Science.gov

Sample records for ii muon pdt

  1. Flammability tests on D0 Run II muon PDT Gas and P-10 Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Herman F. Haggerty; James L. Priest and Tom Marshall

    2001-07-12

    The authors have done a series of measurements with mixtures of Argon, CF4 and CH4 to demonstrate that the mixture chosen for RunII (84% Argon, 8% CH4, 8% CF4) is not flammable. The tests were conducted in the Meson Detector Building in a test cell similar in construction to a cell of a Muon PDT. In order to establish the viability of the test set-up, they first repeated the demonstration that P-10 gas (90% Argon, 10% CH4) is in fact flammable, contrary to the classification by the US DOT. US DOT regulation 173.115 defines flammable gas as: (1) is ignitable (at 14.7 psi) when in a mixture of 13% or less with air; or (2) has a flammability range (at 14.7 psi) with air of at least 12% regardless of the lower explosive limit (LEL). P-10 has a LEL of about 40% and a flammability range of about 10%, so P-10 is not flammable according to the US DOT definition. The point here is that the DOT classifications are to serve the DOT's function to ensure transportation safety, and are not necessarily appropriate for other situations. The first configuration of their test cell, however, apparently failed to ignite P-10. With the guidance of Bill Nuttall of CERN, they modified their test cell to make it more like the standard flammability testing setups, with a large viewing window and a spark gap in the middle of the cell. In this second configuration P-10 was easily and reliably ignitable. After becoming more familiar with the visible indicators of combustion of P-10 (water vapor cloud formation, pressure changes and gas venting) they retested with the initial configuration, and found that the mixture actually had been burning, and that they had just missed all the indications. The data from CERN showed that P-10 burns rather slowly, with about a one second rise time for the pressure to reach the maximum of four atmospheres overpressure. In the tests they saw no signs of any flame, but only a water vapor cloud. Some preliminary tests with the same cell using Argon-Ethane and

  2. The Muon system of the run II D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V.A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J.F.; Baturitsky, M.A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J.M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S.R.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Tata Inst. /Dubna, JINR /Moscow, ITEP /Moscow State U. /Serpukhov, IHEP /St. Petersburg, INP /Arizona U. /Florida State U. /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Boston U. /Northeastern U. /Brookhaven /Washington U., Seattle /Minsk, Inst. Nucl. Problems

    2005-03-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of the upgraded D0 muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the D0 muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  3. Specific light exposure of galactosylated Zn(II) phthalocyanines for selective PDT effects on breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantareva, V. N.; Kril, A.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved non-invasive and curative procedure for different oncological and non-oncological applications. PDT is still under development due to several limitations which lead to partially successful photodynamic response. The crucial steps in PDT procedure are binding of the photosensitizer to outer cell membrane, its penetration and subcellular localization which envisage the target sites of reactive oxygen species generated during irradiation. Since the surrounding normal cells are also exposed to the photosensitizer and the ambient daylight can be harmful for healthy tissues after therapeutic light application, the challenging task in PDT research is to optimize the procedure in a way to reach tumor cell selectivity. The present study outlines the influence of a light exposure pre-treatment (prior therapeutic light) with specific wavelengths (365 nm and 635 nm) on the uptake, the localization and further re-localization of galactose-substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanines into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The in vitro photodynamic effect towards tumor cells was studied in comparison to the normal cell line Balb/c 3T3 (clone 31) after pre-irradiation with UV light (365 nm) and red LED (635 nm). The results suggest that the galactose functional groups of Zn(II) phthalocyanine and the harmless UV light at 365 nm favor the selective PDT response.

  4. Photosensitizer Radachlorin®: Skin cancer PDT phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kochneva, Elena V; Filonenko, Elena V; Vakulovskaya, Elena G; Scherbakova, Elena G; Seliverstov, Oleg V; Markichev, Nikolay A; Reshetnickov, Andrei V

    2010-12-01

    "Radachlorin"(®), also known in the EU as Bremachlorin, a composition of 3 chlorophyll a derivatives in an aqueous solution, was introduced into the Russian Pharmacopoeia. Its GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) facility based manufacturing method was patented. Laboratory experiments and clinical phase I were performed. Protocols were designed for PDT of basal cell carcinoma of the skin to result in GCP (Good Clinical Practice)-conformed randomized phase II clinical studies. "Radachlorin"(®) solution for intravenous infusions 0.35% 10mL in the doses of 0.5-0.6 and 1.0-1.2mg/kg and a gel for topical application 0.1% 25g in the dose of 0.1g/cm(2) were photoactivated by 2.5W 662nm semiconductor laser "LAKHTA-MILON(®)" (St. Petersburg, Russia) in light doses of 200, 300 (solution), 400, 600, 800 (gel) J/cm(2). Safety study showed no side effects and a good tolerability of "Radachlorin"(®) by patients. There was no normal skin/subdermal tissue damage after both laser and sun light exposure. The main part (98%) of the drug was excreted or metabolized in the first 48h. Drug administration at a dose of 1.0-1.2mg/kg and irradiation at 3h with 662±3nm light at a dose of 300J/cm(2) (solution) and 4 PDT sessions at an interval of 1 week with 3h gel exposure, followed by 400J/cm(2) light exposure (gel) were found to be the optimal treatment regimes. Having successfully passed clinical trials, "Radachlorin"(®) achieved marketing authorization in Russia in 2009 and a conditional approval in South Korea in 2008. It is a candidate for phase III clinical trials in the EC and may be commercialized as a prospective second-generation photosensitizer.

  5. The Performance and Long Term Stability of the D0 Run II Forward Muon Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Bezzubov, V.; Denisov, D.; Evdokimov, V.; Lipaev, V.; Shchukin, A.; Vasilyev, I.

    2014-07-21

    The performance of the D0 experiment forward muon scintillation counters system during Run II of the Tevatron from 2001 to 2011 is described. The system consists of 4214 scintillation counters in six layers. The long term stability of the counters amplitude response determined using LED calibration system and muons produced in proton-antiproton collisions is presented. The average signal amplitude for counters of all layers has gradually decreased over ten years by 11%. The reference timing, determined using LED calibration, was stable within 0.26 ns. Average value of muon timing peak position was used for periodic D0 clock signal adjustments to compensate seasonal drift caused by temperature variations. Counters occupancy for different triggers in physics data collection runs and for minimum bias triggers are presented. The single muon yields versus time and the luminosity dependence of yields were stable for the forward muon system within 1% over 10 years.

  6. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  7. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Dai

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to ensure the highest possible physics output while effectively reducing the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment from low instantaneous luminosity (1032 cm-2 s-1) in 2010 to the peak high instantaneous luminosity (1034 cm-2 s-1). The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher centre-of-mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a highly efficient event selection while reducing the processing time by a factor of three. In addition, the two stages of the high level trigger that was deployed in Run I will be merged for Run II. We will discuss novel approaches that are being developed to further improve the trigger algorithms for Run II and beyond.

  8. Multi-year search for a diffuse flxu of muon neutrinos with AMANDA-II

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer; Achterberg, A.; Collaboration, IceCube

    2008-04-13

    A search for TeV-PeV muon neutrinos from unresolved sources was performed on AMANDA-II data collected between 2000 and 2003 with an equivalent livetime of 807 days. This diffuse analysis sought to find an extraterrestrial neutrino flux from sources with non-thermal components. The signal is expected to have a harder spectrum than the atmospheric muon and neutrino backgrounds. Since no excess of events was seen in the data over the expected background, an upper limit of E{sup 2}{Phi}{sub 90%C.L.} < 7.4 x 10{sup -8} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} is placed on the diffuse flux of muon neutrinos with a {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2} spectrum in the energy range 16 TeV to 2.5 PeV. This is currently the most sensitive {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2} diffuse astrophysical neutrino limit. We also set upper limits for astrophysical and prompt neutrino models, all of which have spectra different than {Phi} {proportional_to} E{sup -2}.

  9. I. Atomic Effects in Tritium Beta-Decay II. Muon to Electron Conversion in Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wampler, Kevin Dean

    I. The final-state, atomic effects in the low energy end of the tritium beta decay spectrum are studied in detail. I treat the instantaneous, two-electron repulsion in the final state, effectively to all orders in perturbation theory, by solving the eigenvalue problem with a discretized and truncated form of the Hamiltonian. I find that these effects fail to explain the distortion in the spectrum observed by Simpson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 649 (1985)). Simpson attributed this distortion to the admixture of a heavy mass antineutrino in the outgoing electron antineutrino state. In fact, the final-state Coulomb effects enhance the distortion. This calculation clears up some of the ambiguities of other theoretical analyses based on considerations of screening functions and perturbation theory. II. I present a phenomenological study of separate lepton number violating muon to electron conversion in atoms. Previous work on this process has concentrated on elastic transitions where the nucleus remains in the ground state. I present an analysis of the branching ratios of inelastic to elastic transitions. This analysis uses realistic muon wavefunctions and electron plane waves. A multipole analysis is used for the nuclear matrix elements. The particular case of ^{32}S is studied in detail. It is found that, if anomalous muon capture occurs, the coherent (ground-state to ground-state) transition dominates the rate, if this transition is allowed by the coupling constants. However, incoherent (excited state) transitions could be significant in some cases, particularly if coupling to the nuclear pseudo-scalar current occurs, and would permit one to obtain stringent limits on the corresponding couplings that mediate muon number violation.

  10. The upgraded K-Long and Muon Detector at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Taylor; Belle Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    We describe the KLM (KLong-Muon) detector for the Belle II detector at the SuperKEKB accelerator located at KEK in Tsukuba, Japan. The endcap RPC (Resistive Plate Chamber) detectors used for Belle have been entirely replaced with a scintillator-based system readout out with Si PMTs. The inner two layers of the barrel have also been replaced, while the outer thirteen layers remain instrumented with RPCs. The design of the detectors, their readout, and expected physics performance will be discussed.

  11. PDT: death pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2007-02-01

    Cellular targets of photodynamic therapy include mitochondria, lysosomes, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane. PDT can evoke necrosis, autophagy and apoptosis, or combinations of these, depending on the PDT dose, the site(s) of photodamage and the cellular phenotype. It has been established that loss of viability occurs even when the apoptotic program is inhibited. Studies assessing effects of ER or mitochondrial photodamage, involving loss of Bcl-2 function, indicate that low-dose PDT elicited a rapid autophagic response in L1210 cells. This was attributed to the ability of autophagy to recycle photodamaged organelles, and there was partial protection from loss of viability. This effect was not observed in L1210/Atg7, where autophagy was silenced. At higher PDT doses, apoptotic cells were observed within 60 min in both cell lines, but more so in L1210. The ability of L1210 cells to undergo autophagy did not offer protection from cell death at the higher PDT dose. Previous studies had indicated that autophagy can contribute to cell death, since L1210 cells that do not undergo an initial apoptotic response often contain multiple autophagic vacuoles 24 hr later. With L1210/Atg7, apoptosis alone may account for the loss of viability at an LD 90 PDT dose.

  12. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  13. Synthesis, DNA interactions and antibacterial PDT of Cu(II) complexes of phenanthroline based photosensitizers via singlet oxygen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhamani, C. N.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Sangeetha Gowda, K. R.; Giridhar, M.; Girija, D.; Prashanth Kumar, P. N.

    2015-03-01

    Cu(II) complexes [Cu(mqt)(B)H2O]ClO4(1-3) of 2-thiol 4-methylquinoline and phenanthroline bases (B), viz 1,10-phenanthroline (phen in 1), Dipyrido[3,2-d:2‧,3‧-f]quinoxaline (dpq in 2) and Dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]phenazine (dppz in 3) have been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment values, EPR spectra and conductivity measurements. The spectral data reveal that all the complexes exhibit square-pyramidal geometry. The DNA-binding behaviors of the three complexes were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and thermal denaturation studies. The DNA binding constants for complexes (1), (2) and (3) were determined to 2.2 × 103, 1.3 × 104 and 8.6 × 104 M-1 respectively. The experimental results suggest that these complexes interact with DNA through groove-binding mode. The photo induced cleavage studies shows that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-Visible irradiation via a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy was studied using photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) assay against Escherichiacoli and all complexes exhibited significant reduction in bacterial growth on photoirradiation.

  14. PDT - PARTICLE DISPLACEMENT TRACKING SOFTWARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    multiple frequency RGB monitor (EGA or better), a math co-processor, and a pointing device. The printers supported by the graphical analysis routines are the HP Laserjet+, Series II, and Series III with at least 1.5 MB memory. The data acquisition routines require the EPIX 4-MEG video board and optional 12.5MHz oscillator, and associated EPIX software. Data can be acquired from any CCD or RS-170 compatible video camera with pixel resolution of 600hX400v or better. PDT is distributed on one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. Due to the use of required proprietary software, executable code is not provided on the distribution media. Compiling the source code requires the Microsoft C v5.1 compiler, Microsoft QuickC v2.0, the Microsoft Mouse Library, EPIX Image Processing Libraries, the Microway NDP-Fortran-386 v2.1 compiler, and the Media Cybernetics HALO Professional Graphics Kernal System. Due to the complexities of the machine requirements, COSMIC strongly recommends the purchase and review of the documentation prior to the purchase of the program. The source code, and sample input and output files are provided in PKZIP format; the PKUNZIP utility is included. PDT was developed in 1990. All trade names used are the property of their respective corporate owners.

  15. In vivo light dosimetry for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Culligan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    In-vivo light Dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the important dosimetry quantities critical for predicting PDT outcome. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area, and its accuracy as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trial of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. The ages of the patients studied varied from 34 to 69 year old. All patients were administered 2mg per kg body weight Photoprin 24 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with laser light with a light fluence of 60 J/cm^2 at 630nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm^2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm^2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 30%. The mean fluence rate delivery varied from 37.84 to 94.05 mW/cm^2 and treatment time varied from 1762 to 5232s. We have established a correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume. The results are discussed using an integrating sphere theory and the measured tissue optical properties. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  16. Muons as local probes of three-body correlations in the mixed state of type-II superconductors.

    PubMed

    Menon, G I; Drew, A; Divakar, U K; Lee, S L; Gilardi, R; Mesot, J; Ogrin, F Y; Charalambous, D; Forgan, E M; Momono, N; Oda, M; Dewhurst, C; Baines, C

    2006-10-27

    The vortex glass state formed by magnetic flux lines in a type-II superconductor is shown to possess nontrivial three-body correlations. While such correlations are usually difficult to measure in glassy systems, the magnetic fields associated with the flux vortices allow us to probe these via muon-spin rotation measurements of the local field distribution. We show via numerical simulations and analytic calculations that these observations provide detailed microscopic insight into the local order of the vortex glass and more generally validate a theoretical framework for correlations in glassy systems.

  17. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for perianal bowenoid papulosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlen, Johannes; Stern, Josef; Graschew, Georgi; Kaus, Michael R.; Tilgen, W.

    1995-03-01

    HPV associated bowenoid papulosis of the anogenital region are classified as carcinoma in situ. The treatment can be difficult and recurrence rates are high. Extended surgical resections may have complications such as anal sphincter insufficiency. PDT does have some advantages and less side effects in the treatment of these tumors. We treated one female patient with an extended perianal bowenoid papulosis. Previous surgical resection led to local recurrence and partial sphincter insufficiency. Twenty-four hours before local laser light radiation (Ar-Dye laser, 630 nm wavelength), a systemic photosensitizer was applied (Photofrin II, 1.5 mg/kg BW). Four courses of PDT were performed within one year. We observed a total tumor necrosis in every radiation area. The previous sphincter insufficiency improved during the sessions. Side effects were rare. Pain in the radiation was stopped within 2 - 3 days under pain medication. PDT can induce a total local tumor necrosis in perianal bowenoid papulosis. Concerning local expansion, PDT can be a curable treatment.

  18. A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

    1955-03-01

    The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

  19. New sensitizers for PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Alan R.; Garbo, Greta M.; Krivak, T.; Mastroianni, Marta; Petousis, Nikolaos H.; St Clair, T.; Weisenberger, M.; van Lier, Johan E.

    1991-06-01

    For a number of well-defined reasons, research into the development of alternative photosensitizers to PhotofrinTM, for use in Photodynamic Therapy, continues. The efforts described in this paper cover the study of a number of sensitizers absorbing at different wavelengths, which may have selective applications in the field of photomedicine. In one approach, the use of tetraazoporphyrins (porphyrazines) as sensitizers is studied. Although related tetramacrocyclic systems such as porphyrins and phthalocyanines have been, and continue to be, well studied in this field, porphyrazines have, to-date, received little attention. In a second study, purpurins are examined as possible alternatives to PhotofrinTM. In a recent study, tissue distribution properties of tin etiopurpurin dichloride, as a function of time, were examined. Results indicate that this purpurin continues to show promise for applications in PDT.

  20. PDT: What's Past Is Prologue.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Keith A; Simone, Charles B; Glatstein, Eli

    2016-05-01

    Despite descriptions of light-mediated therapy in ancient texts and the discovery of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the early 1900s, the landmark article in 1978 in Cancer Research by Dougherty and his colleagues at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute remains rightly viewed as the starting point for clinical PDT in modern medicine. As a large clinical series that explored many of the factors now viewed as critical determinates of PDT dose, efficacy, and toxicity, that study showed remarkable foresight, yet it also served to raise as many questions as it answered. Since its publication, PDT has been increasingly utilized in clinical practice for the treatment of both benign and malignant conditions, and many of their questions have yielded new technologies and areas of investigation, thus remaining highly relevant nearly 40 years after their initial asking. Moreover, continuing advances in our ability to measure physical properties such as absorbed light dose, photosensitizer concentration, tissue oxygen concentration, and singlet oxygen production in real-time may allow for adaptive modification of light delivery during PDT on a fine scale to optimize treatment response. Finally, combining molecularly targeted drugs and novel photosensitizers has the potential to improve further the therapeutic index and extend the spectrum of clinical PDT far beyond what was imagined when that sentinel manuscript was written. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2497-9. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Dougherty et al., Cancer Res 1978;38:2628-35Visit the Cancer Research 75(th) Anniversary timeline.

  1. In-vivo Light dosimetry for pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Cullighan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    In-vivo light dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is one of the critical dosimetry quantities for predicting PDT outcome. This study examines the relationship between the PDT treatment time and thoracic treatment volume and surface area for patients undergoing pleural PDT. In addition, the mean light fluence (rate) and its accuracy were quantified. The patients studied here were enrolled in Phase II clinical trial of Photofrin-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. The ages of the patients studied varied from 34 to 69 years old. All patients were administered 2mg per kg body weight Photoprin 24 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with laser light with a light fluence of 60 J/cm2 at 630nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 30%. The mean fluence rate deliver varied from 37.84 to 94.05 mW/cm2 and treatment time varied from 1762 to 5232s. We found a linear correlation between the total treatment time and the treatment area: t (sec) = 4.80 A (cm2). A similar correlation exists between the treatment time and the treatment volume: t (sec) = 2.33 V (cm3). The results can be explained using an integrating sphere theory and the measured tissue optical properties assuming that the saline liquid has a mean absorption coefficient of 0.05 cm−1. Our long term accuracy studies confirmed light fluence rate measurement accuracy of ±10%. The results can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment. PMID:25914792

  2. In-vivo outcome study of HPPH mediated PDT using singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry (SOED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Kim, Michele M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-03-01

    Type II photodynamic therapy (PDT) is based on the use of photochemical reactions mediated through an interaction between a tumor-selective photosensitizer, photoexcitation with a specific wavelength of light, and production of reactive singlet oxygen. However, the medical application of this technique has been limited due to inaccurate PDT dosimetric methods. The goal of this study is to examine the relationship between outcome (in terms of tumor growth rate) and calculated reacted singlet oxygen concentration [1O2]rx after HPPH-mediated PDT to compare with other PDT dose metrics, such as PDT dose or total light fluence. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were treated with different light fluence and fluence rate conditions. Explicit measurements of photosensitizer drug concentration and tissue optical properties via fluorescence and absorption measurement with a contact probe before and after PDT were taken to then quantify total light fluence, PDT dose, and [1O2]rx based on a macroscopic model of singlet oxygen. In addition, photobleaching of photosenitizer were measured during PDT as a second check of the model. Changes in tumor volume were tracked following treatment and compared to the three calculated dose metrics. The correlations between total light fluence, PDT dose, reacted [1O2]rx and tumor growth demonstrate that [1O2]rx serves as a better dosimetric quantity for predicting treatment outcome and a clinically relevant tumor growth endpoint.

  3. Macroscopic Modeling of the singlet oxygen production during PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhou, Xiaodong; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) dose, D, is defined as the absorbed dose by the photosensitizer during photodynamic therapy. It is proportional to the product of photosensitizer concentration and the light fluence. This quantity can be directly characterized during PDT and is considered to be predictive of photodynamic efficacy under ample oxygen supply. For type-II photodynamic interaction, the cell killing is caused by the reaction of cellular acceptors with singlet oxygen. The production of singlet oxygen can be expressed as ηD, where η is the singlet oxygen quantum yield and is a constant under ample oxygen supply. For most PDT, it is desirable to also take into account the effect of tissue oxygenation. We have modeled the coupled kinetics equation of the concentrations of the singlet oxygen, the photosensitizers in ground and triplet states, the oxygen, and tissue acceptors along with the diffusion equation governing the light transport in turbid medium. We have shown that it is possible to express η as a function of local oxygen concentration during PDT and this expression is a good approximation to predict the production of singlet oxygen during PDT. Theoretical estimation of the correlation between the tissue oxygen concentration and hemoglobin concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood flow is presented. PMID:25983366

  4. Muon colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R. B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A. J.; Chen, P.; Cheng, W.-H.; Cho, Y.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.; Garren, A.; Green, M.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Lee, Y. Y.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Popovic, M.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Summers, D.; Stumer, I.; Syphers, M.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; Van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.

    1996-05-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity μ+μ- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  5. Muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B. |; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {micro}{sup +}{micro}{sup {minus}}colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed.

  6. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a biological modifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obochi, Modestus; Tao, Jing-Song; Hunt, David W. C.; Levy, Julia G.

    1996-04-01

    The capacity of photosensitizers and light to ablate cancerous tissues and unwanted neovasculature constitutes the classical application of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Cell death results from either necrotic or apoptotic processes. The use of photosensitizers and light at doses which do not cause death has been found to affect changes in certain cell populations which profoundly effect their expression of cell surface molecules and secretion of cytokines, thereby altering the functional attributes of the treated cells. Cells of the immune system and the skin may be sensitive to modulation by 'sub-lethal PDT.' Ongoing studies have been conducted to assess, at the molecular level, changes in both lymphocytes and epidermal cells (EC) caused by treatment with low levels of benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) (a photosensitizer currently in clinical trials for cancer, psoriasis, endometriosis and age-related macular degeneration) and light. Treatment of skin with BPD and light, at levels which significantly enhanced the length of murine skin allograft acceptance, have been found to down-regulate the expression of Langerhans cell (LC) surface antigen molecules [major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1] and the formation of some cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- (alpha) ).

  7. The role of DAMPS in ALA-PDT for skin squamous cell carcinoma (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Xiaojie; Ji, Jie; Zhang, Haiyan; Shi, Lei

    2016-03-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) is an established local approach for skin squamous cell carcinoma. It is believed that dangerous signals damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) play an important role in ALA-PDT. In this study, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo expressions of major DAMPs, calreticulin (CRT), heat shock proteins 70 (HSP70), and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), induced by ALA-PDT using immunohistochemistry, western blot, and ELISA in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) mouse model. The role of DAMPs in the maturation of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells was detected by FACS and ELISA. Our results showed that ALA-PDT enhanced the expression of CRT, HSP70, and HMGB1. These induced DAMPs played an important role in activating DCs by PDT-treated tumor cells, including phenotypic maturation (upregulation of surface expression of MHC-II, CD80, and CD86) and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secrete IFN-γ and IL-12). Furthermore, injecting ALA-PDT-treated tumor cells into naïve mice resulted in complete protection against cancer cells of the same origin. Our findings indicate that ALA-PDT can upregulate DAMPs and enhance tumor immunogenicity, providing a promising strategy for inducing a systemic anticancer immune response.

  8. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  9. The role of photodynamic therapy (PDT) physics

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality that employs the photochemical interaction of three components: light, photosensitizer, and oxygen. Tremendous progress has been made in the last 2 decades in new technical development of all components as well as understanding of the biophysical mechanism of PDT. The authors will review the current state of art in PDT research, with an emphasis in PDT physics. They foresee a merge of current separate areas of research in light production and delivery, PDT dosimetry, multimodality imaging, new photosensitizer development, and PDT biology into interdisciplinary combination of two to three areas. Ultimately, they strongly believe that all these categories of research will be linked to develop an integrated model for real-time dosimetry and treatment planning based on biological response. PMID:18697538

  10. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  11. ALA-PDT mediated DC vaccine for skin squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jie; Fan, Zhixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wang, Xiaojie; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Peiru; Yang, Degang; Zhang, Linglin; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine has emerged as a promising immunotherapy for cancers. However, most DC vaccines so far have only achieved limited success in cancer treatment. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an established cancer treatment strategy, can cause immunogenic apoptosis to induce an effective antitumor immune response. In this study, we developed a DC-based cancer vaccine using immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT. The maturation of DCs induced by PDT-treated apoptotic cells was evaluated. The anti-tumor immunity of ALA-PDT-DC vaccine was tested with mouse model. We observed the maturations of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT treated tumor cells, including phenotypic maturation (upregulation of surface expression of MHC-II, DC80, and CD86), and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secret INF-Υ and IL-12). ALA-PDT-DC vaccine mediated by apoptotic cells provided protection against tumor in mice, far stronger than that of DC vaccine obtained from freeze/thaw treated tumor cells. Our results indicate that immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells can be more effective in enhancing DC-based cancer vaccine, which could improve the clinical application of PDT- DC vaccines.

  12. Improvement of DC vaccine with ALA-PDT induced immunogenic apoptotic cells for skin squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jie; Fan, Zhixia; Zhou, Feifan; Wang, Xiaojie; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Peiru; Yang, Degang; Zhang, Linglin; Chen, Wei R; Wang, Xiuli

    2015-07-10

    Dendritic cell (DC) based vaccines have emerged as a promising immunotherapy for cancers. However, most DC vaccines so far have achieved only limited success in cancer treatment. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an established cancer treatment strategy, can cause immunogenic apoptosis to induce an effective antitumor immune response. In this study, we developed a DC-based cancer vaccine using immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT. The maturation of DCs induced by PDT-treated apoptotic cells was evaluated using electron microscopy, FACS, and ELISA. The anti-tumor immunity of ALA-PDT-DC vaccine was tested with a mouse model. We observed the maturations of DCs potentiated by ALA-PDT treated tumor cells, including morphology maturation (enlargement of dendrites and increase of lysosomes), phenotypic maturation (upregulation of surface expression of MHC-II, DC80, and CD86), and functional maturation (enhanced capability to secrete IFN-γ and IL-12, and to induce T cell proliferation). Most interestingly, PDT-induced apoptotic tumor cells are more capable of potentiating maturation of DCs than PDT-treated or freeze/thaw treated necrotic tumor cells. ALA-PDT-DC vaccine mediated by apoptotic cells provided protection against tumors in mice, far stronger than that of DC vaccine obtained from freeze/thaw treated tumor cells. Our results indicate that immunogenic apoptotic tumor cells can be more effective in enhancing a DC-based cancer vaccine, which could improve the clinical application of PDT-DC vaccines.

  13. Naphthalocyanine-complexes as potential photosensitizers for PDT of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopova, Maria; Woehrle, Dieter; Mantareva, Vanya; Mueller, Silke

    1999-07-01

    In the present paper information about the synthesis and results on the pharmacokinetic and experimental photodynamic therapy (PDT) of naphthalocyanines are given. The photodynamic activity of differently substituted zinc(II)- and silicon(IV)-naphthalocyanines using liposomes or Cremophor EL as drug-delivery systems is shown on different tumor models. For the evaluation of the phototherapeutic effect different assessment criteria were used, including light and electron microscope observations. The main conclusions which can be arrived at on the basis of our findings are the following: silicon(IV)-naphthalocyanine seems to be not a very effective tumor sensitizer, especially in the treatment o pigmented melanoma, while zinc(II)-naphthalocyanines appear to be very promising for PDT of tumors. Their selective targeting and slow clearance from tumor tissue, fast clearance from skin and pronounced phototherapeutic effect on different tumor models and especially at melanotic tumors, even after application of low drug doses, make this group of photosensitizers very attractive for successful PDT of cancer.

  14. Targeted PDT Agent Eradicates TrkC Expressing Tumors via Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This contribution features a small molecule that binds TrkC (tropomyosin receptor kinase C) receptor that tends to be overexpressed in metastatic breast cancer cells but not in other breast cancer cells. A sensitizer for 1O2 production conjugated to this structure gives 1-PDT for photodynamic therapy. Isomeric 2-PDT does not bind TrkC and was used as a control throughout; similarly, TrkC– cancer cells were used to calibrate enhanced killing of TrkC+ cells. Ex vivo, 1- and 2-PDT where only cytotoxic when illuminated, and 1-PDT, gave higher cell death for TrkC+ breast cancer cells. A 1 h administration-to-illumination delay gave optimal TrkC+/TrkC–-photocytotoxicity, and distribution studies showed the same delay was appropriate in vivo. In Balb/c mice, a maximum tolerated dose of 20 mg/kg was determined for 1-PDT. 1- and 2-PDT (single, 2 or 10 mg/kg doses and one illumination, throughout) had similar effects on implanted TrkC– tumors, and like those of 2-PDT on TrkC+ tumors. In contrast, 1-PDT caused dramatic TrkC+ tumor volume reduction (96% from initial) relative to the TrkC– tumors or 2-PDT in TrkC+ models. Moreover, 71% of the mice treated with 10 mg/kg 1-PDT (n = 7) showed full tumor remission and survived until 90 days with no metastasis to key organs. PMID:25487316

  15. Polarized muon beams for muon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, A. N.

    1996-11-01

    An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance.

