field was observed. The peak field Hpear is strongly temperature-dependent. A severe weak-link effect depresses the development of global supercurrent owing to a very short coherence length. The wires also show a power law temperature dependence for the irreversibility line with H_{\\mathrm {irr}} \\cong (1-T/T_{\\mathrm {c}})^{1.5} . The H-T phase diagram was found to be similar to that of other superconducting cuprates.

  13. Coexistence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in CeO_{0.3}F_{0.7}BiS_{2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jooseop; Demura, S; Stone, Matthew B; Iida, Kazuki; Ehlers, Georg; Dela Cruz, Clarina R; Matsuda, Masaaki; Deguchi, K; Mizuguchi, Y; Miura, O; Louca, Despina; Lee, Seung-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Bulk magnetization, transport and neutron scattering measurements were performed to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of a polycrystalline sample of the newly discovered ferromagnetic superconductor, CeO0:3F0:7BiS2. Ferromagnetism develops below TFM = 6.54(8) K and superconductivity is found to coexist with the ferromagnetic state below TSC 4.5 K. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal a very weakly dispersive magnetic excitation at 1.8 meV that can be explained by an Ising-like spin Hamiltonian. Under application of an external magnetic eld, the direction of the magnetic moment changes from the c-axis to the ab-plane and the 1.8 meV excitation splits into two modes. A possible mechanism for the unusual magnetism and its relation to superconductivity is discussed.

  14. Investigation of Detergent Effects on the Solution Structure of Spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Mateus B; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2010-01-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-{beta}-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  15. Investigation of detergent effects on the solution structure of spinach Light Harvesting Complex II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Mateus B.; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T.; O'Neill, Hugh

    2010-11-01

    The properties of spinach light harvesting complex II (LHC II), stabilized in the detergents Triton X-100 (TX100) and n-Octyl-β-D-Glucoside (BOG), were investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The LHC II-BOG scattering curve overlaid well with the theoretical scattering curve generated from the crystal structure of LHC II indicating that the protein preparation was in its native functional state. On the other hand, the simulated LHC II curve deviated significantly from the LHC II-TX100 experimental data. Analysis by circular dichroism spectroscopy supported the SANS analysis and showed that LHC II-TX100 is inactivated. This investigation has implications for extracting and stabilizing photosynthetic membrane proteins for the development of biohybrid photoconversion devices.

  16. Analysis of interdiffusion between SmFeAsO0.92F0.08 and metals for ex situ fabrication of superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, M.; Matoba, M.; Ozaki, T.; Takano, Y.; Kumakura, H.; Kamihara, Y.

    2011-07-01

    To find good sheath materials that react minimally with the superconducting core of iron-based superconducting wires, we investigated the reaction between polycrystalline SmFeAsO0.92F0.08 and the following seven metals: Cu, Fe, Ni, Ta, Nb, Cr and Ti. Each of the seven metals was prepared as a sheath-material candidate. The interfacial microstructures of SmFeAsO0.92F0.08 and these metal-sheath samples were analysed by an electron probe microanalyzer after annealing at 1000 °C for 20 h. Amongst the seven metal-sheath samples, we found that Cu was the best, because it reacted only very weakly with polycrystalline SmFeAsO0.92F0.08. Moreover, Cu is essential for superconducting wires as a stabilizing material. Metal sheaths made of Fe and Ni do not give rise to reaction layers, but large interdiffusion between these metals and polycrystalline SmFeAsO0.92F0.08 occurs. In contrast, metal sheaths made of Ta, Nb, Cr and Ti do form reaction layers. Their reaction layers apparently prevent electric current from flowing from the sheath material to the superconducting core. In general, through this research, Cu will be expected to be suitable not only as a stabilizing material but also as a sheath material for superconducting Sm-1111 wire fabricated by the ex situ PIT method.

  17. Magnetic properties and electronic structure of LaFeAsO0.85F0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorchenko, A. V.; Grechnev, G. E.; Desnenko, V. A.; Panfilov, A. S.; Volkova, O. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2010-03-01

    The magnetic properties of the compound LaFeAsO0.85F0.1 were investigated by measurements of the dc magnetization for different values of the magnetic field H =0.02, 1.0 and 2.0T in the temperature range 4.2-300K. Superconducting behavior was found below 26K, whereas a distinct peculiarity in the low-field dependence of the magnetic susceptibility χ(T ) was clearly observed at TM≃135K, which resembles a weak ferromagnetic (FM) response with saturation magnetic moment of about 10-4μB per formula unit at 50K. The transition at TM is presumably not governed by magnetic impurities but rather correlated with the antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition in undoped LaFeAsO at about the same temperature. We suggest that the observed magnetic properties of the LaFeAsO0.85F0.1 sample are due to an interplay of FM and AFM transitions, and are presumably related with an intrinsic feature of a small portion of the undoped LaFeAsO phase inherent in our sample. In order to shed light on the problem of magnetic instability of the LaFeAsO, ab initio DFT calculations of the electronic structure and paramagnetic susceptibility were performed within the local spin density approximation. It is shown that a V-shaped peculiarity in the density of electronic states close to the Fermi level can govern magnetic properties of LaFeAsO with fluorine doping and/or oxygen deficiency.

  18. The magnetization of PrFeAsO 0.60F 0.12 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoi, D.; Mandal, P.; Choudhury, P.; Dash, S.; Banerjee, A.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetization of the PrFeAsO 0.60F 0.12 polycrystalline sample has been measured as functions of temperature and magnetic field ( H). The observed total magnetization is the sum of a superconducting irreversible magnetization and a paramagnetic magnetization. Analysis of dc susceptibility χ( T) in the normal state shows that the paramagnetic component of magnetization comes from the Pr 3+ magnetic moments. The intragrain critical current density ( JL) derived from the magnetization data is large. The JL( H) curve displays a second peak which shifts towards the high-field region with decreasing temperature. In the low-field region, a plateau up to a field H* followed by a power law H-5/8 behavior of JL( H) is the characteristic of the strong pinning. A vortex phase diagram for the present superconductor has been obtained from the magnetization and resistivity data.

  19. Design of null tests for an F/0.8 concave oblate elliptical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuezhuan; Yang, Bo; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yinnian

    2010-10-01

    Aspheric surfaces are widely used in aerospace sensing optic instruments. There are numerous reflecting optical system designs that call for oblate elliptical surfaces, such as secondary mirror or tertiary mirror in three mirror anastigmat (TMA). The consequence brought by increase in field of view (FOV) and speed of optical system is the decrease in F/# of aspheric surface which makes its production harder. Due to oblate ellipsoid's stigmatic points are not lined up on the optic axis, null lenses corrector is used more often than the stigmatic null test especially in low F/# aspheric surfaces test. Three types of null lenses tests for an oblate elliptical surface with aperture Φ360mm, F/0.8, conic=0.243 are presented including a new type which is modified by replacing the reference flat and null lens with one lens with reflect surface. Furthermore, sensitivity tolerances for each design are practiced.

  20. FINE-GRAINED PITCH ACCENT AND BOUNDARY TONE LABELING WITH PARAMETRIC F0 FEATURES

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Sankaranarayanan; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by linguistic theories of prosodic categoricity, symbolic representations of prosody have recently attracted the attention of speech technologists. Categorical representations such as ToBI not only bear linguistic relevance, but also have the advantage that they can be easily modeled and integrated within applications. Since manual labeling of these categories is time-consuming and expensive, there has been significant interest in automatic prosody labeling. This paper presents a fine-grained ToBI-style prosody labeling system that makes use of features derived from RFC and TILT parameterization of F0 together with a n-gram prosodic language model for 4-way pitch accent labeling and 2-way boundary tone labeling. For this task, our system achieves pitch accent labeling accuracy of 56.4% and boundary tone labeling accuracy of 67.7% on the Boston University Radio News Corpus. PMID:19180228

  1. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  2. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Counterflow of He II Past Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulaine, Cyprien; Quintard, Michel; Baudouy, Bertrand; Van Weelderen, Rob

    2017-02-01

    We investigate numerically, for the first time, the thermal counterflow of superfluid helium past a cylinder by solving with a finite volume method the complete so-called two-fluid model. In agreement with existing experimental results, we obtain symmetrical eddies both up- and downstream of the obstacle. The generation of these eddies is a complex transient phenomenon that involves the friction of the normal fluid component with the solid walls and the mutual friction between the superfluid and normal components. Implications for flow in a more realistic porous medium are also investigated.

  3. Investigation of resistive losses in type II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benapfl, Brendan W.

    For low-TC materials, the superconducting transition temperature (TC) is depressed by the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, one of the remarkable features of cuprate high-TC materials is that the superconducting transition is broadened by the application of a magnetic field. Tinkham presented a model for the field-dependent resistive transition of high-T C materials, arising from "phase slippage at a complicated network of channels." Coffey & Clem did not include this field-broadening effect in their sophisticated model for the field and temperature dependence of the surface resistance in type-II superconductors. From the model by Lee & Stroud, treating Josephson Junction-coupled superconducting segments, it is concluded that doped, layered superconductors are certain to have a field-broadened superconducting transition. This effect can be identified by measurements of the resistivity as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength, angle of field with respect to the crystal axis as well as with respect to an induced current density. The iron pnictide materials such as Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 (BaK122) have chemical layers with different compositions, differentiating them from elemental type-II superconductors such as niobium, and also from cuprates, by the absence of copper. Experimental data on BaK122 indicate a field-broadened transition in conjunction with a field-depressed superconducting transition temperature. In this work, techniques associated with Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy were used to measure the temperature and field-induced changes in the surface resistance of single-crystal BaK122 samples. In addition, polycrystalline foils of niobium and a NbTi (70/30) alloy were measured using the same techniques to provide comparison. Measurements were taken as a function of applied magnetic field, temperature, rf field intensity, and angle of the applied field with respect to the rf-induced current. BaK122 sample field-dependent surface

  4. Recognizing the authenticity of emotional expressions: F0 contour matters when you need to know

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Matthis; Schubotz, Ricarda I.; Fischer, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Authenticity of vocal emotion expression affects emotion recognition and brain activity in the so-called Theory of Mind (ToM) network, which is implied in the ability to explain and predict behavior by attributing mental states to other individuals. Exploiting the variability of the fundamental frequency (F0 contour), which varies more (higher contour) in play-acted expressions than authentic ones, we examined whether contour biases explicit categorization toward a particular authenticity or emotion category. Moreover, we tested whether contour modulates blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response in the ToM network and explored the role of task as a top-down modulator. The effects of contour on BOLD signal were analyzed by contrasting high and low contour stimuli within two previous fMRI studies that implemented emotion and authenticity rating tasks. Participants preferentially categorized higher contour stimuli as play-acted and lower contour stimuli as sad. Higher contour was found to up-regulate activation task-independently in the primary auditory cortex. Stimulus contour and task were found to interact in a network including medial prefrontal cortex, with an increase in BOLD signal for low-contour stimuli during explicit perception of authenticity and an increase for high-contour stimuli during explicit perception of emotion. Contour-induced BOLD effects appear to be purely stimulus-driven in early auditory and intonation perception, while being strongly task-dependent in regions involved in higher cognition. PMID:24701202

  5. Recognizing the authenticity of emotional expressions: F0 contour matters when you need to know.

    PubMed

    Drolet, Matthis; Schubotz, Ricarda I; Fischer, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Authenticity of vocal emotion expression affects emotion recognition and brain activity in the so-called Theory of Mind (ToM) network, which is implied in the ability to explain and predict behavior by attributing mental states to other individuals. Exploiting the variability of the fundamental frequency (F0 contour), which varies more (higher contour) in play-acted expressions than authentic ones, we examined whether contour biases explicit categorization toward a particular authenticity or emotion category. Moreover, we tested whether contour modulates blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) response in the ToM network and explored the role of task as a top-down modulator. The effects of contour on BOLD signal were analyzed by contrasting high and low contour stimuli within two previous fMRI studies that implemented emotion and authenticity rating tasks. Participants preferentially categorized higher contour stimuli as play-acted and lower contour stimuli as sad. Higher contour was found to up-regulate activation task-independently in the primary auditory cortex. Stimulus contour and task were found to interact in a network including medial prefrontal cortex, with an increase in BOLD signal for low-contour stimuli during explicit perception of authenticity and an increase for high-contour stimuli during explicit perception of emotion. Contour-induced BOLD effects appear to be purely stimulus-driven in early auditory and intonation perception, while being strongly task-dependent in regions involved in higher cognition.

  6. Design of null lens system for f/0.5 hyperboloid mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-wu; Guo, Pei-ji; Chen, Xi; Peng, Ling-jie

    2016-10-01

    The aspherical mirror surface quality testing by using compensation null lens in interferometer is described in this paper. For 310mm, f/0.5 hyperboloid mirror microcrystalline components, based on the theory of aberration compensation, a kind of null lens system which is composed of three pieces of spherical lens is developed. A certain amount of spherical aberration is introduced to the null lens for compensating the deviation of aspheric surface in a normal direction. The design result shows that the primary aberration and the senior aberration are balanced well, the MTF is closed to the diffraction limit and the residual wave aberration (RMS) is less than 0.004λ (λ=0.6328μm). Every indicators of the system meets the requirements of high precision detection of null lens system design. In this paper, the errors caused by the manufacturing, testing and assembling of the null lens system are analyzed. Those errors can be divided into the symmetric error and the asymmetric error. Using the correction method, the influence of the asymmetric error is minimized which seemed bigger than the asymmetric one. Finally, analysis results show that the total residual wave aberration of the system is less than 0.0072λ, which satisfies the requirement of aspheric testing. This null lens system has been applied to aspheric processing.

  7. Metabolic Trade-offs in Yeast are Caused by F1F0-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Avlant; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Intermediary metabolism provides living cells with free energy and precursor metabolites required for synthesizing proteins, lipids, RNA and other cellular constituents, and it is highly conserved among living species. Only a fraction of cellular protein can, however, be allocated to enzymes of intermediary metabolism and consequently metabolic trade-offs may take place. One such trade-off, aerobic fermentation, occurs in both yeast (the Crabtree effect) and cancer cells (the Warburg effect) and has been a scientific challenge for decades. Here we show, using flux balance analysis combined with in vitro measured enzyme specific activities, that fermentation is more catalytically efficient than respiration, i.e. it produces more ATP per protein mass. And that the switch to fermentation at high growth rates therefore is a consequence of a high ATP production rate, provided by a limited pool of enzymes. The catalytic efficiency is also higher for cells grown on glucose compared to galactose and ethanol, which may explain the observed differences in their growth rates. The enzyme F1F0-ATP synthase (Complex V) was found to have flux control over respiration in the model, and since it is evolutionary conserved, we expect the trade-off to occur in organisms from all kingdoms of life. PMID:26928598

  8. Search for the glueball candidates f0(1500) and fJ(1710) in /γγ collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L. M.; Pacheco, A.; Riu, I.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Boix, G.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Greening, T. C.; Halley, A. W.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Leroy, O.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Wright, A. E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Sciabà, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thomson, E.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-01-01

    Data taken with the ALEPH detector at LEP1 have been used to search for /γγ production of the glueball candidates f0(1500) and fJ(1710) via their decay to π+π-. No signal is observed and upper limits to the product of /γγ width and π+π- branching ratio of the f0(1500) and the fJ(1710) have been measured to beΓ(γγ-- >f0(1500)).BR(f0(1500)-- >π+π-)<0.31keV and Γ(γγ-- >fJ(1710)).BR(fJ(1710)-- >π+π-)<0.55keV at 95% confidence level.

  9. Fibre reinforced composite dental bridge. Part II: Numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Swain, M V; Li, Q; Ironside, J; Steven, G P

    2004-09-01

    Motivated by the clinical success and limitations on experimental investigation of the fibre-reinforced composite dental bridge, this paper aims at providing a numerical investigation into the bridge structure. The finite element (FE) model adopted here is constructed from computer tomography images of a physical bridge specimen. The stress and strain distributions in the bridge structure especially in the bonding interfaces are analyzed in detail. The peak stresses and their variations with the different bridge designs are evaluated. Due to the lower bond strengths of adhesives and the high stress concentration in the pontic-abutment interface, the likelihood of failure in the interface is predicted by finite element analysis. The validity of the numerical results is established by a good agreement between the FE prediction and the tests in the load-deflection responses, the structural stiffness as well as the failure location of the composite dental bridge.

  10. Archaeological Investigations in the Upper Tombigbee Valley, Mississippi: Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    previous year. Stripping allowed quick access to a cemented manganese | stratum which effectively sealed the Early Archaic component beneath it. A...I investigators (IV; Bense 1982: Chapter 10, * Figure 10.6), and judged to contain the sealed , intact early Archaic cultural deposits. During the...phase. Feature 4: a historic trash dumping area near what had been the southwest area of the ’old house. Mixed in with plastic, glass , nails, crockery

  11. Investigations on the binding of human hemoglobin with orange I and orange II.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei

    2012-08-01

    The interactions between human hemoglobin and orange I (or orange II) were investigated by UV/vis absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra techniques, and molecular modeling method. Orange I and orange II effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of human hemoglobin by static quenching. The processes of the binding orange I and orange II on human hemoglobin were spontaneous molecular interaction procedure with hydrogen bonds, van der Waals force, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions according to van't Hoff equation and molecular modeling. There is a single class of binding site of orange I (orange II) in human hemoglobin and the molecular modeling study shows that orange I and orange II are dipped into α(2) chain. The results of CD, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated a small loss of α-helical secondary structure of human hemoglobin induced by orange I and orange II.

  12. Investigation of Damping Liquids for Aircraft Instruments : II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, M R; Keulegan, G H

    1932-01-01

    Data are presented on the kinematic viscosity, in the temperature range -50 degrees to +30 degrees C. of pure liquids and of solutions of animal oils, vegetable oils, mineral oils, glycerine, and ethylene glycol in various low freezing point solvents. It is shown that the thermal coefficient of kinematic viscosity as a function of the kinematic viscosity of the solutions of glycerine and ethylene glycol in alcohols is practically independent of the temperature and the chemical composition of the individual liquids. This is similarly true for the mineral oil group and, for a limited temperature interval, for the pure animal and vegetable oils. The efficiency of naphthol, hydroquinone, and diphenylamine to inhibit the change of viscosity of poppyseed and linseed oils was also investigated.

  13. Mechanism of local anesthetic effect. Involvement of F0 in the inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthase by phenothiazines.

    PubMed

    Dabbeni-Sala, F; Palatini, P

    1990-02-02

    The mechanism whereby tertiary amine local anesthetics affect the activity of membrane proteins was investigated by studying the interaction of phenothiazines with mitochondrial ATP synthase. These drugs caused inhibition of the activity of the membrane-bound enzyme at concentrations that do not perturb the phospholipid bilayer. The inhibitory effect appeared consequent to interaction with multiple sites located on both the F1 and the F0 components of the enzyme complex, since: (a) Dixon plots were parabolic; (b) the membrane-bound enzyme was more sensitive to the drug effect than the isolated F1 component; (c) conditions that decreased oligomycin sensitivity also decreased the sensitivity to phenothiazines; (d) irreversible binding of photochemically activated phenothiazines to the ATP synthase complex, followed by detachment of the F1 moiety and reconstitution with purified F1 resulted in an inhibited enzyme complex. These data are interpreted as indicating that tertiary amine local anesthetics affect the activity of membrane proteins by interacting with hydrophobic sites located on both their integral and peripheral domains.

  14. F+0 diuretic protocol is superior to F-15 and F+20 for nuclear renogram in children

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Ramesh; Venkatsubramaniam, Dhandapani; Venkatachalapathy, Easwaramoorthy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We compare the outcomes of three different diuretic protocols for renograms in children with hydronephrosis. Materials and Methods: Between August 2011 and July 2013, 148 diuretic renograms were performed to evaluate unilateral grade 3–4 hydronephrosis (reflux, posterior urethral valves, post-pyeloplasty status excluded). Patients were allotted into three groups based on the timing of diuretic administration: Diuretic given 15 min before (F-15), at the same time as (F + 0) and 20 min after (F + 20) radionuclide administration. Dynamic images and renogram curves were inspected to identify in each group (1) number of equivocal curves and (2) number of interrupted studies due to patient movement/discomfort/voiding. Statistical significance was determined by the Fisher exact test. Results: There was no significant difference in age/sex distribution between groups F-15 (n = 35), F + 0 (n = 38) and F + 20 (n = 75). The number of equivocal curves was significantly less in F + 0 (2/38) and F-15 (3/35) compared with F + 20 (20/75). The number of interrupted studies was significantly less in F + 0 (2/38) compared with F-15 (9/35) and F + 20 (18/75). Conclusion: The F + 0 and F-15 protocols are superior to the F + 20 protocol in reducing the number of equivocal curves, while the F + 0 protocol is superior to the other two in reducing interruptions due to patient movement or voiding. F + 0 is the diuretic protocol of choice for renogram in children. PMID:26166970

  15. Investigations of the Nature of Zn(II) -Si(II) Bonds.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Sebastian; Köppe, Ralf; Roesky, Peter W

    2016-05-17

    A series of zinc(II) silylenes was prepared by using the silylene {PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )Si. Whereas reaction of the silylene with ZnX2 (X=Cl, I) gave the halide-bridged dimers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnX(μ-X)]2 , with ZnR2 (R=Ph, Et, C6 F5 ) as reagent the monomers [{PhC(NtBu)2 }(C5 Me5 )SiZnR2 ] were obtained. The stability of the complexes and the Zn-Si bond lengths clearly depend on the substitution pattern of the zinc atom. Electron-withdrawing groups stabilize these adducts, whereas electron-donating groups destabilize them. This could be rationalized by quantum chemical calculations. Two different bonding modes in these molecules were identified, which are responsible for the differences in reactivity: 1) strong polar Zn-Si single bonds with short Zn-Si distances, Zn-Si force constants close to that of a classical single bond, and strong binding energy (ca. 2.39 Å, 1.33 mdyn Å(-1) , and 200 kJ mol(-1) ), which suggest an ion pair consisting of a silyl cation with a Zn-Si single bond; 2) relatively weak donor-acceptor Zn-Si bonds with long Zn-Si distances, low Zn-Si force constants, and weak binding energy (ca. 2.49 Å, 0.89 mdyn Å(-1) , and 115 kJ mol(-1) ), which can be interpreted as a silylene-zinc adduct.

  16. Modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase activity by cyclophilin D regulates matrix adenine nucleotide levels

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Konràd, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Metelkin, Eugeniy; Töröcsik, Beata; Zhang, Steven F.; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclophilin D was recently shown to bind to and decrease the activity of F0F1-ATP synthase in submitochondrial particles and permeabilized mitochondria (Giorgio et al. 2009, J Biol Chem, 284:33982). Cyclophilin D binding decreased both the ATP synthesis and hydrolysis rates. Here, we reaffirm these findings by demonstrating that in intact mouse liver mitochondria energized by ATP, absence of cyclophilin D or presence of cyclosporin A led to a decrease in the extent of uncoupler-induced depolarization. Accordingly, in substrate-energized mitochondria an increase in F0F1-ATP synthase activity mediated by a relief of inhibition by cyclophilin D was evident as slightly increased respiration rates during arsenolysis. However, the modulation of F0F1-ATP synthase by cyclophilin D did not increase the ANT-mediated ATP efflux rate in energized mitochondria or the ATP influx rate in de-energized mitochondria. The lack of effect of cyclophilin D on the ANT-mediated adenine nucleotide exchange rate was attributed to the ~2.2 times lower flux control coefficient of the F0F1-ATP synthase than that of ANT, deduced from measurements of adenine nucleotide flux rates in intact mitochondria. These findings were further supported by a recent kinetic model of the mitochondrial phosphorylation system, suggesting that a ~30% change in F0F1-ATP synthase activity in fully energized or fully deenergized mitochondria affects ADP-ATP exchange rate mediated by the ANT in the range of 1.38-1.7%. We conclude that in mitochondria exhibiting intact inner membranes, the absence of cyclophilin D or inhibition of its binding to F0F1-ATP synthase by cyclosporin A will affect only matrix adenine nucleotides levels. PMID:21281446

  17. Mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase is a molecular target of 3-iodothyronamine, an endogenous metabolite of thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Cumero, S; Fogolari, F; Domenis, R; Zucchi, R; Mavelli, I; Contessi, S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM) is a metabolite of thyroid hormone acting as a signalling molecule via non-genomic effectors and can reach intracellular targets. Because of the importance of mitochondrial F0F1-ATP synthase as a drug target, here we evaluated interactions of T1AM with this enzyme. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Kinetic analyses were performed on F0F1-ATP synthase in sub-mitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase. Activity assays and immunodetection of the inhibitor protein IF1 were used and combined with molecular docking analyses. Effects of T1AM on H9c2 cardiomyocytes were measured by in situ respirometric analysis. KEY RESULTS T1AM was a non-competitive inhibitor of F0F1-ATP synthase whose binding was mutually exclusive with that of the inhibitors IF1 and aurovertin B. Both kinetic and docking analyses were consistent with two different binding sites for T1AM. At low nanomolar concentrations, T1AM bound to a high-affinity region most likely located within the IF1 binding site, causing IF1 release. At higher concentrations, T1AM bound to a low affinity-region probably located within the aurovertin binding cavity and inhibited enzyme activity. Low nanomolar concentrations of T1AM increased ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration in cardiomyocytes, indicating activation of F0F1-ATP synthase consistent with displacement of endogenous IF1,, reinforcing the in vitro results. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Effects of T1AM on F0F1-ATP synthase were twofold: IF1 displacement and enzyme inhibition. By targeting F0F1-ATP synthase within mitochondria, T1AM might affect cell bioenergetics with a positive effect on mitochondrial energy production at low, endogenous, concentrations. T1AM putative binding locations overlapping with IF1 and aurovertin binding sites are described. PMID:22452346

  18. Magnetization and NMR studies in SmFeAsO0.86F0.14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshray, Amitabha; Majumder, Mayukh; Poddar, Asok; Mazumdar, Chandan; Ghoshray, Kajal; Berardan, David

    2012-06-01

    The Physical properties along with NMR measurements in SmFeAsO0.86F0.14 have been carried out. Superconducting transition TC (onset) remains invariant even under a magnetic field of 7 T. 75As NMR signal could not be measured below 180K in both SmFeAsO and SmFeAsO0.86F0.14 although the later does not show any SDW transition. 19F hyperfine coupling constant found to be temperature independent.

  19. Investigation on the efficiency and mechanism of Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal from aqueous solutions using MgO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chunmei; Wang, Wei; Tan, Fatang; Luo, Fan; Chen, Jianguo; Qiao, Xueliao

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions using MgO nanoparticles prepared by a simple sol-gel method was investigated. The efficiency of Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal was examined through batch adsorption experiments. For the single adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II), The adsorption kinetics and isotherm data obeyed well Pseudo-second-order and Langmuir models, indicating the monolayer chemisorption of heavy metal ions. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated by Langmuir equation were 2294 mg/g for Cd(II) and 2614 mg/g for Pb(II), respectively. The adsorption process was controlled simultaneously by external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion. In the binary system, a competitive adsorption was observed, showing preference of adsorption followed Pb(II) >Cd(II). Significantly, the elution experiments confirmed that neither Cd(II) nor Pb(II) could be greatly desorbed after water washing even for five times. XRD and XPS measurements revealed the mechanism of Cd(II) and Pb(II) removal by MgO nanoparticles was mainly involved in precipitation and adsorption on the surface of MgO, resulting from the interaction between active sites of MgO and heavy metal ions. Easy preparation, remarkable removal efficiency and firmly adsorptive ability make the MgO nanoparticles to be an efficient material in the treatment of heavy metal-contaminated water.

  20. New dinuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes for the investigation of sugar-metal ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Bera, Manindranath; Patra, Ayan

    2011-10-18

    We have studied the binding interactions of biologically important carbohydrates (D-glucose, D-xylose and D-mannose) with the newly synthesized five-coordinate dinuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu(2)(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1) and zinc(II) complex, [Zn(2)(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (2) [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in aqueous alkaline solution. The complexes 1 and 2 are fully characterized both in solid and solution using different analytical techniques. A geometrical optimization was made of the ligand H(3)hpnbpda and the complexes 1 and 2 by molecular mechanics (MM+) method in order to establish the stable conformations. All carbohydrates bind to the metal complexes in a 1:1 molar ratio. The binding events have been investigated by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis spectra indicate a significant blue shift of the absorption maximum of complex 1 during carbohydrate coordination highlighting the sugar binding ability of complex 1. The apparent binding constants of the substrate-bound copper(II) complexes have been determined from the UV-vis titration experiments. The binding ability and mode of binding of these sugar substrates with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for carbon atoms C1, C2, and C3 of sugar substrates.

  1. Investigation of Cu(II) Binding to Bovine Serum Albumin by Potentiometry with an Ion Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jie Liu

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory project that investigates Cu(II) bind to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in an aqueous solution is developed to assist undergraduate students in gaining better understanding of the interaction of ligands with biological macromolecule. Thus, students are introduced to investigation of Cu(II) binding to BSA by potentiometry with the Cu(II)…

  2. B-meson decays to eta' rho, eta' f0, and eta' K*

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-08-25

    We present measurements of B-meson decays to the final states {eta}{prime} {rho}, {eta}{prime} f{sub 0}, and {eta}{prime} K*, where K* stands for a vector, scalar, or tensor strange meson. We observe a significant signal or evidence for {eta}{prime} {rho}{sup +} and all the {eta}{prime}K* channels. We also measure, where applicable, the charge asymmetries, finding results consistent with no direct CP violation in all cases. The measurements are performed on a data sample consisting of 467 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Our results favor the theoretical predictions from perturbative QCD and QCD Factorization and we observe an enhancement of the tensor K*{sub 2} (1430) with respect to the vector K*(892) component.

  3. Suppression of superconductivity in Zn-doped SmFeAsO 0.8F 0.2 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cheng, C. H.; Yang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2011-11-01

    A series of SmFe1-xZnxAsO0.8F0.2 samples with x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 have been successfully synthesized using a solid state method. The lattice parameters are found to increase with increasing Zn doping content. The superconductivity has been definitely suppressed by Zn doping at Fe site with the transition temperature Tc being reduced from 52.5 K to 23.3 K for the sample of x = 0.05, and to 18.2 K for the sample of x = 0.1. For the samples with x > 0.1, the superconducting transition vanishes, and, at the meantime, the spin-density-wave anomaly recovers at 140 K. The metal to semiconductor transition is also observed in the SmFe1-xZnxAsO0.8F0.2 system. The behavior of SmFe1-xZnxAsO0.8F0.2 is very different from that of REFeAsO (RE = rare earth metal), which reveals a very strong electron correlation in SmFe1-xZnxAsO0.8F0.2.

  4. $$B^{0}_{s}$$ Lifetime Measurement in the CP-odd Decay Channel $$B^{0}_{s} \\to J/\\psi\\mbox{ }f_{0}(980)$$

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.

    2016-07-06

    Here, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J/ψπ+π- with 880 ≤ Mπ+π- ≤ 1080 MeV/c2, which is mainly a CP-odd state and dominated by the f0(980) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ(Bs0) = 1.70 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.05(syst) ps. Neglecting CP violation in Bs0/more » $$\\bar{B}$$0s mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH = 0.59 ± 0.05(stat) ± 0.02(syst) ps-1.« less

  5. Bs0 lifetime measurement in the C P -odd decay channel Bs0→J /ψ f 0(980 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernández-Villanueva, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J /ψ π+π- with 880 ≤Mπ+π-≤1080 MeV /c2 , which is mainly a C P -odd state and dominated by the f0(980 ) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ (Bs0)=1.70 ±0.14 (stat ) ±0.05 (syst) ps . Neglecting C P violation in Bs0/B¯s0 mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH=0.59 ±0.05 (stat ) ±0.02 (syst ) ps-1 .

  6. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  7. Binding of Co(II) and Cu(II) cations to chemically modified wool fibres: an IR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Paola; Monti, Patrizia; Freddi, Giuliano; Arai, Takayuki; Tsukada, Masuhiro

    2003-05-01

    Wool fibres were modified by treatment with tannic acid (TA) solution or by acylation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA) dianhydride. The unmodified and modified fibres were subsequently treated with Cu 2+ and Co 2+ solutions, at alkaline pH, and analysed by Attenuated Total Reflectance, ATR/IR spectroscopy to evaluate the changes induced in the structure of the fibre by metal binding. The spectral changes were correlated to metal adsorption results obtained by Inductive Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). The IR results were discussed in relation to our previous findings on the metal binding mode of Bombyx mori and Tussah silk fibres; the changes observed in the spectra were explained by considering the different affinity of the fibres for the modifying reagent and the amount of the metal absorbed. More relevant spectral changes were observed upon Cu 2+ complexation rather than Co 2+ complexation, according to the metal absorption results. The most relevant changes were observed for the EDTA-modified wool sample treated with Cu 2+, according to the higher affinity of wool for EDTA. The IR spectra were quantitatively evaluated by the intensity ratio between the Amide I and Amide II bands (I AmideI/I AmideII) and its trend as a function of metal absorption was reported. The present investigation demonstrated that the interaction between fibre and metal and the subsequent fibre modification depend on the chemical nature of the fibre, the metal cation and the modifying reagent.

  8. Geomagnetic modification of the mid-latitude ionosphere - Toward a strategy for the improved forecasting of f0F2

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.L.; Rodger, A.S.

    1989-02-01

    An approach for modeling and forecasting the interspatial critical frequency (f0F2) at quiet and disturbed times is outlined. Statistical analyses of ionosonde data from the Argentine Islands (65 deg S) are used to define patterns for the main phase effects of midlatitude ionospheric storms. Extended to a number of stations, these could be incorporated into algorithms to permit the forecasting of maximum usable frequency for a few hours ahead and enhance the frequency management of shortwave radio communication, especially during a geomagnetic storm. Data from a complete solar cycle, 1971-1981, are used to determine the errors in the forecasts and to demonstrate that a useful advantage can be attained by this method. The rms error in f0F2 for 90,175 samples is 15.6 percent, which compares favorably with those obtained using forecasts based on quiet time values (20.4 percent) or the previous day's measurements (18 percent). 12 references.

  9. Measurements of the branching fraction and CP-violation asymmetries in B0-->f0(980)K0S.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-02-04

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and CP-violating asymmetries in the decay B0-->f0(980)K0S. The results are obtained from a data sample of 123 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays. From a time-dependent maximum likelihood fit, we measure the branching fraction B(B0-->f0(980)(-->pi+pi-)K0)=(6.0+/-0.9+/-0.6+/-1.2)x10(-6), the mixing-induced CP violation parameter S=-1.62(+0.56)(-0.51)+/-0.09+/-0.04, and the direct CP violation parameter C=0.27+/-0.36+/-0.10+/-0.07, where the first errors are statistical, the second systematic, and the third due to model uncertainties. We measure the f0(980) mass and width to be mf0(980)=(980.6+/-4.1+/-0.5+/-4.0) MeV/c2 and Gammaf0(980)=(43(+12)(-9)+/-3+/-9) MeV/c2, respectively.

  10. An Investigation of the Physical Properties of Erupting Solar Prominences, Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-30

    1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record Copy AFRL /RVBXS/Dr. Richard Altrock 1 cy 40 Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. ... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0195 TR-2014-0195 AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ERUPTING SOLAR PROMINENCES, PHASE II...AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM

  11. Fundamental properties of Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies investigated via Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapińska, A. D.; Uttley, P.; Kaiser, C. R.

    2012-08-01

    Radio galaxies and quasars are among the largest and most powerful single objects known and are believed to have had a significant impact on the evolving Universe and its large-scale structure. We explore the intrinsic and extrinsic properties of the population of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) objects, i.e. their kinetic luminosities, lifetimes and the central densities of their environments. In particular, the radio and kinetic luminosity functions of these powerful radio sources are investigated using the complete, flux-limited radio catalogues of the Third Cambridge Revised Revised Catalogue (3CRR) and Best et al. We construct multidimensional Monte Carlo simulations using semi-analytical models of FR II source time evolution to create artificial samples of radio galaxies. Unlike previous studies, we compare radio luminosity functions found with both the observed and simulated data to explore the best-fitting fundamental source parameters. The new Monte Carlo method we present here allows us to (i) set better limits on the predicted fundamental parameters of which confidence intervals estimated over broad ranges are presented and (ii) generate the most plausible underlying parent populations of these radio sources. Moreover, as has not been done before, we allow the source physical properties (kinetic luminosities, lifetimes and central densities) to co-evolve with redshift, and we find that all the investigated parameters most likely undergo cosmological evolution. Strikingly, we find that the break in the kinetic luminosity function must undergo redshift evolution of at least (1 + z)3. The fundamental parameters are strongly degenerate, and independent constraints are necessary to draw more precise conclusions. We use the estimated kinetic luminosity functions to set constraints on the duty cycles of these powerful radio sources. A comparison of the duty cycles of powerful FR IIs with those determined from radiative luminosities of active galactic nuclei of

  12. Investigation of Mesoporous Graphitic Carbon Nitride as the Adsorbent to Remove Ni (II) Ions.

    PubMed

    Xin, Gang; Xia, Yuanjiao; Lv, Yuhua; Liu, Luman; Yu, Bei

    2016-04-01

    The mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4/r, r was defined as the initial silica/dicyandiamide mass ratio) was successfully synthesized by heating the mixture of silica and dicyandiamide in a nitrogen atmosphere. The morphology and structure of mpg-C3N4/r were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement (BET), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption performances of Ni (II) ions by mpg-C3N4/r were investigated. With increasing of r value, the BET specific surface area of the synthesized mpg-C3N4/r increased; the highest specific surface area of mpg-C3N4/1.5 increased up to 169.3 m2/g. This work shows that mpg-C3N4/1.5 is a promising, high-efficiency adsorbent that can be used to purify the water of a low Ni (II) ions concentration. The maximum adsorption capacity of Ni(II) ions by mpg-C3N4/1.5 was 15.26 mg/g. The adsorption properties of Ni (II) ions by mpg-C3N4/r complied well with pseudo-second-order kinetics and Langmuir isotherm model.

  13. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  14. Investigation of Propellant and Explosive Solid Solution Systems II X-Ray Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    A\\Yj* ^\\C/*^ ^ 1 tatf AD 7t ott w AD-E400 125 TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCD-TR-77066 INVESTIGATION OF PROPELLANT AND EXPLOSIVE SOLID SOLUTION SYSTEMS...Report ARLCD-TR-77066 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. *. TITLE (and Subtitle) INVESTIGATION OF PROPELLANT AND EXPLOSIVE SOLID SOLUTION SYSTEMS II X-RAY...Interplanar spacings and x-ray diffraction 9 intensities of AP, KP and their physical mixtures and solid solutions 4 X-ray data of 3 AN: KP solid solution and

  15. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-23

    AO-AI13 14𔃾 ERTEC WESTERN INC LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY, SEVEN ADDITI-ETC(U) JUN Al F04704-80-C-OGO6...DTIC-DDA-2 FORM DOCUMENT PROCESSING SHEET DTIC ocT :g 70A -- ~’ .9 ’I K ii I / "~1 - i~ / . . ..1’ ~ ~- .. ~ ~1 I E-TR-50 MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY...144 ERTEC WESTERN INC. LONG BEACH CA F/6 7/4 MX SITING INVESTIGATION. MINERAL RESOURCES SURVEY. SEVEN AOOITI-ETCIU) JUN 81 FON7O-80-C-0006

  16. Melanoma-targeted delivery system (part 2): Synthesis, radioiodination and biological evaluation in B16F0 bearing mice.

    PubMed

    El Aissi, Radhia; Miladi, Imen; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Chavignon, Olivier; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Moreau, Emmanuel

    2016-09-14

    Here we report the synthesis and radiolabelling with iodine-125 of a melanoma-selective prodrug (17a*) and its parent drug IUdR. The in vivo and ex vivo biodistributions of [(125)I](17a*) and [(125)I]IUdR were evaluated in a model of melanoma B16F0-bearing mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of [(125)I](17a*) suggests rapid release of the active drug [(125)I]IUdR after i.v. administration of [(125)I](17a*). Preliminary metabolism studies in dedicated compartments (i.e. blood, urine and tumour) yielded results consistent with this hypothesis.

  17. Goethite surface reactivity: a macroscopic investigation unifying proton, chromate, carbonate, and lead(II) adsorption.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Mario; Pérez-Gallegos, Ayax

    2008-10-15

    The goethite surface structure has been extensively studied, but no convincing quantitative description of its highly variable surface reactivity as inversely related to its specific surface area (SSA) has been found. The present study adds experimental evidence and provides a unified macroscopic explanation to this anomalous behavior from differences in average adsorption capacities, and not in average adsorption affinities. We investigated the chromate anion and lead(II) cation adsorption behavior onto three different goethites with SSA varying from 50 to 94 m(2)/g, and analyzed an extensive set of published anion adsorption and proton charging data for variable SSA goethites. Maximum chromate adsorption was found to occupy on average from 3.1 to 9.7 sites/nm(2), inversely related to SSA. Congruency of oxyanion and Pb(II) adsorption behavior based on fractional site occupancy using these values, and a site density analysis suggest that: (i) ion binding occurs to singly and doubly coordinated sites, (ii) proton binding occurs to singly and triply coordinated sites (ranging from 6.2 to 8 total sites/nm(2), in most cases), and (iii) a predominance of (210) and/or (010) faces explains the high reactivity of low SSA goethites. The results imply that the macroscopic goethite adsorption behavior may be predicted without a need to investigate extensive structural details of each specific goethite of interest.

  18. Investigation of the polarization state of dual APPLE-II undulators.

    PubMed

    Hand, Matthew; Wang, Hongchang; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    The use of an APPLE II undulator is extremely important for providing a high-brilliance X-ray beam with the capability to switch between various photon beam polarization states. A high-precision soft X-ray polarimeter has been used to systematically investigate the polarization characteristics of the two helical APPLE II undulators installed on beamline I06 at Diamond Light Source. A simple data acquisition and processing procedure has been developed to determine the Stokes polarization parameters for light polarized at arbitrary linear angles emitted from a single undulator, and for circularly polarized light emitted from both undulators in conjunction with a single-period undulator phasing unit. The purity of linear polarization is found to deteriorate as the polarization angle moves away from the horizontal and vertical modes. Importantly, a negative correlation between the degree of circular polarization and the photon flux has been found when the phasing unit is used.

  19. a1(1420 ) peak as the π f0(980 ) decay mode of the a1(1260 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceti, F.; Dai, L. R.; Oset, E.

    2016-11-01

    We study the decay mode of the a1(1260 ) into a π+ in p wave and the f0(980 ) that decays into π+π- in s wave. The mechanism proceeds via a triangular mechanism where the a1(1260 ) decays into K*K ¯, the K* decays to an external π+ and an internal K that fuses with the K ¯ producing the f0(980 ) resonance. The mechanism develops a singularity at a mass of the a1(1260 ) around 1420 MeV, producing a peak in the cross section of the π p reaction, used to generate the mesonic final state, which provides a natural explanation of all the features observed in the COMPASS experiment, where a peak observed at this energy is tentatively associated to a new resonance called a1(1420 ). On the other hand, the triangular singularity studied here gives rise to a remarkable feature, where a peak is seen for a certain decay channel of a resonance at an energy about 200 MeV higher than its nominal mass.

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid regulates MMP-2 activity and inhibits colorectal invasion of murine B16F0 melanoma cells in C57BL/6J mice: effects of prostaglandin F(2)alpha.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chin-Shaw Stella; Luo, Shue-Fen; Ning, Chung-Chu; Lin, Chien-Liang; Jiang, Ming-Chung; Liao, Ching-Fong

    2009-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that acetylsalicylic acid may reduce the risk of mortality due to colon cancers. Metastasis is the major cause of cancer death. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in tumor invasion regulation, and prostaglandin F(2)alpha (PGF(2)alpha) is a key stimulator of MMP production. Thus, we investigated whether acetylsalicylic acid regulated MMP activity and the invasion of cancer cells and whether PGF(2)alpha attenuated acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of cancer cells. Gelatin-based zymography assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the MMP-2 activity of B16F0 melanoma cells. Matrigel-based chemoinvasion assays showed that acetylsalicylic acid inhibited the invasion of B16F0 cells. Acetylsalicylic acid can inhibit PGF(2)alpha synthesis and PGF(2)alpha is a key stimulator of MMP-2 production. Our data showed that PGF(2)alpha treatment attenuated the acetylsalicylic acid-inhibited invasion of B16F0 cells. In animal experiments, acetylsalicylic acid reduced colorectal metastasis of B16F0 cells in C57BL/6J mice by 44%. Our results suggest that PGF(2)alpha is a therapeutic target for metastasis inhibition and acetylsalicylic acid may possess anti-metastasis ability.

  1. Huge Critical Current Density and Tailored Superconducting Anisotropy in SmFeAsO(0.8)F(0.15) by Low Density Columnar-Defect Incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welp, U.; Fang, L.; Jia, Y.; Mishra, V.; Chaparro, C.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Koshelev, A. E.; Crabtree, G. W.; Zhu, S. F.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Kwok, W. K.

    2014-03-01

    SmFeAsO(0.8)F(0.15) is of great interest because it has the highest transition temperature of all the iron-based superconductors. We find that the introduction of a low density of correlated nano-scale defects enhances the critical current density up to 2 × 107A/cm2 at 5 K without any suppression in the high superconducting transition temperature of 50 K and amounting to 20 % of the theoretical depairing current density. We also observed a surprising reduction in the thermodynamic superconducting anisotropy from 8 to 4 upon irradiation. A model based on anisotropic electron scattering predicts that the superconducting anisotropy can be tailored via correlated defects in semi-metallic, fully gapped type II superconductors. - We acknowledge support by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an EFRC funded by the US DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (LF, YJ, VM, AEK, WKK, GWC), by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (CC, VKV, UW), by the EC Research Council project SuperIron (JK, SK), and by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the National Center of Competence in Research MaNEP (NDZ).

  2. Measurement of the B¯(s)(0) effective lifetime in the J/ψf0(980) final state.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-12

    The effective lifetime of the B ¯(s)(0) meson in the decay mode B¯(s)(0)→J/ψf(0)(980) is measured using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the LHCb detector. The result is 1.700±0.040±0.026 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. As the final state is CP-odd, and CP violation in this mode is measured to be small, the lifetime measurement can be translated into a measurement of the decay width of the heavy B¯(s)(0) mass eigenstate, Γ(H)=0.588±0.014±0.009 ps(-1).

  3. Synthesis, physico-chemical investigations of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes and their in vitro microbial, cytotoxic, DNA cleavage studies.

    PubMed

    Bagihalli, Gangadhar B; Patil, Sangamesh A

    2010-06-01

    A series of metal complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), and copper(II) have been synthesized with newly derived biologically active ligands. These ligands were synthesized by the condensation of 2-amino-4-phenyl-1,3-thiazole with 8-formyl-7-hydroxy- 4-methylcoumarin. The probable structure of the complexes has been proposed on the basis of analytical and spectroscopic data (IR, UV-Vis, ESR, FAB-mass, and thermoanalytical). Electrochemical study of the complexes is also reported. Elemental analysis of the complexes confined them to stoichiometry of the type ML(2).2H(2)O [M = Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II)]. The Schiff base and its metal(II) complexes have been screened for their antibacterial (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus pyogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and antifungal activities (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, and Cladosporium) by the MIC method. The brine shrimp bioassay was carried out to study their in vitro cytotoxic properties, and also the Schiff base and its metal(II) complexes have been studied for DNA cleavage.

  4. Investigation into solar type II radio bursts recorded by CALLISTO-BR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, R. D. C.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Selhorst, C. L.

    2012-04-01

    This work brings out the outcomes of investigation of two solar type II radio bursts observed on October 16, 2010 (19:12:54 UT) and on February 14, 2011 (15:27:05 UT) by CALLISTO-BR (Compound Astronomical Low frequency Low Cost Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory) spectrometer operating in the frequency range of 45-870 MHz. The first event comprises a burst with typical type II starting frequency and clues of partial reabsorption of the fundamental frequency band. The second one consists of a solar split-band type II radio burst with whole reabsorption of the fundamental frequency band. Both events were preceded by solar type III radio bursts. Among the physical parameters determined for the propagation of the associated shock and its region are: source speed of the order of 1127 ± 76 km s-1 and 889 ± 31 km s-1; electron number density of (5.17 ± 0.33) x 107 cm-3 and (2.46 ± 0.07) x 108cm-3; Alfvén speed of the order of 287 ± 11 km s-1 and 398 ± 911 km s-1; Mach number of 1.05 ± 0.01 and 1.12 ± 0.01; magnetic field strength of 0.95 ± 0.03 G and 2.85 ± 0.07 G; and temperature of (3.79 ± 1.02) x 107 K and (1.69 ± 0.39) x 107 K. The results, compared to those reported in the literature, are consistent. The source speed indeed outdoes the Alfvén speed with a density jump at the shock front which is suitable (< 4) for MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) shocks for both events.

  5. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, YONG; YANG, FUWEI; ZHENG, HEXIN; ZHOU, JIANDA; ZHU, GANGHUA; HU, PENG; WU, WEIJING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), sex-determining region Y-box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease-causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease-causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research. PMID:26781036

  6. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  7. VIDA II: a computerised diagnostic recording system for veterinary investigation centres in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Hall, S A; Dawson, P S; Davies, G

    1980-03-22

    "Veterinary Investigation Diagnosis Analysis" II is a computerised recording system for all the diagnoses made at 33 Government diagnostic laboratories in Great Britain. It was created in 1975 and the records of 150,000 specimens are stored on it each year. The system depends on an agreed list of 393 possible diagnoses (101 cattle, 96 sheep, 72 pigs, 71 birds and 53 for other species). Diagnostic records are sent each month to a computer centre which produces an annual record of all diagnoses made and a monthly record of the number of submissions and financial charges. The computer file can be interrogated from a terminal at the epidemiology unit Weybridge and the diagnostic records are available to research workers.

  8. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation. Verification Study - Lake Valley, Nevada. Volume II. Geotechnical Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-31

    dolomite, chalk). J S3 Argillaceous Rocks - Composed of clay and silt-sized particles (e.g., siltstone, shale, claystone). S4 Evaporite Rocks...K 0FOPHONES 1 7 18 24 18ago fm (576 mp) .o ( smp ) ---- s z Z 00 - (2561 mpis) 100 w Wb a a I150 0 MIETERS 50 MX SITING INVESTIGATION SI I I I _j Ir...8217 ~ ’ SH4- 3oV N 8ii~ AO33 S 51~ S a- 8( 8 L 3d~i 3l0NV- mad".s * -s~A LO C42 co o a (0 0 S4 Co 0 ’Ua. c 51 C S C 0 ! .0 0 E t’ t~~•o IoMCW IC ", C1> ti

  9. Tunneling break-junction spectroscopy on the superconductor NdFeAs(O0.9F0.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekino, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Akira; Okabe, Hirotaka; Shohara, Kazuhiro; Ukita, Ryuichi; Akimitsu, Jun; Gabovich, Alexander M.

    2010-12-01

    Tunnel break-junction method has been adopted to study polycrystalline samples of iron-oxypnictide superconductor NdFeAs(O0.9F0.1) with Tc=48K. Measurements were carried out at 4.2 K. Break-junction (BJ) conductance versus voltage curves showed gap-edge peaks with the peak-to-peak distances V=4Δ/e=28-40mV at 4.2 K, where 2Δ(T) is the superconducting energy gap, e>0 is the elementary charge. This yields 2Δ(0)=14-20meV, so that the gap ratio 2Δ(0)/kBTc is about 4.1±0.7,kB being the Boltzmann constant. This ratio implies strong-coupling superconductivity in the framework of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, being, however, much smaller than that for high-Tc copper oxides. This suggests a significant difference in the pairing mechanism between those classes of materials.

  10. Global model of low-frequency chorus (fLHR<f<0.1fce) from multiple satellite observations

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Nigel P; Horne, Richard B; Li, Wen; Thorne, Richard M; Sicard-Piet, Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Whistler mode chorus is an important magnetospheric emission, playing a dual role in the acceleration and loss of relativistic electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt. Chorus is typically generated in the equatorial region in the frequency range 0.1–0.8 fce, where fce is the local electron gyrofrequency. However, as the waves propagate to higher latitudes, significant wave power can occur at frequencies below 0.1fce. Since this wave power is largely omitted in current radiation belt models, we construct a global model of low-frequency chorus, fLHR<f<0.1fce, using data from six satellites. We find that low-frequency chorus is strongest, with an average intensity of 200 pT2, in the prenoon sector during active conditions at midlatitudes (20°<|λm|<50°) from 4

  11. Glueball nature of the σ /f0 (600) from ππ and γγ scatterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennessier, G.; Narison, S.; Ochs, W.

    2008-07-01

    We estimate the I = 0 scalar meson σ /f0 (600) parameters from ππ and γγ scattering data below 700 MeV using an improved analytic K-matrix model. A fit of the hadronic data gives a complex pole mass Mσ = 422 - i 290MeV, while simultaneous best fits of the γγ →π+π- ,π0π0 data give a direct width of (0.13 ± 0.05)keV, a rescattering component of (2.7 ± 0.4)keV and a total (direct + rescattering) width of (3.9 ± 0.6)keV. “Running” these results to the physical real axis, the small “direct”γγ and the large hadronic widths at the “on-shell” mass are compatible with QCD spectral sum rules (QSSR) and some low-energy theorems (LET) expectations for an unmixed lowest mass glueball/gluonium σB of a mass around 1 GeV and a large OZI-violation decay into ππ.

  12. Characteristics of low-latitude whistlers and their relation with f0F2 and magnetic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Z.; Wang, T.; Xu, J.; Chen, S.; Liang, B.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of low-latitude whistlers observed with instrumentation at three locations in China over a three-year period are discussed. The whistler maxima were always detected after midnight, local time, and none occurred during the daytime or evening. The rate of occurrence at the three sites was less than 1/min. A similarity was found between the diurnal variation of the median value of the critical frequency of the F2 region and that of the whistler dispersion. A set of algebraic equations was employed to calculate the electron concentration in the equatorial plane at the top of the propagation path (Neq) and the tube content (NT). The whistler dispersion and f0F2 (the critical frequency) were then converted into Neq and NT, resulting in calculated median values which agreed with satellite observations. Finally, a positive correlation was obtained between the daily variation of Kp and whistler dispersion, supporting the hypothesis that the whistler occurrence rate at low latitudes peaks one or two days after a geomagnetic storm day.

  13. Upper limit for the cross-section of the overlapping scalar resonances f0(980) and a0(980) produced in proton proton collisions in the range of the reaction threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskal, P.; Adam, H.-H.; Budzanowski, A.; Czyzykiewicz, R.; Grzonka, D.; Janusz, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Khoukaz, A.; Kilian, K.; Kolf, C.; Kowina, P.; Lister, T.; Oelert, W.; Piskor-Ignatowicz, C.; Przerwa, J.; Quentmeier, C.; Rozek, T.; Santo, R.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Siemaszko, M.; Smyrski, J.; Strzalkowski, A.; Täschner, A.; Winter, P.; Wolke, M.; Wüstner, P.; Zipper, W.

    2003-09-01

    Utilizing a missing mass technique we investigate the pp rightarrow ppX reaction scanning beam energies in the range permitting to create a mass close to that of the f0(980) and a0(980) scalar resonances, but still below the K+K- threshold where they decay dominantly into pipi and pieta mesons, respectively. Prior to the data analysis we introduce a notion of the close to threshold total cross-section for broad resonances. We estimated for the overlapping mesons a0 and f0 the total cross-section to be smaller than 430 nb at excess energy of Q = 5 MeV. The experiment has been performed at the Cooler Synchrotron (COSY) using the COSY-11 facility.

  14. Investigation of the isotopic ratio 129I/I in petrified wood.

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Tania; Steier, Peter; Wallner, Gabriele; Cichocki, Otto; Sterba, Johannes H

    2013-06-01

    In fossil specimens, measurements of the natural isotopic ratio (129)I/I may provide a method to estimate the age of sample. The motivation for measuring the isotopic composition ((129)I/I) of petrified wood samples collected from Austria was to check this feasibility. Alkaline fusion together with anion exchange was used to extract iodine from the sample. Typical sample size for this study was 10-90 g. An atomic ratio as low as 10(-14) was determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Uranium concentrations measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and α-spectrometry were found to be less than 3 mg kg(-1), therefore the contribution from fissiogenic (129)I was small and an estimation of ages was based on the decrease of the initial ratio (due to decay of the cosmogenic (129)I in a closed system) after subtraction of the fissiogenic (129)I. The value of the prenuclear ratio is crucial for the use of the (129)I system for dating purposes in the terrestrial environment. From the preanthropogenic (initial) ratio of 1.5 × 10(-12) of the hydrosphere and the results of the present study for the samples from Altenburg (1.05 × 10(-12)) and Fuerwald (6.16 × 10(-13)), respective ages of 8 ± 2.2 and 20.2 ± 2.2 million years were derived. Since samples were collected from a stratum deposited in the Upper Oligocene/Ergerien period (~25-30 million years ago), it can be concluded that these isotopic ratios do not show ages but an elapsed time since fossil wood was isolated from mineral rich water. Paleontological investigation shows that samples from Altenburg had mixed characteristics of old and modern Tertiary plants, thus an origin from a younger stratum re-sedimented with Oligocene cannot be excluded. However, the sample from Drasenhofen reflects that the (129)I/I system might not always be suitable for the dating of petrified wood sample due to fixation of anthropogenic (129)I into surface fractures.

  15. Photometric and Period Investigation of the Late F-type Overcontact Binary II UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Kreiner, J.

    2016-03-01

    II UMa is a late F-type (F5) contact binary with a close-in tertiary and a distant visual companion. According to the four-color (B V RcIc) light curves’ solutions of II UMa, it is a high fill-out (f = 86.6%) and low-mass ratio (q = 0.172) contact binary system, which indicates that it is at the late evolutionary stage of late-type tidal-locked binary stars. The masses of the primary star and secondary star are calculated to be {M}1=1.99{M}⊙ and {M}2=0.34{M}⊙ . The primary star has evolved from the zero-age main sequence, but it still appeared before the terminal-age main sequence, and the secondary star is even more evolved. Considering the mass ratio ({M}3/{M}1=0.67) obtained by spectroscopic observations, the mass of the close-in tertiary is estimated to be {M}3=1.34{M}⊙ . The period variations of the binary system are investigated for the first time. According to the observed-calculated (O-C) curve analysis, a continuous period increase at a rate of {dP}/{dt}=4.88× {10}-7 {day} {{yr}}-1 is determined. The parabolic variation in the O-C curve may be part of a cyclic period of change, or the combined period of change of a parabolic variation and a cyclic one. More instances of minimum light are needed to confirm this. The presence of the tertiary component may play an important role in the formation and evolution of this binary system by drawing angular momentum from the central system during the pre-contact stage.