  16. Effect of verteporfin-PDT on epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreola, Fausto; Cerec, Virginie; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-06-01

    EGFR, a member of the ERBB family, plays a pivotal role in carcinogenesis. EGFR overexpression is implicated in DNA repair and synergistic interactions between EGFR-targeting drugs and conventional chemo/radiotherapy have been reported in preclinical studies for different cancers but not cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). To date there are no in vitro data available on the cellular response and effect of either photodynamic therapy (PDT) or EGFR-targeting drugs on CCA. Therefore, we aimed to study the: (i) response to Verteporfin PDT and to EGFR-targeting drugs, as single agents; (ii) effect of PDT on ERBBs expression, phosporylation status and activation of its signaling pathways; (iii) response to combination of PDT and EGFR-targeting agents. We showed that two cholangiocarcinoma cell lines (HuCCT1 and TFK1 cells, intra- and extrahepatic, respectively) differentially respond to verteporfin-PDT treatment and are resistant to EGFR-targeting agents. A constitutive activation of EGFR in both cell lines was also observed, which could partly account for the observed resistance to EGFR-targeting drugs. In addition, verteporfin-PDT induced further phosphorylation of both EGFR and other Receptor Tyrosine Kinases. Mitochondria-independent apoptosis was induced by PDT in both CCA cell lines; in particular, PDT modulated the expression of members of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) family of proteins. Interestingly, there was a PDT-induced EGFR nuclear translocation in both cell lines; co-treatment with either an EGFR-inhibitor (Cetuximab) or a nuclear import blocking agent (Wheat Germ Agglutinin) had an additive effect on PDT cell killing, thus implying a role of EGFR in repairing the potential PDT-induced DNA damage.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms and Apoptosis in Pdt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, Barbara; Verwanger, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a successful new therapy for malignant and non-malignant diseases. It is based on the activation of a photosensitizing dye by visible light in the target tissue, followed by production of cytotoxic substances. The article gives a short overview on the field of PDT with main focus on molecular mechanisms and apoptosis. It includes photodynamic principles, clinical application and procedures, biological effects, molecular mechanisms of damage processing and apoptosis.

  18. Muon Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duldig, Marc L.

    2000-07-01

    Muon observations are complementary to neutron monitor observations but there are some important differences in the two techniques. Unlike neutron monitors, muon telescope systems use coincidence techniques to obtain directional information about the arriving particle. Neutron monitor observations require simple corrections for pressure variations to compensate for the varying mass of atmospheric absorber over a site. In contrast, muon observations require additional corrections for the positive and negative temperature effects. Muon observations commenced many years before neutron monitors were constructed. Thus, muon data over a larger number of solar cycles is available to study solar modulation on anisotropies and other cosmic ray variations. The solar diurnal and semi-diurnal variations have been studied for many years. Using the techniques of Bieber and Chen it has been possible to derive the radial gradient, parallel mean-free path and symmetric latitude gradient of cosmic rays for rigidities <200 GV. The radial gradient varies with the 11-year solar activity cycle whereas the parallel mean-free path appears to vary with the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. The symmetric latitudinal gradient reverses at each solar polarity reversal. These results are in general agreement with predictions from modulation models. In undertaking these analyses the ratio of the parallel to perpendicular mean-free path must be assumed. There is strong contention in the literature about the correct value to employ but the results are sufficiently robust for this to be, at most, a minor problem. An asymmetric latitude gradient of highly variable nature has been found. These observations do not support current modulation models. Our view of the sidereal variation has undergone a revolution in recent times. Nagashima, Fujimoto and Jacklyn proposed a narrow Tail-In source anisotropy and separate Loss-Cone anisotropy as being responsible for the observed variations. A new analysis

  19. Assessing PDT response with diffuse optical spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used to treat a variety of conditions including cancer. Effective PDT requires three components: a photosensitizer (PS), light of a specific wavelength to activate the PS and oxygen. When all three are present in a lesion it leads to cell death and vascular destruction. Optical techniques such as diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), diffuse fluorescence spectroscopy (DFS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) can be used to quantify vascular parameters and photosensitizer content before and after PDT, providing valuable information for assessing response. For the quantification of vascular parameters, a probe-specific empirical light transport model was developed. A look-up-table was constructed using tissue simulating phantoms made of Intralipid to control the scattering, India Ink to control the absorption and water. The empirical model allowed the quantification of optical properties as well as the vascular parameters blood volume fraction (BVf) and blood oxygen saturation (SO2) with DRS. Blood flow was measured using DCS. For the quantification of PS content two techniques were used. DRS was used to fit the absorption of the PS and DFS measured the fluorescence of the PS. For quantification of PS content from measured fluorescence, a correction factor was developed using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the optical properties at the excitation and emission wavelengths. The three techniques were used to assess PDT response in pre-clinical and clinical studies. For the preclinical study, mice were treated with HPPH-PDT and blood flow was measured continuously with DCS. Blood flow variables were compared to STAT3 crosslinking (a molecular marker for PDT photoreaction) and CD31 staining (to visualize intact endothelial cells after PDT). For the clinical study, patients in a clinical trial for HPPH-PDT were measured with DRS, DFS and DCS before and after treatment. Multiple parameters were compared to the clinical response

  20. PD and PDT for hepatoblastoma? Preclinical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Bergmann, Florian; Johansson, Ann; Heide, Michael; Metzger, Roman; Rolle, Udo; Till, Holger

    2011-07-01

    Objective: Provide preclinical data on the feasibility of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) -based photodetection (PD) and Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of early childhood tumors. Methods: Hepatoblastoma (HuH6), neuroblastoma (MHH-NB11) and N1-fibroblast cell lines were tested for their relative capacities to synthesize Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) from 5-ALA and for their susceptibility to PDT in vitro. HuH6-cells were also inoculated in the peritoneum of rats. The pharmacokinetics of porphyrin accumulation was measured in 9 rats by laparoscopic spectroscopy. 5-ALA was applied by i.p. injection of 500 mg/kg bw. In another 21 animals, tumors (n=20), liver (n=5) and peritoneum (n=4) were treated by PDT laparoscopically. 48 h after irradiation, animals were again incubated with 5-ALA and then sacrificed and tissues were removed for further investigation. Results: Both tumor cell lines showed higher levels of porphyrin fluorescence than the fibroblasts. Cell viability testing proved the HuH6 cells to be most susceptible to PDT. Pharmacokinetic measurements of PpIX in xenografted tumors showed a peak at 80-200 min after i.p. injection of 5-ALA. Irradiation resulted in pronounced photobleaching at all irradiated sites and necrosis of tumor and liver tissue, whereas peritoneum appeared to remain unaffected. Necrosis induced by PDT could be seen in fluorescence microscopy due to the lack of porphyrin synthesis in necrotic tissue after the re-incubation with 5-ALA.

  1. Taking PDT into mainstream clinical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, Stephen G.

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals in the field are frustrated by the slow progress getting PDT established in mainstream clinical practice. The five key reasons are: 1. Lack of adequate evidence of safety and efficacy and optimization of dosimetry. These are fundamental. The number of randomized controlled studies is still small. For some cancer applications, it is difficult to get patients to agree to be randomised, so different approaches must be taken. Anecdotal results are not acceptable to sceptics and regulators. 2. The regulatory processes. The rules get more complex every day, but there is no choice, they must be met. The full bureaucratic strength of the pharmaceutical industry is needed to address these issues. 3. Conservatism of the medical profession. Established physicians are reluctant to change practice, especially if it means referring patients to different specialists. 4. Lack of education. It is amazing how few physicians have even heard of PDT and many that have, are sceptical. The profile of PDT to both the medical profession and the general public needs to be raised dramatically. Patient demand works wonders! 5. Money. Major investment is required to run clinical trials. Pharmaceutical companies may see PDT as a threat (eg reduced market for chemotherapy agents). Licensed photosensitisers are expensive. Why not reduce the price initially, to get the technique established and stimulate demand? PDT has the potential for enormous cost savings for health service providers. With appropriate motivation and resources these problems can be addressed. Possible routes forward will be suggested.

  2. PDT Dose Dosimeter for Pleural Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michele M.; Darafsheh, Arash; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    PDT dose is the product of the photosensitizer concentration and the light fluence in the target tissue. For improved dosimetry during plural photodynamic therapy (PDT), a PDT dose dosimeter was developed to measure both the light fluence and the photosensitizer concentration simultaneously in the same treatment location. Light fluence and spectral data were rigorously compared to other methods of measurement (e.g. photodiode, multi-fiber spectroscopy contact probe) to assess the accuracy of the measurements as well as their uncertainty. Photosensitizer concentration was obtained by measuring the fluorescence of the sensitizer excited by the treatment light. Fluence rate based on the intensity of the laser spectrum was compared to the data obtained by direct measurement of fluence rate by a fiber-coupled photodiode. Phantom studies were done to obtain an optical property correction for the fluorescence signal. Measurements were performed in patients treated Photofrin for different locations in the pleural cavity. Multiple sites were measured to investigate the heterogeneity of the cavity and to provide cross-validation via relative dosimetry. This novel method will allow for accurate real-time determination of delivered PDT dose and improved PDT dosimetry. PMID:27053825

  3. Muons in gamma showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.; Vankov, C. P.; Halzen, F.

    1985-01-01

    Muon production in gamma-induced air showers, accounting for all major processes. For muon energies in the GeV region the photoproduction is by far the most important process, while the contribution of micron + micron pair creation is not negligible for TeV muons. The total rate of muons in gamma showers is, however, very low.

  4. The mechanism of PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiongwei; Liu, Timon C.; Ding, Xin-Min; Gu, Ying; Liu, Fan-Guang; Liu, Song-Hao

    2003-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) can induce apoptosis in many cancer cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. Cells become more oxidation with PDT, and maintain differentiation and proliferation, go apoptosis and necrosis with the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. ROS can induce apoptosis through mitochondria by inhibiting respiration chain or oxidative phosphorylation or damaging mitochondrial membrane. ROS can initiate apoptosis through endoplamic reticulum(ER) by opening Ca2+ channel or starting unfold protein response (UPR). ROS can also induce apoptosis through Golgi by producing ganglioside GD3 by use of ceramide, which induces apoptosis by activating caspase-3, JNK and p38 MAPK. It can also induce apoptosis by activating Bip (mitochondria-dependant) or preocaspase-12 (mitochondria- independent) or inhibiting protein synthesizing. There are so complicated cross-talking among different signal pathways or organnells that we think PDT-induced apoptosis is mediated by multiplex pathways and excessive levels in a refined network.

  5. PDT effects on cells and their optical spectroscopic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songhao; Liu, Timon C.; Meng, Yao-Yong

    1999-09-01

    In this paper, the roles that the light of PDT plays were classified into two kinds, PDT1 and PDT2. PDT1 is mediated by photosensitizer. PDT2 results from the direct interaction of light with target cells. As only the photosensitizers in the membrane of a cell can be in the coherent state, PDT1 is mediated by the coherent interaction of membrane photosensitizers, and its main target is the membranes of a cell. PDT2 is governed by the biological information model of low intensity laser (BIML) put forward by Liu TCY et al. According to BIML under the dose of PDT, cold-color (green, blue or violet) laser irradiation activates adenylate cyclase through Gs protein: cAMPARUP; hot color (red, orange or yellow) laser irradiation activates cAMP phosphodiesterase through Gi protein or activates phosphoinositide phospholipase C through Gq protein or activates one of receptor-linked enzyme: cAMPARDN. After reviewing simply the PDT effects on cells from the viewpoint of information biology and the research on them by use of optical spectroscopic approach, we arrived at the conclusion that cold color light PDT is better than hot color light PDT from the viewpoint of the effects on cell and the short term effects on cancer, but hot color light PDT is superior to cold color light PDT with respect to the long term effects on cancer.

  6. PDT-induced in vitro bystander effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, David; Douilard, Samuel; Patrice, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    The mechanisms of Photodynamic therapy (PDT) include singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that damage tumor cells and vasculature. The resulting effect is a balance between photo-oxidations via primary or secondary ROS and scavenging activity. Sensitizers distribute in the extra-cellular space before and during cell sensitization, suggesting that PDT could act directly on cell structures and on extra-cellular compartments, including sera. In this paper we endeavored to determine whether the application of PDT to culture media could have an effect on cell survival. Culture media (RPMI supplemented with Fetal Calf Serum (FCS)) was incubated with Rose Bengal (RB) and irradiated before being added to cells for various times of contact, as a replacement for untreated media. Treatedmedia reduced cell survival by up to 40% after 30 min of contact for 10 μg/mL of RB and 20 J/cm2. This effect was RB or light dose-dependent. The survival reduction observed when adding treated-media was more pronounced when cell doubling time was shorter. Analysis of ROS or peroxide production in treated-media revealed a long-lasting oxidizing activity. Our findings support the hypothesis of a ROS or peroxide-mediated, PDT-induced, delayed cell toxicity

  7. Enhancing protoporphyrin IX-induced PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnow, Alison; Pye, Andrew; Campbell, Sandra

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using porphyrin precursors is commonly used in dermatology. Evidence indicates that good clinical outcomes (associated with excellent cosmesis) can be achieved in superficial precancers and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), however, efficacy appears less favorable for thicker nodular BCC (nBCC) unless multiple PDT treatment cycles are performed. Enhancement is therefore required if nBCC lesions are to be treated effectively with a single PDT treatment. The most common technique currently being routinely employed clinically is the use of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) esters (usually methyl (MAL) or hexyl (HAL)). Standard dermatological PDT employing these porphyrin precursors already manipulates the normal heme biosynthesis pathway resulting in a temporary accumulation of the natural photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Further manipulation using iron chelating agents is possible however. In normal and malignant human cells in vitro, the novel iron chelating agent CP94 produced greater PPIX fluorescence when administered with ALA or MAL than either congener produced alone. CP94 was also significantly more effective than the clinically established iron chelating agent desferrioxamine (DFO). Topical application of ALA+CP94 to clinical nBCC lesions was a simple and safe treatment modification which produced a significant increase in clinical clearance when CP94 was included in the cream.

  8. PDT-induced inflammatory and host responses.

    PubMed

    Firczuk, Małgorzata; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub

    2011-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in the management of neoplastic and nonmalignant diseases. Its unique mechanisms of action include direct cytotoxic effects exerted towards tumor cells, destruction of tumor and peritumoral vasculature and induction of local acute inflammatory reaction. The latter develops in response to (1) damage to tumor and stromal cells that leads to the release of cell death-associated molecular patterns (CDAMs) or damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), (2) early vascular changes that include increased vascular permeability, vascular occlusion, and release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators, (3) activation of alternative pathway of complement leading to generation of potent chemotactic factors, and (4) induction of signaling cascades and transcription factors that trigger secretion of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases, or adhesion molecules. The majority of studies indicate that induction of local inflammatory response contributes to the antitumor effects of PDT and facilitates development of systemic immunity. However, the degree of PDT-induced inflammation and its subsequent contribution to its antitumor efficacy depend on multiple parameters, such as chemical nature, concentration and subcellular localization of the photosensitizers, the spectral characteristics of the light source, light fluence and fluence rate, oxygenation level, and tumor type. Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms and development of therapeutic approaches modulating PDT-induced inflammation will be necessary to tailor this treatment to particular clinical conditions.

  9. PDT dose dosimetry for pleural photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharikova, Anna V.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Liang, Xing; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    PDT dose is the product of the photosensitizer concentration and the light fluence in target tissue. Although existing systems are capable of measuring the light fluence in vivo, the concurrent measurement of photosensitizer in the treated tissue so far has been lacking. We have developed and tested a new method to simultaneously acquire light dosimetry and photosensitizer fluorescence data via the same isotropic detector, employing treatment light as the excitation source. A dichroic beamsplitter is used to split light from the isotropic detector into two fibers, one for light dosimetry, the other, after the 665 nm treatment light is removed by a band-stop filter, to a spectrometer for fluorescence detection. The light fluence varies significantly during treatment because of the source movement. The fluorescence signal is normalized by the light fluence measured at treatment wavelength. We have shown that the absolute photosensitizer concentration can be obtained by an optical properties correction factor and linear spectral fitting. Tissue optical properties are determined using an absorption spectroscopy probe immediately before PDT at the same sites. This novel method allows accurate real-time determination of delivered PDT dose using existing isotropic detectors, and may lead to a considerable improvement of PDT treatment quality compared to the currently employed systems. Preliminary data in patient studies is presented. PMID:25999645

  10. A treatment planning system for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, Julia; Chang, Chang; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2010-02-01

    Uniform light fluence distribution for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is critical to ensure predictable PDT outcome. However, common practice uses a point source to deliver light to the pleural cavity. To improve the uniformity of light fluence rate distribution, we have developed a treatment planning system using an infrared camera to track the movement of the point source. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to chest phantom to simulate a patient undergoing pleural PDT. Fluence rate (mW/cm2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. Light fluence rate in the pleural cavity is also calculated using the diffusion approximation with a finite-element model. We have established a correlation between the light fluence rate distribution and the light fluence rate measured on the selected points based on a spherical cavity model. Integrating sphere theory is used to aid the calculation of light fluence rate on the surface of the sphere as well as inside tissue assuming uniform optical properties. The resulting treatment planning tool can be valuable as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  11. Parameter determination for singlet oxygen modeling of BPD-mediated PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Dayton D.; Chen, Daniel; Kim, Michele M.; Liang, Xing; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) offers a cancer treatment modality capable of providing minimally invasive localized tumor necrosis. To accurately predict PDT treatment outcome based on pre-treatment patient specific parameters, an explicit dosimetry model is used to calculate apparent reacted 1O2 concentration ([1O2]rx) at varied radial distances from the activating light source inserted into tumor tissue and apparent singlet oxygen threshold concentration for necrosis ([1O2]rx, sd) for type-II PDT photosensitizers. Inputs into the model include a number of photosensitizer independent parameters as well as photosensitizer specific photochemical parameters ξ σ, and β. To determine the specific photochemical parameters of benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid A (BPD), mice were treated with BPDPDT with varied light source strengths and treatment times. All photosensitizer independent inputs were assessed pre-treatment and average necrotic radius in treated tissue was determined post-treatment. Using the explicit dosimetry model, BPD specific ξ σ, and β photochemical parameters were determined which estimated necrotic radii similar to those observed in initial BPD-PDT treated mice using an optimization algorithm that minimizes the difference between the model and that of the measurements. Photochemical parameters for BPD are compared with those of other known photosensitizers, such as Photofrin. The determination of these BPD specific photochemical parameters provides necessary data for predictive treatment outcome in clinical BPD-PDT using the explicit dosimetry model.

  12. Mechanistic exploration of a bi-directional PDT-based combination in pancreatic cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huang-Chiao; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Liu, Joyce; Chiang, Chun-Te; Mai, Zhiming; Goldschmidt, Ruth; Rizvi, Imran; Ebrahim-Zadeh, Neema; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly evident that the most effective cancer treatments will involve interactive regimens that target multiple non-overlapping pathways, preferably such that each component enhances the others to improve outcomes while minimizing systemic toxicities. Toward this goal, we developed a combination of photodynamic therapy and irinotecan, which mechanistically cooperate with each other, beyond their individual tumor destruction pathways, to cause synergistic reduction in orthotopic pancreatic tumor burden. A three-way mechanistic basis of the observed the synergism will be discussed: (i) PDT downregulates drug efflux transporters to increase intracellular irinotecan levels. (ii) Irinotecan reduces the expression of hypoxia-induced marker, which is upregulated by PDT. (iii) PDT downregulates irinotecan-induced survivin expression to amplify the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects. The clinical translation potential of the combination will also be highlighted.

  13. Preparations for Muon Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; Ankenbrandt, C.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments--the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment--is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration.

  14. Mechanistic studies on a sequential PDT protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2016-03-01

    A low (~LD15) PDT dose resulting in selective lysosomal photodamage can markedly promote photokilling by subsequent photodamage targeted to mitochondria. Experimental data are consistent with the proposal that cleavage of the autophagyassociated protein ATG5 to a pro-apoptotic fragment is responsible for this effect. This process is known to be dependent on the proteolytic activity of calpain. We have proposed that Ca2+ released from photodamaged lysosomes is the trigger for ATG5 cleavage. We can now document the conversion of ATG5 to the truncated form after lysosomal photodamage. Photofrin, a photosensitizer that targets both mitochondria and lysosomes, can be used for either phase of the sequential PDT process. The ability of Photofrin to target both loci may explain the well-documented efficacy of this agent.

  15. Cell death pathways associated with PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy leads to both direct and indirect tumor cell death. The latter also involves the consequences of vascular shut-down and immunologic effects. While these factors are a major factor in tumor eradication, there is usually an element of direct cell killing that can reduce the cell population by as much as 2-3 logs. Necrosis was initially believed to represent the predominant PDT death mechanism. An apoptotic response to PDT was first reported by Oleinick in 1991, using a sensitizer that targets the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Apoptosis leads to fragmentation of DNA and of cells into apoptotic bodies that are removed by phagocytosis. Inflammatory effects are minimized, and the auto- catalytic elements of the process can amplify the death signal. In this study, we examined consequences of Bcl-2 photodamage by a porphycene sensitizer that targets the ER and causes photodamage to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Death patterns after Bcl-2 inactivation by a small-molecular antagonist were also assessed. In addition to apoptosis, we also characterized a hitherto undescribed PDT effect, the initiation of autophagy. Autophagy was initially identified as a cell survival pathway, allowing the recycling of components as nutrients become scarce. We propose that autophagy can also represent both a potential survival pathway after PDT damage to cellular organelles, as well as a cell-death pathway. Recent literature reports indicate that autophagy, as well as apoptosis, can be evoked after down-regulation of Bcl-2, a result consistent with results reported here.

  16. Animal models for photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Zenildo Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs non-toxic dyes called photosensitizers (PSs), which absorb visible light to give the excited singlet state, followed by the long-lived triplet state that can undergo photochemistry. In the presence of ambient oxygen, reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals are formed that are able to kill cancer cells, inactivate microbial pathogens and destroy unwanted tissue. Although there are already several clinically approved PSs for various disease indications, many studies around the world are using animal models to investigate the further utility of PDT. The present review will cover the main groups of animal models that have been described in the literature. Cancer comprises the single biggest group of models including syngeneic mouse/rat tumours that can either be subcutaneous or orthotopic and allow the study of anti-tumour immune response; human tumours that need to be implanted in immunosuppressed hosts; carcinogen-induced tumours; and mice that have been genetically engineered to develop cancer (often by pathways similar to those in patients). Infections are the second biggest class of animal models and the anatomical sites include wounds, burns, oral cavity, ears, eyes, nose etc. Responsible pathogens can include Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites. A smaller and diverse group of miscellaneous animal models have been reported that allow PDT to be tested in ophthalmology, atherosclerosis, atrial fibrillation, dermatology and wound healing. Successful studies using animal models of PDT are blazing the trail for tomorrow's clinical approvals. PMID:26415497

  17. Boosting Tumor-Specific Immunity Using PDT

    PubMed Central

    Maeding, Nicole; Verwanger, Thomas; Krammer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment with a long-standing history. It employs the application of nontoxic components, namely a light-sensitive photosensitizer and visible light, to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS lead to tumor cell destruction, which is accompanied by the induction of an acute inflammatory response. This inflammatory process sends a danger signal to the innate immune system, which results in activation of specific cell types and release of additional inflammatory mediators. Activation of the innate immune response is necessary for subsequent induction of the adaptive arm of the immune system. This includes the priming of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) that have the capability to directly recognize and kill cells which display an altered self. The past decades have brought increasing appreciation for the importance of the generation of an adaptive immune response for long-term tumor control and induction of immune memory to combat recurrent disease. This has led to considerable effort to elucidate the immune effects PDT treatment elicits. In this review we deal with the progress which has been made during the past 20 years in uncovering the role of PDT in the induction of the tumor-specific immune response, with special emphasis on adaptive immunity. PMID:27782066

  18. Sensitivity of EAS measurements to the energy spectrum of muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espadanal, J.; Cazon, L.; Conceição, R.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied how the energy spectrum of muons at production affects some of the most common measurements related to muons in extensive air shower studies, namely, the number of muons at the ground, the slope of the lateral distribution of muons, the apparent muon production depth, and the arrival time delay of muons at ground. We found that by changing the energy spectrum by an amount consistent with the difference between current models (namely EPOS-LHC and QGSJET-II.04), the muon surface density at ground increases 5% at 20° zenith angle and 17% at 60° zenith angle. This effect introduces a zenith angle dependence on the reconstructed number of muons which might be experimentally observed. The maximum of the muon production depth distribution at 40° increases ∼ 10 g/cm2 and ∼ 0 g/cm2 at 60°, which, from pure geometrical considerations, increases the arrival time delay of muons. There is an extra contribution to the delay due to the subluminal velocities of muons of the order of ∼ 3 ns at all zenith angles. Finally, changes introduced in the logarithmic slope of the lateral density function are less than 2%.

  19. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  20. Induction of anti-tumor immunity by photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollnick, Sandra O.; Owczarczak, Barbara; Maier, Patricia

    2006-02-01

    Tumor directed PDT has been shown by a number of pre-clinical studies to enhance a specific anti-tumor immune response, which appears to be critical to long-term tumor growth control by PDT. The PDT enhanced immune response is T cell dependent, however the mechanism behind the potentiation of the immune response by PDT is unknown. Induction of T cell dependent immunity depends upon the presence of activated antigen presenting cells. Therefore we have examined the ability of PDT to stimulate maturation and activation of antigen presenting cells in the PDT-treated tumor bed and tumor draining lymph node. Our studies demonstrate and increase in the number of activated antigen presenting cells in the tumor bed 24h following treatment of EMT6 murine tumors with Photofrin-PDT. Tumor draining lymph nodes also showed increased levels of activated antigen presenting cells within 4h of treatment. The levels peaked at 24h and declined by 48h after PDT. These results demonstrate that PDT-enhanced anti-tumor immunity is accompanied by an increase in antigen presenting cell activity. Therefore it is possible that T cell dependent immunity is enhanced following PDT through enhanced antigen presenting cell activity.

  1. Comparison of PDT parameters for RIF and H460 tumor models during HPPH-mediated PDT.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baochang; Kim, Michele M; Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M; Busch, Theresa M; Zhu, Timothy C

    2014-03-05

    Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) is the major cytotoxic species producing PDT effects, but it is difficult to monitor in vivo due to its short life time in real biological environments. Mathematical models are then useful to calculate (1)O2 concentrations for PDT dosimetry. Our previously introduced macroscopic model has four PDT parameters: ξ, σ, β and g describing initial oxygen consumption rate, ratio of photobleaching to reaction between (1)O2 and cellular targets, ratio of triplet state (T) phosphorescence to reaction between T and oxygen ((3)O2), and oxygen supply rate to tissue, respectively. In addition, the model calculates a fifth parameter, threshold (1)O2 dose ([(1)O2]rx,sd). These PDT parameters have been investigated for HPPH using radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors in an in-vivo C3H mouse model. In recent studies, we additionally investigated these parameters in human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H460) tumor xenografts, also using HPPH-mediated PDT. In-vivo studies are performed with nude female mice with H460 tumors grown intradermally on their right shoulders. HPPH (0.25 mg/kg) is injected i.v. at 24 hours prior to light delivery. Initial in vivo HPPH concentration is quantified via interstitial HPPH fluorescence measurements after correction for tissue optical properties. Light is delivered by a linear source at various light doses (12-50 J/cm) with powers ranging from 12 to 150 mW per cm length. The necrosis radius is quantified using ScanScope after tumor sectioning and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The macroscopic optimization model is used to fit the results and generate four PDT parameters. Initial results of the parameters for H460 tumors will be reported and compared with those for the RIF tumor.

  2. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  3. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  4. Effects of PDT on the endocytic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2010-02-01

    Two lines of evidence point to an early effect of photodamage on membrane trafficking. [1] Internalization of a fluorescent probe for hydrophobic membrane loci was impaired by prior photodamage. [2] Interference with the endocytic pathway by the PI-3 kinase antagonist wortmannin led to accumulation of cytoplasmic vacuoles suggesting a block in the recycling of plasma membrane components. Prior photodamage blocked this pathway so that no vacuoles were formed upon exposure of cells to wortmannin. In a murine hepatoma line, the endocytic pathway was preferentially sensitive to lysosomal photodamage. The role of photodamage to the endocytic pathway as a factor in PDT efficacy remains to be assessed.

  5. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer: from local to systemic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Janusz M; Arnaut, Luis G

    2015-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires a medical device, a photosensitizing drug and adequate use of both to trigger biological mechanisms that can rapidly destroy the primary tumour and provide long-lasting protection against metastasis. We present a multidisciplinary view of the issues raised by the development of PDT. We show how spectroscopy, photophysics, photochemistry and pharmacokinetics of photosensitizers determine the mechanism of cell death and clinical protocols. Various examples of combinations with chemotherapies and immunotherapies illustrate the opportunities to potentiate the outcome of PDT. Particular emphasis is given to the mechanisms that can be exploited to establish PDT as a systemic treatment of solid tumours and metastatic disease.

  6. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  7. Multiple muons in MACRO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinz, R.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the multiple muon events in the Monopole Astrophysics and Cosmic Ray Observatory detector was conducted to determine the cosmic ray composition. Particular emphasis is placed on the interesting primary cosmic ray energy region above 2000 TeV/nucleus. An extensive study of muon production in cosmic ray showers has been done. Results were used to parameterize the characteristics of muon penetration into the Earth to the location of a detector.

  8. Muon collider design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Baltz, A.; Caspi, S.; P., Chen; W-H., Cheng; Y., Cho; Cline, D.; Courant, E.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J.; Garren, A.; Gordon, H.; Green, M.; Gupta, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnstone, C.; Kahn, S.; Kirk, H.; Kycia, T.; Y., Lee; Lissauer, D.; Luccio, A.; McInturff, A.; Mills, F.; Mokhov, N.; Morgan, G.; Neuffer, D.; K-Y., Ng; Noble, R.; Norem, J.; Norum, B.; Oide, K.; Parsa, Z.; Polychronakos, V.; Popovic, M.; Rehak, P.; Roser, T.; Rossmanith, R.; Scanlan, R.; Schachinger, L.; Silvestrov, G.; Stumer, I.; Summers, D.; Syphers, M.; Takahashi, H.; Torun, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Turner, W.; van Ginneken, A.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.; Weggel, R.; Willen, E.; Willis, W.; Winn, D.; Wurtele, J.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity \\mu^+ \\mu^- colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed.

  9. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele; Finlay, Jarod; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles; Friedberg, Joseph; Cengel, Keith

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light dose uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  10. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Timothy C; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M; Finlay, Jarod C; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  11. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 – 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method. PMID:25995987

  12. PDT of the endometrium using ALA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Michael J.; Vernon, David I.; Holroyd, J. Andrew; Stringer, Mark R.; Johnson, Nick; Brown, Stanley B.

    1997-05-01

    There is a widely recognized need for new approaches to effect endometrial ablation as an alternative to hysterectomy for treatment of menorrhagia. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) offers one such approach. We have investigated the use of 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-based PDT of the endometrium in model systems and in a series of patients. In all of this work, the ALA was administrated directly into the uterine cavity to reduce any possibility of systemic photosensitization. In a series of experiments in perfused ex vivo uteri, ALA was introduced into the cavity and protoporphyrin formation was measured in the endometrium, the underlying myometrium and the perfusate. ALA transfer into the perfusate was also measured. This work demonstrated that protoporphyrin formation in the endometrium was approximately ten fold that in the underlying myometrium and that systemic photosensitization would be unlikely to result form transfer of administered ALA from the uterus into the circulation. Similar results were found in studies carried out in vivo, where ALA was administered to patients scheduled for hysterectomy. Using a specially designed light source, the first patients have now been treated by giving intrauterine ALA followed by laser light. Two series of treatments - 10 in all - have been carried out. Eight patients have one year follow up. A reduction in measured menstrual blood loss was demonstrated in all but one patient. Complete symptomatic relief was obtained in tow women who did not require further treatment.

  13. SSC muon detector group report

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsmith, D.; Groom, D.; Hedin, D.; Kirk, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Reeder, D.; Rosner, J.; Wojcicki, S.

    1986-01-01

    We report here on results from the Muon Detector Group which met to discuss aspects of muon detection for the reference 4..pi.. detector models put forward for evaluation at the Snowmass 1986 Summer Study. We report on: suitable overall detector geometry; muon energy loss mechanisms; muon orbit determination; muon momentum and angle measurement resolution; raw muon rates and trigger concepts; plus we identify SSC physics for which muon detection will play a significant role. We conclude that muon detection at SSC energies and luminosities is feasible and will play an important role in the evolution of physics at the SSC.

  14. Host cell infiltration into PDT-treated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd; Dougherty, Graeme J.; Chaplin, David J.

    1992-06-01

    C3H mice bearing SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) 24 hours after receiving Photofrin (25 mg/kg, i.v.). Single cell suspensions obtained by the enzymatic digestion of tumors excised either 30 minutes or 4 hours after PDT were analyzed for the content of host immune cells and colony forming ability of malignant cells. The results were compared to the data obtained with non-treated tumors. It is shown that there is a marked increase in the content of cells expressing Mac-1 (monocytes/macrophages or granulocytes) in the tumor 30 minutes post PDT, while a high level of other leucocytes are found within the tumors by 4 hours after PDT. As elaborated in Discussion, the infiltration rate of host immune cells, dying of malignant tumor cells, and yet unknown death rate of host cells originally present in PDT treated tumor occurring concomitantly during this time period complicates this analysis. The results of this study suggest a massive infiltration of macrophages and other leucocytes in PDT treated SCCVII tumor, supporting the suggestion that a potent immune reaction is one of the main characteristics of PDT action in solid tumors. It remains to be determined to what extent is the activity of tumor infiltrating immune cells responsible for its eradication by PDT.

  15. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Moriyama, L. T.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed.

  16. Stimulation of the host immune response by photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollnick, Sandra O.; Kabingu, Edith; Kousis, Philaretos C.; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2004-07-01

    The tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves a complex interplay between direct cytotoxicity to the tumor cells and secondary damage as a result of the effects of PDT on the vasculature and stimulation of the host inflammatory response. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that the combination of direct and indirect effects of PDT culminate in an activation of host anti-tumor immune responses. We have begun to examine the direct effects of PDT on tumor immunogenicity and have made the novel discovery that PDT treatment of tumor cells in vitro enhances tumor cell immunogenicity. We have further demonstrated that the increase in tumor cell immunogenicity by PDT can be correlated with the ability of PDT-generated tumor cell lysates to stimulate dendritic cell maturation and activation. The mechanisms by which PDT is able to enhance tumor cell immunogenicity and stimulate dendritic cell maturation and activation is unclear, however our finding suggest that alterations in tumor immunogenicity correlate with enhanced release of dendritic cell stimulating factors such as heat shock proteins.

  17. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  18. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  19. Activity of glycated chitosan and other adjuvants to PDT vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Banáth, Judit; Čiplys, Evaldas; Szulc, Zdzislaw; Bielawska, Alicja; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Glycated chitosan (GC), a water soluble galactose-conjugated natural polysaccharide, has proven to be an effective immunoadjuvant for treatment of tumors based on laser thermal therapy. It was also shown to act as adjuvant for tumor therapy with high-intensity ultrasound and in situ photodynamic therapy (PDT). In the present study, GC was examined as potential adjuvant to PDT-generated cancer vaccine. Two other agents, pure calreticulin protein and acid ceramidase inhibitor LCL521, were also tested as prospective adjuvants for use in conjunction with PDT vaccines. Single treatment with GC, included with PDT vaccine cells suspension, improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to vaccine alone. This attractive prospect of GC application remains to be carefully optimized and mechanistically elucidated. Both calreticulin and LCL521 proved also effective adjuvants when combined with PDT vaccine tumor treatment.

  20. An outline of the hundred-year history of PDT.

    PubMed

    Moan, Johan; Peng, Qian

    2003-01-01

    Photosensitizing drugs have been known and applied in medicine for several thousand years. However, the scientific basis for such use was vague or non-existent before about 1900. Photodynamic therapy, PDT, has now become an established treatment modality for several medical indications. Notably, in the cases of skin actinic keratosis, several forms of cancer and blindness due to age-related macular degeneration, PDT has been successful. PDT is the combined application of a lesion-localizing photosensitizer and light. PDT with porphyrin derivatives as photosensitizing drugs was developed from about 1960. The basic, underlying mechanisms for tumour localization of photosensitizers and processes explaining the effect of PDT on tumours were elucidated from about that time. It has become clear that PDT is efficient only in the presence of oxygen, and that the oxygen dependency of PDT is similar to that of X-rays. Singlet oxygen, 1O2, a short-lived product of the reaction between an excited sensitizer molecule and oxygen, plays a key role. In contrast to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, PDT has a low mutagenic potential and, except for skin phototoxicity, few adverse effects. Approvals for clinical use of PDT now exist in many countries. The annual number of scientific articles on PDT, clinical as well as basic, steadily increases and new aspects and applications of it continue to be discovered. Many of the new investigators are obviously not aware of the early work in the field and repeat many of the experiments that had been reported before the Internet and modern data bases were established. Therefore, in the present historical review, the early work is weighted more heavily than recent work that is more easily accessible to the readers.

  1. Additional approach to PDT: type III mechanism and the role of native free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Dezso; Kriska, Tamas; Shutova, Tatiana G.; Nemeth, Andras

    2001-04-01

    It has been suggested by us earlier that interactions of excited triplet sensitizer (3PS) and native free radicals compete with Type I (sensitizer radical mediated) and Type II (singlet oxygen mediated) mechanisms during PDT. Evidence such as fall in the overall radical concentration in vivo ( in mice tumors) during PDT and in the life time of 3PS caused by free radicals supported this assumption In addition, following results have been obtained recently. 1.) Excited Photofrin II and m-THPC affected luminol dependent chemiluminescence (CL) generated by respiratory burst of macrophages like free radical inhibitors. 2.) Quantification of spin trapping for chemical and in vitro systems by kinetic ESR spectrometry yielded detailed knowledge of triplet-doublet interactions 3.)Measurements in open systems (tank reactor) yielded data for the interactions between 3PS and peroxy type radicals 4.)Simulation of experimental data based on mechanisms suggested gave fair agreement. Based on experimental results new PS-s called Antioxidant Carrier Sensiters (ACS-s) have been devised, synthesized and tested one of them showing enhanced activity for PDT.

  2. On the in vivo photochemical rate parameters for PDT reactive oxygen species modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Greer, Alexander; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-03-01

    Photosensitizer photochemical parameters are crucial data in accurate dosimetry for photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on photochemical modeling. Progress has been made in the last few decades in determining the photochemical properties of commonly used photosensitizers (PS), but mostly in solution or in vitro. Recent developments allow for the estimation of some of these photochemical parameters in vivo. This review will cover the currently available in vivo photochemical properties of photosensitizers as well as the techniques for measuring those parameters. Furthermore, photochemical parameters that are independent of environmental factors or are universal for different photosensitizers will be examined. Most photosensitizers discussed in this review are of the type II (singlet oxygen) photooxidation category, although type I photosensitizers that involve other reactive oxygen species (ROS) will be discussed as well. The compilation of these parameters will be essential for ROS modeling of PDT.

  3. Experimental study of PDT with aluminum sulphophthalocyanine using sodium ascorbate and hyperbaric oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Volkova, Anna I.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Kaliya, Oleg L.; Lukyanets, Eugeny A.; Kogan, Boris Y.; Butenin, Alexander V.; Kogan, Eugenia A.; Gladskikh, Olga P.; Polyakova, Larisa N.

    1999-02-01

    It is well known that sulphophthalocyanine derivatives under laser irradiation induce photochemical reaction of II type with generation of cytotoxic agent - singlet oxygen. The combination of phthalocyanine and exogenic reductant - sodium ascorbate may also induce other reactions, involving the formation of free radicals, and thus intensify the antitumor effect. To improve the results of PDT we used the additional injection of sodium ascorbate, the hyperbaric oxygenation and different regimes of laser irradiation. We conducted the experimental study on 100 white mice with Erlich carcinoma. Macroscopic and microscopic data showed that sodium ascorbate significantly increases the effect of PDT in comparison with control group due to the higher tumor damage, vascular alterations, inhibition of cell proliferation and stimulation of antitumor desmoplastic reaction.

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma of dogs and cats: an ideal test system for human head and neck PDT protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is ideally suited for the treatment of head and neck cancer (HNC) in humans. Developing useful PDT protocols for HNC is challenging due to the expense of Phase I and II clinical trials. Moreover, the often-poor predictive value of murine models means that photosensitizers may proceed far into development before problems are noted. Dogs and cats with spontaneous oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) share striking similarities with humans affected with oral SCC. These similarities include viral and environmental tobacco smoke as risk factors, location-dependent prognoses, and relative resistance to chemotherapy. The relatively large oral cancers encountered in veterinary patients allow for light and drug dosimetry that are directly applicable to humans. The irregular shape of oral SCC allows a rigorous evaluation of novel photodynamic therapy protocols under field conditions. Because spontaneous tumors in dogs and cats arise in an outbred animal population it is possible to observe an intact host response to PDT. The shorter lifespan of dogs and cats allows rapid accrual of endpoint data. External beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy are commonplace in veterinary medicine, making dogs and cats with spontaneous SCC a useful resource to study the interactions with PDT and other cancer treatment modalities. Our preliminary results demonstrate that PDT is well-tolerated by dogs with oral cancer, and a Phase II clinical trial of zinc-phthalocyanine-based photodynamic therapy is underway in dogs with oral SCC. The usefulness of 5-aminolevulinic acid methyl ester-based PDT is being investigated in cats with oral SCC.

  5. Underwater measurements of muon intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, V. M.; Pustovetov, V. P.; Trubkin, Y. A.; Kirilenkov, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental measurements of cosmic ray muon intensity deep underwater aimed at determining a muon absorption curve are of considerable interest, as they allow to reproduce independently the muon energy spectrum at sea level. The comparison of the muon absorption curve in sea water with that in rock makes it possible to determine muon energy losses caused by nuclear interactions. The data available on muon absorption in water and that in rock are not equivalent. Underground measurements are numerous and have been carried out down to the depth of approx. 15km w.e., whereas underwater muon intensity have been measured twice and only down to approx. 3km deep.

  6. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  7. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  8. Muons and neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanev, T.

    1986-01-01

    The first generation of large and precise detectors, some initially dedicated to search for nucleon decay has accumulated significant statistics on neutrinos and high-energy muons. A second generation of even better and bigger detectors are already in operation or in advanced construction stage. The present set of experimental data on muon groups and neutrinos is qualitatively better than several years ago and the expectations for the following years are high. Composition studies with underground muon groups, neutrino detection, and expected extraterrestrial neutrino fluxes are discussed.

  9. The effect of PDT on H. influenzae biofilm in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Chung-Ku; Chang, So-Young; Hwang, Dong-Jo; Kim, Young Hoon; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2010-02-01

    Biofilm formation has been demonstrated for many mucosal pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae. The presence of mucosal biofilms with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) suggests that bacteria do not clear by antibiotics. Aim: To test the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on H. influenzae induced biofilm in vivo. Methods: Gerbils were divided into control (C), HI group, Laser (L), PS, PDT A, and PDT B groups. The C group received no treatment. HI group was injected with 20μl (108CFU/ml) of H. influenzae into the bullae and formation of biofilms in the bullae was obtained by 5 days. For L group, 120 J/cm2 (100 mw × 20 min) of 632 nm LD laser was irradiated by a fiber inserted into the bullae 5 days after the H. influenzaeinjection. For PS group, photofrin 40μl (1mg/ml) were injected into the bullae 5 days after the H. influenzae injection. PDT A group received photofrin 1 mg/ml and LD laser 120 J/cm2 that were administered into the bullae 5 days after the H. influenzae injection. PDT B group received photofrin 2 mg/ml and laser 150 J/cm2 5 days after the H. influenzae injection. The mucosal tissues in bullae were examined by H/E staining, and SEM. Results: The C group showed normal mucosa of bullae. The HI, L, and PS groups have shown well formed biofilm. Twenty five percent of the PDT A group and 50 % of the PDT B group have shown completely or partially resolved biofilm. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that PDT appears to be effective to treat experimental H. influenzae induced biofilms in vivo. Clinical implication: PDT may be an alternative to antibiotic treatment on otitis media with biofilm formation.

  10. PDT: loss of autophagic cytoprotection after lysosomal photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Price, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is known to evoke both autophagy and apoptosis. Apoptosis is an irreversible death pathway while autophagy can serve a cytoprotective function. In this study, we examined two photosensitizing agents that target lysosomes, although they differ in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during irradiation. With both agents, the 'shoulder' on the PDT dose-response curve was substantially attenuated, consistent with loss of a cytoprotective pathway. In contrast, this 'shoulder' is commonly observed when PDT targets mitochondria or the ER. We propose that lysosomal targets may offer the possibility of promoting PDT efficacy by eliminating a potentially protective pathway.

  11. Light dose verification for pleural PDT.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Julia L; Liang, Xing; Zhu, Timothy

    2012-02-13

    The ability to deliver uniform light dose in Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is critical to treatment efficacy. Current protocol in pleural photodynamic therapy uses 7 isotropic detectors placed at discrete locations within the pleural cavity to monitor light dose throughout treatment. While effort is made to place the detectors uniformly through the cavity, measurements do not provide an overall uniform measurement of delivered dose. A real-time infrared (IR) tracking camera is development to better deliver and monitor a more uniform light distribution during treatment. It has been shown previously that there is good agreement between fluence calculated using IR tracking data and isotropic detector measurements for direct light phantom experiments. This study presents the results of an extensive phantom study which uses variable, patient-like geometries and optical properties (both absorption and scattering). Position data of the treatment is collected from the IR navigation system while concurrently light distribution measurements are made using the aforementioned isotropic detectors. These measurements are compared to fluence calculations made using data from the IR navigation system to verify our light distribution theory is correct and applicable in patient-like settings. The verification of this treatment planning technique is an important step in bringing real-time fluence monitoring into the clinic for more effective treatment.

  12. A heterogeneous optimization algorithm for reacted singlet oxygen for interstitial PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Altschuler, Martin D.; Hu, Yida; Wang, Ken; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2010-02-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic agent for type II photodynamic therapy (PDT). The production of 1O2 involves the complex reactions among light, oxygen molecule, and photosensitizer. From universal macroscopic kinetic equations which describe the photochemical processes of PDT, the reacted 1O2 concentration, [1O2]rx, with cell target can be expressed in a form related to time integration of the product of 1O2 quantum yield and the PDT dose rate. The object of this study is to develop optimization procedures that account for the optical heterogeneity of the patient prostate, the tissue photosensitizer concentrations, and tissue oxygenation, thereby enable delivery of uniform reacted singlet oxygen to the gland. We use the heterogeneous optical properties measured for a patient prostate to calculate a light fluence kernel. Several methods are used to optimize the positions and intensities of CDFs. The Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which is fast, linear, and always converges reliably, is applied as a search tool to optimize the weights of the light sources at each step of the iterative selection. Maximum and minimum dose limits chosen for sample points in the prostate constrain the solution for the intensities of the linear light sources. The study shows that optimization of individual light source positions and intensities is feasible for the heterogeneous prostate during PDT. To study how different photosensitizer distributions as well as tissue oxygenation in the prostate affect optimization, comparisons of light fluence rate were made with measured distribution of photosensitizer in prostate under different tissue oxygenation conditions.

  13. A heterogeneous optimization algorithm for reacted singlet oxygen for interstitial PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Altschuler, Martin D.; Hu, Yida; Wang, Ken; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic agent for type II photodynamic therapy (PDT). The production of 1O2 involves the complex reactions among light, oxygen molecule, and photosensitizer. From universal macroscopic kinetic equations which describe the photochemical processes of PDT, the reacted 1O2 concentration, [1O2]rx, with cell target can be expressed in a form related to time integration of the product of 1O2 quantum yield and the PDT dose rate. The object of this study is to develop optimization procedures that account for the optical heterogeneity of the patient prostate, the tissue photosensitizer concentrations, and tissue oxygenation, thereby enable delivery of uniform reacted singlet oxygen to the gland. We use the heterogeneous optical properties measured for a patient prostate to calculate a light fluence kernel. Several methods are used to optimize the positions and intensities of CDFs. The Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which is fast, linear, and always converges reliably, is applied as a search tool to optimize the weights of the light sources at each step of the iterative selection. Maximum and minimum dose limits chosen for sample points in the prostate constrain the solution for the intensities of the linear light sources. The study shows that optimization of individual light source positions and intensities is feasible for the heterogeneous prostate during PDT. To study how different photosensitizer distributions as well as tissue oxygenation in the prostate affect optimization, comparisons of light fluence rate were made with measured distribution of photosensitizer in prostate under different tissue oxygenation conditions. PMID:25995533

  14. Monitoring blood flow and photobleaching during topical ALA PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Theresa L.; Sunar, Ulas; Foster, Thomas H.; Oseroff, Allan R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using topical aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is currently used as a clinical treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers. In order to optimize PDT treatment, vascular shutdown early in treatment must be identified and prevented. This is especially important for topical ALA PDT where vascular shutdown is only temporary and is not a primary method of cell death. Shutdown in vasculature would limit the delivery of oxygen which is necessary for effective PDT treatment. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) was used to monitor relative blood flow changes in Balb/C mice undergoing PDT at fluence rates of 10mW/cm2 and 75mW/cm2 for colon-26 tumors implanted intradermally. DCS is a preferable method to monitor the blood flow during PDT of lesions due to its ability to be used noninvasively throughout treatment, returning data from differing depths of tissue. Photobleaching of the photosensitizer was also monitored during treatment as an indirect manner of monitoring singlet oxygen production. In this paper, we show the conditions that cause vascular shutdown in our tumor model and its effects on the photobleaching rate.

  15. Combination of vascular targeting PDT with combretastatin A4 phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chong; Fateye, Babasola; Chen, Bin

    2009-06-01

    Tumor vasculature is an attractive target for cancer therapy due to its accessibility to blood-borne therapeutic agents and the dependence of tumor cells on a functional blood supply for survival and growth. Vascular targeting photodynamic therapy (vPDT) is a novel modality based on the selective laser light activation of photosensitizers localized inside tumor vasculature to shutdown tumor vascular function. Although this vascular targeting therapy is showing great promise for cancer treatment, tumor recurrence has been observed in both preclinical and clinical studies. In this study, we intend to enhance the therapeutic outcome of vascular targeting PDT by combining it with combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P), a blood flow inhibitor. We found that the combination of CA4P and vPDT significantly increased endothelial cell apoptosis than each single therapy. Western blot analysis suggests that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is a common target of CA4P and vPDT. In a PC-3 prostate tumor model, we found that CA4P was able to greatly enhance tumor response to vPDT. These results demonstrate that CA4P and vPDT can be combined to enhance the therapeutic effect.

  16. The effect of PDT on H. influenzae biofilm in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, C.-K.; Bae, S. H.; Lee, J. W.; Ahn, J. C.; Jung, J. Y.; Suh, M.-W.

    2009-02-01

    Biofilm formation has been demonstrated for many mucosal pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae. The presence of mucosal biofilms with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) suggests that bacteria do not clear by antibiotics. Aim: To test the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on H. influenzae biofilm in vitro. Methods: Sixteen biofilms of H. influenzae were maintained on culture chamber with continuous flow cell system. The biofilms were divided into control, laser, photofrin, and PDT groups. For culture group, the biofilms were cultured. For laser group, 7.2 J/cm2 of 632 nm diode laser was irradiated to the biofilms. For photofrin group, photofrins 5 and 25ug/ml were added to the media. For PDT group, photofrins 5 and 25 ug/ml were added to the media following 632 nm diode laser was irradiated (7.2 J/cm2) to the biofilms. Live/Dead (DAPI/PI) stain was performed and biofilms were examined under confocal laser microscope for thickness and density of biofilms. Results: By DAPI/PI staining, significant reduction of biofilms thickness and complete killing of H. influenzae in PDT group with 25µg photofrin was noted while the biofilms were well maintained in the other groups. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrated that PDT appears to be effective to photoinactivate experimental H. influenzae biofilms in vitro. Clinical implication: PDT can be a possible alternative treatment to antiobiotic treatment on otitis media with biofilm formation.

  17. From molecular PDT damage to cellular PDT responses: attempts at bridging the gap on the role of Bcl-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuda, Jitsuo; Xue, Liang-yan; Chiu, Song-mao; Azizuddin, Kashif; Morris, Rachel L.; Mulvihill, John; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2003-06-01

    Expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and/or Bcl-xL is greatly elevated in many advanced cancers, especially those resistant to standard therapies, such as radiation or chemotherapy. It has been suggested that those two proteins would be attractive targets for the development of new cancer treatments. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with photosensitizers that localize in or target mitochondria, such as the phthalocyanine Pc 4, specifically attack the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, generating a variety of oxidized, complexed, and cleaved photoproducts. The closely related protein Bcl-xL is also a target of Pc 4-PDT. In a recent study employing transient transfection of an expression vector encoding deletion mutants of Bcl-2, we identified the membrane anchorage regions of the protein that are required to form the photosensitive target. In spite of the demonstrated photodamage to Bcl-2 (and Bcl-xL), how the photodamage translates into changes in the sensitivity of cells to PDT-induced apoptosis or other modes of cell death is not clear, and it also remains unclear how elevated amounts of anti-apoptotic proteins in tumors might make them more or less responsive to PDT. In the present study, we have studied the PDT response of MCF7 human breast cancer cells overexpressing wild-type Bcl-2 or certain deletion mutants either in a transient or stable mode. We show that cells expressing modestly elevated amounts (<10-fold increase) of Bcl-2 and in which the pro-apoptotic protein Bax is not upregulated do not differ from the parental cells with respect to PDT-induced cell killing. In contrast, cells expressing higher amounts (>50-fold increase) of Bcl-2 or certain mutants are made significantly more resistant to the induction of apoptosis and the loss of clonogenicity upon exposure to Pc 4-PDT. In the presence of high levels of Bcl-2, extensive photodamage requires higher PDT doses. We conclude that Pc 4-PDT targets Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, eliminating one mechanism that

  18. Balancing particle absorption with structural support of the muon beam stop in muons-to-electrons experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is seeking a full conversion from muon to electron. The design for Mu2e is based off MECO, another proposed experiment that sought a full conversion from muon to electron at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s. Mu2e will provide sensitivity that is four times the sensitivity of the previous experiment, SINDRUM II. Discovering muon to electron conversions could help explain physics beyond the standard model of the particle physics.

  19. Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    Japanese government announced cold-shutdown condition of the reactors at Fukushima Daiichi by the end of 2011, and mid- and long-term roadmap towards decommissioning has been drawn. However, little is known for the conditions of the cores because access to the reactors has been limited by the high radiation environment. The debris removal from the Unit 1 - 3 is planned to start as early as 2020, but the dismantlement is not easy without any realistic information of the damage to the cores, and the locations and amounts of the fuel debris. Soon after the disaster of Fukushima Daiichi, several teams in the US and Japan proposed to apply muon transmission or scattering imagings to provide information of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors without accessing inside the reactor building. GEANT4 modeling studies of Fukushima Daiichi Unit 1 and 2 showed clear superiority of the muon scattering method over conventional transmission method. The scattering method was demonstrated with a research reactor, Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA), where a fuel assembly was imaged with 3-cm resolution. The muon scattering imaging of Fukushima Daiichi was approved as a national project and is aiming at installing muon trackers to Unit 2. A proposed plan includes installation of muon trackers on the 2nd floor (operation floor) of turbine building, and in front of the reactor building. Two 7mx7m detectors were assembled at Toshiba and tested.

  20. Accelerator Preparations for Muon Physics Experiments at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments - the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment - is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. Operating scenarios being investigated and anticipated accelerator improvements or reconfigurations will be presented.

  1. Precison Muon Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzog, David

    2013-04-01

    The worldwide, vibrant experimental program involving precision measurements with muons will be presented. Recent achievements in this field have greatly improved our knowledge of fundamental parameters: Fermi constant (lifetime), weak-nucleon pseudoscalar coupling (μp capture), Michel decay parameters, and the proton charged radius (Lamb shift). The charged-lepton-violating decay μ->eγ sets new physics limits. Updated Standard Model theory evaluations of the muon anomalous magnetic moment has increased the significance beyond 3 σ for the deviation with respect to experiment. Next-generation experiments are mounting, with ambitious sensitivity goals for the muon-to-electron search approaching 10-17 sensitivity and for a 0.14 ppm determination of g-2. The broad physics reach of these efforts involves atomic, nuclear and particle physics communities. I will select from recent work and outline the most important efforts that are in preparation.

  2. Initial targets and cellular responses to PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Myriam E.; Azizuddin, Kashif; Chiu, Song-mao; Delos Santos, Grace; Joseph, Sheeba; Xue, Liang-yan; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2007-02-01

    Pc 4, a photosensitizer first synthesized at Case Western Reserve University and now in clinical trial at University Hospitals of Cleveland, has been shown to bind preferentially and with high affinity to mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon photoirradiation of Pc 4-loaded cells, membrane components are photodamaged. In most cancer cells, apoptosis is triggered by the initial photodamage; however, in cells deficient in one of the critical intermediates of apoptosis, this process does not occur, although the cells remain as sensitive to the lethal effects of Pc 4-PDT as the apoptosis-competent cells, when cell death is determined by colony formation. Here we report that an alternative death process, autophagy, is induced in all cells tested and becomes the dominant pathway for elimination of lethally damaged cells when apoptosis is compromised. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, when overexpressed, protects only apoptosis-competent cells against loss of clonogenicity, while the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine provides a markedly greater protection to apoptosis-deficient cells. The results suggest that the primary determinant of cell death is not the final pathway for elimination of the cells but the initial photodamage to critical membrane targets. In attempts to identify those targets, we have studied the role of different membrane phospholipids in the localization of Pc 4. Cardiolipin (CL) is a phospholipid found exclusively in the mitochondrial inner membrane and at the contact sites between the inner and outer membranes. Previous fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies revealed colocalization of Pc 4 and CL, which points to CL as a possible binding site and target for Pc 4. Unilamellar liposomes with different lipid compositions were used as membrane models to test the affinity of Pc 4. As revealed by the binding constants, Pc 4 does not display preferential binding to CL in these systems. Moreover, binding affinities appear to be

  3. Biological consequences of PDT: tying up the loose ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Andrzejak, Michelle; Price, Michael

    2011-02-01

    While many of the determinants of photodynamic tumor eradication have been identified, the story is not yet complete. Fluorescent probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) are seldom specific, and the role of different ROS in apoptosis vs. autophagy are not fully delineated. Moreover, the conflicting roles of autophagy as both a death and a survival pathway remain to be explained. Most tissue-culture studies are carried out in 20% oxygen although this is far in excess of the environment of malignant cells in vivo. And while apoptotic and/or autophagic death appears to account for the lethal effects of PDT, an effect on membrane recycling has now been identified. In this report, we summarize some recent experiments designed to examine the specificity of fluorescent ROS probes. We also demonstrate the ability of hydrogen peroxide to accelerate the autophagic response to PDT in an adhering cell line, the 1c1c7 murine hepatoma. In this cell line, autophagy appears to be a pro-survival mechanism since a sub-line (KD) depleted in a critical autophagy protein (atg7) was more responsive to PDT than wild-type (WT) cells. There are clearly multiple determinants of direct tumor cell kill by PDT that depend on the PDT target, the ROS produced and phenotypic variations.

  4. Fluorescence Guided PDT for Optimization of Skin Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Kate; Moriyama, Lilian; Inada, Natalia; Kurachi, Cristina; Salvio, Ana; Leite, Everson; Menezes, Priscila; Bagnato, Vanderlei

    2015-04-01

    The photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an alternative technique that can be indicated for superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), Bowen’s disease and actinic keratosis with high efficiency. The objective of this study is to present the importance of fluorescence imaging for PDT guidance and monitoring in real time. Confirming that the lesion is well prepared and the photosensitizer shows a homogenous distribution, the outcome after few PDT sessions will be positive and the recurrence should be lower. Our proposition in this study is use the widefield fluorescence imaging to evaluate the PDT protocol in situ and in real time for each lesion. This evaluation procedure is performed in two steps: first with the monitoring of the production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced by methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), an derivative of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and second with the detection of PpIX photobleaching after illumination. The fluorescence images provide information correlated with distinct clinical features and with the treatment outcome. Eight BCC lesions are presented and discussed in this study. Different fluorescence patterns of PpIX production and photobleaching could be correlated with the treatment response. The presented results show the potential of using widefield fluorescence imaging as a guidance tool to customized PDT.

  5. A heterogeneous algorithm for PDT dose optimization for prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, Martin D.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Hu, Yida; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Wang, Ken; Li, Jun; Cengel, Keith; Malkowicz, S. B.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2009-02-01

    The object of this study is to develop optimization procedures that account for both the optical heterogeneity as well as photosensitizer (PS) drug distribution of the patient prostate and thereby enable delivery of uniform photodynamic dose to that gland. We use the heterogeneous optical properties measured for a patient prostate to calculate a light fluence kernel (table). PS distribution is then multiplied with the light fluence kernel to form the PDT dose kernel. The Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which is fast, linear, and always converges reliably, is applied as a search tool to choose the weights of the light sources to optimize PDT dose. Maximum and minimum PDT dose limits chosen for sample points in the prostate constrain the solution for the source strengths of the cylindrical diffuser fibers (CDF). We tested the Cimmino optimization procedures using the light fluence kernel generated for heterogeneous optical properties, and compared the optimized treatment plans with those obtained using homogeneous optical properties. To study how different photosensitizer distributions in the prostate affect optimization, comparisons of light fluence rate and PDT dose distributions were made with three distributions of photosensitizer: uniform, linear spatial distribution, and the measured PS distribution. The study shows that optimization of individual light source positions and intensities are feasible for the heterogeneous prostate during PDT.