  16. A Multi-wavelength Investigation of RCW175: An H II Region Harboring Spinning Dust Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Compiègne, M.; Dickinson, C.; Alves, M. I. R.; Flagey, N.; Shenoy, S.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S.; Casassus, S.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Molinari, S.; Elia, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Schisano, E.

    2012-08-01

    Using infrared, radio continuum, and spectral observations, we performed a detailed investigation of the H II region RCW175. We determined that RCW175, which actually consists of two separate H II regions, G29.1-0.7 and G29.0-0.6, is located at a distance of 3.2 ± 0.2 kpc. Based on the observations we infer that the more compact G29.0-0.6 is less evolved than G29.1-0.7 and was possibly produced as a result of the expansion of G29.1-0.7 into the surrounding interstellar medium. We compute a star formation rate for RCW175 of (12.6 ± 1.9) × 10-5 M ⊙ yr-1, and identified six possible young stellar object candidates within its vicinity. Additionally, we estimate that RCW175 contains a total dust mass of 215 ± 53 M ⊙. RCW175 has previously been identified as a source of anomalous microwave emission (AME), an excess of emission at centimeter wavelengths often attributed to electric dipole radiation from the smallest dust grains. We find that the AME previously detected in RCW175 is not correlated with the smallest dust grains (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or small carbonaceous dust grains), but rather with the exciting radiation field within the region. This is a similar result to that found in the Perseus molecular cloud, another region which harbors AME, suggesting that the radiation field may play a pivotal role in the production of this new Galactic emission mechanism. Finally, we suggest that these observations may hint at the importance of understanding the role played by the major gas ions in spinning dust models.

  17. A BCS-like gap in the superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15.

    PubMed

    Chen, T Y; Tesanovic, Z; Liu, R H; Chen, X H; Chien, C L

    2008-06-26

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in the high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) copper oxides two decades ago, it has been firmly established that the CuO(2) plane is essential for superconductivity and gives rise to a host of other very unusual properties. A new family of superconductors with the general composition of LaFeAsO(1-x)F(x) has recently been discovered and the conspicuous lack of the CuO(2) planes raises the tantalizing question of a different pairing mechanism in these oxypnictides. The superconducting gap (its magnitude, structure, and temperature dependence) is intimately related to pairing. Here we report the observation of a single gap in the superconductor SmFeAsO(0.85)F(0.15) with T(c) = 42 K as measured by Andreev spectroscopy. The gap value of 2Delta = 13.34 +/- 0.3 meV gives 2Delta/k(B)T(c) = 3.68 (where k(B) is the Boltzmann constant), close to the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) prediction of 3.53. The gap decreases with temperature and vanishes at T(c) in a manner consistent with the BCS prediction, but dramatically different from that of the pseudogap behaviour in the copper oxide superconductors. Our results clearly indicate a nodeless gap order parameter, which is nearly isotropic in size across different sections of the Fermi surface, and are not compatible with models involving antiferromagnetic fluctuations, strong correlations, the t-J model, and the like, originally designed for the high-T(c) copper oxides.

  18. Evidence for the Synthesis of ATP by an F0F1 ATP Synthase in Membrane Vesicles from Halorubrum Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faguy, David; Lawson, Darion; Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Vesicles prepared in a buffer containing ADP, Mg(2+) and Pi synthesized ATP at an initial rate of 2 nmols/min/mg protein after acidification of the bulk medium (pH 8 (right arrow) 4). The intravesicular ATP concentration reached a steady state after about 30 seconds and slowly declined thereafter. ATP synthesis was inhibited by low concentrations of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and m-chlorophenylhydrazone indicating that synthesis took place in response to the proton gradient. NEM and PCMS, which inhibit vacuolar ATPases and the vacuolar-like ATPases of extreme halophiles, did not affect ATP synthesis, and, in fact, produced higher steady state levels of ATP. This suggested that two ATPase activities were present, one which catalyzed ATP synthesis and one that caused its hydrolysis. Azide, a specific inhibitor of F0F1 ATP Synthases, inhibited halobacterial ATP synthesis. The distribution of acridine orange as imposed by a delta pH demonstrated that azide inhibition was not due to the collapse of the proton gradient due to azide acting as a protonophore. Such an effect was observed, but only at azide concentrations higher than those that inhibited ATP synthesis. These results confirm the earler observations with cells of H. saccharovorum and other extreme halophiles that ATP synthesis is inconsistent with the operation of a vacuolar-like ATPase. Therefore, the observation that a vacuolar-like enzyme is responsible for ATP synthesis (and which serves as the basis for imputing ATP synthesis to the vacuolar-like ATPases of the extreme halophiles, and the Archaea in general) should be taken with some degree of caution.

  19. Superconducting phase fluctuations in SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 from diamagnetism at a low magnetic field above Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prando, G.; Lascialfari, A.; Rigamonti, A.; Romanó, L.; Sanna, S.; Putti, M.; Tropeano, M.

    2011-08-01

    Superconducting fluctuations (SFs) in SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 (characterized by superconducting transition temperature Tc≃52.3 K) are investigated by means of isothermal high-resolution dc magnetization measurements. The diamagnetic response above Tc to magnetic fields up to 1 T is similar to that previously reported for underdoped cuprate superconductors and justified in terms of metastable superconducting islands of nonzero order parameter lacking long-range coherence because of strong phase fluctuations. In the high-field regime (H≳1.5 T) scaling arguments predicted on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau theory for conventional SFs are confirmed, at variance with what is observed in the low-field regime. This fact shows that two different phenomena are simultaneously present in the fluctuating diamagnetism, namely the phase SFs of novel character and the conventional SFs. High magnetic fields (1.5 T ≲H≪Hc2) are found to suppress the former while leaving unaltered the latter.

  20. Granularity and vortex dynamics in LaFeAsO0.92F0.08 probed by harmonics of the ac magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polichetti, Massimiliano; Adesso, Maria G.; Zola, Danilo; Luo, Jianlin; Chen, G. F.; Li, Zheng; Wang, N. L.; Noce, Canio; Pace, Sandro

    2008-12-01

    Fundamental and higher harmonics of the ac magnetic susceptibility have been measured on LaFeAsO0.92F0.08 samples as a function of the temperature, at various amplitudes and frequencies of the ac magnetic field, with a small superimposed dc field parallel to the ac field. The granularity of the samples has been investigated and the intergrain and intragrain contributions have been clearly individuated looking at both the first and the third harmonics. The vortex dynamics has been also analyzed, and a comparison with the magnetic behavior of both the MgB2 and the cuprate superconductors has been performed. Some vortex dissipative phenomena, i.e., the thermally activated flux flow and the flux creep, have been detected in the presented experimental data, similar to what have been obtained on YBCO. Nevertheless, although the general behavior is similar, several differences have been also evidenced between these different classes of superconductors, mainly in the third harmonics. We infer that different vortex dynamics has to be included into the analysis of the magnetic response in this iron-based material.

  1. Investigation of II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Sensitized Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoz, Sabit

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, also referred to as quantum dots (QDs) which have advantages of low-cost, photostability, high molar extinction coefficients and size-dependent optical properties, have been the focus of great scientific and technological efforts in solar cells development. Due to the multi-electron generation effect, the theoretical maximum efficiency of quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) is much higher than that of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Thus QDSSCs have a clear potential to overtake the efficiency of other kinds of solar cells. Doped semiconductor QDs can not only retain nearly all advantages of intrinsic QDs, but also have additional absorption bands for improved efficiency. This approach is particularly important for wide band gap semiconductors, for example, zinc based QDs. Zinc based are desirable candidates as they are inexpensive, earth abundant and nontoxic. When doped, they can cover a broad range of visible spectrum. In my project, I aim at developing novel methods for the preparation of II-VI QDs and investigating the effects of doping on the properties and performances of QDSSCs. Cadmium selenide (CdSe), manganese doped cadmium selenide (Mn:CdSe), and manganese doped zinc sulfide (Mn:ZnS) QDs have been synthesized by laser ablation in water. The structural and luminescent properties of the QDs have been investigated. In addition, QDSSC performances of the samples have been measured using nanowire electrode made of ZnO and Zn2SnO 4. I have also successfully synthesized europium doped zinc sulfide (Eu:ZnS) and manganese doped cadmium sulfide (Mn:CdS) nanoparticles by wet chemical method, and analyzed structural, optical, and magnetic properties as well as the device performance of the nanoparticles.

  2. Topological and functional relationship of subunits F1-gamma and F0I-PVP(b) in the mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Gaballo, A; Zanotti, F; Solimeo, A; Papa, S

    1998-12-15

    Diamide treatment of the F0F1-ATP synthase in "inside out" submitochondrial particles (ESMP) in the absence of a respiratory Delta mu H+ as well as of isolated Fo reconstituted with F1 or F1-gamma subunit results in direct disulfide cross-linking between cysteine 197 in the carboxy-terminal region of the F0I-PVP(b) subunit and cysteine 91 at the carboxyl end of a small alpha-helix of subunit F1-gamma, both located in the stalk. The F0I-PVP(b) and F1-gamma cross-linking cause dramatic enhancement of oligomycin-sensitive decay of Delta mu H+. In ESMP and MgATP particles the cross-linking is accompanied by decoupling of respiratory ATP synthesis. These effects are consistent with the view that F0I-PVP(b) and F1-gamma are components of the stator and rotor of the proposed rotary motor, respectively. The fact that the carboxy-terminal region of F0I-PVP(b) and the short alpha-helix of F1-gamma can form a direct disulfide bridge shows that these two protein domains are, at least in the resting state of the enzyme, in direct contact. In isolated F0, diamide also induces cross-linking of OSCP with another subunit of F0, but this has no significant effect on proton conduction. When ESMP are treated with diamide in the presence of Delta mu H+ generated by respiration, neither cross-linking between F0I-PVP(b) and F1-gamma subunits nor the associated effects on proton conduction and ATP synthesis is observed. Cross-linking is restored in respiring ESMP by Delta mu H+ collapsing agents as well as by DCCD or oligomycin. These observations indicate that the torque generated by Delta mu H+ decay through Fo induces a relative motion and/or a separation of the F0I-PVP(b) subunit and F1-gamma which places the single cysteine residues, present in each of the two subunits, at a distance at which they cannot be engaged in disulfide bridging.

  3. Vibrational dynamics of plant light-harvesting complex LHC II investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Maksym; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Rusevich, Leonid; Pieper, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from spinach was investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering (QENS and INS) at three different temperatures of 80, 160, and 285 K. QENS/INS spectra of solubilised LHC II and of the corresponding buffer solution were obtained separately and exhibit characteristic inelastic features. After subtraction of the buffer contribution, the INS spectrum of LHC II reveals a distinct Boson peak at ˜ 2.5 meV at 80 K that shifts towards lower energies if the temperature is increased to 285 K. This effect is interpreted in terms of a "softening" of the protein matrix along with the dynamical transition at ˜ 240 K. Our findings indicate that INS is a valuable method to obtain the density of vibrational states not only at cryogenic, but also at physiological temperatures.

  4. INVESTIGATING THE DEAROMATIVE REARRANGEMENT OF BIARYL PHOSPHINE-LIGATED PD(II) COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Phillip J.; Maimone, Thomas J.; Su, Mingjuan; Chen, Jiahao; Müller, Peter; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    A series of monoligated L•PdII(Ar)X complexes (L = dialkyl biarylphosphine) have been prepared and studied in an effort to better understand an unusual dearomative rearrangement previously documented in these systems. Experimental and theoretical evidence suggest a concerted process involving the unprecedented PdII-mediated insertion of an aryl group into an unactivated arene. PMID:23153301

  5. Possible Involvement of F1F0-ATP synthase and Intracellular ATP in Keratinocyte Differentiation in normal skin and skin lesions

    PubMed Central

    Xiaoyun, Xie; Chaofei, Han; Weiqi, Zeng; Chen, Chen; Lixia, Lu; Queping, Liu; Cong, Peng; Shuang, Zhao; Juan, Su; Xiang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    The F1F0-ATP synthase, an enzyme complex, is mainly located on the mitochondrial inner membrane or sometimes cytomembrane to generate or hydrolyze ATP, play a role in cell proliferation. This study focused on the role of F1F0-ATP synthase in keratinocyte differentiation, and its relationship with intracellular and extracellular ATP (InATP and ExATP). The F1F0-ATP synthase β subunit (ATP5B) expression in various skin tissues and confluence-dependent HaCaT differentiation models was detected. ATP5B expression increased with keratinocyte and HaCaT cell differentiation in normal skin, some epidermis hyper-proliferative diseases, squamous cell carcinoma, and the HaCaT cell differentiation model. The impact of InATP and ExATP content on HaCaT differentiation was reflected by the expression of the differentiation marker involucrin. Inhibition of F1F0-ATP synthase blocked HaCaT cell differentiation, which was associated with a decrease of InATP content, but not with changes of ExATP. Our results revealed that F1F0-ATP synthase expression is associated with the process of keratinocyte differentiation which may possibly be related to InATP synthesis. PMID:28209970

  6. Investigation of the Geoeffectiveness of CMEs Associated with IP Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth, V.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Wang, B.

    2015-06-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of the geoeffectiveness of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are associated with interplanetary (IP) type II bursts in Solar Cycle 23 during the period 1997 - 2008. About 47 % (109 out of 232) of IP type II bursts are found to be associated with geomagnetic storms. Of these 47 %, 27 % are associated with moderate, 14 % with intense, and 6 % with severe geomagnetic storms. We find that the IP type II bursts and their corresponding end frequencies can be used as indicators of CME geoeffectiveness: the lower the type II burst end frequency, the higher the possibility of having a stronger storm. In addition, we show that various combinations of CME remote-sensing and IP type II parameters can be used to improve geomagnetic storm forecasting.

  7. Dynamic investigation of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topoisomerases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qing; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2009-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases catalyze DNA decatenation and unwinding which is crucial for cell division, and therefore type II topoisomerases are some of the main targets of anti-cancer drugs. A recent crystal structure shows that, during the catalytic cycle, a yeast type II topoimerase can bend a 10 base pair DNA segment by up to 150 degrees. Bacterial gyrase, another type II topoisomerase, can wrap DNA into a tight 180 degree turn. Bending a stiff polymer like DNA requires considerable energy and could represent the rate limiting step in the catalytic (topological) cycle. Using modified deoxyribonucleotides in PCR reactions, stiffer DNA fragments have been produced and used as substrates for topoisomerase II-mediated relaxation of plectonemes introduced in single molecules using magnetic tweezers. The wrapping ability of gyrase decreases for diamino-purine-substituted DNA in which every base pair has three hydrogen-bonds. The overall rate of relaxation of plectonemes by recombinant human topoisomerase II alpha also decreases. These results reveal the dynamic properties of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topisomerases and suggest that A:T base pair melting is a rate determining step for bending and wrapping.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of bis-appended 1,2,3-triazole probe for the detection of Cu(II) ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Rhodes, Shannon; Winder, Domonique; Atkinson, Austin; Gibson, Jaclyn; Ming, Weihua; Padgett, Clifford; Landge, Shainaz; Aiken, Karelle

    2017-04-01

    A novel bis-1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole chemosensor, accessed with "Click Chemistry", was probed for its recognition of metal ions. The interaction of the sensor with various cation analytes was investigated by 1H-NMR, UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The bis-triazole is selective for Cu(II) with a detection limit in the micromolar concentration range and a clear to yellow colorimetric response that is exclusive to that ion is observed. The stoichiometry of probe to Cu(II), 2:1, was determined with Job's plots based on titration studies using UV-absorption and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Computational and spectroscopic investigations revealed that the sensor binds to Cu(II) via its triazole units.

  9. Two-band superconductivity in LaFeAsO0.89F0.11 at very high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Hunte, F; Jaroszynski, J; Gurevich, A; Larbalestier, D C; Jin, R; Sefat, A S; McGuire, M A; Sales, B C; Christen, D K; Mandrus, D

    2008-06-12

    The recent synthesis of the superconductor LaFeAsO(0.89)F(0.11) with transition temperature T(c) approximately 26 K (refs 1-4) has been quickly followed by reports of even higher transition temperatures in related compounds: 41 K in CeFeAsO(0.84)F(0.16) (ref. 5), 43 K in SmFeAsO(0.9)F(0.1) (ref. 6), and 52 K in NdFeAsO(0.89)F(0.11) and PrFeAsO(0.89)F(0.11) (refs 7, 8). These discoveries have generated much interest in the mechanisms and manifestations of unconventional superconductivity in the family of doped quaternary layered oxypnictides LnOTMPn (Ln: La, Pr, Ce, Sm; TM: Mn, Fe, Co, Ni; Pn: P, As), because many features of these materials set them apart from other known superconductors. Here we report resistance measurements of LaFeAsO(0.89)F(0.11) at high magnetic fields, up to 45 T, that show a remarkable enhancement of the upper critical field B(c2) compared to values expected from the slopes dB(c2)/dT approximately 2 T K(-1) near T(c), particularly at low temperatures where the deduced B(c2)(0) approximately 63-65 T exceeds the paramagnetic limit. We argue that oxypnictides represent a new class of high-field superconductors with B(c2) values surpassing those of Nb(3)Sn, MgB(2) and the Chevrel phases, and perhaps exceeding the 100 T magnetic field benchmark of the high-T(c) copper oxides.

  10. The adsorption behavior and mechanism investigation of Pb(II) removal by flocculation using microbial flocculant GA1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Yang, Zhaohui; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Jing; Xu, Haiyin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wei, Shumei; Wang, Like

    2013-11-01

    In this work, microbial flocculant GA1 (MBFGA1) was used to remove Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution. A series of experimental parameters including initial pH, MBFGA1 dose, temperature and initial calcium ions concentration on Pb(II) uptake was evaluated. Meanwhile, the flocculation mechanism of MBFGA1 was investigated. The removal efficiency of Pb(II) reached up to 99.85% when MBFGA1 was added in two stages, separately. The results indicated that Pb(II) adsorption could be described by the Langmuir adsorption model, and being the monolayer capacity negatively affected with an increase in temperature. The adsorption process could be described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Fourier transform-infrared spectra and environmental scanning electron microscope analysis indicated that MBFGA1 had a large number of functional groups, which had strong capacity for removing Pb(II). The main mechanisms of Pb(II) removal by MBFGA1 could be charge neutralization and adsorption bridging.

  11. Nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) metallo-intercalators: structural details of the DNA-binding by a combined experimental and computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Antonino; Bonsignore, Riccardo; Terenzi, Alessio; Spinello, Angelo; Giannici, Francesco; Longo, Alessandro; Almerico, Anna Maria; Barone, Giampaolo

    2014-04-28

    We present a thorough characterization of the interaction of novel nickel(II) (1), copper(II) (2) and zinc(II) (3) Schiff base complexes with native calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA), in buffered aqueous solution at pH 7.5. UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and viscometry titrations provided clear evidence of the intercalative mechanism of the three square-planar metal complexes, allowing us to determine the intrinsic DNA-binding constants (K(b)), equal to 1.3 × 10(7), 2.9 × 10(6), and 6.2 × 10(5) M(-1) for 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Preferential affinity, of one order of magnitude, toward AT compared to GC base pair sequences was detected by UV-vis absorption titrations of 1 with [poly(dG-dC)]2 and [poly(dA-dT)]2. Structural details of the intercalation site of the three metal complexes within [dodeca(dA-dT)]2 were obtained by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations followed by density functional theory/molecular mechanics (DFT/MM) calculations. The calculations revealed that three major intermolecular interactions contribute to the strong affinity between DNA and the three metal complexes: (1) the electrostatic attraction between the two positively charged triethylammoniummethyl groups of the metal complexes and the negatively charged phosphate groups of the DNA backbone; (2) the intercalation of the naphthalene moiety within the four nitrogen bases of the intercalation site; (3) the metal coordination by exocyclic donor atoms of the bases, specifically the carbonyl oxygen and amine nitrogen atoms. Remarkably, the Gibbs formation free energy calculated for the intercalation complexes of 1, 2 and 3 with [dodeca(dA-dT)]2 in the implicit water solution is in agreement with the experimental Gibbs free energy values obtained from the DNA-binding constants as ΔG° = -RT ln(K(b)). In particular, the DNA-binding affinity trend, 1 > 2 > 3, is reproduced. Finally, the first shell coordination distances calculated for the intercalation complex 3/[dodeca(dA-dT)]2 are in

  12. A preliminary investigation of the Topaz II reactor as a lunar surface power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Polansky, G.F.; Houts, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    Reactor power supplies offer many attractive characteristics for lunar surface applications. The Topaz II reactor resulted from an extensive development program in the former Soviet Union. Flight quality reactor units remain from this program and are currently under evaluation in the United States. This paper examines the potential for applying the Topaz II, originally developed to provide spacecraft power, as a lunar surface power supply.

  13. Phase II Investigation at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility in Savannah, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2012-05-01

    contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation is being conducted in phases, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase II objectives: Investigate the more detailed characteristics of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility and the contaminated Morgan and MoDOT private wells; Obtain additional information on the vertical and lateral distribution and concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility and the contaminated Morgan and MoDOT private wells; Investigate further for possible evidence of carbon tetrachloride in the subsurface (vadose zone) and deeper soils beneath the former CCC/USDA facility, as well as in the vicinity of the contaminated MoDOT private well.

  14. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  15. Pitch (F0) and formant profiles of human vowels and vowel-like baboon grunts: The role of vocalizer body size and voice-acoustic allometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendall, Drew; Kollias, Sophie; Ney, Christina; Lloyd, Peter

    2005-02-01

    Key voice features-fundamental frequency (F0) and formant frequencies-can vary extensively between individuals. Much of the variation can be traced to differences in the size of the larynx and vocal-tract cavities, but whether these differences in turn simply reflect differences in speaker body size (i.e., neutral vocal allometry) remains unclear. Quantitative analyses were therefore undertaken to test the relationship between speaker body size and voice F0 and formant frequencies for human vowels. To test the taxonomic generality of the relationships, the same analyses were conducted on the vowel-like grunts of baboons, whose phylogenetic proximity to humans and similar vocal production biology and voice acoustic patterns recommend them for such comparative research. For adults of both species, males were larger than females and had lower mean voice F0 and formant frequencies. However, beyond this, F0 variation did not track body-size variation between the sexes in either species, nor within sexes in humans. In humans, formant variation correlated significantly with speaker height but only in males and not in females. Implications for general vocal allometry are discussed as are implications for speech origins theories, and challenges to them, related to laryngeal position and vocal tract length. .

  16. Vacuolar ATPases, like F1,F0-ATPases, show a strong dependence of the reaction velocity on the binding of more than one ATP per enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kasho, V N; Boyer, P D

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies with vacuolar ATPases have shown that multiple copies catalytic subunits are present and that these have definite sequence homology with catalytic subunits of the F1,F0-ATPases. Experiments are reported that assess whether the vacuolar ATPases may have the unusual catalytic cooperativity with sequential catalytic site participation as in the binding change mechanism for the F1,F0-ATPases. The extent of reversal of bound ATP hydrolysis to bound ADP and Pi as medium ATP concentration was lowered was determined by 18O-exchange measurements for yeast and neurospora vacuolar ATPases. The results show a pronounced increase in the extent of water oxygen incorporation into the Pi formed as ATP concentration is decreased to the micromolar range. The F1,F0-ATPase from neurospora mitochondria showed an even more pronounced modulation, similar to that of other F1-type ATPases. The vacuolar ATPases thus appear to have a catalytic mechanism quite analogous to that of the F1,F0-ATPases. PMID:2530585

  17. The roles of voice onset time and F0 in stop consonant voicing perception: Effects of masking noise and low-pass filtering

    PubMed Central

    Winn, Matthew B.; Chatterjee, Monita; Idsardi, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The contributions of voice onset time (VOT) and fundamental frequency (F0) were evaluated for the perception of voicing in syllable-initial stop consonants in words that were low-pass filtered and/or masked by speech-shaped noise. It was expected that listeners would rely less on VOT and more on F0 in these degraded conditions. Method Twenty young normal-hearing listeners identified modified natural speech tokens that varied by VOT and F0 in several conditions of low-pass filtering and masking noise. Stimuli included /b/-/p/ and /d/-/t/ continua that were presented in separate blocks. Identification results were modeled using mixed-effects logistic regression. Results When speech was filtered and/or masked by noise, listeners’ voicing perceptions were driven less by VOT and more by F0. Speech-shaped masking noise exerted greater effects on the /b/-/p/ contrast, while low-pass filtering exerted greater effects on the /d/-/t/ contrast, consistent with the acoustics of these contrasts. Conclusion Listeners can adjust their use of acoustic-phonetic cues in a dynamic way that is appropriate for challenging listening conditions; cues that are less influential in ideal conditions can gain priority in challenging conditions. PMID:23785185

  18. On the role of horizontal wind shears in the generation of F0.5 layers over the dip equatorial location of Thiruvananthapuram: A numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridula, N.; Pant, Tarun Kumar

    2017-03-01

    A numerical simulation is carried out to estimate the rate of convergence of ionization required to produce a F0.5 layer with peak plasma frequency (foF0.5) of 3.2 MHz from three different background layer densities, over Thiruvananthapuram (8.5°N; 77°E; dip latitude 0.5°N), a dip equatorial station in India. Further the simulation study is extended to understand the convergences required by considering the seasonal mean peak F0.5 layer frequencies also. One possible mechanism by which this convergence can be produced is by a horizontal shear in the meridional wind. The corresponding shears required to generate the layer with the above convergence conditions are estimated. It is found that gravity waves are capable of generating wind shears, leading to the pooling of ionization and the generation of the layer over the dip equator. A meridional wind with the gravity wave induced wind shear is numerically estimated. Finally, the short scale gravity waves of periods around 3-23 min have been inferred to be more efficient in generating the wind shear when compared to large scale horizontal waves leading to the generation of F0.5 layer.

  19. Investigation of equid paleodiet from Schöningen 13 II-4 through dental wear and isotopic analyses: Archaeological implications.

    PubMed

    Rivals, Florent; Julien, Marie-Anne; Kuitems, Margot; Van Kolfschoten, Thijs; Serangeli, Jordi; Drucker, Dorothée G; Bocherens, Hervé; Conard, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    The paleodietary traits of the equid population from Schöningen 13 II-4 were investigated through tooth mesowear and microwear analyses, as well as stable isotopic analyses. The mesowear pattern observed on the upper teeth indicates a low abrasion diet with a significant amount of browse in the diet of the horses. The tooth microwear analysis and the isotopic data confirm that the horses from Schöningen 13 II-4 were mixed feeders, like many populations from other Pleistocene localities in Northern and Eastern Europe. Microwear also provides information on seasonal changes in the diet of the horses and offers the possibility to test hypotheses about the presence of one or several horse populations. Our analysis determined that the assemblage of horse remains from Schöningen 13 II-4 resulted from multiple accumulation events, which took place at different periods of time.

  20. Investigating the Conditions of the Formation of a Type II Radio Burst on 2014 January 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, W.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Ning, Z. J.; Ji, H. S.

    2016-10-01

    It is believed that type II radio bursts are generated by shock waves. In order to understand the generation conditions of type II radio bursts, we analyze the physical parameters of a shock front. The type II radio burst we selected was observed by the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) and Learmonth radio station and was associated with a limb coronal mass ejection (CME) occurring on 2014 January 8 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The evolution of the CME in the inner corona presents a double-layered structure that propagates outward. We fit the outer layer (OL) of the structure with a partial circle and divide it into seven directions from -45° to 45° with an angular separation of 15°. We measure the OL speed along the seven directions and find that the speed in the direction of -15° with respect to the central direction is the fastest. We use the differential emission measure method to calculate the physical parameters at the OL at the moment when the type II radio burst was initiated, including the temperature (T), emission measure (EM), temperature ratio ({T}d/{T}{{u}}), compression ratio (X), and Alfvén Mach number (M A). We compare the quantities X and M A to those obtained from band-splitting in the radio spectrum, and find that this type II radio burst is generated at a small region of the OL that is located at the sector in the 45° direction. The results suggest that the generation of type II radio bursts (shocks) requires larger values of X and M A rather than simply a higher speed of the disturbance.

  1. Evolution of Overlapping Spreading Centers: A SeaMARC II Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-07

    be seen if ACIFIC OCEAN - ,,’- ... . magma actually flows laterally below ’. ’ the ridge axis, but significant evidence 100 A has been found to support... ocean ridges based primarily on SeaMARC II data from our ONR cruise,-3) creation of fin 150 mcontour interval maps for 8°-18°N merging SeaMARC II data...time period. 2) A marked variation in fault-facing direction with spreading rate is observed on the flanks of mid- ocean ridges. On slow and

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of new water soluble Mn(II)(2) and Mg(II)(2) complexes for the substrate binding models of xylose/glucose isomerases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ayan; Bera, Manindranath

    2014-01-30

    In methanol, the reaction of stoichiometric amounts of Mn(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H(3)hpnbpda [H(3)hpnbpda=N,N'-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-hydroxy-1,3-propanediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid] in the presence of NaOH, afforded a new water soluble dinuclear manganese(II) complex, [Mn2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)] (1). Similarly, the reaction of Mg(OAc)(2)·4H(2)O and the ligand H3hpnbpda in the presence of NaOH, in methanol, yielded a new water soluble dinuclear magnesium(II) complex, [Mg2(hpnbpda)(μ-OAc)(H2O)2] (2). DFT calculations have been performed for the structural optimization of complexes 1 and 2. The DFT optimized structure of complex 1 shows that two manganese(II) centers are in a distorted square pyramidal geometry, whereas the DFT optimized structure of complex 2 reveals that two magnesium(II) centers adopt a six-coordinate distorted octahedral geometry. To understand the mode of substrate binding and the mechanistic details of the active site metals in xylose/glucose isomerases (XGI), we have investigated the binding interactions of biologically important monosaccharides d-glucose and d-xylose with complexes 1 and 2, in aqueous alkaline solution by a combined approach of FTIR, UV-vis, fluorescence, and (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence spectra show the binding-induced gradual decrease in emission of complexes 1 and 2 accompanied by a significant blue shift upon increasing the concentration of sugar substrates. The binding modes of d-glucose and d-xylose with complex 2 are indicated by their characteristic coordination induced shift (CIS) values in (13)C NMR spectra for C1 and C2 carbon atoms.

  3. Quantitative investigation of copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and computer-simulated appraisal of their potential significance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brumas, V; Venturini, M; Filella, M; Berthon, G

    1989-12-01

    S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (SCC) is a mucolytic agent extensively used in the treatment of respiratory tract disorders. Some of the undesirable side effects observed during SCC therapy being reminiscent of symptoms characteristic of copper and zinc imbalances, the objective of this paper was to test the possible interference of SCC with the metabolism of these two metals. Copper(II)- and zinc(II)-SCC complex equilibria have thus been investigated under physiological conditions by means of classical potentiometry combined with computer-assisted calculation techniques. Formation constants derived from these studies have then been used to simulate 1) the potential influence of SCC on the distribution of the above metals in blood plasma and 2) the extent to which gastrointestinal interactions between the drug and each metal ion in turn are likely to affect the bioavailability of each other. The results of these simulations show that 1) plasma therapeutic levels of SCC are not likely to induce dramatic changes in the distributions of copper(II) and zinc(II) low molecular weight fractions, 2) the gastrointestinal distribution of the drug is not affected by standard dietary doses of these metals, and 3) in contrast, therapeutic concentrations of SCC are capable of mobilizing significant fractions of both metals into tissue-diffusible electrically neutral complexes. In conclusion significant depletions of neither copper nor zinc are to be expected from oral administration of SCC. While the drug may to some extent facilitate the excretion of Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions from blood plasma, its gastrointestinal influence is, on the contrary, favorable to a better absorption of these two metals.

  4. Huge critical current density and tailored superconducting anisotropy in SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 by low-density columnar-defect incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; Jia, Y.; Mishra, V.; Chaparro, C.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Koshelev, A. E.; Welp, U.; Crabtree, G. W.; Zhu, S.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Karpinski, J.; Kwok, W. K.

    2013-11-01

    Iron-based superconductors could be useful for electricity distribution and superconducting magnet applications because of their relatively high critical current densities and upper critical fields. SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 is of particular interest as it has the highest transition temperature among these materials. Here we show that by introducing a low density of correlated nano-scale defects into this material by heavy-ion irradiation, we can increase its critical current density to up to 2 × 107 A cm-2 at 5 K—the highest ever reported for an iron-based superconductor—without reducing its critical temperature of 50 K. We also observe a notable reduction in the thermodynamic superconducting anisotropy, from 8 to 4 upon irradiation. We develop a model based on anisotropic electron scattering that predicts that the superconducting anisotropy can be tailored via correlated defects in semimetallic, fully gapped type II superconductors.

  5. Interacting cytoplasmic loops of subunits a and c of Escherichia coli F1F0 ATP synthase gate H+ transport to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Steed, P Ryan; Kraft, Kaitlin A; Fillingame, Robert H

    2014-11-25

    H(+)-transporting F1F0 ATP synthase catalyzes the synthesis of ATP via coupled rotary motors within F0 and F1. H(+) transport at the subunit a-c interface in transmembranous F0 drives rotation of a cylindrical c10 oligomer within the membrane, which is coupled to rotation of subunit γ within the α3β3 sector of F1 to mechanically drive ATP synthesis. F1F0 functions in a reversible manner, with ATP hydrolysis driving H(+) transport. ATP-driven H(+) transport in a select group of cysteine mutants in subunits a and c is inhibited after chelation of Ag(+) and/or Cd(+2) with the substituted sulfhydryl groups. The H(+) transport pathway mapped via these Ag(+)(Cd(+2))-sensitive Cys extends from the transmembrane helices (TMHs) of subunits a and c into cytoplasmic loops connecting the TMHs, suggesting these loop regions could be involved in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm. Here, using select loop-region Cys from the single cytoplasmic loop of subunit c and multiple cytoplasmic loops of subunit a, we show that Cd(+2) directly inhibits passive H(+) transport mediated by F0 reconstituted in liposomes. Further, in extensions of previous studies, we show that the regions mediating passive H(+) transport can be cross-linked to each other. We conclude that the loop-regions in subunits a and c that are implicated in H(+) transport likely interact in a single structural domain, which then functions in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm.

  6. Project PRE-Schooner II. Postshot Geologic and Engineering Properties Investigations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-11-01

    rock medium. 9 1. 5 PROJECT LOCATION AND ACCESSIBILITY The Pre-Schooner II Event was located in Owyhee County of southwestern Idaho. The site is...Radiation Laboratory, Livermore. 11. L. M. Gard and J. W. Hasler; "Geology of Proposed Schooner Site, Bruneau River Area, Owyhee County, Idaho" USGS

  7. Investigation of the strontium (Sr(II)) adsorption of an alginate microsphere as a low-cost adsorbent for removal and recovery from seawater.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Park, In-Su; Ryu, Taegong; Chung, Kang-Sup; Kim, Byuong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated alginate microspheres as a low-cost adsorbent for strontium (Sr(II)) removal and recovery from seawater. Alginate microspheres have demonstrated a superior adsorption capacity for Sr(II) ions (≈110 mg/g). A Freundlich isotherm model fits well with the Sr(II) adsorption of an alginate microsphere. The mechanism of Sr(II) adsorption is inferred as an ion exchange reaction with Ca(II) ions. The effects of the solution pH and co-existing ions in seawater are also investigated. Except for a pH of 1-2, Sr(II) adsorption capacity is not affected by pH. However, increasing the seawater concentration of metal cations seriously decreases Sr(II) uptake. In particular, highly concentrated (15,000 mg/L) Na(I) ions significantly interfere with Sr(II) adsorption. Sr(II) desorption was performed using 0.1 M HCl and CaCl2. Both regenerants show an excellent desorption efficiency, but the FTIR spectrum reveals that the chemical structure of the microsphere is destroyed after repeated use of HCl. Conversely, CaCl2 successfully desorbed Sr(II) without damage, and the Sr(II) adsorption capacity does not decrease after three repeated uses. The alginate microsphere was also applied to the adsorption of Sr(II) in a real seawater medium. Because of inhibition by co-existing ions, the Sr(II) adsorption capacity was decreased and the adsorption rate was retarded compared with D.I. water. Although the Sr(II) adsorption capacity was decreased, the alginate microsphere still exhibited 17.8 mg/g of Sr(II) uptake in the seawater medium. Considering its excellent Sr(II) uptake in seawater and its reusability, an alginate microsphere is an appropriate cost-effective adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Sr(II) from seawater.

  8. A spectroscopic investigation of captopril and the Cu(II) captopril system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Taddei, Paola; Tosi, M. Raffaella; Tugnoli, Vitaliano

    2001-05-01

    A Raman and IR study of captopril (CpSH), a synthetic derivative of L-proline, and the Cu(II)-CpSH system at different pHs and metal/ligand ratios was carried out. The vibrational spectra suggested disulphide formation (CpSSCp) by the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) and allowed the identification of the sites involved in metal coordination. Various complexes can be formed and the nature of the predominant species depends mainly on the pH. At pH 10 CpSH gives rise to two monomeric complexes with different structures depending on the metal/ligand ratio, whereas at acid pH a water-insoluble polymeric species predominates.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy for Investigation of Ribosome-inactivating Proteins' Type II Tetramerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savvateev, M.; Kozlovskaya, N.; Moisenovich, M.; Tonevitsky, A.; Agapov, I.; Maluchenko, N.; Bykov, V.; Kirpichnikov, M.

    2003-12-01

    Biology of the toxins violently depends on their carbohydrate-binding centres' organization. Toxin tetramerization can lead to both increasing of lectin-binding centres' number and changes in their structural organization. A number and three-dimensional localization of such centres per one molecule strongly influence on toxins' biological properties. Ricin was used to obtain the AFM images of natural dimeric RIPsII structures as far as ricinus agglutinin was used for achievement of AFM images of natural tetrameric RIPsII forms. It is well-known that viscumin (60 kDa) has a property to form tetrameric structures dependently on ambient conditions and its concentration. Usage of the model dimer-tetramer based on ricin-agglutinin allowed to identify viscumin tetramers in AFM scans and to differ them from dimeric viscumin structures. Quantification analysis produced with the NT-MDT software allowed to estimate the geometrical parameters of ricin, ricinus agglutinin and viscumin molecules.

  10. Cultural Resources Investigations at Redstone Arsenal, Madison County, Alabama. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    was an infant or child . Parts of broken pottery vessels were found with two of the burials. I As mentioned above, ceramics were relatively infrequent...ai-j- IL is also due to a certain amiount of I tI ’rt ie 1(a ao -- tilit- iV! t-ri i process does not porn i t an extant I ii tfel to !, -,I) Ip it

  11. An Investigation Of The Metallicity Dependence Of The Sn Type Ii Mn Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeunjin; Sobeck, J.; Frohlich, C.; Truran, J.

    2010-01-01

    Element abundance trends over the history of our Galaxy serve as important guides in establishing relative contributions from supernovae of Types Ia and II. In particular, spectroscopic studies have revealed a deficiency of manganese (Mn) relative to the abundances of neighboring iron-peak nuclei in metal-poor stars. However, more recent analyses of the observational data have found a constant Mn/Fe abundance ratio over a wide range of metallicity and hence, contradict these previous findings. In this project, we will study the nucleosynthetic yields of Type II supernovae as a function of metallicity by parameterizing the initial properties of the shock. We will compare our results with the two distinct manganese abundance trends identified above. Once we study the metallicity dependency of Type II yields as reflected in observations at lower metallicities, we will explore the constraints this imposes on Type Ia supernova contributions to Mn in different stellar and galactic populations. We acknowledge the financial support by the National Science Foundation for the Frontier Center Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA). C.F. acknowledges an Enrico Fermi Fellowship.

  12. Evolutionary behaviour of AGN: Investigations on BL Lac objects and Seyfert II galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, V.

    2000-12-01

    The evolution and nature of AGN is still one of the enigmatic questions in astrophysics. While large and complete Quasar samples are available, special classes of AGN, like BL Lac objects and Seyfert II galaxies, are still rare objects. In this work I present two new AGN samples. The first one is the HRX-BL Lac survey, resulting in a sample of X-ray selected BL Lac objects. This sample results from 223 BL Lac candidates based on a correlation of X-ray sources with radio sources. The identification of this sample is 98% complete. 77 objects have been identified as BL Lac objects and form the HRX-BL Lac complete sample, the largest homogeneous sample of BL Lac objects existing today. For this sample, redshifts are now known for 62 objects (81 %). In total I present 101 BL Lac objects in the enlarged HRX-BL Lac survey, for which redshift information is available for 84 objects. During the HRX-BL Lac survey I found several objects of special interest. 1ES 1517+656 turned out to be the brightest known BL Lac object in the universe. 1ES 0927+500 could be the first BL Lac object with a line detected in the X-ray region. RX J1211+2242 is probably the the counterpart of the up to now unidentified gamma-ray source 3EG J1212+2304. Additionally I present seven candidates for ultra high frequency peaked BL Lac objects. RX J1054+3855 and RX J1153+3517 are rare high redshift X-ray bright QSO or accreting binary systems with huge magnetic fields. For the BL Lac objects I suggest an unified scenario in which giant elliptical galaxies, formed by merging events of spiral galaxies at z > 2, start as powerful, radio dominated BL Lacs. As the jet gets less powerful, the BL Lacs start to get more X-ray dominated, showing less total luminosities (for z < 1). This effect is seen in the different evolutionary behavior detected in high and low frequency cut off BL Lac objects (HBL and LBL, respectively). The model of negative evolution is supported by assumptions about the energetic effects

  13. A qualitative investigation of hypomania and depression in bipolar II disorder.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kathryn; Parker, Gordon; Manicavasagar, Vijaya

    2013-12-01

    Psychological treatments may have differential impacts on bipolar (BP) sub-types, yet little is known about psychological processes in BP II disorder. We explored cognitive processes and behaviors mediating hypomania and depression in participants diagnosed with BP II disorder. Semi-structured interviews with 13 participants were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The majority were able to detect hypomanic and depressive prodromes, and describe behavioral responses to these mood states. Qualitative analyses revealed four theme clusters. Hypomania ascent beliefs described beliefs regarding identity, positioning hypomania as an enjoyable state preferable to depression. Hypomania descent beliefs referred to hypomania as a signal for depression, causing interpersonal difficulties. Beliefs about depression positioned depression as an abnormal, fearful state, impacting negatively interpersonally, occupationally and on self-perceptions. Finally, The impact of chronicity referred to shifts in coping strategies over time, moving from maladaptive to adaptive behavioral responses. Themes were interpreted within the framework of a cognitive model of BP disorder. Clinical implications for BP II disorder were discussed.

  14. Production of f 2(1270) and f 0(975) mesons by photons and hadrons of energy 65 175 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, R. J.; Atkinson, M.; Baake, M.; Bagdasarian, L. S.; Barberis, D.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brook, N.; Charity, T.; Clegg, A. B.; Coyle, P.; Danaher, S.; Danagulian, S.; Davenport, M.; Dickinson, B.; Diekmann, B.; Donnachie, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Eades, J.; Ellison, R. J.; Fiedler, F.; Flower, P. S.; Foster, J. M.; Galbraith, W.; Galumian, P. I.; Gapp, C.; Gebert, F.; Hallewell, G.; Heinloth, K.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hickman, M. T.; Hoeger, K. C.; Hofmann, R. P.; Holzkamp, A.; Holzkamp, S.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacob, H. P.; Joseph, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Kingler, J.; Körsgen, G.; Kolya, S. D.; Lafferty, G. D.; McCann, H.; McClatchey, R.; McManus, C.; Mercer, D.; Morris, J. A. G.; Morris, J. V.; Newton, D.; O'Connor, A.; Oedingen, R.; Oganesian, A. G.; Ottewell, P. J.; Paterson, C. N.; Paul, E.; Reid, D.; Rotscheidt, H.; Sharp, P. H.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Thacker, N. A.; Thompson, L.; Thompson, R. J.; Waterhouse, J.; Weigend, A. S.; Wilson, G. W.

    1992-06-01

    Measurements are reported of inclusive f 2(1270) and f 0(975) production in γp, π± p and K ± p collisions at photon beam energies of 65 to 175 GeV and hadron beam energies of 80 and 140 GeV. The f 2 and f 0 mesons were found at masses of 1.250 GeV and 0.961 GeV respectively. Inclusive f 2 production at low x F was found to have a similar p T dependence for each beam type, whereas an additional pion-exchange contribution was found for production by pions at high x F. Cross sections are compared with those for ρ0 production and give no indication of a non-qbar q component in either f-meson state.

  15. Identification and validation of the mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase as the molecular target of the immunomodulatory benzodiazepine Bz-423.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathryn M; Chen, Xueni; Boitano, Anthony; Swenson, Lara; Opipari, Anthony W; Glick, Gary D

    2005-04-01

    Bz-423 is a 1,4-benzodiazepine that suppresses disease in lupus-prone mice by selectively killing pathogenic lymphocytes, and it is less toxic compared to current lupus drugs. Cells exposed to Bz-423 rapidly generate O(2)(-) within mitochondria, and this reactive oxygen species is the signal initiating apoptosis. Phage display screening revealed that Bz-423 binds to the oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP) component of the mitochondrial F(1)F(0)-ATPase. Bz-423 inhibited the F(1)F(0)-ATPase in vitro, and reconstitution experiments demonstrated that inhibition was mediated by the OSCP. This target was further validated by generating cells with reduced OSCP expression using RNA interference and studying the sensitivity of these cells to Bz-423. Our findings help explain the efficacy and selectivity of Bz-423 for autoimmune lymphocytes and highlight the OSCP as a target to guide the development of novel lupus therapeutics.

  16. Forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase during F0F1-ATPase reversal: critical role of matrix substrate-level phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Gerencser, Akos A.; Mandi, Miklos; Mathe, Katalin; Töröcsik, Beata; Doczi, Judit; Turiak, Lilla; Kiss, Gergely; Konràd, Csaba; Vajda, Szilvia; Vereczki, Viktoria; Oh, Richard J.; Adam-Vizi, Vera

    2010-01-01

    In pathological conditions, F0F1-ATPase hydrolyzes ATP in an attempt to maintain mitochondrial membrane potential. Using thermodynamic assumptions and computer modeling, we established that mitochondrial membrane potential can be more negative than the reversal potential of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) but more positive than that of the F0F1-ATPase. Experiments on isolated mitochondria demonstrated that, when the electron transport chain is compromised, the F0F1-ATPase reverses, and the membrane potential is maintained as long as matrix substrate-level phosphorylation is functional, without a concomitant reversal of the ANT. Consistently, no cytosolic ATP consumption was observed using plasmalemmal KATP channels as cytosolic ATP biosensors in cultured neurons, in which their in situ mitochondria were compromised by respiratory chain inhibitors. This finding was further corroborated by quantitative measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption, and extracellular acidification rates, indicating nonreversal of ANT of compromised in situ neuronal and astrocytic mitochondria; and by bioluminescence ATP measurements in COS-7 cells transfected with cytosolic- or nuclear-targeted luciferases and treated with mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors in the presence of glycolytic plus mitochondrial vs. only mitochondrial substrates. Our findings imply the possibility of a rescue mechanism that is protecting against cytosolic/nuclear ATP depletion under pathological conditions involving impaired respiration. This mechanism comes into play when mitochondria respire on substrates that support matrix substrate-level phosphorylation.—Chinopoulos, C., Gerencser, A. A., Mandi, M., Mathe, K., Töröcsik, B., Doczi, J., Turiak, L., Kiss, G., Konràd, C., Vajda, S., Vereczki, V., Oh, R. J., Adam-Vizi, V. Forward operation of adenine nucleotide translocase during F0F1-ATPase reversal: critical role of matrix substrate-level phosphorylation. PMID

  17. F1F0-ATPase, early target of the radical initiator 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in rat liver mitochondria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Beauseigneur, F; Goubern, M; Chapey, M F; Gresti, J; Vergely, C; Tsoko, M; Demarquoy, J; Rochette, L; Clouet, P

    1996-12-01

    This study was designed to determine which enzyme activities were first impaired in mitochondria exposed to 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), a known radical initiator. EPR spin-trapping revealed generation of reactive oxygen species although malondialdehyde formation remained very low. With increasing AAPH concentrations, State-3 respiration was progressively depressed with unaltered ADP/O ratios. A top-down approach demonstrated that alterations were located at the phosphorylation level. As shown by inhibitor titrations, ATP/ADP translocase activity was unaffected in the range of AAPH concentrations used. In contrast, AAPH appeared to exert a deleterious effect at the level of F1F0-ATPase, comparable with dicyclohexylcarbodi-imide, which alters Fo proton channel. A comparison of ATP hydrolase activity in uncoupled and broken mitochondria reinforced this finding. In spite of its pro-oxidant properties, AAPH was shown to act as a dose-dependent inhibitor of cyclosporin-sensitive permeability transition initiated by Ca2+, probably as a consequence of its effect on F1F0-ATPase. Resveratrol, a potent antiperoxidant, completely failed to prevent the decrease in State-3 respiration caused by AAPH. The data suggest that AAPH, when used under mild conditions, acted as a radical initiator and was capable of damaging F1F0-ATPase, thereby slowing respiratory chain activity and reducing mitochondrial antioxidant defences.

  18. SERS and DFT investigation of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and its metal complexes with Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, László; Herman, Krisztian; Mircescu, Nicoleta E.; Fălămaş, Alexandra; Leopold, Loredana F.; Leopold, Nicolae; Buzumurgă, Claudia; Chiş, Vasile

    The development of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a prospective analytical methodology for detection of metal ions was shown in recent years by several studies on metal complexes. In this work, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and its Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) complexes were studied by FTIR, FT-Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopies. Molecular geometry optimization, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distribution and vibrational frequencies calculations were performed using the hybrid B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the PAN molecule and its bidentate complexes. The calculated MEP distributions indicated the atoms with highest electronegativity, the adsorption to the silver surface occurring through these atoms. Based on experimental and theoretical data we were able to identify unique and representative features, useful for the identification of each PAN-metal complex.

  19. SERS and DFT investigation of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and its metal complexes with Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Szabó, László; Herman, Krisztian; Mircescu, Nicoleta E; Fălămaş, Alexandra; Leopold, Loredana F; Leopold, Nicolae; Buzumurgă, Claudia; Chiş, Vasile

    2012-07-01

    The development of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a prospective analytical methodology for detection of metal ions was shown in recent years by several studies on metal complexes. In this work, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and its Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) complexes were studied by FTIR, FT-Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopies. Molecular geometry optimization, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) distribution and vibrational frequencies calculations were performed using the hybrid B3LYP exchange-correlation functional for the PAN molecule and its bidentate complexes. The calculated MEP distributions indicated the atoms with highest electronegativity, the adsorption to the silver surface occurring through these atoms. Based on experimental and theoretical data we were able to identify unique and representative features, useful for the identification of each PAN-metal complex.

  20. A comparative investigation of the thermal unfolding of pseudoazurin in the Cu(II)-holo and apo form.

    PubMed

    Stirpe, Andrea; Sportelli, Luigi; Guzzi, Rita

    2006-12-05

    The contribution of the copper ion to the stability and to the unfolding pathway of pseudoazurin was investigated by a comparative analysis of the thermal unfolding of the Cu(II)-holo and apo form of the protein. The unfolding has been followed by calorimetry, fluorescence, optical density, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The thermal transition of Cu(II)-holo pseudoazurin is irreversible and occurs between 60.0 and 67.3 degrees C, depending on the scan rate and technique used. The denaturation pathway of Cu(II)-holo pseudoazurin can be described by the Lumry-Eyring model: N --> U --> [corrected] F; the protein reversibly goes from the native (N) to the unfolded (U) state, and then irreversibly to the final (F) state. The simulation of the experimental calorimetric profiles, according to this model, allowed us to determine the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the two steps. The DeltaG value calculated for the Cu(II)-holo pseudoazurin is 39.2 kJ.mol(-1) at 25 degrees C. The sequence of events in the denaturation process of Cu(II)-holo pseudoazurin emergence starts with the disruption of the copper site and the hydrophobic core destabilization followed by the global protein unfolding. According to the EPR findings, the native type-1 copper ion shows type-2 copper features after the denaturation. The removal of the copper ion (apo form) significantly reduces the stability of the protein as evidenced by a DeltaG value of 16.5 kJ.mol(-1) at 25 degrees C. Moreover, the apo Paz unfolding occurs at 41.8 degrees C and is compatible with a two-state reversible process N --> [corrected] U.

  1. Thiocyanate-free cyclometalated ruthenium(II) sensitizers for DSSC: a combined experimental and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Chitumalla, Ramesh Kumar; Gupta, Kankatala S V; Malapaka, Chandrasekhram; Fallahpour, Reza; Islam, Ashraful; Han, Liyuan; Kotamarthi, Bhanuprakash; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2014-02-14

    In an effort to bring out efficient thiocyanate-free dyes for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) we have designed, synthesized and characterized four novel cyclometalated ruthenium(II) dyes (M1 to M4) with superior photochemical properties. All dyes contain terpyridyl ligands (TPY) with carboxylic acids as anchoring groups and cyclometalated ligand (TPY-C) with substituents for fine tuning the electronic properties. We obtain a broad absorption band which extends up to 725 nm due to metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) when donating groups are used, which slightly blue-shifts when a withdrawing group is used. In addition to the CT, small HOMO-LUMO gaps are obtained from electrochemical measurements which indicate characteristics of an ideal sensitizer. All four dyes were used as sensitizers for DSSC and photoelectrochemical measurements were carried out. Reasonably good efficiency (7.1%) has been achieved for . We have carried out periodic-DFT studies of these dyes adsorbed on the (TiO2)38 cluster. They revealed that, in bidentate bridging mode the dyes preferably bind with the help of two carboxylic groups onto the TiO2. To the best of our knowledge we are the first to do DFT studies of thiocyanate free cyclometalated ruthenium(ii) dyes tethered to TiO2.

  2. Spectral characteristic investigation on complex of Ni (II) with captopril and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoling; Du, Liangwei; Li, Dongmei; Gong, Qi; Wang, Lisheng; Lin, Yu

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, Ni (II) reacting with captopril (CPT) can form complex in alkaline solution and the formed complex has a characteristic absorption peak at 340nm. The absorbance of the Ni-CPT complex increases linearly with the increased concentration of captopril. The study also shows that ammonia has an obvious sensitizing effect on the absorbance. Based on the study, a new method for the determination of captopril is established. Experimental results show that the linear range of this method under optimum condition is 1.0-60mg/L with correlation coefficient, detection limit and precision of 0.9999, 0.31mg/L and 0.87%, respectively. The method used to determine captopril in commercial captopril tablets has a satisfactory result with the recoveries in the range of 99.0-103.6% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 0.8-3.7%. We preliminarily study the reaction mechanism and demonstrate that the complex ratio of Ni (II) with captopril is 1:2 and the formation constant is 6.3×10(9).

  3. Spectral characteristic investigation on complex of Ni (II) with captopril and its analytical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoling; Du, Liangwei; Li, Dongmei; Gong, Qi; Wang, Lisheng; Lin, Yu

    In this paper, Ni (II) reacting with captopril (CPT) can form complex in alkaline solution and the formed complex has a characteristic absorption peak at 340 nm. The absorbance of the Ni-CPT complex increases linearly with the increased concentration of captopril. The study also shows that ammonia has an obvious sensitizing effect on the absorbance. Based on the study, a new method for the determination of captopril is established. Experimental results show that the linear range of this method under optimum condition is 1.0-60 mg/L with correlation coefficient, detection limit and precision of 0.9999, 0.31 mg/L and 0.87%, respectively. The method used to determine captopril in commercial captopril tablets has a satisfactory result with the recoveries in the range of 99.0-103.6% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 0.8-3.7%. We preliminarily study the reaction mechanism and demonstrate that the complex ratio of Ni (II) with captopril is 1:2 and the formation constant is 6.3 × 109.

  4. Magnetotransport and thermal properties characterization of 55 K superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Amit; Pal, Anand; Singh, Saurabh; Shekhar, C.; Singh, H. K.; Awana, V. P. S.; Srivastava, O. N.