  6. A heterogeneous algorithm for PDT dose optimization for prostate

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Martin D.; Zhu, Timothy C.; Hu, Yida; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Wang, Ken; Li, Jun; Cengel, Keith; Malkowicz, S.B.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    The object of this study is to develop optimization procedures that account for both the optical heterogeneity as well as photosensitizer (PS) drug distribution of the patient prostate and thereby enable delivery of uniform photodynamic dose to that gland. We use the heterogeneous optical properties measured for a patient prostate to calculate a light fluence kernel (table). PS distribution is then multiplied with the light fluence kernel to form the PDT dose kernel. The Cimmino feasibility algorithm, which is fast, linear, and always converges reliably, is applied as a search tool to choose the weights of the light sources to optimize PDT dose. Maximum and minimum PDT dose limits chosen for sample points in the prostate constrain the solution for the source strengths of the cylindrical diffuser fibers (CDF). We tested the Cimmino optimization procedures using the light fluence kernel generated for heterogeneous optical properties, and compared the optimized treatment plans with those obtained using homogeneous optical properties. To study how different photosensitizer distributions in the prostate affect optimization, comparisons of light fluence rate and PDT dose distributions were made with three distributions of photosensitizer: uniform, linear spatial distribution, and the measured PS distribution. The study shows that optimization of individual light source positions and intensities are feasible for the heterogeneous prostate during PDT. PMID:25914793

  7. A novel CL system for PDT therapecitic dosimeter in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yanfang; Xing, Da; Zhong, Xueyun; Zhou, Jing; Luo, Shiming; Chen, Qun

    2005-04-01

    It has been proved that singlet oxygen is the major cytotoxic agent in Photodynamic therapy (PDT). Chemiluminescence(CL) mediated with Cyp- ridina luciferin analog (FCLA) was recently reported to successfully detect singlet oxygen in chemical and biological systems. The present study has focused on establishing the experiment conditions of FCLA-assisted CL method and tested the validity of the system as a dosimetric tool for PDT in vitro. HL-60 leukemia cell suspensions were sensitized with varying dose of Photofrin and irradiated with 635nm laser light at different rate. The FCLA-CL associated with singlet oxygen was measured with a band-pass filtered photon multiplier tube (PMT) system. We have observed that the CL intensity of FCLA is dependent on PDT treatment parameters. In addition, Cell survival corresponded strongly with peak CL intensity. These results suggest that the FCLA-assisted CL system can be an effective means in in vitro PDT study as an indicator of reactive oxygen species. The system may as well, with additional investigations, provide an alternative dosimetry technique for PDT.

  8. PDT-apoptotic tumor cells induce macrophage immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fei-fan; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) functions as a cancer therapy through two major cell death mechanisms: apoptosis and necrosis. Immunological responses induced by PDT has been mainly associated with necrosis while apoptosis associated immune responses have not fully investigated. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play an important role in regulating immune responses. In present study, we studied whether apoptotic tumor cells could induce immune response and how the HSP70 regulates immune response. The endocytosis of tumor cells by the activated macrophages was observed at single cell level by LSM. The TNF-α release of macrophages induced by co-incubated with PDT-apoptotic tumor cells was detected by ELISA. We found that apoptotic tumor cells treated by PDT could activate the macrophages, and the immune effect decreased evidently when HSP70 was blocked. These findings not only show that apoptosis can induce immunological responses, but also show HSP70 may serves as a danger signal for immune cells and induce immune responses to regulate the efficacy of PDT.

  9. Brain PDD and PDT unlocking the mystery of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Eljamel, M Sam

    2004-12-01

    Malignant brain tumours (MBTs) have one of the worst outcomes of human cancers today and their incidence is on the increase. Current treatment failure is usually due to local recurrence of the tumour rather than distant metastasis. In the last three decades we have seen many novel and potentially effective treatment strategies rise rapidly to the rescue. Sadly, however, the majority of these approaches were not good enough to withstand the harsh reality of the sceptical gaze of the scientific eye or the stringent health economics of this millennium. PDD and PDT, however, is one of the few therapies fighting back and still standing today. The results of its randomised controlled trials are eagerly awaited. To date the literature suggests that both PDD and PDT significantly prolong the time to tumour progression, reduce local recurrence, increase radical resection and prolong overall survival of MBTs. PDD and PDT are well tolerated by patients and worthwhile pursuing.

  10. Tumor PDT-associated immune response: relevance of sphingolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Separovic, Duska M.

    2010-02-01

    Sphingolipids have become recognized as essential effector molecules in signal transduction with involvement in various aspects of cell function and death, immune response and cancer treatment response. Major representatives of sphingolipids family, ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), have attracted interest in their relevance to tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) because of their roles as enhancers of apoptosis, mediators of cell growth and vasculogenesis, and regulators of immune response. Our recent in vivo studies with mouse tumor models have confirmed that PDT treatment has a pronounced impact on sphingolipid profile in the targeted tumor and that significant advances in therapeutic gain with PDT can be attained by combining this modality with adjuvant treatment with ceramide analog LCL29.

  11. PREFACE: Muon spin rotation, relaxation or resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffner, Robert H.; Nagamine, Kanetada

    2004-10-01

    ), is currently being built to replace the current Japanese muSR capability at KEK. These muSR institutions provide scientists a variety of sample environments, including a range of temperatures, magnetic fields and applied pressure. In addition, very low-energy muon beams (< 1 keV) have been developed for studies of thin films and nano-materials. In 2002 this world-wide community founded the International Society of muSR Spectroscopy (http://musr.org/~isms/) in order to promote the health of this growing field of research. The 20 papers presented in this volume are intended to highlight some of the current muSR research activities of interest to condensed matter physicists. It is not an exhaustive review. In particular, the active and exciting area of muonium chemistry is left to a future volume. The group of papers in section I addresses the physics of strongly correlated electrons in solids, one of the most active fields of condensed matter research today. Strong electron correlations arise from (Coulomb) interactions which render Landau's theory of electron transport for weakly interacting systems invalid. Included in this category are unconventional heavy-fermion superconductors, high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors, non-Fermi liquid (NFL) systems and systems with strong electron-lattice-spin coupling, such as the colossal magnetoresistance manganites. Two key properties often make the muon a unique probe of these materials: (1) the muon's large magnetic moment (~3 mup) renders it extremely sensitive to the tiny magnetic fields (~1 Gauss) found, for example, in many NFL systems and in superconductors possessing time-reversal-violating order parameters, and (2) the muon's spin 1/2 creates a simple muSR lineshape (no quadrupolar coupling), ideal for measuring spin-lattice-relaxation, local susceptibilities and magnetic-field distributions in ordered magnets and superconductors. Section II contains studies which exploit the unique sensitivities of muSR just

  12. Borehole Muon Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneville, A.; Flygare, J.; Kouzes, R.; Lintereur, A.; Yamaoka, J. A. K.; Varner, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations have spurred investigation into carbon sequestration methods. One of the possibilities being considered, storing super-critical CO2 in underground reservoirs, has drawn more attention and pilot projects are being supported worldwide. Monitoring of the post-injection fate of CO2 is of utmost importance. Generally, monitoring options are active methods, such as 4D seismic reflection or pressure measurements in monitoring wells. We propose here to develop a 4-D density tomography of subsurface CO2 reservoirs using cosmic-ray muon detectors deployed in a borehole. Muon detection is a relatively mature field of particle physics and there are many muon detector designs, though most are quite large and not designed for subsurface measurements. The primary technical challenge preventing deployment of this technology in the subsurface is the lack of miniaturized muon-tracking detectors capable of fitting in standard boreholes and that will resist the harsh underground conditions. A detector with these capabilities is being developed by a collaboration supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. Current simulations based on a Monte Carlo modeling code predict that the incoming muon angle can be resolved with an error of approximately two degrees, using either underground or sea level spectra. The robustness of the design comes primarily from the use of scintillating rods as opposed to drift tubes. The rods are arrayed in alternating layers to provide a coordinate scheme. Preliminary testing and measurements are currently being performed to test and enhance the performance of the scintillating rods, in both a laboratory and a shallow underground facility. The simulation predictions and data from the experiments will be presented.

  13. First clinical results with a new drug for PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Yakubovskaya, Raisa I.; Sukhin, Garry M.; Galpern, Maria G.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Gulin, Alexander V.; Zhitkova, Margarita B.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.; Smirnov, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    After experimental investigation clinical trials of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with the new photosensitizer Photosens -- (AL-sulphonated phthalocyanine) -- have been started. Four patients (with basal cell carcinoma, sarcoma Kaposi and early stage lung cancer) were treated by PDT. After an intravenous injection of drug in dose 2.0 mg/kg b.w. tumors were exposed to frequency-doubled radiation of Nd:yttrium aluminate laser (670 nm) with power densities from 80 to 200 mW/sq cm and total energies up to 2144 J. Immunological and clinical observations of patients are performed. First results indicate the high efficacy of the new drug as a tumor photosensitizer.

  14. Critical dosimetry measures and surrogate tools that can facilitate clinical success in PDT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Davis, Scott C.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Maytin, Edward V.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Palanisami, Akilan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy can be a highly complex treatment with more than one parameter to control, or in some cases it is easily implemented with little control other than prescribed drug and light values. The role of measured dosimetry as related to clinical adoption has not been as successful as it could have been, and part of this may be from the conflicting goals of advocating for as many measurements as possible for accurate control, versus companies and clinical adopters advocating for as few measurements as possible, to keep it simple. An organized approach to dosimetry selection is required, which shifts from mechanistic measurements in pre-clinical and early phase I trials, towards just those essential dose limiting measurements and a focus on possible surrogate measures in phase II/III trials. This essential and surrogate approach to dosimetry should help successful adoption of clinical PDT if successful. The examples of essential dosimetry points and surrogate dosimetry tools which might be implemented in phase II and higher trials are discussed for solid tissue PDT with verteporfin and skin lesion treatment with aminolevulinc acid.

  15. On muon energy spectrum in muon groups underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which was used to measure muon energy spectrum characteristics in muon groups underground using mu-e decays recording. The Baksan Telescope's experimental data on mu-e decays intensity in muon groups of various multiplicities are analyzed. The experimental data indicating very flat spectrum does not however represent the total spectrum in muon groups. Obviously the muon energy spectrum depends strongly on a distance from the group axis. The core attraction effect makes a significant distortion, making the spectrum flatter. After taking this into account and making corrections for this effect the integral total spectrum index in groups has a very small depencence on muon multiplicity and agrees well with expected one: beta=beta (sub expected) = 1.75.

  16. Isolation and characterization of PDT-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zamarrón, Alicia; Lucena, Silvia R; Salazar, Nerea; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Jaén, Pedro; Gilaberte, Yolanda; González, Salvador; Juarranz, Ángeles

    2015-08-01

    Even though the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating premalignant and malignant lesions has been demonstrated, resistant tumor cells to this therapy occasionally appear. Here, we describe the published methods to isolate resistant cancer cells to PDT and propose new procedures that may be used, as laboratory models allow a better understanding of resistance mechanisms. For this purpose, the treatment conditions, the photosensitizer (PS) or pro-drug, the cell line and the final selection - clonal of total population - must be taken into account. In general, high and repeated treatment doses are used. The resistant cell population characterization may include cell morphology, response to PDT, expression of death proteins or survival related genes and cell proliferation analysis. In addition, in vivo models such as the resistant cell transplantation to mice, allow evaluating tumorigenicity and aggressiveness, leading to the determination of the in vivo resistance. Summarizing, in order to improve clinical results, cellular models can help understand PDT-resistance mechanisms in vivo and in vitro.

  17. Clinical applications of PDT in urology: present and near future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumaker, Bryan P.

    1991-06-01

    The treatment of non-invasive bladder carcinoma using Photofrin (sodium porfimer) and laser photodynamic therapy (PDT) is described. The patients described who were treated with this modality had positive cytology and biopsy-proven transitional cell carcinoma, no histologic evidence of muscle invasion, and negative excretory urograms.

  18. Techport Input for Propulsive Descent Technologies (PDT) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    The PDT project will investigate the use of retro propulsion during the supersonic phase of atmospheric entry for Mars missions. The project technical approach involves a combination of procurement and evaluation of commercially provided flight data, development of candidate vehicle configurations, and engineering calibration of computational fluid dynamics models to the available flight data.

  19. Preclinical evaluation of zinc phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate-based PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgatti-Jeffreys, Antonella; Hooser, Stephen B.; Miller, Margaret A.; Thomas, Rose M.; deGortari, Amalia; Lucroy, Michael D.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the light activation of a drug within a tumor causing selective tumor cell death. Unfortunately, some photosensitizing drugs have been associated with adverse reactions in veterinary patients. Zinc phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (ZnPcS4) is a promising second-generation photosensitizer for use in veterinary medicine, however, it cannot be applied clinically until safety and efficacy data are available. ZnPcS4 was given to Swiss Webster mice to assess acute toxicity. Doses >100 mg/kg were associated with acute toxicity and mortality, and doses >100 mg/kg resulted in renal tubular nephrosis, suggesting that the minimum toxic dose is approximately 100 mg/kg. Based on these data, a Phase I clinical trial of ZnPcS4-based PDT in tumor-bearing dogs is underway, with ZnPcS4 doses up to 2 mg/kg producing no apparent toxicity. Tumor response has been observed after ZnPcS4-based PDT using doses as low as 0.25 mg/kg, suggesting that conventional phase I clinical trials may not be appropriate for PDT protocols.

  20. In vivo light dosimetry for HPPH-mediated pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Cullighan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area. The accuracy of treatment delivery is analyzed as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here are enrolled in a Phase I clinical trial of HPPH-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. Patients are administered 4mg per kg body weight HPPH 24-48 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with light therapy with a fluence of 15-60 J/cm2 at 661nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm2) is monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors are used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 15%. The mean fluence rate delivery and treatment time are recorded. A correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume is established. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  1. Muon identification with Muon Telescope Detector at the STAR experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T. C.; Ma, R.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Ruan, L.; Todoroki, T.; Xu, Z.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zha, W.

    2016-07-15

    The Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) is a newly installed detector in the STAR experiment. It provides an excellent opportunity to study heavy quarkonium physics using the dimuon channel in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we report the muon identification performance for the MTD using proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 500 GeV with various methods. Here, the result using the Likelihood Ratio method shows that the muon identification efficiency can reach up to ~ 90% for muons with transverse momenta greater than 3 GeV/c and the significance of the J/ψ signal is improved by a factor of 2 compared to using the basic selection.

  2. Muon identification with Muon Telescope Detector at the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T. C.; Ma, R.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Ruan, L.; Todoroki, T.; Xu, Z.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Zha, W.

    2016-10-01

    The Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) is a newly installed detector in the STAR experiment. It provides an excellent opportunity to study heavy quarkonium physics using the dimuon channel in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we report the muon identification performance for the MTD using proton-proton collisions at √{ s }=500 GeV with various methods. The result using the Likelihood Ratio method shows that the muon identification efficiency can reach up to ∼90% for muons with transverse momenta greater than 3 GeV/c and the significance of the J / ψ signal is improved by a factor of 2 compared to using the basic selection.

  3. Muon Production Height from the Muon Tracking Detector in KASCADE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, C.; Antoni, T.; Apel, W. D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bercuci, A.; Blümer, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Feßler, F.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Iwan, A.; Kampert, K-H.; Klages, H. O.; Maier, G.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Müller, M.; Obenland, R.; Oehschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Risse, M.; Roth, M.; Schatz, G.; Schieler, H.; Scholz, J.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Vardanyan, A.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Zabierowski, J.

    2003-07-01

    The Muon Tracking Detector (MTD; Eµh =0.8 GeV) [5] of the KASCADEt Grande experiment enables the analysis of the longitudinal shower development by means of the Muon production Height (MPH). The analysis employes radial and tangential angles of the muon track with respect to the shower direction, and the distance of the muon hit to the shower core. Comparing analysed MPH of distributions with Monte Carlo simulations (CORSIKA) [6] an increase of ln A d f the primary cosmic rays with lg(Nµr ) is observed. t

  4. PDT driven by energy-converting materials: a theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Jarod C.

    2009-02-01

    Materials have been developed which absorb radiation of one energy and emit light of another. We present a theoretical analysis of the use of these materials as light sources for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The advantage of this strategy is that radiation of higher particle energy (e.g. x ray or electron beam) or lower photon energy (e.g. infra-red) may have more favorable penetration in tissue or more readily available radiation sources than the radiation absorbed by the sensetizer. Our analysis is based on the transfer of energy from radiation fields to visible light. We analyze two scenarios: PDT pumped by (1) infrared light in a two-photon process and (2) ionizing radiation. In each case, we assume that the converting material and the sensitizer are matched sufficiently that the transfer of energy between them is essentially lossless. For the infinite and semiinfinite geometries typically used in PDT, we calculate the resulting photodynamic dose distribution, and compare it to the dose distribution expected for conventional PDT. We also calculate the dose of the incident beam (ionizing or infrared radiation) required to produce PDT-induced tumoricidal effects, and evaluate the expected toxicity in surrounding normal tissue. The toxicity is assumed to arise from thermal effects and acute ionizing radiation effects, for infrared and ionizing radiation, respectively. Our results predict that ionizing radiation will produce dose-limiting toxicity in most conventional geometries as a result of the high toxicity per unit energy of ionizing radiation. For infrared radiation, we predict that the toxicity can be moderated by proper choice of sensitizer and irradiation geometry and fractionation.

  5. PDT in periodontal disease of HAART resistance patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovani, Elcio M.; Noro-Filho, Gilberto A.; Caputo, Bruno V.; Casarin, Renato; Costa, Claudio; Salgado, Daniela; Santos, Camila C.

    2016-03-01

    HIV/Aids patients present a change of microbiota associated with host immunodeficiency. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) showed as a promising and viable alternative in reducing microbiota. Present study evaluate effectiveness of photodynamic therapy in periodontal disease of AIDS patients with highly activity antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure, measuring the clinical periodontal parameters and periodontal microbiota. Twelve patients with HARRT resistance (R group) divided into two groups (control and PDT) and 12 patients with no HAART resistance (NR group) divided into two groups (control and PDT). The results show the difference in baseline of CD4 cells count, NR group 640.0 +/- 176.2 cells/mm3 R group and 333.3 +/- 205.8 cells / mm3 (p<0.05), and in 8.3% detectable viral load in NR group and 75% detectable (p <0.001) in R group. As clinical periodontal parameters (PD and CAL), PDT was more effective than the control group only in the NR group (p <0.05%), moreover, there was no difference in the evaluation of clinical periodontal parameters between the both R groups (p>0.05%). Microbiological evaluation in R group presents a general reduction in the Aa at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, demonstrated a reduction of Pg in all groups at 6 months and in R group at 3 months. The impact assessment of photodynamic therapy in patients with different levels of immunosuppression determined that the combination of mechanical periodontal treatment with photodynamic therapy in patients with HAART failure did not cause additional benefits. Therefore, PDT in this study could not been indicated in HAART resistance patients.

  6. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  7. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  8. Comparative in vitro study on the characteristics of different photosensitizers employed in PDT.

    PubMed

    Berlanda, Juergen; Kiesslich, Tobias; Engelhardt, Victoria; Krammer, Barbara; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2010-09-02

    At present a wide range of photosensitizers are employed in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that have very different characteristics. Although, countless in vitro studies on the attributes of photosensitizers do exist, a direct comparison of these substances on one cell line are rare and may contribute to the choice of the optimal photoactive substance for a specific application. We therefore evaluated the properties of six widespread photosensitizers, namely Foscan, Fospeg, hypericin, aluminum (III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate chloride (AlPcS(4)), 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), and Photofrin in terms of: (i) cytotoxicity without illumination, (ii) phototoxicity, (iii) cellular uptake and release, and (iv) apoptosis induction in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells using comparable illumination regimens. We clearly show that meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC, Foscan) is a very effective photosensitizer inducing high phototoxicity at very low concentrations. Similar in vitro characteristics and phototoxicity were observed for Fospeg, the water-soluble formulation of mTHPC. Hypericin, a photosensitizer extracted from plants of the Hypericum genus, is very effective in inducing apoptosis over a wide range of light fluences. AlPcS(4) absorbs light of 674 nm wavelength providing a higher penetration depth in tissue. Its hydrophilic character allows for application as aqueous solution. ALA can be administered at very high concentrations without producing cytotoxic effects in the dark. The intracellular concentration of protoporphyrin IX rapidly decreases after withdrawal of ALA, thus minimizing the period of light sensitivity post PDT. Among all photosensitizers Photofrin has most clinical approvals and serves as standard.

  9. Susceptibility of representative dental pathogens to inactivation by the PDT with water-soluble photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Ivan; Mantareva, Vanya; Kussovski, Veselin; Worle, Diter; Kisov, Hristo; Belcheva, Marieta; Georgieva, Tzvetelina; Dimitrov, Slavcho

    2011-02-01

    In the recent decade the applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) rapidly increase in several topics and one of areas where the PDT in the future will be play significant role is dentistry. The different photosensitizing complexes with a good water solubility and with absorption with an intensive maximum in the red region (630-690 nm), which makes them suitable for photodynamic treatments, were investigated. The photochemical properties of complexes for singlet oxygen generation were investigated and were shown relations between uptake levels and light intensity to achieve increase in photodynamic efficacy. Photodynamic efficacy against fungi Candida albicans and bacteria's E. faecalis, MRSA and S. Mutans in planktonic media was evaluated. The high photodynamic efficacy was shown for SiPc at very low concentrations (0.9 μM) and light doses of 50 J cm-2 by intensity of light 60 mW cm-2. The photodynamic response for E. faecalis, MRSA and S. Mutans, after treatments with different photosensitizers show strong dependence on concentrations of photsensitzers and micro organisms. The level of inactivation of the pathogen bacteria's from 1-2 degree of initial concentration up to full inactivation was observed. The studied complexes were compared to the recently studied Methylene blue, Haematoporphyrine and tetra-methylpirydiloxy Zn(II)- phthalocyanines and experimental results show that some of them have a good potential for inactivation of representative pathogenic bacterial strains. Experimental results also indicate that photodynamic therapy appears an effective method for inactivation of oral pathogenic bacterias and fungi.

  10. Susceptibility of representative dental pathogens to inactivation by the PDT with water-soluble photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Ivan; Mantareva, Vanya; Kussovski, Veselin; Worle, Diter; Kisov, Hristo; Belcheva, Marieta; Georgieva, Tzvetelina; Dimitrov, Slavcho

    2010-09-01

    In the recent decade the applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) rapidly increase in several topics and one of areas where the PDT in the future will be play significant role is dentistry. The different photosensitizing complexes with a good water solubility and with absorption with an intensive maximum in the red region (630-690 nm), which makes them suitable for photodynamic treatments, were investigated. The photochemical properties of complexes for singlet oxygen generation were investigated and were shown relations between uptake levels and light intensity to achieve increase in photodynamic efficacy. Photodynamic efficacy against fungi Candida albicans and bacteria's E. faecalis, MRSA and S. Mutans in planktonic media was evaluated. The high photodynamic efficacy was shown for SiPc at very low concentrations (0.9 μM) and light doses of 50 J cm-2 by intensity of light 60 mW cm-2. The photodynamic response for E. faecalis, MRSA and S. Mutans, after treatments with different photosensitizers show strong dependence on concentrations of photsensitzers and micro organisms. The level of inactivation of the pathogen bacteria's from 1-2 degree of initial concentration up to full inactivation was observed. The studied complexes were compared to the recently studied Methylene blue, Haematoporphyrine and tetra-methylpirydiloxy Zn(II)- phthalocyanines and experimental results show that some of them have a good potential for inactivation of representative pathogenic bacterial strains. Experimental results also indicate that photodynamic therapy appears an effective method for inactivation of oral pathogenic bacterias and fungi.

  11. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100–280 MeV/c.

  12. Electron-Muon Ranger: Performance in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, D.

    2015-12-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. Lastly, the EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta inmore » the range 100–280 MeV/c.« less

  13. Ionization Cooling for Muon Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Prebys, E.

    2014-09-18

    Possible application for muon experiments such as mu2e is discussed of the initial part of the ionization cooling channel originally developed for muon collider. It is shown that with the FNAL Booster as the proton driver the mu2e sensitivity can be increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the presently considered experiment.

  14. Endobronchial occlusive disease: Nd:YAG or PDT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regal, Anne-Marie; Takita, Hiroshi

    1991-06-01

    Patients with endobronchial occlusion commonly experience dyspnea, cough, hemoptysis, pneumonitis, and atelectasis. If luminal patency is not re-established, obstructive symptoms may progress to sepsis and death. Although the overall survival of patients with lung cancer may not be altered by relief of airway obstruction, the prognosis for this subset of patients may be improved by eliminating the septic complications of bronchial occlusion. Techniques to treat occluded bronchi include electro-fulguration, cryotherapy, brachytherapy, laser (CO2, Nd-YAG) therapy, and photodynamic therapy (PDT). These represent local forms of treatment and are intended to be palliative. Nd-YAG and PDT are the modalities more frequently utilized in this setting. Comparison of the two treatment forms may furnish insight regarding the appropriate role for each as individual therapies and as part of the armamentarium of cancer therapies.

  15. Fractionated PDT with 5-aminolevulinic acid: effective, cost effective, and patient friendly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vijlder, Hannah C.; Middelburg, Tom A.; de Bruijn, Henriette S.; Robinson, Dominic J.; Neumann, H. A. Martino; de Haas, Ellen R. M.

    2009-06-01

    PDT with ALA and MAL is established as a relatively effective treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer and premalignancies. PDT is often repeated, because a single treatment gives poor long term results. Preclinical studies showed that ALA-PDT applying a fractionated illumination scheme with a small first light fraction and a second larger light fraction separated by a dark interval of two hours resulted in a significant increase in efficacy. Whereas the efficacy was not enhanced by fractionating MAL-PDT, indicating that ALA-PDT mechanism is not the same as MAL-PDT mechanism. The increase in efficacy using fractionated PDT was confirmed clinically. A randomized comparative clinical study comparing fractionated ALA-PDT versus non-fractionated ALA-PDT in the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma showed a significant higher response rate in the lesions treated with fractionated ALA-PDT after a follow-up of one year ( p<0.002, log-rank test). The five year follow-up is studied at moment. So far the complete response in the group treated with fractionated ALA-PDT seems to be only a few percentages lower compared to the one year follow-up. Besides the gain in response rate, fractionated ALA PDT is cost effective. ALA gel is less expensive than the commercially available MAL (Metvix) and moreover fractionated ALA-PDT takes one treatment day, instead of two treatment days using the Metvix treatment protocol (two MAL-PDT treatments separated by one week), both reducing direct and indirect costs and the burden to the patient.

  16. Optical properties of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), a PDT photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Lei, Tim C; Glazner, Gregory F; Duffy, Michael; Scherrer, Larry; Pendyala, Srinivas; Li, Buhong; Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Hongwei; Huang, Zheng

    2012-09-01

    We report on some of the optical properties of Hemoporfin (hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether, HMME), a photodynamic therapy (PDT) photosensitizer that has been in clinical trials in China since the early 1990s. We characterized the photosensitizer on the basis of one- and two-photon absorption and fluorescence emission. The effects of photobleaching were probed to characterize its decay kinetics. Additionally, we determined time resolved fluorescence and thermal effects on fluorescence and absorption properties.

  17. Mars Mission Scenario: Data Volume and PDT Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Biswas, A.; Piazzolla, S.; Townes, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives of this work are: (1) Investigate methods for quantifying the value of interoperability for deep space missions: A network of optical receive stations Each one potentially owned by a different space agency. Reduces overall cost to any individual agency Provides geographically diverse locations to mitigate weather problems (clouds, wind, rain, dust, etc.) (2) Metrics: a. Total data volume returned over mission duration b. Percent data transferred (PDT) or something similar.

  18. Ultrasound-guided interventional PDT of liver cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chaoying; Yang, Dong; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Huijuan; Huang, Muyin; Chen, Ji; Lu, Guorong

    1996-09-01

    Thirty patients with advanced liver cancer were treated by interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT). These included 28 hepatocellular carcinoma and two adenocarcinoma, 19 primary tumors and 11 recurred follow other treatments. The diameter of tumors were 7-10cm in 13 cases and 10-16cm in 17 cases. In this study, an argon laser pumped dye laser system was used to give a CW laser beam at 630 nm which was split and coupled into there optical fibers. The patients were injected intravenously with photosensitizer hematoporphyrin derivative at a dose of 5mg/kg body weight 48 hours before PDT. Then the fibers were inserted into tumor by ultrasound- guided percutaneous puncture. The inserted irradiation points were spaced in entire tumor with the light release power 300mW and the irradiation time 12 minutes per point. Total 52 treatments were performed in 30 patients. Among them, 14 cases were treated only one time and 16 cases via 2-3 times. The follow-up was carried out in 25 cases for 12- 24 months. The results show that significant remission was 22 percent in those patients by only one treatment and 62 percent in those via 2 to 3 treatments. The shrink rate of tumor size was over 90 percent in five of six cases after treatment 3. The survival time has been over one year in 12 cases. No obvious change to be found for all patients in liver function test, renal function test and blood routine examination. The level of AFP indicated a descending trend after PDT. This work indicate that PDT is effective and safe for the treatment of large liver cancers including those recurred follow hepatic resection and those failed in hepatic artery infusion embolic chemotherapy.

  19. Light dosimetry and dose verification for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimofte, Andreea; Sharikova, Anna V.; Meo, Julia L.; Simone, Charles B.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2013-03-01

    In-vivo light dosimetry for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is critical for predicting PDT outcome. Patients in this study are enrolled in a Phase I clinical trial of HPPH-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. They are administered 4mg per kg body weight HPPH 48 hours before the surgery and receive light therapy with a fluence of 15-45 J/cm2 at 661 and 665nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm2) are monitored at 7 sites during the light treatment delivery using isotropic detectors. Light fluence (rate) delivered to patients is examined as a function of treatment time, volume and surface area. In a previous study, a correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume and surface area was established. However, we did not include the direct light and the effect of the shape of the pleural surface on the scattered light. A real-time infrared (IR) navigation system was used to separate the contribution from the direct light. An improved expression that accurately calculates the total fluence at the cavity wall as a function of light source location, cavity geometry and optical properties is determined based on theoretical and phantom studies. The theoretical study includes an expression for light fluence rate in an elliptical geometry instead of the spheroid geometry used previously. The calculated light fluence is compared to the measured fluence in patients of different cavity geometries and optical properties. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  20. The in Vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of PDT against Periodontopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Haag, Philippe A; Steiger-Ronay, Valerie; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2015-11-13

    Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease, is caused by biofilms with a mixed microbial etiology and involves the progressive destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. A rising number of studies investigate the clinical potential of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjunct during active therapy. The aim of the present review was to evaluate the available literature for the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic therapy focusing on the periodontopathogenic bacteria Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. The focused question was: "Is it possible to decrease (at least 3 log steps or 99.9%) or even eliminate bacterial growth by photodynamic therapy in vitro when compared to untreated control groups or control groups treated by placebo?" In general, PDT resulted in a substantial reduction of surviving bacteria. However, not all studies showed the desired reduction or elimination. The ranges of log10-reduction were 0.38 (58%) to a complete eradication (100%) for P. gingivalis, 0.21 (39%) to 100% for A. actinomycetemcomitans and 0.3 (50%) to 100% for F. nucleatum. In conclusion, further and particularly more comparable studies are needed to evaluate if PDT can be clinically successful as an adjuvant in periodontal therapy.

  1. Using iron chelating agents to enhance dermatological PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnow, Alison; Dogra, Yuktee; Winyard, Paul; Campbell, Sandra

    2009-06-01

    Topical protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) induced photodynamic therapy (PDT) of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) produces good clinical outcomes with excellent cosmesis as long as the disease remains superficial. Efficacy for nodular BCC however appears inferior to standard treatment unless repeat treatments are performed. Enhancement is therefore required and is possible by employing iron chelating agents to temporarily increase PPIX accumulation above the levels normally obtained using aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or the methyl ester of ALA (MAL) alone. In vitro studies investigated the effect of the novel iron chelator, CP94 on necrotic or apoptotic cell death in cultured human skin fibroblasts and epidermal carcinoma cells incubated with MAL. Furthermore, following a dose escalating safety study conducted with ALA in patients, an additional twelve nodular BCCs were recruited for topical treatment with standard MAL-PDT +/- increasing doses of CP94. Six weeks later following clinical assessment, the whole treatment site was excised for histological analysis. CP94 produced greater cell death in vitro when administered in conjunction with MAL than this porphyrin precursor could produce when administered alone. Clinically, PDT treatment using Metvix + CP94 was a simple and safe modification associated with a trend of reduced tumor thickness with increasing CP94 dose.

  2. The in Vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of PDT against Periodontopathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Philippe A.; Steiger-Ronay, Valerie; Schmidlin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease, is caused by biofilms with a mixed microbial etiology and involves the progressive destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. A rising number of studies investigate the clinical potential of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjunct during active therapy. The aim of the present review was to evaluate the available literature for the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic therapy focusing on the periodontopathogenic bacteria Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. The focused question was: “Is it possible to decrease (at least 3 log steps or 99.9%) or even eliminate bacterial growth by photodynamic therapy in vitro when compared to untreated control groups or control groups treated by placebo?” In general, PDT resulted in a substantial reduction of surviving bacteria. However, not all studies showed the desired reduction or elimination. The ranges of log10-reduction were 0.38 (58%) to a complete eradication (100%) for P. gingivalis, 0.21 (39%) to 100% for A. actinomycetemcomitans and 0.3 (50%) to 100% for F. nucleatum. In conclusion, further and particularly more comparable studies are needed to evaluate if PDT can be clinically successful as an adjuvant in periodontal therapy. PMID:26580607

  3. PDT-induced apoptosis in arterial smooth muscles cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamekye, Isaac; Renick, R.; Gilbert, C.; McEwan, Jean R.; Evan, G.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    PDT kills smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vivo and thus prevents intimal hyperplasia after angioplasty. It causes little inflammation and structural integrity of the artery is not compromised. We have studied the process of the SMC death in vitro. Cultured rat SMC (cell line sv40 ATCC) were sensitized with aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc), and then irradiated with 675 nm laser light (2.5 J/cm2). Controls were studied using only sensitizer or laser for treatment. The cells were incubated and the dying process observed with a time lapse video and microscope system. PDT caused a characteristic pattern of death. Cells lost contact with neighbors, shrank, and showed hyperactivity and membrane ruffling. The cells imploded into active and condensed membrane bound vesicles which were terminally reduced to residual bodies. These are the morphological changes of apoptosis. The control cells which were given AlS2Pc alone or laser alone showed no death. PDT induced cultured arterial SMC death by apoptosis rather than necrosis. An apoptotic mechanism of cell death in vivo would explain the relative lack of inflammation and local tissue destruction in the face of massive death.

  4. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy (PDT) with photosensitizer photosens for superficial bladder cancer: experimental investigations to treat prostate cancer by PDT with photosens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolikhin, Oleg I.; Chernishov, Igor V.; Sivkov, Andrey V.; Altunin, Denis V.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.

    2007-07-01

    14 patients with transional-cell bladder cancer in stage T1N0M0G2 after transurethral bladder resection were offered adjuvant treatment with PDT. Adjuvant PDT was performed 1-1.5 months after transurethral bladder resection for superficial bladder cancer. Prior to PDT conventional and fluorescent cystoscopy were performed. In the absence of inflammation and after full epitalisation of postoperative wound a session of therapy was performed. 24 hours prior to PDT-session photosensitizer Photosens was injected intravenously in the dose of 0.8 mg per kg of body weight. Prior to PDT local anesthesia of urethra with lidocain-gel was performed. Cystoscopy was carried out. PDT was performed with diode laser "Biospec" (675 nm). During the session the place of standing diffuser and the volume of a bladder were controlled. After 7 months of observation no tumor recidivists were observed. Registered side effects were not life-threatened. 5 patients had pain or discomfort in suprapubic area, ceasing spontaneously or requiring administration of analgetics. No systemic side-effects or allergic reactions were observed. The method can be used in out-patient practice. Absence of early recidivists shows efficiency of PDT in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer. Further study is necessary to estimate optimal regimen of PDT. The further controlling of condition on the patients in this group is required. At the laboratory animals' experiment, we conducted the explorations devoted to the influence of the photodynamic effect at the prostate's tissues.

  5. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Muon Simulation at the Daya Bay SIte

    SciTech Connect

    Mengyun, Guan; Jun, Cao; Changgen, Yang; Yaxuan, Sun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2006-05-23

    With a pretty good-resolution mountain profile, we simulated the underground muon background at the Daya Bay site. To get the sea-level muon flux parameterization, a modification to the standard Gaisser's formula was introduced according to the world muon data. MUSIC code was used to transport muon through the mountain rock. To deploy the simulation, first we generate a statistic sample of sea-level muon events according to the sea-level muon flux distribution formula; then calculate the slant depth of muon passing through the mountain using an interpolation method based on the digitized data of the mountain; finally transport muons through rock to get underground muon sample, from which we can get results of muon flux, mean energy, energy distribution and angular distribution.

  7. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  8. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  9. Delivering the world's most intense muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S.; D'Arcy, R.; Edmonds, A.; Fukuda, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Lancaster, M.; Mori, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Tran, N. H.; Truong, N. M.; Wing, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2017-03-01

    A new muon beam line, the muon science innovative channel, was set up at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, in Osaka, Japan, using the 392 MeV proton beam impinging on a target. The production of an intense muon beam relies on the efficient capture of pions, which subsequently decay to muons, using a novel superconducting solenoid magnet system. After the pion-capture solenoid, the first 36° of the curved muon transport line was commissioned and the muon flux was measured. In order to detect muons, a target of either copper or magnesium was placed to stop muons at the end of the muon beam line. Two stations of plastic scintillators located upstream and downstream from the muon target were used to reconstruct the decay spectrum of muons. In a complementary method to detect negatively charged muons, the x-ray spectrum yielded by muonic atoms in the target was measured in a germanium detector. Measurements, at a proton beam current of 6 pA, yielded (10.4 ±2.7 )×1 05 muons per watt of proton beam power (μ+ and μ-), far in excess of other facilities. At full beam power (400 W), this implies a rate of muons of (4.2 ±1.1 )×1 08 muons s-1 , among the highest in the world. The number of μ- measured was about a factor of 10 lower, again by far the most efficient muon beam produced. The setup is a prototype for future experiments requiring a high-intensity muon beam, such as a muon collider or neutrino factory, or the search for rare muon decays which would be a signature for phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. Such a muon beam can also be used in other branches of physics, nuclear and condensed matter, as well as other areas of scientific research.

  10. Measurement of muon intensity by Cerenkov method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Li, G. J.; Bai, G. Z.; Liu, J. G.; Geng, Q. X.; Ling, J.

    1985-01-01

    Optical detection is an important technique in studies and observations of air showers, muons and relevant phenomena. The muon intensity is measured in a proper energy range and to study some problems about Cerenkov radiation of cosmic rays are studied, by a muon-telescope operated with Cerenkov detector. It is found that the measured muon intensity agrees with the integral energy spectrum of cosmic ray muons.

  11. Muon ID - taking care of lower momenta muons

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    In the Muon package under study, the tracks are extrapolated using an algorithm which accounts for the magnetic field and the ionization (dE/dx). We improved the calculation of the field dependent term to increase the muon detection efficiency at lower momenta using a Runge-Kutta method. The muon identification and hadron separation in b-bbar jets is reported with the improved software. In the same framework, the utilization of the Kalman filter is introduced. The principle of the Kalman filter is described in some detail with the propagation matrix, with the Runge-Kutta term included, and the effect on low momenta for low momenta single muons particles is described.

  12. Muon identification with Muon Telescope Detector at the STAR experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, T. C.; Ma, R.; Huang, B.; ...

    2016-07-15

    The Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) is a newly installed detector in the STAR experiment. It provides an excellent opportunity to study heavy quarkonium physics using the dimuon channel in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we report the muon identification performance for the MTD using proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 500 GeV with various methods. Here, the result using the Likelihood Ratio method shows that the muon identification efficiency can reach up to ~ 90% for muons with transverse momenta greater than 3 GeV/c and the significance of the J/ψ signal is improved by a factor of 2 compared to using the basic selection.« less

  13. Simulation of Underground Muon Flux with Application to Muon Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, J. A. K.; Bonneville, A.; Flygare, J.; Lintereur, A.; Kouzes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Muon tomography uses highly energetic muons, produced by cosmic rays interacting within the upper atmosphere, to image dense materials. Like x-rays, an image can be constructed from the negative of the absorbed (or scattered) muons. Unlike x-rays, these muons can penetrate thousands of meters of earth. Muon tomography has been shown to be useful across a wide range of applications (such as imaging of the interior of volcanoes and cargo containers). This work estimates the sensitivity of muon tomography for various underground applications. We use simulations to estimate the change in flux as well as the spatial resolution when imaging static objects, such as mine shafts, and dynamic objects, such as a CO2 reservoir filling over time. We present a framework where we import ground density data from other sources, such as wells, gravity and seismic data, to generate an expected muon flux distribution at specified underground locations. This information can further be fed into a detector simulation to estimate a final experimental sensitivity. There are many applications of this method. We explore its use to image underground nuclear test sites, both the deformation from the explosion as well as the supporting infrastructure (access tunnels and shafts). We also made estimates for imaging a CO2 sequestration site similar to Futuregen 2.0 in Illinois and for imaging magma chambers beneath the Cascade Range volcanoes. This work may also be useful to basic science, such as underground dark matter experiments, where increasing experimental sensitivity requires, amongst other factors, a precise knowledge of the muon background.

  14. Muon capture in deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, P.; Truhlík, E.; Mosconi, B.; Smejkal, J.

    2010-06-01

    Model dependence of the capture rates of the negative muon capture in deuterium is studied starting from potential models and the weak two-body meson exchange currents constructed in the tree approximation and also from an effective field theory. The tree one-boson exchange currents are derived from the hard pion chiral Lagrangians of the NΔπρωa system. If constructed in conjunction with the one-boson exchange potentials, the capture rates can be calculated consistently. On the other hand, the effective field theory currents, constructed within the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, contain a low energy constant d that cannot be extracted from data at the one-particle level nor determined from the first principles. Comparative analysis of the results for the doublet transition rate allows us to extract the constant d.

  15. Dose from slow negative muons.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, T

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients from fluence to ambient dose equivalent, from fluence to maximum dose equivalent and quality factors for slow negative muons are examined in detail. Negative muons, when stopped, produce energetic photons, electrons and a variety of high-LET particles. Contribution from each particle type to the dose equivalent is calculated. The results show that for the high-LET particles the details of energy spectra and decay yields are important for accurate dose estimates. For slow negative muons the ambient dose equivalent does not always yield a conservative estimate for the protection quantities. Especially, the skin equivalent dose is strongly underestimated if the radiation-weighting factor of unity for slow muons is used. Comparisons to earlier studies are presented.

  16. LINACS FOR FUTURE MUON FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Slawomir Bogacz, Rolland Johnson

    2008-10-01

    Future Muon Colliders (MC) and Neutrino Factories (NF) based on muon storage rings will require innovative linacs to: produce the muons, cool them, compress longi-tudinally and ‘shape’ them into a beam and finally to rap-idly accelerate them to multi-GeV (NF) and TeV (MC) energies. Each of these four linac applications has new requirements and opportunities that follow from the na-ture of the muon in that it has a short lifetime (τ = 2.2 μsec) in its own rest frame, it is produced in a tertiary process into a large emittance, and its electron, photon, and neutrino decay products can be more than an annoy-ance. As an example, for optimum performance, the linac repetition rates should scale inversely with the laboratory lifetime of the muon in its storage ring, something as high as 1 kHz for a 40 GeV Neutrino Factory or as low as 20 Hz for a 5 TeV Muon Collider. A superconducting 8 GeV Linac capable of CW operation is being studied as a ver-satile option for muon production [1] for colliders, facto-ries, and muon beams for diverse purposes. A linac filled with high pressure hydrogen gas and imbedded in strong magnetic fields has been proposed to rapidly cool muon beams [2]. Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are possible because muons do not generate significant syn-chrotron radiation even at extremely high energy and in strong magnetic fields. We will describe the present status of linacs for muon applications; in particular the longitu-dinal bunch compression in a single pass linac and multi-pass acceleration in the RLA, especially the optics and technical requirements for RLA designs, using supercon-ducting RF cavities capable of simultaneous acceleration of both μ+ and μ- species, with pulsed linac quadrupoles to allow the maximum number of passes. The design will include the optics for the multi-pass linac and droplet-shaped return arcs.

  17. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) in advanced inoperable bronchial carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghissi, Keyvan; Dixon, Kate; Stringer, Mark R.; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of PDT to: Palliate symptoms, control disease and extend survival in patients with advanced inoperable cancer. Subject and Method: 55 Males and 23 females aged between 45-81 years (mean 66 years) with inoperable and advanced lung cancer with > 5O. obstructive lesions of the main, lobar or segmental bronchi. Patients had pre-treatment routine clinical radiological, functional and endoscopic assessment with proven histological diagnosis. Protocol of PDT was; Intravenous injection of 2 mg/Kg bodyweight Polyhaematoporphyrin (equivalent to Photofrin) or Photofrin followed 24-72 hours later by illumination of tumour using 630 nm light (Oxford Laser) delivered via an optical fibre with end diffuser. Treatments were carried out under general anaesthesia as a day case procedure. Patients were rebronchoscoped for debridement/retreatment 4-7 days later. Results: There was no treatment related mortality. Two patients developed mild photosensitivity reaction. All patients showed symptomatic improvement with good initial functional and radiological amelioration. Every patient responded to treatment. Seven patients had complete response and negative histology for 3-12 months. After the first treatment average Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) improvement was 0.5 litres and 0.4 litres respectively. Twenty five percent of patients (nr 19) survived more than 2 years, 10'. (nr=8) between 1-2 years and the remaining 51 patients less than a year. Conclusion: PDT should be considered as a therapeutic modality for all stages of lung cancer and is an excellent treatment modality for palliation in advanced bronchial malignancies.

  18. Muon spin rotation in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The muon spin rotation (MuSR) technique is used to probe the microscopic electron density in materials. High temperature MuSR and magnetization measurements in nickel are in progress to allow an unambiguous determination of the muon impurity interaction and the impurity induced change in local spin density. The first results on uniaxial stress induced frequency shifts in an Fe single crystal are also reported.

  19. The muon and the electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, V. W.

    Our present understanding of the muon and of its relationship to the electron is reviewed, with particular emphasis on the contributions of atomic physics to this topic. A large body of precise experimental data has been obtained, and all this evidence still indicates that the muon is a pointlike lepton which has the same electroweak interactions given by the standard theory as does the electron, and hence the muon differs from the electron only in its larger mass. There is as yet no understanding of the relationship of the muon (or tau particle) to the electron, or of a spectrum comprising these apparently independent lepton generations. Nous rappelons ce qui est actuellement compris du muon et de sa relation avec l'électron, en insistant sur les contributions de la Physique Atomique à ce sujet. Une large masse de données expérimentales est maintenant acquise, et tout concourt à indiquer que le muon est une particule ponctuelle qui a les mêmes interactions électrofaibles, données par la théorie standard, que l'électron, et ainsi que le muon ne diffère de l'électron que par une masse plus grande. Il n'y a jusqu'à présent aucune interprétation de cette relation du muon (ou de la particule tau) avec l'électron, ou d'un spectre comprenant ces générations de leptons apparemment indépendants.

  20. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2016-07-12

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  1. Molecular mechanisms associated with ALA-PDT of brain tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqawi, Omar; Espiritu, Myrna; Singh, Gurmit

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that low-dose PDT using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced photoporphyrin IX (PpIX) can induce apoptosis in tumor cells without causing necrosis. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms associated with apoptosis after ALA-PDT treatment in two brain glioma cell lines: human U87, and rat CNS-1cells. We used high energy light at a short time (acute PDT) and low energy light at a long time of exposure (metronomic PDT) to treat both cell lines. The cells were treated with 0.25 mM ALA at 5 joules for energy. We found that CNS-1 cells were more resistant to ALA-PDT than U87 cells when treated by both acute and metronomic PDT. To screen possible apoptosis mechanisms associated with acute and metronomic PDT, microarray analysis of gene expression was performed on RNA from glioblastoma cells treated with either acute or metronomic ALA-PDT. Within the set of genes that were negatively or positively regulated by both treatments are tumor necrosis factor receptors. The expression of TNF receptors was investigated further by RT-PCR and western blotting. The apoptosis mechanism of the cell death occurred through different pathways including BCL-2 and TNF receptors, and in part caused by cleaving caspase 3. Interestingly, metronomic ALA-PDT inhibited the expression of LTβR and the transcription factor NFκB. This inhibition was ALA concentration dependent at low concentrations.

  2. Topical PDT in the Treatment of Benign Skin Diseases: Principles and New Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miri; Jung, Haw Young; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-09-25

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light energy, and molecular oxygen to cause cell damage. Cells exposed to the photosensitizer are susceptible to destruction upon light absorption because excitation of the photosensitizing agents leads to the production of reactive oxygen species and, subsequently, direct cytotoxicity. Using the intrinsic cellular heme biosynthetic pathway, topical PDT selectively targets abnormal cells, while preserving normal surrounding tissues. This selective cytotoxic effect is the basis for the use of PDT in antitumor treatment. Clinically, PDT is a widely used therapeutic regimen for oncologic skin conditions such as actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and basal cell carcinoma. PDT has been shown, under certain circumstances, to stimulate the immune system and produce antibacterial, and/or regenerative effects while protecting cell viability. Thus, it may be useful for treating benign skin conditions. An increasing number of studies support the idea that PDT may be effective for treating acne vulgaris and several other inflammatory/infective skin diseases, including psoriasis, rosacea, viral warts, and aging-related changes. This review provides an overview of the clinical investigations of PDT and discusses each of the essential aspects of the sequence: its mechanism of action, common photosensitizers, light sources, and clinical applications in dermatology. Of the numerous clinical trials of PDT in dermatology, this review focuses on those studies that have reported remarkable therapeutic benefits following topical PDT for benign skin conditions such as acne vulgaris, viral warts, and photorejuvenation without causing severe side effects.

  3. PDT-induced apoptosis: investigations using two malignant brain tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Menzies, Keir; Bisland, Stuart K.; Lin, Annie; Wilson, Brian C.

    2002-06-01

    PDT included necrosis in brain tissue and an intracranial tumor has been quantified for various photosensitizers, and it has been shown to be dependent on the sub-cellular localization of these photosensitizers. In quantifying non- necrotic biological endpoints, such as PDT induced apoptosis, the expression and translation of apoptosis inhibiting or promoting genes is of considerable importance. We studied the susceptibility of two glioblastoma cell lines to under go apoptotic cell death following photodynamic treatment with either Photofrin or delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta) ALA) in vivo. Murine 9L Gliosarcoma cells or human U87 Glioblastoma cells were implanted into the cortex of rats, and following 12 or 14 days of growth respectively, subjected to either Photofrin-mediated PDT or ALA-mediated PDT. 9L gliosarcoma cells express the phosphatase Tensin homologue (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene while in U87 cells PTEN is mutated. Differences in the Photofrin mediated PDT induced apoptosis were noted between the two different cell lines in vivo, suggesting that Photofrin mediated PDT may be dependent on apoptotic pathways. ALA induced PPIX showed higher selectivity towards 9L than Photofrin mediated PDT. These studies suggests that PDT could be used as an effective treatment for intracranial neoplasm. Endogenous photosensitizers such as ALA could be used to promote apoptosis in tumor cells due to PDT treatment and thereby minimize the extent of necrotic infarction in the surrounding normal brain.

  4. Experimental studies of combination of PDT and tumor chemotherapy or 60Co irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didziapetriene, Janina; Prasmickiene, Grazina; Sukeliene, Dalija; Rotomskis, Ricardas; Streckyte, Giedre; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Staciokiene, Laima; Smilgevicius, Valerijus

    1995-01-01

    We present experimental results obtained by combining photodynamic therapy (PDT) with tumor chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Dimethoxyhematoporphyrin (DMHp) and photosan (PS) were used as photosensitizers, pharanoxi and vincristine as antitumor drugs. The therapeutic effect of the combination of PDT and antitumor drugs (pharanoxi, vincristine) slightly increases as compared to the treatment of PDT or antitumor drug alone. The additive therapeutic effect is achieved under the combination of PDT and 60Co irradiation. It seems that the sensitizers DMHp and PS regulate lipid peroxidation in blood serum of experimental animals, which becomes more active under the influence of alkylating antitumor drugs. Therefore, they could protect an organism from negative influence of tumor chemotherapy.

  5. Topical PDT in the Treatment of Benign Skin Diseases: Principles and New Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miri; Jung, Haw Young; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses a photosensitizer, light energy, and molecular oxygen to cause cell damage. Cells exposed to the photosensitizer are susceptible to destruction upon light absorption because excitation of the photosensitizing agents leads to the production of reactive oxygen species and, subsequently, direct cytotoxicity. Using the intrinsic cellular heme biosynthetic pathway, topical PDT selectively targets abnormal cells, while preserving normal surrounding tissues. This selective cytotoxic effect is the basis for the use of PDT in antitumor treatment. Clinically, PDT is a widely used therapeutic regimen for oncologic skin conditions such as actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ, and basal cell carcinoma. PDT has been shown, under certain circumstances, to stimulate the immune system and produce antibacterial, and/or regenerative effects while protecting cell viability. Thus, it may be useful for treating benign skin conditions. An increasing number of studies support the idea that PDT may be effective for treating acne vulgaris and several other inflammatory/infective skin diseases, including psoriasis, rosacea, viral warts, and aging-related changes. This review provides an overview of the clinical investigations of PDT and discusses each of the essential aspects of the sequence: its mechanism of action, common photosensitizers, light sources, and clinical applications in dermatology. Of the numerous clinical trials of PDT in dermatology, this review focuses on those studies that have reported remarkable therapeutic benefits following topical PDT for benign skin conditions such as acne vulgaris, viral warts, and photorejuvenation without causing severe side effects. PMID:26404243

  6. Overcoming therapeutic resistance in pancreatic cancer is not a simple mix of PDT and chemotherapy: Evaluation of PDT-chemotherapy combinations in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Petrovic, Ljubica; Massdodi, Iqbal; Rizvi, Imran; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    The dismal survival statistics for pancreatic cancer are due in large part to the notoriously poor response of these tumors to conventional therapies. Here we examine the ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using the photosensitizer verteporfin to enhance of the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy agents and/or eradicate populations that are nonresponsive to these agents. Using an in vitro 3D tumor model of pancreatic cancer combined with an imaging-based methodology for quantifying therapeutic response, we specifically examine PDT combination treatments with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin. We show that our 3D cell culture model recapitulates a more clinically-relevant dose response to gemcitabine, with minimal cytotoxic response even at high doses. The same cultures exhibit modest response to PDT treatments, but are also less responsive to this modality relative to our previous reports of monolayer dose response in the same cells. In combination we found no evidence of any enhancement in efficacy of either PDT or gemcitabine treatment regardless of dose or sequence (PDT before gemcitabine, or gemcitabine before PDT). However, when oxaliplatin chemotherapy was administered immediately after treatment with 2.5J/cm2 verteporfin PDT, there was an observable enhancement in response that appears to exceed the additive combination of either treatment alone and suggesting there may be a synergistic interaction. This observation is consistent with previous reports of enhanced efficacy in combinations of PDT with platinum-based chemotherapy. The contrast in results between the combinations examined here underscores the need for rational design of mechanism-based PDT combinations.

  7. Quasi-isochronous muon collection channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Neuffer, David; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2015-04-26

    Intense muon beams have many potential commercial and scientific applications, ranging from low-energy investigations of the basic properties of matter using spin resonance to large energy-frontier muon colliders. However, muons originate from a tertiary process that produces a diffuse swarm. To make useful beams, the swarm must be rapidly captured and cooled before the muons decay. In this STTR project a promising new concept for the collection and cooling of muon beams to increase their intensity and reduce their emittances was investigated, namely, the use of a nearly isochronous helical cooling channel (HCC) to facilitate capture of the muons into RF bunches. The muon beam can then be cooled quickly and coalesced efficiently to optimize the luminosity of a muon collider, or could provide compressed muon beams for other applications. Optimal ways to integrate such a subsystem into the rest of a muon collection and cooling system, for collider and other applications, were developed by analysis and simulation. The application of quasi-isochronous helical cooling channels (QIHCC) for RF capture of muon beams was developed. Innovative design concepts for a channel incorporating straight solenoids, a matching section, and an HCC, including RF and absorber, were developed, and its subsystems were simulated. Additionally, a procedure that uses an HCC to combine bunches for a muon collider was invented and simulated. Difficult design aspects such as matching sections between subsystems and intensity-dependent effects were addressed. The bunch recombination procedure was developed into a complete design with 3-D simulations. Bright muon beams are needed for many commercial and scientific reasons. Potential commercial applications include low-dose radiography, muon catalyzed fusion, and the use of muon beams to screen cargo containers for homeland security. Scientific uses include low energy beams for rare process searches, muon spin resonance applications, muon beams for

  8. Real-time treatment feedback guidance of Pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Kim, Michele M.; Liang, Xing; Liu, Baochang; Meo, Julia L.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles; Cengel, Keith; Friedberg, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for mesothelioma with remarkable results. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light and the light dose are monitored by 7 detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an infrared (IR) camera system is used to track the motion of the light sources. A treatment planning system uses feedback from the detectors as well as the IR camera to update light fluence distribution in real-time, which is used to guide the light source motion for uniform light dose distribution. We have improved the GUI of the light dose calculation engine to provide real-time light fluence distribution suitable for guiding the surgery to delivery light more uniformly. A dual-correction method is used in the feedback system, so that fluence calculation can match detector readings using both direct and scatter light models. An improved measurement device is developed to automatically acquire laser position for the point source. Comparison of the effects of the guidance is presented in phantom study.

  9. A real-time treatment guidance system for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Sandell, Julia; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Cengel, Keith; Friedberg, Joseph; Hahn, Stephen M.; Glatstein, Eli

    2012-02-01

    Intrapleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for mesothelioma. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light and the light dose are monitored by 7 detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an infrared (IR) camera system is used to track the motion of the light sources. A treatment planning system uses feedback from the detectors as well as the IR camera to update light fluence distribution in real-time, which is used to guide the light source motion for uniform light dose distribution. We have reported previously the success of using IR camera to passively monitor the light fluence rate distribution. In this study, the real-time feedback has been implemented in the current system prototype, by transferring data from the IR camera to a computer at a rate of 20 Hz, and by calculation/displaying using Matlab. A dual-correction method is used in the feedback system, so that fluence calculation can match detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom showed superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown using the correction method dose model.

  10. Real-time treatment feedback guidance of Pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Kim, Michele M.; Liang, Xing; Liu, Baochang; Meo, Julia L.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B.; Cengel, Keith; Friedberg, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for mesothelioma with remarkable results. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light and the light dose are monitored by 7 detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an infrared (IR) camera system is used to track the motion of the light sources. A treatment planning system uses feedback from the detectors as well as the IR camera to update light fluence distribution in real-time, which is used to guide the light source motion for uniform light dose distribution. We have improved the GUI of the light dose calculation engine to provide real-time light fluence distribution suitable for guiding the surgery to delivery light more uniformly. A dual-correction method is used in the feedback system, so that fluence calculation can match detector readings using both direct and scatter light models. An improved measurement device is developed to automatically acquire laser position for the point source. Comparison of the effects of the guidance is presented in phantom study. PMID:25999647

  11. A real-time treatment guidance system for Pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Sandell, Julia; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Cengel, Keith; Friedberg, Joseph; Hahn, Stephen M; Glatstein, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Intrapleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for mesothelioma. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light and the light dose are monitored by 7 detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an infrared (IR) camera system is used to track the motion of the light sources. A treatment planning system uses feedback from the detectors as well as the IR camera to update light fluence distribution in real-time, which is used to guide the light source motion for uniform light dose distribution. We have reported previously the success of using IR camera to passively monitor the light fluence rate distribution. In this study, the real-time feedback has been implemented in the current system prototype, by transferring data from the IR camera to a computer at a rate of 20 Hz, and by calculation/displaying using Matlab. A dual-correction method is used in the feedback system, so that fluence calculation can match detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom showed superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown using the correction method dose model. PMID:26005245

  12. Noncoherent light for PDT of spontaneous animal tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucroy, Michael D.; Ridgway, Tisha D.; Higbee, Russell G.; Reeds, Kimberly

    2004-07-01

    Cultured 9L cells were incubated with graded doses of pheophorbide-a-hexyl ether (HPPH) and exposed to 665 nm red light from either a noncoherent light source or a KTP-pumped dye laser. Cell death was observed after irradiation using either light source, with the noncoherent light being most effective at the highest HPPH concentrations. To determing the practicality of using the noncoherent light source for clinical PDT, dogs and cats with spontaneous tumors were injected intravenously with 0.15 mg/kg HPPH one hour before their tumors were irradiated with 665 nm noncoherent light (50 mW cm-2, 100 J cm-2). Of the 9 tumors treated, 8 complete responses were observed, all of which occurred in animals with squamous cell carcinoma. After 68 weeks of follow up, the median initial disease free interval had not been reached. These data support the use of noncoherent light sources for PDT of spontaneous tumors in animals, representing a cost-effective alternative to medical lasers in both veterinary and human dermatology and oncology.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence calculation during pleural PDT.