    2013-09-01

    This report fairly underlines the magneto-transport, thermal properties characterization and bulk superconductivity in the FeAs-based SmFeAsO0.85F0.1. The phase formation and structure are confirmed by Rietveld analysis of room temperature powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Electron microscopy was employed to unravel the micro structural details, such as perfection of the lattice and the grain morphology including size and boundaries. The electrical and magnetic measurements have been carried out to confirm the bulk superconductivity and understand the nature of electrical transport in the normal and superconducting state. The intra-grain critical current density (Jc) with applied magnetic field is calculated from isothermal DC magnetization (MH) plots using conventional Bean critical state model. Superconductivity is observed at transition temperature (Tc) above 55 K without HPHT (high pressure high temperature) synthesis route. The value of Jc is found to be around 5.26 × 104 A/cm2 at 5 K in zero field. The dependence of thermally activated flux flow energy (U/kB) on the applied magnetic field has been observed. AC susceptibility measurements were performed for 55 K superconducting SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample at various amplitude of applied AC drive field and its granular nature is confirmed. The parent compound SmFeAsO is found to be magnetic with Fe spin density wave (SDW) like order below 150 K, on the other hand the F doped SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample is bulk superconducting at below 55 K. Both Fe (SDW) at 150 K for SmFeAsO and 55 K superconductivity in case of SmFeAsO0.85F0.15 sample has confirmed by Specific heat [Cp(T)] measurement too. Further Sm orders anti-ferro-magnetically at 4.5 K for non-superconducting and at 3.5 K for superconducting samples, also the entropy change is reduced significantly for the later than the former. Summarily complete physical property characterization for both non-superconducting SmFeAsO and 55 K superconductor SmFeAsO0.85F0

  5. Cross-reconstitution of the F0F1-ATP synthases of chloroplasts and Escherichia coli with special emphasis on subunit delta.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, S; Deckers-Hebestreit, G; Altendorf, K; Junge, W

    1989-05-01

    F0F1-ATP synthases catalyse ATP formation from ADP and Pi by using the free energy supplied by the transmembrane electrochemical potential of the proton. The delta subunit of F1 plays an important role at the interface between the channel portion F0 and the catalytic portion F1. In chloroplasts it can plug the protonic conductance of CF0 and in Escherichia coli it is required for binding of EF1 to EF0. We wanted to know whether or not delta of one species was effective between F0 and F1 of the other species and vice versa. To this end the respective coupling membrane (thylakoids, everted vesicles from E. coli) was (partially) depleted of F1 and purified F1, F1(-delta), and delta were added in various combinations to the F1-depleted membranes. The efficiency or reconstitution was measured in thylakoids via the rate of phenazinemethosulfate-mediated cyclic photophosphorylation and in E. coli everted vesicles via the degree of 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine fluorescence quenching. Addition of CF1 to partially CF1-depleted thylakoid vesicles restored photophosphorylation to the highest extent. CF1(-delta)+chloroplast delta, EF1, EF1(-delta)+E. coli delta were also effective but to lesser extent. CF1(-delta)+E. coli delta and EF1(-delta)+chloroplast delta restored photophosphorylation to a small but still significant extent. With F1-depleted everted vesicles prepared by repeated EDTA treatment of E. coli membranes, addition of CF1, CF1 (-delta)+chloroplast delta and CF1(-delta)+E. coli delta gave approximately half the extent of 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine fluorescence quenching as compared to EF1 or EF1(-delta)+E. coli delta by energization of the vesicles with NADH, while Ef1(-delta)+chloroplast delta was ineffective. All 'mixed' combinations were probably reconstitutively active only by plugging the protonic leak through the exposed F0 (structural reconstitution) rather than by catalytic activity. Nevertheless, the cross-reconstitution is stunning in view

  6. Metabolism of methandrostenolone in the horse: a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric investigation of phase I and phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A R; Ridley, D D; Suann, C J

    2001-12-05

    The phase I and phase II metabolism of the anabolic steroid methandrostenolone was investigated following oral administration to a standardbred gelding. In the phase I study, metabolites were isolated from the urine by solid-phase extraction, deconjugated by acid catalysed methanolysis and converted to their O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl derivatives. GC-MS analysis indicated the major metabolic processes to be sequential reduction of the A-ring and hydroxylation at C6 and C16. In the phase II study, unconjugated, beta-glucuronidated and sulfated metabolites were fractionated and deconjugated using a combination of liquid-liquid extraction, enzyme hydrolysis, solid-phase extraction and acid catalysed methanolysis. Derivatization followed by GC-MS analysis revealed extensive conjugation to both glucuronic and sulfuric acids, with only a small proportion of metabolites occurring in unconjugated form.

  7. Experimental Investigation on the Mechanism of Chelation-Assisted, Copper(II) Acetate-Accelerated Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Gui-Chao; Guha, Pampa M.; Brotherton, Wendy S.; Simmons, J. Tyler; Stankee, Lisa A.; Nguyen, Brian T.; Clark, Ronald J.; Zhu, Lei

    2011-01-01

    mediating a 2-picolylazide-involved AAC reaction than the fully reduced Cu(OAc)2. Finally, the discontinuous kinetic behavior that has been observed by us and others in copper(I/II)-mediated AAC reactions is explained by the likely catalyst disintegration during the course of a relatively slow reaction. Complementing the prior mechanistic conclusions drawn by other investigators which primarily focus on the copper(I)/alkyne interactions, we emphasize the kinetic significance of copper(I/II)/azide interaction. This work not only provides a mechanism accounting for the fast Cu(OAc)2-mediated AAC reactions involving chelating azides, which has apparent practical implications, but suggests the significance of mixed-valency dinuclear copper species in catalytic reactions where two copper centers carry different functions. PMID:21809811

  8. Upper Critical Field, Critical Current Density and Activation Energy of the New La1-xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2 (x = 0.2, 0.8) Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalai Selvan, Ganesan; Singh Thakur, Gohil; Manikandan, Krishnan; Uwatoko, Yoshia; Haque, Zeba; Gupta, Laxmi Chand; Ganguli, Ashok Kumar; Arumugam, Sonachalam

    2015-12-01

    Critical current density (Jc), thermal activation energy (U0), and upper critical field (Hc2) of La1-xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2 (x = 0.2, 0.8) superconductors are investigated from magnetic field dependent ρ(T) studies. The estimated upper critical field (Hc2) has low values of 1.04 T for x = 0.2 and 1.41 T for x = 0.8. These values are lower than Sm free LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 superconductor (1.9 T). The critical current density (Jc) is estimated to be 1.35 × 105 and 5.07 × 105 A/cm2 (2 K) for x = 0.2 and 0.8 respectively, using the Bean's model. The thermal activation energy (U0/kB) is 61 K for x = 0.2 and 140 K for x = 0.8 as calculated from Arrhenius plots at low magnetic field (1 T) and indicates a strong flux pinning potential which might be co-existing with applied magnetic field.

  9. Superconductivity in La1-x Sm x O0.5F0.5BiS2 (x  =  0.2, 0.8) under hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalai Selvan, G.; Thakur, Gohil S.; Manikandan, K.; Banerjee, A.; Haque, Zeba; Gupta, L. C.; Ganguli, Ashok K.; Arumugam, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the pressure effect on the newly discovered samarium-doped La1-x Sm x O0.5F0.5BiS2 superconductors. More than a threefold increase in T c (10.3 K) is observed with external pressure (at ~1.74 GPa at a rate of 4.08 K GPa-1) for x  =  0.2 composition. There is a concomitant large improvement in the quality of the superconducting transition. Beyond this pressure T c decreases monotonously at the rate of  -2.09 K GPa-1. In the x  =  0.8 sample, we do not observe any enhancement in T c with the application of pressure (up to 1.76 GPa). The semiconducting behavior observed in the normal-state resistivity of both samples is significantly subdued with the application of pressure which, if interpreted by invoking the thermal activation process, implies that the activation energy gap of the carriers is significantly reduced with pressure. We believe these observations should generate further interest in La1-x Sm x O0.5F0.5BiS2 superconductors.

  10. Flight investigation of natural laminar flow on the Bellanca Skyrocket II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Obara, C. J.; Gregorek, G. M.; Hoffman, M. J.; Freuhler, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Two major concerns have inhibited the use of natural laminar flow (NLF) for viscous drag reduction on production aircraft. These are the concerns of achieveability of NLF on practical airframe surfaces, and maintainability in operating environments. Previous research in this area left a mixture of positive and negative conclusions regarding these concerns. While early (pre-1950) airframe construction methods could not achieve NLF criteria for waviness, several modern construction methods (composites for example) can achieve the required smoothness. This paper presents flight experiment data on the achieveability and maintainability of NLF on a high-performance, single-propeller, composite airplane, the Bellanca Skyrocket II. The significant contribution of laminar flow to the performance of this airplane was measured. Observations of laminar flow in the propeller slipstream are discussed, as are the effects of insect contamination on the wing. These observations have resulted in a new appreciation of the operational feasibility for achieving and maintaining NLF on modern airframe surfaces.

  11. Paleotectonic investigations of the Mississippian System in the United States: Parts I and II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; Connor, Carol Waite; Others,

    1979-01-01

    This professional paper is the fifth in a series of paleotectonic studies each covering a geologic system in the conterminous United States. Part I provides a region-by-region discussion of data concerning the Mississippian System and an explanation and documentation for the maps and sections contained in part III. Part II of the paper provides a summary of the Mississippian System, presents interregional interpretations permitted by this study, and includes sections on notable features of the system. The maps contained in the separate case as part III may be divided into two groups: (1) a sequence of factual or basic maps that shows, with a minimum of interpretation, the Mississippian System as it occurs today, and (2) interpretive maps that attempt a reasonable reconstruction of the original extent of the system, its tectonics, environment, and geography.

  12. MX Siting Investigation. Geotechnical Evaluation. Verification Study - Ralston Valley, Nevada. Volume II. Geotechnical Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-15

    Table II-1-1 Explanation Station Number Geologic stations are numbered sequentially. Where more than one geologic field team worked in a CDP , stations...x xx J X x x X X xxL 0® XX x X 0 Sx x 00 x x j 0 x x x x e e -80 x x 0® Ixa® xx 0 a -200 0200 400 Boo Boo DISTANCE IN FEET 0 ESE SHOT F G H I...457 M SEC) sx 2020 FT SEC (616 M SEC) S 4000 FT SEC (1219 M SEC) S cW- 940 FT SEC ( 287 M SEE) oo 0 GM 1280 FT SEC (390 M SEC, 10 2460 FT SEC (750

  13. Investigation of edge ExB sheared flow development in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, M. Angeles; Alonso, Arturo; Chmyga, Alexander A.; Eliseev, Leonid; Estrada, Teresa; Krupnik, Ludmila; Melnikov, Alexander V.; Orozco, Roberto Octavio; Zweben, Stewart J.

    2005-10-01

    Experiments carried out by means of Langmuir probes in the TJ-II stellarator have shown that above a plasma density threshold the level of turbulence decreases with a concomitant development of ExB perpendicular sheared flow (i.e. naturally occurring shear layer). The effect of density on sheared flows has been observed in different plasma magnetic configurations and regimes [1, 2]. The reversal in the ExB rotation has been 2-D visualized using Ultra Fast Speed cameras. Estimated velocity of observed blobs, rotating predominantly in the perpendicular direction, is in the range of 10^3--10^4 m/s. Heavy Ion Beam Probe and reflectometry measurements also show a strong dependence of edge radial electric fields and plasma rotation with plasma density. [1] C. Hidalgo et al., Phys. Rev. E 70 (2004) 067402. [2] M.A. Pedrosa et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47 (2005) 777.

  14. Speech Production in Parkinson's Disease: II. Acoustic and Electropalatographic Investigation of Sentence, Word and Segment Durations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuliffe, Megan J.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Murdoch, Bruce E.

    2006-01-01

    Previous investigations employing electropalatography (EPG) have identified articulatory timing deficits in individuals with acquired dysarthria. However, this technology is yet to be applied to the articulatory timing disturbance present in Parkinson's disease (PD). As a result, the current investigation aimed to use EPG to comprehensively…

  15. Liquid-crystalline dendrimer Cu(II) complexes and Cu(0) nanoclusters based on the Cu(II) complexes: An electron paramagnetic resonance investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domracheva, N. E.; Mirea, A.; Schwoerer, M.; Torre-Lorente, L.; Lattermann, G.

    2007-07-01

    New nanostructured materials, namely, the liquid-crystalline copper(II) complexes that contain poly(propylene imine) dendrimer ligands of the first (ligand 1) and second (ligand 2) generations and which have a columnar mesophase and different copper contents (x = Cu/L), are investigated by EPR spectroscopy. The influence of water molecules and nitrate counterions on the magnetic properties of complex 2 (x = 7.3) is studied. It is demonstrated that water molecules can extract some of the copper ions from dendrimer complexes and form hexaaqua copper complexes with free ions. The dimer spectra of fully hydrated complex 2 (x = 7.3) are observed at temperatures T < 10 K. For this complex, the structure is identified and the distance between the copper ions is determined. It is shown that the nitrate counterion plays the role of a bridge between the hexaaqua copper(II) complex and the dendrimer copper(II) complex. The temperature-induced valence tautomerism attended by electron transport is revealed for the first time in blue dendrimer complexes 1 (x = 1.9) with a dimer structure. The activation energy for electron transport is estimated to be 0.35 meV. The coordination of the copper ion site (NO4) and the structural arrangement of green complexes 1 (x = 1.9) in the columnar mesophase are determined. Complexes of this type form linear chains in which nitrate counterions serve as bridges between copper centers. It is revealed that green complexes 1 (x = 1.9) dissolved in isotropic inert solvents can be oriented in the magnetic field (B 0 = 8000 G). The degree of orientation of these complexes is rather high (S z = 0.76) and close to that of systems with a complete ordering (S z = 1) in the magnetic field. Copper(0) nanoclusters prepared by reduction of complex 2 (x = 7.3) in two reducing agents (NaBH4, N2H4 · H2O) are examined. A model is proposed for a possible location of Cu(0) nanoclusters in a dendrimer matrix.

  16. a Gas Phase Investigation of CuOH(H_2O)+ and Cu(II) Oligoglycine Water Oxidation Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Brett; Zhou, Jia; Garand, Etienne

    2014-06-01

    The abundance of copper and copper compounds within the crust of the Earth and the well characterized coordination chemistry of copper species has led to investigation of copper as a catalyst for several different chemical reactions. Among the most notable of these has been the application of copper containing compounds to water oxidation. The chemistry used in this reaction has thus far been dominated by expensive materials containing the rare metals ruthenium or iridium. In this presentation we study several copper species which have attracted interest in this field including CuOH(H_2O)n+ clusters and Cu(II) oligoglycine complexes. We find that in the case of CuOH(H_2O)n+ clusters that the undercoordinated CuOH(H_2O)+ cluster has a strong affinity towards activating D2 while the higher coordinated CuOH(H_2O)2+ and CuOH(H_2O)3+ clusters show no propensity for the activation of D2. In the case of the Cu(II) oligoglycine complexes we find that the charge environment strongly affects the diagnostic CO stretch frequencies, creating a clear spectroscopic fingerprint for assessing the charge and interactions within these systems. Despite the small size (6-12 atoms) of the CuOH(H_2O)n+ clusters electronic structure methods including DFT and MP2 give poor agreement with the experimental results while DFT calculations on the relatively large Cu(II) oligoglycine species show excellent agreement with experiment.

  17. An investigation of long-distance propagation of gravity waves under CAWSES India Phase II Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, N.; Taori, A.

    2015-05-01

    Coordinated measurements of airglow features from the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region were performed at Allahabad (25.5° N, 81.9° E) and Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India to study the propagation of gravity waves in 13-27° N latitude range during the period June 2009 to May 2010 under CAWSES (Climate And Weather of Sun Earth System) India Phase II Programme. At Allahabad, imaging observations of OH broadband emissions and OI 557.7 nm emission were made using an all-sky imager, while at Gadanki photometric measurements of OH (6, 2) Meinel band and O2 (0, 1) Atmospheric band emissions were carried out. On many occasions, the nightly observations reveal the presence of similar waves at both locations. Typically, the period of observed similar waves lay in the 2.2-4.5 h range, had large phase speeds (~ 77-331 m s-1) and large wavelengths (~ 1194-2746 km). The images of outgoing long-wave radiation activity of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the high-resolution infrared images of KALPANA-1 satellite suggest that such waves possibly originated from some nearby convective sources. An analysis of their propagation characteristics in conjunction with SABER/TIMED temperature profiles and Horizontal Wind Model (HWM 2007) wind estimates suggest that the waves propagated over long distances (~ 1200-2000 km) in atmospheric ducts.

  18. Investigating the Apoptosis Ability of Ethylenediamine 8-Hydroxyquinolinato Palladium (II) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Rezaei, Elham; Kamranfar, Farzaneh; Heidari Majd, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High solubility, low renal toxicity and apoptosis-inducing ability of palladium complexes are the reasons for their synthesis. Methods: In vitro cytotoxic study of previously synthesized [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3 , was carried out on breast cancer MCF-7 cell lines and prostate cancer DU145 cell lines. DNA fragmentation indicative of apoptotic was also evaluated by TUNEL assay on DU145 cell line. Results: FT-IR spectra of final complex confirmed the existence of chelating ligands. The DU145 cells unlike the MCF-7 cells, demonstrated the significant influence of the Pd (II) complex. The IC50 values of [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3 and cisplatin on DU145 cells were 27 and 8.3 μM, respectively. Moreover, nearly 38% apoptosis was evident in DU145 cells after treatment with [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3. Conclusion: [Pd(en)(8HQ)]NO3 has great potential in DNA binding and induction of apoptosis; thus it can be used in the future against prostate cancer. PMID:27766230

  19. New investigations of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabijanić, Ivana; Matković-Čalogović, Dubravka; Pilepić, Viktor; Ivanišević, Irena; Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Sanković, Krešimir

    2017-01-01

    Crystals of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex, (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O (HGua = protonated guanine), were prepared and analysed by spectroscopic (IR, Raman) and computational methods. A new single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was conducted to obtain data with lower standard uncertainties than those in the previously published structure. Raman and IR spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical analysis gave us new insight into the vibrational states of the (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O crystal. The vibrational spectra of the crystal were assigned by performing a normal coordinate analysis for a free dimer with a centre of inversion as the only symmetry element. The stretching vibration observed at 279 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum corresponds to the N-Cu bond. The noncovalent interaction (NCI) plots and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis of the electron density obtained from periodic DFT calculations elucidated the interactions that exist within the crystal structure. Closed-shell ionic attractions, as well as weak and medium strength hydrogen bonds, prevailed in the crystal packing.

  20. Investigation of HV/HR-CMOS technology for the ATLAS Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Grabas, H.; Grillo, A. A.; Liang, Z.; Martinez-Mckinney, F.; Seiden, A.; Volk, J.; Affolder, A.; Buckland, M.; Meng, L.; Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Huffman, T.; John, J.; McMahon, S.; Nickerson, R.; Phillips, P.; Plackett, R.; Shipsey, I.; Vigani, L.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Kanisauskas, K.; Maneuski, D.; Benoit, M.; Di Bello, F.; Caragiulo, P.; Dragone, A.; Grenier, P.; Kenney, C.; Rubbo, F.; Segal, J.; Su, D.; Tamma, C.; Das, D.; Dopke, J.; Turchetta, R.; Wilson, F.; Worm, S.; Ehrler, F.; Peric, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Stanitzki, M.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Seidel, S.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Muenstermann, D.; Wang, R.; Zhang, J.; Warren, M.; Song, W.; Xiu, Q.; Zhu, H.

    2016-09-01

    ATLAS has formed strip CMOS project to study the use of CMOS MAPS devices as silicon strip sensors for the Phase-II Strip Tracker Upgrade. This choice of sensors promises several advantages over the conventional baseline design, such as better resolution, less material in the tracking volume, and faster construction speed. At the same time, many design features of the sensors are driven by the requirement of minimizing the impact on the rest of the detector. Hence the target devices feature long pixels which are grouped to form a virtual strip with binary-encoded z position. The key performance aspects are radiation hardness compatibility with HL-LHC environment, as well as extraction of the full hit position with full-reticle readout architecture. To date, several test chips have been submitted using two different CMOS technologies. The AMS 350 nm is a high voltage CMOS process (HV-CMOS), that features the sensor bias of up to 120 V. The TowerJazz 180 nm high resistivity CMOS process (HR-CMOS) uses a high resistivity epitaxial layer to provide the depletion region on top of the substrate. We have evaluated passive pixel performance, and charge collection projections. The results strongly support the radiation tolerance of these devices to radiation dose of the HL-LHC in the strip tracker region. We also describe design features for the next chip submission that are motivated by our technology evaluation.

  1. Molecular structures, charge distributions, and vibrational analyses of the tetracoordinate Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine investigated by density functional theory in comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Kumru, Mustafa; Altun, Ahmet

    2016-07-01

    The Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) bromide complexes of p-toluidine have been studied with B3LYP calculations by using def2-TZVP basis set at the metal atoms and using def2-TZVP and 6-311G+(d,p) basis sets at the remaining atoms. Both basis set combinations give analogous results, which validate the use of quickly converging 6-311G+(d,p) basis set in future studies. The molecular structures, atomic charge and spin distributions, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of the complexes have been calculated. The Zn, Cd and Hg complexes have been found to have distorted tetrahedral environments around the metal atoms whereas Cu complex has a square planar geometry. The NBO charge analysis have been found more accurate and less misleading compared with the Mulliken scheme. The present vibrational spectra calculations allow accurate assignment of the vibrational bands, which otherwise assigned tentatively in previous experimental-only studies.

  2. Individualizing Instruction in Large Undergraduate Biology Laboratories. II. Computers and Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norberg, Ann Marie

    1975-01-01

    Describes the following uses of computers in college biology laboratories: (1) to organize and analyze research data and (2) to simulate biological systems. Also being developed are computer simulations to systematically prepare students for independent investigations. (See also SE 515 092.) (LS)

  3. Geologic and seismologic investigations for Rocky Flats Plant. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume contains the results of a seismic refraction study of the Ralston Reservoir area, soil stratigraphic investigations, unit descriptions, an analysis of geodetic data, experimental models, seismological evaluation, a seismicity survey of the Northern Golden Fault, historical data for the November 7, 1882 earthquake, and a dendrochronology study. (ACR)

  4. A large Turkish kindred with syndactyly type II (synpolydactyly). 1. Field investigation, clinical and pedigree data.

    PubMed Central

    Sayli, B S; Akarsu, A N; Sayli, U; Akhan, O; Ceylaner, S; Sarfarazi, M

    1995-01-01

    A very large Turkish family with syndactyly type II (synpolydactyly (SPD)) is described, which originated from and is mainly concentrated in the village of Derbent, Afyon. The kindred consists of 425 subjects over seven generations, of whom 182 are affected. It appears that a founder effect in this village has led to this extensive kindred. This condition is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with variable expressivity and an estimated penetrance of 96%. Penetrance is different between the upper (96%) and lower (69.5%) extremities. No excess of affected males or females or other associated features were documented in this condition. Variations in the involvement of one or both hands, upper or lower extremities, bone and soft tissue, as well as variation in the affected subjects of two successive generations were documented. We also noted that metacarpal and metatarsal involvement and middle phalangeal hypoplasia of the feet are the consistent features of SPD and, therefore, should be considered as characteristic of this phenotype. We observed four different phenotypes in various branches of the Derbent kindred: (1) subjects presenting typical features of SPD; (2) subjects exhibiting both pre- and post-axial polydactyly simultaneously; (3) persons manifesting postaxial polydactyly type A; and (4) subjects born to two affected parents with severe hand and foot deformities that have not been previously described in any other SPD families (that is, homozygotes). A total of 27 affected offspring were born to two such affected parents, of whom seven are expected to be homozygous for the SPD gene. This group is presented in an accompanying paper in this issue of the Journal. A molecular study is currently under way to identify the chromosomal location of the defective gene. Images PMID:7666393

  5. MarsSedEx I and II: Experimental investigation of gravity effects on sedimentation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sorting of sedimentary rocks is a proxy for the environmental conditions at the time of deposition, in particular the runoff that moved and deposited the material forming the rocks. Settling of sediment is strongly influenced by the gravity of a planetary body. As a consequence, sorting of a sedimentary rock varies with gravity for a given depth and velocity of surface runoff. Theoretical considerations for spheres indicate that sorting is less uniform on Mars than on Earth for runoff of identical depth. The effects of gravity on flow hydraulics limit the use of common, semi-empirical models developed to simulate particle settling in terrestrial environments, on Mars. Assessing sedimentation patterns on Mars, aimed at identifying strata potentially hosting traces of life, is potentially affected by such uncertainties. Using first-principle approaches, e.g. through Computational Fluid Dynamics, for calculating settling velocities on other planetary bodies requires a large effort and is limited by the values of boundary conditions, e.g. the shape of the particle. The degree of uncertainty resulting from the differences in gravity on Earth and Mars was therefore tested during three reduced-gravity flights, the MarsSedEx I and II missions, conducted in November 2012 and 2013. Nine types of sediment, ranging in size, shape and density were tested in custom-designed settling tubes during parabolas of Martian gravity lasting 20 to 25 seconds. Based on the observed settling velocities, the uncertainties of empirical relationships developed on Earth to assess particle settling on Mars are discussed. In addition, the potential effects of reduced gravity on patterns of erosion, transport and sorting of sediment, including the implications for identifying strata bearing traces of past life on are examined.

  6. Architecture of Kepler's Multi-transiting Systems: II. New investigations with twice as many candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; Steffen, Jason H.; Agol, Eric; Barclay, Thomas; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William; Ciardi, David R.; Ford, Eric B.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Geary, John C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Li, Jie; Morehead, Robert C.; Morris, Robert L.; Shporer, Avi; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Still, Martin; Van Cleve, Jeffrey

    2014-07-16

    Having discovered 885 planet candidates in 361 multiple-planet systems, Kepler has made transits a powerful method for studying the statistics of planetary systems. The orbits of only two pairs of planets in these candidate systems are apparently unstable. This indicates that a high percentage of the candidate systems are truly planets orbiting the same star, motivating physical investigations of the population. Pairs of planets in this sample are typically not in orbital resonances. However, pairs with orbital period ratios within a few percent of a first-order resonance (e.g. 2:1, 3:2) prefer orbital spacings just wide of the resonance and avoid spacings just narrow of the resonance. Finally, we investigate mutual inclinations based on transit duration ratios. We infer that the inner planets of pairs tend to have a smaller impact parameter than their outer companions, suggesting these planetary systems are typically coplanar to within a few degrees.

  7. Investigating rare events with nonequilibrium work measurements. II. Transition and reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2014-01-21

    We present a formalism for investigating transition pathways and transition probabilities for rare events in biomolecular systems. The formalism is based on combining Transition Path Theory with the results of nonequilibrium work relations, and shows that the equilibrium and nonequilibrium transition rates are in fact related. Aside from its fundamental importance, this allows for the calculation of relative equilibrium reaction rates with driven nonequilibrium simulations such as Steered Molecular Dynamics. The workings of the formalism are illustrated with a few typical numerical examples.

  8. Archaeological Investigations, Navigation Pool II, Upper Mississippi River Basin. Volume 2. Data File

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    successful Contractor will be provided a set of detailed tract maps for their uise. Finally, note that the abandoned town of Peru, Iowa, talls partially...the principal investigator through the maintenance of employee time records, travel and equipment expenditures , payroll records, and other...Engineer Office, Rock Island, IL under the direction of Major C.L. Hall . These maps portray the pool conditions immediately prior to construction of the

  9. Investigation of the Hazards Posed by Chemical Vapors Released in Marine Operations - Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    at San Antonio, Texas . 307 U.S. COAST GUARDf SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE, SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS , USA UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, HOUSTON... TEXAS , USA SUBJECT CONSENT FOR PARTICIPATION IN AN INVESTIGATION OF "HAZARDS POSED BY CHEMICAL VAPORS RELEASED IN MARINE OPERATIONS: TASK V...write to the following persons: Dr. Stanley M. Pier Mr. William J. Astleford 5326 Dora Street Southwest Research Institute Houston, Texas , 77005, USA

  10. Multiple and reversible hydrogenases for hydrogen production by Escherichia coli: dependence on fermentation substrate, pH and the F(0)F(1)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Trchounian, Karen; Poladyan, Anna; Vassilian, Anait; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H(2)) can be produced via hydrogenases during mixed-acid fermentation by bacteria. Escherichia coli possesses multiple (four) hydrogenases. Hydrogenase 3 (Hyd-3) and probably 4 (Hyd-4) with formate dehydrogenase H (Fdh-H) form two different H(2)-evolving formate hydrogen lyase (FHL) pathways during glucose fermentation. For both FHL forms, the hycB gene coding small subunit of Hyd-3 is required. Formation and activity of FHL also depends on the external pH ([pH](out)) and the presence of formate. FHL is related with the F(0)F(1)-ATPase by supplying reducing equivalents and depending on proton-motive force. Two other hydrogenases, 1 (Hyd-1) and 2 (Hyd-2), are H(2)-oxidizing enzymes during glucose fermentation at neutral and low [pH](out). They operate in a reverse, H(2)-producing mode during glycerol fermentation at neutral [pH](out). Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 activity depends on F(0)F(1). Moreover, Hyd-3 can also work in a reverse mode. Therefore, the operation direction and activity of all Hyd enzymes might determine H(2) production; some metabolic cross-talk between Hyd enzymes is proposed. Manipulating of different Hyd enzymes activity is an effective way to enhance H(2) production by bacteria in biotechnology. Moreover, a novel approach would be the use of glycerol as feedstock in fermentation processes leading to H(2) production, reduced fuels and other chemicals with higher yields than those obtained by common sugars.

  11. Low-temperature synthesis of SmFeAsO0.7F0.3 - δ wires with a high transport critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Qi, Yanpeng; Wang, Dongliang; Gao, Zhaoshun; Zhang, Xianping; Zhang, Zhiyu; Wang, Chunlei; Ma, Yanwei

    2010-07-01

    Ag-sheathed SmFeAsO0.7F0.3 - δ (Sm-1111) superconducting wires were prepared by a one-step solid state reaction at temperatures as low as 850-900 °C, instead of commonly used temperatures of 1150-1250 °C. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the as-sintered samples is well indexed on the basis of the tetragonal ZrCuSiAs-type structure. We characterized the transport critical current density Jc of the SmFeAsO0.7F0.3 - δ wires in increasing and subsequently decreasing fields, by a resistive four-probe method. A transport Jc as high as ~ 1300 A cm - 2 at 4.2 K and self-field has been observed for the first time in Sm-1111 type polycrystalline superconductors. The Jc also shows a rapid depression in small applied fields as well as a magnetic-history dependence, indicating weak-linked grain boundaries. The low-temperature synthesis method can be very beneficial for fabricating the RE-1111 iron oxypnictides in a convenient and safe way.

  12. Pressure-induced phase transition in La1–xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2

    DOE PAGES

    Fang, Y.; Yazici, D.; White, B. D.; ...

    2015-09-15

    Electrical resistivity measurements on La1–xSmxO0.5F0.5BiS2 (x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8) have been performed under applied pressures up to 2.6 GPa from 2 K to room temperature. The superconducting transition temperature Tc of each sample significantly increases at a Sm-concentration dependent pressure Pt, indicating a pressure-induced phase transition from a low-Tc to a high-Tc phase. At ambient pressure, Tc increases dramatically from 2.8 K at x = 0.1 to 5.4 K at x = 0.8; however, the Tc values at P > Pt decrease slightly with x and Pt shifts to higher pressures with Sm substitution. In the normal state,more » semiconducting-like behavior is suppressed and metallic conduction is induced with increasing pressure in all of the samples. Furthermore, these results suggest that the pressure dependence of Tc for the BiS2-based superconductors is related to the lattice parameters at ambient pressure and enable us to estimate the evolution of Tc for SmO0.5F0.5BiS2 under pressure.« less

  13. Studies on the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation: effects of specific F0 modifiers on ligand-induced conformation changes of F1.

    PubMed

    Matsuno-Yagi, A; Yagi, T; Hatefi, Y

    1985-11-01

    Aurovertin is a fluorescent antibiotic that binds to the catalytic beta subunits of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase and inhibits ATP synthesis and hydrolysis. ATP, ADP, and membrane energization in submitochondrial particles (SMP) alter the fluorescence of F1-bound aurovertin. These fluorescence changes are considered to be in response to the conformation changes of F1-ATPase. This paper shows that the ATP-induced fluorescence change of aurovertin bound to SMP or complex V (purified ATP synthase complex F0-F1) is inhibited when these preparations are pretreated with oligomycin or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). This inhibition is not seen with isolated F1-ATPase. These and other results have suggested that modifications of the DCCD-binding protein in the membrane sector (F0) of the ATP synthase complex are communicated to F1, thereby altering the binding characteristics of ATP to the beta subunits. By analogy, it is proposed that modifications (e.g., protonation/deprotonation) of the DCCD-binding protein effected by protonic energy alter the conformation of F1 and bring about the substrate/product binding changes that appear to be essential features of the mechanism and regulation of oxidative phosphorylation.

  14. Role of scalar dibaryon and f0(500 ) in the isovector channel of low-energy neutron-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinet, Werner; Teilab, Khaled; Giacosa, Francesco; Rischke, Dirk H.

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the total and the differential cross section for n p scattering at low energies in the isospin I =1 channel within the so-called extended linear sigma model. This model contains conventional (pseudo)scalar and (axial-)vector mesons, as well as the nucleon and its chiral partner within the mirror assignment. In order to obtain good agreement with experimental data analysis results we need to consider two additional resonances: the lightest scalar state f0(500 ) and a dibaryon state with quantum numbers I =1 ,JP=0+ (also known as S10 resonance). The resonance f0(500 ) is coupled to nucleons in a chirally invariant way through the mirror assignment and is crucial for a qualitatively correct description of the shape of the differential cross section. On the other hand, the dibaryon is exchanged in the s channel and is responsible of the large cross section close to threshold. We compare our results to data analysis results performed by the said program of the CNS Data Analysis Center (in the following "said results").

  15. Development of a novel biosensor based on F(0)F(1)-ATPase for the detection of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone in irradiated beef.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueliang; Ha, Yiming; Yue, Jiachang; Wang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    A novel biosensor regulated by the rotator of F0F1-ATPase was developed to analyze 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) to detect γ-ray irradiated beef rapidly. The biosensor was assembled by conjugating 2-DCB monoclonal antibodies with the "rotator" ε-subunit of F0F1-ATPase within chromatophores through an ε-subunit monoclonal antibody-biotin-avidin-biotin linker. The limit of detection (LOD) of 2-DCB was approximately 10(-8) μg/mL. The recovery ratio of 2-DCB from ground beef patties ranged from 75.1% to 116.4%. The intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation were both <15.0%. The proposed method was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with high correlation. The biosensor was used to detect 2-DCB in ground beef patties with different fat contents (10%, 20%, and 30%) irradiated at 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0, and 7.0 kGy. The 2-DCB concentration linearly increased with the radiation dose in all the beef samples. 2-DCB concentration increased with fat levels in the three samples.

  16. Cluster II Wideband (WBD) Plasma Wave Investigation Mission Operations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    This Summary of Research is being submitted to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. A summary of the significant accomplishments of the Cluster Wideband (WBD) Plasma Wave Investigation team achieved during the period of the grant, October 1,2000 through January 14, 2004, and a listing of all of the publications that resulted from work carried out under the grant is presented. Also included is a listing of the numerous public outreach activities that took place during the period of the grant in which the Cluster mission and Cluster WBD science were discussed.

  17. NMR investigation of dynamic processes in complexes of nickel(II) and zinc(II) with iminodiacetate, n-methyliminodiacetate and n-ethyliminodiacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.R.

    1985-11-01

    Analysis of oxygen-17 bulk water relaxation rates with an aqueous solution of 1:1 Ni(II):ida reveals that two rate-limiting processes are involved with solvent exchange. Analysis of carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation rates of the bis-ligand complexes with zinc(II) are used to determine molecular tumbling rates and methyl rotation rates. The carbon-13 transverse relaxation rates for the carbons in the bis-ligand complex with Ni(II) are adequately fitted to the Solomon-Bloembergen equation. Three carboxylate carbon peaks are seen with the /sup 13/C spectrum of the 1:2 Ni(II):ida complex, which coalesce into a single peak above about 360 K. The mechanism and rate of ligand exchange are determined for the complexes Zn(II)L/sub 2//sup -2/ (L = mida, eida) in aqueous solution by total lineshape analysis of the proton spectrum at 500 MHz.

  18. EXAFS investigations of Zn(II) in concentrated aqueous hydroxide solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, K.I.; Russell, A.E.; McBreen, J.; O`Grady, W.E.

    1995-08-03

    The structure of the Zn{sup 2+} species in concentrated aqueous solutions of NaOH, KOH, RbOH, and CsOH was investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The results show that the Zn{sup 2+} species exist in a tetrahedral configuration with a Zn-O bond distance of 1.96 x 0.01 A, independent of the cation of the hydroxide electrolyte. No evidence for higher Zn-H{sub 2}O coordination shells, aggregation of the Zn(OH){sub 4}{sup 2} tetrahedra, or Zn-Zn interactions were found. The necessity of including the multiple-scattering contributions to obtain a complete and correct EXAFS analysis is clearly shown. 34 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Melting of oxidized nickel ores in a barbotage unit: II. Experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starykh, R. V.; Pakhomov, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of efficient processing of oxidized nickel ores (ONOs) to form ferronickel in a barbotage unit (liquid bath melting (LBM), Vanyukov furnace) is corroborated theoretically and experimentally. The processing of the ONOs of the Buruktal deposit with the formation of ferronickel under the conditions that model melting in a barbotage unit is subjected to laboratory investigations. Wet or dried ore and its reduced cinder are melted. It is shown that melting of the reduced cinder of ONO can result in the formation of nickel-rich (up to 40% Ni) ferronickel upon the extraction of more than 91% nickel from the raw materials at a residual nickel content of <0.1% in a slag. Direct melting of the ore results in the formation of ferronickel with at most 18% Ni and a low degree of nickel extraction into ferronickel, which has high sulfur, phosphorus, and carbon contents in this case.

  20. Evaluation of some biological tests as parameters for microbial activities in soils. II. Field investigations.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Malek, Y; Monib, M; Rizk, S G; Shehata, S M

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were designed to study the effect of certain factors on the microbial activities in soil. The parameters, used as an index of the microbial activities, were total bacterial counts, dehydrogenase activity, oxidation of organic carbon, and CO2 evolved/7 days. Bahteem Farm clay soil was examined for determining the effects of depth, type of fertilization, and crop rotation on the microbial activities. It appears that the microbial activities, as indicated by the tested parameters, were more pronounced in the surface 15 cm-layer than in the subsurface layer (15-30 cm). Results of all the parameters tested showed markedly higher increases with farmyard manure than with nitrogenous fertilizer and in the control, without significant differences between the latter two. Moreover, the time of sampling had no effect on the results obtained for all parameters. Different types of rotations did not exert significant variation in total bacterial counts, though more than one crop per year increased the organic carbon content of soil and mostly the dehydrogenase activity, whereas the evolution of CO2 tended to decrease. At Gabal el-Asfar Farm, the effect of irrigation with sewage effluent, for long periods, on the microbial activities of sandy soil was investigated. Sewage water stimulated the total bacteria, raised the dehydrogenase activity, the organic carbon, and the production of CO2. In North El Tahreer and Mariut Sectors, the effect of both the type and age of cultivation on the microbial activities in the calcareous soils were examined. Cultivation raised the figures of all the tested parameters progressively with time of cultivation. It was also noticed that crops exerted more beneficial effects on microbial activities than orchards, and the dehydrogenase test was the most reliable parameter to reveal this fact.

  1. Saturn's icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R.N.; Cuzzi, J.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P.D.; McCord, T.B.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R.M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-01-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper (Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/F continua at 0.55 ??m, 1.822 ??m and 3.547 ??m, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  2. Investigation on aerodynamic characteristics of baseline-II E-2 blended wing-body aircraft with canard via computational simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Rizal E. M.; Ali, Zurriati; Kuntjoro, Wahyu; Wisnoe, Wirachman

    2012-06-01

    Previous wind tunnel test has proven the improved aerodynamic charasteristics of Baseline-II E-2 Blended Wing-Body (BWB) aircraft studied in Universiti Teknologi Mara. The E-2 is a version of Baseline-II BWB with modified outer wing and larger canard, solely-designed to gain favourable longitudinal static stability during flight. This paper highlights some results from current investigation on the said aircraft via computational fluid dynamics simulation as a mean to validate the wind tunnel test results. The simulation is conducted based on standard one-equation turbulence, Spalart-Allmaras model with polyhedral mesh. The ambience of the flight simulation is made based on similar ambience of wind tunnel test. The simulation shows lift, drag and moment results to be near the values found in wind tunnel test but only within angles of attack where the lift change is linear. Beyond the linear region, clear differences between computational simulation and wind tunnel test results are observed. It is recommended that different type of mathematical model be used to simulate flight conditions beyond linear lift region.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a novel mononuclear copper(II) azido compound with tridentate (NNO) Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karahan, Ahmet; Karabulut, Sedat; Dal, Hakan; Kurtaran, Raif; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-08-01

    The tridentate (NNO) Schiff base (HL), has been prepared by the condensation of 2-(aminomethyl)pyridine with 5-chloro-salicylaldehyde. The mononuclear [N-(2-pyridylmethyl)-3-chloro-salicylaldiminato] (azido) copper(II) complex of general formula [Cu(L)(N3)] (1) has been synthesized by the treatment of HL and CuCl2·2H2O with sodium azide. The ligand and complex have been investigated by various methods including IR, TG-DTA and X-ray diffraction techniques. The complex crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c, with unit cell dimensions a = 6.7369(4), b = 11.6058(8), c = 17.1379(11) Å, β = 93.823(2)°. The distorted square-planar Cu(II) ion in complex is chelated by one imino N, one phenolic O and one pyridine N atoms of Schiff base ligand and one N atom of azide ion. The electrochemical behavior of the mononuclear copper azido complex was studied with cyclic voltammetry. Tautomer stability of the ligand and the complex has been determined by molecular modeling techniques. It has been concluded that the HL is more stable than its tautomeric form (THL) both as ligand and complex structures.

  4. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; George, Gerald L.; Gubernatis, David C.; Schreiber, Stephen B.

    2015-07-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previously described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.

  5. Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100: Part II. Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Max A.; Fuchs, Gerhard E.

    2016-05-01

    Oxide bifilms are a proposed casting inclusion reported to have been observed in vacuum investment cast polycrystalline Ni-based superalloys. Ongoing research seeks to determine if current superalloy casting practices can result in the formation of oxide bifilms, and subsequently if it is possible to observe and characterize this phenomenon. The effect of casting atmosphere, turbulence, filtering, hot isostatic pressing, and heat treatment has been investigated to identify the critical parameters that have been reported to result in bifilm formation in Ni-based superalloy IN100. Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were utilized to characterize samples from each casting condition. In situ ultrahigh vacuum Auger fractography did not indicate the presence of bifilms on the fracture behavior of IN100 in any processing condition. SAM analysis identified a sulfur-enriched monolayer on the surface of dendritic casting porosity, and identified heterogeneous Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100. SEM analysis also indicated the presence of Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100, and determined that these inclusion structures consist of fine blocky external M(Ti, Mo)C carbide enveloping an internal core of alumina. HR-TEM analysis indicated that none of the oxycarbide inclusion interfaces exist as discontinuous unbound interfaces, and that the internal alumina core is an ultra-fine polycrystalline structure.

  6. Investigation of injury/illness data at a nuclear facility. Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Sandoval, Arnold N.; ...

    2015-07-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there are several nuclear facilities, accelerator facilities, radiological facilities, explosives sites, moderate- and high-hazard non-nuclear facilities, biosciences laboratory, etc. The Plutonium Science and Manufacturing Directorate (ADPSM) provides special nuclear material research, process development, technology demonstration, and manufacturing capabilities. ADPSM manages the LANL Plutonium Facility. Within the Radiological Control Area at TA-55 (PF-4), chemical and metallurgical operations with plutonium and other hazardous materials are performed. LANL Health and Safety Programs investigate injury and illness data. In this study, statistically significant trends have been identified and compared for LANL, ADPSM, and PF-4 injury/illness cases. A previouslymore » described output metric is used to measures LANL management progress towards meeting its operational safety objectives and goals. Timelines are used to determine trends in Injury/Illness types. Pareto Charts are used to prioritize causal factors. The data generated from analysis of Injury/Illness data have helped identify and reduce the number of corresponding causal factors.« less

  7. A renal protocol for all ages and all indications: mercapto-acetyl-triglycine (MAG3) with simultaneous injection of furosemide (MAG3-F0): a 17-year experience.

    PubMed

    Sfakianakis, George N; Sfakianaki, Efrosyni; Georgiou, Mike; Serafini, Aldo; Ezuddin, Shabbir; Kuker, Russ; Zilleruelo, Gaston; Strauss, Jose; Abitbol, Carolyn; Chandar, Jayanthi; Seeherunvong, Wacharee; Bourgoignie, Jacque; Roth, David; Leveillee, Raymond; Bird, Vincent G; Block, Norman; Gosalbez, Rafael; Labbie, Andrew; Guerra, Jorge J; Yrizarry, Jose

    2009-05-01

    Current clinical requirements mandate the existence of a renal diuretic protocol, which is fast and easy, applicable in all ages and for all indications, convenient for both the patient and the technologist, and provides diagnostic as well as prognostic information. Seventeen years ago a 25-minute protocol, after oral hydration, with no bladder catheterization, and simultaneous injection of mercapto-acetyl-triglycine (MAG(3)) and furosemide (MAG(3)-F(0)), was initiated. It initially was used for the evaluation of drainage and emerged as a protocol to also evaluate the renal parenchyma. Results of this protocol have been published individually, per clinical application. MAG(3)-F(0) was instrumental in the evaluation and prognosis of congenital disorders. For obstruction, in the newborn, an increasing renogram mandates intervention, whereas a downsloping one predicts spontaneous resolution. In children or adults, preoperatively or postoperatively, when the cortex was visualized and drained normally, there was no obstruction, even if urine was retained within a dilated collecting system or an extrarenal pelvis. For diseases of the renal parenchyma, the protocol enabled the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis (APN) revealing the "regional parenchymal dysfunction," diagnostic of APN. Diffuse parenchymal diseases were characterized by increased residual cortical activity (RCA), and their progression was manifested as a deterioration of RCA. End-stage renal disease was characterized by lack of accumulation and retention. Trauma and leaks were identified with specific patterns. In renovascular hypertension (RVH), an increase in RCA after angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors is diagnostic of RVH and prognostic of the beneficial effect of angioplasty on hypertension. In renal colic, stratification was possible into (1) complete or severe obstruction requiring immediate intervention, (2) mild obstruction allowing waiting, (3) spontaneous decompression (stunned kidney), and

  8. A phase II study of an investigational tetravalent influenza vaccine formulation combining MF59®

    PubMed Central

    Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Nothdurft, Hans Dieter; Perona, Pamela; Borkowski, Astrid; Fragapane, Elena; Nicolay, Uwe; Clemens, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    An investigational tetravalent vaccine combining pre-pandemic, MF59®-adjuvanted A/H5N1 vaccine with non-adjuvanted, trivalent, seasonal influenza vaccine has been developed, which has the potential to be used for pre-pandemic priming and to improve levels of compliance and coverage. It is important to determine whether the safety and immunogenicity of the combination vaccine is equivalent to that of the two separate vaccines when administered concomitantly. Healthy adults (n = 601) were randomly assigned to three vaccination groups to receive either: (1) tetravalent vaccine and placebo concomitantly (in separate arms) on Day 1, followed by A/H5N1 vaccine on Day 22; (2) A/H5N1 vaccine and placebo concomitantly on Day 1, followed by tetravalent vaccine on Day 22; or (3) A/H5N1 and seasonal vaccines concomitantly on Day 1, followed by A/H5N1 vaccine on Day 22. Antibody responses were measured using single radial hemolysis (SRH), haemagglutination inhibition (HI), and microneutralization (MN) assays on Days 1, 22, and 43. Solicited adverse reactions were recorded for seven days after vaccination. Spontaneous adverse events were recorded throughout the study. The tetravalent vaccine elicited antibody titers equivalent to those for separate A/H5N1 and seasonal vaccines, and sufficient to meet the European licensure criteria against A/H5N1 and all three seasonal strains. Local and systemic reactions were mainly mild to moderate. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. These findings demonstrate that MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines had an acceptable safety profile and could be effectively administered as a tetravalent formulation, supporting the possibility of integrating pre-pandemic priming into seasonal influenza vaccination programs. PMID:24047817

  9. Identification of Criticality in Neuronal Avalanches: II. A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of the Driven Case.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Caroline; Taylor, Timothy J; Kiss, Istvan Z; Farmer, Simon F; Berthouze, Luc

    2014-01-01

    The observation of apparent power laws in neuronal systems has led to the suggestion that the brain is at, or close to, a critical state and may be a self-organised critical system. Within the framework of self-organised criticality a separation of timescales is thought to be crucial for the observation of power-law dynamics and computational models are often constructed with this property. However, this is not necessarily a characteristic of physiological neural networks-external input does not only occur when the network is at rest/a steady state. In this paper we study a simple neuronal network model driven by a continuous external input (i.e. the model does not have an explicit separation of timescales from seeding the system only when in the quiescent state) and analytically tuned to operate in the region of a critical state (it reaches the critical regime exactly in the absence of input-the case studied in the companion paper to this article). The system displays avalanche dynamics in the form of cascades of neuronal firing separated by periods of silence. We observe partial scale-free behaviour in the distribution of avalanche size for low levels of external input. We analytically derive the distributions of waiting times and investigate their temporal behaviour in relation to different levels of external input, showing that the system's dynamics can exhibit partial long-range temporal correlations. We further show that as the system approaches the critical state by two alternative 'routes', different markers of criticality (partial scale-free behaviour and long-range temporal correlations) are displayed. This suggests that signatures of criticality exhibited by a particular system in close proximity to a critical state are dependent on the region in parameter space at which the system (currently) resides.

  10. Polarized XANES and EXAFS spectroscopic investigation into copper(II) complexes on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnare, Luca J.; Vailionis, Arturas; Strawn, Daniel G.

    2005-11-01

    Interaction of heavy metals with clay minerals can dominate solid-solution reactions in soil, controlling the fate of the metals in the environment. In this study we used powdered and polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) to investigate Cu sorbed on Llano vermiculite and compare the results to reported Cu sorption mechanism on Wyoming (WY) smectite and reduced South African (SA) vermiculite. Analysis of the Cu K-edge spectra revealed that Cu sorbed on Llano vermiculite at high ionic strength ( I) has the greatest degree of covalent bond character, followed by Cu sorbed on montmorillonite at high I, and Cu sorbed on reduced SA vermiculite at high I. Cu sorbed on clay minerals at low I has the least covalent character. EXAFS data from Cu sorbed Ca- and K-equilibrated Llano vermiculites showed the presence of a second-shell Al, Si, or Mg backscatterer at 3.02 Å. This distance is consistent with Cu sorbing via a corner-sharing monodentate or bidentate bond. Polarized XANES and EXAFS results revealed that the angle between the Cu atom and the mineral sorption sites is 68° with respect to the [001] direction. From the bond angle and the persistence of the second-shell backscatterer when the interlayer is collapsed (K-equilibration), we conclude that Cu adsorption on the Llano vermiculite is not occurring in the interlayer but rather Cu is adsorbing onto the edges of the vermiculite. Results from this research provide evidence that Cu forms inner-sphere and outer-sphere complexes on clay minerals, and does not form the vast multinuclear surface precipitates that have been observed for Co, Zn, and Ni.

  11. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Delta mu Na+ drives the synthesis of ATP via an delta mu Na(+)-translocating F1F0-ATP synthase in membrane vesicles of the archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Gö1.

    PubMed Central

    Becher, B; Müller, V

    1994-01-01

    Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 couples the methyl transfer from methyl-tetrahydromethanopterin to 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (coenzyme M) with the generation of an electrochemical sodium ion gradient (delta mu Na+) and the reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and 7-mercaptoheptanoylthreoninephosphate with the generation of an electrochemical proton gradient (delta muH+). Experiments with washed inverted vesicles were performed to investigate whether both ion gradients are used directly for the synthesis of ATP. delta mu Na+ and delta mu H+ were both able to drive the synthesis of ATP in the vesicular system. ATP synthesis driven by heterodisulfide reduction (delta mu H+) or an artificial delta pH was inhibited by the protonophore SF6847 but not by the sodium ionophore ETH157, whereas ETH157 but not SF6847 inhibited ATP synthesis driven by a chemical sodium ion gradient (delta pNa) as well as the methyl transfer reaction (delta mu Na+). Inhibition of the Na+/H+ antiporter led to a stimulation of ATP synthesis driven by the methyl transfer reaction (delta mu Na+), as well as by delta pNa. These experiments indicate that delta mu Na+ and delta mu H+ drive the synthesis of ATP via an Na(+)- and an H(+)-translocating ATP synthase, respectively. Inhibitor studies were performed to elucidate the nature of the ATP synthase(s) involved. delta pH-driven ATP synthesis was specifically inhibited by bafilomycin A1, whereas delta pNa-driven ATP synthesis was exclusively inhibited by 7-chloro-4-nitro-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, azide, and venturicidin. These results are evidence for the presence of an F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase in addition to the A(1)A(0)-ATP synthase in membranes of M. Mazei Gö1 and suggest that the F(1)F(0)-type enzyme is an Na+-translocating ATP synthase, whereas the A(1)A(0)-ATP synthase uses H+ as the coupling ion. PMID:8169202

  13. Role of the a0(980), f0(980) resonances in η → 3π from the Khuri-Treiman formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussallam, B.; Albaladejo, M.

    2016-11-01

    The chiral expansion of the η → 3π decay amplitude at NLO fails to reproduce the recent high accuracy measurements of the Dalitz plot parameters. We reconsider the idea of employing the chiral expansion in an unphysical region surrounding the Adler zero and then deducing the amplitude in the physical region using the Khuri-Treiman dispersive formalism. We further present an extension of this formalism which takes into account KK¯ inelastic rescattering effects and thus provides a realistic description of the double a0(980), f0(980) resonance effect. We evaluate how the influence of these resonances propagates down to the low-energy decay region and show that it is significant, in particular for the η → 3π0 decay, and improve the agreement of the predicted Dalitz plot parameters with experiment.

  14. Vortex dynamics and irreversibility line in optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 from ac susceptibility and magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prando, G.; Carretta, P.; de Renzi, R.; Sanna, S.; Palenzona, A.; Putti, M.; Tropeano, M.

    2011-05-01

    Ac susceptibility and static magnetization measurements were performed in the optimally doped SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 superconductor. The field-temperature phase diagram of the superconducting state was drawn, and, in particular, the features of the flux lines were derived. The dependence of the intragrain depinning energy on the magnetic field intensity was derived in the thermally activated flux-creep framework, enlightening a typical 1/H dependence in the high-field regime. The intragrain critical current density was extrapolated in the zero-temperature and zero-magnetic-field limit, showing a remarkably high value Jc0(0)~2×107 A/cm2, which demonstrates that this material is rather interesting for potential future technological applications.

  15. Optical Study of LaO0.9F0.1FeAs: Evidence for a Weakly Coupled Superconducting State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drechsler, S.-L.; Grobosch, M.; Koepernik, K.; Behr, G.; Köhler, A.; Werner, J.; Kondrat, A.; Leps, N.; Hess, C.; Klingeler, R.; Schuster, R.; Büchner, B.; Knupfer, M.

    2008-12-01

    We have studied the reflectance of the recently discovered superconductor LaO0.9F0.1FeAs in a wide energy range from the far infrared to the visible regime. We report on the observation of infrared active phonons, the plasma edge, and possible interband transitions. On the basis of this data and the reported in-plane penetration depth λL(0)=254nm [H. Luetkens , Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 097009 (2008)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.101.097009] a disorder sensitive relatively small value of the total electron-boson coupling constant λtot=λe-ph+λe-sp˜0.6±0.35 can be estimated adopting an effective single-band picture.

  16. Role of the local structure in superconductivity of LaO0.5F0.5BiS2‑x Se x system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, E.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Hacisalihoglu, M. Y.; Hiroi, T.; Joseph, B.; Aquilanti, G.; Miura, O.; Mizokawa, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2017-04-01

    We have studied the local structure of LaO0.5F0.5BiS2‑x Se x by Bi L1-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). We find a significant effect of Se substitution on the local atomic correlations with a gradual elongation of average in-plane Bi-S bondlength. The associated mean square relative displacement, measuring average local distortions in the BiS2 plane, hardly shows any change for small Se substitution, but decreases significantly for x≥slant 0.6 . The Se substitution appears to suppress the local distortions within the BiS2 plane that may optimize in-plane orbital hybridization and hence the superconductivity. The results suggest that the local structure of the BiS2-layer is one of the key ingredients to control the physical properties of the BiS2-based dichalcogenides.

  17. Multiband superconductivity in LaFeAsO0.9F0.1 single crystals probed by high-field vortex torque magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Grissonnanche, G.; Gurevich, A.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Balicas, L.

    2011-06-01

    To probe manifestations of multiband superconductivity in oxypnictides, we measured the angular dependence of the magnetic torque τ(θ) in the mixed state of LaO0.9F0.1FeAs single crystals as a function of temperature T and magnetic fields H up to 18 T. The paramagnetic contribution of the Fe ions is properly treated in order to extract the effective mass anisotropy parameter γ=(mc/mab)1/2 from τ(θ). We show that γ depends strongly on both T and H, reaching a maximum value of ~10 followed by a decrease toward values close to 1 as T is lowered. The observed field dependencies of the London penetration depth λab and γ suggest the onset of suppression of a superconducing gap at H≈Hc2/3.

  18. High magnetic field vortex torque magnetometry in SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balicas, Luis; Gurevich, Alex; Jo, Younjung; Jaroszynski, Jan; Larbalestier, David; Liu, R. H.; Chen, H.; Chen, Xianhui H.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.

    2009-03-01

    To probe manifestations of multiband superconductivity in oxypnictides, we measured the angular dependence of magnetic torque τ(θ) in the mixed state of SmO0.8F0.2FeAs single crystals as functions of temperature T and high magnetic field H up to 30 T. We show that the effective mass anisotropy parameter γ extracted from τ(θ), can be greatly overestimated if the strong paramagnetism of Sm or Fe ions is not properly taken into account. The correctly extracted γ depends on both T and H, saturating at γ˜9 at lower temperatures. Neither the London penetration depth nor the superfluid density is affected by high fields fields up to the upper critical field. Our results indicate two strongly-coupled superconducting gaps of nearly equal magnitudes.

  19. Fluctuation conductivity and possible pseudogap state in FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovjov, A. L.; Omelchenko, L. V.; Terekhov, A. V.; Rogacki, K.; Vovk, R. V.; Khlybov, E. P.; Chroneos, A.

    2016-07-01

    The study of excess conductivity σ \\prime (T) in the textured polycrystalline FeAs-based superconductor EuFeAsO0.85F0.15 ({T}{{c}}=11 {{K}}) prepared by the solid state synthesis is reported for the first time. The σ \\prime (T) analysis has been performed within the local pair (LP) model based on the assumption of the LPs formation in cuprate high-T c superconductors (cuprates) below the pseudogap (PG) temperature {T}* \\gg {T}{{c}}. Similarly to the cuprates, near {T}{{c}} σ \\prime (T) is adequately described by the 3D term of the Aslamasov-Larkin (AL) theory but the range of the 3D-AL fluctuations, {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, is relatively short. Above the crossover temperature {T}0≈ 11.7 {{K}} σ \\prime (T) is described by the 2D Maki-Thompson (MT) fluctuation term of the Hikami-Larkin theory. But enhanced 2D-MT fluctuation contribution being typical for the magnetic superconductors is observed. Within the LP model the PG parameter, {{{Δ }}}* (T), was determined for the first time. It is shown that {{{Δ }}}* (T) demonstrates the narrow maximum at {T}s≈ 160 {{K}} followed by the descending linear length down to {T}{SDW}={T}{NFe}≈ 133 {{K}}. Observed small {{Δ }}{T}3{{D}}, enlarged 2D σ \\prime (T) and linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) are considered to be the evidence of the enhanced magnetic interaction in EuFeAsO0.85F0.15. Importantly, the slop of the linear {{{Δ }}}* (T) and its length are found to be the same as it is revealed for SmFeAsO0.85. The results suggest both the similarity of the magnetic interaction processes in different Fe-pnictides and applicability of the LP model to the σ \\prime (T) analysis even in magnetic superconductors.