    PubMed

    Meo, Julia L; Zhu, Timothy

    2013-02-02

    A thorough understanding of light distribution in the desired tissue is necessary for accurate light dosimetry in PDT. Solving the problem of light dose depends, in part, on the geometry of the tissue to be treated. When considering PDT in the thoracic cavity for treatment of malignant, localized tumors such as those observed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), changes in light dose caused by the cavity geometry should be accounted for in order to improve treatment efficacy. Cavity-like geometries demonstrate what is known as the "integrating sphere effect" where multiple light scattering off the cavity walls induces an overall increase in light dose in the cavity. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence based on a spherical and an elliptical cavity geometry with various dimensions. The tissue optical properties as well as the non-scattering medium (air and water) varies. We have also introduced small absorption inside the cavity to simulate the effect of blood absorption. We expand the MC simulation to track photons both within the cavity and in the surrounding cavity walls. Simulations are run for a variety of cavity optical properties determined using spectroscopic methods. We concluded from the MC simulation that the light fluence inside the cavity is inversely proportional to the surface area.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence calculation during pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Julia L.; Zhu, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    A thorough understanding of light distribution in the desired tissue is necessary for accurate light dosimetry in PDT. Solving the problem of light dose depends, in part, on the geometry of the tissue to be treated. When considering PDT in the thoracic cavity for treatment of malignant, localized tumors such as those observed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), changes in light dose caused by the cavity geometry should be accounted for in order to improve treatment efficacy. Cavity-like geometries demonstrate what is known as the "integrating sphere effect" where multiple light scattering off the cavity walls induces an overall increase in light dose in the cavity. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of light fluence based on a spherical and an elliptical cavity geometry with various dimensions. The tissue optical properties as well as the non-scattering medium (air and water) varies. We have also introduced small absorption inside the cavity to simulate the effect of blood absorption. We expand the MC simulation to track photons both within the cavity and in the surrounding cavity walls. Simulations are run for a variety of cavity optical properties determined using spectroscopic methods. We concluded from the MC simulation that the light fluence inside the cavity is inversely proportional to the surface area.

  15. Beta-lactamase targeted enzyme activatable photosensitizers for antimicrobial PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiang; Verma, Sarika; Sallum, Ulysses W.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a treatment modality for infectious disease has shown promise. However, most of the antimicrobial photosensitizers (PS) non-preferentially accumulate in both bacteria and host tissues, causing host tissue phototoxicity during treatment. We have developed a new antimicrobial PDT strategy which exploits beta-lactam resistance mechanism, one of the major drug-resistance bacteria evolved, to achieve enhanced target specificity with limited host damage. Our strategy comprises a prodrug construct with a PS and a quencher linked by beta-lactam ring, resulting in a diminished phototoxicity. This construct, beta-lactamase enzyme-activated-photosensitizer (beta-LEAP), can only be activated in the presence of both light and bacteria, and remains inactive elsewhere such as mammalian tissue. Beta-LEAP construct had shown specific cleavage by purified beta-lactamase and by beta-lactamase over-expressing methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Specific photodynamic toxicity was observed towards MRSA, while dark and light toxicity were equivalent to reference strains. The prodrug design, synthesis and photophysical properties will be discussed.

  16. Muon Tomography for Geological Repositories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, D.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Gluyas, J.; Clark, S. J.; Thompson, L. F.; Klinger, J.; Spooner, N. J.; Blackwell, T. B.; Pal, S.; Lincoln, D. L.; Paling, S. M.; Mitchell, C. N.; Benton, C.; Coleman, M. L.; Telfer, S.; Cole, A.; Nolan, S.; Chadwick, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic-ray muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere in collisions of primary cosmic rays with atoms in air. Due to their high penetrating power these muons can be used to image the content (primarily density) of matter they pass through. They have already been used to image the structure of pyramids, volcanoes and other objects. Their applications can be extended to investigating the structure of, and monitoring changes in geological formations and repositories, in particular deep subsurface sites with stored CO2. Current methods of monitoring subsurface CO2, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and require highly skilled personnel to operate. Our simulations based on simplified models have previously shown that muon tomography could be used to continuously monitor CO2 injection and migration and complement existing technologies. Here we present a simulation of the monitoring of CO2 plume evolution in a geological reservoir using muon tomography. The stratigraphy in the vicinity of the reservoir is modelled using geological data, and a numerical fluid flow model is used to describe the time evolution of the CO2 plume. A planar detection region with a surface area of 1000 m2 is considered, at a vertical depth of 776 m below the seabed. We find that one year of constant CO2 injection leads to changes in the column density of about 1%, and that the CO2 plume is already resolvable with an exposure time of less than 50 days. The attached figure show a map of CO2 plume in angular coordinates as reconstructed from observed muons. In parallel with simulation efforts, a small prototype muon detector has been designed, built and tested in a deep subsurface laboratory. Initial calibrations of the detector have shown that it can reach the required angular resolution for muon detection. Stable operation in a small borehole within a few months has been demonstrated.

  17. Explanation for the low flux of high-energy astrophysical muon neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Pakvasa, Sandip; Joshipura, Anjan; Mohanty, Subhendra

    2013-04-26

    There has been some concern about the unexpected paucity of cosmic high-energy muon neutrinos in detectors probing the energy region beyond 1 PeV. As a possible solution we consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, we consider (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac-particles. This would provide a mechanism for the reduction of high-energy muon events in the IceCube detector, for example.

  18. Using Muons to Image the Subsurface.

    SciTech Connect

    Bonal, Nedra; Cashion, Avery Ted; Cieslewski, Grzegorz; Dorsey, Daniel J.; Foris, Adam; Miller, Timothy J.; Roberts, Barry L; Su, Jiann-Cherng; Dreesen, Wendi; Green, J. Andrew; Schwellenbach, David

    2016-11-01

    Muons are subatomic particles that can penetrate the earth 's crust several kilometers and may be useful for subsurface characterization . The absorption rate of muons depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity, making them beneficial for subsurface investigation . Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. This work consists of three parts to address the use of muons for subsurface characterization : 1) assess the use of muon scattering for estimating density differences of common rock types, 2 ) using muon flux to detect a void in rock, 3) measure muon direction by designing a new detector. Results from this project lay the groundwork for future directions in this field. Low-density objects can be detected by muons even when enclosed in high-density material like lead, and even small changes in density (e.g. changes due to fracturing of material) can be detected. Rock density has a linear relationship with muon scattering density per rock volume when this ratio is greater than 0.10 . Limitations on using muon scattering to assess density changes among common rock types have been identified. However, other analysis methods may show improved results for these relatively low density materials. Simulations show that muons can be used to image void space (e.g. tunnels) within rock but experimental results have been ambiguous . Improvements are suggested to improve imaging voids such as tunnels through rocks. Finally, a muon detector has been designed and tested to measure muon direction, which will improve signal-to-noise ratio and help address fundamental questions about the source of upgoing muons .

  19. Muon-muon and other high energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The first section looks at the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron, of lepton and photon-photon colliders for comparison. The second section discusses the physics considerations for the muon collider. The third section covers muon collider components. The fourth section is about the intersection region and detectors. In the fifth section, the authors discuss modifications to enhance the muon polarization`s operating parameters with very small momentum spreads, operations at energies other than the maximum for which the machine is designed, and designs of machines for different maximum energies. The final section discusses a Research and Development plan aimed at the operation of a 0.5 TeV demonstration machine by the year 2010, and of the 4 TeV machine by the year 2020.

  20. Muon motion in titanium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempton, J. R.; Petzinger, K. G.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Hitti, B. S.; Stronach, C. E.; Adu, N.; Lankford, W. F.; Reilly, J. J.; Seymour, E. F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Motional narrowing of the transverse-field muon spin rotation signal was observed in gamma-TiH(x) for x = 1.83, 1.97, and 1.99. An analysis of the data for TiH1.99 near room temperature indicates that the mechanism responsible for the motion of the muon out of the octahedral site is thermally activated diffusion with an attempt frequency comparable to the optical vibrations of the lattice. Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the effect of muon and proton motion upon the muon field-correlation time were used to interpret the motional narrowing in TiH1.97 near 500 K. The interpretation is dependent upon whether the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) theory or an independent spin-pair relaxation model is used to obtain the vacancy jump rate from proton NMR T1 measurements. Use of BPP theory shows that the field-correction time can be obtained if the rate of motion of the muon with respect to the rate of the motion for the protons is decreased. An independent spin-pair relaxation model indicates that the field-correlation time can be obtained if the rate of motion for the nearest-neighbor protons is decreased.

  1. Autophagy inhibition enhances photocytotoxicity of Photosan-II in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Guoqing; Lin, Liangwu; Huang, He; Kang, Hongxiang; Chen, Wei; Miao, Xiongying; Wen, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has emerged as an attractive therapeutic treatment for colorectal cancer because of its accessibility through endoscopy and its ability to selectively target tumors without destroying the anatomical integrity of the colon. We therefore investigated the therapeutic relevance of the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in Photosan-II (PS-II)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PS-PDT) in in vitro and in vivo models for human colorectal cancer. We observed that PS-PDT-induced dose-dependently triggered apoptosis and autophagy in both SW620 and HCT116 cells. PS-PDT-treated SW620 cells exhibited nuclear condensation and increased levels of cleaved caspase-3, PARP and Bax, which is reminiscent of apoptosis. PS-PDT also induced autophagic vacuoles, double membrane autophagosome structures and the autophagy-related proteins P62, Bcl-2, ATG7 and LC3-II. In addition, the AKT-mTOR pathway was downregulated, while AMPK was upregulated in PS-PDT-treated cells. Inhibiting autophagy using chloroquine or by downregulating ATG7 using shRNA further upregulated apoptosis, suggesting autophagy was probably was protective to PS-PDT-treated tumor cells. In vivo relevance was demonstrated when a combination of chloroquine and PS-PDT significantly reduced the tumor size in a xenograft mice model. Our findings demonstrate that combination therapy using PS-PDT and autophagy inhibitors may be an effective approach to treating colorectal cancer patients. PMID:28031534

  2. Muon-pair production by atmospheric muons in CosmoALEPH.

    PubMed

    Maciuc, F; Grupen, C; Hashim, N-O; Luitz, S; Mailov, A; Müller, A-S; Putzer, A; Sander, H-G; Schmeling, S; Schmelling, M; Tcaciuc, R; Wachsmuth, H; Ziegler, Th; Zuber, K

    2006-01-20

    Data from a dedicated cosmic ray run of the ALEPH detector were used in a study of muon trident production, i.e., muon pairs produced by muons. Here the overburden and the calorimeters are the target materials while the ALEPH time projection chamber provides the momentum measurements. A theoretical estimate of the muon trident cross section is obtained by developing a Monte Carlo simulation for muon propagation in the overburden and the detector. Two muon trident candidates were found to match the expected theoretical pattern. The observed production rate implies that the nuclear form factor cannot be neglected for muon tridents.

  3. Muon-fluorine entanglement in fluoropolymers.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, T; Pratt, F L; Blundell, S J; McKenzie, I; Assender, H E

    2009-08-26

    We present the results of muon spin relaxation measurements on the fluoropolymers polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(vinyl fluoride) (PVF). Entanglement between the muon spin and the spins of the fluorine nuclei in the polymers allows us to identify the different muon stopping states that occur in each of these materials and provides a method of probing the local environment of the muon and the dynamics of the polymer chains.

  4. MUON COLLIDERS - IONIZATION COOLING AND SOLENOIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    1999-03-29

    For a muon collider, to obtain the needed luminosity, the phase space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. Alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed for muon colliders, where the emittance are huge. We present an overview, discuss formalism, transfer maps for solenoid magnets and beam dynamics.

  5. Sensitive detection of PDT-induced cell damages with luminescent oxygen nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Ru; Peng, Hong-shang; You, Fang-tian; Ping, Jian-tao; Zhou, Chao; Guo, Lan-ying

    2016-09-01

    In this work luminescent nanosensors specifically created for intracellular oxygen (ic-O2) were utilized to assess photodynamic therapy (PDT) -induced cell damages. Firstly, ic-O2 was demonstrated to be consumed much faster than extracellular O2 with respective O2 nanosensors. Using the ic-O2 nanosensors, PDT-treated cells with different degree of impairment were then resolved according to the oxygen consumption rate (OCR). The evolving trend of cytotoxicity derived from OCRs was in agreement with cell viability obtained from 3-(4,5-cimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Moreover, the direct damage of PDT on cell mitochondria was successfully detected by monitoring respiration instantly after PDT treatment, which is actually beyond the scope of MTT assay. These results suggest that fluorescence sensing of ic-O2-associated cell respiration is promising and even may become a standardized method, complementary to MTT assay, to evaluate PDT-induced cytotoxicity.

  6. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-06

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  7. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, Marco

    2011-10-01

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  8. Law of Conservation of Muons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Feinberg, G.; Weinberg, S.

    1961-02-01

    A multiplicative selection rule for mu meson-electron transitions is proposed. A "muon parity" = -1 is considered for the muon and its neutrino, while the "muon parity" for all other particles is +1. The selection rule then states that (-1) exp(no. of initial (-1) parity particles) = (-1) exp(no. of final (-1) parity particles). Several reactions that are forbidden by an additive law but allowed by the multiplicative law are suggested; these reactions include mu{sup +} .> e{sup +} + nu{sub mu} + {ovr nu}{sub e}, e{sup -} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + mu{sup -}, and muonium .> antimuonium (mu{sup +} + e{sup -} .> mu{sup -} + e{sup +}). An intermediate-boson hypothesis is suggested. (T.F.H.)

  9. Muon problem in UHECR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrukhin, A. A.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Kokoulin, R. P.

    2013-02-01

    In many UHECR experiments, some excess of muons is observed, which cannot be explained in frame of the existing theoretical models of hadron interaction. Attempts of its explanation through a heavy mass composition of PCR contradict the results of Xmax measurements. Really, the excess of muons appears already at lower energies (1016 - 1017 eV), but in this domain it may be explained by the trend to a heavier mass composition, which is in a qualitative agreement with the galactic model of CR origin. The absence of heavy nuclei at energies of the order of 1018 eV requires to consider other possibilities of the appearance of muon excess, including changes of hadron interaction model. The actuality of the considered problem is connected with plans of future experiments in UHECR physics, in which the necessity of its solution must be taken into account.

  10. CDF Run 2 muon system

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Ginsburg

    2004-02-05

    The CDF muon detection system for Run 2 of the Fermilab Tevatron is described. Muon stubs are detected for |{eta}| < 1.5, and are matched to tracks in the central drift chamber at trigger level 1 for |{eta}| < 1.25. Detectors in the |{eta}| < 1 central region, built for previous runs, have been enhanced to survive the higher rate environment and closer bunch spacing (3.5 {micro}sec to 396 nsec) of Run 2. Azimuthal gaps in the central region have been filled in. New detectors have been added to extend the coverage from |{eta}| < 1 to |{eta}| < 1.5, consisting of four layers of drift chambers covered with matching scintillators for triggering. The Level 1 Extremely Fast Tracker supplies matching tracks with measured p{sub T} for the muon trigger. The system has been in operation for over 18 months. Operating experience and reconstructed data are presented.

  11. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  12. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  13. Muon g - 2 and Tests of Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Francis J. M.

    2015-07-01

    After a brief introduction to the muon anomalous moment a ≡ (g-2)/2, the pioneering measurements at CERN are described. This includes the CERN cyclotron experiment, the first Muon Storage Ring, the invention of the "magic energy", the second Muon Storage Ring and stringent tests of special relativity.

  14. A Highly intense DC muon source, MuSIC and muon CLFV search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, A.; Sakamoto, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tran, N. H.; Hashim, I. H.; Fukuda, M.; Hayashida, Y.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2014-08-01

    MuSIC is a new muon facility, which provides the world's highest intense muon beam with continuous time structure at Research Center of Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. It's intensity is designed to be 108 muons per second with only 0.4 kW proton beam. Such a high intense muon beam is very important for searches of rare decay processes, for example search for the muon to electron conversion.

  15. Enhancing PDT drug delivery by enzymatic cleavage of porphyrin phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Liang, Gaolin; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou; Chan, Kalok; Chang, Chi K.

    2007-02-01

    A new anionic porphyrin-phosphate conjugate has been made as the substrate of phosphatase to evaluate its cellular-uptake and potential targeting on cancer cells, taking advantage of the over-expression of phosphatases associated with the development of cancers. The phosphate groups increase the hydrophilicity of porphyrin dityrosine phosphate and facilitate its formulation in aqueous solvent. Upon hydrolysis by phosphatase after cellular uptaking, the more hydrophobic porphyrin-dityrosine promises to give better cellular retention. Indeed, the phosphate conjugate displayed a much better PDT effect than that of the parent porphyrin at the same concentration (10 μM) and light dosage on HeLa cells, indicating the enzyme-cleavage reaction occurred in HeLa cells plays a role. Photosenzitizers utilizing enzyme-cleavage might be a promising approach for photodynamic therapy.

  16. One more PDT application of chlorin e6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrei V.; Reshetnickov, Andrei V.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.

    2000-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo biological evaluation of a novel drug substance 'photodithazine' has been performed. In vitro photocytotoxicity (EC50) was 1 (mu) M together with some cytotoxicity. In vivo acute toxicity has been found to be 170 mg/kg for KD10, 175 mg/kg for LD16, 197 mg/kg for LD50, 220 mg/kg for LD84 following 1 percent aqueous solution i.v. injection. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies have been done using the same mice bearing inoculated under the skin of the flanks T36 embryocarcinomas injected i.v. with 40 mg/kg dose of the drug. Maximal tumor and most organs' uptake was attained 1 h.p.i., however, the drug's level in the organs rapidly decreasing to zero with the best tumor/muscle ratios over 10 by 5 h.p.i. 'Photodithazine' has been found to possess rapid clearance from the organism: 94 percent elimination 24 h.p.i. and 98 percent to 48 h.p.i. PDT has been performed in vivo involving 21-23 g A/Snell mice with the same type 0.9-1 g tumors injected 40 mg/kg drug i.p., with 670 nm light being delivered 5-6 h p.i. at different doses. The best irradiation dose has been found to be 170 J/cm2 with a sound necrotic effect and 1-3 week remission. Thus, 'Photodithazine' represents a potent photosensitizer for PDT.

  17. Pharmacology of photosensitizer in rats with metastatic breast cancer: time point determination for photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment of vertebral metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akens, Margarete K.; Yee, Albert J. M.; Lilge, Lothar; Burch, Shane; Whyne, Cari; Wilson, Brian C.; Bisland, Stuart K.

    2005-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a non-radiative treatment has been applied successfully in various cancers. PDT may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of vertebral metastases. PDT efficacy requires the administration of a photosensitiser drug followed by subsequent drug activation by wavelength specific light. The study purpose was to establish the pharmacokinetic profiles for 2 photosensitisers, BPD-MA and 5-ALA induced PpIX, to determine the optimal drug-light interval for vertebral PDT.

  18. Recirculating Linear Accelerators for Future Muon Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Bogacz, K.B.Beard, R.P. Johnson

    2010-05-01

    Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses superconducting RF structures can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity. A new concept of rapidly changing the strength of the RLA focusing quadrupoles as the muons gain energy is being developed to increase the number of passes that each muon will make in the RF cavities, leading to greater cost effectiveness.

  19. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Gail G.; Snopak, Pavel; Bao, Yu

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  20. Design Concepts for Muon-Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R. D.; Berg, J. S.; Kirk, H. G.; Palmer, R. B.; Stratkis, D.; Alexahin, Y.; Bross, A.; Gollwitzer, K.; Mokhov, N. V.; Neuffer, D.; Palmer, M. A.; Yonehara, K.; Snopok, P.; Bogacz, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Delahaye, J. -P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced, thus enabling high-quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design & simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider. This paper summarizes the current status of design concepts for muon-based accelerators for neutrino factories and a muon collider.

  1. Muon g-2 Experiment Shimming

    SciTech Connect

    Kiburg, Brendan

    2016-06-28

    The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab will use as its primary instrument a 52-foot-wide electromagnet that creates a precise magnetic field. In this video, Fermilab's Brendan Kiburg explains the lengthy process of finely "shimming" that magnetic field into shape.

  2. Muon g-2 Experiment Shimming

    ScienceCinema

    Kiburg, Brendan

    2016-07-12

    The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab will use as its primary instrument a 52-foot-wide electromagnet that creates a precise magnetic field. In this video, Fermilab's Brendan Kiburg explains the lengthy process of finely "shimming" that magnetic field into shape.

  3. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J. -B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  4. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  5. Cosmic muons, as messengers from the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Brancus, I. M.; Rebel, H.

    2015-02-24

    Penetrating from the outer space into the Earth atmosphere, primary cosmic rays are producing secondary radiation by the collisions with the air target subsequently decaying in hadrons, pions, muons, electrons and photons, phenomenon called Extensive air Shower (EAS). The muons, considered as the “penetrating” component, survive the propagation to the Earth and even they are no direct messenger of the Universe, they reflect the features of the primary particles. The talk gives a description of the development of the extensive air showers generating the secondary particles, especially the muon component. Results of the muon flux and of the muon charge ratio, (the ratio between the positive and the negative muons), obtained in different laboratories and in WILLI experiment, are shown. At the end, the contribution of the muons measured in EAS to the investigation of the nature of the primary cosmic rays is emphasized in KASCADE and WILLI-EAS experiments.

  6. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-06-18

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

  7. Noninvasive monitoring hemodynamic responses in RIF tumors during and after PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Durduran, Turgut; Busch, Theresa M.; Wang, Hsing-Wen; Zhou, Chao; Saunders, H. Mark; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-06-01

    Changes in blood flow and oxygenation during and after PDT provide information about tumor vessel and cellular damage. The characterization of these changes may improve our understanding of PDT mechanisms and help predict treatment efficacy. We have designed a hybrid system that can non-invasively measure in vivo hemodynamic changes and provide independent information about tumor oxygenation and blood flow. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) monitors blood flow by measuring the optical phase shifts caused by moving blood cells, while diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) spectroscopy measures tissue absorption and scattering. When mounted on a camera, our unique probe allows non-contact measurements that avoid compressing the tumor and altering blood flow. An optical filter mounted in front of the camera lens cut off light below 650nm, which allowed monitoring of blood flow during PDT. The utility of the hybrid system was demonstrated by monitoring the hemodynamic changes during and after PDT in mice bearing the experimental radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF). For the first time, we non-invasively and continually monitored the in vivo flow changes during PDT. Relative oxygen consumption was calculated using flow values measured by DCS and oxygenation measured by a broadband absorption spectrometer. During PDT an initial rapid increase in blood flow was found, followed by a decrease and slow recovery. After PDT, substantial and continued reductions in blood saturation, blood flow and oxygen consumption were found after 3 hours, suggesting that permanent damage to tumor cells and blood vessels had occurred. The comparison of flow values after PDT as measured by DCS and by Power Doppler ultrasound (CWFA) demonstrated that both techniques non-invasively detected similar global changes in tumor blood flow or perfusion after PDT.

  8. SU-D-16A-07: Photobleaching Predicts Necrosis in Interstitial PDT

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Finlay, J; Liu, B; Zhu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetry for PDT has proven to be a challenge thus far, and for prediction of PDT outcome, a singlet oxygen model based on fundamental photophysical parameters has been developed. Previously, the photobleaching effect of photosensitizers was taken into account in the singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry model; here we report of direct measurements of photobleaching in the same model to assess the conditions under which implicit dosimetry using photobleaching can serve as an intermediate surrogate for PDT damage. Methods: Fluorescence spectra were measured interstitially in sensitized mouse tumors prior to after irradiation via a cylindrical diffuser. Photobleaching was determined by the relative decrease in fluorescence amplitude from the initial pre-treatment measurement. Spectra were analyzed by singular value decomposition to determine the photosensitizer concentration. Different photosensitizers were used to see the effect of photobleaching on PDT outcome and the impact of fluence on photobleaching. The drugs used were BPD (at two drug-light intervals), HPPH, and Photofrin. PDT outcome was determined by tumor necrosis radii measured upon sectioning and staining of treated tumors. Results: Post-PDT photosentizer concentrations were compared to initial pre-PDT photosensitizer concentrations, and the decrease was greater with a higher fluence measured during treatment. Furthermore, photobleaching and necrosis radius were found to be positively correlated. The relationship between photobleaching and necrosis radius is sensitizer-dependent, however the differences among sensitizers can be understood in terms of their respective photophysical parameters. Conclusions: Photobleaching is predictive of PDT outcome, but a comprehensive singlet oxygen model, has the potential to further improve the prediction of PDT outcome and the understanding of implicit dosimetry.

  9. Monitoring PDT response of head and neck lesions with diffuse optical spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Rigual, Nestor; Tracy, Erin; Keymel, Ken; Cooper, Michele T.; Baumann, Heinz; Henderson, Barbara W.; Sunar, Ulas

    2013-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has recently emerged as a potential treatment alternative for head and neck cancer. There is strong evidence that imprecise PDT dosimetry results in variations in clinical responses. Quantitative tools are likely to play an essential role in bringing PDT to a full realization of its potential benefits. They can provide standardization of site-specific individualized protocols that are used to monitor both light and photosensitizer (HPPH) dose, as well as the tissue response for individual patients. To accomplish this, we used a custom instrument and a hand-held probe that allowed quantification of blood flow, blood volume, blood oxygen saturation and drug concentration.

  10. Investigation of the Muon Pseudorapidities in EAS with the Muon Tracking Detector of the KASCADE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabierowski, J.; Antoni, T.; Apel, W. D.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bercuci, A.; Blümer, H.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Büttner, C.; Chilingarian, A.; Daumiller, K.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Feßler, F.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Iwan, A.; Kampert, K-H.; Klages, H. O.; Maier, G.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Müller, M.; Obenland, R.; Oehschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Petcu, M.; Rebel, H.; Risse, M.; Roth, M.; Schatz, G.; Schieler, H.; Scholz, J.; Thouw, T.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Vardanyan, A.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.

    2003-07-01

    High angular accuracy of muon track measurements in KASCADE Muon Tracking Detector (MTD), together with the high precision in determination of the shower direction and shower core position, allow to investigate the pseudorapidity of muons in EAS using the concept of radial and tangential angles. Preliminary results of the pseudorapidity distribution of muons registered by the KASCADE experiment are presented. Mean muon pseudorapidity values at different stages of the longitudinal development of the EAS cascade are calculated using additionally the reconstructed muon production height provided by the MTD data. experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: Karnofsky score and neurological score in patients with recurrent gloms treated with Photofrin PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Yang, Victor X.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2002-06-01

    In our previous phase II studies we treated 112 patients with malignant brain tumors with 2-mg/kg Photofrin i.v. and intra-operative cavitary PDT. We concluded that PDT was safe in patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent supratentorial malignant gliomas. Pathology, performance grade and light dose were significantly related to survival time. In selected patients when an adequate light dose was used survival time improved. The surgical mortality rate was less than 3%. [spie 2000] We have initiated two randomized prospective trials - the first, to determine if the addition of PDT to standard therapy [surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy] prolongs the survival of patients with newly diagnosed malignant astrocytic tumors; and the second, to determine whether high light dose PDT [120 J/cm2] is superior to low light dose PDT [40 J/cm2] in patients with recurrent malignant astrocytic tumors. To date, 158 patients have been recruited - 72 to the newly diagnosed malignant glioma study and 86 to the recurrent glioma study. In the recurrent glioma study we compared the pre-operative KS and elements of the neurological examination [speech function, visual fields, cognitive function, sensory examination and gait] to the post-operative examinations at hospital discharge. The means were compared by paired student-t test. The KS in 86 of 88 patients with recurrent gliomas were assessable. The mean [s.d.] preoperative and post-operative KS were 82+/- 14 and 79+/- 17, respectively [p=0.003]. The mean decline in KS, although statistically significant, was small and of no clinical importance. The median Karnofsky score changed from 90 to 80. The KS improved in 8 patients; their post-operative average length of stay (alos) was =9.7 days. There was no change in 47 [alos=8.3], a decline of 10 points in 24 [aloc=13.4] and declined by more than 10 points in 7 [alos=23.3]. Three of these 7 patients who had a decline of >10 points improved in follow-up but did not reach their

  12. Biocompatible magnetic microspheres for Use in PDT and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, C B; Cerize, N N P; Morais, P C; Ré, M I; Tedesco, A C

    2012-06-01

    Loaded microspheres with a silicon (IV) phthalocyanine derivative (NzPC) acting as a photosensitizer were prepared from polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHBHV) and poly(ecaprolactone) (PCL) polymers using the emulsification solvent evaporation method (EE). The aim of our study was to prepare two systems of these biodegradable PHBHV/PCL microspheres. The first one containing only photosensitizer previously incorporated in the PHBHV and poly(ecaprolactone) (PCL) microspheres and the second one with the post magnetization of the DDS with magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic fluid is successfully used for controlled incorporation of nanosized magnetic particles within the micron-sized template. This is the first time that we could get a successful pos incorporation of nanosized magnetic particles in a previously-prepared polymeric template. This procedure opens a great number of possibilities of post-functionalization of polymeric micro or nanoparticles with different bioactive materials. The NzPC release profile of the systems is ideal for PDT, the zeta potential and the size particle are stable upon aging in time. In vitro studies were evaluated using gingival fibroblastic cell line. The dark citotoxicity, the phototoxicity and the AC magnetic field assays of the as-prepared nanomagnetic composite were evaluated and the cellular viability analyzed by the classical test of MTT.

  13. Optimization of parodontium tissue irradiation method for fluorescent diagnostic (FD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyaeva, Maria L.; Mamedov, Ad. A.; Lervkin, V. V.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Volkova, Anna I.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Berezin, Anatoly N.; Kiselev, Gennady L.

    2004-06-01

    During the last several years research activities have been conducted to study PDT availability in stomatology for pathogenic microflora suppression, which presence causes different kinds of oral cavity inflammatory disease. Studies indicate that PDT can be alternative to traditional antibiotic therapy. We carried out research in order to determine the optimal method of tooth irradiation to provide necessary therapeutic radiation dose for affected parodontium tissue in case of inflammatory disease. These data can be used for fiber-optic catheter positioning for further influence on oral cavity nidus of inflammation during PDT and PD. 20 teeth ex vivo were examined. Teeth were irradiated with diode laser (680 nm). In different teeth regions laser radiation intensity was measured by LESA-01-Biospec spectrometer. Optimal radiation method for PDT and PD was found.

  14. Real-life practice study of the clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of photodynamic therapy using methyl aminolevulinate (MAL-PDT) in the management of actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Annemans, Lieven; Caekelbergh, Karin; Roelandts, Rik; Boonen, Hugo; Leys, Christoph; Nikkels, Arjen F; van Den Haute, V; van Quickenborne, L; Verhaeghe, Evelien; Leroy, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Clinical trials have shown that photodynamic therapy using methyl aminolevulinate (MAL-PDT) is an effective treatment for actinic keratosis (AK), and nodular and superficial basal cell carcinoma (nBCC and sBCC) unsuitable for other available therapies. Economic evaluation models have shown that it is a cost effective intervention as well. The objectives of this prospective, observational, one arm study were (i) to verify in a real-life practice study the results obtained in previous clinical trials with MAL-PDT in the treatment of AK, nBCC and sBCC; (ii) to calculate the real-life cost of treatment and validate predictions from an economic evaluation model. Patients with AK and/or BCC were selected according to Belgian reimbursement criteria for treatment with MAL-PDT. Clinical response, cosmetic outcome and tolerability were assessed. MAL-PDT cost was calculated and compared to published model cost data. Data were collected from 247 patients (117 AK, 130 BCC). A complete clinical response was obtained for 83% of AK (85/102) and BCC (97/116) patients. A good or excellent cosmetic outcome was obtained for 95% of AK patients and 93% of BCC patients. Tolerability was good: only 2 patients withdrew for adverse events. Clinical results were similar to previous studies. Total cost of care per patient was euro 381 for AK, euro 318 for nBCC, and euro 298 for sBCC. Total cost per lesion was euro 58 for AK (identical to model prediction), euro 316 for nBCC and euro 178 for sBCC (both within 20% of model prediction). The clinical results of MAL-PDT in this real-life practice study confirm those demonstrated in previous clinical trials. Costs calculated from this study confirm predicted cost-effectiveness in the original model for MAL-PDT in the management of AK and BCC.

  15. Local magnetism in palladium bionanomaterials probed by muon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Creamer, Neil J; Mikheenko, Iryna P; Johnson, Clive; Cottrell, Stephen P; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2011-05-01

    Palladium bionanomaterial was manufactured using the sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricansm, to reduce soluble Pd(II) ions to cell-bound Pd(0) in the presence of hydrogen. The biomaterial was examined using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) to measure bulk magnetisation and by Muon Spin Rotation Spectroscopy (µSR) which is uniquely able to probe the local magnetic environment inside the sample. Results showed behaviour attributable to interaction of muons both with palladium electrons and the nuclei of hydrogen trapped in the particles during manufacture. Electronic magnetism, also suggested by SQUID, is not characteristic of bulk palladium and is consistent with the presence of nanoparticles previously seen in electron micrographs. We show the first use of μSR as a tool to probe the internal magnetic environment of a biologically-derived nanocatalyst material.

  16. Squaraine dyes in PDT: from basic design to in vivo demonstration.

    PubMed

    Avirah, Rekha R; Jayaram, Dhanya T; Adarsh, Nagappanpillai; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2012-02-07

    The design and development of novel squaraine dyes as sensitisers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications has grown tremendously in the last decade from the time when a squaraine dye was proposed to be a potential candidate, to-date when the use of such dyes have been demonstrated in animal models for skin cancer. This perspective article highlights the basic design, tuning of absorption, triplet excited state and two-photon absorption properties and recent developments of the squaraines as PDT sensitisers.

  17. The first muon beam from a new highly-intense DC muon source, MuSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nam Hoai; MuSIC Collaboration

    2012-09-01

    A new DC muon source, MuSIC, is now under construction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Japan. The MuSIC adopts a new pion/muon collection system and a curved transport solenoid. These techniques are important in realization of future muon programs such as the muon to electron conversion experiments (COMET/Mu2e), neutrino factories, and muon colliders. The pion capture magnet and a part of the transport solenoid have been built and beam tests were carried out to assess the MuSIC's performance. Muon lifetime measurements and muonic X-ray measurements have been used for estimation of muon yield of the MuSIC. The result indicates that the MuSIC would be one of the most intense DC muon beams in the world.

  18. Introduction to Mini Muon Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, Konstantin N.

    2012-08-13

    Using a mini muon tracker developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory we performed experiments of simple landscapes of various materials, including TNT, 9501, lead, tungsten, aluminium, and water. Most common scenes are four two inches thick step wedges of different dimensions: 12-inch x 12-inch, 12-inch x 9-inch, 12-inch x 6-inch, and 12-inch x 3-inch; and a one three inches thick hemisphere of lead with spherical hollow, and a similar full lead sphere.

  19. Muon ID at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a new way to reconstruct and identify muons with high efficiency and high pion rejection. Since muons at the ILC are often produced with or in jets, for many of the physics channels of interest [1], an efficient algorithm to deal with the identification and separation of particles within jets is important. The algorithm at the core of the method accounts for the effects of the magnetic field and for the loss of energy by charged particles due to ionization in the detector. We have chosen to develop the analysis within the setup of one of the Linear Collider Concept Detectors adopted by the US. Within b-pair production jets, particles cover a wide range in momenta; however {approx}80% of the particles have a momentum below 30 GeV[2]. Our study, focused on bbar-b jets, is preceded by a careful analysis of single energy particles between 2 and 50 GeV. As medium energy particles are a substantial component of the jets, many of the particles lose part of their energy in the calorimeters and the solenoid coil before reaching the muon detector where they may have energy below 2 GeV. To deal with this problem we have implemented a Runge-Kutta correction of the calculated trajectory to better handle these lower energy particles. The multiple scattering and other stochastic processes, more important at lower energy, is addressed by a Kalman-filter integrated into the reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm provides a unique and powerful separation of muons from pions. The 5 Tesla magnetic field from a solenoid surrounds the hadron calorimeter and allows the reconstruction and precision.

  20. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  1. Muon Physics at Run-I and its upgrade plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benekos, Nektarios Chr.

    2015-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its multi-purpose Detector, ATLAS, has been operated successfully at record centre-of-mass energies of 7 and TeV. After this successful LHC Run-1, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity leveling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb-1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb-1 by around 2030. To cope with the corresponding rate increase, the ATLAS detector needs to be upgraded. The upgrade will proceed in two steps: Phase I in the LHC shutdown 2018/19 and Phase II in 2023-25. The largest of the ATLAS Phase-1 upgrades concerns the replacement of the first muon station of the highrapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel. This configuration copes with the highest rates expected in Phase II and considerably enhances the performance of the forward muon system by adding triggering functionality to the first muon station. Prospects for the ongoing and future data taking are presented. This article presents the main muon physics results from LHC Run-1 based on a total luminosity of 30 fb^-1. Prospects for the ongoing and future data taking are also presented. We will conclude with an update of the status of the project and the steps towards a complete operational system, ready to be installed in ATLAS in 2018/19.

  2. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with endoscopic ultrasound for the treatment of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2000-05-01

    In 1995, PDT was approved for palliative use in patients with esophageal cancer. We report our experience using PDT to treat esophageal cancer patients previously treated with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In our series, nine patients referred for PDT with persistent esophageal cancer after chemo-radiation therapy. We found: (1) All patients were men with a mean age of 63 years and eight out of nine had adenocarcinoma with Barrett's esophagus; (2) All patients required endoscopic dilation after PDT; (3) At a mean follow up of 4 months, two T2N0 patients had no demonstrable tumor and all three T3N0 patients had greater than 50% tumor reduction (the partially responsive T3N0 patients will be offered repeat PDT); (4) Patients with metastatic disease (T3N1 or M1) had effective dysphagia palliation. Thus, PDT is safe and effective in ablating all or most tumor in patients with persistent esophageal cancer after chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  3. Nuclear medicine for photodynamic therapy in cancer: planning, monitoring and nuclear PDT.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi Lakouas, Dris; Huglo, Damien; Mordon, Serge; Vermandel, Maximilien

    2017-03-11

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality with promising results for the treatment of various cancers. PDT is increasingly included in the standard of care for different pathologies. This therapy relies on the effects of light delivered to photosensitized cells. At different stages of delivery, PDT requires imaging to plan, evaluate and monitor treatment. The contribution of molecular imaging in this context is important and continues to increase. In this article, we review the contribution of nuclear medicine imaging in oncology to PDT for planning and therapeutic monitoring purposes. Several solutions have been proposed to plan PDT from nuclear medicine imaging. For instance, photosensitizer biodistribution has been evaluated with a radiolabeled photosensitizer or with conventional radiopharmaceuticals on positron emission tomography. The effects of PDT delivery have also been explored with specific SPECT or PET radiopharmaceuticals to evaluate the effects on cells (apoptosis, necrosis, proliferation, metabolism) or vascular damage. Finally, the synergy between photosensitizers and radiopharmaceuticals has been studied considering the Cerenkov effect to activate photosensitized cells.

  4. The bacterial flora of the skin surface following routine MAL-PDT.

    PubMed

    Bryld, Lars Eeik; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2006-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy using methylated 5-aminolevulate (MAL-PDT) appears to have an effect on non-neoplastic skin diseases, for example acne vulgaris and rosacea, for which antibiotics are sometimes used, and a possible antibiotic effect of PDT has previously been suggested. It does, however, also cause local immunosuppression and post-treatment barrier defects, which may promote infection. At the same time, PDT-induced therapeutic skin damage is sometimes confused with secondary bacterial infection by non-dermatologists. The possible changes in bacterial flora associated with MAL-PDT were therefore studied in 47 patients undergoing treatment. Skin swabs were taken immediately before applying the MAL and instantly after light irradiation. Bacterial growth was identified in 18 cases. No statistically significant changes were seen, either in the specific species found or the estimated bacterial density on the skin surface. The observations do not support the notion that routine MAL-PDT affects the bacterial flora of the skin in a clinically significant manner. Therefore, the possible antibacterial effect of routine MAL-PDT is probably not the main explanation of its apparent effect on non-neoplastic skin disease.

  5. EGF targeted fluorescence molecular tomography as a predictor of PDT outcomes in pancreas cancer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Isabelle, Martin E.; O'Hara, Julia; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    Verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer and investigations for its use are currently underway in both orthotopic xenograft mouse models and in human clinical trials. The mouse models have been studied extensively using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a measure of surrogate response to verteporfin PDT and it was found that tumor lines with different levels of aggression respond with varying levels to PDT. MR imaging was successful in determining the necrotic volume caused by PDT but there was difficultly in distinguishing inflamed tissues and regions of surviving tumor. In order to understand the molecular changes within the tumor immediately post-PDT we propose the implementation of MR-guided fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) in conjunction with an exogenously administered fluorescently labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF-IRDye800CW, LI-COR Biosciences). We have previously shown that MR-guided FMT is feasible in the mouse abdomen when multiple regions of fluorescence are considered from contributing internal organs. In this case the highly aggressive AsPC-1 (+EGFR) orthotopic tumor was implanted in SCID mice, interstitial verteporfin PDT (1mg/kg, 20J/cm) was performed when the tumor reached ~60mm3 and both tumor volume and EGF binding were followed with MR-guided FMT.

  6. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  7. COMPUTATIONAL NEEDS FOR MUON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BERG, J.S.

    2004-06-29

    Muon accelerators contain beam lines and components which are unlike any found in existing accelerators. Production of the muons requires targets for beams with powers which are at or beyond what has currently been achieved. Many subsystems use solenoid focusing systems where at any given point, several magnets have a significant influence. The beams that are transported can have energy spreads of {+-}30% or more. The required emittances necessitate accurate tracking of particles with angles of tenths of a radian and which are positioned almost at the edge of the beam pipe. Tracking must be done not only in vacuum, but also in materials; therefore, statistical fluctuations must also be included. Design and simulation of muon accelerators requires software which can: accurately simulate the dynamics of solid and liquid targets under proton bombardment; predict the production of particles from these targets; accurately compute magnetic fields based on either a real magnet design or a model which includes end fields; and accurately design and simulate a beam line where the transported beam satisfies the above specifications and the beam line contains non-standard, overlapping elements. The requirements for computational tools will be discussed, the capabilities of existing tools will be described and compared to what is required.

  8. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  9. Compression and extraction of stopped muons.

    PubMed

    Taqqu, D

    2006-11-10

    Efficient conversion of a standard positive muon beam into a high-quality slow muon beam is shown to be achievable by compression of a muon swarm stopped in an extended gas volume. The stopped swarm can be squeezed into a mm-size swarm flow that can be extracted into vacuum through a small opening in the stop target walls. Novel techniques of swarm compression are considered. In particular, a density gradient in crossed electric and magnetic fields is used.

  10. Materials science with muon spin rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    During this reporting period, the focus of activity in the Materials Science with Muon Spin Rotation (MSMSR) program was muon spin rotation studies of superconducting materials, in particular the high critical temperature and heavy-fermion materials. Apart from these studies, work was continued on the analysis of muon motion in metal hydrides. Results of these experiments are described in six papers included as appendices.

  11. Neutrino induced muons in Soudan 2.

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, D. M.; Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1999-06-23

    The neutrino-induced muon rate underground has been measured at Soudan 2. To discriminate from the intense background of atmospheric muons we consider only the through-going muons which originate from horizontal direction ({minus}0.14 < cos{theta} < 0.14). We calculate the horizontal, neutrino-induced muon rate at Soudan 2 from an exposure of 1.23 x 10{sup 8} s as {Phi}{sub {nu}{mu}} = (3.45 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.61) x 10{sup {minus}13} (cm{sup 2} sr s){sup {minus}1}.

  12. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Flanagan, Gene

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  13. FLIM and SLIM for molecular imaging in PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueck, Angelika C.; Dolp, Frank; Huelshoff, Christian; Hauser, Carmen; Scalfi-Happ, Claudia

    2005-03-01

    Various problems arising during molecular imaging of different fluoroprobes and metabolites used in photodynamic therapy could be circumvented by focusing on time-resolved detection. For this, an interesting new method seems to be time-correlated single photon counting, where a time-to-amplitude converter determines the temporal position and a scanning interface connected to the scanning unit of a laser microscope determines the spatial location of a signal. In combination with spectral resolved detection (spectral lifetime imaging) the set-up achieves the features of highly sophisticated lifetime imaging systems. The photoactive substance on which 5-ALA PDT is based, is protoporphyrine IX which is synthesized in mitochondria. Alternatively, other metabolites from 5-ALA could be involved. Subcellular differentiation of those metabolites without extensive extraction procedures is not trivial, because of highly overlapping spectral properties. Measuring the fluorescence lifetime on a subcellular level could be a successful alternative. To record lifetime images (τ-mapping) a setup consisting on a laser scanning microscope equipped with detection units for time-correlated single photon counting and ps diode lasers for short-pulsed excitation was implemented. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of 5-ALA metabolites were investigated in solution and in cell culture. The lifetimes were best fitted by a biexponential fitting routine. Different lifetimes could be found in different cell compartments. During illumination, the lifetimes decreased significantly. Different metabolites of 5-ALA could be correlated with different fluorescence lifetimes. In addition cells were coincubated with the nuclear staining dye DAPI, in order to investigate the cell cycle. Using appropriate filtering or alternatively spectral lifetime imaging the time-resolved fluorescence of DAPI could be very well distinguished from 5-ALA-metabolites. In contrast to ALA, the lifetime of DAPI

  14. Effects of TOOKAD-PDT on canine prostates pre-treated with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Huang, Zheng; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Trncic, Nadira; LaRue, Susan M.; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-06-01

    PDT in prostate cancer will likely be implemented clinically with patients who have failed prior ionizing radiation therapy (RT). The current study is to develop an in vivo model to evaluate the effects of PDT on prostatic tissue after RT. To produce a physiological and anatomical environment in prostate similar to that in patients who have failed RT, canine prostates (n=4) were subjected to a definitive course of ionizing radiation therapy (2.7 Gy x 20 fractions) 5 to 6 months prior to PDT. A laparotomy was performed to expose the prostate for PDT. Second generation photosensitizer Tookad (Palladium-Bacteriopheophorbide, Steba Biotech, The Netherlands) acts primarily on tissue vasculature and is very effective in destroying normal prostatic tissue, as shown by our prior studies. Due to the extremely fast clearance of the photosensitizer, interstitial light irradiation (760 nm, 50-200 J/cm, 150 mW/cm from a 1 cm diffuser fiber) was delivered 4 minutes after the onset of Tookad infusion (i.v. 2.5 mg/ml, 2 mg/kg, total infusion time 10 min). The prostates were harvested for histopathology one week after PDT. At one week, the lesions were characterized by acute hemorrhagic necrosis with patchy sub-capsular hyperemia and edema. The maximum lesion diameter for 50, 100 and 200 J/cm PDT was approximately 15, 20 and 28 mm, respectively. The lesion size is well correlated with light fluence and comparable to that in prostates treated with identical PDT doses but without prior-RT. Under light-microscopy, the PDT induced necrosis is clearly distinguishable from the radiation induced fibrosis. No urethral lesions were observed. Dyer"s Verhoeff stain showed the loss of stromal connective tissue and the acinar collagen in the PDT treated area. There was no noticeable damage on the bladder or underlying colon section. In conclusion, Tookad-PDT can effectively destroy prostate tissue with prior-RT induced fibrosis, thus, may provide an alternative modality for those prostate

  15. Imaging the Subsurface with Upgoing Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, A.

    2014-12-01

    We assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upgoing muons. Traditional muon imaging focuses on more-prevalent downgoing muons. Muons are subatomic particles capable of penetrating the earth's crust several kilometers. Downgoing muons have been used to image the Pyramid of Khafre of Giza, various volcanoes, and smaller targets like cargo. Unfortunately, utilizing downgoing muons requires below-target detectors. For aboveground objects like a volcano, the detector is placed at the volcano's base and the top portion of the volcano is imaged. For underground targets like tunnels, the detector would have to be placed below the tunnel in a deeper tunnel or adjacent borehole, which can be costly and impractical for some locations. Additionally, detecting and characterizing subsurface features like voids from tunnels can be difficult. Typical characterization methods like sonar, seismic, and ground penetrating radar have shown mixed success. Voids have a marked density contrast with surrounding materials, so using methods sensitive to density variations would be ideal. High-energy cosmic ray muons are more sensitive to density variation than other phenomena, including gravity. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, tomography using downgoing muons can resolve features to the sub-meter scale. We present results of exploratory work, which demonstrates that upgoing muon fluxes appear sufficient to achieve target detection within a few months. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. ALA-PDT of glioma cell micro-clusters in BD-IX rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Carper, Stephen W.; Ziegler, Sarah A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2006-02-01

    A significant contributory factor to the poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme is the inability of conventional treatments to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells. A syngeneic rat brain tumor model is used to investigate the effects of aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on small clusters of tumor cells sequestered in normal brain. The intrinsic sensitivity of rat glioma cells to PDT was investigated by exposing ALA-incubated cells to a range of radiant exposures and irradiances using 635 nm light. Biodistribution studies were undertaken on tumor-bearing animals in order to determine the tumor selectivity of the photosensitizer following systemic administration (i.p.) of ALA. Effects of ALA-PDT on normal brain and gross tumor were evaluated using histopathology. Effects of PDT on isolated glioma cells in normal brain were investigated by treating animals 48 h after tumor cell implantation: a time when the micro-clusters of cells are protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Rat glioma cells in monolayer are susceptible to ALA-PDT - lower irradiances are more effective than higher ones. Fluorescence microscopy of frozen tissue sections showed that photosensitizer is produced with better than 200:1 tumor-to-normal tissue selectivity following i.p. ALA administration. ALA-PDT resulted in significant damage to both gross tumor and normal brain, however, the treatment failed to prolong survival of animals with newly implanted glioma cells compared to non-treated controls if the drug was delivered either i.p. or directly into the brain. In contrast, animals inoculated with tumor cells pre-incubated in vitro with ALA showed a significant survival advantage in response to PDT.

  17. Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon BeamAccelerators for Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-09-25

    Historically, progress in particle physics has largely beendetermined by development of more capable particle accelerators. Thistrend continues today with the recent advent of high-luminosityelectron-positron colliders at KEK and SLAC operating as "B factories,"the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and theworldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider.Looking to the future, one of the most promising approaches is thedevelopment of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very highscientific potential, and would substantially advance thestate-of-the-art in accelerator design. A 20-50 GeV muon storage ringcould serve as a copious source of well-characterized electron neutrinosor antineutrinos (a Neutrino Factory), providing beams aimed at detectorslocated 3000-7500 km from the ring. Such long baseline experiments areexpected to be able to observe and characterize the phenomenon ofcharge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector, and thusprovide an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in science,namely, why the matter-dominated universe in which we reside exists atall. By accelerating muons to even higher energies of several TeV, we canenvision a Muon Collider. In contrast with composite particles likeprotons, muons are point particles. This means that the full collisionenergy is available to create new particles. A Muon Collider has roughlyten times the energy reach of a proton collider at the same collisionenergy, and has a much smaller footprint. Indeed, an energy frontier MuonCollider could fit on the site of an existing laboratory, such asFermilab or BNL. The challenges of muon-beam accelerators are related tothe facts that i) muons are produced as a tertiary beam, with very large6D phase space, and ii) muons are unstable, with a lifetime at rest ofonly 2 microseconds. How these challenges are accommodated in theaccelerator design will be described. Both a Neutrino Factory and a Muon

  18. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-11-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC).

  19. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2013-06-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  20. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-10-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  1. Improving scintillation crystals using muon tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Fineman, B.J.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The cosmic ray muon scanning array provides information on NaI(T1) crystals using some 65,536 trajectories, each measuring the NaI(T1) response to high energy muons. With this information, it is possible to use established computer-aided-tomography techniques to deconvolute these integrated responses and produce a detailed picture of the detector's interior.

  2. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  3. BATATA: a buried muon hodoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, F.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Paic, G.; Salazar, M. E. Patiño; D'Olivo, J. C.; Molina, R. Alfaro

    2009-04-01

    Muon hodoscopes have several applications, ranging from astrophysics to fundamental particle physics. In this work, we present a detector dedicated to the study, at ground level, of the main signals of cosmic-ray induced showers above 6 PeV. The whole detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes buried at fix depths ranging from 120 g/cm2 to 600 g/cm2 and by a triangular array of water cerenkov detectors located nearby on ground.

  4. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed.

  5. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  6. Muon dynamics in a toroidal sector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, J.C.; Fernow, R.C.; Palmer, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The present scenario for the cooling channel in a high brightness muon collider calls for a quasi-continuous solenoidal focusing channel. The beam line consists of a periodic array of hydrogen absorbers immersed in a solenoid with alternating focusing field and rf linacs at the zero field points. Solenoids and toroidal sectors have a natural place in muon collider design given the large emittance of the beam and consequently, the large transverse momentum of the initial pion beam or the decay muon beam. Bent solenoids as shown were studied for use at the front end of the machine, as part of the capture channel and more recently as part of a diagnostic setup to measure the position and momentum of muons. The authors present a Hamiltonian formulation of muon dynamics in toroidal sector solenoids (bent solenoid).

  7. In vitro therapeutic effect of PDT combined with VEGF-A gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecaros, Rumwald Leo G.; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2014-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), commonly known as VEGF, is one of the primary factors that affect tumor angiogenesis. It was found to be expressed in cancer cell lines including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel therapeutic modality to treat cancer by using a photosensitizer which is activated by a light source to produce reactive oxygen species and mediates oxygen-independent hypoxic conditions to tumor. Another emerging treatment to cure cancer is the use of interference RNA (e.g. siRNA) to silence a specific mRNA sequence. VEGF-A was found to be expressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma and overexpressed after 24 hour post-PDT by Western blot analysis. Cell viability was found to decrease at 25 nM of transfected VEGF-A siRNA. In vitro combined therapy of PDT and VEGF-A siRNA showed better response as compared with PDT and gene therapy alone. The results suggest that PDT combined with targeted gene therapy has a potential mean to achieve better therapeutic outcome.

  8. The application of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) in dentistry: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E. T.; Dias, H. B.; Corbi, S. C. T.; Marcantonio, R. A. C.; Bernardi, A. C. A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Hamblin, M. R.; Rastelli, A. N. S.

    2016-12-01

    In recent years there have been an increasing number of in vitro and in vivo studies that show positive results regarding antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) used in dentistry. These include applications in periodontics, endodontics, and mucosal infections caused by bacteria present as biofilms. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy is a therapy based on the combination of a non-toxic photosensitizer (PS) and appropriate wavelength visible light, which in the presence of oxygen is activated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS induce a series of photochemical and biological events that cause irreversible damage leading to the death of microorganisms. Many light-absorbing dyes have been mentioned as potential PS for aPDT and different wavelengths have been tested. However, there is no consensus on a standard protocol yet. Thus, the goal of this review was to summarize the results of research on aPDT in dentistry using the PubMed database focusing on recent studies of the effectiveness aPDT in decreasing microorganisms and microbial biofilms, and also to describe aPDT effects, mechanisms of action and applications.

  9. Toxic pulmonary effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luketich, James D.; Perry, Yaron; Wong, Hsien; Epperly, Michael W.

    2002-06-01

    A major limitation of PDT for Barrett's esophagus is the development of esophageal strictures. This report summarizes the effects of PDT delivered to mouse esophagus. Sixty-two C3H/Nsd mice were injected with Photofrin (2-10mg/Kg) intraperitoneally. Forty-eight hours later a 1 cm laser probe was passed orally to the mid-esophagus. Light energy (630nm) ranged from 0 to 400 Joules/cm (J). Animals were sacrificed if death was imminent, otherwise at 6 weeks and 3 months. Gross and microscopic exams were performed on paraffin embedded esophagus and lung specimens. Exposure to 400J as a single fraction, 125 X 3 or 150 X 3 fractions resulted in a lethal pulmonary injury in 90% of mice within 48 hours. There was no esophageal mucosal damage at this early time point. Lower doses caused minor pulmonary injury allowing long-term survival but no change in the esophageal endothelium and no stricture. In the mouse, this histopathologic study demonstrates that pulmonary toxicity is the limiting factor following esophageal PDT. At lower PDT doses, minimal pulmonary damage occurred but no effect was observed on the esophagus. We believe the 5 mm depth of PDT injury leads to lethal pulmonary damage preventing subsequent study of the effects on the esophagus.

  10. Interleukin-12 reverses the inhibitory impact of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on the murine contact hypersensitivity response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkin, Guillermo O.; Levy, Julia G.; Hunt, David W. C.

    1998-05-01

    Treatment of mice with certain photosensitizers combined with exposure to visible light limits the development of the immunologically-mediated contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response against topically-applied chemical haptens. Understanding of the inhibitory action of photosensitizers upon the CHS response is incomplete. Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA, verteporfin), a photosensitizer with immunomodulatory activity, strongly depressed CHS responses to the hapten dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB). However, if mice were administered 1 (mu) g of a recombinant preparation of the pro- inflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 (rIL-12), full-fledged CHS responses to DNFB ensued in animals treated with BPD-MA and light. In contrast, when rIL-12 was given in combination with an anti-IL-12 antibody the restorative effect of rIL-12 on the CHS response of PDT-treated mice was blocked. Evaluation of the cytokine status of spleen and draining lymph node cells showed for DNFB painted animals, that the release of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 was increased by PDT and rIL-12 counter-acted the increase in IL-10 liberation associated with PDT. These studies indicate that IL-10 formation is upregulated and the availability of IL-12 may be limited in mice treated with PDT. These features may contribute to deficient CHS responses observed with PDT.

  11. Our experience of PDT of cancer with two Russian-produced photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.

    1995-05-01

    Analysis of the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating malignant neoplasms of the skin, mammary glands, tongue, oral mucous, lower lip, larynx, lungs, urinary bladder, rectum,and other locations has been made. During 1992-1994 432 tumoral foci in 108 patients have been treated with PDT. All patients were previously treated with conventional techniques without effect or they were not treated due to contraindications either because of sever accompanying diseases or because of old age. A number of the patients had PDT because of recurrences or intradermal metastases within one to two years after surgical, radial, or combined treatment. Two homemade preparations were used as photosensitizers: Photohem (hematoporphyrin derivative) and Photosense (aluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine). Light sources were an American dye laser with argon laser pumping and homemade laser devices including a copper vapor laser-pumped dye laser, gas discharge unit, gold vapor laser for the Photohem sessions, wile for the Photosense sessions were used solid state lasers on yttrium aluminate. Up to now we have follow-up control data within 2 months and 3 years. Positive effect of PDT was seen in 90.7% of patients including complete regression of tumors in 52% and partial in 38.7%. Currently this new technique of treating malignant neoplasms is successfully being used in Russia; new photosensitizers and light sources for PDT and fluorescent tumor diagnostics are being developed as well.

  12. Monitoring blood volume and saturation using superficial fibre optic reflectance spectroscopy during PDT of actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Middelburg, Tom A; Kanick, Stephen C; de Haas, Ellen R M; Sterenborg, Henricus J C M; Amelink, Arjen; Neumann, Martino H A M; Robinson, Dominic J

    2011-10-01

    Optically monitoring the vascular physiology during photodynamic therapy (PDT) may help understand patient-specific treatment outcome. However, diffuse optical techniques have failed to observe changes herein, probably by optically sampling too deep. Therefore, we investigated using differential path-length spectroscopy (DPS) to obtain superficial measurements of vascular physiology in actinic keratosis (AK) skin. The AK-specific DPS interrogation depth was chosen up to 400 microns in depth, based on the thickness of AK histology samples. During light fractionated aminolevulinic acid-PDT, reflectance spectra were analyzed to yield quantitative estimates of blood volume and saturation. Blood volume showed significant lesion-specific changes during PDT without a general trend for all lesions and saturation remained high during PDT. This study shows that DPS allows optically monitoring the superficial blood volume and saturation during skin PDT. The patient-specific variability supports the need for dosimetric measurements. In DPS, the lesion-specific optimal interrogation depth can be varied based on lesion thickness.

  13. Study of multi-muon events produced in p anti-p interactions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab

    2010-06-12

    We report the results of a study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and acquired with the CDF II detector using a dedicated dimuon trigger. The production cross section and kinematics of events in which both muon candidates are produced inside the beam pipe of radius 1.5 cm are successfully modeled by known processes which include heavy flavor production. In contrast, we are presently unable to fully account for the number and properties of the remaining events, in which at least one muon candidate is produced outside of the beam pipe, in terms of the same understanding of the CDF II detector, trigger, and event reconstruction.

  14. Muon implantation of metallocenes: ferrocene.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, Upali A; Grinter, Roger; Hubbard, Penny L; Aston, Georgina M; Stride, John A; Hopkins, Gareth A; Camus, Laure; Reid, Ivan D; Cottrell, Stephen P; Cox, Stephen F J

    2007-01-01

    Muon Spin Relaxation and Avoided Level Crossing (ALC) measurements of ferrocene are reported. The main features observed are five high field resonances in the ALC spectrum at about 3.26, 2.44, 2.04, 1.19 and 1.17 T, for the low-temperature phase at 18 K. The high-temperature phase at 295 K shows that only the last feature shifted down to about 0.49 T and a muon spin relaxation peak at about 0.106 T which approaches zero field when reaching the phase transition temperature of 164 K. A model involving three muoniated radicals, two with muonium addition to the cyclopentadienyl ring and the other to the metal atom, is postulated to rationalise these observations. A theoretical treatment involving spin-orbit coupling is found to be required to understand the Fe-Mu adduct, where an interesting interplay between the ferrocene ring dynamics and the spin-orbit coupling of the unpaired electron is shown to be important. The limiting temperature above which the full effect of spin-orbit interaction is observable in the muSR spectra of ferrocene was estimated to be 584 K. Correlation time for the ring rotation dynamics of the Fe-Mu radical at this temperature is 3.2 ps. Estimated electron g values and the changes in zero-field splittings for this temperature range are also reported.