  20. Ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) 1,2,3-triazolylidene organometallics: a preliminary investigation into the biological activity of 'click' carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Kilpin, Kelly J; Crot, Stéphanie; Riedel, Tina; Kitchen, Jonathan A; Dyson, Paul J

    2014-01-21

    Taking advantage of the facile and versatile synthetic properties of 'click' 1,2,3-triazolylidene N-heterocyclic carbenes (tzNHC's), a range of new organometallic Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes containing functionalised tzNHC ligands, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)(tzNHC)Cl2] [M = Ru(II), Os(II)], have been synthesised and fully characterised, including the X-ray crystal structure of one of the Os(II) complexes. The tzNHC ligands remain coordinated to the metal centres under relevant physiological conditions, and following binding to the model protein, ubiquitin. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the compounds towards human ovarian cancer cells is dependent on the substituent on the tzNHC ligand but is generally <50 μM and in some cases <1 μM, whilst still retaining a high degree of selectivity towards cancer cells over healthy cells (1.85 μM in A2780 ovarian cancer cells versus 435 μM in human embryonic kidney cells in one case).

  1. Peripherally and non-peripherally tetra-benzothiazole substituted metal-free zinc (II) and lead (II) phthalocyanines: Synthesis, characterization, and investigation of photophysical and photochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirbaş, Ümit; Göl, Cem; Barut, Burak; Bayrak, Rıza; Durmuş, Mahmut; Kantekin, Halit; Değirmencioğlu, İsmail

    2017-02-01

    In this study, novel phthalonitrile compounds bearing 2-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-5-yloxy groups (4 and 5) and their peripherally and non-peripherally tetra-substituted metal-free (6 and 7), zinc (II) (8 and 9), and lead (II) (10 and 11) phthalocyanine derivatives were synthesized and characterized for the first time. These novel compounds showed extremely good solubility in most common organic solvents. The novel phthalocyanine compounds presented excellent results from photophysical and photochemical examinations in DMF solution. Especially, the singlet oxygen quantum yield (ΦΔ) values of the substituted zinc (II) phthalocyanines indicate that these compounds have significant potential as photosensitizers in cancer treatment by the photodynamic therapy (PDT) technique. The fluorescence quenching behaviour of these novel phthalocyanine compounds by 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) was also examined in DMF solution.

  2. Structure and flexibility of the C-ring in the electromotor of rotary F(0)F(1)-ATPase of pea chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Saroussi, Shai; Schushan, Maya; Ben-Tal, Nir; Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    A ring of 8-15 identical c-subunits is essential for ion-translocation by the rotary electromotor of the ubiquitous F(O)F(1)-ATPase. Here we present the crystal structure at 3.4Å resolution of the c-ring from chloroplasts of a higher plant (Pisum sativum), determined using a native preparation. The crystal structure was found to resemble that of an (ancestral) cyanobacterium. Using elastic network modeling to investigate the ring's eigen-modes, we found five dominant modes of motion that fell into three classes. They revealed the following deformations of the ring: (I) ellipsoidal, (II) opposite twisting of the luminal circular surface of the ring against the stromal surface, and (III) kinking of the hairpin-shaped monomers in the middle, resulting in bending/stretching of the ring. Extension of the elastic network analysis to rings of different c(n)-symmetry revealed the same classes of dominant modes as in P. sativum (c(14)). We suggest the following functional roles for these classes: The first and third classes of modes affect the interaction of the c-ring with its counterparts in F(O), namely subunits a and bb'. These modes are likely to be involved in ion-translocation and torque generation. The second class of deformation, along with deformations of subunits γ and ε might serve to elastically buffer the torque transmission between F(O) and F(1).

  3. Complexation of heteroaromatic N-oxides with rhodium(II) tetracarboxylates in solution: DFT and NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Głaszczka, Rafał; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2014-03-01

    Complexation of rhodium(II) tetraacetate and rhodium(II) tetrakistrifluoroacetate with a set of heteroaromatic N-oxides containing additional functional groups was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and 1H, 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in CDCl3 solutions. Chemical shifts for five N-oxides and their 1:1 adducts with rhodium tetraacetate were computed at the B3PW91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart ECP)//B3LYP/[6-31G(2d), LANL2DZ] theory level applying IEF PCM (CHCl3) solvation model and taking into account various complexation modes and conformational variety. Calculated values were used for the estimation of complexation shifts Δδ (Δδ = δadduct - δligand). The largest negative complexation shift were estimated for heteroatoms bonded to Rh, from -37 to -70 ppm (N), from -100 to -160 ppm (O in NO group), from -13 to -23 ppm (O in OCH3 group), and from -12 to -22 ppm (Cl). For the remaining heteroatoms in adducts, the corresponding Δδ values ranged from -22 to +8.2 ppm (N), from +3 to +58 ppm (O) and from +6 to +51 ppm (Cl). The Δδ(1H) usually did not exceed 1 ppm, whereas Δδ(13C) varied from ca. -1 to +7 ppm. Some trends useful for the determination of the complexation site were extracted from calculated data sets. Theoretical findings were applied to analyse experimental NMR data.

  4. Targeted mutagenesis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system induces complete knockout individuals in the F0 generation.

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Rolf B; Leininger, Sven; Kleppe, Lene; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Wargelius, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biological function behind key proteins is of great concern in Atlantic salmon, both due to a high commercial importance and an interesting life history. Until recently, functional studies in salmonids appeared to be difficult. However, the recent discovery of targeted mutagenesis using the CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system enables performing functional studies in Atlantic salmon to a great extent. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target two genes involved in pigmentation, tyrosinase (tyr) and solute carrier family 45, member 2 (slc45a2). Embryos were assayed for mutation rates at the 17 somite stage, where 40 and 22% of all injected embryos showed a high degree of mutation induction for slc45a2 and tyr, respectively. At hatching this mutation frequency was also visible for both targeted genes, displaying a graded phenotype ranging from complete lack of pigmentation to partial loss and normal pigmentation. CRISPRslc45a2/Cas9 injected embryos showing a complete lack of pigmentation or just a few spots of pigments also lacked wild type sequences when assaying more than 80 (slc45a2) sequence clones from whole embryos. This indicates that CRISPR/Cas9 can induce double-allelic knockout in the F0 generation. However, types and frequency of indels might affect the phenotype. Therefore, the variation of indels was assayed in the graded pigmentation phenotypes produced by CRISPR/Cas9-slc45a2. The results show a tendency for fewer types of indels formed in juveniles completely lacking pigmentation compared to juveniles displaying partial pigmentation. Another interesting observation was a high degree of the same indel type in different juveniles. This study shows for the first time successful use of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in a marine cold water species. Targeted double-allelic mutations were obtained and, though the level of mosaicism has to be considered, we demonstrate that F0 fish can be used

  5. Targeted Mutagenesis in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System Induces Complete Knockout Individuals in the F0 Generation

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Leininger, Sven; Kleppe, Lene; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Wargelius, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biological function behind key proteins is of great concern in Atlantic salmon, both due to a high commercial importance and an interesting life history. Until recently, functional studies in salmonids appeared to be difficult. However, the recent discovery of targeted mutagenesis using the CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated) system enables performing functional studies in Atlantic salmon to a great extent. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to target two genes involved in pigmentation, tyrosinase (tyr) and solute carrier family 45, member 2 (slc45a2). Embryos were assayed for mutation rates at the 17 somite stage, where 40 and 22% of all injected embryos showed a high degree of mutation induction for slc45a2 and tyr, respectively. At hatching this mutation frequency was also visible for both targeted genes, displaying a graded phenotype ranging from complete lack of pigmentation to partial loss and normal pigmentation. CRISPRslc45a2/Cas9 injected embryos showing a complete lack of pigmentation or just a few spots of pigments also lacked wild type sequences when assaying more than 80 (slc45a2) sequence clones from whole embryos. This indicates that CRISPR/Cas9 can induce double-allelic knockout in the F0 generation. However, types and frequency of indels might affect the phenotype. Therefore, the variation of indels was assayed in the graded pigmentation phenotypes produced by CRISPR/Cas9-slc45a2. The results show a tendency for fewer types of indels formed in juveniles completely lacking pigmentation compared to juveniles displaying partial pigmentation. Another interesting observation was a high degree of the same indel type in different juveniles. This study shows for the first time successful use of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in a marine cold water species. Targeted double-allelic mutations were obtained and, though the level of mosaicism has to be considered, we demonstrate that F0 fish can be used

  6. From controversy to precision on the sigma meson: A review on the status of the non-ordinary f0(500) resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, José R.

    2016-11-01

    The existence and properties of the sigma meson have been controversial for almost six decades, despite playing a central role in the spontaneous chiral symmetry of QCD or in the nucleon-nucleon attraction. This controversy has also been fed by the strong indications that it is not an ordinary quark-antiquark meson. Here we review both the recent and old experimental data and the model independent dispersive formalisms which have provided precise determinations of its mass and width, finally settling the controversy and leading to its new name: f0(500) . We then provide a rather conservative average of the most recent and advanced dispersive determinations of its pole position √{sσ } = 449-16+22 - i(275 ± 12) . In addition, after comprehensive introductions, we will review within the modern perspective of effective theories and dispersion theory, its relation to chiral symmetry, unitarization techniques, its quark mass dependence, popular models, as well as the recent strong evidence, obtained from the QCD 1 /Nc expansion or Regge theory, for its non ordinary nature in terms of quarks and gluons.

  7. Information From the Voice Fundamental Frequency (F0) Region Accounts for the Majority of the Benefit When Acoustic Stimulation Is Added to Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Dorman, Michael F.; Spahr, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the minimum amount of low-frequency acoustic information that is required to achieve speech perception benefit in listeners with a cochlear implant in one ear and low-frequency hearing in the other ear. Design The recognition of monosyllabic words in quiet and sentences in noise was evaluated in three listening conditions: electric stimulation alone, acoustic stimulation alone, and combined electric and acoustic stimulation. The acoustic stimuli presented to the nonimplanted ear were either low-pass-filtered at 125, 250, 500, or 750 Hz, or unfiltered (wideband). Results Adding low-frequency acoustic information to electrically stimulated information led to a significant improvement in word recognition in quiet and sentence recognition in noise. Improvement was observed in the electric and acoustic stimulation condition even when the acoustic information was limited to the 125-Hz-low-passed signal. Further improvement for the sentences in noise was observed when the acoustic signal was increased to wideband. Conclusions Information from the voice fundamental frequency (F0) region accounts for the majority of the speech perception benefit when acoustic stimulation is added to electric stimulation. We propose that, in quiet, low-frequency acoustic information leads to an improved representation of voicing, which in turn leads to a reduction in word candidates in the lexicon. In noise, the robust representation of voicing allows access to low-frequency acoustic landmarks that mark syllable structure and word boundaries. These landmarks can bootstrap word and sentence recognition. PMID:20050394

  8. A Variable Temperature Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Colossal Magnetoresistant NdMnAsO0.95F0.05

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, E. J.; Mclaughlin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductivity in Fe arsenides has invigorated research into transition metal pnictides. Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) has recently been reported for NdMnAsO1-xFx for x = 0.05–0.08, with a maximum magnetoresistance achieved at low temperature (MR9T(3 K)) = −95%). This appears to be a novel mechanism of CMR, which is as a result of a second order phase transition in field from an insulating antiferromagnet to a semiconducting paramagnet. Here we report a variable temperature synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the CMR oxypnictide NdMnAsO0.95F0.05 between 4 K–290 K. An excellent fit to the tetragonal unit cell with space group P4/nmm is obtained over the entire temperature range, with no change in crystal structure detected down to 4 K. A coupling of the lattice and magnetic order is observed, where subtle discontinuities in the temperature variation of a and the c/a ratio are apparent as the Nd spins order antiferromagnetically and the Mn moments reorient into the basal plane at TSR. The results suggest that very small changes in lattice parameters effect the coupling between lattice, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom. PMID:26875693

  9. Biallelic mutations in the gene encoding eEF1A2 cause seizures and sudden death in F0 mice

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Faith C. J.; Hope, Jilly E.; McLachlan, Fiona; Nunez, Francis; Doig, Jennifer; Bengani, Hemant; Smith, Colin; Abbott, Catherine M.

    2017-01-01

    De novo heterozygous missense mutations in the gene encoding translation elongation factor eEF1A2 have recently been found to give rise to neurodevelopmental disorders. Children with mutations in this gene have developmental delay, epilepsy, intellectual disability and often autism; the most frequently occurring mutation is G70S. It has been known for many years that complete loss of eEF1A2 in mice causes motor neuron degeneration and early death; on the other hand heterozygous null mice are apparently normal. We have used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing in the mouse to mutate the gene encoding eEF1A2, obtaining a high frequency of biallelic mutations. Whilst many of the resulting founder (F0) mice developed motor neuron degeneration, others displayed phenotypes consistent with a severe neurodevelopmental disorder, including sudden unexplained deaths and audiogenic seizures. The presence of G70S protein was not sufficient to protect mice from neurodegeneration in G70S/− mice, showing that the mutant protein is essentially non-functional. PMID:28378778

  10. Production and characterization of a novel monoclonal antibody against Vibrio parahaemolyticus F0F1 ATP synthase's delta subunit and its application for rapid identification of the pathogen.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Junko; Kawatsu, Kentaro; Iwasaki, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Takenaka, Shigeo; Kumeda, Yuko; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We raised monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Vibrio parahaemolyticus cell extracts. One of the MAbs, designated MAb-VP34, reacted in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) with 140 V. parahaemolyticus strains, regardless of serotype or origin. MAb-VP34 did not detectably react with 96 strains belonging to 27 other Vibrio species (except for Vibrio natriegens) or with 29 non-Vibrio species. These results show that MAb-VP34 is highly specific for V. parahaemolyticus. Western blotting and mass spectrometry analyses revealed that MAb-VP34 recognized V. parahaemolyticus F(0)F(1) ATP synthase's delta subunit. Using MAb-VP34, a rapid and simple immunodot blotting assay (VP-Dot) was developed to determine whether bacterial colonies growing on selective agar, represented V. parahaemolyticus. To evaluate VP-Dot, 20 V. parahaemolyticus strains and 19 non-related strains were tested. The results indicated that VP-Dot is a reliable tool for identification of V. parahaemolyticus colonies. The simple VP-Dot procedure took 40min, indicating that the MAb-VP34 based immunological method will greatly reduce labor, time, and costs required to verify V. parahaemolyticus colonies as compared with the conventional biochemical test.

  11. Polarographic investigation of Cu(II) complexes with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-hydroxypropyl)-ethylenediamine.

    PubMed

    Norkus, E; Vaskelis, A; Zakaité, I; Reklaitis, J

    1995-11-01

    During investigation of the formation of Cu(2+) ion complexes with N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-hydroxypropyl)-ethylenediamine (Quadrol-Q) by means of constant current polarography (20 degrees C, ionic strength J = 3 mol l(-1)), the possibility of the formation of two complex compounds; CuQ(2+) and CuQ(2+)(2), was shown within the pH range from 6 to 8. The logarithms of the stability constants for these compounds are 10.6 +/- 0.5 and 14.6 +/- 0.4 respectively. Cu(II) complexation increases sharply when the pH increases from 8 to 10. It was shown that the data at a pH of greater than 10 are in accordance with the existence of the hydroxy complexes CuQ(OH)(2) and CuQ(2)(OH)(2), the logarithms of the stability constants being 26.9 +/- 0.5 and 29.1 +/- 0.3.

  12. A systematic investigation on biological activities of a novel double zwitterionic Schiff base Cu(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalamuthu, S.; Annaraj, B.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Double zwitterionic amino acid Schiff base, o-vanillylidene-L-histidine (OVHIS) and its copper complex (CuOVHIS) have been synthesized and characterized. CuOVHIS has distorted octahedral geometry, and OVHIS coordinates the copper ion in a tetradentate manner (N2O2). The pKa of OVHIS in aqueous solution was studied by potentiometric and spectrophotometric methods. DNA binding behavior of the compounds was investigated using spectrophotometric, cyclic voltammetric, and viscosity methods. The efficacy of DNA cleaving nature was tested on pUC19 DNA. The in vitro biological activity was tested against various micro organisms. The effect of CuOVHIS on the surface feature of Escherichia coli was analyzed by SEM. DPPH assay studies revealed that CuOVHIS has higher antioxidant activity. OVHIS inhibits proliferation of HCT117 cells with half maximal inhibition (IC50) of 71.15 ± 0.67. Chelation of OVHIS with Cu(II) ion enhances the inhibition of proliferation action (IC50 = 53.14 ± 0.67).

  13. A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of a new imineoxime and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes: Synthesis, structural characterization and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Yunus; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T.; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2014-12-01

    A new imineoxime compound {(1E,2E)-(2-hydroxy-ethylimino)-naphthalene-2yl-ethanal oxime (heineoH)} and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes ([M(heineo)2]) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR, UV-vis, elemental analysis, mass spectra and X-ray single crystal diffraction. [Pt(heineo)2] was obtained as a single crystal, while [Pd(heineo)2] was synthesized as a polycrystalline powder. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the [Pt(heineo)2] indicated that the platinum(II) ion is coordinated by two heineo ligands in a distorted square-planar geometry. DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and LANL2DZ) calculations on the ligand and its complexes were carried out to correlate the geometry and vibrational and electronic properties. Additionally, heineoH is fluorescent in EtOH at room temperature, but the fluorescence is quenched in the case of the metal complexes.

  14. A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of a new imineoxime and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes: synthesis, structural characterization and spectroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yunus; Icsel, Ceyda; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2014-12-10

    A new imineoxime compound {(1E,2E)-(2-hydroxy-ethylimino)-naphthalene-2yl-ethanal oxime (heineoH)} and its palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes ([M(heineo)2]) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, NMR, UV-vis, elemental analysis, mass spectra and X-ray single crystal diffraction. [Pt(heineo)2] was obtained as a single crystal, while [Pd(heineo)2] was synthesized as a polycrystalline powder. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the [Pt(heineo)2] indicated that the platinum(II) ion is coordinated by two heineo ligands in a distorted square-planar geometry. DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and LANL2DZ) calculations on the ligand and its complexes were carried out to correlate the geometry and vibrational and electronic properties. Additionally, heineoH is fluorescent in EtOH at room temperature, but the fluorescence is quenched in the case of the metal complexes.

  15. A Primary Investigation on Serum CTX-II Changes in Patients Infected with Brucellosis in Qinghai Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi Jun; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Ma, Li; Xu, Li Qing; Yang, Pei Zhen; Meng, Xian Ya; Yu, Hui Zhen; Xu, Xiao Qing; Cao, Jian Ying

    2016-03-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most widespread zoonotic diseases, with the most frequent complication being osteoarticular changes. The aim of this study was to assess the changes of C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) in patients infected with brucellosis. A total of 84 brucellosis patients and 43 volunteers were selected and divided into brucellosis vs. control groups. Serum samples were subjected to serological tests for brucellosis, and CTX-II levels in all samples were measured simultaneously with ELISA. The results showed that serum CTX-II levels in human brucellosis were higher than those of healthy controls, without a statistically significant difference, but serum CTX-II levels in male patients were significantly higher than those of female patients (P<0.05). This finding could indicate the biological changes in the cartilage and bone in human brucellosis.

  16. Theoretical investigation, biological evaluation and VEGFR2 kinase studies of metal(II) complexes derived from hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, S; Mahendiran, D; Srinivasan, T; Mohanraj, G; Kalilur Rahiman, A

    2016-02-01

    The reaction of soft tripodal scorpionate ligand, sodium hydrotris(methimazolyl)borate with M(ClO4)2·6H2O [MMn(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II)] in methanol leads to the cleavage of B-N bond followed by the formation of complexes of the type [M(MeimzH)4](ClO4)2·H2O (1-4), where MeimzH=methimazole. All the complexes were fully characterized by spectro-analytical techniques. The molecular structure of the zinc(II) complex (4) was determined by X-ray crystallography, which supports the observed deboronation reaction in the scorpionate ligand with tetrahedral geometry around zinc(II) ion. The electronic spectra of complexes suggested tetrahedral geometry for manganese(II) and nickel(II) complexes, and square-planar geometry for copper(II) complex. Frontier molecular orbital analysis (HOMO-LUMO) was carried out by B3LYP/6-31G(d) to understand the charge transfer occurring in the molecules. All the complexes exhibit significant antimicrobial activity against Gram (-ve) and Gram (+ve) bacterial as well as fungal strains, which are quite comparable to standard drugs streptomycin and clotrimazole. The copper(II) complex (3) showed excellent free radical scavenging activity against DPPH in all concentration with IC50 value of 30μg/mL, when compared to the other complexes. In the molecular docking studies, all the complexes showed hydrophobic, π-π and hydrogen bonding interactions with BSA. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes against human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells was assessed by MTT assay, which showed exponential responses toward increasing concentration of complexes.

  17. Mn(II) Binding and Subsequent Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase MnxG Investigated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lizhi; Stich, Troy A; Butterfield, Cristina N; Romano, Christine A; Spiro, Thomas G; Tebo, Bradley M; Casey, William H; Britt, R David

    2015-08-26

    The dynamics of manganese solid formation (as MnOx) by the multicopper oxidase (MCO)-containing Mnx protein complex were examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectra of samples of Mnx, prepared in atmosphere and then reacted with Mn(II) for times ranging from 7 to 600 s, indicate rapid oxidation of the substrate manganese (with two-phase pseudo-first-order kinetics modeled using rate coefficients of: k(1obs) = 0.205 ± 0.001 s(-1) and k(2obs) = 0.019 ± 0.001 s(-1)). This process occurs on approximately the same time scale as in vitro solid MnOx formation when there is a large excess of Mn(II). We also found CW and pulse EPR spectroscopic evidence for at least three classes of Mn(II)-containing species in the reaction mixtures: (i) aqueous Mn(II), (ii) a specifically bound mononuclear Mn(II) ion coordinated to the Mnx complex by one nitrogenous ligand, and (iii) a weakly exchange-coupled dimeric Mn(II) species. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of manganese mineralization.

  18. Investigation of irradiated rats DNA in the presence of Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, N H; Torosyan, A L; Malakyan, M; Bajinyan, S A; Haroutiunian, S G

    2016-01-01

    The new synthesized Cu(II) chelates of amino acids Schiff bases were studied as a potential radioprotectors. Male albino rats of Wistar strain were exposed to X-ray whole-body irradiation at 4.8 Gy. This dose caused 30% mortality of the animals (LD30). The survival of animals exposed to radiation after preliminary administration of 10 mg/kg Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 or Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 prior to irradiation was registered about 80 and 100% correspondingly. Using spectrophotometric melting and agarose gel electrophoresis methods, the differences between the DNA isolated from irradiated rats and rats pretreated with Cu(II) chelates were studied. The fragments of DNA with different breaks were revealed in DNA samples isolated from irradiated animals. While, the repair of the DNA structure was observed for animals pretreated with the Cu(II) chelates. The results suggested that pretreatment of the irradiated rats with Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tyrosinate)2 and Cu(II)(Nicotinyl-L-Tryptophanate)2 compounds improves the liver DNA characteristics.

  19. Theoretical investigations of the structures and electronic spectra of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes with cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohan; Wang, Na; He, Hongqing; Wang, Li

    2014-03-01

    The ground-state structures of two ligands cyclohexylamine-N-dithiocarbamate (L) and PPh3 and four complexes [Zn(L)2] (A), [Ni(L)2] (B), [Zn(L)2PPh3] (C), and [Ni(L)2PPh3] (D) are optimized by M06, B3LYP, and B3PW91 methods with the same mixed basis set. As compared with the experimental data of other complexes containing the Ni-P bond, the result obtained by M06/6-31+G(d)-LANL2DZ method is finally regarded as accurate and reliable for this project. Based on the optimized geometries, the compositions of molecular orbitals are analyzed and the absorption spectra are simulated. When one more ligand PPh3 is coordinated, the lowest-lying transition energy presents red-shift; while it shows blue-shift when the metal coordination center change from Ni to Zn with the same ligands. The detailed transition characters related with the absorption spectrum are assigned. In all the key transitions, it is hard to find the contribution from Zn atom. On the contrary, the d orbital of Ni atom contributes a lot for the HOMO and LUMO of complexes B and D. Consequently, the transition characters of Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes are different.

  20. An investigation on new ruthenium(II) hydrazone complexes as anticancer agents and their interaction with biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Alagesan, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Dharmaraj, Nallasamy

    2014-04-28

    A new set of ruthenium(II) hydrazone complexes [Ru(H)(CO)(PPh3)2(L)] (1) and [RuCl2(DMSO)2(HL)] (2), with triphenyl phosphine or DMSO as co-ligands was synthesized by reacting benzoyl pyridine furoic acid hydrazone (HL) with [Ru(H)(Cl)(CO)(PPh3)3] and [RuCl2(DMSO)4]. The single crystal X-ray data of complexes 1 and 2 revealed an octahedral geometry around the ruthenium ion in which the hydrazone is coordinated through ON and NN atoms in complexes 1 and 2 respectively. The interaction of the compounds with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been estimated by absorption and emission titration methods which indicated that the ligand and the complexes interacted with CT-DNA through intercalation. In addition, the DNA cleavage ability of these newly synthesized ruthenium complexes assessed by an agarose gel electrophoresis method demonstrated that complex 2 has a higher DNA cleavage activity than that of complex 1. The binding properties of the free ligand and its complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein have been investigated using UV-visible, fluorescence and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated the stronger binding nature of the ruthenium complexes to BSA than the free hydrazone ligand. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the compounds examined in vitro on a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) and a normal mouse embryonic fibroblasts cell line (NIH 3T3) revealed that complex 2 exhibited a superior cytotoxicity than complex 1 to the cancer cells but was less toxic to the normal mouse embryonic fibroblasts under identical conditions.

  1. Investigation and Control of "Sphere-Like" Buckminsterfullerene C60 and "Disk-Like" Copper(II) Phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAfee, Terry Richard

    Due to the growing global need for cheap, flexible, and portable electronics, numerous research groups from mechanical and electrical engineering, material science, chemistry, and physics have increasingly turned to organic electronics research over the last ˜5--10 years. Largely, the focus of researchers in this growing field have sought to obtain the next record holding device, allowing a heuristic approach of trial and error to become dominant focus of research rather than a fundamental understanding. Rather than working with the latest high performance organic semiconducting materials and film processing techniques, I have chosen to investigate and control the fundamental self-assembly interactions of organic photovoltaic thin films using simplified systems. Specifically, I focus on organic photovoltaic research using two of the oldest and well studies semiconducting materials, namely "sphere-like" electron donor material Buckminsterfullerene C60 and "disklike" electron acceptor material Copper(II) Phthalocyanine. I manufactured samples using the well-known technique of physical vapor deposition using a high vacuum chamber that I designed and built to accommodate my need of precise material deposition control, with codeposition capability. Films were characterized using microscopy and spectroscopy techniques locally at NCSU, including Atomic Force Microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, as well as at National Laboratory based synchrotron x-ray techniques, including Carbon and Nitrogen k-edge Total Electron Yield and Transmission Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, Carbon k-edge Resonant Soft x-ray Microscopy, Resonant Soft x-ray reflectivity, and Grazing Incidence Wide-Angle X-ray scattering.

  2. Co-sequestration of Zn(II) and phosphate by γ-Al2O3: From macroscopic to microscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xuemei; Tan, Xiaoli; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-10-30

    Little information is available concerning co-sorbing oxyanion and metal contaminants in the environment, yet in most metal-contaminated areas, co-contamination by phosphate is common. In this study, the mutual effects of phosphate and Zn(II) on their interaction with γ-Al2O3 are investigated by batch experiments and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technique. The results show that the co-sorption of phosphate on γ-Al2O3 modifies both the extent of Zn(II) sorption and the local atomic structures of sorbed Zn(II) ions. Multiple mechanisms are involved in Zn(II) retention in the presence of phosphate, including electrostatic interaction, binary and ternary surface complexation, and the formation of Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes. At pH 6.5, type III ternary surface complexation occurs concurrently with binary Zn-alumina surface complexation at low phosphate concentrations, whereas the formation of type III ternary surface complexes is promoted as the phosphate concentration increases. With further increasing phosphate concentration, Zn(II)-phosphate polynuclear complexes are formed. At pH 8.0, Zn dominantly forms type III ternary surface complexes in the presence of phosphate. The results of this study indicate the variability of Zn complexation on oxide surface and the importance of combining macroscopic observations with XAFS capable of determining metal complex formation mechanism for ternary system.

  3. Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a TG-100A Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine II - Windmilling Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E. W.; Durham, J. D.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the operational and performance characteristics of the TG-100A gas turbine-propeller engine II. Windmilling characteristics were deterined for a range of altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, true airspeeds from 100 to 273 miles per hour, and propeller blade angles from 4 degrees to 46 degrees.

  4. TECHNICAL REPORT ON TECHNOLOGICALLY ENHANCED NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM URANIUM MINING, VOLUME II: INVESTIGATION OF POTENTIAL HEALTH, GEOGRAPHIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES OF ABANDONED URANIUM MINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II investigates the potential radiogenic risks from abandoned uranium mines and evaluates which may pose the greatest hazards to members of the public and to the environment. The intent of this report is to identify who may be most likely to be exposed to wastes at small a...

  5. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  6. Mean F0 values obtained through standard phrase pronunciation compared with values obtained from the normal work environment: a study on teacher and child voices performed in a preschool environment.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Fredric; Ohlsson, Ann-Christine; Sjöholm, Jonas; Waye, Kerstin Persson

    2010-05-01

    Mean fundamental frequency (F(0)) values are often used in research on vocal load. In this study, we examine how the mean F(0) differs when evaluated through pronouncing a standard phrase as compared to the mean F(0) obtained in a real work/play environment. We also examine how the F(0) values change throughout the day. The study was performed in a preschool, nine adult female preschool teachers and 11 children participated. The participants wore a digital recorder equipped with an accelerometer, which was attached to the neck. In the study, the participant first pronounced a standard phrase in a controlled environment; thereafter, the voice was recorded in the environment where both children and adults normally reside throughout the day, denoted by the work/play environment. For each participant, the procedure was repeated four times throughout the day. Analyses showed that the F(0) values of the children's and adult's voices were significantly higher when recorded in the work/play environment as compared to the controlled environment. The average difference was 36 Hz for adults and 24 Hz for children. Previous studies have shown an increase of F(0) over the day for teachers. In this study, an increase between morning and afternoon values was found amounting to 8 Hz for adults and 24 Hz for children. For the child population, this increase was statistically significant. However, the total changes over the day revealed a somewhat more complex scheme, with an increase of F(0) in the morning, a decrease during lunch, and finally an increase in the afternoon. This pattern was verified statistically for the joint child-adult population.

  7. Measurements of Branching Fractions, Polarizations, and Direct CP-Violation Asymmetries in B to rho K* and B to f0(980) K* Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    The authors report searches for B-meson decays to the charmless final states {rho}K* and f{sub 0}(980)K* with a sample of 232 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC.

  8. Catalytic Mechanism of Heparinase II Investigated by Site-directed Mutagenesis and the Crystal Structure with Its Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Zhao, W; Garron, M; Xiao, Z; Cui, Q; Zhang, Z; Sulea, T; Linhardt, R; Cygler, M

    2010-01-01

    Heparinase II (HepII) is an 85-kDa dimeric enzyme that depolymerizes both heparin and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans through a {beta}-elimination mechanism. Recently, we determined the crystal structure of HepII from Pedobacter heparinus (previously known as Flavobacterium heparinum) in complex with a heparin disaccharide product, and identified the location of its active site. Here we present the structure of HepII complexed with a heparan sulfate disaccharide product, proving that the same binding/active site is responsible for the degradation of both uronic acid epimers containing substrates. The key enzymatic step involves removal of a proton from the C5 carbon (a chiral center) of the uronic acid, posing a topological challenge to abstract the proton from either side of the ring in a single active site. We have identified three potential active site residues equidistant from C5 and located on both sides of the uronate product and determined their role in catalysis using a set of defined tetrasaccharide substrates. HepII H202A/Y257A mutant lost activity for both substrates and we determined its crystal structure complexed with a heparan sulfate-derived tetrasaccharide. Based on kinetic characterization of various mutants and the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex we propose residues participating in catalysis and their specific roles.

  9. Catalytic mechanism of heparinase II investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and the crystal structure with its substrate.

    PubMed

    Shaya, David; Zhao, Wenjing; Garron, Marie-Line; Xiao, Zhongping; Cui, Qizhi; Zhang, Zhenqing; Sulea, Traian; Linhardt, Robert J; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2010-06-25

    Heparinase II (HepII) is an 85-kDa dimeric enzyme that depolymerizes both heparin and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans through a beta-elimination mechanism. Recently, we determined the crystal structure of HepII from Pedobacter heparinus (previously known as Flavobacterium heparinum) in complex with a heparin disaccharide product, and identified the location of its active site. Here we present the structure of HepII complexed with a heparan sulfate disaccharide product, proving that the same binding/active site is responsible for the degradation of both uronic acid epimers containing substrates. The key enzymatic step involves removal of a proton from the C5 carbon (a chiral center) of the uronic acid, posing a topological challenge to abstract the proton from either side of the ring in a single active site. We have identified three potential active site residues equidistant from C5 and located on both sides of the uronate product and determined their role in catalysis using a set of defined tetrasaccharide substrates. HepII H202A/Y257A mutant lost activity for both substrates and we determined its crystal structure complexed with a heparan sulfate-derived tetrasaccharide. Based on kinetic characterization of various mutants and the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex we propose residues participating in catalysis and their specific roles.

  10. Measurement of the ratio B (Bs0 → J / ψf0 (980)) / B (Bs0 → J / ψϕ (1020)) in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.

    2016-05-01

    A measurement of the ratio of the branching fractions of the Bs0 meson to J / ψf0 (980) and to J / ψϕ (1020) is presented. The J / ψ, f0 (980), and ϕ (1020) are observed through their decays to μ+μ-, π+π-, and K+K-, respectively. The f0 and the ϕ are identified by requiring |Mπ+π- - 974 MeV | < 50 MeV and |MK+K- - 1020 MeV | < 10 MeV. The analysis is based on a data sample of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1. The measured ratio is B(Bs0 → J / ψf0) B (f0 →π+π-)/B (Bs0 → J / ψϕ) B (ϕ →K+K-) = 0.140 ± 0.008 (stat) ± 0.023 (syst), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  11. Investigation of the photophysical and photochemical properties of peripherally tetra-substituted water-soluble zwitterionic and cationic zinc(ii) phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Çolak, Senem; Durmuş, Mahmut; Yıldız, Salih Zeki

    2016-06-21

    In this study, 4-{4-[N-((3-dimethylamino)propyl)amide]phenoxy}phthalonitrile () and its zinc(ii) phthalocyanine derivative () were synthesized for the first time. 4-(N-((3-Dimethylamino)propyl)amide)phenoxy substituted zinc(ii) phthalocyanine () was converted to its water-soluble sulfobetaine (), betaine () and N-oxide () containing zwitterionic and quaternized cationic () derivatives. All newly synthesized compounds () were characterized by the combination of UV-vis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy techniques and elemental analysis. The photophysical (fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes) and photochemical (singlet oxygen quantum yields) properties were investigated in DMSO for all the synthesized zinc(ii) phthalocyanines () and in both DMSO and aqueous solutions for zwitterionic and cationic phthalocyanines () for the specification of their capability as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The binding behavior of water soluble phthalocyanines () to the bovine serum albumin protein was also examined for the determination of their transportation ability in the blood stream.

  12. Protein Binding and the Electronic Properties of Iron(II) Complexes: An Electrochemical and Optical Investigation of Outer Sphere Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Kylie D.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Hartings, Matthew R.; Abajian, Carnie; Georganopoulou, Dimitra; Ratner, Mark A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2010-11-17

    Metalloenzymes and electron transfer proteins influence the electrochemical properties of metal cofactors by controlling the second-sphere environment of the protein active site. Properties that tune this environment include the dielectric constant, templated charge structure, van der Waals interactions, and hydrogen bonds. By systematically varying the binding of a redox-active ligand with a protein, we can evaluate how these noncovalent interactions alter the electronic structure of the bound metal complex. For this study, we employ the well-characterized avidin-biotin conjugate as the protein-ligand system, and have synthesized solvatochromic biotinylated and desthiobiotinylated iron(II) bipyridine tetracyano complexes ([Fe(BMB)(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} (1) and [Fe(DMB)(CN){sub 4}]{sup 2-} (2)). The binding affinities of 1 and 2 with avidin are 3.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} and 1.5 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}, respectively. The redox potentials of 1 and 2 (333 mV and 330 mV) shift to 193 mV and 203 mV vs Ag/AgCl when the complex is bound to avidin and adsorbed to a monolayer-coated gold electrode. Upon binding to avidin, the MLCT1 band red-shifts 20 nm for 1 and 10 nm for 2. Similarly, the MLCT2 band for 1 red-shifts 7 nm and the band for 2 red-shifts 6 nm. For comparison, the electronic properties of 1 and 2 were investigated in organic solvents, and similar shifts in the MLCT bands and redox potentials were observed. An X-ray crystal structure of 1 bound to avidin was obtained, and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze the protein environment of the protein-bound transition metal complexes. Our studies demonstrate that changes in the binding affinity of a ligand-receptor pair influence the outer-sphere coordination of the ligand, which in turn affects the electronic properties of the bound complex.

  13. Part I. Inviscid, Swirling Flows and Vortex Breakdown. Part II. a Numerical Investigation of the Lundgren Turbulence Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntine, James Douglas

    Part I. A study of the behaviour of an inviscid, swirling fluid is performed. This flow can be described by the Squire-Long equation if the constraints of time -independence and axisymmetry are invoked. The particular case of flow through a diverging pipe is selected and a study is conducted to determine over what range of parameters (both pipe inlet conditions and geometry) does a (unique) solution exist. The work is performed with a view to understanding how the phenomenon of vortex breakdown develops. Experiments and previous numerical studies have indicated that the flow is sensitive to boundary conditions particularly at the pipe inlet. A "quasi-cylindrical" simplification of the Squire-Long equation is compared with the more complete model and shown to be able to account for most of its behaviour. An advantage of this latter representation is the relatively undetailed description of the flow geometry it requires in order to calculate a solution. "Criticality" or the ability of small disturbances to propagate upstream is related to results of the quasi -cylindrical and axisymmetric flow models. This leads to an examination of claims made by researchers such as Benjamin and Hall concerning the interrelationship between "failure" of the quasi-cylindrical model and the occurrence of a "critical" flow state. Other criteria for predicting the onset of vortex breakdown are considered in the context of the model employed, particularly those of Brown & Lopez and Spall, Gatski & Grosch. Part II. Lundgren (1982) developed an analytical model for homogeneous turbulence based on a collection of contracting spiral vortices each embedded in an axisymmetric strain field. Using asymptotic approximations he was able to deduce the Kolmogorov k^{-5/3} behaviour for inertial scales in the turbulence energy spectrum. Pullin & Saffman have enlarged upon his work to make a number of predictions about the behaviour of turbulence described by the model. This work investigates the

  14. Solution structure investigation of Ru(II) complex ion pairs: quantitative NOE measurements and determination of average interionic distances.

    PubMed

    Zuccaccia, C; Bellachioma, G; Cardaci, G; Macchioni, A

    2001-11-07

    The structure of the Ru(II) ion pairs trans-[Ru(COMe)[(pz(2))CH(2)](CO)(PMe(3))(2)]X (X(-) = BPh(4)(-), 1a; BPh(3)Me(-), 1b; BPh(3)(n-Bu)(-), 1c; BPh(3)(n-Hex)(-), 1d; B(3, 5-(CF(3))(2)(C(6)H(3)))(4)(-), 1e; PF(6)(-), 1f; and BF(4)(-), 1g; pz = pyrazol-1-yl-ring) was investigated in solution from both a qualitative (chloroform-d, methylene chloride-d(2), nithromethane-d(3)) and quantitative (methylene chloride-d(2)) point of view by performing 1D- and 2D-NOE NMR experiments. In particular, the relative anion-cation localization (interionic structure) was qualitatively determined by (1)H-NOESY and (19)F, (1)H-HOESY (heteronuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) NMR experiments. The counteranion locates close to the peripheral protons of the bispyrazolyl ligand independent of its nature and that of the solvent. In complexes 1c and 1d bearing unsymmetrical counteranions, the aliphatic chain points away from the metal center as indicated by the absence of NOE between the terminal Me group and any cationic protons. An estimation of the average interionic distances in solution was obtained by the quantification of the NOE build-up versus the mixing time under the assumption that the interionic and intramolecular correlation times (tau(c)) are the same. Such an assumption was checked by the experimental measurements of tau(c) from both the dipolar contribution to the carbon-13 longitudinal relaxation time T(DD-1)and the comparison of the intramolecular and interionic cross relaxation rate constant (sigma) dependence on the temperature. Both the methodologies indicate that anion and cation have comparable tau(c) values. The determined correlation time values were compared with those obtained for the neutral trans-[Ru(COMe)[(pz(2))BH(2)](CO)(PMe(3))(2)] complex (2), isosteric with the cation of 1. They were significantly shorter (approximately 3.8 times), indicating that the main contribution to dipolar relaxation processes comes from the overall ion pair rotation. As a

  15. Investigation of uptake and retention of atmospheric Hg(II) by boreal forest plants using stable Hg isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graydon, J.A.; St. Louis, V.L.; Hintelmann, H.; Lindberg, S.E.; Sandilands, K.A.; Rudd, J.W.M.; Kelly, C.A.; Tate, M.T.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Lehnherr, I.

    2009-01-01

    Although there is now a general consensus among mercury (Hg) biogeochemists that increased atmospheric inputs of inorganic Hg(II) to lakes and watersheds can result in increased methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, researchers still lack kinetic data describing the movement of Hg from the atmosphere, through watershed and lake ecosystems, and into fish. The use of isotopically enriched Hg species in environmental studies now allows experimentally applied new Hg to be distinguished from ambient Hg naturally present in the system. Four different enriched stable Hg(II) isotope "spikes" were applied sequentially over four years to the ground vegetation of a microcatchment at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in the remote boreal forest of Canada to examine retention of Hg(II) following deposition. Areal masses of the spikes and ambient THg (all forms of Hg in a sample) were monitored for eight years, and the pattern of spike retention was used to estimate retention of newly deposited ambient Hg within the ground vegetation pool. Fifty to eighty percent of applied spike Hg was initially retained by ground vegetation. The areal mass of spike Hg declined exponentially over time and was best described by a first-order process with constants (k) ranging between 9.7 ?? 10-4 day -1 and 11.6 ?? 10-4 day-1. Average half-life (t1/2) of spike Hg within the ground vegetation pool (??S.D.) was 704 ?? 52 days. This retention of new atmospheric Hg(II) by vegetation delays movement of new Hg(II) into soil, runoff, and finally into adjacent lakes. Ground-applied Hg(II) spikes were not detected in tree foliage and litterfall, indicating that stomatal and/or root uptake of previously deposited Hg (i.e., "recycled" from ground vegetation or soil Hg pools) were likely not large sources of foliar Hg under these experimental conditions. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  16. Investigation of uptake and retention of atmospheric Hg(II) by boreal forest plants using stable Hg isotopes.

    PubMed

    Graydon, Jennifer A; St Louis, Vincent L; Hintelmann, Holger; Lindberg, Steve E; Sandilands, Ken A; Rudd, John W M; Kelly, Carol A; Tate, Michael T; Krabbenhoft, Dave P; Lehnherr, Igor

    2009-07-01

    Although there is now a general consensus among mercury (Hg) biogeochemists that increased atmospheric inputs of inorganic Hg(II) to lakes and watersheds can result in increased methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in fish, researchers still lack kinetic data describing the movement of Hg from the atmosphere, through watershed and lake ecosystems, and into fish. The use of isotopically enriched Hg species in environmental studies now allows experimentally applied new Hg to be distinguished from ambient Hg naturally present in the system. Four different enriched stable Hg(II) isotope "spikes" were applied sequentially over four years to the ground vegetation of a microcatchment at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in the remote boreal forest of Canada to examine retention of Hg(II) following deposition. Areal masses of the spikes and ambient THg (all forms of Hg in a sample) were monitored for eight years, and the pattern of spike retention was used to estimate retention of newly deposited ambient Hg within the ground vegetation pool. Fifty to eighty percent of applied spike Hg was initially retained by ground vegetation. The areal mass of spike Hg declined exponentially over time and was best described by a first-order process with constants(k) ranging between 9.7 x 10(-40 day(-1) and 11.6 x 10(-4) day(-1). Average halflife (t1/2) of spike Hg within the ground vegetation pool (+/-S.D.) was 704 +/- 52 days. This retention of new atmospheric Hg(II) by vegetation delays movement of new Hg(II) into soil, runoff, and finally into adjacent lakes. Ground-applied Hg(II) spikes were not detected in tree foliage and litterfall, indicating that stomatal and/or root uptake of previously deposited Hg (i.e., "recycled" from ground vegetation or soil Hg pools) were likely not large sources of foliar Hg under these experimental conditions.

  17. Spectroscopic investigation into the interaction of a diazacyclam-based macrocyclic copper(ii) complex with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hakimi, Mohammad; Morovati, Teimoor; Hadidi, Saba; Moeini, Keyvan

    2017-02-01

    Cyclam-based ligands and their complexes are known to show antitumor activity. This study was undertaken to examine the interaction of a diazacyclam-based macrocyclic copper(II) complex with bovine serum albumin (BSA) under physiological conditions. The interactions of different metal-based drugs with blood proteins, especially those with serum albumin, may affect the concentration and deactivation of metal drugs, and thereby influence their availability and toxicity during chemotherapy. In this vein, several spectral methods including UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy techniques were used. Spectroscopic analysis of the fluorescence quenching confirmed that the Cu(II) complex quenched BSA fluorescence intensity by a dynamic mechanism. In order to further determine the quenching mechanism, an analysis of Stern-Volmer plots at various concentrations of BSA was carried out. It was found that the KSV value increased with the BSA concentration. It was suggested that the fluorescence quenching process was a dynamic quenching rather than a static quenching mechanism. Based on Förster's theory, the average binding distance between the Cu(II) complex and BSA (r) was found to be 4.98 nm; as the binding distance was less than 8 nm, energy transfer from BSA to the Cu(II) complex had a high possibility of occurrence. Thermodynamic parameters (positive ΔH and ΔS values) and measurement of competitive fluorescence with 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid (1,8-ANS) indicated that hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in the Cu(II) complex interaction with BSA. A Job's plot of the results confirmed that there was one binding site in BSA for the Cu(II) complex (1:1 stoichiometry). The site marker competitive experiment confirmed that the Cu(II) complex was located in site I (subdomain IIA) of BSA. Finally, CD data indicated that interaction of the Cu(II) complex with BSA caused a small increase in the α-helical content. Copyright

  18. Spectrophotometric investigation on the kinetics of oxidation of adrenaline by dioxygen of μ-dioxytetrakis(histidinato)-dicobalt(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiquee, M. Z. A.; Siddiqui, Masoom R.; Ali, Mohd. Sajid; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.

    The cobalt(II)histidine complex binds molecular oxygen reversibly to form an oxygen adduct complex, μ-dioxytetrakis-(histidinato)dicobalt(II). The molecular oxygen can be released from the oxygenated complex by heating it or by passing N2, He or Ar gas through its solution. μ-Dioxytetrakis-(histidinato)dicobalt(II) complex oxidizes adrenaline into leucoadrenochrome at 25 °C while at higher temperature (>40 °C) adrenochrome with λmax at 490 nm is formed. The rate of formation of leucoadrenochrome was found to be independent of [bis(histidinato)cobalt(II)]. The rate of reaction for the formation of leucoadrenochrome and adrenochrome increased with the increase in [adrenaline] at its lower concentration but become independent at higher concentration. Similarly, the rate of formation of both leucoadrenochrome and adrenochrome was linearly dependent upon [NaOH]. The values of activation parameters i.e. ΔEa, ΔH‡ and ΔS‡ for the formation of leucoadrenochrome are reported.

  19. Multiple Intelligences and ESL Teaching and Learning: An Investigation in KG II Classrooms in One Private School in Beirut, Lebanon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghamrawi, Norma

    2014-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of the Multiple Intelligences Theory on vocabulary acquisition by preschoolers during English as a second language (ESL) classes in a K-12 school in Lebanon. Eighty kindergartners (KG II, aged 5 years) and eight teachers constituted the sample. The study used mixed methods, including observations of videotaped…

  20. Investigation of X-class Flare-Associated Coronal Mass Ejections with and without DH Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrance, M. Bendict; Shanmugaraju, A.; Vršnak, Bojan

    2015-11-01

    A statistical analysis of 135 out of 141 X-class flares observed during 1997 - 2012 with and without deca-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts has been performed. It was found that 79 events (X-class flares and coronal mass ejections - Group I) were associated with DH type II radio bursts and 62 X-class flare events were not. Out of these 62 events without DH type IIs, 56 events (Group II) have location information, and they were selected for this study. Of these 56 events, only 32 were associated with CMEs. Most of the DH-associated X-class events ({˜} 79 %) were halo CMEs, in contrast to 14 % in Group II. The average CME speed of the X-class flares associated with DH type IIs is 1555 km s-1, which is nearly twice that of the X-class flare-associated CMEs without DH event (744 km s-1). The X-class flares associated with DH radio bursts have a mean flare intensity (3.63 × 10^{-4} W m^{-2}) that is 38 % greater than that of X-class flares without DH radio bursts (2.23 × 10^{-4} W m^{-2}). In addition to the greater intensity, it is also found that the the duration and rise time of flares associated with DH radio emission (DH flares) is more than twice than that of the flares without DH radio emission. When the events were further divided into two categories with respect to their source locations in eastern and western regions, 65 % of the events in the radio-loud category (with DH radio bursts) are from the western hemisphere and the remaining 35 % are from the eastern hemisphere. On the other hand, in the radio-quiet category (without DH radio bursts), nearly 60 % of the events are from the eastern hemisphere in contrast to those of the radio-loud category. It is found that 81 % of the events from eastern regions have flare durations > 30 min in the DH-flare category, in contrast to a nearly equal number from the western side for flare durations longer/shorter than 30 min. Similarly, the eastern events in the DH-flare category have a longer average rise-time of

  1. How do type II topoisomerases use ATP hydrolysis to simplify DNA topology beyond equilibrium? Investigating the relaxation reaction of nonsupercoiling type II topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Stuchinskaya, Tanya; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Corbett, Kevin D; Berger, James M; Bates, Andrew D; Maxwell, Anthony

    2009-02-06

    DNA topoisomerases control the topology of DNA (e.g., the level of supercoiling) in all cells. Type IIA topoisomerases are ATP-dependent enzymes that have been shown to simplify the topology of their DNA substrates to a level beyond that expected at equilibrium (i.e., more relaxed than the product of relaxation by ATP-independent enzymes, such as type I topoisomerases, or a lower-than-equilibrium level of catenation). The mechanism of this effect is currently unknown, although several models have been suggested. We have analyzed the DNA relaxation reactions of type II topoisomerases to further explore this phenomenon. We find that all type IIA topoisomerases tested exhibit the effect to a similar degree and that it is not dependent on the supercoil-sensing C-terminal domains of the enzymes. As recently reported, the type IIB topoisomerase, topoisomerase VI (which is only distantly related to type IIA enzymes), does not exhibit topology simplification. We find that topology simplification is not significantly dependent on circle size in the range approximately 2-9 kbp and is not altered by reducing the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis by varying the ADP:ATP ratio. A direct test of one model (DNA tracking; i.e., sliding of a protein clamp along DNA to trap supercoils) suggests that this is unlikely to be the explanation for the effect. We conclude that geometric selection of DNA segments by the enzymes is likely to be a primary source of the effect, but that it is possible that other kinetic factors contribute. We also speculate whether topology simplification might simply be an evolutionary relic, with no adaptive significance.

  2. How do type II topoisomerases use ATP hydrolysis to simplify DNA topology beyond equilibrium? Investigating the relaxation reaction of non-supercoiling type II topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Stuchinskaya, Tanya; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Corbett, Kevin D.; Berger, James M.; Bates, Andrew D.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases control the topology of DNA (e.g. the level of supercoiling) in all cells. Type IIA topoisomerases are ATP-dependent enzymes that have been shown to simplify the topology of their DNA substrates to a level beyond that expected at equilibrium (i.e. more relaxed than the product of relaxation by ATP-independent enzymes, such as type I topoisomerases, or a lower than equilibrium level of catenation). The mechanism of this effect is currently unknown, although several models have been suggested. We have analysed the DNA relaxation reactions of type II topoisomerases to further explore this phenomenon. We find that all type IIA topoisomerases tested exhibit the effect to a similar degree and that it is not dependent on the C-terminal domains of the enzymes. As recently reported, the type IIB topoisomerase, topo VI (which is only distantly related to the type IIA enzymes), does not exhibit topology simplification. We find that topology simplification is not significantly dependent on circle size in the range ~2–9 kbp, and is not altered by reducing the free energy available from ATP hydrolysis by varying the ATP:ADP ratio. A direct test of one model (DNA tracking, i.e. sliding of a protein clamp along DNA to trap supercoils) suggests that this is unlikely to be the explanation for the effect. We conclude that geometric selection of DNA segments by the enzymes is likely to be a primary source of the effect but that it is possible that other factors contribute. We also speculate whether topology simplification might simply be an evolutionary relic, with no adaptive significance. PMID:19094994

  3. Synthesis, spectral characterization, structural investigation and antimicrobial studies of mononuclear Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes of a new potentially hexadentate N2O4 Schiff base ligand derived from salicylaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keypour, Hassan; Shayesteh, Maryam; Rezaeivala, Majid; Chalabian, Firoozeh; Elerman, Yalcin; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    A new potentially hexadentate N2O4 Schiff base ligand, H2L derived from condensation reaction of an aromatic diamine and salicylaldehyde, and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis, EI-MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectra, as well as conductance measurements. It has been originated that the Schiff base ligand with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) ions form mononuclear complexes on 1:1 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry. The conductivity data confirm the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes. Also the crystal structures of the complexes [ZnL] and [CoL] have also been determined by using X-ray crystallographic technique. The Zn(II) and Co(II) complexes show a tetrahedral configuration. Electronic absorption spectra of the Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes suggest a square-planar geometry around the central metal ion. The synthesized compounds have antibacterial activity against the three Gram-positive bacteria: Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria monocytogenes and also against the three Gram-negative bacteria: Salmonella paraB, Citrobacter freundii and Enterobacter aerogenes. The results showed that in some cases the antibacterial activity of complexes were more than nalidixic acid and amoxicillin as standards.

  4. A dual nitrite isotopic investigation of chemodenitrification by mineral-associated Fe(II) and its production of nitrous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabb, Kalina C.; Buchwald, Carolyn; Hansel, Colleen M.; Wankel, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, the environmental reduction of nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) to more reduced forms is widely regarded as being microbially catalyzed. However, the chemical reduction of oxidized nitrogen species by reduced iron (Fe(II)), whether mineral-bound or surface-associated, may also occur under environmentally relevant conditions. Here we examine the nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) stable isotope dynamics of the chemical reduction of NO2- by mineral associated Fe(II) (chemodenitrification) and its production of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). By shedding light on factors controlling kinetics of the reaction and its corresponding dual isotopic expression in the reactant NO2- and product N2O, this work contributes to a growing body of work aiming to improve our ability to identify chemodenitrification in the environment. Consistent with previous studies, we find that while homogenous reactions between aqueous NO2- and Fe(II) were kinetically slow, heterogeneous reactions involving Fe(II)-containing minerals often catalyzed considerable nitrite loss. In particular, rapid reduction of NO2- was catalyzed by the Fe-rich smectite clay mineral nontronite as well as the mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxyhydroxide phase green rust. These minerals serve as both a source of reduced iron within the mineral structure as well as a surface for promoting the reactivity of Fe(II). However, even in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), experiments with low-Fe and non-Fe containing minerals showed little to no NO2- loss, perhaps suggesting a more dominant role for structural iron during chemodenitrification. When catalyzed by nontronite and green rust, N and O isotope effects for chemodenitrification (15εcDNF and 18εcDNF) ranged from 2 to 11‰ and 4 to 10‰, respectively, with lower values generally observed at higher reaction rates. Higher reaction rates were also linked to higher molar yields of N2O (up to 31%), highlighting a strong potential for

  5. Investigation of interaction between the Pt(II) ions and aminosilane-modified silica surface in heterogeneous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Waldemar; Gąsowska, Anna; Kirszensztejn, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    UV-vis spectroscopy measurements confirmed the reaction in heterogeneous system between Pt(II) ions and ethylenediamine type ligand, n-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane, immobilized at the silica surface. The formation of complexes is a consequence of interaction between the amine groups from the ligand grafted onto SiO2 and ions of platinum. A potentiometric titration technique was to determine the stability constants of complexes of Pt(II) with immobilized insoluble ligand (SG-L), on the silica gel. The results show the formation of three surface complexes of the same type (PtHSG-L, Pt(HSG-L)2, PtSG-L) with SG-L ligand, in a wide range of pH for different Debye length. The concentration distribution of the complexes in a heterogeneous system is evaluated.

  6. Vibrational investigation on the copper(II) binding mode of carcinine and its pH dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Reggiani, Matteo; Manco, Immacolata; Tinti, Anna

    2007-05-01

    A comparative FT-Raman and FT-IR study of Carcinine (Carc), a natural imidazole dipeptide, and its complexes with Cu(II) ions was performed at different pH's. Both Raman and IR spectra present marker bands useful for the identification of the predominant complexes; in particular, Raman spectroscopy appears useful for identifying the metal-coordination site of the imidazole ring (N π or N τ atoms) of Carc. Free Carc shows a strong network of H-bonds and tautomer I (N τ-H) is the preferred form of the imidazolic ring (bands at 1578, 1292 and 988 cm -1). The presence of Cu(II) does not affect the tautomeric equilibrium at pH 7, whereas the deprotonation of both N-imidazolic nitrogens is strongly induced at higher pH. Under neutral and alkaline conditions the primary amino group takes part to the Cu(II) chelation, whereas all the peptidic moieties are involved in coordination only at pH 7. Thus, Carc acts as a tri-dentate ligand at neutral pH, mainly giving a monomeric complex, [CuLH -1], containing tautomer I, whereas an oligonuclear complex, probably [Cu 4L 4H -8], where metal-imidazolate ions connect different ligand molecules, predominates at alkaline pH.

  7. Differentiation-inducing and anti-proliferative activities of isoliquiritigenin and all-trans-retinoic acid on B16F0 melanoma cells: Mechanisms profiling by RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Ming; Hao, Wenjin; Han, Jichun; Ma, Jun; Wang, Caixia; Sun, Shiguo; Zheng, Qiusheng

    2016-10-30

    Melanoma is a cancer that arises from melanocytes, specialized pigmented cells that are found predominantly in the skin. The incidence of malignant melanoma has significantly increased over the last decade. With the development of therapy, the survival rate of some kind of cancer has been improved greatly. But the treatment of melanoma remains unsatisfactory. Much of melanoma's resistance to traditional chemotherapy is believed to arise intrinsically, by virtue of potent growth and cell survival-promoting genetic alteration. Therefore, significant attention has recently been focused on differentiation therapy, as well as differentiation inducer compounds. In previous study, we found isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a natural product extracted from licorice, could induce B16F0 melanoma cell differentiation. Here we investigated the transcriptional response of melanoma differentiation process induced by ISL and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA). Results showed that 390 genes involves in 201 biochemical pathways were differentially expressed in ISL treatment and 304 genes in 193 pathways in RA treatment. Differential expressed genes (DGEs, fold-change (FC)≥10) with the function of anti-proliferative and differentiation inducing indicated a loss of grade malignancy characteristic. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis indicated glutathione metabolism, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and pentose phosphate pathway were the top three relative pathway perturbed by ISL, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was the most important pathway in RA treatment. In the analysis of hierarchical clustering of DEGs, we discovered 72 DEGs involved in the process of drug action. We thought Cited1, Tgm2, Xaf1, Cd59a, Fbxo2, Adh7 may have critical role in the differentiation of melanoma. The evidence displayed herein confirms the critical role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in melanoma pathobiology and provides evidence for future targets in the

  8. Validated quantitation of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) in human plasma by liquid-chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using minimum sample clean-up and investigation of ion suppression.

    PubMed

    Ferreirós, Nerea; Dresen, Sebastian; Alonso, Rosa María; Weinmann, Wolfgang

    2007-12-01

    For the quantitation of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) in human plasma, a method using liquid-chromatography (LC)-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed with respect to simple sample clean-up and investigation of ion suppression effects. For sample preparation, protein precipitation using zinc sulphate and methanol showed advantages in speed, recovery, and reproducibility over solid-phase extraction. A triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (Sciex API 365) with turbo ionspray source was used for detection of compounds with multireaction monitoring (MRM) of two transitions per compound. Suppression effects caused by endogenous matrix compounds were investigated by post-column infusion of analytes and LC analysis of precipitates of blank plasma samples and could be excluded. A validation was performed for the ARA-II drugs (valsartan, irbesartan, losartan and its active metabolite EXP 3174, eprosartan, candesartan, and telmisartan). The developed method showed good intra- and interday precision (<12% relative standard deviation) and accuracy (<11.5% bias) at different concentrations for all the studied compounds. The calculated lower limits of quantitation were between 7 and 13 ng/mL, and the compounds were stable during the analytical process. These rather expensive drugs against hypertension are prescribed with increasing numbers in Europe and the industrialized nations. Complications might arise from overdosage or metabolic disorders. However, drug monitoring is not usually performed. Because the therapeutic concentrations range from a few nanograms to hundreds of nanograms per milliliter for the different drugs, and they are not amenable to gas chromatography/MS analysis because of their high molecular weight and polarity, the LC-MS/MS method is the golden standard for therapeutic drug monitoring and for clinical and forensic toxicology of ARA-II drugs.

  9. The design of phase II clinical trials testing cancer therapeutics: consensus recommendations from the clinical trial design task force of the national cancer institute investigational drug steering committee.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Lesley; Ivy, S Percy; Sargent, Daniel; Spriggs, David; Baker, Laurence; Rubinstein, Larry; Ratain, Mark J; Le Blanc, Michael; Stewart, David; Crowley, John; Groshen, Susan; Humphrey, Jeffrey S; West, Pamela; Berry, Donald

    2010-03-15

    The optimal design of phase II studies continues to be the subject of vigorous debate, especially studies of newer molecularly targeted agents. The observations that many new therapeutics "fail" in definitive phase III studies, coupled with the numbers of new agents to be tested as well as the increasing costs and complexity of clinical trials, further emphasize the critical importance of robust and efficient phase II design. The Clinical Trial Design Task Force (CTD-TF) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Investigational Drug Steering Committee (IDSC) has published a series of discussion papers on phase II trial design in Clinical Cancer Research. The IDSC has developed formal recommendations about aspects of phase II trial design that are the subject of frequent debate, such as endpoints (response versus progression-free survival), randomization (single-arm designs versus randomization), inclusion of biomarkers, biomarker-based patient enrichment strategies, and statistical design (e.g., two-stage designs versus multiple-group adaptive designs). Although these recommendations in general encourage the use of progression-free survival as the primary endpoint, randomization, inclusion of biomarkers, and incorporation of newer designs, we acknowledge that objective response as an endpoint and single-arm designs remain relevant in certain situations. The design of any clinical trial should always be carefully evaluated and justified based on characteristic specific to the situation.

  10. Chemical and cellular investigations of trans-ammine-pyridine-dichlorido-platinum(II), the likely metabolite of the antitumor active cis-diammine-pyridine-chorido-platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dechen; Min, Yuanzeng; Cheng, Qinqin; Shi, Hongdong; Wei, Kaiju; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni; Liu, Yangzhong

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed that the well-studied monofunctional platinum complex cis-[PtCl(NH3)2(py)](+) (cDPCP) forms DNA adducts similar to those of the trans platinum complex trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(py)] (ampyplatin, py=pyridine). Thus this latter could be the active form of cDPCP. Detailed studies on the mechanism of ampyplatin action were performed in this work. Results indicate that ampyplatin has significantly higher antiproliferative activity than cDPCP and is comparable to cisplatin. Cellular uptake experiments indicate that ampyplatin can be efficiently accumulated in A549 cancer cells. Binding of ampyplatin to DNA mainly produces monofunctional adducts; remarkably, these adducts can be recognized by the HMGB1 protein. Kinetic studies on the reaction with GMP indicate that the reactivity of ampyplatin is much lower than that of transplatin and is more similar to that of trans-[PtCl2{E-HN=C(Me)OMe}2] (trans-EE), a widely investigated antitumor active trans-oriented platinum complex. In addition, the hydrolysis of ampyplatin is significantly suppressed, whereas the hydrolysis of the mono-GMP adduct is highly enhanced. These results indicate that the mechanism of ampyplatin differs not only from that of antitumor inactive transplatin but also from that of antitumor active trans-EE and this could account for the remarkable activity of parent cDPCP.

  11. Effects of maturase binding and Mg2+ concentration on group II intron RNA folding investigated by UV cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Noah, James W; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2003-11-04

    The Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron encodes a reverse transcriptase/maturase (LtrA protein) that promotes RNA splicing by stabilizing the catalytically active RNA structure. Here, we mapped 17 UV cross-links induced in both wild-type Ll.LtrB RNA and Ll.LtrB-Delta2486 RNA, which has a branch-point deletion that prevents splicing, and we used these cross-links to follow tertiary structure formation under different conditions in the presence or absence of the LtrA protein. Twelve of the cross-links are long-range, with six near known tertiary interaction sites in the active RNA structure. In a reaction medium containing 0.5 M NH(4)Cl, eight of the 17 cross-links were detected in the absence of Mg(2+) or the presence of EDTA, and all were detected at 5 mM Mg(2+), where efficient splicing requires the LtrA protein. The frequencies of all but four cross-links increased with increasing Mg(2+) concentrations, becoming maximal between 4 and 50 mM Mg(2+), where the intron is self-splicing. These findings suggest that a high Mg(2+) concentration induces self-splicing by globally stabilizing tertiary structure, including key tertiary interactions that are required for catalytic activity. Significantly, the binding of the maturase under protein-dependent splicing conditions (0.5 M NH(4)Cl and 5 mM Mg(2+)) increased the frequency of only nine cross-links, seven of which are long-range, suggesting that, in contrast to a high Mg(2+) concentration, LtrA promotes splicing by stabilizing critical tertiary structure interactions, while leaving other regions of the intron relatively flexible. This difference may contribute to the high rate of protein-dependent splicing, relative to the rate of self-splicing. The propensity of the intron RNA to form tertiary structure even at relatively low Mg(2+) concentrations raises the possibility that the maturase functions at least in part by tertiary structure capture. Finally, an abundant central wheel cross-link, present in >50% of

  12. A first principles investigation of electron transfer between Fe(II) and U(VI) on insulating Al- vs. semiconducting Fe-oxide surfaces via the proximity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Becker, U.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how the intrinsic chemical and electronic properties of mineral surfaces and their associated electron transfer (ET) pathways influence the reduction of U(VI) by surface-associated Fe(II). Density functional theory (DFT), including the Hubbard U correction to the exchange-correlation functional, was used to investigate sorption/redox reactions and ET mechanisms between Fe(II) and U(VI) coadsorbed on isostructural, periodic (0 0 1) surfaces of the insulator corundum (α-Al2O3) vs. the semiconductor hematite (α-Fe2O3). Furthermore, the coadsorbed Fe(II) and U(VI) ions are spatially separated from one another on the surfaces (⩾5.9 Å) to observe whether electronic-coupling through the semiconducting hematite surface facilitates ET between the adsorbates, a phenomenon known as the proximity effect. The calculations show that the different chemical and electronic properties between the isostructural corundum and hematite (0 0 1) surfaces lead to considerably different ET mechanisms between Fe(II) and U(VI). ET on the insulating corundum (0 0 1) surface is limited by the adsorbates' structural configuration. When Fe(II) and U(VI) are spatially separated and do not directly interact with one another (e.g. via an inner-sphere complex), U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) cannot occur as there is no physical pathway enabling ET between the adsorbates. In contrast to the insulating corundum (0 0 1) surface, the hematite (0 0 1) surface can potentially participate in ET reactions due to the high number of electron acceptor sites from the Fe d-states near the Fermi level at the hematite surface. The adsorption of Fe(II) also introduces d-states near the Fermi level as well as shifts unoccupied d-states of the Fe cations at the hematite surface to lower energies, making the surface more conductive. In turn, electronic coupling through the surface can link the spatially separated adsorbates to one another and provide distinct ET pathways for an electron from Fe(II

  13. Effects of PEGylated lipid nanoparticles on the oral absorption of one BCS II drug: a mechanistic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingwang; Chen, Guijiang; Zhang, Tianpeng; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2014-01-01

    Lipid nanocarriers are becoming a versatile platform for oral delivery of lipophilic drugs. In this article, we aimed to explore the gastrointestinal behaviors of lipid nanoparticles and the effect of PEGylation on oral absorption of fenofibrate (FN), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) II model drug. FN-loaded PEGylated lipid nanoparticles (FN-PLNs) were prepared by the solvent-diffusion method and characterized by particle size distribution, morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and drug release. Lipolytic experiments were performed to assess the resistance of lipid nanoparticles against pancreatic lipase. Pharmacokinetics was evaluated in rats after oral administration of FN preparations. The obtained FN-PLNs were 186.7 nm in size with an entrapment efficiency of >95%. Compared to conventional lipid nanoparticles, PLNs exhibited slower drug release in the lipase-containing medium, strikingly reduced mucin binding, and suppressed lipolysis in vitro. Further, oral absorption of FN was significantly enhanced using PLNs with relative bioavailability of 123.9% and 157.0% to conventional lipid nanoparticles and a commercial formulation (Lipanthyl®), respectively. It was demonstrated that reduced mucin trapping, suppressed lipolysis, and/or improved mucosal permeability were responsible for increased oral absorption. These results facilitated a better understanding of the in vivo fate of lipid nanoparticles, and suggested the potential of PLNs as oral carriers of BCS II drugs. PMID:25473287

  14. $B^{0}_{s}$ Lifetime Measurement in the CP-odd Decay Channel $B^{0}_{s} \\to J/\\psi\\mbox{ }f_{0}(980)$

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2016-07-06

    Here, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured in the decay channel Bs0→J/ψπ+π- with 880 ≤ Mπ+π- ≤ 1080 MeV/c2, which is mainly a CP-odd state and dominated by the f0(980) resonance. In 10.4 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector in Run II of the Tevatron, the lifetime of the Bs0 meson is measured to be τ(Bs0) = 1.70 ± 0.14(stat) ± 0.05(syst) ps. Neglecting CP violation in Bs0/$\\bar{B}$0s mixing, the measurement can be translated into the width of the heavy mass eigenstate of the Bs0, ΓH = 0.59 ± 0.05(stat) ± 0.02(syst) ps-1.

  15. Air-Pollution and Cardiometabolic Diseases (AIRCMD): a prospective study investigating the impact of air pollution exposure and propensity for type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhichao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Brook, Robert D; Gatts, Geoffrey A; Yang, Fumo; Sun, Qinghua; Brook, Jeffrey R; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2013-03-15

    There is a paucity of prospective cohort studies investigating the impact of environmental factors on the development of cardiometabolic (CM) disorders like type II diabetes (T2DM). The objective of the Air-Pollution and Cardiometabolic Diseases (AIRCMD) study is to investigate the impact of personal level air pollution measures [personal black carbon (BC)/sulfate measures] and ambient fine particulate matter [(PM2.5)/NO2] levels on propensity to type II diabetes in Beijing, China. Subjects with metabolic syndrome will undergo four repeated study visits within each season over a one year period following an initial screening visit. At each study visit, subjects will be monitored for sub-acute exposure to personal and ambient measures of air-pollution exposure and will undergo a series of functional CM outcomes. The primary endpoints include independent associations between integrated 5-day mean exposure to PM2.5 and BC and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) measures, 24-hour mean diastolic and mean arterial pressure and endothelial-dependent vasodilatation. The secondary endpoints will explore the mechanistic explanation for a causal relationship between exposures and propensity for type II diabetes and will include additional functional outcomes such as arterial compliance, heart rate variability and plasma adipokines. The novel aspects of the study include the launch of infrastructure for future translational investigations in highly polluted urbanized environments and the creation of novel methodologies for linking personalized exposure measurements with functional CM outcomes. We believe that AIRCMD will allow for unprecedented new investigations into the association between environmental risk factors and CM disorders.

  16. An investigation of climate patterns on Earth-like planets using the NASA GISS global climate model II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elowitz, Robert Mark

    To determine the capability of NASA's GISS GCM-II global climate model, the user-friendly EdGCM interface to the 3-D climate model code was evaluated by simulating global climate patterns that Earth-like planets may experience. The simulation scenarios involved different greenhouse gas emissions trends, planetary orbital parameters, and solar irradiance variations. It is found that the EdGCM interface to the GCM-II 3-D climate model is capable of studying climate patterns on hypothetical Earth-like planets, with some limitations involved. Studying extreme climate patterns on Earth-like planets as a function of planetary obliquity, orbital eccentricity, atmospheric composition, solar irradiance variations, and location with the host star's habitable zone is needed to determine whether such planets are habitable for life as we know it. Studying the behavior of climate on hypothetical Earth-like planet also provides insight into the future climate of our own planet. A database of climate models based on hypothetical Earth-like worlds will provide a valuable resource to the astrobiology community in support of future detections of exoplanets with masses, sizes, and composition similar to Earth. At present, most studies involved the use of 1-D, or 2-D climate models to explore planetary climate on Earth-like planets. This is due to the difficulty of using very complex 3-D climate model codes that typically have poor user interfaces or interfaces that are very difficult to use. EdGCM provides scientists with a user-friendly interface to a full 3-D climate model capable of simulating the climate on Earth-like planets. However, EdGCM is extremely limited in studying global climate on exo-Earth planets outside our solar system. The user is able to change the simulation initial conditions, including different greenhouse gas concentrations and their associated trends, solar irradiance and its trend over time, planetary obliquity and orbit eccentricity, and heliocentric

  17. DFT investigation of Ni(II) adsorption onto MA-DTPA/PVDF chelating membrane in the presence of coexistent cations and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Song, Laizhou; Zhao, Xiaodan; Fu, Jie; Wang, Xiuli; Sheng, Yiping; Liu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-15

    Melamine-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid/polyvinylidene fluoride (MA-DTPA/PVDF) chelating membrane bearing polyaminecarboxylate groups was used to remove Ni(II) from nickel plating effluents. Adsorption experiments were conducted to study the adsorption of the membrane towards Ni(II) in Ni(II)-Ca(II), Ni(II)-NH(4)(+), Ni(II)-Fe(III) binary systems, and Ni(II)-lactic acid, Ni(II)-succinic acid and Ni(II)-citric acid complex systems. For the ternary nickel plating processes, the effects of 3d transition metals including Fe(II), Co(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) on Ni(II) adsorption were evaluated. The influences of the aforementioned coexistent cations and organic acids were elucidated by the continuum solvation model (COSMO)-corrected density functional theory (DFT) method. Geometries and complexation energies were analyzed for metal-MA-DTPA and Ni(II)-organic acid complexes. DFT results accord with the experimental data, indicating that DFT is helpful to evaluate the complexation between the membrane and metal cations. The coexistent Ca(II) tends to form more stable complex with MA-DTPA ligand than NH(4)(+) and Fe(III), and can interfere with the formation of Ni(II)-MA-DTPA complex. The complexing sequence of 3d metals with MA-DTPA ligand is Zn(II)). Therefore, both Fe(II) and Cu(II) have the considerable competition with Ni(II). The stabilities of Ni(II)-organic acid complexes follow the order of lactic acidII)-MA-DTPA complex.

  18. Measurements of branching fractions, polarizations, and direct CP-violation asymmetries in B -> rho0 K* and B -> f0(980) K* decays

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    We present measurements of the branching fractions, longitudinal polarization, and direct CP-violation asymmetries for the decays B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} and B{sup +} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} with a sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We observe B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +} with a significance of 5.3{sigma} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}K*{sup +}) = (4.6 {+-} 1.0 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, the longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.78 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03, and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = 0.31 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.03. We observe B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +} and measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K*{sup +}) x {Beta}(f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (4.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and the CP-violation asymmetry A{sub CP} = -0.15 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.03. The first uncertainty quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  19. Toxicity of Cu (II) to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris: a perspective of photosynthesis and oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zunwei; Song, Shufang; Wen, Yuezhong; Zou, Yuqin; Liu, Huijun

    2016-09-01

    The toxic effects of Cu (II) on the freshwater green algae Chlorella vulgaris and its chloroplast were investigated by detecting the responses of photosynthesis and oxidant stress. The results showed that Cu (II) arrested the growth of C. vulgaris and presented in a concentration- and time-dependent trend and the SRichards 2 model fitted the inhibition curve best. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including qP, Y (II), ETR, F v /F m , and F v /F 0, were stimulated at low concentration of Cu (II) but declined at high concentration, indicating the photosystem II (PSII) of C. vulgaris was destroyed by Cu (II). The chloroplasts were extracted, and the Hill reaction activity (HRA) of chloroplast was significantly decreased with the increasing Cu (II) concentration under both illuminating and dark condition, and faster decline speed was observed under dark condition. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also significantly decreased at high concentration Cu (II), companied with a large number of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All these results indicated a severe oxidative stress on algal cells occurred as well as the effect on photosynthesis, thus inhibiting the growth of algae, which providing sights to evaluate the phytotoxicity of Cu (II).

  20. Reactivity of dicoordinated stannylones (Sn0) versus stannylenes (SnII): an investigation using DFT-based reactivity indices.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, Lies; Frenking, Gernot; Geerlings, Paul; De Proft, Frank

    2013-10-07

    The reactivity of dicoordinated Sn(0) compounds, stannylones, is probed using density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity indices and compared with the reactivity of dicoordinated Sn(II) compounds, stannylenes. For the former compounds, the influence of different types of electron-donating ligands, such as cyclic and acyclic carbenes, stannylenes and phosphines, on the reactivity of the central Sn atom is analyzed in detail. Sn(0) compounds are found to be relatively soft systems with a high nucleophilicity, and the plots of the Fukui function f(-) for an electrophilic attack consistently predict the highest reactivity on the Sn atom. Next, complexes of dicoordinated Sn compounds with different Lewis acids of variable hardness are computed. In a first part, the double-base character of stannylones is demonstrated in interactions with the hardest Lewis acid H(+). Both the first and second proton affinities (PAs) are high and are well correlated with the atomic charge on the Sn atom, probing its local hardness. These observations are also in line with electrostatic potential plots that demonstrate that the tin atom in Sn(0) compounds bears a higher negative charge in comparison to Sn(II) compounds. Stannylones and stannylenes can be distinguished from each other by the partial charges at Sn and by various reactivity indices. It also becomes clear that there is a smooth transition between the two classes of compounds. We furthermore demonstrate both from DFT-based reactivity indices and from energy decomposition analysis, combined with natural orbitals for chemical valence (EDA-NOCV), that the monocomplexed stannylones are still nucleophilic and as reactive towards a second Lewis acid as towards the first one. The dominating interaction is a strong σ-type interaction from the Sn atom towards the Lewis acid. The interaction energy is higher for complexes with the cation Ag(+) than with the non-charged electrophiles BH(3), BF(3), and AlCl(3).

  1. Investigation of simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) on dried Chlorella vulgaris from binary metal mixtures: Application of multicomponent adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Aksu, Z.; Acikel, U.; Kutsal, T.

    1999-02-01

    Although the biosorption of single metal ions to various kinds of microorganisms has been extensively studied and the adsorption isotherms have been developed for only the single metal ion situation, very little attention has been given to the bioremoval and expression of adsorption isotherms of multimetal ions systems. In this study the simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) to Chlorella vulgaris from a binary metal mixture was studied and compared with the single metal ion situation in a batch stirred system. The effects of pH and single- and dual-metal ion concentrations on the equilibrium uptakes were investigated. In previous studies the optimum biosorption pH had been determined as 4.0 for copper(II) and as 2.0 for chromium(VI). Multimetal ion biosorption studies were performed at these two pH values. It was observed that the equilibrium uptakes of copper(II) or chromium(VI) ions were changed due to the biosorption pH and the presence of other metal ions. Adsorption isotherms were developed for both single- and dual-metal ions systems at these two pH values, and expressed by the mono- and multicomponent Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. Model parameters were estimated by nonlinear regression. It was seen that the adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to the competitive Freundlich model in the concentration ranges studied.

  2. Investigation of antitumor potential of Ni(II) complexes with tridentate PNO acylhydrazones of 2-(diphenylphosphino)benzaldehyde and monodentate pseudohalides.

    PubMed

    Čobeljić, Božidar; Milenković, Milica; Pevec, Andrej; Turel, Iztok; Vujčić, Miroslava; Janović, Barbara; Gligorijević, Nevenka; Sladić, Dušan; Radulović, Siniša; Jovanović, Katarina; Anđelković, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    Square-planar azido Ni(II) complex with condensation product of 2-(diphenylphosphino)benzaldehyde and Girard's T reagent was synthesized and its crystal structure was determined. Cytotoxic activity of the azido complex and previously synthesized isothiocyanato, cyanato and chlorido Ni(II) complexes with this ligand was examined on six tumor cell lines (HeLa, A549, K562, MDA-MB-453, MDA-MB-361 and LS-174) and two normal cell line (MRC-5 and BEAS-2B). All the investigated nickel(II) complexes were cytotoxic against all tumor cell lines. The newly synthesized azido complex showed selectivity to HeLa and A549 tumor cell lines compared to the normal cells (for A549 IC50 was similar to that of cisplatin). Azido complex interferes with cell cycle phase distribution of A549 and HeLa cells and possesses nuclease activity towards supercoiled DNA. The observed selectivity of the azido complex for some tumor cell lines can be connected with its strong DNA damaging activity.

  3. Preliminary Results of Nene II Engine Altitude-chamber Performance Investigation. 2; Altitude Performance using 18.41-inch Diameter-jet Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstron, J. C.; Wilsted, H. D.; Vincent, K. R.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation is being conducted to determine the altitude performance characteristics of the Nene II engine and its components. The present paper presents preliminary results obtained using a jet nozzle of 18.41 inches in diameter, giving an area equal to 96.4 percent of the area of the standard jet nozzle of this engine. The test results presented are for conditions simulating altitudes from seal level to 50,000 feet and ram-pressure ratios from 1.00 to 2.70. The ram pressure ratios correspond to flight Mach numbers between zero and 1.28.

  4. Theoretical investigation of the magnetic exchange interactions in copper(II) oxides under chemical and physical pressures.

    PubMed

    Rocquefelte, Xavier; Schwarz, Karlheinz; Blaha, Peter

    2012-01-01

    It remains a challenge to understand the unconventional mechanisms that cause high-T(C) superconductivity in cuprate superconductors, high-T(C) multiferroicity in CuO, or low-dimensional magnetism in the spin-Peierls transition compounds such as CuGeO(3). A common feature of all these copper oxide compounds (containing Cu(2+) ions) is the presence of large magnetic superexchange interactions J. It is a general strategy to apply chemical and/or physical pressure in order to tune these exotic properties. Here we show theoretically, for the first time, the impact of physical pressure on J on CuO, for which we predict a strong enhancement of the low-dimensionality of the magnetic interactions and the spin-frustration at high-pressures. Such modifications are expected to strongly influence the multiferroic properties of CuO. We finally demonstrate that PBE0 hybrid DFT calculations provide reliable J values for a wide range of copper(II) oxides compounds, i.e. CuGeO(3), BaCu(2)Si(2)O(7), BaCu(2)Ge(2)O(7), and La(2)CuO(4).

  5. Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

    1987-10-01

    A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. A novel mutation in the alpha-helix 1 of the C subunit of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase responsible for optochin resistance of a Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolate.

    PubMed

    Cogné, N; Claverys, J; Denis, F; Martin, C

    2000-10-01

    Previously reported mutations involved in optochin resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae clinical isolates changed residues 48, 49 or 50, in the transmembrane alpha-helix 2 of the F(1)/F(0) ATPase subunit. We report here an unusual mutation which changes the sequence of the transmembrane alpha-helix 1 of the AtpC subunit. This mutation involves a Gly to Ser substitution resulting from a G to A transition at codon 14 of the atpC gene.

  7. Anisotropy and Vortex Pinning of Heavy Ion irradiated SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 and BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Fang, Lei; Chaparro, Carlos; Jia, Ying; Welp, Ulrich; Koshelev, Alexei; Xu, Shaofei; Crabtree, George; Karpinski, Janusz

    2012-02-01

    We report specific heat and magnetization measurements on SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 and BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 single crystals irradiated with high energy heavy ions of 1.4GeV Pb to dose matching fields up to 4 Tesla. We find a nearly one half reduction in the superconducting anisotropy and doubling of the irreversibility field in SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 after irradiation and virtually no change in the zero-field superconducting transition temperature. In both SmFeAsO0.8F0.15 and BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 crystals, we find a substantial increase in the critical current determined from SQUID and micro-Hall probe magnetization measurements. Pinning force analysis on proton and heavy ion irradiated pristine overdoped BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 crystals indicates presence of induced δTc-type pinning defects in these samples.

  8. Pressure-induced phase transitions and correlation between structure and superconductivity in iron-based superconductor Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinggeng; Liu, Haozhe; Ehm, Lars; Dong, Dawei; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingqing; Hu, Wanzheng; Wang, Nanlin; Jin, Changqing

    2013-07-15

    High-pressure angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments on iron-based superconductor Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs were performed up to 54.9 GPa at room temperature. A tetragonal to tetragonal isostructural phase transition starts at about 13.9 GPa, and a new high-pressure phase has been found above 33.8 GPa. At pressures above 19.9 GPa, Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs completely transforms to a high-pressure tetragonal phase, which remains in the same tetragonal structure with a larger a-axis and smaller c-axis than those of the low-pressure tetragonal phase. The structure analysis shows a discontinuity in the pressure dependences of the Fe-As and Ce-(O, F) bond distances, as well as the As-Fe-As and Ce-(O, F)-Ce bond angles in the transition region, which correlates with the change in T(c) of this compound upon compression. The isostructural phase transition in Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs leads to a drastic drop in the superconducting transition temperature T(c) and restricts the superconductivity at low temperature. For the 1111-type iron-based superconductors, the structure evolution and following superconductivity changes under compression are related to the radius of lanthanide cations in the charge reservoir layer.

  9. Electronic anisotropy from magneto-transport near Tc in SmFeAs(O0.7F0.25) and (Ba,Rb)Fe2As2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Philip; Kunze, Karsten; Bukowski, Zbigniew; Zhigadlo, Nikolai; Karpinski, Janusz; Batlogg, Bertram

    2009-03-01

    We derived thermally activated flux flow (TAFF) activation energies Ea(H) and the upper critical fields Hc2(T) parallel to the c-axis and in the Lorentz-force free configuration (H || ab || j) of SmFeAs(O0.7F0.25) and (Ba,Rb)Fe2As2 single crystals from resistance measurements and compare them to the ones reported for other REFeAs(OF). A perfectly rectangular rod (67x11x4 μm), aligned with the crystal axes, was cut from a larger SmFeAs(O0.7F0.25) single crystal (˜ 200 μm) by a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) which allowed us to precisely control its geometry factor L/A = 0.89 1/μm. The FIB was also used to deposit 4 Pt contacts. We found a slope of Hc2, 50% (T), parallel to the c-axis, of 1.9 T/K for SmFeAs(O0.7F0.25) and 3.7 T/K for (Ba,Rb)Fe2As2 near Tc. The electronic anisotropy, derived from magneto-transport, is significantly larger in the REFeAs(OF) crystals than in (Ba,Rb)Fe2As2.

  10. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, SEM, Antimicrobial, Antioxidative Activity Evaluation, DNA Binding and DNA Cleavage Investigation of Transition Metal(II) Complexes Derived from a tetradentate Schiff base bearing thiophene moiety.

    PubMed

    Abdel Aziz, Ayman A; Seda, Sabry H

    2017-03-01

    A novel series of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mononuclear complexes have been synthesized involving a potentially tetradentate Schiff base ligand, which was obtained by condensation of 2-aminophenol with 2,5-thiophene-dicarboxaldehyde. The complexes were synthesized via reflux reaction of methanolic solution of the appropriate Schiff base ligand with one equivalent of corresponding metal acetate salt. Based on different techniques including micro analysis, FT-IR, NMR, UV-Vis, ESR, ESI-mass and conductivity measurements, four-coordinated geometry was assigned for all complexes. Spectroscopic data have shown that, the reported Schiff base coordinated to metal ions as a dibasic tetradentate ligand through the phenolic oxygen and the azomethine nitrogen. The antimicrobial activities of the parent ligand and its complexes were investigated by using the agar disk diffusion method. Antioxidation properties of the novel complexes were investigated and it was found that all the complexes have good radical scavenging properties. The binding of complexes to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by absorption, emission and viscosity measurements. Binding studies have shown that all the complexes interacted with CT-DNA via intercalation mode and the binding affinity varies with relative order as Cu(II) complex > Co(II) complex > Zn(II) complex > Ni(II) complex. Furthermore, DNA cleavage properties of the metal complexes were also investigated. The results suggested the possible utilization of novel complexes for pharmaceutical applications.

  11. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS. VOLUME II. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LYNN, FRANK

    THE APPENDIXES FOR "AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, FINAL REPORT, VOLUME I" (VT 004 006) INCLUDE (1) TWO LETTERS FROM PLANT ENGINEERS STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, (2) A DESCRIPTION OF THE MAINTENANCE TRAINING SURVEY, A SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE,…

  12. Investigating Students' Mental Models and Knowledge Construction of Microscopic Friction. II. Implications for Curriculum Design and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corpuz, Edgar D.; Rebello, N. Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Our previous research showed that students' mental models of friction at the atomic level are significantly influenced by their macroscopic ideas. For most students, friction is due to the meshing of bumps and valleys and rubbing of atoms. The aforementioned results motivated us to further investigate how students can be helped to improve their…

  13. Recent innovations in the USA National Cancer Institute-sponsored investigator initiated Phase I and II anticancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Bando, Hideaki; Takebe, Naoko

    2015-11-01

    Exciting recent advancements in deep-sequencing technology have enabled a rapid and cost-effective molecular characterization of patient-derived tumor samples. Incorporating these innovative diagnostic technologies into early clinical trials could significantly propel implementation of precision medicine by identifying genetic markers predictive of sensitivity to agents. It may also markedly accelerate drug development and subsequent regulatory approval of novel agents. Particularly noteworthy, a high-response rate in a Phase II trial involving a biomarker-enriched patient cohort could result in a regulatory treatment approval in rare histologies, which otherwise would not be a candidate for a large randomized clinical trial. Furthermore, even if a trial does not meet its statistical endpoint, tumors from a few responders should be molecularly characterized as part of the new biomarker-mining processes. In order to accommodate patient screening and accelerate the accrual process, institutions conducting early clinical trials need to be a part of a multi-institution clinical trials network. Future clinical trial design will incorporate new biomarkers discovered by a 'phenotype-to-genotype' effort with an appropriate statistical design. To help advance such changes, the National Cancer Institute has recently reformed the existing early phase clinical trials network. A new clinical trial network, the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ET-CTN), was begun and, in addition to its pre-existing infrastructure, an up-to-date clinical trial registration system, clinical trial monitoring system including electronic database and a central Institutional Review Board were formed. Ultimately, these reforms support identifying the most appropriate therapy for each tumor type by incorporating state-of-the-art molecular diagnostic tools into early clinical trials.

  14. Recent innovations in the USA National Cancer Institute-sponsored investigator initiated Phase I and II anticancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Hideaki; Takebe, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Exciting recent advancements in deep-sequencing technology have enabled a rapid and cost-effective molecular characterization of patient-derived tumor samples. Incorporating these innovative diagnostic technologies into early clinical trials could significantly propel implementation of precision medicine by identifying genetic markers predictive of sensitivity to agents. It may also markedly accelerate drug development and subsequent regulatory approval of novel agents. Particularly noteworthy, a high-response rate in a Phase II trial involving a biomarker-enriched patient cohort could result in a regulatory treatment approval in rare histologies, which otherwise would not be a candidate for a large randomized clinical trial. Furthermore, even if a trial does not meet its statistical endpoint, tumors from a few responders should be molecularly characterized as part of the new biomarker-mining processes. In order to accommodate patient screening and accelerate the accrual process, institutions conducting early clinical trials need to be a part of a multi-institution clinical trials network. Future clinical trial design will incorporate new biomarkers discovered by a ‘phenotype-to-genotype’ effort with an appropriate statistical design. To help advance such changes, the National Cancer Institute has recently reformed the existing early phase clinical trials network. A new clinical trial network, the Experimental Therapeutics Clinical Trials Network (ET-CTN), was begun and, in addition to its pre-existing infrastructure, an up-to-date clinical trial registration system, clinical trial monitoring system including electronic database and a central Institutional Review Board were formed. Ultimately, these reforms support identifying the most appropriate therapy for each tumor type by incorporating state-of-the-art molecular diagnostic tools into early clinical trials. PMID:26423340

  15. An Investigation of the Ranger V-770-8 Engine Installation for the Edo XOSE-1 Airplane II : Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennard, John S.

    1945-01-01

    Investigations were made to determine the cowling and cooling characteristics of the Ranger V-770-8 engine installation in an observation seaplane. Final cowl configurations possessed ample engine and oil-cooler pressure drops for cooling in the critical normal-power climb condition with any of the three baffle configurations tested. The indicated critical Mach number of the cowling was found to be 0.70 as determined by the pressure on the lower lip of the inlet.

  16. Excited State Investigation of a New Ru(II) Complex for Dual Reactivity with Low Energy Light

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, J. D.; Albani, B. A.; Turro, C.

    2015-01-01

    The new complex [Ru(tpy)(Me2dppn)(py)]2+ efficiently photodissociates py in CH3CN with Φ500 = 0.053(1) induced by steric bulk from methyl substituents and produces 1O2 with ΦΔ = 0.69(9) from its long-lived 3ππ* excited state. The unique excited state processes that result in dual reactivity were investigated using ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. PMID:25912170

  17. Investigation of the difficulties associated with the use of lead telluride and other II - IV compounds for thin film thermistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclennan, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The fabrication of thermistors was investigated for use as atmospheric temperature sensors in meteorological rocket soundings. The final configuration of the thin film thermistor is shown. The composition and primary functions of the six layers of the sensor are described. A digital controller for thin film deposition control is described which is capable of better than .1 A/sec rate control. The computer program modules for digital control of thin film deposition processing are included.

  18. Coumarins in the gaseous phase. II. Investigation of stimulated emission from coumarin vapors in the range 470--540 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Logunov, O.A.; Startsev, A.V.; Stoilov, Y.Y.

    1981-06-01

    An investigation was made of the spectral and time characteristics of lasers utilizing coumarin 7 (C7, C153, C30, 7-diethylamino-3(2'-benzoxazolyl)-coumarin, and C6 vapors mixed with buffer gases (approx.35 atm) and kept at 200 /sup 0/C. The lasing efficiency in the region of 500 nm exceeded 6% and the threshold pump intensities were below 0.3 MW/cm/sup 2/, so that it should be possible to construct efficient cw and pulsed tunable gas lasers emitting in the blue-green part of the spectrum.

  19. Numerical investigations with a hybrid isentropic-sigma model. I - Normal-mode characteristics. II - The inclusion of moist processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, R. B.; Johnson, Donald R.; Reames, Fred M.; Zapotocny, Tom H.; Wolf, Bart J.

    1991-01-01

    The normal-mode characteristics of baroclinically amplifying disturbances were numerically investigated in a series of adiabatic simulations by a hybrid isentropic-sigma model, demonstrating the effect of coupling an isentropic-coordinate free atmospheric domain with a sigma-coordinate PBL on the normal-mode characteristics. Next, the normal-mode model was modified by including a transport equation for water vapor and adiabatic heating by condensation. Simulations with and without a hydrological component showed that the overall effect of latent heat release is to markedly enhance cyclogenesis and frontogenesis.

  20. Investigations in Time and of Space Using the FIRST Survey: Radio Source Variability and the Evolution of FR II Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan

    than with Friedmann models. These earlier results can be attributed to a combination of selection effects, sample definition problems, and inconsistencies in analysis. However, some recent and more successful analyses have still failed to distinguish among different Friedmann models. A catalog of ∼ 680 FR II quasars was constructed from the FIRST sources with redshifts taken from the SDSS spectroscopic QSO catalog and a similar sized sample from the SDSS photometric QSO catalog which are the largest quasar compilations to date. Using statistical analyses, no evidence for intrinsic evolution of sizes with redshift is found. A static Euclidean model for the universe is clearly ruled out. However, new degeneracies between parameters in the multi-dimensional χ2-surface are found which can only be resolved with additional, independent information. Notable differences are found between the spectroscopic and photometric samples raising questions about the nature and origin of these populations.

  1. Research on air sprays and unique foam application methods. Phase II report. Laboratory investigation of foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of air sprays and foam systems for dust control on longwall double-drum shearer faces. Laboratory testing has been conducted using foam systems and promising results have been obtained. Upon Bureau approval, underground testing will be scheduled to assess the effectiveness of foam systems under actual operating conditions. Laboratory testing of air sprays is being conducted at present. This report presents the results of the laboratory testing of foam systems. Specifically, the results obtained on the evaluation of selected foaming agents are presented, the feasibility investigation of flushing foam through the shearer-drum are demonstrated, and conceptual layout of the foam system on the shearer is discussed. The laboratory investigation of the selected foaming agents reveal that the Onyx Microfoam, Onyx Maprosyl and DeTer Microfoam foaming agents have higher expansion ratios compared to the others tested. Flushing foam through the shearer drum is entirely feasible and could be a viable technique for dust suppression on longwall faces.

  2. Mechanical energy dissipation induced by sloshing and wave breaking in a fully coupled angular motion system. II. Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouscasse, B.; Colagrossi, A.; Souto-Iglesias, A.; Cercos-Pita, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    In Paper I of this series [B. Bouscasse, A. Colagrossi, A. Souto-Iglesias, and J. L. C. Pita, "Mechanical energy dissipation induced by sloshing and wave breaking in a fully coupled angular motion system. I. Theoretical formulation and numerical investigation," Phys. Fluids 26, 033103 (2014)], a theoretical and numerical model for a driven pendulum filled with liquid was developed. The system was analyzed in the framework of tuned liquid dampers and hybrid mass liquid dampers (HMLD) theory. In this paper, in order to measure the energy dissipation resulting from shallow water sloshing, an experimental investigation is conducted. Accurate evaluations of energy transfers are obtained through the recorded kinematics of the system. A set of experiments is conducted with three different liquids: water, sunflower oil, and glycerine. Coherently with the results of Paper I, the energy dissipation obtained when the tank is filled with water can mainly be explained by the breaking waves. For all three liquids, the effects of varying the external excitation amplitude are discussed.

  3. In-vitro investigation to evaluate the flexural bond strengths of three commercially available ultra low fusing ceramic systems to Grade II Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Mabrurkar, Vijay; Habbu, Nitin; Hashmi, Sayed Wahhiuddin; Musani, Smita; Joshi, Nikhil

    2013-01-01

    Background: This in-vitro investigation was designed to compare the flexural bond strengths of three commercially available ultra low fusing ceramic systems to Grade II Titanium and evaluate the type of bond failure through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersion X ray Spectrum (EDS). Materials & Methods: Sixty patterns of auto polymerizing resin of dimensions 25.1 mm X 3.1mm X 0.6mm each were fabricated from a stainless steel die. Titanium casting for all the samples was done in a Titanium casting machine. Ten samples were allotted to each of three groups randomly. Ceramic build up was done step by step using the manufacturers' instructions. Flexural Bond strength tests for the samples were performed by using a 3-point bending test on a Universal testing machine in compliance with Deutsches Institut für Normung (DIN) 13.927 draft. After the tests were completed, three samples, one from each group were selected randomly for the subsequent Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) studies to characterize the type and morphology of the fracture in representative specimens. Results: The maximum load to fracture the porcelain was recorded for each specimen. All the means of the three groups were compared by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and it was found that Group I & Group III had significantly higher bond strength values as compared with the Group II (P< 0.001). All the 10 samples of Group I & III gave bond strength values above the standard values of 25 MPa. There was statistically significant difference in the bond strengths between Group I & Group III (t = 2.76 and P< 0.05), between Group I & II (t = 5.09 and P< 0.001) and between Group II & Group III (t = 13.28 and P< 0.001). SEM studies revealed occurrence of cohesive type fractures in the ceramic body of samples belonging to Groups I & III, while there was adhesive failure at ceramo-metal junction of samples belonging to Group II. EDS Analysis supported the findings of SEM studies

  4. Statistical investigation of simulated intestinal fluid composition on the equilibrium solubility of biopharmaceutics classification system class II drugs.

    PubMed

    Khadra, Ibrahim; Zhou, Zhou; Dunn, Claire; Wilson, Clive G; Halbert, Gavin

    2015-01-25

    A drug's solubility and dissolution behaviour within the gastrointestinal tract is a key property for successful administration by the oral route and one of the key factors in the biopharmaceutics classification system. This property can be determined by investigating drug solubility in human intestinal fluid (HIF) but this is difficult to obtain and highly variable, which has led to the development of multiple simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) recipes. Using a statistical design of experiment (DoE) technique this paper has investigated the effects and interactions on equilibrium drug solubility of seven typical SIF components (sodium taurocholate, lecithin, sodium phosphate, sodium chloride, pH, pancreatin and sodium oleate) within concentration ranges relevant to human intestinal fluid values. A range of poorly soluble drugs with acidic (naproxen, indomethacin, phenytoin, and piroxicam), basic (aprepitant, carvedilol, zafirlukast, tadalafil) or neutral (fenofibrate, griseofulvin, felodipine and probucol) properties have been investigated. The equilibrium solubility results determined are comparable with literature studies of the drugs in either HIF or SIF indicating that the DoE is operating in the correct space. With the exception of pancreatin, all of the factors individually had a statistically significant influence on equilibrium solubility with variations in magnitude of effect between the acidic and basic or neutral compounds and drug specific interactions were evident. Interestingly for the neutral compounds pH was the factor with the second largest solubility effect. Around one third of all the possible factor combinations showed a significant influence on equilibrium solubility with variations in interaction significance and magnitude of effect between the acidic and basic or neutral compounds. The least number of significant media component interactions were noted for the acidic compounds with three and the greatest for the neutral compounds at seven

  5. Year 6 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring and Phase II Source Investigation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2004-04-02

    The Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, encompasses the property of the former United Heckathorn pesticide packaging plant and the adjacent waterway, Lauritzen Channel. The site was used from 1945 to 1966 by several operators to produce various agricultural chemicals. The site was placed on the National Priorities List of Superfund sites in 1990, which resulted in the removal of pesticide-contaminated soil from the upland portion of the site and dredging the marine portion of the site. Post-remediation marine monitoring and associated studies conducted through 2002 indicate that the contamination in the channel continues to pose a significant risk to biota and human health. This report documents continued marine monitoring and source investigation studies conducted in 2003.

  6. Dielectric approach to investigation of erythrocyte aggregation. II. Kinetics of erythrocyte aggregation-disaggregation in quiescent and flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Pribush, A; Meiselman, H J; Meyerstein, D; Meyerstein, N

    2000-01-01

    A method based on dielectric properties of dispersed systems was applied to investigate the kinetics of RBC aggregation and the break-up of the aggregates. Experimentally, this method consists of measuring the capacitance at a frequency in the beginning of the beta-dispersion. Two experimental protocols were used to investigate the aggregation process. In the first case, blood samples were fully dispersed and then the flow was decreased or stopped to promote RBC aggregation. It was found that the initial phases of RBC aggregation are not affected by the shear rate. This finding indicates that RBC aggregation is a slow coagulation process. In the second case, RBCs aggregated under flow conditions at different shear rates and after the capacitance reached plateau levels, the flow was ceased. The steady-state capacitance of the quiescent blood and the kinetics of RBC aggregation after stoppage of shearing depend on the prior shear rate. To clarify the reasons for this effect, the kinetics of the disaggregation process was studied. In these experiments, time courses of the capacitance were recorded under different flow conditions and then a higher shear stress was applied to break up RBC aggregates. It was found that the kinetics of the disaggregation process depend on both the prior and current shear stresses. Results obtained in this study and their analysis show that the kinetics of RBC aggregation in stasis consists of two consecutive phases: At the onset, red blood cells interact face-to-face to form linear aggregates and then, after an accumulation of an appropriate concentration of these aggregates, branched rouleaux are formed via reactions of ends of the linear rouleaux with sides of other rouleaux (face-to-side interactions). Branching points are broken by low shear stresses whereas dispersion of the linear rouleaux requires significantly higher energy.

  7. Temperature-dependent vibrational and conformational dynamics of photosystem II membrane fragments from spinach investigated by elastic and inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Jörg; Trapp, Marcus; Skomorokhov, Andrei; Natkaniec, Ireneusz; Peters, Judith; Renger, Gernot

    2012-08-01

    Vibrational and conformational protein dynamics of photosystem II (PS II) membrane fragments from spinach were investigated by elastic and inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS and IINS). As to the EINS experiments, the average atomic mean square displacement values of PS II membrane fragments hydrated at a relative humidity of 57% exhibit a dynamical transition at ~230K. In contrast, the dynamical transition was absent at a relative humidity of 44%. These findings are in agreement with previous studies which reported a "freezing" of protein mobility due to dehydration (Pieper et al. (2008) Eur. Biophys. J. 37: 657-663) and its correlation with an inhibition of electron transfer from Q(A)(-) to Q(B) (Kaminskaya et al. (2003) Biochemistry 42, 8119-8132). IINS spectra of a sample hydrated at a relative humidity of 57% show a distinct Boson peak at ~7.5meV at 20K, which shifts towards lower energy values upon temperature increase to 250K. This unexpected effect is interpreted in terms of a "softening" of the protein matrix along with the onset of conformational protein dynamics as revealed by the EINS experiments. Information on the density of vibrational states of pigment-protein complexes is important for a realistic calculation of excitation energy transfer kinetics and spectral lineshapes and is often routinely obtained by optical line-narrowing spectroscopy at liquid helium temperature. The data presented here demonstrate that IINS is a valuable experimental tool in determining the density of vibrational states not only at cryogenic, but also at nearly physiological temperatures up to 250K. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial.

  8. Saturn’s icy satellites investigated by Cassini-VIMS. II. Results at the end of nominal mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Coradini, A.; Cerroni, P.; Nicholson, P. D.; McCord, T. B.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Tosi, F.; Nelson, R. M.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.

    2010-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of the spectrophotometric properties of Saturn's icy satellites as derived by full-disk observations obtained by visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) experiment aboard Cassini. In this paper, we have extended the coverage until the end of the Cassini's nominal mission (June 1st 2008), while a previous paper ( Filacchione, G., and 28 colleagues [2007]. Icarus 186, 259-290, hereby referred to as Paper I) reported the preliminary results of this study. During the four years of nominal mission, VIMS has observed the entire population of Saturn's icy satellites allowing us to make a comparative analysis of the VIS-NIR spectral properties of the major satellites (Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Hyperion, Iapetus) and irregular moons (Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, Telesto, Calypso, Phoebe). The results we discuss here are derived from the entire dataset available at June 2008 which consists of 1417 full-disk observations acquired from a variety of distances and inclinations from the equatorial plane, with different phase angles and hemispheric coverage. The most important spectrophotometric indicators (as defined in Paper I: I/ F continua at 0.55 μm, 1.822 μm and 3.547 μm, visible spectral slopes, water and carbon dioxide bands depths and positions) are calculated for each observation in order to investigate the disk-integrated composition of the satellites, the distribution of water ice respect to "contaminants" abundances and typical regolith grain properties. These quantities vary from the almost pure water ice surfaces of Enceladus and Calypso to the organic and carbon dioxide rich Hyperion, Iapetus and Phoebe. Janus visible colors are intermediate between these two classes having a slightly positive spectral slope. These results could help to decipher the origins and evolutionary history of the minor moons of the Saturn's system. We introduce a polar representation of the spectrophotometric

  9. Synthesis and characterization of mixed-ligand diimine-piperonal thiosemicarbazone complexes of ruthenium(II): Biophysical investigations and biological evaluation as anticancer and antibacterial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckford, Floyd A.; Thessing, Jeffrey; Shaloski, Michael, Jr.; Canisius Mbarushimana, P.; Brock, Alyssa; Didion, Jacob; Woods, Jason; Gonzalez-Sarrías, Antonio; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-04-01

    We have used a novel microwave-assisted method developed in our laboratories to synthesize a series of ruthenium-thiosemicarbazone complexes. The new thiosemicarbazone ligands are derived from benzo[ d][1,3]dioxole-5-carbaldehyde (piperonal) and the complexes are formulated as [(diimine) 2Ru(TSC)](PF 6) 2 (where the TSC is the bidentate thiosemicarbazone ligand). The diimine in the complexes is either 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline. The complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic means (NMR, IR and UV-Vis) as well as by elemental analysis. We have studied the biophysical characteristics of the complexes by investigating their anti-oxidant ability as well as their ability to disrupt the function of the human topoisomerase II enzyme. The complexes are moderately strong binders of DNA with binding constants of 10 4 M -1. They are also strong binders of human serum albumin having binding constants on the order of 10 4 M -1. The complexes show good in vitro anticancer activity against human colon cancer cells, Caco-2 and HCT-116 and indeed show some cytotoxic selectivity for cancer cells. The IC 50 values range from 7 to 159 μM (after 72 h drug incubation). They also have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains of pathogenic bacteria with IC 50 values as low as 10 μM; little activity was seen against Gram-negative strains. It has been established that all the compounds are catalytic inhibitors of human topoisomerase II.

  10. Chemical synthesis of methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside and its use for investigation of the action of starch synthase II.

    PubMed

    Damager, Iben; Olsen, Carl Erik; Blennow, Andreas; Denyer, Kay; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik

    2003-01-20

    The branched pentasaccharide methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside was chemically synthesised and investigated as a primer for particulate starch synthase II (SSII) using starch granules prepared from the low-amylose pea mutant lam as the enzyme source. For chemical synthesis, the trichloroacetimidate activation method was used to synthesise methyl O-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->4)-O-(2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->6)-O-[(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-O-(2,3-di-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->4)-2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside, which was then debenzylated to provide the desired branched pentasaccharide methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside as documented by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Using a large excess of the maltoside, the pentasaccharide was tested as a substrate for starch synthase II (SSII). Both of the non-reducing ends of methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside were extended equally resulting in two hexasaccharide products in nearly equal amounts. Thus, SSII catalyses an equimolar and non-processive elongation reaction of this substrate. Accordingly, the presence of the alpha-1,6 linkages does not dictate a specific structure of the pentasaccharide in which only one of the two non-reducing ends are available for extension.

  11. Experimental and Theoretical Investigation of the Charge-Separation Energies of Hydrated Zinc(II): Redefinition of the Critical Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Theresa E.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2009-11-01

    In the preceding article, the hydration energies of Zn2+(H2O)n complexes, where n = 6-10, were measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer (GIBMS) coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The present investigation explores the charge-separation processes observed, Zn2+(H2O)n → ZnOH+(H2O)m + H+(H2O)n-m-1, and the competition between this process and the loss of water. Our results demonstrate that charge-separation processes occur at variable complex sizes of n = 6, 7, and 8, prompting a redefinition of the critical size for charge separation. Experimental kinetic energy-dependent cross sections are analyzed to yield 0 K threshold energies for the charge-separation products and the effects of competition with this channel on the energies for losing one and two water ligands after accounting for multiple collisions, kinetic shifts, and energy distributions. A complete reaction coordinate is calculated for the n = 7 complex dissociating into ZnOH+(H2O)3 + H+(H2O)3. Calculated rate-limiting transition states for n = 6-8 are also compared to experimental threshold measurements for the charge-separation processes.

  12. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the charge-separation energies of hydrated zinc(II): redefinition of the critical size.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Theresa E; Armentrout, P B

    2009-12-10

    In the preceding article, the hydration energies of Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) complexes, where n = 6-10, were measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer (GIBMS) coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The present investigation explores the charge-separation processes observed, Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) --> ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(m) + H(+)(H(2)O)(n-m-1), and the competition between this process and the loss of water. Our results demonstrate that charge-separation processes occur at variable complex sizes of n = 6, 7, and 8, prompting a redefinition of the critical size for charge separation. Experimental kinetic energy-dependent cross sections are analyzed to yield 0 K threshold energies for the charge-separation products and the effects of competition with this channel on the energies for losing one and two water ligands after accounting for multiple collisions, kinetic shifts, and energy distributions. A complete reaction coordinate is calculated for the n = 7 complex dissociating into ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(3) + H(+)(H(2)O)(3). Calculated rate-limiting transition states for n = 6-8 are also compared to experimental threshold measurements for the charge-separation processes.

  13. The clouds of Venus. II - An investigation of the influence of coagulation on the observed droplet size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    An approximate numerical technique is used to investigate the influence of coagulation, sedimentation and turbulent motions on the observed droplet size distribution in the upper layers of the Venus clouds. If the cloud mass mixing ratio is less than 0.000001 at 250 K or the eddy diffusivity throughout the cloud is greater than 1,000,000 sq cm per sec, then coagulation is unimportant. In this case, the observed droplet size distribution is the initial size distribution produced by the condensation of the droplets. It is found that all cloud models with droplet formation near the cloud top (e.g., a photochemical model) must produce the observed droplet size distribution by condensation without subsequent modification by coagulation. However, neither meteoritic or surface dust can supply sufficient nucleating particles to account for the observed droplet number density. If the cloud droplets are formed near the cloud bottom, the observed droplet size distribution can be produced solely by the interaction of coagulation and dynamics; all information about the initial size distribution is lost. If droplet formation occurs near the cloud bottom, the lower atmosphere of Venus is oxidizing rather than reducing.

  14. Polymer-cushioned bilayers. II. An investigation of interaction forces and fusion using the surface forces apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J Y; Park, C K; Seitz, M; Israelachvili, J

    1999-01-01

    We have created phospholipid bilayers supported on soft polymer "cushions" which act as deformable substrates (see accompanying paper, Wong, J. Y., J. Majewski, M. Seitz, C. K. Park, J. N. Israelachvili, and G. S. Smith. 1999. Biophys. J. 77:1445-1457). In contrast to "solid-supported" membranes, such "soft-supported" membranes can exhibit more natural (higher) fluidity. Our bilayer system was constructed by adsorption of small unilamellar dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) vesicles onto polyethylenimine (PEI)-supported Langmuir-Blodgett lipid monolayers on mica. We used the surface forces apparatus (SFA) to investigate the long-range forces, adhesion, and fusion of two DMPC bilayers both above and below their main transition temperature (T(m) approximately 24 degrees C). Above T(m), hemi-fusion activation pressures of apposing bilayers were considerably smaller than for solid-supported bilayers, e.g., directly supported on mica. After separation, the bilayers naturally re-formed after short healing times. Also, for the first time, complete fusion of two fluid (liquid crystalline) phospholipid bilayers was observed in the SFA. Below T(m) (gel state), very high pressures were needed for hemi-fusion and the healing process became very slow. The presence of the polymer cushion significantly alters the interaction potential, e.g., long-range forces as well as fusion pressures, when compared to solid-supported systems. These fluid model membranes should allow the future study of integral membrane proteins under more physiological conditions. PMID:10465756

  15. Photophysical properties of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl DNA intercalators: effects of the molecular surroundings investigated by theory.

    PubMed

    Véry, Thibaut; Ambrosek, David; Otsuka, Miho; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Assfeld, Xavier; Monari, Antonio; Daniel, Chantal

    2014-09-26

    The environmental effects on the structural and photophysical properties of [Ru(L)2 (dppz)](2+) complexes (L=bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline, tap=1,4,5,8-tetraazaphenanthrene; dppz=dipyrido[3,3-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), used as DNA intercalators, have been studied by means of DFT, time-dependent DFT, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The electronic characteristics of the low-lying triplet excited states in water, acetonitrile, and DNA have been investigated to decipher the influence of the environment on the luminescent behavior of this class of molecules. The lowest triplet intra-ligand (IL) excited state calculated at λ≈800 nm for the three complexes and localized on the dppz ligand is not very sensitive to the environment and is available for electron transfer from a guanine nucleobase. Whereas the lowest triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)MLCT) states remain localized on the ancillary ligand (tap) in [Ru(tap)2 (dppz)](2+), regardless of the environment, their character is drastically modified in the other complexes [Ru(phen)2 (dppz)](2+) and [Ru(bpy)2 (dppz)](2+) upon going from acetonitrile (MLCTdppz/phen or MLCTdppz/bpy) to water (MLCTdppz) and DNA (MLCTphen and MLCTbpy). The change in the character of the low-lying (3) MLCT states accompanying nuclear relaxation in the excited state controls the emissive properties of the complexes in water, acetonitrile, and DNA. The light-switching effect has been rationalized on the basis of environment-induced control of the electronic density distributed in the lowest triplet excited states.

  16. Part I. Inviscid, swirling flows and vortex breakdown. Part II. A numerical investigation of the Lundgren turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Buntine, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Part I. A study of the behaviour of an inviscid, swirling fluid is performed. This flow can be described by the Squire-Long equation if the constraints of time-independence and axisymmetry are invoked. The particular case of flow through a diverging pipe is selected and a study is conducted to determine over what range of parameters does a solution exist. The work is performed with a view to understanding how the phenomenon of vortex breakdown develops. Experiments and previous numerical studies have indicated that the flow is sensitive to boundary conditions particularly at the pipe inlet. A {open_quotes}quasi-cylindrical{close_quotes} amplification of the Squire-Long equation is compared with the more complete model and shown to be able to account for most of its behaviour. An advantage of this latter representation is the relatively undetailed description of the flow geometry it requires in order to calculate a solution. {open_quotes}Criticality{close_quotes} or the ability of small disturbances to propagate upstream is related to results of the quasi-cylindrical and axisymmetric flow models. This leads to an examination of claims made by researchers such as Benjamin and Hall concerning the interrelationship between {open_quotes}failure{close_quotes} of the quasi-cylindrical model and the occurrence of a {open_quotes}critical{close_quotes} flow state. Lundgren developed an analytical model for homogeneous turbulence based on a collection of contracting spiral vortices each embedded in an axisymmetric strain field. Using asymptotic approximations he was able to deduce the Kolmogorov k{sup {minus}5/3} behaviour for inertial scales in the turbulence energy spectrum. Pullin & Saffman have enlarged upon his work to make a number of predictions about the behaviour of turbulence described by the model. This work investigates the model numerically. The first part considers how the flow description compares with numerical simulations using the Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. Dependence on the F0F1-ATP synthase for the activities of the hydrogen-oxidizing hydrogenases 1 and 2 during glucose and glycerol fermentation at high and low pH in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Trchounian, Karen; Pinske, Constanze; Sawers, R Gary; Trchounian, Armen

    2011-12-01

    Escherichia coli has four [NiFe]-hydrogenases (Hyd); three of these, Hyd-1, Hyd-2 and Hyd-3 have been characterized well. In this study the requirement for the F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase for the activities of the hydrogen-oxidizing hydrogenases Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 was examined. During fermentative growth on glucose at pH 7.5 an E. coli F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase mutant (DK8) lacked hydrogenase activity. At pH 5.5 hydrogenase activity was only 20% that of the wild type. Using in-gel activity staining, it could be demonstrated that both Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 were essentially inactive at these pHs, indicating that the residual activity at pH 5.5 was due to the hydrogen-evolving Hyd-3 enzyme. During fermentative growth in the presence of glycerol, hydrogenase activity in the mutant was highest at pH 7.5 attaining a value of 0.76 U/mg, or ~50% of wild type activity, and Hyd-2 was only partially active at this pH, while Hyd-1 was inactive. Essentially no hydrogenase activity was measured at pH 5.5 during growth with glycerol. At this pH the mutant had a hydrogenase activity that was maximally only ~10% of wild type activity with either carbon substrate but a weak activity of both Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 could be detected. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that the activity of the hydrogen-oxidizing hydrogenases in E. coli depends on an active F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase during growth at high and low pH.

  18. Synthesis, crystal structure and investigation of mononuclear copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a new carboxylate rich tripodal ligand and their interaction with carbohydrates in alkaline aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Christopher D; Pedraza, Mayra; Arman, Hadi; Fan, Hua-Jun; Schilling, Eduardo Luiz; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Musie, Ghezai T

    2015-08-01

    A new carboxylate rich asymmetric tripodal ligand, N-[2-carboxybenzomethyl]-N-[carboxymethyl]-β-alanine (H3camb), and its di-copper(II), (NH4)2[1]2, and di-zinc(II), ((CH3)4N)2[2]2, complexes have been synthesized as carbohydrate binding models in aqueous solutions. The ligand and complexes have been fully characterized using several techniques, including single crystal X-ray diffraction. The interactions of (NH4)2[1]2 and ((CH3)4N)2[2]2 with D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose and xylitol in aqueous alkaline media were investigated using UV-Vis and (13)C-NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. The molar conductance, NMR and ESI-MS studies indicate that the complexes dissociate in solution to produce the respective complex anions, 1(-) and 2(-). Complexes 1(-) and 2(-) showed chelating ability towards the naturally abundant and biologically relevant sugars, D-glucose, D-mannose, D-xylose, and xylitol. The complex ions bind to one molar equivalent of the sugars, even in the presence of stoichiometric excess of the substrates, in solution. Experimentally obtained spectroscopic data and computational results suggest that the substrates bind to the metal center in a bidentate fashion. Apparent binding constant values, pK(app), between the complexes and the substrates were determined and a specific mode of substrate binding is proposed. The pK(app) and relativistic density functional theory (DFT) calculated Gibbs free energy values indicate that D-mannose displayed the strongest interaction with the complexes. Syntheses, characterizations, detailed substrate binding studies using spectroscopic techniques, single crystal X-ray diffraction and geometry optimizations of the complex-substrates with DFT calculations are also reported.

  19. Investigation of copper(II) binding to the protein precursor of Non-Amyloid-Beta Component of Alzheimer Disease Amyloid Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Francis; Hodak, Miroslav; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The Non-Amyloid-Beta Component Precursor (NACP) is a natively unfolded synaptic protein that is implicated in Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases. Its aggregation into fibrillar structures is accelerated by the binding of copper(II). Experimental studies suggest that the dominant copper binding site is located at the histidine residue in NACP. Based on this evidence we assembled a model fragment of the binding site and used DFT to analyze the conformational details of the most probable binding motifs. We investigated the overall conformational effects with classical MD by constraining the copper binding site to the most energetically favorable geometry obtained from the DFT calculations. These results are compared and contrasted with those of the unbound NACP.

  20. Theoretical investigation of InAs/GaSb type-II pin superlattice infrared detector in the mid wavelength infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, U.; Hostut, M.; Kilic, A.; Sakiroglu, S.; Sokmen, I.; Ergun, Y.; Aydinli, A.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we present the theoretical investigation of type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice p-i-n detector. Kronig-Penney and envelope function approximation is used to calculate band gap energy and superlattice minibands. Variational method is also used to calculate exciton binding energies. Our results show that carriers overlap increases at GaSb/InAs interface on the higher energy side while it decreases at InAs/GaSb interface on the lower energy side with increasing reverse bias due to shifting the hole wavefunction toward to the GaSb/InAs interface decisively. Binding energies increase with increasing electric field due to overall overlap of electron and hole wave functions at the both interfaces in contrast with type I superlattices. This predicts that optical absorption is enhanced with increasing electric field.

  1. Hierarchical structure of the energy landscape of proteins revisited by time series analysis. II. Investigation of explicit solvent effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alakent, Burak; Camurdan, Mehmet C.; Doruker, Pemra

    2005-10-01

    Time series analysis tools are employed on the principal modes obtained from the Cα trajectories from two independent molecular-dynamics simulations of α-amylase inhibitor (tendamistat). Fluctuations inside an energy minimum (intraminimum motions), transitions between minima (interminimum motions), and relaxations in different hierarchical energy levels are investigated and compared with those encountered in vacuum by using different sampling window sizes and intervals. The low-frequency low-indexed mode relationship, established in vacuum, is also encountered in water, which shows the reliability of the important dynamics information offered by principal components analysis in water. It has been shown that examining a short data collection period (100ps) may result in a high population of overdamped modes, while some of the low-frequency oscillations (<10cm-1) can be captured in water by using a longer data collection period (1200ps). Simultaneous analysis of short and long sampling window sizes gives the following picture of the effect of water on protein dynamics. Water makes the protein lose its memory: future conformations are less dependent on previous conformations due to the lowering of energy barriers in hierarchical levels of the energy landscape. In short-time dynamics (<10ps), damping factors extracted from time series model parameters are lowered. For tendamistat, the friction coefficient in the Langevin equation is found to be around 40-60cm-1 for the low-indexed modes, compatible with literature. The fact that water has increased the friction and that on the other hand has lubrication effect at first sight contradicts. However, this comes about because water enhances the transitions between minima and forces the protein to reduce its already inherent inability to maintain oscillations observed in vacuum. Some of the frequencies lower than 10cm-1 are found to be overdamped, while those higher than 20cm-1 are slightly increased. As for the long

  2. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 413: Clean Slate II Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick; Burmeister, Mark; Gallo, Patricia

    2016-04-21

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 413 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, which is approximately 130 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and approximately 40 miles southeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CAU 413 site consists of the release of radionuclides to the surface and shallow subsurface from the conduct of the Clean Slate II (CSII) storage–transportation test conducted on May 31, 1963. CAU 413 includes one corrective action site (CAS), TA-23-02CS (Pu Contaminated Soil). The known releases at CAU 413 are the result of the atmospheric deposition of contamination from the 1963 CSII test. The CSII test was a non-nuclear detonation of a nuclear device located inside a reinforced concrete bunker covered with 2 feet of soil. This test dispersed radionuclides, primarily plutonium, on the ground surface. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 413 will be evaluated based on information collected from a corrective action investigation (CAI). The investigation is based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 17, 2015, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; the U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 413. The CAI will include radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, collection and analyses of soil samples, and assessment of investigation results. The collection of soil samples will be accomplished using both probabilistic and judgmental sampling approaches. To facilitate site investigation and the evaluation of DQO decisions, the releases at CAU 413 have been divided into seven study groups.

  4. Cool Subdwarf Investigations. II. Multiplicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    stellar objects, and is relevant to our understanding of stellar and planetary system stability. Many binary surveys have been carried out on varied...experiment allowed for the determination of scale and position angle zero point without relying on binaries themselves to de- termine calibration parameters ...Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) and by Riaz et al. (2008) using the HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS); these are noted as “W” = WFPC2 or “A

  5. Madaline Rule II: An Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    learning algorithm for training layered feed-forward networks of Adalines . An Adaline is a basic neuron-like processing element which forms a binary output...correct responses to inputs not included in the training set. Networks that contained more Adalines than necessary to solve a given training problem...1 1.1 Contributions .......................................... 1 1.2 The Adaline ............................................ 3 1.3 Early Madalines

  6. Synthesis and characterization of mixed-ligand diimine-piperonal thiosemicarbazone complexes of ruthenium(II): Biophysical investigations and biological evaluation as anticancer and antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Beckford, Floyd A.; Thessing, Jeffrey; Shaloski, Michael; Mbarushimana, P. Canisius; Brock, Alyssa; Didion, Jacob; Woods, Jason; Gonzalez-Sarrías, Antonio; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2011-01-01

    We have used a novel microwave-assisted method developed in our laboratories to synthesize a series of ruthenium-thiosemicarbazone complexes. The new thiosemicarbazone ligands are derived from benzo[d][1,3]dioxole-5-carbaldehyde (piperonal) and the complexes are formulated as [(diimine)2Ru(TSC)](PF6)2 (where the TSC is the bidentate thiosemicarbazone ligand). The diimine in the complexes is either 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline. The complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic means (NMR, IR and UV-Vis) as well as by elemental analysis. We have studied the biophysical characteristics of the complexes by investigating their anti-oxidant ability as well as their ability to disrupt the function of the human topoisomerase II enzyme. The complexes are moderately strong binders of DNA with binding constants of 104 M−1. They are also strong binders of human serum albumin having binding constants on the order of 104 M−1. The complexes show good in vitro anticancer activity against human colon cancer cells, Caco-2 and HCT-116 and indeed show some cytotoxic selectivity for cancer cells. The IC50 values range from 7 – 159 μM (after 72 h drug incubation). They also have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains of pathogenic bacteria with IC50 values as low as 10 μM; little activity was seen against Gram-negative strains. It has been established that all the compounds are catalytic inhibitors of human topoisomerase II. PMID:21552381

  7. Queen Nefertari, the Royal Spouse of Pharaoh Ramses II: A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Mummified Remains Found in Her Tomb (QV66)

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, Michael E.; Bianucci, Raffaella; Buckley, Stephen A.; Fletcher, Joann; Bouwman, Abigail S.; Öhrström, Lena M.; Seiler, Roger; Galassi, Francesco M.; Hajdas, Irka; Vassilika, Eleni; Böni, Thomas; Henneberg, Maciej; Rühli, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Queen Nefertari, the favourite Royal Consort of Pharaoh Ramses II (Ancient Egypt, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty c. 1250 BC) is famous for her beautifully decorated tomb in the Valley of the Queens. Her burial was plundered in ancient times yet still many objects were found broken in the debris when the tomb was excavated. Amongst the found objects was a pair of mummified legs. They came to the Egyptian Museum in Turin and are henceforth regarded as the remains of this famous Queen, although they were never scientifically investigated. The following multidisciplinary investigation is the first ever performed on those remains. The results (radiocarbon dating, anthropology, paleopathology, genetics, chemistry and Egyptology) all strongly speak in favour of an identification of the remains as Nefertari’s, although different explanations—albeit less likely—are considered and discussed. The legs probably belong to a lady, a fully adult individual, of about 40 years of age. The materials used for embalming are consistent with Ramesside mummification traditions and indeed all objects within the tomb robustly support the burial as of Queen Nefertari. PMID:27902731

  8. Compendium of the antidiabetic effects of supranutritional selenate doses. In vivo and in vitro investigations with type II diabetic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Andreas S; Pallauf, Josef

    2006-08-01

    In recent years, a number of investigations on the antidiabetic effects of supranutritional selenate doses have been carried out. Selenate (selenium oxidation state +VI) was shown to possess regulatory effects on glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and fatty acid metabolism, metabolic pathways which are disturbed in diabetic disorders. An enhanced phosphorylation of single components of the insulin signalling pathway could be shown to be one molecular mechanism responsible for the insulinomimetic properties of selenate. In type II diabetic animals, a reduction of insulin resistance could be shown as an outcome of selenate treatment. The present study with db/db mice was performed to investigate the antidiabetic mechanisms of selenate in type II diabetic animals. Twenty-one young adult female db/db mice were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (selenium deficient=0Se, selenite-treated group=SeIV and selenate-treated group=SeVI) with seven animals each. Mice of all groups were fed a selenium-deficient diet for 8 weeks. The animals of the groups SeIV and SeVI were supplemented with increasing amounts of sodium selenite or sodium selenate up to 35% of the LD50 in week 8 in addition to the diet by tube feeding. Selenate treatment reduced insulin resistance significantly and reduced the activity of liver cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators of insulin signalling by about 50%. In an in vitro inhibition test selenate (oxidation state +VI) per se did not inhibit PTP activity. In this test, however, selenium compounds of the oxidation state +IV were found to be the actual inhibitors of PTP activity. Selenate administration in vivo further led to characteristic changes in the selenium-dependent redox system, which could be mimicked in an in vitro assay and provided further evidence for the intermediary formation of SeIV metabolites. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), another important factor in

  9. Randomized controlled phase I/II study to investigate immune stimulatory effects by low dose radiotherapy in primarily operable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficiencies of T cell based immunotherapies are affected by insufficient migration and activation of tumor specific effector T cells in the tumor. Accumulating evidence exists on the ability of ionizing radiation to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. The aim of this phase I/II clinical trial is to evaluate whether low dose single fraction radiotherapy can improve T cell associated antitumor immune response in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods/Design This trial has been designed as an investigator initiated; prospective randomised, 4-armed, controlled Phase I/II trial. Patients who are candidates for resection of pancreatic cancer will be randomized into 4 arms. A total of 40 patients will be enrolled. The patients receive 0 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy or 5 Gy radiation precisely targeted to their pancreatic carcinoma. Radiation will be delivered by external beam radiotherapy using a 6 MV Linac with IMRT technique 48 h prior to the surgical resection. The primary objective is the determination of an active local external beam radiation dose, leading to tumor infiltrating T cells as a surrogate parameter for antitumor activity. Secondary objectives include local tumor control and recurrence patterns, survival, radiogenic treatment toxicity and postoperative morbidity and mortality, as well as quality of life. Further, frequencies of tumor reactive T cells in blood and bone marrow as well as whole blood cell transcriptomics and plasma-proteomics will be correlated with clinical outcome. An interim analysis will be performed after the enrolment of 20 patients for safety reasons. The evaluation of the primary endpoint will start four weeks after the last patient's enrolment. Discussion This trial will answer the question whether a low dose radiotherapy localized to the pancreatic tumor only can increase the number of tumor infiltrating T cells and thus potentially enhance the antitumor immune response. The study will also

  10. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of LaCa0.143 (4)O0.857 (4)F0.143 (4)Bi0.857 (4)S2

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rongtie; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Dong; Cai, Chuanbing; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of lithium dibarium calcium oxide fluoride di­sulfide are reported. LaCa0.143 (4)O0.857 (4)F0.143 (4)Bi0.857 (4)S2 crystallizes in the tetra­gonal space group P4/nmm. The structure exhibits disorder of the Ca2+ and Bi3+ cations, and the O2− and F− anions. The structure is composed of a stacking of [(O,F)2La2] layers and double [(Bi,Ca)S2] layers. Magnetic property measurements indicate a very small magnetization at 300 K and the existence of weak ferromagnetism at 2 K. PMID:27308056

  11. Transcriptional control of the F0F1-ATP synthase operon of Corynebacterium glutamicum: SigmaH factor binds to its promoter and regulates its expression at different pH values

    PubMed Central

    Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Barreiro, Carlos; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Martín, Juan F

    2013-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum used in the amino acid fermentation industries is an alkaliphilic microorganism. Its F0F1-ATPase operon (atpBEFHAGDC) is expressed optimally at pH 9.0 forming a polycistronic (7.5 kb) and a monocistronic (1.2 kb) transcripts both starting upstream of the atpB gene. Expression of this operon is controlled by the SigmaH factor. The sigmaH gene (sigH) was cloned and shown to be co-transcribed with a small gene, cg0877, encoding a putative anti-sigma factor. A mutant deleted in the sigH gene expressed the atpBEFHAGDC operon optimally at pH 7.0 at difference of the wild-type strain (optimal expression at pH 9.0). These results suggested that the SigmaH factor is involved in pH control of expression of the F0F1 ATPase operon. The SigmaH protein was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the GST (glutathione-S-transferase) and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on a GSTrap HP column. The fused protein was identified by immunodetection with anti-GST antibodies. DNA-binding studies by electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the SigH protein binds to a region of the atpB promoter containing the sigmaH recognition sequence (−35)TTGGAT…18nt…GTTA(−10). SigmaH plays an important role in the cascade of control of pH stress in Corynebacterium. PMID:23298179

  12. Transcriptional control of the F0F1-ATP synthase operon of Corynebacterium glutamicum: SigmaH factor binds to its promoter and regulates its expression at different pH values.

    PubMed

    Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Barreiro, Carlos; Sola-Landa, Alberto; Martín, Juan F

    2013-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum used in the amino acid fermentation industries is an alkaliphilic microorganism. Its F(0)F(1)-ATPase operon (atpBEFHAGDC) is expressed optimally at pH 9.0 forming a polycistronic (7.5 kb) and a monocistronic (1.2 kb) transcripts both starting upstream of the atpB gene. Expression of this operon is controlled by the SigmaH factor. The sigmaH gene (sigH) was cloned and shown to be co-transcribed with a small gene, cg0877, encoding a putative anti-sigma factor. A mutant deleted in the sigH gene expressed the atpBEFHAGDC operon optimally at pH 7.0 at difference of the wild-type strain (optimal expression at pH 9.0). These results suggested that the SigmaH factor is involved in pH control of expression of the F(0) F(1) ATPase operon. The SigmaH protein was expressed in Escherichia coli fused to the GST (glutathione-S-transferase) and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on a GSTrap HP column. The fused protein was identified by immunodetection with anti-GST antibodies. DNA-binding studies by electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the SigH protein binds to a region of the atpB promoter containing the sigmaH recognition sequence (-35)TTGGAT…18nt…GTTA(-10). SigmaH plays an important role in the cascade of control of pH stress in Corynebacterium.

  13. Interactions between beta D372 and gamma subunit N-terminus residues gamma K9 and gamma S12 are important to catalytic activity catalyzed by Escherichia coli F1F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Lowry, David S; Frasch, Wayne D

    2005-05-17

    Substitution of Escherichia coli F(1)F(0) ATP synthase residues betaD372 or gammaS12 with groups that are unable to form a hydrogen bond at this location decreased ATP synthase-dependent cell growth by 2 orders of magnitude, eliminated the ability of F(1)F(0) to catalyze ATPase-dependent proton pumping in inverted E. coli membranes, caused a 15-20% decrease in the coupling efficiency of the membranes as measured by the extent of succinate-dependent acridine orange fluorescence quenching, but increased soluble F(1)-ATPase activity by about 10%. Substitution of gammaK9 to eliminate the ability to form a salt bridge with betaD372 decreased soluble F(1)-ATPase activity and ATPase-driven proton pumping by 2-fold but had no effect on the proton gradient induced by addition of succinate. Mutations to eliminate the potential to form intersubunit hydrogen bonds and salt bridges between other less highly conserved residues on the gamma subunit N-terminus and the beta subunits had little effect on ATPase or ATP synthase activities. These results suggest that the betaD372-gammaK9 salt bridge contributes significantly to the rate-limiting step in ATP hydrolysis of soluble F(1) while the betaD372-gammaS12 hydrogen bond may serve as a component of an escapement mechanism for ATP synthesis in which alphabetagamma intersubunit interactions provide a means to make substrate binding a prerequisite of proton gradient-driven gamma subunit rotation.

  14. The impact of hygrothermal preconditioning on mode II interlaminar fracture toughness in unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composites: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempowicz, Michael L.

    The correlation between the interlaminar Mode II fracture toughness (GIIC) of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy and other material properties across different conditioning regimes was investigated. Specimens were preconditioned using select hygrothermal criteria to evaluate how changes in the material and mechanical properties in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite correlations with changes in GIIC for each regime. An increase in GIIC from baseline values was demonstrated across all conditions from end-notched flexure (ENF) testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and tensile tests had varying responses based on preconditioning environment. Since tensile and some DMA properties rely on fiber strength and show property loss with increased plasticization, fiber strength may not have a large impact on GIIC properties. Test data also implied that the GIIC increased when consolidation of the polymer chains occurred in the arid condition as well as when crosslink density increased in the moisture exposed conditions. From these results it is believed that the chemical and physical changes in matrix cohesion are more important to GIIC behavior prediction than fiber behavior.

  15. Klimt artwork (Part II): material investigation by backscattering Fe-57 Mössbauer- and Raman- spectroscopy, SEM and p-XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, B. F. O.; Lehmann, R.; Wengerowsky, D.; Blumers, M.; Sansano, A.; Rull, F.; Schmidt, H.-J.; Dencker, F.; Niebur, A.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Sindelar, R.; Renz, F.

    2016-12-01

    In a rediscovered Klimt-artwork " Trompetender Putto" material tests have been conducted. We report studies on different points of the painting. The spots are of different colors, mainly taken in spots of the painting not restaurated. MIMOS II Fe-57 Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed mainly haematite and nano particle oxides in red and red/brown colors. Brown colors also contain crystallized goethite. In brown/ochre colors the same pigments as in brown colors are observed, but there is less quantity of goethite and more quantity of haematite. The green colors show Fe-rich clays, like celadonite or glauconite and or lepidocrocite as main component. Raman spectroscopy revealed cinnabar in red colors of the Scarf; and massicot in brown/ochre points, i.e. in the Left Wing of the "Putto". With scanning electron microscopy, various layers of the original and of overpainting could be recognized. The investigations of sample 1 show three layers of colored materials, which were identified as zinc-white, cinnabar and galena as well as carbon compounds. In sample 2 four layers could be detected. These are identified (bottom to top) as gypsum and lead-white (layer 1), zinc-white (layer 2), lead-white and cinnabar (layer 3) and titanium-white (layer 4). The elementary composition was examined with the portable X-ray-fluorescence analysis for qualitative manner at different points.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and investigation of the photophysical and photochemical properties of highly soluble novel metal-free, zinc(II), and indium(III) phthalocyanines substituted with 2,3,6-trimethylphenoxy moieties.

    PubMed

    Gürel, Ekrem; Pişkin, Mehmet; Altun, Selçuk; Odabaş, Zafer; Durmuş, Mahmut

    2015-04-07

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of metal-free, zinc(II), and indium(III)acetate phthalocyanines substituted with 2,3,6-trimethylphenoxy groups at the peripheral and non-peripheral positions. The photophysical (fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes) and photochemical (singlet oxygen generation and photodegradation under light irradiation) properties of these novel phthalocyanines and unsubstituted zinc(II) and indium(III)acetate phthalocyanines were investigated in dimethylformamide solution. The effects of the types of substituents and their positions and the variety of central metal ions on the phthalocyanine core on their spectroscopic, photophysical and photochemical properties were also determined. The studied 2,3,6-trimethylphenoxy substituted metal-free, zinc(II) and indium(III)acetate phthalocyanines especially indium(III)acetate derivatives exhibited appropriate photophysical and photochemical properties such as high singlet oxygen generation and these phthalocyanines can be potential Type II photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy in cancer applications.

  17. Crystal structure of nonadentate tricompartmental ligand derived from pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid: Spectroscopic, electrochemical and thermal investigations of its transition metal(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Shenoy, Rashmi V.; Badiger, Dayananda S.; Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Devi, L. Gomathi; Nethaji, Munirathinam

    2011-07-01

    The coordinating behavior of a new dihydrazone ligand, 2,6-bis[(3-methoxysalicylidene)hydrazinocarbonyl]pyridine towards manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II) and cadmium(II) has been described. The metal complexes were characterized by magnetic moments, conductivity measurements, spectral (IR, NMR, UV-Vis, FAB-Mass and EPR) and thermal studies. The ligand crystallizes in triclinic system, space group P-1, with α = 98.491(10)°, β = 110.820(10)° and γ = 92.228(10)°. The cell dimensions are a = 10.196(7) Å, b = 10.814(7) Å, c = 10.017(7) Å, Z = 2 and V = 1117.4(12). IR spectral studies reveal the nonadentate behavior of the ligand. All the complexes are neutral in nature and possess six-coordinate geometry around each metal center. The X-band EPR spectra of copper(II) complex at both room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature showed unresolved broad signals with giso = 2.106. Cyclic voltametric studies of copper(II) complex at different scan rates reveal that all the reaction occurring are irreversible.

  18. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation at Savannah is being conducted in phases. This approach is being used by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase I of the Savannah program was conducted in October-November 2007 and January 2008 (Argonne 2007a, 2008). This site-specific Work Plan provides a brief summary of the Phase I findings and the results of groundwater level monitoring that has been ongoing since completion of the Phase I study and also outlines technical objectives, investigation tasks, and investigation methods for Phase II of the site characterization at Savannah.

  19. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the spectroscopic properties of a DNA-intercalator salphen-type Zn(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Biancardi, Alessandro; Burgalassi, Azzurra; Terenzi, Alessio; Spinello, Angelo; Barone, Giampaolo; Biver, Tarita; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2014-06-10

    The photophysical and DNA-binding properties of the cationic zinc(II) complex of 5-triethylammonium methyl salicylidene ortho-phenylenediiminato (ZnL(2+)) were investigated by a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. DFT calculations were performed on both the ground and the first excited states of ZnL(2+) and on its possible mono- and dioxidation products, both in vacuo and in selected solvents mimicked by the polarizable continuum model. Comparison of the calculated absorption and fluorescence transitions with the corresponding experimental data led to the conclusion that visible light induces a two-electron photooxidation process located on the phenylenediiminato ligand. Kinetic measurements, performed by monitoring absorbance changes over time in several solvents, are in agreement with a slow unimolecular photooxidation process, which is faster in water and slower in less polar solvents. Moreover, structural details of ZnL-DNA binding were obtained by DFT calculations on the intercalation complexes between ZnL and the d(ApT)2 and d(GpC)2 dinucleoside monophosphate duplexes. Two main complementary binding interactions are proposed: 1) intercalation of the central phenyl ring of the ligand between the stacked DNA base pairs; 2) external electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged phosphate groups and the two cationic triethylammonium groups of the Schiff-base ligand. Such suggestions are supported by fluorescence titrations performed on the ZnL/DNA system at different ionic strengths and temperatures. In particular, the values of the DNA-binding constants obtained at different temperatures provided the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the binding and confirmed that two competitive mechanisms, namely, intercalation and external interaction, are involved. The two mechanisms are coexistent at room temperature under physiological conditions.

  20. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-05

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb=(7.6±0.21)×10(5)) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2±0.11)×10(6)M(-1). Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules.

  1. Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Study to Investigate the Immunogenicity and Safety of a West Nile Virus Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbender, Rex; Bevilacqua, Joan; Gregg, Anne M.; Watson, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Background. ChimeriVax-WN02 is a live, attenuated chimeric vaccine for protection against West Nile virus. This Phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo–controlled, multicenter study assessed the immunogenicity, viremia, and safety of the ChimeriVax-WN02 vaccine. Methods. The 2-part study included adults in general good health. In part 1, subjects aged 18–40 years were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment groups: ChimeriVax–WN02 3.7- × -105 plaque-forming units (PFU), 3.7 × 104 PFU, 3.7 × 103 PFU, or placebo. In part 2, subjects aged 41–64 and ≥65 years were randomized to receive ChimeriVax-WN02 3.7 × 105 PFU or placebo. Results. In both part 1 and part 2, seroconversion was achieved at day 28 by >96% of subjects in active treatment groups. In part 1, neutralizing antibody titers at day 28 were higher and viremia levels lower with the highest dose, whereas the adverse event profile was similar between the dose groups. In part 2, antibody titers and viremia levels were higher in subjects aged ≥65 years, and more subjects in the 41–64 years cohort experienced adverse events. Conclusions. The ChimeriVax-WN02 vaccine was highly immunogenic in younger adults and the elderly, and it was well tolerated at all dose levels and in all age groups investigated. Clinical Trials.gov identifier: NCT00442169. PMID:21148499

  2. Binding affinities of Schiff base Fe(II) complex with BSA and calf-thymus DNA: Spectroscopic investigations and molecular docking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudra, Suparna; Dasmandal, Somnath; Patra, Chiranjit; Kundu, Arjama; Mahapatra, Ambikesh

    2016-09-01

    The binding interaction of a synthesized Schiff base Fe(II) complex with biological macromolecules viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and calf thymus(ct)-DNA have been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques coupled with viscosity measurements at physiological pH and 298 K. Regular amendments in emission intensities of BSA upon the action of the complex indicate significant interaction between them, and the binding interaction have been characterized by Stern Volmer plots and thermodynamic binding parameters. On the basis of this quenching technique one binding site with binding constant (Kb = (7.6 ± 0.21) × 105) between complex and protein have been obtained at 298 K. Time-resolved fluorescence studies have also been encountered to understand the mechanism of quenching induced by the complex. Binding affinities of the complex to the fluorophores of BSA namely tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr) have been judged by synchronous fluorescence studies. Secondary structural changes of BSA rooted by the complex has been revealed by CD spectra. On the other hand, hypochromicity of absorption spectra of the complex with the addition of ct-DNA and the gradual reduction in emission intensities of ethidium bromide bound ct-DNA in presence of the complex indicate noticeable interaction between ct-DNA and the complex with the binding constant (4.2 ± 0.11) × 106 M- 1. Life-time measurements have been studied to determine the relative amplitude of binding of the complex to ct-DNA base pairs. Mode of binding interaction of the complex with ct-DNA has been deciphered by viscosity measurements. CD spectra have also been used to understand the changes in ct-DNA structure upon binding with the metal complex. Density functional theory (DFT) and molecular docking analysis have been employed in highlighting the interactive phenomenon and binding location of the complex with the macromolecules.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and spectroscopic investigation of new iron(III) and copper(II) complexes of a carboxylate rich ligand and their interaction with carbohydrates in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Christopher D; Arman, Hadi; Bawazir, Huda; Musie, Ghezai T

    2014-10-20

    New tetra-iron(III) (K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and K3[2]·3H2O·(OH)) and di-copper(II) (Na3[3]·5H2O) complexes as carbohydrate binding models have been synthesized and fully characterized used several techniques including single crystal X-ray crystallography. Whereas K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and Na3[3]·5H2O are completely water-soluble, K3[2]·3H2O·(OH) is less soluble in all common solvents including water. The binding of substrates, such as d-mannose, d-glucose, d-xylose, and xylitol with the water-soluble complexes in different reaction conditions were investigated. In aqueous alkaline media, complexes K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and Na3[3]·5H2O showed coordination ability toward the applied substrates. Even in the presence of stoichiometric excess of the substrates, the complexes form only 1:1 (complex/substrate) molar ratio species in solution. Apparent binding constants, pKapp, values between the complexes and the substrates were determined and specific mode of substrate binding is proposed. The pKapp values showed that d-mannose coordinates strongest to K4[1]·25H2O·(CH3)2CO and Na3[3]·5H2O. Syntheses, characterizations and detailed substrate binding study using spectroscopic techniques and single crystal X-ray diffraction are reported.

  4. [Investigation of effect and process of nitric oxide removal in rotating drum biofilter coupled with absorption by Fe(II) (EDTA)].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Yang, Xuan; Yu, Jian-Ming; Jiang, Yi-Feng; Chen, Jian-Meng

    2012-02-01

    In order to accelerate the NO removal efficiency, a novel and effective system was developed for the complete treatment of NO from flue gases. The system features NO absorption by Fe(II) (EDTA) and biological denitrification in a rotating drum biofilter (RDB) so as to promote biological reduction. The experimental results show that a moderate amount of Fe(II) (EDTA) was added to the nutrient solution to improve the mass transfer efficiency of NO from gas to liquid, with the concomitant formation of nitrosyl complex Fe(II) (EDTA)-NO. Under the experimental conditions of rotational speed was at 0.5 r x min(-1), EBRT of 57.7 s, temperature was at 30 degrees C, pH was 7-8, with the increasing concentration of Fe(II) (EDTA) was from 0 mg x L(-1) to 500 mg x L(-1), the NO removal efficiency was improved from 61.1% to 97.6%, and the elimination capacity was from 16.2 g (m3 x h)(-1) to 26.7 g (m3 x h)(-1). In order to simulate the denitrifying process of waste gas containing NO by using RDB coupled with Fe(II) (EDTA) absorption, a tie-in equation of NO removal and the Fe(II) (EDTA) concentration added in RDB was established. The experimental NO removal efficiency change tendency agrees fairly with that predicted by the proposed equation.

  5. Poisoning effect of Mn in LaFe1-xMnxAsO0.89F0.11: Unveiling a quantum critical point in the phase diagram of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerath, F.; Bonfà, P.; Sanna, S.; Prando, G.; De Renzi, R.; Kobayashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Carretta, P.

    2014-04-01

    A superconducting-to-magnetic transition is reported for LaFeAsO0.89F0.11 where a per-thousand amount of Mn impurities is dispersed. By employing local spectroscopic techniques like muon spin rotation (μSR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) on compounds with Mn contents ranging from x =0.025% to x =0.75%, we find that the electronic properties are extremely sensitive to the Mn impurities. In fact, a small amount of Mn as low as 0.2% suppresses superconductivity completely. Static magnetism, involving the FeAs planes, is observed to arise for x >0.1% and becomes further enhanced upon increasing Mn substitution. Also a progressive increase of low-energy spin fluctuations, leading to an enhancement of the NQR spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1, is observed upon Mn substitution. The analysis of T1-1 for the sample closest to the crossover between superconductivity and magnetism (x =0.2%) points toward the presence of an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point around that doping level.

  6. First determination of f +(0)| V us | from a combined analysis of τ → Kπν τ decay and πK scattering with constraints from K ℓ3 decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Véronique

    2014-06-01

    We perform a combined analysis of τ → Kπν τ decay and πK scattering with constraints from K ℓ3 data using a N/ D approach that fulfills requirements from unitarity and analyticity. We obtain a good fit of the I = 1/2 πK amplitude in the P wave using the LASS data above the elastic region while in this region data are generated via Monte Carlo using the FOCUS results based on D ℓ4 decay. The spectrum and branching ratio of τ → Kπν τ constrained by K ℓ3 decays are also well reproduced leading to f +(0)| V us | = 0 .2163±0 .0014. Furthermore, we obtain the slope of the vector form factor λ + = (25 .56 ± 0 .40) × 10-3 while the value of the scalar form factor at the Callan-Treiman point is ln C = 0 .2062 ± 0 .0089. Given the experimental precision our results are compatible with the Standard Model.

  7. Cu(II) salen complex with propylene linkage: An efficient catalyst in the formation of Csbnd X bonds (X = N, O, S) and biological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Adil, S. F.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2017-02-01

    The catalytic property of a mononuclear Cu(II) salen complex in Chan-Lam coupling reaction with phenyl boronic acid at room temperature is reported. The studied complex is found to be potential catalyst in the preparation of carbon-heteroatom bonds with excellent yields. The studied Cu(II) salen complex is monoclinic with cell parameters, a = 9.6807(5) (α 90°), (b = 17.2504(8) (β 112.429 (2), c = 11.1403 (6) (γ = 90°), and has distorted square planar environment around Cu(II) ion. Furthermore, there is no π⋯π interactions in the reported complex due to large distance between the centroid of aromatic rings. In addition, DNA binding study of Cu(II) salen complex by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy is also reported. Moreover, the reported Cu(II) salen complex exhibits significant anticancer activity against MCF-7 cancer cell lines, and displays potential antimicrobial biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa, suggesting antimicrobial biofilm an important tool for suppression of resistant infections caused by P. aeruginosa.

  8. Structural investigation of 5,10-A2B2-type porphyrins: palladium(II) and zinc(II) complexes of 5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Senge, Mathias O; Zawadzka, Monika

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato]palladium(II), [Pd(C34H22Br2N4)], and [5,10-dibromo-15,20-bis(4-methylphenyl)porphyrinato](methanol)zinc(II), [Zn(C34H22Br2N4)(CH4O)], reveals a small but localized influence of the bromine residues on the conformation of the macrocycle. A comparison of the 5,10-dibromo substituent pattern with literature data for 5,15-dibromoporphyrins shows similar in-plane distortions in both but a different mix of out-of-plane distortion modes for the different regiochemical arrangements.

  9. PspGI, a type II restriction endonuclease from the extreme thermophile Pyrococcus sp.: structural and functional studies to investigate an evolutionary relationship with several mesophilic restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pingoud, Vera; Conzelmann, Charlotte; Kinzebach, Steffen; Sudina, Anna; Metelev, Valeri; Kubareva, Elena; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Lurz, Rudi; Lüder, Gerhild; Xu, Shuang-Yong; Pingoud, Alfred

    2003-06-20

    We present here the first detailed biochemical analysis of an archaeal restriction enzyme. PspGI shows sequence similarity to SsoII, EcoRII, NgoMIV and Cfr10I, which recognize related DNA sequences. We demonstrate here that PspGI, like SsoII and unlike EcoRII or NgoMIV and Cfr10I, interacts with and cleaves DNA as a homodimer and is not stimulated by simultaneous binding to two recognition sites. PspGI and SsoII differ in their basic biochemical properties, viz. stability against chemical denaturation and proteolytic digestion, DNA binding and the pH, MgCl(2) and salt-dependence of their DNA cleavage activity. In contrast, the results of mutational analyses and cross-link experiments show that PspGI and SsoII have a very similar DNA binding site and catalytic center as NgoMIV and Cfr10I (whose crystal structures are known), and presumably also as EcoRII, in spite of the fact that these enzymes, which all recognize variants of the sequence -/CC-GG- (/ denotes the site of cleavage), are representatives of different subgroups of type II restriction endonucleases. A sequence comparison of all known restriction endonuclease sequences, furthermore, suggests that several enzymes recognizing other DNA sequences also share amino acid sequence similarities with PspGI, SsoII and EcoRII in the region of the presumptive active site. These results are discussed in an evolutionary context.

  10. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  11. Investigation of the insulin-like properties of zinc(II) complexes of 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinones: identification of a compound with glucose lowering effect in STZ-induced type I diabetic animals.

    PubMed

    Moniz, Tânia; Amorim, M João; Ferreira, Rita; Nunes, Ana; Silva, Ana; Queirós, Carla; Leite, Andreia; Gameiro, Paula; Sarmento, Bruno; Remião, Fernando; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sakurai, Hiromu; Rangel, Maria

    2011-12-01

    Results from an investigation in an in vivo model of STZ-induced diabetic rats demonstrate that compound bis(1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-pyridinonate)zinc(II), Zn(dmpp)(2), significantly lowers the blood glucose levels of individuals, thus showing evidence of glucose lowering activity. The compound was selected from a set of eight zinc(II) complexes of 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinones with diverse lipophilicity that were prepared and characterized in our laboratory. Assessment of insulin-like activity of the complexes was firstly performed in vitro by measuring the inhibition of FFA release in isolated rat adipocytes. The results indicate that compounds bis(2-methyl-3-hydroxy-4-pyridinonate)zinc(II), Zn(mpp)(2) and Zn(dmpp)(2) display significantly higher activity than that of the respective positive control thus suggesting its selection for in vivo tests. Safety evaluation of the active zinc(II) compounds was performed in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. The results support that cell viability is not significantly different from the control set after 1 and 2h of incubation with both zinc(II) complexes.

  12. Microarray analysis and draft genomes of two Escherichia coli 0157:H7 lineage II cattle isolates FRIK966 and FRIK2000 investigating lack of Shiga toxin expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The existence of two separate lineages of Escherichia coli O157:H7 has previously been reported, and research indicates that lineage I might be more pathogenic towards human hosts than lineage II. We have previously shown that lineage I expresses higher levels of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2). To evaluate w...

  13. Investigation of thiourea activated polyglutaraldehyde with bound Ag(I) or Pt(II) as an alternative to avidin for immobilizing biotin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Miles, D R; Knotts, J W; García, A A

    1995-01-01

    Pre-polymerized glutaraldehyde covalently linked to thiourea has been synthesized as a soluble polymer for immobilizing Ag(I) and Pt(II) and it has also been used for activating a polyacrylamide gel filtration media. The modified gel filtration media (Bio-Gel P-200) has a high capacity for Ag(I) (20 mumol/ml) and Pt(II) (8 mumol/ml) and has been shown to be stable and useful even in the presence of relatively high chloride (up to 1 M NaCl) and phosphate concentrations (0.25 M). The soluble polymer can have a Ag(I) capacity of between 2-11 mmol/g. Bio-Gel P-200 modified using glutaraldehyde/thiourea and in the Ag(I) and Pt(II) form selectively binds biotinylated BSA (b-BSA) over BSA. Using the Ag(I) form of the gel at pH 4.8 (0.05 M phosphate) only b-BSA binds and 30% can be eluted using 0.15 M NaCl, while no BSA binds to the column under these conditions. For the Pt(II) form of Bio-Gel P-200 at pH 4.8, none of the applied BSA binds to the modified resin while 40% of b-BSA does bind.

  14. Oxygen Radical Scavenger Activity, EPR, NMR, Molecular Mechanics and Extended-Hückel Molecular Orbital Investigation of the Bis(Piroxicam)Copper(II) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Pogni, Rebecca; Basosi, Riccardo; Donati, Alessandro; Rossi, Claudio; Sabadini, Luciano; Rollo, Libertario; Lorenzini, Sauro; Gelli, Renata; Marcolongo, Roberto

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen radical scavenger activity (ORSA) of [CuII(Pir)2] (HPir = Piroxicam = 4-hydroxy -2- methyl -N-2- pyridyl -2H- 1,2-benzothiazine -3- carboxamide 1,1-dioxide) was determined by chemiluminescence of samples obtained by mixing human neutrophils (from healthy subjects) and [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] (DMF = N,N -dimethylformammide) in DMSO/GLY/PBS (2:1:2, v/v) solution (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide, GLY = 1,2,3-propantriol, PBS = Dulbecco’s buffer salt solution). The ratio of the residual radicals, for the HPir (1.02·10−4M) and [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] (1.08·10−5M)/HPir (8.01·10−−5M) systems was higher than 12 (not stimulated) [excess of piroxicam was added (Cu/Pir molar ratio ≈1:10) in order to have most of the metal complexed as bischelate]. In contrast, the ratio of residual radicals for the CuCl2 (1.00·10−5M) and [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] (1.08·10−5M)/Hpir (8.01·10−5M)system was 5. The [CuII(Pir)2] compound is therefore a stronger radical scavenger than either HPir or CuCl2. A molecular mechanics (MM) analysis of the gas phase structures of neutral HPir, its zwitterionic (HPir+-) and anionic (Pir-) forms, and some CuII-piroxicam complexes based on X-ray structures allowed calculation of force constants. The most stable structure for HPir has a ZZZ conformation similar to that found in the CuII (and CdII complexes) in the solid state as well as in the gas phase. The structure is stabilized by a strong H bond which involves the N(amide)-H and O(enolic) groups. The MM simulation for the [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] complex showed that two high repulsive intramolecular contacts exist between a pyridyl hydrogen atom of one Pir- molecule with the O donor of the other ligand. These interactions activate a transition toward a pseudo-tetrahedral geometry, in the case the apical ligands are removed. On refluxing a suspension of [CuII(Pir)2(DMF)2] in acetone a brown microcystalline solid with the Cu(Pir)2·0.5DMF stoichiometry was in fact prepared. 13C spin-lattice relaxation

  15. Frequency Drift Rate Investigation of Solar Radio Burst Type II Due to Coronal Mass Ejections Occurrence on 4th November 2015 Captured by CALLISTO at Sumedang-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batubara, M.; Manik, T.; Suryana, R.; Lathif, M.; Sitompul, P.; Zamzam, M.; Mumtahana, F.

    2017-03-01

    The formations type of solar radio bursts can be known base on the frequency range that is detected. The CALLISTO system works with a wide band of the frequency making it possible to detect several types of solar burst. Indonesia exactly at Sumedang, CALLISTO system detected the formation of solar radio bursts forms of type II for the first time on 5 November 2014. On the other side, CALLISTO spectrometer detects and traces the phenomenon of CME (Coronal Mass Ejections) which causes the solar radio burst type II occurrence. In this paper will be calculated frequency drift rate during the occurrence of solar radio bursts of type II phenomenon on 4th November 2015 at 03:30 UT. The results of these calculations will be discussed as a related study of drift rate during the phenomenon of burst type II radio bursts associated with CME. The obtained drift rate during the solar radio bursts events above 2.8 MHz / s with low drift rate so that the speed of the CME that occurred only about 790 km / s as shown from LASCO.

  16. Rearrangement of the antiferromagnetic ordering at high magnetic fields in SmFeAsO and SmFeAsO0.9F0.1 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyeneth, S.; Moll, P. J. W.; Puzniak, R.; Ninios, K.; Balakirev, F. F.; McDonald, R. D.; Chan, H. B.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Keller, H.; Batlogg, B.; Balicas, L.

    2011-04-01

    The low-temperature antiferromagnetic state of the Sm ions in both nonsuperconducting SmFeAsO and superconducting SmFeAsO0.9F0.1 single crystals was studied by magnetic torque, magnetization, and magnetoresistance measurements in magnetic fields up to 60 T and temperatures down to 0.6 K. We uncover in both compounds a distinct rearrangement of the antiferromagnetically ordered Sm moments near 35-40 T. This is seen in both static and pulsed magnetic fields as a sharp change in the sign of the magnetic torque, which is sensitive to the magnetic anisotropy and hence to the magnetic moment in the ab plane, (i.e., the FeAs layers), and as a jump in the magnetization for magnetic fields perpendicular to the conducting planes. This rearrangement of magnetic ordering in 35-40 T is essentially temperature independent and points toward a canted or a partially polarized magnetic state in high magnetic fields. However, the observed value for the saturation moment above this rearrangement, suggests that the complete suppression of the antiferromagnetism related to the Sm-moments would require fields in excess of 60 T. Such a large field value is particularly remarkable when compared to the relatively small Néel temperature TN≃5 K, suggesting very anisotropic magnetic exchange couplings. At the transition, magnetoresistivity measurements show a crossover from positive to negative field dependence, indicating that the charge carriers in the FeAs planes are sensitive to the magnetic configuration of the rare-earth elements. This points towards a finite magnetic/electronic coupling between the SmO and the FeAs layers which are likely to mediate the exchange interactions leading to the long-range antiferromagnetic order of the Sm ions.

  17. Filtering reaction dynamics using nearside-farside theory and local angular momentum theory: application to the angular scattering of the H + D2(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0) --> HD(v(f) = 3, j(f) = 0) + D reaction in the energy and time domains.

    PubMed

    Monks, P D D; Connor, J N L; Bouakline, F

    2009-04-23

    We investigate methods for filtering reaction mechanisms in the angular scattering of the state-to-state reaction, H + D(2)(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0, m(i) = 0) --> HD(v(f) = 3, j(f) = 0, m(f) = 0) + D, where v(i), j(i), and m(i) and v(f), j(f), and m(f) are initial and final vibrational, rotational, and helicity quantum numbers, respectively. The input to our filtrations is a new set of accurate quantum scattering matrix elements for total energies in the range 1.52-2.50 eV (in steps of 0.01 eV) and for total angular momentum quantum numbers in the range, 0-40, in steps of unity. We filter reaction mechanisms in both the energy domain and the time domain. The time-domain calculations employ the plane wave packet formulation of time-dependent scattering. The theoretical tools used are nearside-farside (NF) analysis of partial wave series for scattering amplitudes, together with NF local angular momentum (LAM) theory. An energy-domain LAM analysis reveals the existence of an important dynamical feature in the N scattering, a "trench" which bisects the (energy, angle) plane. We use the location of this trench to approximately filter two reaction mechanisms. Transformation to the time domain demonstrates that the two reaction mechanisms correspond to direct and delayed (by about 25 fs) scattering. Further analysis, including filtration in the time domain, shows that the pronounced LAM trench arises from the interference of the energy-domain analogues of the time-direct and time-delayed scattering. Our theory and results provide the first successful demonstration of reaction mechanism filtering carried out directly in the (energy, angle) domain. The calculations and results in this paper extend and complement earlier research reported by Monks, Connor, and Althorpe (Monks, P. D. D.; Connor, J. N. L.; Althorpe, S. C. J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 741; J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, 10302).

  18. A Phase II, Randomized Study on an Investigational DTPw-HBV/Hib-MenAC Conjugate Vaccine Administered to Infants in Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Abraham; Forgor, Abudulai Adams; Chandramohan, Daniel; Reed, Zarifah; Binka, Fred; Bevilacqua, Cornelia; Boutriau, Dominique; Greenwood, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Background Combining meningococcal vaccination with routine immunization in infancy may reduce the burden of meningococcal meningitis, especially in the meningitis belt of Africa. We have evaluated the immunogenicity, persistence of immune response, immune memory and safety of an investigational DTPw-HBV/Hib-MenAC conjugate vaccine given to infants in Northern Ghana. Methods and Findings In this phase II, double blind, randomized, controlled study, 280 infants were primed with DTPw-HBV/Hib-MenAC or DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age. At 12 months of age, children in each group received a challenge dose of serogroup A+C polysaccharides. Antibody responses were assessed pre, and one month-post dose 3 of the priming schedule and pre and 1 month after administration of the challenge dose. One month post-dose 3, 87.8% and 88.2% of subjects in the study group had bactericidal meningococcal serogroup A (SBA-MenA) and meningococcal serogroup C (SBA-MenC) antibody titres ≥1∶8 respectively. Seroprotection/seropositivity rates to the 5 antigens administered in the routine EPI schedule were non-inferior in children in the study group compared to those in the control group. The percentages of subjects in the study group with persisting SBA-MenA titres ≥ 1∶8 or SBA-MenC titres ≥1∶8 at the age of 12 months prior to challenge were significantly higher than in control group (47.7% vs 25.7% and 56.4% vs 5.1% respectively). The administration of 10 μg of serogroup A polysaccharide increased the SBA-MenA GMT by 14.0-fold in the DTPW-HBV/HibMenAC-group compared to a 3.8 fold increase in the control-group. Corresponding fold-increases in SBA-MenC titres following challenge with 10 μg of group C polysaccharide were 18.8 and 1.9 respectively. Reactogenicity following primary vaccination or the administration of the challenge dose was similar in both groups, except for swelling (Grade 3) after primary vaccination which was more frequent in children in the

  19. The multiple conformational charge states of zinc(II) coordination by 2His-2Cys oligopeptide investigated by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, density functional theory and theoretical collision cross sections.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, Stephanie M; Deeconda, Manogna; Cumpian, Kayleah L; Ortiz, Rafael; Chinthala, Swetha; Angel, Laurence A

    2016-12-01

    Whether traveling wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), B3LYP/LanL2DZ density functional theory, and ion size scaled Lennard-Jones (LJ) collision cross sections (CCS) from the B3LYP optimized structures could be used to determine the type of Zn(II) coordination by the oligopeptide acetyl-His1 -Cys2 -Gly3 -Pro4 -Tyr5 -His6 -Cys7 (amb5 ) was investigated. The IM-MS analyses of a pH titration of molar equivalents of Zn(II):amb5 showed that both negatively and positively charged complexes formed and coordination of Zn(II) increased as the His and Cys deprotonated near their pKa values. The B3LYP method was used to generate a series of alternative coordination structures to compare with the experimental results. The method predicted that the single negatively charged complex coordinated Zn(II) in a distorted tetrahedral geometry via the 2His-2Cys substituent groups, whereas, the double negatively charged and positively charged complexes coordinated Zn(II) via His, carbonyl oxygens and the C-terminus. The CCS of the B3LYP complexes were calculated using the LJ method and compared with those measured by IM-MS for the various charge state complexes. The LJ method provided CCS that agreed with five of the alternative distorted tetrahedral and trigonal bipyramidal coordinations for the doubly charged complexes, but provided CCS that were 15 to 31 Å(2) larger than those measured by IM-MS for the singly charged complexes. Collision-induced dissociation of the Zn(II) complexes and a further pH titration study of amb5B , which included amidation of the C-terminus, suggested that the 2His-2Cys coordination was more significant than coordinations that included the C-terminus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Chelation behavior of various flavonols and transfer of flavonol-chelated zinc(II) to alanylaspartic dipeptide: A PCM/DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasarawan, Nuttawisit; Thipyapong, Khajadpai; Ruangpornvisuti, Vithaya

    2016-03-01

    Alanylaspartic dipeptide (AlaAsp) and zinc(II)-flavonol complex could represent a metal-binding site in proteins and a metal-ion releasing agent, respectively. Chelation of zinc(II) by either AlaAsp or flavonol ligands in aqueous solution has been examined using DFT methods with polarizable continuum model (PCM/DFT). Coordination geometry, complexation stoichiometry, coordination bond strength, preferable metal-binding site on ligands and effect of water coordination on the stability of complexes have been addressed. In several cases, the long-range corrected density functional CAM-B3LYP allows the most accurate prediction of both structural and spectroscopic data. The preferential transfer of flavonol-chelated zinc(II) to AlaAsp under solvation is attainable through the ligand-exchange reaction. The energy barrier of such reaction is significantly dependent on the degree of hydrogen bonding within the transition state. In summary, either hydroxylation or methoxylation at particular positions on the 3-hydroxyflavone backbone significantly affects the reactivity of flavonol chelates in the metal-ion transfer.

  1. Photobilirubin II.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, R; Buckley, D G; Hamzetash, D; Hawkes, G E; Ioannou, S; Stoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    An improved preparation of photobilirubin II in ammoniacal methanol is described. Evidence is presented which distinguishes between the two structures proposed earlier for photobilirubin II in favour of the cycloheptadienyl structure. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement measurements with bilirubin IX alpha and photobilirubin II in dimethyl sulphoxide are complicated by the occurrence of negative and zero effects. The partition coefficient of photobilirubin II between chloroform and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) is 0.67. PMID:6743241

  2. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH4)2S2O8 for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Ye, Gang; Chen, Jing; Lv, Dachao; Wang, Jianchen

    2015-12-01

    Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH4)2S2O8 as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in Csbnd O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  3. Effect of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) on Pb(II) biosorption by algae Gelidium-derived materials.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Vítor J P; Botelho, Cidália M S; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-06-15

    Biosorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II) from binary metal solutions onto the algae Gelidium sesquipedale, an algal industrial waste and a waste-based composite material was investigated at pH 5.3, in a batch system. Binary Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) solutions have been tested. For the same equilibrium concentrations of both metal ions (1 mmol l(-1)), approximately 66, 85 and 86% of the total uptake capacity of the biosorbents is taken by lead ions in the systems Pb(II)/Cu(II), Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II), respectively. Two-metal results were fitted to a discrete and a continuous model, showing the inhibition of the primary metal biosorption by the co-cation. The model parameters suggest that Cd(II) and Zn(II) have the same decreasing effect on the Pb(II) uptake capacity. The uptake of Pb(II) was highly sensitive to the presence of Cu(II). From the discrete model it was possible to obtain the Langmuir affinity constant for Pb(II) biosorption. The presence of the co-cations decreases the apparent affinity of Pb(II). The experimental results were successfully fitted by the continuous model, at different pH values, for each biosorbent. The following sequence for the equilibrium affinity constants was found: Pb>Cu>Cd approximately Zn.

  4. Fundamentals of coal depolymerization: investigation of free radicals in coal depolymerization under SRC-II preheater/reactor conditions. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Petrakis, L; Grandy, D W

    1980-09-01

    The overall objective of the project is to study the fundamentals of coal depolymerization under direct liquefaction preheater/reactor conditions. A uniquely designed and fabricated high pressure/high temperature Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) apparatus is used to monitor the formation and behavior of free radicals, which are generally assumed to be the key factor in coal liquefaction. The main conclusions that have been reached are as follows: the methodology indeed allows the observation of the free radical formation and behavior at conditions relating to direct liquefaction preheater/reactor conditions. Measurements can be made continually three minutes after the heating of the coal slurry is started. Temperatures up to 500/sup 0/C and pressures up to 1800 psi are accessible; the observed changes in the concentration of free radicals due to variations of process variables are a real effect. Concentrations can be determined to +- 40%, but process variable manipulation has produced a 12-fold increase; temperature is the single most significant process variable that affects free radical formation; the next most significant effect is due to the combination of solvent and residence time. Some considerable different chemistry takes place especially in the first half-hour of the reaction when the SRC-II distillate is used as the solvent; this effect is particularly pronounced at 460/sup 0/C; and the conversions obtained in the in situ ESR experiments using SRC-II heavy distillate as the solvent are comparable to the shaken autoclave conversion.

  5. The clinical investigation of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) schrad fruit in treatment of Type II diabetic patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Huseini, H Fallah; Darvishzadeh, F; Heshmat, R; Jafariazar, Z; Raza, Mohsin; Larijani, B

    2009-08-01

    Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad fruit is an herbal medicine used by traditional herbalists for the treatment of diabetes in Iran. To determine its efficacy and toxicity, a 2 month clinical trial was conducted in 50 type II diabetic patients. Two groups of 25 each under standard antidiabetic therapy, received 100 mg C. colocynthis fruit capsules or placebos three times a day, respectively. The patients were visited monthly and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglyceride, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine levels were determined at the beginning and after 2 months. The results showed a significant decrease in HbA1c and fasting blood glucose levels in C. colocynthis treated patients. Other serological parameters levels in both the groups did not change significantly. No notable gastrointestinal side effect was observed in either group. In conclusion, C. colocynthis fruit treatment had a beneficial effect on improving the glycemic profile without severe adverse effects in type II diabetic patients. Further clinical studies are recommended to evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of C. colocynthis in diabetic patients.

  6. Synthesis, spectral investigation and catalytic aspects of entrapped VO(IV) and Cu(II) complexes into the supercages of zeolite-Y

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Chetan K.; Gade, Bhagyashree G.; Chudasama, Jiten A.; Parmar, Digvijay K.; Nakum, Haresh D.; Patel, Arun L.

    2015-04-01

    VO(IV) and Cu(II) complexes with Schiff base ligand derived from 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-formyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (PMFP) and 2-amino phenol have been synthesized as their neat and entrapped complexes into the supercages of zeolite-Y. The compounds were characterized by chemical analysis (ICP-OES and elemental), electronic and/or UV reflectance spectra, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction patterns, SEMs, BET and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. All the prepared catalysts were tested on the liquid phase limonene oxidation reaction, using 30% H2O2 as an oxidant. Limonene glycol, carveol, carvone and limonene 1,2-epoxide were the main products obtained. It was observed that zeolite-Y entrapped complexes exhibited higher catalytic activity than neat complexes. The catalysts undergo no metal leaching and can be easily recovered and reused. The use of inexpensive catalyst and oxidant are significant practical advantages of this environmentally friendly process.

  7. The investigation of the solvent effect on coordination of nicotinato ligand with cobalt(II) complex containing tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, Koray; Karakaş, Duran

    2014-11-01

    The electronic structure of [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion are optimized by using density functional theory (DFT) method with mix basis set. Where (ntb) represents tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine ligand and (nic) is the anion of nicotinic acids. Six different fields, vacuum, chloroform, butanonitrile, methanol, water and formamide solvents are used in these calculations. The calculated structural parameters indicate that (nic) ligand coordinates to cobalt(II) containing (ntb) ligand with one oxygen atom in butanonitrile, methanol, water and formamide solvents but coordinates with two oxygen atoms in vacuum. These results are supported with IR, UV and 1H NMR spectra. According to the calculated results, the geometry of [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion is distorted octahedral in vacuum while the geometry is distorted square pyramidal in the all other solvents. Distorted octahedral [Co(ntb)(nic)]+ complex ion have not been synthesized as experimentally and it is predicted with computational chemistry methods.

  8. A few molecules of zeaxanthin per reaction centre of photosystem II permit effective thermal dissipation of light energy in photosystem II of a poikilohydric moss.

    PubMed

    Bukhov, N G; Kopecky, J; Pfündel, E E; Klughammer, C; Heber, U

    2001-04-01

    The relationship between thermal dissipation of light energy (as indicated by the quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence), zeaxanthin availability and protonation reactions was investigated in the moss Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus (Hedw.) Warnst. In the absence of zeaxanthin and actinic illumination, acidification by 20% CO2 in air was incapable of quenching basal, so-called F0 fluorescence either in the moss or in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves. However, 1-s light pulses given either every 40, 60 or 200 s increased thermal dissipation as indicated by F0 and Fm quenching in the presence of 20% CO2 in air in the moss, but not in spinach while reaction centres of photosystem II (PSII) were photochemically open. In the moss, a few short light pulses, which were separated by prolonged dark times, were sufficient to raise zeaxanthin levels in the presence of 20% CO2 in air. Simultaneously, quantum efficiency of charge separation in PSII was decreased. Increasing the CO2 concentration beyond 20% further decreased quantum efficiency even in the absence of short light pulses. Under conditions optimal for fluorescence quenching, one molecule of zeaxanthin per reaction centre of PSII was sufficient to decrease quantum efficiency of charge separation in PSII by 50%. Thus, in combination with a protonation reaction, one molecule of zeaxanthin was as efficient at capturing excitation energy as a photochemically open reaction centre. The data are discussed in relation to the interaction between zeaxanthin and thylakoid protonation, which enables effective thermal dissipation of light energy in the antennae of PSII in the moss but not in higher plants when actinic illumination is absent.

  9. Some Investigations of the General Instability of Stiffened Metal Cylinders II : Preliminary Tests of Wire-braced Specimens and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    This is the second of a series of reports covering an investigation of the general instability problem by the California Institute of Technology. The first five reports of this series cover investigations of the general instability problem under the loading conditions of pure bending and were prepared under the sponsorship of the Civil Aeronautics Administration. The succeeding reports of this series cover the work done on other loading conditions under the sponsorship of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  10. Investigation of the Effect of Some Optically Active Imine Compounds on the Enzyme Activities of hCA-I and hCA-II under In Vitro Conditions: An Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Tektas, Osman; Akkemik, Ebru; Baykara, Haci

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitors of carbonic anhydrase (hCA; EC 4.2.1.1) are used as medicines for many diseases. Therefore, they are very important. In this study, a known series of Schiff bases were synthesized and their effects on the activities of hCA-I and hCA-II, which are cytosolic isoenzymes of carbonic anhydrase, were investigated under in vitro conditions. The synthesized compounds (H1, H2, H3, and H4) were found to cause inhibition on enzyme activities of hCA-1 and hCA-II. IC50 values of H1, H2, H3, and H4 compounds were 140, 88, 201, and 271 μM for hCA-I enzyme activity and 134, 251, 79, and 604 μM for hCA-II enzyme activity, respectively. The synthesized Schiff bases were characterized by several methods, including (1) H NMR, FT-IR, elemental analysis, and polarimetric measurements. Correlation coefficient square values (R(2) ) of comparison of the theoretical and experimental (1) H NMR shifts for H1, H2, H3, and H4 compounds were found as 0.9781, 0.9814, 0.9758, and 0.8635, respectively.

  11. Assessment of photosystem II thermoluminescence as a tool to investigate the effects of dehydration and rehydration on the cyclic/chlororespiratory electron pathways in wheat and barley leaves.

    PubMed

    Bürling, Kathrin; Ducruet, Jean-Marc; Cornic, Gabriel; Hunsche, Mauricio; Cerovic, Zoran G

    2014-06-01

    Thermoluminescence emission from wheat leaves was recorded under various controlled drought stress conditions: (i) fast dehydration (few hours) of excised leaves in the dark (ii) slow dehydration (several days) obtained by withholding watering of plants under a day/night cycle (iii) overnight rehydration of the slowly dehydrated plants at a stage of severe dessication. In fast dehydrated leaves, the AG band intensity was unchanged but its position was shifted to lower temperatures, indicating an activation of cyclic and chlororespiratory pathways in darkness, without any increase of their overall electron transfer capacity. By contrast, after a slow dehydration the AG intensity was strongly increased whereas its position was almost unchanged, indicating respectively that the capacity of cyclic pathways was enhanced but that they remained inactivated in darkness. Under more severe dehydration, the AG band almost disappeared. Rewatering caused its rapid bounce significantly above the control level. No significant differences in AG emission could be found between the two drought-sensitive and drought-tolerant wheat cultivars. The afterglow thermoluminescence emission in leaves provides an additional tool to follow the increased capacity and activation of cyclic electron flow around PSI in leaves during mild, severe dehydration and after rehydration.

  12. High-resolution mass spectrometric investigation of the phase I and II metabolites of finasteride in pig plasma, urine and bile.

    PubMed

    Lundahl, Anna; Tevell Åberg, Annica; Bondesson, Ulf; Lennernäs, Hans; Hedeland, Mikael

    2014-06-01

    1. The metabolite profile of the 5α-reductase type II inhibitor finasteride has been studied in pig plasma, urine and bile using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The porcine biotransformation products were compared to those formed by human liver microsomes and to literature data of recently identified human in vivo metabolites. The objective of this study was to gain further evidence for the validity of using pigs for advanced, invasive drug-drug interaction studies that are not possible to perform in humans. 2. The use of high-resolution mass spectrometry with accurate mass measurements enabled identification of the metabolites by calculation of their elemental compositions as well as their fragmentation patterns. 3. There was an excellent match between the porcine and human metabolic profiles, corroborating the pig as a model of human drug metabolism. The glucuronides of the two recently described human hydroxylated metabolites MX and MY and the carboxylated metabolite M3 were identified as the major biotransformation products of finasteride in pig urine and bile. 4. Furthermore, the CYP enzymes involved in the formation of the hydroxylated metabolites were characterized. Human recombinant CYP3A4 could produce the two major hydroxylated metabolites MX and MY, whereas human recombinant CYP2D6 formed MY only.

  13. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes.

  14. Individual Differences and Learner Control II: Investigation of Control Over Pictorial Mediators in Computer-Assisted Instruction. AFHRL-TR-74-30. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Wilson A.; And Others

    The reported research was designed to investigate the impact of learner control on performance and anxiety in a computer assisted instruction task. This, the third phase of a project, substituted pictorial mediators for mnemonic devices as the facilitating variable in an instruction program on edible plants. Four experimental groups were formed…

  15. A Randomized Phase II Trial Investigating the Effect of Platelet Function Inhibition on Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roop, Ryan P.; Naughton, Michael J.; Van Poznak, Catherine; Schneider, Jochen G.; Lammers, Philip E.; Pluard, Timothy J.; Johnson, Farley; Eby, Charles S.; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blockade of platelet activation and aggregation can inhibit metastasis in preclinical models and is associated with cancer prevention. To test whether disruption of platelet function with clopidogrel and aspirin would decrease the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in patients with metastatic breast cancer, a randomized phase II study was performed. Methods Patients with metastatic breast cancer who were not currently receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy were eligible. Patients were randomized to receive either clopidogrel and aspirin or to a control group receiving no treatment. Phlebotomy was performed at baseline, at 2 and 4 weeks, and monthly thereafter to obtain specimens to assess CTC, platelet aggregation, and thrombin activity. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with detectable CTCs at 1 month. Results Forty-eight patients were enrolled and 42 were evaluable at 1 month. Baseline CTC numbers were ≥ 5 in 13% and ≥ 1 in 65% of patients. Despite adequate platelet function inhibition in the treatment group, the proportion of patients with detectable CTCs was similar between the clopidogrel/aspirin and control groups at baseline (P = .21) and 4 weeks (P = .75), showing no treatment effect. Measured endogenous thrombin potential did not correlate with CTC number. No bleeding-related serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred. Conclusion The baseline CTC numbers were lower than expected, decreasing the ability to detect an impact of platelet inhibition on CTCs. Clopidogrel and aspirin were well tolerated. Future studies evaluating the potential therapeutic role of antiplatelet therapy in breast cancer remain of interest, and they may be informed by these results. PMID:24267729

  16. Use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to compare antihypertensive efficacy and safety of two angiotensin II receptor antagonists, losartan and valsartan. Losartan Trial Investigators.

    PubMed

    Monterroso, V H; Rodriguez Chavez, V; Carbajal, E T; Vogel, D R; Aroca Martinez, G J; Garcia, L H; Cuevas, J H; Lara Teran, J; Hitzenberger, G; Leao Neves, P; Middlemost, S J; Dumortier, T; Bunt, A M; Smith, R D

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of losartan and valsartan were evaluated in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Blood pressure responses to once-daily treatment with either losartan 50 mg (n = 93) or valsartan 80 mg (n = 94) for 6 weeks were assessed through measurements taken in the clinic and by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Both drugs significantly reduced clinic sitting systolic (SiSBP) and diastolic blood pressure (SiDBP) at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Maximum reductions from baseline in SiSBP and SiDBP on 24-hour ABPM were also significant with the two treatments. The reduction in blood pressure was more consistent across patients in the losartan group, as indicated by a numerically smaller variability in change from baseline on all ABPM measures, which achieved significance at peak (P = .017) and during the day (P = .002). In addition, the numerically larger smoothness index with losartan suggested a more homogeneous antihypertensive effect throughout the 24-hour dosing interval. The antihypertensive response rate was 54% with losartan and 46% with valsartan. Three days after discontinuation of therapy, SiDBP remained below baseline in 73% of losartan and 63% of valsartan patients. Both agents were generally well tolerated. Losartan, but not valsartan, significantly decreased serum uric acid an average 0.4 mg/dL at week 6. In conclusion, once-daily losartan 50 mg and valsartan 80 mg had similar antihypertensive effects in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Losartan produced a more consistent blood pressure-lowering response and significantly lowered uric acid, suggesting potentially meaningful differences between these two A II receptor antagonists.

  17. Effect of substitution and planarity of the ligand on DNA/BSA interaction, free radical scavenging and cytotoxicity of diamagnetic Ni(II) complexes: a systematic investigation.

    PubMed

    Sathyadevi, Palanisamy; Krishnamoorthy, Paramasivam; Butorac, Rachel R; Cowley, Alan H; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Dharmaraj, Nallasamy

    2011-10-14

    Four new bivalent nickel hydrazone complexes have been synthesised from the reactions of [NiCl(2)(PPh(3))(2)] with H(2)L {L = dianion of the hydrazones derived from the condensation of salicylaldehyde or o-hydroxy acetophenone with p-toluic acid hydrazide (H(2)L(1)) (1), (H(2)L(2)) (2) and o-hydroxy acetophenone or o-hydroxy naphthaldehyde with benzhydrazide (H(2)L(3)) (3) and (H(2)L(4)) (4)} and formulated as [Ni(L(1))(PPh(3))] (5), [Ni(L(2))(PPh(3))] (6), [Ni(L(3))(PPh(3))] (7) and [Ni(L(4))(PPh(3))] (8). Structural characterization of complexes 5-8 were accomplished by using various physico-chemical techniques. In order to study the influence of substitution in the ligand and its planarity on the biological activity of complexes 5-8 containing them, suitable hydrazone ligands 1-4 have been selected in this study. Single crystal diffraction data of complexes 5, 7 and 8 proved the geometry of the complexes to be distorted square planar with a 1 : 1 ratio between the metal ion and the coordinated hydrazones. To provide more insight on the mode of action of complexes 5-8 under biological conditions, additional experiments involving their interaction with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were monitored by UV-visible and fluorescence titrations respectively. Further, the ligands 1-4 and corresponding nickel(ii) chelates 5-8 have been tested for their scavenging effect towards OH and O(2)(-) radicals. The effect of complexes 5-8 to arrest the growth of HeLa and Hep-2 tumour cell lines has been studied along with the cell viability against the non-cancerous NIH 3T3 cells under in vitro conditions.

  18. Investigating the early stages of photosystem II assembly in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: isolation of CP47 and CP43 complexes.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Marko; Romero, Elisabet; Reisinger, Veronika; Yu, Jianfeng; Komenda, Josef; Eichacker, Lutz A; Dekker, Jan P; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-04-29

    Biochemical characterization of intermediates involved in the assembly of the oxygen-evolving Photosystem II (PSII) complex is hampered by their low abundance in the membrane. Using the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we describe here the isolation of the CP47 and CP43 subunits, which, during biogenesis, attach to a reaction center assembly complex containing D1, D2, and cytochrome b(559), with CP47 binding first. Our experimental approach involved a combination of His tagging, the use of a D1 deletion mutant that blocks PSII assembly at an early stage, and, in the case of CP47, the additional inactivation of the FtsH2 protease involved in degrading unassembled PSII proteins. Absorption spectroscopy and pigment analyses revealed that both CP47-His and CP43-His bind chlorophyll a and β-carotene. A comparison of the low temperature absorption and fluorescence spectra in the Q(Y) region for CP47-His and CP43-His with those for CP47 and CP43 isolated by fragmentation of spinach PSII core complexes confirmed that the spectroscopic properties are similar but not identical. The measured fluorescence quantum yield was generally lower for the proteins isolated from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and a 1-3-nm blue shift and a 2-nm red shift of the 77 K emission maximum could be observed for CP47-His and CP43-His, respectively. Immunoblotting and mass spectrometry revealed the co-purification of PsbH, PsbL, and PsbT with CP47-His and of PsbK and Psb30/Ycf12 with CP43-His. Overall, our data support the view that CP47 and CP43 form preassembled pigment-protein complexes in vivo before their incorporation into the PSII complex.

  19. A computational mechanistic investigation of hydrogen production in water using the [Rh(III)(dmbpy)2Cl2](+)/[Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+)/ascorbic acid photocatalytic system.

    PubMed

    Kayanuma, Megumi; Stoll, Thibaut; Daniel, Chantal; Odobel, Fabrice; Fortage, Jérôme; Deronzier, Alain; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle

    2015-04-28

    We recently reported an efficient molecular homogeneous photocatalytic system for hydrogen (H2) production in water combining [Rh(III)(dmbpy)2Cl2](+) (dmbpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) as a H2 evolving catalyst, [Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and ascorbic acid as a sacrificial electron donor (Chem. - Eur. J., 2013, 19, 781). Herein, the possible rhodium intermediates and mechanistic pathways for H2 production with this system were investigated at DFT/B3LYP level of theory and the most probable reaction pathways were proposed. The calculations confirmed that the initial step of the mechanism is a reductive quenching of the excited state of the Ru photosensitizer by ascorbate, affording the reduced [Ru(II)(bpy)2(bpy˙(-))](+) form, which is capable, in turn, of reducing the Rh(III) catalyst to the distorted square planar [Rh(I)(dmbpy)2](+) species. This two-electron reduction by [Ru(II)(bpy)2(bpy˙(-))](+) is sequential and occurs according to an ECEC mechanism which involves the release of one chloride after each one-electron reduction step of the Rh catalyst. The mechanism of disproportionation of the intermediate Rh(II) species, much less thermodynamically favoured, cannot be barely ruled out since it could also be favoured from a kinetic point of view. The Rh(I) catalyst reacts with H3O(+) to generate the hexa-coordinated hydride [Rh(III)(H)(dmbpy)2(X)](n+) (X = Cl(-) or H2O), as the key intermediate for H2 release. The DFT study also revealed that the real source of protons for the hydride formation as well as the subsequent step of H2 evolution is H3O(+) rather than ascorbic acid, even if the latter does govern the pH of the aqueous solution. Besides, the calculations have shown that H2 is preferentially released through an heterolytic mechanism by reaction of the Rh(III)(H) hydride and H3O(+); the homolytic pathway, involving the reaction of two Rh(III)(H) hydrides, being clearly less favoured. In parallel to this

  20. Mode of death and hospitalization from the Second Follow-up Serial Infusions of Nesiritide (FUSION II) trial and comparison of clinical events committee adjudicated versus investigator reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Christopher M; Fiuzat, Mona; Lindenfeld, Joann; Miller, Alan; Lombardi, Carlo; Carson, Peter; Shaw, Linda K; Wang, Li-Joy; Connolly, Patricia; Mills, Roger; Yancy, Clyde; Mahaffey, Kenneth

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mode of death and hospitalizations in advanced heart failure (HF) patients with renal dysfunction and to examine the rate of concordance between events reported by the clinical events committee and site investigators (using case report forms) in the Second Follow-Up Serial Infusions of Nesiritide (FUSION II) trial. Little is known about the cause of death and hospitalization in patients with advanced HF. FUSION II was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating outpatient nesiritide infusions versus placebo, with 911 patients with advanced HF (New York Heart Association class III or IV) and renal dysfunction enrolled. There were 151 deaths and 1,041 hospitalizations at 24 weeks. The clinical events committee classified events as cardiac, renal, cardiorenal, other or noncardiovascular, or unknown. Kappa statistics and McNemar tests were used to assess agreement (overall and by individual modes of death and hospitalization indications). In conclusion, the most common cause of death or hospitalization was cardiac related, with 70% of deaths and 60% of hospitalizations due to cardiac causes. There was 74% agreement (26% disagreement) on cardiac cause of death (κ = 0.40, McNemar p = 0.001) and 75% agreement (25% disagreement) between the investigators and the clinical events committee on cardiac classification for hospitalization (κ = 0.49, McNemar p <0.0001).

  1. Altitude Test Chamber Investigation of Performance of a 28-inch Ram-jet Engine II : Effects of Gutter Width and Blocked Area on Operating Range and Combustion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shillito, T B; Jones, W L; Kahn, R W

    1950-01-01

    Altitude-test-chamber investigation of effects of flame-holder blocked area and gutter width on performance of 28-inch diameter ram jet at simulated flight Mach number of 2.0 for altitudes from 40,000 to 55,000 feet was conducted at NACA Lewis laboratory. Ten flame holders investigated covered gutter widths from 1.00 to 2.50 inches and blocked areas from 40.5 to 62.0 percent of combustion-chamber area. Gutter width did not appreciably affect combustion efficiency. Increase in blocked area from 40 to 62 percent resulted in 5- to 10-percent increase in combustion efficiency. Increasing gutter width resulted in improvement in fuel-air-ratio operating range.

  2. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  3. On the possible involvement of ascorbic acid and copper proteins in leukemia: II. Electron spin resonance (ESR) and atomic absorption investigations on erythrocyte ghosts and plasma.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, W; Greulich, W; Döll, G

    1979-11-01

    The effect of ascorbic acid on white ghosts of erythrocytes and plasma has been investigated by means of ESR spectroscopy. Since the spectra obtained are identical to the one obtained with leukemic blood it is concluded that the receptor for vitamin C has to be searched for in membrane and plasma as well. Determination of Cu and Fe by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed that both of the metals are also present in the membrane. In the case of copper, it must exist there as a protein which has not been identified yet. Oxidizing substances, such as KMnO4, reverse the effect produced by ascorbic acid.

  4. Cz-Silicon Produced from Solar-Grade and Recycled Materials. Part II: Investigating Performances of Solar Cell Produced from Solar-Grade Cz-Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Øvrelid, Eivind Johannes; Di Sabtino, Marisa; Juel, Mari; Tranell, Gabriella

    2015-03-01

    This paper is the second of two, investigating the properties of P-type Cz-silicon materials and solar cells produced with recycled silicon and Elkem Solar Silicon (ESS) materials. While the focus on the first work was on the bulk properties and grown defects of the material, the current study focuses on the solar cell performances. In the processing of the solar cells, the phosphorous diffusion process was optimized to improve the bulk properties and thus to maximize the final solar cell characteristics. Results from the characterization of material defects suggest that the performances of the experimental ingots are limited by the activated grown-in defects, which should be strictly controlled during crystal growth and solar cell processing. The solar cells produced from the investigated ingots showed efficiency values up to 18.5 pct and fill factor values up to 79 pct, comparable to conventional silicon produced from poly silicon. Solar cells produced from mixed recycled and ESS material exhibit a better performance than 100 pct recycled material. Boron and oxygen concentration levels and net doping level showed a concurrent effect on light-induced degradation (LID). Appropriate compensation was finally demonstrated to be an efficient way to improve solar cells efficiency of Cz-silicon produced from recycled silicon, even though higher dopant concentration incurred relatively faster LID.

  5. Inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere during the MaCWAVE winter campaign - Part II: Radar investigations and modelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, A.; Zülicke, Ch.; Hoffmann, P.; Peters, D.; Dalin, P.; Singer, W.

    2006-11-01

    We present an experimental and modelling study of a strong gravity wave event in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere near the Scandinavian mountain ridge. Continuous VHF radar measurements during the MaCWAVE rocket and ground-based measurement campaign were performed at the Norwegian Andoya Rocket Range (ARR) near Andenes (69.3° N, 16° E) in January 2003. Detailed gravity wave investigations based on PSU/NCAR Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model (MM5) data have been used for comparison with experimentally obtained results. The model data show the presence of a mountain wave and of an inertia gravity wave generated by a jet streak near the tropopause region. Temporal and spatial dependencies of jet induced inertia gravity waves with dominant observed periods of about 13 h and vertical wavelengths of ~4.5-5 km are investigated with wavelet transform applied on radar measurements and model data. The jet induced wave packet is observed to move upstream and downward in the upper troposphere. The model data agree with the experimentally obtained results fairly well. Possible reasons for the observed differences, e.g. in the time of maximum of the wave activity, are discussed. Finally, the vertical fluxes of horizontal momentum are estimated with different methods and provide similar amplitudes. We found indications that the derived positive vertical flux of the horizontal momentum corresponds to the obtained parameters of the jet-induced inertia gravity wave, but only at the periods and heights of the strongest wave activity.

  6. An Investigation of Adherence to Diagnostic Criteria, Revisited: Clinical Diagnosis of the DSM-IV/DSM-5 Section II Personality Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morey, Leslie C; Benson, Kathryn T

    2016-02-01

    In an initial investigation by Morey and Ochoa (1989), adherence to DSM-III personality disorder diagnostic criteria was examined as an agreement rate between clinician (global) diagnoses and diagnoses algorithmically generated from DSM-III criteria rules. Morey and Ochoa (1989) findings suggested significant clinician-criterion diagnostic incongruity, a result that cross-validated in a DSM-III-R replication performed by Blashfield and Herkov (1996). The current study examined such adherence, utilizing DSM-IV decision rules, in a national sample of 337 clinicians and their target patients. The results of the current study are largely consistent with the earlier findings, with clinician-criterion agreement rates comparable to those commonly reported for interdiagnostician reliability. Ramifications for the future of personality disorder diagnostic classification are discussed.

  7. Investigations of the effects of cosmic rays on Artemia cysts and tobacco seeds; results of Exobloc II experiment, flown aboard Biocosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Gaubin, Y; Delpoux, M; Pianezzi, B; Gasset, G; Heilmann, C; Planel, H

    1990-01-01

    Artemia (Brine shrimp) cysts and tobacco seeds, dormant biological material devoid of metabolic activity, were flown aboard the Soviet Biocosmos 1887 in order to investigate the effects of cosmic rays. Artemia cysts and tobacco seeds were used in bulk or in monolayers sandwiched with track detectors. Biological and physical units were located outside and inside the spacecraft. Stacks included lead shielding in order to expose the objects to different doses of radiation. Total dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent detectors. In spite of low levels of doses, the space flight resulted in a decrease in developmental capacity of Artemia cysts, and in a higher mutation rate in tobacco seeds. The more obvious responses occurred, in both cases, in biological objects exposed to the highest doses. These results are compared to those of previous space experiments.

  8. Investigation of the osteometry of the skull of the one-humped camels. Part II: sex dimorphism and geographical variations in adults.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, Ahmed; Olopade, James O; Kwari, Hyelduku D; Wiam, Ibrahim M

    2012-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in the skull of different species has been of importance in archaeological, forensic and anatomical studies; also, a variation in phenotypic and genetic traits across geographic space is a recurring phenomenon in biological species. This study investigated 10 adult camels from each of three geographical locations in northern Nigeria, for sex- and location-based variations in the skulls. In one location, male skulls had greater absolute osteometric values but there were no significance differences in relative proportions between sexes. Moreover, all index values (skull, cranial and facial) indicate no sexual dimorphism in all locations. There were some variations in the osteometry of the frontal region, and neurocranial volume between the locations. In addition it was observed that the skull index of Nigerian camels was similar to the Malha type documented in literature but wide variations exist in many other craniometric dimensions of the skull. This suggests a definite difference in phenotype and probable origin.

  9. Contraction behaviors of Vorticella sp. stalk investigated using high-speed video camera. II: Viscosity effect of several types of polymer additives.

    PubMed

    Kamiguri, Junko; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Hidema, Ruri; Yatabe, Zenji; Shoji, Masahiko; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Pansu, Robert Bernard; Ushiki, Hideharu

    2012-01-01

    The contraction process of living Vorticella sp. in polymer solutions with various viscosities has been investigated by image processing using a high-speed video camera. The viscosity of the external fluid ranges from 1 to 5mPa·s for different polymer additives such as hydroxypropyl cellulose, polyethylene oxide, and Ficoll. The temporal change in the contraction length of Vorticella sp. in various macromolecular solutions is fitted well by a stretched exponential function based on the nucleation and growth model. The maximum speed of the contractile process monotonically decreases with an increase in the external viscosity, in accordance with power law behavior. The index values approximate to 0.5 and this suggests that the viscous energy dissipated by the contraction of Vorticella sp. is constant in a macromolecular environment.

  10. Contraction behaviors of Vorticella sp. stalk investigated using high-speed video camera. II: Viscosity effect of several types of polymer additives

    PubMed Central

    Kamiguri, Junko; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Hidema, Ruri; Yatabe, Zenji; Shoji, Masahiko; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Pansu, Robert Bernard; Ushiki, Hideharu

    2012-01-01

    The contraction process of living Vorticella sp. in polymer solutions with various viscosities has been investigated by image processing using a high-speed video camera. The viscosity of the external fluid ranges from 1 to 5mPa·s for different polymer additives such as hydroxypropyl cellulose, polyethylene oxide, and Ficoll. The temporal change in the contraction length of Vorticella sp. in various macromolecular solutions is fitted well by a stretched exponential function based on the nucleation and growth model. The maximum speed of the contractile process monotonically decreases with an increase in the external viscosity, in accordance with power law behavior. The index values approximate to 0.5 and this suggests that the viscous energy dissipated by the contraction of Vorticella sp. is constant in a macromolecular environment. PMID:27857603

  11. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  12. Online immunoaffinity liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry determination of a type II collagen peptide biomarker in rat urine: Investigation of the impact of collision-induced dissociation fluctuation on peptide quantitation.

    PubMed

    Berna, Michael; Schmalz, Chris; Duffin, Kevin; Mitchell, Peter; Chambers, Mark; Ackermann, Brad

    2006-09-15

    Proteolytic fragments of type II collagen, a major component of joint tissue, have recently been identified as biomarkers for osteoarthritis, a progressive disease associated with cartilage degeneration. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) assay that utilizes online immunoaffinity chromatography and column switching was developed in our laboratory for the neoepitope of type II collagen (NET2C). During method development, peptide collision-induced dissociation (CID) was found to be a significant source of assay variation, which exceeded 10% CV, despite the fact that a stable-isotope-labeled (SIL) internal standard was used to minimize imprecision. This phenomenon was studied in detail using peptides and associated SIL internal standards of varying lengths and amino acid compositions. Variability in peptide CID necessitated the monitoring of multiple MS/MS transitions to obtain acceptable assay precision. The assay was subsequently validated to measure NET2C concentrations in rat urine over the range of 0.1 to 10 ng/mL. The interday accuracy and precision ranged from 3.9 to 13.1 (%CV) and 10.7 to 5.3 (%RE), respectively, across the range of validated concentrations. A specific application of the assay is presented in which the role of estrogen deficiency in the development and progression of osteoarthritis was investigated. In this study, the effect of estrogen on lowering NET2C concentrations in urine in ovariectomized rats was demonstrated.

  13. Temperature-dependent interactions and disorder in the spin-transition compound [Fe(II)(L)2][ClO4]2.C7H8 through structural, calorimetric, magnetic, photomagnetic, and diffuse reflectance investigations.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vibha; Mukherjee, Rabindranath; Linares, Jorge; Balde, Chérif; Desplanches, Cédric; Létard, Jean-François; Collet, Eric; Toupet, Loic; Castro, Miguel; Varret, François

    2008-09-01

    The title compound [Fe (II)(L) 2][ClO 4] 2.C 7H 8 (L = 2-[3-(2'-pyridyl)pyrazol-1-ylmethyl]pyridine) has been isolated while attempting to grow single crystals of the spin-transition (continuous-type) compound [Fe (II)(L) 2][ClO 4] 2, published earlier ( Dalton Trans. 2003, 3392-3397). Magnetic susceptibility measurements, as well as Mossbauer and calorimetric investigations on polycrystalline samples of [Fe(L) 2][ClO 4] 2.C 7H 8 revealed the occurrence of an abrupt HS ( (5) T 2) <--> LS ( (1) A 1) transition with steep and narrow (2 K) hysteresis at approximately 232 K. The photomagnetic properties exhibit features typical for a broad distribution of activation energies, with relaxation curves in the shape of stretched exponentials. We performed a crystal structure determination of the compound at 120, 240, and 270 K. A noteworthy temperature-dependent behavior of the structural parameters was observed, in terms of disorder of both the anions and solvent molecules, leading to a strong thermal dependence of the strength and dimensionality of the interaction network. Additional data were obtained by diffuse reflectance measurements. We model and discuss the antagonistic effects of interactions and disorder by using a two-level cooperative mean-field approach which includes a distribution of barrier energies at the microscopic scale.

  14. Toward a small molecule, biomimetic carbonic anhydrase model: theoretical and experimental investigations of a panel of zinc(II) aza-macrocyclic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Lucas; Valdez, Carlos A; Baker, Sarah E; Lau, Edmond Y; Floyd, William C; Wong, Sergio E; Satcher, Joe H; Lightstone, Felice C; Aines, Roger D

    2012-06-18

    A panel of five zinc-chelated aza-macrocycle ligands and their ability to catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate, H(2)O + CO(2) → H(+) + HCO(3)(–), was investigated using quantum-mechanical methods and stopped-flow experiments. The key intermediates in the reaction coordinate were optimized using the M06-2X density functional with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. Activation energies for the first step in the catalytic cycle, nucleophilic CO(2) addition, were calculated from gas-phase optimized transition-state geometries. The computationally derived trend in activation energies was found to not correspond with the experimentally observed rates. However, activation energies for the second, bicarbonate release step, which were estimated using calculated bond dissociation energies, provided good agreement with the observed trend in rate constants. Thus, the joint theoretical and experimental results provide evidence that bicarbonate release, not CO(2) addition, may be the rate-limiting step in CO(2) hydration by zinc complexes of aza-macrocyclic ligands. pH-independent rate constants were found to increase with decreasing Lewis acidity of the ligand-Zn complex, and the trend in rate constants was correlated with molecular properties of the ligands. It is suggested that tuning catalytic efficiency through the first coordination shell of Zn(2+) ligands is predominantly a balance between increasing charge-donating character of the ligand and maintaining the catalytically relevant pK(a) below the operating pH.

  15. Relative importance of column and adsorption parameters on the productivity in preparative liquid chromatography II: Investigation of separation systems with competitive Langmuir adsorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Forssén, Patrik; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2014-06-20

    In this study we investigated how the maximum productivity for commonly used, realistic separation system with a competitive Langmuir adsorption isotherm is affected by changes in column length, packing particle size, mobile phase viscosity, maximum allowed column pressure, column efficiency, sample concentration/solubility, selectivity, monolayer saturation capacity and retention factor of the first eluting compound. The study was performed by generating 1000 random separation systems whose optimal injection volume was determined, i.e., the injection volume that gives the largest achievable productivity. The relative changes in largest achievable productivity when one of the parameters above changes was then studied for each system and the productivity changes for all systems were presented as distributions. We found that it is almost always beneficial to use shorter columns with high pressure drops over the column and that the selectivity should be greater than 2. However, the sample concentration and column efficiency have very limited effect on the maximum productivity. The effect of packing particle size depends on the flow rate limiting factor. If the pumps maximum flow rate is the limiting factor use smaller packing, but if the pressure of the system is the limiting factor use larger packing up to about 40μm.

  16. Investigation of thermal decomposition as the kinetic process that causes the loss of crystalline structure in sucrose using a chemical analysis approach (part II).

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Won; Thomas, Leonard C; Jerrell, John; Feng, Hao; Cadwallader, Keith R; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2011-01-26

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a calcium form cation exchange column with refractive index and photodiode array detection was used to investigate thermal decomposition as the cause of the loss of crystalline structure in sucrose. Crystalline sucrose structure was removed using a standard differential scanning calorimetry (SDSC) method (fast heating method) and a quasi-isothermal modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) method (slow heating method). In the fast heating method, initial decomposition components, glucose (0.365%) and 5-HMF (0.003%), were found in the sucrose sample coincident with the onset temperature of the first endothermic peak. In the slow heating method, glucose (0.411%) and 5-HMF (0.003%) were found in the sucrose sample coincident with the holding time (50 min) at which the reversing heat capacity began to increase. In both methods, even before the crystalline structure in sucrose was completely removed, unidentified thermal decomposition components were formed. These results prove not only that the loss of crystalline structure in sucrose is caused by thermal decomposition, but also that it is achieved via a time-temperature combination process. This knowledge is important for quality assurance purposes and for developing new sugar based food and pharmaceutical products. In addition, this research provides new insights into the caramelization process, showing that caramelization can occur under low temperature (significantly below the literature reported melting temperature), albeit longer time, conditions.

  17. Self assembling monolayers of dialkynyl bridged Pd(II) thiols obtained by thermally induced multilayer desorption: Thermal and chemical stability investigated by SR-XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Fratoddi, I.; Bondino, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Russo, M. V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2012-02-01

    Self assembling monolayers (SAMs) of organometallic thiols trans-[HS-Pd(PBu3)2-SH], trans-[HS-Pd(PBu3)2(-Ctbnd C-C6H5)] and trans,trans-[HS-Pd(PBu3)2(-Ctbnd C-C6H4-C6H4-Ctbnd C-Pd(PBu3)2-SH] on gold were obtained from the corresponding multilayers through thermally induced desorption. Temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation-induced X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS) measurements were carried out on the heated multilayers during the annealing process, in order to investigate the thermal and chemical stability of the systems. SAMs of the same organometallic thiols were also obtained by rinsing the thick films with appropriate solvents. SR-XPS was used to ascertain that the molecular and electronic structure of the two series of SAMs are not influenced by the rinsing or thermal desorption process, i.e. both strategies allow for obtaining well ordered monolayers of organometallic thiols.

  18. Investigation of combinatorial coevaporated thin film Cu2ZnSnS4 (II): Beneficial cation arrangement in Cu-rich growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, E. A.; Du, H.; Hlaing OO, W. M.; Teeter, G.; Scarpulla, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) is an earth-abundant semiconductor with potential for economical photovoltaic power generation at terawatt scales. In this work, we use Raman scattering to investigate phase coexistence in combinatorial CZTS thin films grown at 325 or 470 °C. The surface of the samples grown at 325 °C is rough except for a prominent specularly reflective band near and along the ZnS-Cu2SnS3 (CTS) tie line in the Cu-Zn-Sn-S quaternary phase diagram. All structurally incoherent secondary phases (SnS2, CuS) exist only as surface phases or are embedded as separate grains, whereas the structurally coherent secondary phase CTS coexists with CZTS in the dense underlying film. In films grown at 325 °C, which are kinetically trapped by the low growth temperature, a change is observed in Cu and Sn site occupancy, evidenced by the shift from cubic-CTS in the Cu-rich region (Cu/Sn > 2) to more tetragonal-CTS in the Sn-rich region (Cu/Sn < 2). For CZTS samples grown at 470 °C, CTS is not observed and regions grown under excess Sn flux are more disordered than Cu-rich regions evidenced by broader CZTS A mode peaks. Therefore, increasing Sn chemical potential results in more CZTS lattice disorder, suggesting, with other evidence, the formation of Sn antisite defects. In contrast, the CZTS A mode breadth is insensitive to Zn richness suggesting that excess Zn does not induce significant disorder within the CZTS lattice. We postulate that initially growing CZTS films Cu-rich (Cu/Sn > 2) results in higher cation ordering meaning fewer antisite defects.

  19. Post-marketing safety and effectiveness evaluation of the intravenous anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor peramivir. II: a pediatric drug use investigation.

    PubMed

    Komeda, Takuji; Ishii, Shingo; Itoh, Yumiko; Ariyasu, Yasuyuki; Sanekata, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Takayoshi; Shimada, Jingoro

    2015-03-01

    Peramivir is the only intravenous formulation among anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitors currently available. Peramivir was approved for manufacturing and marketing in Japan in January 2010. In October 2010, an additional indication for pediatric use was approved. We conducted a pediatric drug use investigation of peramivir from October 2010 to February 2012 and evaluated its real-world safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients. We collected the data of 1254 peramivir-treated pediatric patients from 161 facilities across Japan and examined the safety in 1199 patients and effectiveness in 1188 patients. In total, 245 adverse events were observed with an incidence rate of 14.01% (168/1199). Of these, 115 events were adverse drug reactions (ADRs) with an incidence rate of 7.67% (92/1199). Common ADRs were diarrhea and abnormal behavior, with incidence rates of 2.50% (30/1199) and 2.25% (27/1199), respectively. Fourteen serious ADRs were observed in 12 patients (1.00%), including 5 cases each of abnormal behavior and neutrophil count decreased. While 87.0% (100 events) of ADRs occurred within 3 days after the initiation of peramivir administration, 87.8% (101 events) resolved or improved within 7 days after onset. Multivariate analyses indicated that the presence or absence of underlying diseases/complications was significantly related to ADR incidence. With regard to effectiveness, the median time to alleviation of both influenza symptoms and fever was 3 days, including the first day of administration. Thus, this study confirms the pediatric safety of peramivir without any concerns about effectiveness under routine clinical settings.

  20. Gravity wave momentum fluxes in the MLT—Part II: Meteor radar investigations at high and midlatitudes in comparison with modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placke, Manja; Hoffmann, Peter; Becker, Erich; Jacobi, Christoph; Singer, Werner; Rapp, Markus

    2011-06-01

    For the analysis of gravity waves the method presented by Hocking (2005) is used, which enables us to derive wind variances and gravity wave momentum fluxes in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from all-sky interferometric meteor radar wind measurements considering waves and variances with periods less than 2 h. A sensitivity study for the applicability of this method has been performed for the first time using a mechanistic general circulation model with high spatial resolution and explicit description of gravity waves. Wind variances and momentum fluxes have been determined from the model directly and by Hocking’s method. Results of both methods are in good agreement except for vertical wind variances in case of weak vertical winds, which in the model are of the order of 1 m/s, whereas short period gravity waves estimated by meteor radar lead to larger vertical winds with a smaller ratio between horizontal and vertical wind fluctuations. A latitudinal comparison of mean annual variations of wind variances and momentum fluxes has been performed using meteor radar measurements at the high latitude site Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E) and the midlatitude site Juliusruh (54.6°N, 13.4°E). A semi-annual variation of the activity of short period gravity waves has been found having stronger magnitudes at high latitudes. The mean zonal winds show the typical summer wind reversal that shifts to higher altitudes from middle to high latitudes. Finally, the coupling between gravity waves and the mean background circulation is investigated based on long-term measurements at Andenes and the midlatitude site Collm (51.3°N, 13.0°E) during a period from 2004 to 2009.

  1. Synthesis, Crystal Structures, Magnetic Properties, and Theoretical Investigation of a New Series of Ni(II)-Ln(III)-W(V) Heterotrimetallics: Understanding the SMM Behavior of Mixed Polynuclear Complexes.

    PubMed

    Vieru, Veacheslav; Pasatoiu, Traian D; Ungur, Liviu; Suturina, Elizaveta; Madalan, Augustin M; Duhayon, Carine; Sutter, Jean-Pascal; Andruh, Marius; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2016-12-05

    The polynuclear compounds containing anisotropic metal ions often exhibit efficient barriers for blocking of magnetization at fairly arbitrary geometries. However, at variance with mononuclear complexes, which usually become single-molecule magnets (SMM) under the sole requirement of a highly axial crystal field at the metal ion, the factors influencing the SMM behavior in polynuclear complexes, especially, with weakly axial magnetic ions, still remain largely unrevealed. As an attempt to clarify these conditions, we present here the synthesis, crystal structures, magnetic behavior, and ab initio calculations for a new series of Ni(II)-Ln(III)-W(V) trimetallics, [(CN)7W(CN)Ni(H2O)(valpn)Ln(H2O)4]·H2O (Ln = Y 1, Eu 2, Gd 3, Tb 4, Dy 5, Lu 6). The surprising finding is the absence of the magnetic blockage even for compounds involving strongly anisotropic Dy(III) and Tb(III) metal ions. This is well explained by ab initio calculations showing relatively large transversal components of the g-tensor in the ground exchange Kramers doublets of 1 and 4 and large intrinsic tunneling gaps in the ground exchange doublets of 3 and 5. In order to get more insight into this behavior, another series of earlier reported compounds with the same trinuclear [W(V)Ni(II)Ln(III)] core structure, [(CN)7W(CN)Ni(dmf)(valdmpn)Ln(dmf)4]·H2O (Ln = Gd(III) 7, Tb(III) 8a, Dy(III) 9, Ho(III) 10), [(CN)7W(CN)Ni(H2O)(valdmpn)Tb(dmf)2.5(H2O)1.5]·H2O·0.5dmf 8b, and [(CN)7W(CN)Ni(H2O)(valdmpn)Er(dmf)3(H2O)1]·H2O·0.5dmf 11, has been also investigated theoretically. In this series, only 8b exhibits SMM behavior which is confirmed by the present ab initio calculations. An important feature for the entire series is the strong ferromagnetic coupling between Ni(II) and W(V), which is due to an almost perfect trigonal dodecahedron geometry of the octacyano wolframate fragment. The reason why only 8b is an SMM is explained by positive zero-field splitting on the nickel site, precluding magnetization

  2. Annex II technical documentation assessed.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, A W; Roszek, B; van Tienhoven, E A E; Geertsma, R E; Boumans, R T; Kraus, J J A M

    2005-12-01

    Annex II of the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is used frequently by manufacturers to obtain CE-marking. This procedure relies on a full quality assurance system and does not require an assessment of the individual medical device by a Notified Body. An investigation into the availability and the quality of technical documentation for Annex II devices revealed severe shortcomings, which are reported here.

  3. Investigating Team Cohesion in COCOMO II.2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowdeal-Carden, Betty A.

    2013-01-01

    Software engineering is team oriented and intensely complex, relying on human collaboration and creativity more than any other engineering discipline. Poor software estimation is a problem that within the United States costs over a billion dollars per year. Effective measurement of team cohesion is foundationally important to gain accurate…

  4. FAQs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    In their paper entitled "Why should postsecondary institutions consider partnering to offer (Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?" the authors reviewed frequently asked questions they encountered from higher education professionals about IDAs, but as their research continued so did the questions. FAQ II has more in-depth questions and…

  5. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  6. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  7. Mod II engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Albert E.; Huang, Shyan-Cherng

    1987-01-01

    The testing of a prototype of an automotive Stirling engine, the Mod II, is discussed. The Mod II is a one-piece cast block with a V-4 single-crankshaft configuration and an annular regenerator/cooler design. The initial testing of Mod II concentrated on the basic engine, with auxiliaries driven by power sources external to the engine. The performance of the engine was tested at 720 C set temperature and 820 C tube temperature. At 720 C, it is observed that the power deficiency is speed dependent and linear, with a weak pressure dependency, and at 820 C, the power deficiency is speed and pressure dependent. The effects of buoyancy and nozzle spray pattern on the heater temperature spread are investigated. The characterization of the oil pump and the operating cycle and temperature spread tests are proposed for further evaluation of the engine.

  8. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  9. Preparation and characterization of multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel for removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Ming-yu; Feng, Chang-gen; Zeng, Qing-xuan

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the multi-carboxyl-functionalized silica gel was prepared by surface grafting method and applied for the removal of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) from aqueous solution. The adsorbent was characterized by FT-IR, thermogravimetry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and elemental analysis, and it proved that the organic functional group, carboxyl group, was grafted successfully onto the silica gel surface. The effect of solution pH on removal efficiencies of Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was investigated and it was found that with the exception of Zn (II), the removal efficiencies of the rest of metal ions increased with the increasing of pH in the solution, the maximum removal efficiency occurred at pH 6.0, whereas the maximum removal efficiency for Zn (II) was found to be at pH 7.0. Adsorption equilibrium data were well fitted to Langmuir than Freundlich isotherm model and the maximum adsorption capacity for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) was 47.07, 41.48, 30.80 and 39.96 mg/g, respectively. Competitive adsorption experiments demonstrated that the adsorbent material had excellent adsorption amount and high affinity for the Cu (II) in the binary systems. In addition, the column experiments were used to investigate stability and reusability of the adsorbent, the dynamic adsorption performance, and desorption of metal ions absorbed from the adsorbent. The results confirmed that the adsorbent presents good dynamic adsorption performance for Cu (II), Cd (II), Ni (II) and Zn (II) and these metal ions adsorbed were easy to be desorbed from the adsorbent. The adsorption capacities of metal ions did not present an obvious decrease after five cycles of adsorption-desorption.

  10. Application of Heisenberg's S matrix program to the angular scattering of the H + D2(v(i) = 0, j(i) = 0) → HD(v(f) = 3, j(f) = 0) + D reaction: piecewise S matrix elements using linear, quadratic, step-function, and top-hat parametrizations.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao; Connor, J N L

    2012-11-26

    A previous paper by Shan and Connor (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011, 13, 8392) reported the surprising result that four simple parametrized S matrices can reproduce the forward-angle glory scattering of the H + D(2)(v(i)=0,j(i)=0) → HD(v(f)=3,j(f)=0) + D reaction, whose differential cross section (DCS) had been computed in a state-of-the-art scattering calculation for a state-of-the-art potential energy surface. Here, v and j are vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, respectively, and the translational energy is 1.81 eV. This paper asks the question: Can we replace the analytic functions (of class C(ω)) used by Shan-Connor with simpler mathematical functions and still reproduce the forward-angle glory scattering? We first construct S matrix elements (of class C(0)) using a quadratic phase and a piecewise-continuous pre-exponential factor consisting of three pieces. Two of the pieces are constants, with one taking the value N (a real normalization constant) at small values of the total angular momentum number, J; the other piece has the value 0 at large J. These two pieces are joined at intermediate values of J by either a straight line, giving rise to the linear parametrization (denoted param L), or a quadratic curve, which defines the quadratic parametrization (param Q). We find that both param L and param Q can reproduce the glory scattering for center-of-mass reactive scattering angles, θ(R) ≲ 30°. Second, we use a piecewise-discontinuous pre-exponential factor and a quadratic phase, giving rise to a step-function parametrization (param SF) and a top-hat parametrization (param TH). We find that both param SF and param TH can reproduce the forward-angle scattering, even though these class C(-1) parametrizations are usually considered too simplistic to be useful for calculations of DCSs. We find that an ultrasimplistic param THz, which is param TH with a phase of zero, can also reproduce the glory scattering at forward angles. The S matrix elements for

  11. Heteroleptic bis(dipyrrinato)copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Ryojun; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Matsuoka, Ryota; Wu, Kuo-Hui; Hattori, Yohei; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2015-09-14

    Heteroleptic bis(dipyrrinato)copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes are synthesized. Their structures are determined by X-ray diffraction analysis, and their properties are investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and UV/vis absorption spectroscopy.

  12. PESTICINS II. I and II

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.; Surgalla, Michael J.

    1962-01-01

    Brubaker, Robert R. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Michael J. Surgalla. Pesticins. II. Production of pesticin I and II. J. Bacteriol. 84:539–545. 1962.—Pesticin I was separated from pesticin I inhibitor by ion-exchange chromatography of cell-free culture supernatant fluids and by acid precipitation of soluble preparations obtained from mechanically disrupted cells. The latter procedure resulted in formation of an insoluble pesticin I complex which, upon removal by centrifugation and subsequent dissolution in neutral buffer, exhibited a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in antibacterial activity over that originally observed. However, activity returned to the former level upon addition of the acid-soluble fraction, which contained pesticin I inhibitor. Since the presence of pesticin I inhibitor leads to serious errors in the determination of pesticin I, an assay medium containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in excess Ca++ was developed; this medium eliminated the effect of the inhibitor. By use of the above medium, sufficient pesticin I was found to be contained within 500 nonirradiated cells to inhibit growth of a suitable indicator strain; at least 107 cells were required to effect a corresponding inhibition by pesticin II. Although both pesticins are located primarily within the cell during growth, pesticin I may arise extracellularly during storage of static cells. Slightly higher activity of pesticin I inhibitor was found in culture supernatant fluids than occurred in corresponding cell extracts of equal volume. The differences and similarities between pesticin I and some known bacteriocins are discussed. PMID:14016110

  13. Class II Microcins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, Gaëlle; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Peduzzi, Jean

    Class II microcins are 4.9- to 8.9-kDa polypeptides produced by and active against enterobacteria. They are classified into two subfamilies according to their structure and their gene cluster arrangement. While class IIa microcins undergo no posttranslational modification, class IIb microcins show a conserved C-terminal sequence that carries a salmochelin-like siderophore motif as a posttranslational modification. Aside from this C-terminal end, which is the signature of class IIb microcins, some sequence similarities can be observed within and between class II subclasses, suggesting the existence of common ancestors. Their mechanisms of action are still under investigation, but several class II microcins use inner membrane proteins as cellular targets, and some of them are membrane-active. Like group B colicins, many, if not all, class II microcins are TonB- and energy-dependent and use catecholate siderophore receptors for recognition/­translocation across the outer membrane. In that context, class IIb microcins are considered to have developed molecular mimicry to increase their affinity for their outer membrane receptors through their salmochelin-like posttranslational modification.

  14. Location of the allergenic monomer in warm-polymerized acrylic dentures. Part II: Experiments aimed at establishing guidelines for production of acrylic dentures suited for patients allergic to acrylic monomer and complementary investigations.

    PubMed

    Fernström, A I; Oquist, G

    1980-01-01

    An account has been given of a patient with denture sore mouth caused by allergy to the denture material (Part I). In the continued investigation the residual monomer or part thereof was found to be the allergen. Patch testing of the skin with drillings from the upper and lower dentures made of a "warm-polymerized" methyl methacrylate resin was carried out with special reference to the topography of the distribution of the allergenic factor within the dentures. Only that surface of the upper denture that is in contact with the hard palate and the maxillary crista were allergenic. All other surfaces of the upper denture as well as the complete lower denture were non-allergenic. The resin was, in other words, inhomogeneous as regards the allergenic factor. An analysis of the test castings showed that the allergenic properties in the resin are located in the surface and that the resin was free from allergens below the "allergenic film" (Parts I and II). A non-allergenic, extraordinarily well-fitting denture was produced from the same make of acrylic as that used for the non-tolerated denture. It was made by a new technique, "directed polymerization," comprising initial application of heat centrally in the cuvette (a metal cup surrounding the gypsum), including tin-foiling of the palatal half of the mould. The production of the denture was based on experience from tests with test castings. A check-up 18 months later showed no stomatitis and the retention and stability of the denture were very satisfactory, and tests with the original model of the upper gum showed that it had an excellent fit.

  15. Mechanism of interaction of Al3+ with the proteins composition of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Hasni, Imed; Yaakoubi, Hnia; Hamdani, Saber; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Carpentier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of Al3+on photosystem II (PSII) electron transport was investigated using several biophysical and biochemical techniques such as oxygen evolution, chlorophyll fluorescence induction and emission, SDS-polyacrylamide and native green gel electrophoresis, and FTIR spectroscopy. In order to understand the mechanism of its inhibitory action, we have analyzed the interaction of this toxic cation with proteins subunits of PSII submembrane fractions isolated from spinach. Our results show that Al 3+, especially above 3 mM, strongly inhibits oxygen evolution and affects the advancement of the S states of the Mn4O5Ca cluster. This inhibition was due to the release of the extrinsic polypeptides and the disorganization of the Mn4O5Ca cluster associated with the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. This fact was accompanied by a significant decline of maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) together with a strong damping of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. The energy transfer from light harvesting antenna to reaction centers of PSII was impaired following the alteration of the light harvesting complex of photosystem II (LHCII). The latter result was revealed by the drop of chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra at low temperature (77 K), increase of F0 and confirmed by the native green gel electrophoresis. FTIR measurements indicated that the interaction of Al 3+ with the intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of PSII induces major alterations of the protein secondary structure leading to conformational changes. This was reflected by a major reduction of α-helix with an increase of β-sheet and random coil structures in Al 3+-PSII complexes. These structural changes are closely related with the functional alteration of PSII activity revealed by the inhibition of the electron transport chain of PSII.

  16. FTIR investigation of the H2, N2, and C2H4 molecular complexes formed on the Cr(II) sites in the Phillips catalyst: a preliminary step in the understanding of a complex system.

    PubMed

    Groppo, E; Lamberti, C; Bordiga, S; Spoto, G; Damin, A; Zecchina, A

    2005-08-11

    This work reports the first complete FTIR characterization of H2, N2 and C2H4 molecular complexes formed on the Cr(II) sites in the Phillips catalyst. The use of a silica aerogel as support for Cr(II) sites, substituting the conventional aerosil material, allowed us to obtain a remarkable increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the IR spectra of adsorbed species. The improvement is directly related to an increase of the surface area of the support (approximately 700 m2 g(-1)) and to an almost complete absence of scattering [Groppo et al., Chem. Mater. 2005, 17, 2019-2027]. The use of this support and the adoption of suitable experimental conditions results, for the first time, in the clear observation of H2 and N2 adducts formed on two different types of Cr(II) sites, thus yielding important information on the coordinative state of the Cr(II) ions, which well agrees with the evidences provided in the past by other probe molecules. Furthermore, we report the first complete characterization of the C2H4 pi-complexes formed on Cr(II) sites. These results are particularly important in the view of the understanding of the polymerization mechanism, since the C2H4 coordination and the formation of pi-bonded complexes are the first steps of the reaction.

  17. Operation Everest II

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Wagner, Peter D. Operation Everest II. High Alt. Med. Biol. 11:111–119, 2010.—In October 1985, 25 years ago, 8 subjects and 27 investigators met at the United States Army Research Institute for Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) altitude chambers in Natick, Massachusetts, to study human responses to a simulated 40-day ascent of Mt. Everest, termed Operation Everest II (OE II). Led by Charlie Houston, John Sutton, and Allen Cymerman, these investigators conducted a large number of investigations across several organ systems as the subjects were gradually decompressed over 40 days to the Everest summit equivalent. There the subjects reached a \\documentclass{aastex}\\usepackage{amsbsy}\\usepackage{amsfonts}\\usepackage{amssymb}\\usepackage{bm}\\usepackage{mathrsfs}\\usepackage{pifont}\\usepackage{stmaryrd}\\usepackage{textcomp}\\usepackage{portland,xspace}\\usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra}\\pagestyle{empty}\\DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \\begin{document} \\begin{align*} \\dot{\\rm V}{\\sc O}_2{\\rm max} \\end{align*} \\end{document} of 15.3 mL/kg/min (28% of initial sea-level values) at 100 W and arterial Po2 and Pco2 of ∼28 and ∼10 mm Hg, respectively. Cardiac function resisted hypoxia, but the lungs could not: ventilation–perfusion inequality and O2 diffusion limitation reduced arterial oxygenation considerably. Pulmonary vascular resistance was increased, was not reversible after short-term hyperoxia, but was reduced during exercise. Skeletal muscle atrophy occurred, but muscle structure and function were otherwise remarkably unaffected. Neurological deficits (cognition and memory) persisted after return to sea level, more so in those with high hypoxic ventilatory responsiveness, with motor function essentially spared. Nine percent body weight loss (despite an unrestricted diet) was mainly (67%) from muscle and exceeded the 2% predicted from energy intake–expenditure balance. Some immunological and lipid metabolic changes occurred, of uncertain

  18. An Investigation of Minimum Buy Policies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    Remaining are 2393 items for which we make a minimum buy . We also converted the quarterly data into a series of requisitions more appropriate for our...AO80 399 ARMY INVENTORY RESEARCH OFFICE PHILADELPHIA PA F/B 5/3 AN INVESTIGATION OF MINIMUM BUY POLICIES.(U) AUG 79 S FRAZZA. A J KAPLAN...UNCLASSIFIED IRO-269 NL EEEEEEEEE///EEEflfllflfflfllflf EN AD- FINAL REPORT F0 REPORt NO269 AN INVESTIGATION OF o MINIMUM BUY POLICIES l.5S ARMY U.S. CUSTOM

  19. Adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions by cross-linking chitosan/rectorite nano-hybrid composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixuan; Chen, Yufei; Zhang, Qiuyun; Guo, Xingmei; Peng, Yanni; Xiao, Huijuan; Chen, Xiaocheng; Luo, Jiwen

    2015-10-05

    Chitosan/rectorie (CTS/REC) nano-hybrid composite microsphere was prepared by changing the proportion of CTS/REC with 2:1, 3:1 and 4:1. Compared with the pure cross-linking chitosan microsphere, the nano-hybrid composite microsphere was proved to have better sorption capacity of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II), especially 2:1(CTS/REC-1). The adsorption behavior of the microsphere of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) was investigated in single and binary metal systems. In single system, the equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) followed the Langmuir model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative values of (ΔG) suggested that the adsorption process was spontaneous. In binary system, the combined action of the metals was found to be antagonistic and the metal sorption followed the order of Cu(II)>Cd(II)>Ni(II). The regeneration studies indicated that EDTA desorbed Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) from cross-linking microspheres better than HCl. The FT-IR and XPS spectra showed that coordination bonds were formed between Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) and the nitrogen atoms of cross-linking CTS/REC nano-hybrid composite microspheres.

  20. Solar Type II Radio Bursts and IP Type II Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined radio data from the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft in conjunction with ground-based data in order to investigate the relationship between the shocks responsible for metric type II radio bursts and the shocks in front of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bow shocks of fast, large CMEs are strong interplanetary (IP) shocks, and the associated radio emissions often consist of single broad bands starting below approx. 4 MHz; such emissions were previously called IP type II events. In contrast, metric type II bursts are usually narrowbanded and display two harmonically related bands. In addition to displaying complete dynamic spectra for a number of events, we also analyze the 135 WAVES 1 - 14 MHz slow-drift time periods in 2001-2003. We find that most of the periods contain multiple phenomena, which we divide into three groups: metric type II extensions, IP type II events, and blobs and bands. About half of the WAVES listings include probable extensions of metric type II radio bursts, but in more than half of these events, there were also other slow-drift features. In the 3 yr study period, there were 31 IP type II events; these were associated with the very fastest CMEs. The most common form of activity in the WAVES events, blobs and bands in the frequency range between 1 and 8 MHz, fall below an envelope consistent with the early signatures of an IP type II event. However, most of this activity lasts only a few tens of minutes, whereas IP type II events last for many hours. In this study we find many examples in the radio data of two shock-like phenomena with different characteristics that occur simultaneously in the metric and decametric/hectometric bands, and no clear example of a metric type II burst that extends continuously down in frequency to become an IP type II event. The simplest interpretation is that metric type II bursts, unlike IP type II events, are not caused by shocks driven in front of CMEs.

  1. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  2. An Investigation of Systems Designs and Management Techniques with Implications Toward a Systems Approach to Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Occupational Education As Part of the Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgen, Joseph A.; Davis, Dwight E.

    As part of the Phase II report of the Illinois Occupational Curriculum Project, this document summarizes efforts made to: (1) gain a familiarity with the terminology and theory of systems modeling, (2) study the application of systems modeling in various management settings, and (3) identify factors to be considered in selecting and developing a…

  3. Low-temperature UV-visible and NMR spectroscopic investigations of O(2) binding to ((6)L)Fe(II), a ferrous heme bearing covalently tethered axial pyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Ghiladi, Reza A; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2002-05-06

    In this report, we describe the reversible dioxygen reactivity of ((6)L)Fe(II) (1) [(6)L = partially fluorinated tetraphenylporphyrin with covalently appended TMPA moiety; TMPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine] using a combination of low-temperature UV-vis and multinuclear ((1)H and (2)H) NMR spectroscopies. Complex 1, or its pyrrole-deuterated analogue ((6)L-d(8))Fe(II) (1-d(8)), exhibits downfield shifted pyrrole resonances (delta 28-60 ppm) in all solvents utilized [CH(2)Cl(2), (CH(3))(2)C(O), CH(3)CN, THF], indicative of a five-coordinate high-spin ferrous heme, even when there is no exogenous axial solvent ligand present (i.e., in methylene chloride). Furthermore, ((6)L)Fe(II) (1) exhibits non-pyrrolic upfield and downfield shifted peaks in CH(2)Cl(2), (CH(3))(2)C(O), and CH(3)CN solvents, which we ascribed to resonances arising from the intra- or intermolecular binding of a TMPA-pyridyl arm to the ferrous heme. Upon exposure to dioxygen at 193 K in methylene chloride, ((6)L)Fe(II) (1) [UV-vis: lambda(max) = 433 (Soret), 529 (sh), 559 nm] reversibly forms a dioxygen adduct [UV-vis: lambda(max) = 422 (Soret), 542 nm], formulated as the six-coordinate low-spin [delta(pyrrole) 9.3 ppm, 193 K] heme-superoxo complex ((6)L)Fe(III)-(O(2)(-)) (2). The coordination of the tethered pyridyl arm to the heme-superoxo complex as axial base ligand is suggested. In coordinating solvents such as THF, reversible oxygenation (193 K) of ((6)L)Fe(II) (1) [UV-vis: lambda(max) = 424 (Soret), 542 nm] also occurs to give a similar adduct ((6)L)Fe(III)-(O(2)(-)) (2) [UV-vis: lambda(max) = 418 (Soret), 537 nm. (2)H NMR: delta(pyrrole) 8.9 ppm, 193 K]. Here, we are unable to distinguish between a bound solvent ligand or tethered pyridyl arm as axial base ligand. In all solvents, the dioxygen adducts decompose (thermally) to the ferric-hydroxy complex ((6)L)Fe(III)-OH (3) [UV-vis: lambda(max) = 412-414 (Soret), 566-575 nm; approximately delta(pyrrole) 120 ppm at 193 K]. This study on the O(2

  4. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial Investigating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara Smallpox Vaccine (MVA-BN®) in 56-80-Year-Old Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Hay, Christine M.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Marbury, Thomas C.; Wagner, Eva; Kreitmeir, Eva; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Young, Philip; Nichols, Richard; Meyer, Thomas P.; Weigl, Josef; Virgin, Garth; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Chaplin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® is a live, highly attenuated, viral vaccine under advanced development as a non-replicating smallpox vaccine. In this Phase II trial, the safety and immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® (MVA) was assessed in a 56–80 years old population. Methods MVA with a virus titer of 1 x 108 TCID50/dose was administered via subcutaneous injection to 56–80 year old vaccinia-experienced subjects (N = 120). Subjects received either two injections of MVA (MM group) or one injection of Placebo and one injection of MVA (PM group) four weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events (AE), focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings and safety laboratories. Solicited AEs consisted of a set of pre-defined expected local reactions (erythema, swelling, pain, pruritus, and induration) and systemic symptoms (body temperature, headache, myalgia, nausea and fatigue) and were recorded on a memory aid for an 8-day period following each injection. The immunogenicity of the vaccine was evaluated in terms of humoral immune responses measured with a vaccinia-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) before and at different time points after vaccination. Results Vaccinations were well tolerated by all subjects. No serious adverse event related to MVA and no case of myopericarditis was reported. The overall incidence of unsolicited AEs was similar in both groups. For both groups immunogenicity responses two weeks after the final vaccination (i.e. Visit 4) were as follows: Seroconversion (SC) rates (doubling of titers from baseline) in vaccine specific antibody titers measured by ELISA were 83.3% in Group MM and 82.8% in Group PM (difference 0.6% with 95% exact CI [-13.8%, 15.0%]), and 90.0% for Group MM and 77.6% for Group PM measured by PRNT (difference 12.4% with 95% CI of [-1.1%, 27.0%]). Geometric mean titers (GMT) measured by ELISA two weeks after

  5. An Investigation of Methods to Measure and Predict Biological and Physical Effects of Commercial Navigation Traffic: Workshop II Held in St. Louis, Missouri on 17-18 April 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    Biolog- ical Effects of Vessel Passage - Mr. Gene Buglewicz, LMV 1500-1530 Break 1530-1545 Panel Discussion II: Strategies for Predicting Biological...for expert testimony as it does for most of life. Care taken to define the limits of a problem pays large dividends in Cime and resources saved later...Wildlife Service Gail Peterson, US Fish and Wildlife Service Joseph Harber, Dan McGuiness and Associates, Wabasha, MN Gene Hollenstein, Minnesota

  6. Synthesis, characterization and spectroscopy studying of some metal complexes of a new Schiff base ligand; X-ray crystal structure, NMR and IR investigation of a new dodecahedron Cd(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Rezaeivala, Majid; Khalili, Maryam; Notash, Behrouz; Karimi, Javad

    2016-12-01

    Some new [Cd(H2L1)(NO3)]ClO4 (1), [Mn(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (2), [Ni(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (3) and [Cu(H2L1)](ClO4)2 (4) complexes were prepared by the reaction of a Schiff base ligand and M (II) metal ions in equimolar ratios (M = Cd, Mn, Ni and Cu). The ligand H2L1 was synthesized by reaction of 2-[2-(3-formyl phenoxy)propoxy]benzaldehyde and ethanol amine and characterized by IR, 1H,13C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The synthesized complexes were characterized with IR and elemental analysis in all cases and 1H, 13C NMR, and X-ray in the case of Cd(II) complex. The X-ray crystal structure of compound 1 showed that all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of Schiff base ligand (N2O4) and a molecule of nitrate with two donor oxygen atom have been coordinated to the metal ion and the Cd(II) ion is in an eight-coordinate environment that is best described as a distorted dodecahedron geometry.

  7. DichotomY IdentitY: Euler-Bernoulli Numbers, Sets-Multisets, FD-BE Quantum-Statistics, 1 /f0 - 1 /f1 Power-Spectra, Ellipse-Hyperbola Conic-Sections, Local-Global Extent: ``Category-Semantics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, G.-C.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Seminal Apostol[Math.Mag.81,3,178(08);Am.Math.Month.115,9,795(08)]-Rota[Intro.Prob. Thy.(95)-p.50-55] DichotomY equivalence-class: set-theory: sets V multisets; closed V open; to Abromowitz-Stegun[Hdbk.Math.Fns.(64)]-ch.23,p.803!]: numbers/polynomials generating-functions: Euler V Bernoulli; to Siegel[Schrodinger Cent.Symp.(87); Symp.Fractals, MRS Fall Mtg.,(1989)-5-papers!] power-spectrum: 1/ f {0}-White V 1/ f {1}-Zipf/Pink (Archimedes) HYPERBOLICITY INEVITABILITY; to analytic-geometry Conic-Sections: Ellipse V (via Parabola) V Hyperbola; to Extent/Scale/Radius: Locality V Globality, Root-Causes/Ultimate-Origins: Dimensionality: odd-Z V (via fractal) V even-Z, to Symmetries/(Noether's-theorem connected)/Conservation-Laws Dichotomy: restored/conservation/convergence=0- V broken/non-conservation/divergence=/=0: with asymptotic-limit antipodes morphisms/ crossovers: Eureka!!!; "FUZZYICS"=''CATEGORYICS''!!! Connection to Kummer(1850) Bernoulli-numbers proof of FLT is via Siegel(CCNY;1964) < (1994)[AMS Joint Mtg. (2002)-Abs.973-60-124] short succinct physics proof: FLT = Least-Action Principle!!!

  8. New sensitizing roles of defect-induced self-activator in Sr2.5-3x/2Ca0.5PrxAl1-yInyO4F (0.001 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.05 y = 0, 0.1) Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sangmoon

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent materials composed of Sr2.5-3x/2Ca0.5PrxAl1-yInyO4F (0.001 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.05 y = 0, 0.1) were prepared by solid-state reaction. The dependence of the luminescent intensity of Pr3+-doped oxyfluorides on the Pr3+ content (x = 0.001-0.05) is also discussed. The photoluminescence (PL) properties of Pr3+-doped in both Sr2.5Ca0.5Al1-yInyO4F and Sr2.5Ca0.5Al1-yInyO4-αF1-δ oxyfluorides were scrutinized. Replacement of Al3+ by In3+ in the Pr3+-doped host structure sensitized the material and enabled a novel and high-energy charge-transfer. The desired CIE values with emission through the red, orange, yellow, and blue-green regions of the spectra in the oxyfluorides were achieved. The effective sensitization using the defect-induced self-activating oxyfluoride phosphors will be useful in applications related to NUV-LEDs.

  9. Macrocyclic receptor showing extremely high Sr(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Ca(II) selectivities with potential application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; de Blas, Andrés; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2011-04-18

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the complexation properties of the macrocyclic decadentate receptor N,N'-Bis[(6-carboxy-2-pyridil)methyl]-4,13-diaza-18-crown-6 (H(2)bp18c6) toward different divalent metal ions [Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Sr(II), and Ca(II)] in aqueous solution. We have found that this ligand is especially suited for the complexation of large metal ions such as Sr(II) and Pb(II), which results in very high Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) selectivities (in fact, higher than those found for ligands widely used for the treatment of lead poisoning such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (edta)), as well as in the highest Sr(II)/Ca(II) selectivity reported so far. These results have been rationalized on the basis of the structure of the complexes. X-ray crystal diffraction, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (B3LYP) level have been performed. Our results indicate that for large metal ions such as Pb(II) and Sr(II) the most stable conformation is Δ(δλδ)(δλδ), while for Ca(II) our calculations predict the Δ(λδλ)(λδλ) form being the most stable one. The selectivity that bp18c6(2-) shows for Sr(II) over Ca(II) can be attributed to a better fit between the large Sr(II) ions and the relatively large crown fragment of the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) complex shows that the Δ(δλδ)(δλδ) conformation observed in solution is also maintained in the solid state. The Pb(II) ion is endocyclically coordinated, being directly bound to the 10 donor atoms of the ligand. The bond distances to the donor atoms of the pendant arms (2.55-2.60 Å) are substantially shorter than those between the metal ion and the donor atoms of the crown moiety (2.92-3.04 Å). This is a typical situation observed for the so-called hemidirected compounds, in which the Pb(II) lone pair is stereochemically active. The X-ray structures of the Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes show that

  10. Probing outflows in z = 1 ∼ 2 galaxies through Fe II/Fe II* multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuping; Giavalisco, Mauro; Guo, Yicheng

    2014-10-01

    We report on a study of the 2300-2600 Å Fe II/Fe II* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.6 as probes of galactic-scale outflows. We extracted a mass-limited sample of 97 galaxies at z ∼ 1.0-2.6 from ultra-deep spectra obtained during the GMASS spectroscopic survey in the GOODS South field with the Very Large Telescope and FORS2. We obtain robust measures of the rest equivalent width of the Fe II absorption lines down to a limit of W{sub r} > 1.5 Å and of the Fe II* emission lines to W{sub r} > 0.5 Å. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [O II] emission line, we find that both the Fe II and Mg II absorption lines are blueshifted, indicating that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the Fe II gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of Mg II. We investigate the variation of Fe II line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that Fe II lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the Fe II lines relative to the Mg II doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended Fe II* emission in two-dimensional stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for Fe II absorption lie close (3 ∼ 4 kpc) to the disks of galaxies. We show that the Fe II/Fe II* multiplets offer unique probes of the kinematic structure of galactic outflows.

  11. Mostly Plants. Individualized Biology Activities on: I. Investigating Bread Mold; II. Transpiration; III. Botany Project; IV. Collecting/Preserving/Identifying Leaves; [and] V. Student Science Laboratory Write-Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Paul R.

    Individualized biology activities for secondary students are presented in this teaching guide. The guide is divided into five sections: (1) investigating bread mold; (2) investigating transpiration; (3) completing a botany project; (4) collecting, preserving, and identifying leaves; and (5) writing up science laboratory investigations. The…

  12. Spectroscopic and fluorescence studies on Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with NO donor fluorescence dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Metwaly, Nashwa M.

    2011-10-01

    The reactions of the two common dyes [2TMPACT and 4PENI] with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions were done. All the isolated complexes have been characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The IR data reflect the bidentate mode of 2TMPACT towards the mononuclear complex [Mn(II)] even its tetradentate in binuclear complexes [Co(II) and Cu(II)]. However, the bidentate mode is the only behavior of 4PENI ligand towards each metal ion in its mononuclear complexes. The UV-vis spectral analysis beside the magnetic moment measurements are proposed different geometries concerning each metal ions with the two ligands under investigation, as the Mn(II)-2TMPACT complex is an octahedral but Mn(II)-4PENI is a tetrahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds are thermogravimetrically investigated. The proposed thermal decomposition was discussed for each compound with each step as well as, the kinetic parameters were calculated for all preferrible decomposition steps. The mass spectroscopy tool was used to emphasis on the suitable molecular formula proposed and the fragmentation patterns were displayed. The fluorescence properties of the synthesized ligands and their complexes were studied in DMSO at room temperature.

  13. Spectroscopic and fluorescence studies on Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with NO donor fluorescence dyes.

    PubMed

    Refat, Moamen S; el-Metwaly, Nashwa M

    2011-10-15

    The reactions of the two common dyes [2TMPACT and 4PENI] with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions were done. All the isolated complexes have been characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The IR data reflect the bidentate mode of 2TMPACT towards the mononuclear complex [Mn(II)] even its tetradentate in binuclear complexes [Co(II) and Cu(II)]. However, the bidentate mode is the only behavior of 4PENI ligand towards each metal ion in its mononuclear complexes. The UV-vis spectral analysis beside the magnetic moment measurements are proposed different geometries concerning each metal ions with the two ligands under investigation, as the Mn(II)-2TMPACT complex is an octahedral but Mn(II)-4PENI is a tetrahedral geometry. All the synthesized compounds are thermogravimetrically investigated. The proposed thermal decomposition was discussed for each compound with each step as well as, the kinetic parameters were calculated for all preferrible decomposition steps. The mass spectroscopy tool was used to emphasis on the suitable molecular formula proposed and the fragmentation patterns were displayed. The fluorescence properties of the synthesized ligands and their complexes were studied in DMSO at room temperature.

  14. Spectroscopic evaluation for VO(II), Ni(II), Pd(II) and Cu(II) complexes derived from thiosemicarbazide: A special emphasis on EPR study and DNA cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, Nashwa M.; Al-Hazmi, Gamil A. A.

    2013-04-01

    Some thiosemicarbazide complexes were prepared and deliberately investigated by all allowed tools. The ligand coordinates as a mono negative bidentate towards VO(II) and Ni(II) as well as a neutral bidentate towards Pd(II) and Cu(II) ions. Electronic spectral data beside the magnetic measurements facilitate the structural geometry proposal. EPR spectra of Cu(II) and VO(II) complexes were recorded in their solid state. Spin Hamiltonian parameters and molecular orbital coefficient for Cu(II) and VO(II) complexes were calculated and supporting the octahedral geometry of Cu(II) complex and a square pyramidal for VO(II) one. The biological activity investigation was studied by the use of all prepared compounds. The VO(II) and Cu(II) complexes display the susceptible biotoxicity against a gram-positive bacterium. Also, Cu(II) complex displays the same toxicity against gram-negative bacteria used. The effect of all compounds on DNA were photographed. A successive degradation for the DNA target was observed with Pd(II) and Ni(II) complexes beside their original ligand.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles impregnated on apple pomace to enhanced adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chand, Piar; Pakade, Yogesh B

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and impregnated onto apple pomace surface (HANP@AP) for efficient removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from water. HANP@AP was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and surface area analysis. Batch sorption studies were carried out to investigate the influence of different parameters as amount of dose (g), pH, time (min), and initial concentration (mg L(-1)) on adsorption process. Experimental kinetic data followed pseudo-second-order model and equilibrium data well fitted to Langmuir adsorption model with maximum adsorption capacities of 303, 250, and 100 mg g(-1) for Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions, respectively. Competitive adsorption of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions in presences of each other was studied to evaluate the removal efficiency of HANP@AP against multi metal-loaded water. HANP@AP was successfully applied to real industrial wastewater with 100 % removal of all three metal ions even at high concentration. HANP@AP could be recycled for four, four, and three cycles in case of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II), respectively. The study showed that HANP@AP is fast, cost effective, and environmental friendly adsorbent for removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) ions from real industrial wastewater.

  16. Calix[4]arene based chemosensor for selective complexation of Cd(II) and Cu(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, Mansoor Ahmed; Qureshi, Imdadullah; Memon, Shahabuddin

    2010-06-01

    The present article describes synthesis, characterization and a detailed complexation study of calix[4]arene based chemosensor ( 4) bearing two anthracenyl units as signaling groups on its coordination sphere. The complex formation ability of 4 toward selected transition metals such as Cd(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) has been investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy. Assessment of results reveal that the chemosensor is selective toward Cd(II) and Cu(II). The FT-IR spectroscopic method was applied for further confirmation of the complexation phenomenon. Besides this, a study regarding interference of other metals on complex formation in solution has also supported the efficient binding preference of 4 for Cd(II) and Cu(II). From the results it has been concluded that 4 has compatible coordination sphere to accommodate these metals. The similarities and differences revealed that being soft nature of both metals and because of diagonal relationship in the periodic table their coordination behavior toward N/O-donor ligand may be treated as a test on possibility of the Cu(II) ions to be displaced by Cd(II). The study certainly will help in understanding the hazards of Cd(II) in biological systems.

  17. How Do Heavier Halide Ligands Affect the Signs and Magnitudes of the Zero-Field Splittings in Halogenonickel(II) Scorpionate Complexes? A Theoretical Investigation Coupled to Ligand-Field Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank

    2012-07-10

    This work presents a detailed analysis of the physical origin of the zero-field splittings (ZFSs) in a series of high-spin (S = 1) nickel(II) scorpionate complexes Tp*NiX (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazole)borate, X = Cl, Br, I) using quantum chemical approaches. High-frequency and -field electron paramagnetic resonance studies have shown that the complexes with heavier halide ligands (Br, I) have greater magnitudes but opposite signs of the ZFSs compared with the chloro congener (Desrochers, P. J.; Telser, J.; Zvyagin, S. A.; Ozarowski, A.; Krzystek, J.; Vicic, D. A. Inorg. Chem.2006, 45, 8930-8941). To rationalize the experimental findings, quantum chemical calculations of the ZFSs in this Ni(II) halide series have been conducted. The computed ZFS using wave-function-based ab initio methods (state-averaged CASSCF, NEVPT2, and SORCI) are in good agreement with the experiment. For comparison, density functional theory was only marginally successful. The ligand-field analysis demonstrates that the signs and magnitudes of the ZFSs are subtly determined by the trade-off between the negative contributions from the (1,3)A1(1e→2e) transitions relative to the positive contributions from the remaining d-d excited states. The term from (1,3)A1(1e→2e) stems from the structural feature that the metal center displaces out of the equatorial plane, and gains the importance when heavier halide ligand is involved.

  18. Adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions on activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Naiya, Tarun Kumar; Bhattacharya, Ashim Kumar; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2009-05-01

    The ability of activated alumina as synthetic adsorbent was investigated for adsorptive removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Various physico-chemical parameters such as pH, initial metal ion concentration, and adsorbent dosage level and equilibrium contact time were studied. The optimum solution pH for adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions was found to be 5. Kinetics data were best described by pseudo-second order model. The effective particle diffusion coefficient of Cd(II) and Pb(II) are of the order of 10(-10) m(2)/s. Values of mass transfer coefficient were estimated as 4.868x10(-6) cm/s and 6.85x10(-6) cm/s for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were better fitted to Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous and exothermic for Cd(II) adsorption and endothermic for Pb(II). The sorption energy calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm were 11.85 kJ/mol and 11.8 kJ/mol for the adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) respectively which indicated that both the adsorption processes were chemical in nature. Desorption studies were carried out using dilute mineral acids. Application studies carried out using industrial waste water samples containing Cd(II) and Pb(II) showed the suitability of activated alumina in waste water treatment plant operation.

  19. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage IIA, IIB, and stage II primary peritoneal cancer; the first panel (stage IIA) shows cancer inside both ovaries that ...

  20. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should. Factor II is one such coagulation factor. Factor II deficiency runs in families (inherited) and is very rare. Both parents must ...

  1. A Three Generation Study with Effect of Imidacloprid in Rats: Biochemical and Histopathological Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Prerna; Khera, Kuldeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to evaluate the dose-dependent toxic effects of imidacloprid on the female ratsthat were treated through three generations (F0, F1, and F2). F2 female rats were sacrificed at the end of the experiment to see the long-term effect of imidacloprid. Materials and Methods: Rats were divided into three groups of 6 each. Group I served as control. Group II served as treated I and given 1/45th LD50 (10 mg/kg/day) of imidacloprid. Group III served as treated II and given 1/22th LD50 (20 mg/kg/day) of imidacloprid. After 60 days, oral administration of imidacloprid females were mated with normal males to get F1 and F2 generation. F2 generation female rats were sacrificed at the end of the experiment. Biochemical and a histopathological investigation was done for three groups of F2 generation and statistically analyzed by ANOVA. Results: Average feed intake of F2 female rats was significantly reduced (P < 0.01) at 20 mg/kg/day dose of imidacloprid. There was a significant increase in the activity of alanine aminotransferase, AKP, and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in Group III rats of F2 generation. There was a significant decrease in acetylcholine esterase activity in plasma and brain of both the imidacloprid treated groups. Tissue samples of liver, kidney, and brain of females of F2 generation showed histopathological condition. Conclusion: The results indicated that imidacloprid at a dose of 20 mg/kg bw/day exerts significant toxicological effects on biochemical and histological studies of F2 generation females as compare to 10 mg/kg bw/day. PMID:26862272

  2. Removal of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and trichloroethylene from water by Nanofer ZVI.

    PubMed

    Eglal, Mahmoud M; Ramamurthy, Amruthur S

    2015-01-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticle (Nanofer ZVI) is a new reagent due to its unique structure and properties. Images of scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction revealed that Nanofer ZVI is stable, reactive and has a unique structure. The particles exhibited a spherical shape, a chain-like structure with a particle size of 20 to 100 nm and a surface area between 25-30 m2g(-1). The time interval for particles to agglomerate and settle was between 4-6 h. SEM/EDS Images showed that particle size increased to 2 µm due to agglomeration. Investigation of adsorption and oxidation behavior of Nanofer ZVI used for the removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) ions and trichloroethylene (TCE) from aqueous solutions showed that the optimal pH for Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and TCE removal were 4.5 and 4.8, 5.0 and 6.5, respectively. Test data were used to form Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum contaminant loading was estimated as 270, 170, 110, 130 mg per gram of Nanofer ZVI for Cu(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and TCE respectively. Removal of metal ions is interpreted in terms of their hydrated ionic radii and their electronegativity. TCE oxidation followed the dechlorination pathway resulting in nonhazardous by-products.

  3. Competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on carbonaceous nanofibers: A spectroscopic and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangxue; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-08-05

    The competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the uniform carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated in binary/ternary-metal systems. The pH-dependent sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs was independent of ionic strength, indicating that inner-sphere surface complexation dominated sorption Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs. The maximum sorption capacities of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs in single-metal systems at a pH 5.5±0.2 and 25±1°C were 3.84 (795.65mg/g), 3.21 (204.00mg/g) and 2.67 (156.70mg/g)mmol/g, respectively. In equimolar binary/ternary-metal systems, Pb(II) exhibited greater inhibition of the sorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II), demonstrating the stronger affinity of CNFs for Pb(II). The competitive sorption of heavy metals in ternary-metal systems was predicted quite well by surface complexation modeling derived from single-metal data. According to FTIR, XPS and EXAFS analyses, Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were specifically adsorbed on CNFs via covalent bonding. These observations should provide an essential start in simultaneous removal of multiple heavy metals from aquatic environments by CNFs, and open the doorways for the application of CNFs.

  4. Ion paired chromatography of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) as their 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline chelates.

    PubMed

    Mudasir; Yoshioka, N; Inoue, H

    1997-07-01

    A reversed phase ion-paired chromatographic method that can be used to determine trace amounts of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) was developed and applied to the determination of iron (II) and iron (III) levels in natural water. The separation of these metal ions as their 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline) chelates on an Inertsil ODS column was investigated by using acetonitrile-water (80/20, v/v) containing 0.06 M perchloric acid as mobile phase and diode array spectrophotometric detection at 250-650 nm. Chromatographic parameters such as composition of mobile phase and concentration of perchloric acid in mobile phase were optimized. The calibration graphs of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) ions were linear (r > 0.991) in the concentration range 0-0.5, 0-2.0 and 0-4.0 mug ml(-1), respectively. The detection limit of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) were 2.67, 5.42 and 18.2 ng ml(-1) with relative standard deviation (n = 5) of 3.11, 5.81 and 7.16% at a concentration level of 10 ng ml(-1) for iron (II) and nickel (II) and 25 ng ml(-1) for copper (II), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of iron(II) and iron(III) in tap water and sea water samples without any interference from other common metal ions.

  5. Electrochemical studies of DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII Schiff base tetraazamacrocyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anuj; Vashistha, Vinod Kumar; Tevatia, Prashant; Singh, Randhir

    2017-04-01

    Tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII have been synthesized by template method. These tetraazamacrocycles have been analyzed with various techniques like molar conductance, IR, UV-vis, mass spectral and cyclic voltammetric studies. On the basis of all these studies, octahedral geometry has been assigned to these tetraazamacrocyclic complexes. The DNA binding properties of these macrocyclic complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammetric studies. The cyclic voltammetric data showed that ipc and ipa were effectively decreased in the presence of calf thymus DNA, which is a strong evidence for the interaction of these macrocyclic complexes with the calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant found in the order: KCoII > KNiII > KMnII which indicates that CoII macrocyclic complex has formed a strong intercalated intermediate. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV) and voltammetric binding constant were found in the order KSV(CoII) > KSV(NiII) > KSV(MnII) and K+(CoII) > K+(NiII) > K+(MnII) which shows that CoII macrocyclic complex exhibits the high interaction affinity towards ct-DNA by the intercalation binding. Biological studies of the macrocyclic complexes compared with the standard drug like Gentamycin, have shown antibacterial activities against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. cereus, S. aureus and antifungal activity against C. albicans.

  6. Syntheses and magnetostructural investigations on Kuratowski-type homo- and heteropentanuclear coordination compounds [MZn4Cl4(L)6] (M(II) = Zn, Fe, Co, Ni, or Cu; L = 5,6-dimethyl-1,2,3-benzotriazolate) represented by the nonplanar K(3,3) graph.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Shyam; Tonigold, Markus; Speldrich, Manfred; Kögerler, Paul; Weil, Matthias; Volkmer, Dirk

    2010-08-16

    Homo- and heteropentanuclear coordination compounds [MZn(4)Cl(4)(L)(6)] (M(II) = Zn, Fe, Co, Ni, or Cu; L = 5,6-dimethyl-1,2,3-benzotriazolate) were prepared containing mu(3)-bridging N-donor ligands (1,2,3-benzotriazolate), which are structurally related to the fundamental secondary building unit of Metal-organic Framework Ulm University-4 (MFU-4). The unique topology of these T(d)-symmetrical compounds is characterized by the nonplanar K(3,3) graph, introduced into graph theory by the mathematician Casimir Kuratowski in 1930. The following "Kuratowski-type" compounds were investigated by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis: [MZn(4)Cl(4)(Me(2)bta)(6)].2DMF (M(II) = Zn, Fe, Co, and Cu; DMF = N,N'-dimethylformamide) and [MZn(4)Cl(4)(Me(2)bta)(6)].2C(6)H(5)Br (M(II) = Co and Ni; C(6)H(5)Br = bromobenzene). The mu(3)-bridging benzotriazolate ligands span the edges of an imaginary tetrahedron, in the center of which a redox-active octahedrally coordinated M(II) ion is placed. Four Zn(II) ions are located at the corners of the coordination units. Each Zn center is bound to a monodentate Cl(-) anion and three N-donor atoms stemming from different benzotriazolate ligands. The fact that open-shell redox-active M(II) ions can be introduced selectively into the central octahedral coordination sites is unambiguously proven by a combination of magnetic measurements, UV-vis spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry analysis. The phase purity of all compounds was checked by powder X-ray diffractometry, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The electronic spectra and magnetic properties of the compounds are in complete agreement with their structures determined from single-crystal data. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that all compounds possess a high thermal stability up to 673 K. The pentanuclear compounds retain their structural integrity in solution, as evidenced by time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis

  7. Immobilization of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) ions on kaolinite and montmorillonite surfaces from aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Sen Gupta, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2008-04-01

    The present study investigates the immobilization of Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) on clays (kaolinite and montmorillonite) in aqueous medium through the process of adsorption under a set of variables (concentration of metal ion, amount of clay, pH, time and temperature of interaction). Increasing pH favours the removal of metal ions till they are precipitated as the insoluble hydroxides. The uptake is rapid with maximum adsorption being observed within 180 min for Pb(II) and Ni(II) and 240 min for Cd(II). A number of available models like the Lagergren pseudo first-order kinetics, second-order kinetics, Elovich equation, liquid film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion are utilized to evaluate the kinetics and the mechanism of the immobilization interactions. Two isotherm equations due to Langmuir and Freundlich showed good fits with the experimental data. Kaolinite and montmorillonite have considerable Langmuir monolayer capacity with respect to Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II), the values being in the range of 6.8-11.5mg/g (kaolinite) and 21.1-31.1mg/g (montmorillonite). The Freundlich adsorption capacity follows a similar order. The thermodynamics of the immobilization process indicates the same to be exothermic with Pb(II) and Ni(II), but endothermic with Cd(II). The interactions with Pb(II) and Ni(II) are accompanied by decrease in entropy and Gibbs energy while the endothermic immobilization of Cd(II) is supported by an increase in entropy and an appreciable decrease in Gibbs energy. The results have established good potentiality for kaolinite and montmorillonite to remove heavy metals like Pb(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous medium through adsorption-mediated immobilization.

  8. Part i: Numerical Investigation of the Rkky Interaction in a BCS Superconductor; Part II: Dynamical Analysis of Leed from the (110) Surfaces of Substitutionally Disordered GALLIUM(X)ALUMINUM(1-X)ARSENIDE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Steven Leslie

    In Part I the spatial spin susceptibility (chi)(r) of a BCS superconductor is calculated using finite temperature Green's functions. A numerical study of the results reveals that the RKKY interaction is only modified by about 2 - 3% from its normal value for distances less than 10 p(,o)(' -1) where p(,o) is the Fermi momentum, and that the change in the RKKY interaction is exponentially damped out at further distances. In Part II we discuss how low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), which has been successful in determining the surface atomic geometries of compound semiconductors, can be extended to surface structure studies of substitutionally disordered ternary semiconductor interfaces. We use an average T-matrix approximation (ATA) to compute the intensities of 30 - 240 eV low-energy electrons diffracted from the (110) surfaces of Ga(,x)Al(,1-x)As(110), for values of x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.32, 0.50, 1.00. We find that our computed diffracted intensities correctly mimic the trends in the experimental data and attempt a structure search for Ga(,0.50)Al(,0.50)As.

  9. Comparative investigation of GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II and InP/InGaAs type-I doped-channel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Jung-Hui; Chiang, Te-Kuang; Chiang, Chung-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Min

    2015-02-15

    DC performance of GaAsSb/InGaAs type-II and InP/InGaAs type-I doped-channel field-effect transistors (DCFETs) is demonstrated and compared by two-dimensional simulated analysis. As compared with the traditional InP/InGaAs DCFET, the GaAsSb/InGaAs DCFET exhibits a higher drain current of 8.05 mA, a higher transconductance of 216.24 mS/mm, and a lower gate turn-on voltage of 0.25 V for the presence of a relatively large conduction band discontinuity (ΔE{sub c} ≈ 0.4 eV) at GaAsSb/InGaAs heterostructure and the formation of two-dimensional electron gas in the n{sup +}-InGaAs doping channel. However, due to the tunneling effect under large gate-to-source bias, it results in considerably large gate leakage current in the GaAsSb/InGaAs DCFET.

  10. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel investigation of Westinghouse 19B-2, 19B-8, and 19XB-1 Jet-Propulsion Engines II : analysis of turbine performance of 19B-8 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Richard P; Suozzi, Frank L

    1948-01-01

    Performance characteristics were determined from an investigation of the complete engine in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The investigation covered a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 30,000 feet and flight Mach numbers from 0.05 to 0.46 for various tail-cone positions over the entire operable range of engine speeds. The characteristics of the turbine are presented as functions of the total-pressure ratio across the turbine and the turbine speed and the gas flow corrected to NACA standard atmospheric conditions at sea level.

  11. Investigation of the configurational and conformational influences on the hormonal activity of 1,2-bis(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamines and of their platinum(II) complexes. 1. Synthesis, estradiol receptor affinity, and estrogenic activity of diastereomeric [N-alkyl- and N,N'-dialkyl-1,2- bis(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylenediamine]dichloroplatinum(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Gust, R; Niebler, K; Schönenberger, H

    1995-06-09

    N-Monoalkylated (Et) and N,N'-dialkylated (Me and Et) 1,2-bis(2,6-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethylenediamines and their dichloroplatinum(II) complexes were synthesized, and their configuration and conformational behavior were 1H-NMR spectroscopically clarified. The latter was brought in relation to their relative binding affinity (RBA) to the estrogen receptor as well as to their estrogenic potency. In contrast to the RR/SS-configurated diamines, the R/S-configurated ones showed marked estrogenic properties which correlate with the RBA's. In the related R/S-configurated complexes the estrogenic activity is determined by the same structural requirements as in the diamine series. However, a correlation between RBA's and estrogenic potencies is missing. The connection between spatial structure and activity is discussed by use of a drug-receptor model recently proposed by Höltje and Dall.

  12. On the Lewis acidic character of bis(salicylaldiminato)zinc(ii) Schiff-base complexes: a computational and experimental investigation on a series of compounds varying the bridging diimine.

    PubMed

    Forte, Giuseppe; Oliveri, Ivan Pietro; Consiglio, Giuseppe; Failla, Salvatore; Di Bella, Santo

    2017-03-20

    This contribution explores the effect of the 1,2-diimine bridge upon the Lewis acidic character of a series of bis(salicylaldiminato)zinc(ii), ZnL, Schiff-base complexes. The structure of the monomeric and dimeric ZnL complexes, and of the 1 : 1 adducts with pyridine, ZnL·py, is fully optimized by means of DFT calculations. The Gibbs free energy for the dimerization of ZnL complexes and for the formation of ZnL·py adducts is evaluated by accurate composite calculations. It accounts for their spontaneous dimerization and for the greater stability of the ZnL·py adducts with respect to the dimers. Calculated binding constants for the formation ZnL·py adducts are in excellent agreement with experimentally derived values, thus allowing establishing a relative Lewis acidity scale within this series. While the complex derived from the non-conjugated ethylenediamine reveals the lowest Lewis acidity, the complex derived from the diaminomaleonitrile represents the stronger Lewis acidic species. These findings are in good agreement with the greater catalytic activity observed for ZnL Schiff-base complexes derived from conjugated 1,2-diamines in comparison to the non-conjugated analogues. Both in ZnL dimers as well as in ZnL·py adducts the geometry of the coordination sphere seems to be a relevant feature to assess their relative stability. Thus, while the quasi-planarity of ZnL monomers of the conjugated diimines is an unfavourable feature in the dimerization process, it represents an important aspect in stabilizing ZnL·py adducts in a nearly perfect square-pyramidal coordination. These features are relevant for the sensing and catalytic properties of these complexes.

  13. Palladium(II) chloride complexation: Spectrophotometric investigation in aqueous solutions from 5 to 125°C and theoretical insight into Pd-Cl and Pd-OH2 interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Boily, Jean F.; Seward, Terry M.

    2005-08-01

    The thermodynamic stabilities of these complexes were studied in aqueous solutions from 5 to 125°C with UV-vis spectrophotometry using a quartz flow-through cell. Tentative measurements up to 200°C were also carried out in pressurised titanium and gold-lined optical cells but revealed important losses in soluble palladium. The strong ligand-to-metal charge transfer bands of the palladium complexes below 350 nm were used to constrain the stepwise thermodynamic formation constants at each temperature, using results of singular value decompositions of the spectra over a broad range of palladium:chloride ratios and wavelengths. The temperature-dependent constants were used to obtain changes in enthalpy and in entropy for each reaction. The thermodynamic stabilities of PdCl(H2O)3+, PdCl2(H2O)20, and PdCl3(H2O)- are larger at higher temperatures, whilst the one of PdCl42- is smaller. All changes in entropies are positive for the former three species, but negative for the latter, presumably due to a larger solvent reorganisation around the doubly charged PdCl42- species. The room temperature thermodynamic values derived from this study are also in agreement with previously published calorimetric data. Theoretical calculations on the intramolecular distributions of electrons in the different palladium(II) chloro aqua complexes, using the methods of atoms in molecules and of the electron localisation function, showed Pd-Cl and Pd-OH2 interactions to be of largely closed-shell/ionic nature. These interactions induce an important distortion of the outer core shell electrons of Pd, as well as stable accumulations of electrons between adjacent Pd-Cl and Pd-OH2 bonds known as ligand opposed core charge concentrations

  14. An Observational and modeling strategy to investigate the impact of remote sources on local air quality: A Houston, Texas case study from the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS II)

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, W. W.; Pierce, R.; Sparling, L. C.; Osterman, G.; McCann, K.; Fischer, M. L.; Rappengluck, B.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Kittaka, C.; Evans, K.; Biraud, S.; Lefer, Barry; Andrews, A.; Oltmans, S.

    2010-01-05

    Quantifying the impacts of remote sources on individual air quality exceedances remains a significant challenge for air quality forecasting. One goal of the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS II) was to assess the impact of distant sources on air quality in east Texas. From 23-30 August 2006, retrievals of tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) from NASA’s Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) reveal the transport of CO from fires in the United States Pacific Northwest to Houston, Texas. This transport occurred behind a cold front and contributed to the worst ozone exceedance period of the summer in the Houston area. We present supporting satellite observations from the NASA A-Train constellation of the vertical distribution of smoke aerosols and CO. Ground-based in situ CO measurements in Oklahoma and Texas track the CO plume as it moves south and indicate mixing of the aloft plume to the surface by turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer and convection during the day. Ground-based aerosol speciation and lidar observations do not find appreciable smoke aerosol transport for this case. However, MODIS aerosol optical depths and model simulations indicate some smoke aerosols were transported from the Pacific Northwest through Texas to the Gulf of Mexico. Chemical transport and forward trajectory models confirm the three major observations: (1) the AIRS envisioned CO transport, (2) the satellite determined smoke plume height, and (3) the timing of the observed surface CO increases. Further, the forward trajectory simulations find two of the largest Pacific Northwest fires likely had the most significant impact.

  15. A Phase I/II Study of the Investigational Drug Alisertib in Combination With Abiraterone and Prednisone for Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Progressing on Abiraterone

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheel A.; Sama, Ashwin R.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean H.; Kennedy, Brooke; Kilpatrick, Deborah; Ye, Zhong; Yang, Hushan; Mu, Zhaomei; Leiby, Benjamin; Lewis, Nancy; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Kelly, William Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer did not tolerate the combination of alisertib with abiraterone and prednisone. There was no clear signal indicating that adding alisertib might be beneficial for those patients progressing on abiraterone. Background. We hypothesized that Aurora A kinase (AK) contributes to castrate resistance in prostate cancer (PCa) and that inhibiting AK with alisertib can resensitize PCa cells to androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor abiraterone. Methods. This was a phase I/II trial to determine the safety and efficacy of alisertib when given in combination with abiraterone plus prednisone (AP). Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients were treated with dose escalation (alisertib at 30, 40, and 50 mg orally b.i.d., days 1–7 every 21 days) per standard 3+3 design. Results. Nine of 43 planned subjects were enrolled. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached, and the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) included neutropenic fever (1 of 9), neutropenia (1 of 9), fatigue with memory impairment (1 of 9), and diarrhea/mucositis (1 of 9). No prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decrease or circulating tumor cell (CTC) changes were observed during the study. Pharmacodynamically, adding alisertib did not affect total testosterone or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels. There was some change in neuroendocrine markers after therapy. Mean duration on study was 2.5 months. The trial was terminated early. Conclusion. A tolerable dose of alisertib in combination with AP in mCRPC was not established in this study. There was no clear signal indicating that alisertib might be beneficial for patients with mCRPC progressing on abiraterone. PMID:28178640

  16. Solar Ca II K Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  17. Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions by olive cake.

    PubMed

    Doyurum, Sabriye; Celik, Ali

    2006-11-02

    The removal of heavy metals from wastewater using olive cake as an adsorbent was investigated. The effect of the contact time, pH, temperature, and concentration of adsorbate on adsorption performance of olive cake for Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were examined by batch method. Adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) in aqueous solution onto olive cake was studied in single component. After establishing the optimum conditions, elution of these ions from the adsorbent surface was also examined. The optimum sorption conditions were determined for two elements. Maximum desorption of the Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions were found to be 95.92 and 53.97% by 0.5M HNO(3) and 0.2M HCl, respectively. The morphological analysis of the olive cake was performed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  18. Influence of different mineral and Organic pesticide treatments on Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) contents determined by derivative potentiometric stripping analysis in Italian white and red wines.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Francesco; La Pera, Lara; Di Bella, Giuseppa; Nicotina, Mariano; Dugo, Giacomo

    2003-02-12

    This paper deals with the use of derivative potentiometric stripping analysis (dPSA) as a rapid and precise method to determine Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels in red and white wine samples from Sicily, Campania, and Tuscany and to investigate the possible connection between the content of these metals and the pesticide treatments used in vine-growing to control plant diseases and pests. dPSA allowed direct quantitation of heavy metals in acidified wines without any sample pretreatment. Mean recoveries of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ranged from 95.5 to 99.2% for white wine samples and from 96.1 to 100.0% for red wine samples. The obtained results showed that Cd(II) was not found in any sample and that Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) levels were always lower than the toxicity limits in both fungicide- and water-treated wines. Nevertheless, the contents of metals were increased in samples from organic and inorganic pesticides treatment with respect to the water-treated samples. In particular, quinoxyfen, dinocap-penconazole, and dinocap applications considerably increased Cu(II) and Zn(II) contents in white and red wines. The levels of lead were significantly raised by azoxystrobin and sulfur treatments.

  19. T lymphocytes and dendritic cells are activated by the deletion of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) gene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Yi; Noh, Young-Wook; Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Jin-Man; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2006-02-15

    Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) is a member of antioxidant enzyme family and it plays a protective role against oxidative damage. Constitutive production of endogenous reactive oxygen species was detected in spleen and bone marrow cells lacking Prx II. Here, we investigated the role of Prx II in immune responses. The total number of splenocytes (especially, the population of S-phase cells and CD3(+) T cells) was significantly higher in Prx II(-/-) mice than in wild type. Number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in Prx II(-/-) mice was also higher than wild type. Differentiation of Prx II(-/-) mouse bone marrow cells into CD11c-positive dendritic cells was greater than that of wild type. Transplantation of Prx II(-/-) bone marrow cells into wild type mice increased PBMCs in blood and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Prx II deletion enhances concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenocyte proliferation and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) activity of bone marrow-derived CD11c-positive dendritic cells to stimulate recipient splenocytes. Collectively, these data suggest that Prx II inhibits the immune cell responsiveness, which may be regulated by scavenging the low amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  20. Sequestration of chelated copper by structural Fe(II): Reductive decomplexation and transformation of Cu(II)-EDTA.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Wu, Deli; Zhao, Linghui; Luo, Cong; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Yalei

    2016-05-15

    Chelated coppers, such as Cu(II)-EDTA, are characteristically refractory and difficult to break down because of their high stability and solubility. Cu(II)-EDTA sequestration by structural Fe(II) (Fe(II)) was investigated intensively in this study. Up to 101.21mgCu(II)/gFe(II) was obtained by Fe(II) in chelated copper sequestration under near neutral pH condition (pH 7.70). The mechanism of Cu(II)-EDTA sequestration by Fe(II) was concluded as follows: 3Cu(II)-EDTA+7Fe(II)+9H2O → Cu(0)↓+ Cu2O↓(the major product)+2Fe2O3·H2O↓+3Fe(II)-EDTA +14H(+) Novel results strongly indicate that Cu(II) reductive transformation induced by surface Fe(II) was mainly responsible for chelated copper sequestration. Cu(0) generation was initially facilitated, and subsequent reduction of Cu(II) into Cu(I) was closely combined with the gradual increase of ORP (Oxidation-Reduction Potential). Cu-containing products were inherently stable, but Cu2O would be reoxidized to Cu(II) with extra-aeration, resulting in the release of copper, which was beneficial to Cu reclamation. Concentration diminution of Cu(II)-EDTA within the electric double layer and competitive adsorption were responsible for the negative effects of Ca(2+), Mg(2+). By generating vivianite, PO4(3-) was found to decrease surface Fe(II) content. This study is among the first ones to identify the indispensible role of reductive decomplexation in chelated copper sequestration. Given the high feasibility and reactivity, Fe(II) may provide a potential alternative in chelated metals pollution controlling.

  1. Formation of layered Fe(II)-Al(III)-hydroxides during reaction of Fe(II) with aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Evert J

    2012-05-01

    The reactivity of aqueous Fe(II) with aluminum oxide in anoxic solutions was investigated with batch kinetic experiments combined with Fe K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to characterize Fe(II) sorption products. Formation of Fe(II)-Al(III)-layered double hydroxides with an octahedral sheet structure similar to nikischerite (NaFe(II)(6) Al(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(18) (H(2)O)(12)) was observed within a few hours during sorption at pH 7.5 and aqueous Fe(II) concentrations of 1-3 mM. These Fe(II) phases are composed of brucite-like Fe(II)(OH)(2) sheets with partial substitution of Al(III) for Fe(II), charge balanced by anions coordinated along the basal planes. Their fast rate of formation suggests that these previously unrecognized Fe(II) phases, which are structurally and compositionally similar to green rust, may be an important sink of Fe(II) in suboxic and anoxic geochemical environments, and impact the fate of structurally compatible trace metals, such as Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), as well as redox-reactive species including Cr(VI) and U(VI). Further studies are required to assess the thermodynamics, formation kinetics, and stability of these Fe(II) minerals under field conditions.

  2. Investigations of the Safety of Li/SOCl2 Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    INVESTIGATIONS OF THE SAFETY OF LI/SOCL2 BATTERIES . CU) _ SS FEB 80 K M ABRAHAM, R M MANK, 6 L HOLLECK DAABO?-78-C-0564 UNCLASSIFIED C-536 DELETTR-78...Research and Development Technical Report DELET-TR-78-054-F 0 INVESTIGATIONS OF THE SAFETY OF Li/SOC12 BATTERIES 0 Kuzhikalail M. Abraham Richard M...formed from the reaction of Li2S, produced in the cell under these operational modes, with LiAlCl4. It has been found that the lithium thioalminum

  3. Copper(II) and lead(II) removal from aqueous solution by water treatment residues.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, Paola; Silvetti, Margherita; Garau, Giovanni; Demurtas, Daniela; Deiana, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the ability of Fe- and Al-based water treatment residues (Fe- and Al-WTR) to accumulate Pb(II) and Cu(II) at pH 4.5. The role of the inorganic and organic fractions of WTRs in metals sorption was also assessed. Sorption isotherms showed a higher sorption of Pb(II) by both WTRs with respect to Cu(II) (e.g. 0.105 and 0.089 mmol g(-1) of Pb(II) and Cu(II) respectively sorbed by Fe-WTR). Fe-WTR revealed a stronger sorbent for both metals than Al-WTR. The amount of Pb(II) and Cu(II) sorbed by Fe-WTR was about the 69% and 63% higher than that sorbed by the Al-WTR. The organic matter of Fe- and Al-WTR contributed to about 26% and 8.5% respectively in the sorption of both metals. The sequential extraction procedure showed that the greatest amount of metals sorbed by both WTRs were tightly bound and not extractable, and this was particularly apparent for Cu(II). The FT-IR spectra indicated the formation of inner-sphere complexes between the Fe(Al)-O nucleus and Pb(II) and Cu(II). Moreover, the FT-IR spectra also suggested that the humic fraction of WTRs interacted, through the carboxylate groups, with Cu(II) and Pb(II) by forming mainly monodentate and bidentate complexes, respectively.

  4. Investigation of turbines for driving supersonic compressors II : performance of first configuration with 2.2 percent reduction in nozzle flow area / Warner L. Stewart, Harold J. Schum, Robert Y. Wong

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Warner L; Schum, Harold J; Wong, Robert Y

    1952-01-01

    The experimental performance of a modified turbine for driving a supersonic compressor is presented and compared with the performance of the original configuration to illustrate the effect of small changes in the ratio of nozzle-throat area to rotor-throat area. Performance is based on the performance of turbines designed to operate with both blade rows close to choking. On the basis of the results of this investigation, the ratio of areas is concluded to become especially critical in the design of turbines such as those designed to drive high-speed, high-specific weight-flow compressors where the turbine nozzles and rotor are both very close to choking.

  5. Watershed Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Investigating local watersheds presents middle school students with authentic opportunities to engage in inquiry and address questions about their immediate environment. Investigation activities promote learning in an investigations interdisciplinary context as students explore relationships among chemical, biological, physical, geological, and…

  6. Adsorption and desorption of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions using chitosan crosslinked with epichlorohydrin-triphosphate as the adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Laus, Rogério; Costa, Thiago G; Szpoganicz, Bruno; Fávere, Valfredo T

    2010-11-15

    In this study, chitosan (CTS) was crosslinked with both epichlorohydrin (ECH) and triphosphate (TPP), by covalent and ionic crosslinking, respectively. The resulting new CTS-ECH-TPP adsorbent was characterized by CHN analysis, EDS, FTIR spectroscopy, TGA and DSC, and the adsorption and desorption of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in aqueous solution were investigated. Potentiometric studies were also performed and revealed three titratable protons for each pK(a) value of 5.14, 6.76 and 9.08. The results obtained showed that the optimum pH values for adsorption were 6.0 for Cu(II), 7.0 for Cd(II) and 5.0 for Pb(II). The kinetics study demonstrated that the adsorption process proceeded according to the pseudo-second-order model. Three isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich) were employed in the analysis of the adsorption equilibrium data. The Langmuir model resulted in the best fit and the new adsorbent had maximum adsorption capacities for Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions of 130.72, 83.75 and 166.94 mg g(-1), respectively. Desorption studies revealed that HNO(3) and HCl were the best eluents for desorption of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from the crosslinked chitosan.

  7. Sensitive electrochemical sensor using a graphene-polyaniline nanocomposite for simultaneous detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Ruecha, Nipapan; Rodthongkum, Nadnudda; Cate, David M; Volckens, John; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S

    2015-05-18

    This work describes the development of an electrochemical sensor for simultaneous detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) using a graphene-polyaniline (G/PANI) nanocomposite electrode prepared by reverse-phase polymerization in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Two substrate materials (plastic film and filter paper) and two nanocomposite deposition methods (drop-casting and electrospraying) were investigated. Square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry currents were higher for plastic vs. paper substrates. Performance of the G/PANI nanocomposites was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry. The G/PANI-modified electrode exhibited high electrochemical conductivity, producing a three-fold increase in anodic peak current (vs. the unmodified electrode). The G/PANI-modified electrode also showed evidence of increased surface area under SEM. Square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry was used to measure Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) in the presence of Bi(III). A linear working range of 1-300 μg L(-1) was established between anodic current and metal ion concentration with detection limits (S/N=3) of 1.0 μg L(-1) for Zn(II), and 0.1 μg L(-1) for both Cd(II) and Pb(II). The G/PANI-modified electrode allowed selective determination of the target metals in the presence of common metal interferences including Mn(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(II). Repeat assays on the same device demonstrated good reproducibility (%RSD<11) over 10 serial runs. Finally, this system was utilized for determining Zn(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) in human serum using the standard addition method.