  15. Muon spin rotation research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stronach, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Data from cyclotron experiments and room temperature studies of dilute iron alloys and iron crystals under strain were analyzed. The Fe(Mo) data indicate that the effect upon the contact hyperfine field in Fe due to the introduction of Mo is considerably less than that expected from pure dilution, and the muon (+) are attracted to the Mo impurity sites. There is a significant change in the interstitial magnetic field with Nb concentration. The Fe(Ti) data, for which precession could clearly be observed early only at 468K and above, show that the Ti impurities are attractive to muon (+), and the magnitude of B(hf) is reduced far beyond the amount expected from pure dilution. Changes in the intersitital magnetic field with the introduction of Cr, W, Ge, and Si are also discussed. When strained to the elastic limit, the interstitial magnetic field in Fe crystals is reduced by 33 gauss, and the relaxation rate of the precession signal increases by 47%.

  16. The Majorana Muon Veto System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Andrew; Majorana Demonstrator Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Majorana Demonstrator (MJD) is one of the major efforts of the DOE NP to demonstrate very high sensitivity for the search of the neutrino less double beta decay. The ultimate goal of MJD is to prove that background levels for a tonne-scale experiment with a similar design can be as low as 1.0 count/(4 keV*t*y). One source of background is cosmic muons that can interact in the detectors or in the shielding. In order to tag cosmic muon induced background, an efficient veto system is necessary. The MJD veto system is made out of thirty two panels of 1'' plastic scintillator. Understanding the performance of MJD veto system is vital for reducing the background count. Initial data of veto system performance during the commissioning stage will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics and Nuclear Physics Programs of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  17. Developing a cosmic ray muon sampling capability for muon tomography and monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidakis, S.; Chrysikopoulou, S.; Tsoukalas, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a cosmic ray muon sampling capability using a phenomenological model that captures the main characteristics of the experimentally measured spectrum coupled with a set of statistical algorithms is developed. The "muon generator" produces muons with zenith angles in the range 0-90° and energies in the range 1-100 GeV and is suitable for Monte Carlo simulations with emphasis on muon tomographic and monitoring applications. The muon energy distribution is described by the Smith and Duller (1959) [35] phenomenological model. Statistical algorithms are then employed for generating random samples. The inverse transform provides a means to generate samples from the muon angular distribution, whereas the Acceptance-Rejection and Metropolis-Hastings algorithms are employed to provide the energy component. The predictions for muon energies 1-60 GeV and zenith angles 0-90° are validated with a series of actual spectrum measurements and with estimates from the software library CRY. The results confirm the validity of the phenomenological model and the applicability of the statistical algorithms to generate polyenergetic-polydirectional muons. The response of the algorithms and the impact of critical parameters on computation time and computed results were investigated. Final output from the proposed "muon generator" is a look-up table that contains the sampled muon angles and energies and can be easily integrated into Monte Carlo particle simulation codes such as Geant4 and MCNP.

  18. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  19. A model-based comparison of implicit and direct dosimetry for ALA-PDT of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baochang; Farrell, Thomas J.; Patterson, Michael S.

    2011-07-01

    Photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching and Singlet Oxygen (1O2) Luminescence Dosimetry (SOLD) are being studied as potential dosimetric tools for ALA-PDT of skin diseases. However, the correlation of both SOLD data and PpIX fluorescence to 1O2 distribution is difficult to interpret because of the temporal and spatial variations of the PDT parameters (light fluence rate, photosensitizer concentration and oxygen concentration). This work used our dynamic model to investigate both dosimetry approaches for varied PpIX concentration and distribution, and three commonly used treatment wavelengths. The results show that SOLD is much less dependent upon the treatment parameters, which implies it has better potential as a "gold standard" dosimetric tool for clinical PDT.

  20. Cell cycle arrest induced by MPPa-PDT in MDA-MB-231 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liming; Bi, Wenxiang; Tian, Yuanyuan

    2016-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a medical treatment using a photosensitizing agent and light source to treat cancers. Pyropheophorbidea methyl ester (MPPa), a derivative of chlorophyll, is a novel potent photosensitizer. To learn more about this photosensitizer, we examined the cell cycle arrest in MDA-MB-231. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometer. Checkpoints of the cell cycle were measured by western blot. In this study, we found that the expression of Cyclin D1 was obviously decreased, while the expression of Chk2 and P21 was increased after PDT treatment. This study showed that MPPa-PDT affected the checkpoints of the cell cycle and led the cells to apoptosis.

  1. Feasibility of repeated sequential treatments of RIF-1 tumors with photodynamic therapy (PDT) using lutetium texaphyrin (PCI-0123)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Dale R.; Parker, Lynn M.; Thiemann, Patricia A.; Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Young, Stuart W.

    1997-05-01

    Lutetium texaphyrin (PCI-0123) is currently in clinical trials as a PDT agent for the treatment of cancer patients. The drug is cleared rapidly from the plasma, and photoirradiation can be performed shortly after drug administration.T He photosensitizer as yet does not appear to elicit any significant skin photosensitivity. These characteristics favor frequent multiple PDT treatments with PCI-0123. In order to support repeated PDT treatments in the clinic, the safety of multiple drug dosing was studied in rats and mice. In rats, each group received 5 consecutive daily intravenous administrations of 5, 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg/day of PCI-0123. There were no deaths in any of the groups, and no drug-related effects were detected in the 5 mg/kg/day group. In mice, there were no observable signs of toxicity after consecutive daily administration of 10 micrometers ol/kg/day of PCI-0123 for 13 days. The feasibility and efficacy of repeated PDT treatments were assessed in C3H mice bearing RIF-1 tumors. Repeated PDT proved to be superior to a single PDT treatment. Repeated PDT treatments were well tolerated. Seven PDT treatments were administered over a nine day period without significant toxicity while achieving good therapeutic responses. All six groups receiving repeated PDT treatments showed an improved response compared to groups receiving a single PDT cycle, and the improvement was statistically significant for five of these groups. Sixty-two percent of mice receiving four sequential daily treatments were cured, and daily treatments were superior to regimens with longer intervals between PDT cycles.

  2. Immunogenic cell death due to a new photodynamic therapy (PDT) with glycoconjugated chlorin (G-chlorin)

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Mamoru; Kataoka, Hiromi; Yano, Shigenobu; Sawada, Takuya; Akashi, Haruo; Inoue, Masahiro; Suzuki, Shugo; Inagaki, Yusuke; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Nishie, Hirotada; Shimura, Takaya; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Mori, Yoshinori; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Takahashi, Satoru; Joh, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Both the pre-apoptotic exposure to calreticulin (CRT) and the post-apoptotic release of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) are required for immunogenic cell death. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic photosensitizers and visible light at a specific wavelength in combination with oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells by apoptosis and/or necrosis, shut down the tumor microvasculature, and stimulate the host immune system. We have previously shown that glycoconjugated chlorin (G-chlorin) has superior cancer cell selectivity and effectively suppresses the growth of xenograft tumors. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of PDT with G-chlorin treatment in colon cancer cells. PDT with G-chlorin suppressed CT26 (mouse colon cancer cells) tumor growth considerably more efficiently in immunocompetent mice (wild-type mice, allograft model) than in immune-deficient mice (nude mice, xenograft model), although control treatments were not different between the two. This treatment also induced CRT translocation and HMGB1 release in cells, as shown by western blot and immunofluorescence staining. To evaluate the use of PDT-treated cells as a tumor vaccine, we employed a syngeneic mouse tumor model (allograft model). Mice inoculated with PDT-treated CT26 cells were significantly protected against a subsequent challenge with live CT26 cells, and this protection was inhibited by siRNA for CRT or HMGB1. In conclusion, PDT with G-chlorin treatment induced immunogenic cell death in a mouse model, where the immunogenicity of this treatment was directed by CRT expression and HMGB1 release. PMID:27363018

  3. ALA PDT for high grade dysplasia in Barrett's oesophagus: review of a decade's experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, Stephen G.; Mackenzie, Gary D.; Dunn, Jason M.; Thorpe, Sally M.; Lovat, Laurence B.

    2009-06-01

    We have been investigating PDT with 5 aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) for the treatment of high grade dysplasia (HGD) in Barrett's oesophagus (BO) for over a decade. This drug has inherent advantages over porfimer sodium (Photofrin), the current approved photosensitiser in the UK and USA, which causes strictures in 18-50% and light sensitivity for up to three months. ALA has a lower rate of oesophageal strictures due to its preferential activity in the mucosa, sparing the underlying muscle, and patients are only light sensitive for 1-2 days. Within a randomised controlled trial, we demonstrated that an ALA dose of 60mg/kg activated by 1000J/cm red laser light is the most effective. Using these values we achieved complete reversal of HGD at 1 year in 89% of 27 patients. A randomised controlled trial of ALA vs porfimer sodium PDT for HGD is currently under way with end points of efficacy and safety. 50 of 66 patients have been recruited. Preliminary data suggest ALA PDT is safer with a trend to higher efficacy. Late relapse can occur in 20% of patients. New prognostic markers, in particular aneuploidy, are helping us to identify and target patients at risk of late relapse. Furthermore optical biopsy techniques such as elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) may allow detection of nuclear abnormalities in vivo and enable us to target areas of interest whilst reducing sampling error. PDT faces new challenges for the treatment of HGD in BO, with the recent introduction of balloon based radiofrequency ablation. This technique appears simpler and as effective as PDT, but follow up is currently short and long term safety data is lacking. In our experience ALA PDT is currently the most effective minimally invasive treatment for HGD in BO. This work was undertaken at UCLH/UCL who received a proportion of funding from the Department of Health's NIHR Biomedical Research Centres funding scheme.

  4. Muon simulation codes MUSIC and MUSUN for underground physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2009-03-01

    The paper describes two Monte Carlo codes dedicated to muon simulations: MUSIC (MUon SImulation Code) and MUSUN (MUon Simulations UNderground). MUSIC is a package for muon transport through matter. It is particularly useful for propagating muons through large thickness of rock or water, for instance from the surface down to underground/underwater laboratory. MUSUN is designed to use the results of muon transport through rock/water to generate muons in or around underground laboratory taking into account their energy spectrum and angular distribution.

  5. Calibration Software for the Muon Detectors at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannon, Kevin

    2001-04-01

    The muon detector system at CDF consists of the following subsystems: Central Muon Detector (CMU), the Central Muon Upgrade (CMP), the Central Muon Extension (CMX), and the Intermediate Muon Detector (IMU). Each subsystem is a collection of drift chambers and all but the CMU also incorporate scintillation counters for trigger and timing purposes. The muon calibration system performs diagnostics and calibrations on the above systems. We will describe the software that controls the muon calibration system. This software takes advantage of the existing CDF DAQ infrastructure to handle communication between a Java client containing the user interface and the VME crates where the calibration hardware resides.

  6. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; ...

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less thanmore » $$\\sim$$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $$f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.« less

  7. Calibration Hardware for the Muon Detectors at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickey, Trevor

    2001-04-01

    The muon detector system at CDF consists of the following subsystems: Central Muon Detector (CMU), the Central Muon Upgrade (CMP), the Central Muon Extension (CMX), and the Intermediate Muon Detector (IMU). Each subsystem is a collection of drift chambers and all but the CMU also incorporate scintillation counters for trigger and timing purposes. We will describe the muon calibration system hardware, which performs diagnostics and calibrations on the above detectors. The muon calibration system injects charge into each channel of the CDF muon detectors to generate a signal similar to that of a muon traversing the chamber. Reading this pulse out with the data acquisition system allows us to spot problems with the muon system electronics as well as to calibrate detector timing and response to different amounts of charge.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and preclinical studies of two-photon-activated targeted PDT therapeutic triads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, C. W.; Starkey, J. R.; Rebane, A.; Meng, F.; Gong, A.; Drobizhev, M.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) continues to evolve into a mature clinical treatment of a variety of cancer types as well as age-related macular degeneration of the eye. However, there are still aspects of PDT that need to be improved in order for greater clinical acceptance. While a number of new PDT photo-sensitizers, sometimes referred to as second- or third- generation therapeutic agents, are currently under clinical investigation, the direct treatment through the skin of subcutaneous tumors deeper than 5 mm remains problematic. Currently approved PDT porphyrin photo-sensitizers, as well as several modified porphyrins (e.g. chlorins, bacteriochlorins, etc.) that are under clinical investigation can be activated at 630-730 nm, but none above 800 nm. It would be highly desirable if new PDT paradigms could be developed that would allow photo-activation deep in the tissue transparency window in the Near-infrared (NIR) above 800 nm to reduce scattering and absorption phenomena that reduce deep tissue PDT efficacy. Rasiris and MPA Technologies have developed new porphyrins that have greatly enhanced two-photon absorption ( P A ) cross-sections and can be activated deep in the NIR (ca. 780-850 nm). These porphyrins can be incorporated into a therapeutic triad that also employs an small molecule targeting agent that directs the triad to over-expressed tumor receptor sites, and a NIR onephoton imaging agent that allows tracking the delivery of the triad to the tumor site, as well as clearance of excess triad from healthy tissue prior to the start of PDT treatment. We are currently using these new triads in efficacy studies with a breast cancer cell line that has been transfected with luciferase genes that allow implanted tumor growth and post- PDT treatment efficacy studies in SCID mouse models by following the rise and decay of the bioluminescence signal. We have also designed highly absorbing and scattering collagen breast cancer phantoms in which we have demonstrated

  9. Muon-to-Electron Conversion with COMET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The Coherent Muon-to-Electron Transition (COMET) experiment is presented, focusing on the particle detection systems. COMET is currently under construction as the first of two phases at the J-PARC proton accelerator laboratory in Tokai, Japan. COMET will search for muon-to-electron conversion with a single-event sensitivity of 2.6 × 10-17, with Phase-I achieving a sensitivity of 3.1 × 10-15 and due to enter commissioning in 2016. Phase-I will also allow us to study the novel pion and muon beamline and the rates of background processes.

  10. Systematic muon capture rates in PQRPA

    SciTech Connect

    Samana, A. R.; Sande, D.; Krmpotić, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this work we performed a systematic study of the inclusive muon capture rates for several nuclei with A < 60 using the Projected Random Quasi-particle Phase Approximation (PQRPA) as nuclear model, because it is the only RPA model that treats the Pauli Principle correctly. We reckon that the comparison between theory and data for the inclusive muon capture is not a fully satisfactory test on the nuclear model that is used. The exclusive muon transitions are more robust for such a purpose.

  11. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L.; Lukic, Zarija; Masuda, Koji; Perry, John O.

    2013-05-15

    A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  12. The University of Texas Maya Muon Project

    SciTech Connect

    Schwitters, Roy

    2007-05-09

    Plans to explore the ruin of a Maya Pyramid in Belize using cosmic ray muon tomography will be described. Muon tomography was pioneered by Luis Alvarez in the 1960's to explore the Second Pyramid of Chephren in Egypt. Improvements in detector technology since the Alvarez experiment suggest that muon tomography may be a practical method for exploring and monitoring relatively large underground volumes when exposure times of order months are acceptable. A prototype detector based on Fermilab/MINOS scintillator strip/WLS fiber technology has been built and is being tested at UT Austin. Initial results using the detector will be discussed.

  13. Report on the National Survey of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for Gastric Cancer in Japan (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, Takeshi; Nishiwaki, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: A national survey of photodynamic therapy (PDT) was carried out in order to understand the present situation in Japan and the efficacy of PDT for gastric cancer. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire concerning with PDT was sent to all hospitals performing or previously performed PDT. The answers were collected and analyzed. An additional investigation about efficacy of PDT for gastric cancer was conducted for the main 3 hospitals. Results: In 18 of 19 responded hospitals, PDT was performed for 386 cases of superficial early gastric cancer and for 27 cases of advanced gastric cancer. In the 3 main hospitals, a complete response was achieved in 42 of 57 patients (73.7%) of superficial early gastric cancer not indicated for surgery or other endoscopic treatments such as endoscopic submucosal dissection. No serious complication occurred. Conclusions: PDT has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for early gastric cancer, not only for the intramucosal type, but also for the submucosal invasion. PDT will be one of the important endoscopic treatments for gastric cancer especially in a super ageing society like Japan. PMID:27721560

  14. Studies of a novel photosensitizer Pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) for the prostate cancer PDT in canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with vascular acting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad), is investigated as an alternative modality for the total ablation of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate is used as the animal model. Interstitial PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the i.v. infused photosensitizer drug. The effects of two-session PDT were evaluated. The prostate and its adjacent tissues were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. At one-week, post second-session PDT, the animals recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. Two-session PDT or one single session PDT induced a similar extent of damage. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis. Maximum lesion size of over 3 cm in dimension could be achieved with a single 1-cm interstitial treatment, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. Pharmacokinetic studies show that the photosensitizer is cleared rapidly from the circulation. In conclusion, the novel photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  15. Combination of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors and PDT in endothelial and tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateye, Babasola; Chen, Bin

    2011-02-01

    The PI3/Akt/mTOR kinase signaling pathway is a major signaling pathway in eukaryotic cells, and dysregulation of this signaling pathway has been implicated in tumorigenesis and malignancy in several cancers including prostate cancer. We assessed the effects of combination PI3K pathway inhibition on the efficacy of PDT in human prostate tumor cell line (PC3) and SV40-transformed mouse endothelial cell line (SVEC-40). Combination of PDT and BEZ 235 (BEZ), a pan-PI3/ mTOR kinase inhibitor additively enhanced efficacy of sub-lethal PDT in both cell lines. The combination of the pan-PI3/ mTOR kinase inhibitor LY294002 (LY) with PDT also enhanced efficacy of PDT in PC3 in an additive manner but synergistically in SVEC. In order to determine the mechanism of enhancement of efficacy, we assessed apoptosis and autophagy following PDT. PDT-mediated apoptosis was enhanced in endothelial cells, by both BEZ and LY rapidly after treatment. Compared to SVEC, PC3 cells are apoptosis-deficient and apoptosis was not significantly enhanced by either LY or BEZ. However, lethal PDT of PC3 cells induced a delayed autophagic response which may be enhanced by combination, depending on PI3K inhibitor and dose.

  16. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome and associated changes in the blood-brain barrier following Pc 4-PDT of glioma in an athymic nude rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Vaijayantee; Anka, Ali; Cross, Nathan; Thompson, Paul; Mott, Eric; Sharma, Rahul; Gray, Kayla; Zhang, Ruozhen; Xu, Yueshuo; Sun, Jiayang; Flask, Chris A.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) appears to provide an unambiguous means of tracking the outcome of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumors with the photosensitizer Pc 4. The increase in Gd enhancement observed after Pc 4-PDT may be due to a temporary opening of the blood-brain-barrier which, as noted by others, may offer a therapeutic window. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells into the brains of 9 athymic nude rats. After 8-9 days peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7.0 T microMRI scanner before and after the administration of 150 μL Gd. DCE-MRI scans were repeated three times following Pc 4-PDT. Results: The average, normalized peak enhancement in the tumor region, approximately 30-90 seconds after Gd administration, was 1.31 times greater than baseline (0.03 Standard Error [SE]) prior to PDT and was 1.44 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the first Post-PDT scans (Day 11), a statistically significant (p ~ 0.014, N=8) increase over the Pre- PDT scans, and was 1.38 (0.02 SE) times baseline in the second scans (Day 12), also a statistically significant (p ~ 0.008, N=7) increase. Observations were mixed in the third Post-PDT scans (Day 13), averaging 1.29 (0.03 SE) times baseline (p ~ 0.66, N=7). Overall a downward trend in enhancement was observed from the first to the third Post-PDT scans. Discussion: DCE-MRI may provide an unambiguous indication of brain tumor PDT outcome. The initial increase in DCE-MRI signal may correlate with a temporary, PDT-induced opening of the blood-brain-barrier, creating a potential therapeutic window.

  17. Atmospheric muons and neutrinos, and the neutrino-induced muon flux underground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liland, A.

    1985-01-01

    The diffusion equation for neutrino-induced cosmic ray muons underground was solved. The neutrino-induced muon flux and charge ratio underground have been calculated. The calculated horizontal neutrino-induced muon flux in the energy range 0.1 - 10000 GeV is in agreement with the measured horizontal flux. The calculated vertical flux above 2 GeV is in agreement with the measured vertical flux. The average charge ratio of neutrino-induced muons underground was found to be mu+/mu- = 0.40.

  18. An additional study of multi-muon events produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    We present one additional study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. We use a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.9 fb{sup -1}. We investigate the distribution of the azimuthal angle between the two trigger muons in events containing at least four additional muon candidates to test the compatibility of these events with originating from known QCD processes. We find that this distribution is markedly different from what is expected from such QCD processes and this observation strongly disfavours the possibility that multi-muon events result from an underestimate of the rate of misidentified muons in ordinary QCD events.

  19. Statistical reconstruction for cosmic ray muon tomography.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Larry J; Blanpied, Gary S; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Fraser, Andrew M; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Klimenko, Alexei V; Morris, Christopher L; Orum, Chris; Sossong, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    Highly penetrating cosmic ray muons constantly shower the earth at a rate of about 1 muon per cm2 per minute. We have developed a technique which exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering of these particles to perform nondestructive inspection without the use of artificial radiation. In prior work [1]-[3], we have described heuristic methods for processing muon data to create reconstructed images. In this paper, we present a maximum likelihood/expectation maximization tomographic reconstruction algorithm designed for the technique. This algorithm borrows much from techniques used in medical imaging, particularly emission tomography, but the statistics of muon scattering dictates differences. We describe the statistical model for multiple scattering, derive the reconstruction algorithm, and present simulated examples. We also propose methods to improve the robustness of the algorithm to experimental errors and events departing from the statistical model.

  20. Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    2000-10-05

    High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings ({mu}SR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included.

  1. Development of a Portable Muon Witness System

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Since understanding and quantifying cosmic ray induced radioactive backgrounds in copper and germanium are important to the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, methods are needed for monitoring the levels of such backgrounds produced in materials being transported and processed for the experiment. This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop a muon witness system as a one way of monitoring induced activities. The operational goal of this apparatus is to characterize cosmic ray exposure of materials. The cosmic ray flux at the Earth’s surface is composed of several types of particles, including neutrons, muons, gamma rays and protons. These particles induce nuclear reactions, generating isotopes that contribute to the radiological background. Underground, the main mechanism of activation is by muon produced spallation neutrons since the hadron component of cosmic rays is removed at depths greater than a few tens of meters. This is a sub-dominant contributor above ground, but muons become predominant in underground experiments. For low-background experiments cosmogenic production of certain isotopes, such as 68Ge and 60Co, must be accounted for in the background budgets. Muons act as minimum ionizing particles, depositing a fixed amount of energy per unit length in a material, and have a very high penetrating power. Using muon flux measurements as a “witness” for the hadron flux, the cosmogenic induced activity can be quantified by correlating the measured muon flux and known hadronic production rates. A publicly available coincident muon cosmic ray detector design, the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector (BLCRD), assembled by Juniata College, is evaluated in this work. The performance of the prototype is characterized by assessing its muon flux measurements. This evaluation is done by comparing data taken in identical scenarios with other cosmic ray telescopes. The prototype is made of two plastic scintillator paddles with

  2. Motivations for muon radiography of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.

    2010-02-01

    Muon radiography represents an innovative tool for investigating the interior of active volcanoes. This method integrates the conventional geophysical techniques and provides an independent way to estimate the density of the volcano structure and reveal the presence of magma conduits. The experience from the pioneer experiments performed at Mt. Asama, Mt. West Iwate, and Showa-Shinzan (Japan) are very encouraging. Muon radiography could be applied, in principle, at any stratovolcano. Here we focus our attention on Vesuvius and Stromboli (Italy).

  3. Biochemical changes in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma submitted to PDT using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Cassio A.; Goulart, Viviane P.; de Castro, Pedro A. A.; Correa, Luciana; Benetti, Carolina; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-06-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers are the most common form of malignancy in humans. Between the traditional treatment ways, the photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative which is minimally invasive and do not requires surgical intervention or exposure to ionizing radiation. The understanding of the cascade of effects playing role in PDT is not fully understood, so that define and understand the biochemical events caused by photodynamic effect will hopefully result in designing better PDT protocols. In this study we investigated the potential of the FTIR spectroscopy to assess the biochemical changes caused by photodynamic therapy after 10 and 20 days of treatment using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) as precursor of the photosensitizer photoporphyrin IX (PpIX). The amplitude values of second derivative from vibrational modes obtained with FTIR spectroscopy showed similar behavior with the morphological features observed in histopathological analysis, which showed active lesions even 20 days after PDT. Thus, the technique has the potential to be used to complement the investigation of the main biochemical changes that photodynamic therapy promotes in tissue.

  4. In vivo study of ALA PLGA nanoparticles-mediated PDT for treating cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Shi, Lei; Huang, Zheng; Wang, Xiuli

    2014-09-01

    Background: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common skin cancer and its treatment is still a challenge. Although topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is effective for treating in situ and superficial SCC, the effectiveness of topical ALA delivery to thick SCC can be limited by its bioavailability. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid nanopartieles (PLGA NPs) might provide a promising ALA delivery strategy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ALA PLGA NPs PDT for the treatment of cutaneous SCC in a mouse model. Methods: ALA loaded PLGA NPs were prepared and characterized. The therapeutic efficacy of ALA PLGA NP mediated PDT in treating UV-induced cutaneous SCC in the mice model were examined. Results: In vivo study showed that ALA PLGA NPs PDT were more effective than free ALA of the same concentration in treating mouse cutaneous SCC. Conclusion: ALA PLGA NPs provides a promising strategy for delivering ALA and treating cutaneous SCC.

  5. Label-Free, Longitudinal Visualization of PDT Response In Vitro with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yookyung; Nichols, Alexander J.; Klein, Oliver J.; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Evans, Conor L.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in creating and optimizing therapeutics in the fight against cancer is visualizing and understanding the microscale spatiotemporal treatment response dynamics that occur in patients. This is especially true for photodynamic therapy (PDT), where therapeutic optimization relies on understanding the interplay between factors such as photosensitizer localization and uptake, in addition to light dose and delivery rate. In vitro 3D culture systems that recapitulate many of the biological features of human disease are powerful platforms for carrying out detailed studies on PDT response and resistance. Current techniques for visualizing these models, however, often lack accuracy due to the perturbative nature of the sample preparation, with light attenuation complicating the study of intact models. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an ideal method for the long-term, non-perturbative study of in vitro models and their response to PDT. Monitoring the response of 3D models to PDT by time-lapse OCT methods promises to provide new perspectives and open the way to cancer treatment methodologies that can be translated towards the clinic. PMID:23316088

  6. In-vivo light dosimetry for HPPH-mediated pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Dimofte, Andreea; Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Cullighan, Melissa; Edmonds, Christine E.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to patients undergoing pleural PDT as a function of treatment time, treatment volume and surface area. The accuracy of treatment delivery is analyzed as a function of the calibration accuracies of each isotropic detector and the calibration integrating sphere. The patients studied here are enrolled in a Phase I clinical trial of HPPH-mediated PDT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural effusion. Patients are administered 4mg per kg body weight HPPH 24-48 hours before the surgery. Patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) are treated with light therapy with a fluence of 15-60 J/cm2 at 661nm. Fluence rate (mW/cm2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm2) is monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors are used for in-vivo light dosimetry. The anisotropy of each isotropic detector was found to be within 15%. The mean fluence rate delivery and treatment time are recorded. A correlation between the treatment time and the treatment volume is established. The result can be used as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment. PMID:26005243

  7. In vivo outcome study of BPD-mediated PDT using a macroscopic singlet oxygen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-03-01

    Macroscopic modeling of the apparent reacted singlet oxygen concentration ([1O2]rx) for use with photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed and studied for benzoporphryin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD), a common photosensitizer. The four photophysical parameters (ξ, σ, β, δ) and threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]rx, sh) have been investigated and determined using the RIF model of murine fibrosarcomas and interstitial treatment delivery. These parameters are examined and verified further by monitoring tumor growth post-PDT. BPD was administered at 1 mg/kg, and mice were treated 3 hours later with fluence rates ranging between 75 - 150 mW/cm2 and total fluences of 100 - 350 J/cm2. Treatment was delivered superficially using a collimated beam. Changes in tumor volume were tracked following treatment. The tumor growth rate was fitted for each treatment condition group and compared using dose metrics including total light dose, PDT dose, and reacted singlet oxygen. Initial data showing the correlation between outcomes and various dose metrics indicate that reacted singlet oxygen serves as a good dosimetric quantity for predicting PDT outcome.

  8. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) with Chemotherapy for Advanced Lung Cancer with Airway Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masakazu; Miyajima, Kuniharu; Kojika, Masakazu; Kono, Takafumi; Kato, Harubumi

    2015-10-23

    Intractable advanced lung cancer can be treated palliatively with photodynamic therapy (PDT) combined with chemotherapy to remove central and peripheral (lobar or segmental bronchi) bronchial stenosis and obstruction. We present data for 12 (eight men, four women) consecutive patients with 13 advanced non-small cell lung carcinomas in whom curative operations were contraindicated, who underwent PDT combined with chemotherapy for local control of the intraluminal lesions. The mean age was 73.3 years (range, 58-80 years), and the stages of cancer were IIA-IV. The median stenosis rates before treatment, one week post-treatment, and one month post-treatment were 60% (range, 30%-100%), 15% (range, 15%-99%), and 15% (range 15%-60%), respectively. The mean and median survival times were 9.3 and 5.9 months, respectively. The overall 1-year survival rate was 30.0%. No PDT-related morbidity or mortality occurred. In this single-institution study, all patients experienced improved symptoms and quality of life at one week after treatment; furthermore, an objective response was evidenced by the substantial increase in the openings of the bronchial lumen and prevention of obstructive pneumonia. Therefore, PDT with chemotherapy was useful and safe for the treatment of bronchial obstruction.

  9. Establishment of treatment parameters for ALA-PDT of plaque psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringer, Mark R.; Robinson, Dominic J.; Collins, P.

    1996-12-01

    We report an investigation into the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT), following topically applied 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), as a treatment for plaque psoriasis. Treatment was performed 4 hours post-ALA, using white light doses of 2 - 16 J cm-2 delivered at 10 - 40 mW cm-2. The fluorescence emission of protoporphyrin IX was used as an indicator of the relative concentration of photosensitizer within each plaque before, during, and after therapy. Results show that the rate of sensitizer photo- oxidation is proportional to both pre-treatment fluorescence intensity and surface irradiance, consistent with a rate- equation analysis. A correlation of fluorescence measurements with clinical response of plaques indicates that the effectiveness of PDT is dominated by the level of PpIX at the onset of treatment, and is much less dependent upon light dose. Using these findings we have established a PDT treatment protocol that involves the delivery of 8 J cm-2 of white light, at a rate of 15 mW cm-2. The possibility of ALA-PDT being established as the therapy of choice is discussed.

  10. Topical application of ALA PDT for the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Ling-Lin; Su, Lina; Guo, Ming-Xia; Huang, Zheng

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)- medicated photodynamic therapy (ALA PDT) for the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Methods: Sixteen Chinese patients with moderate to severe facial acne were treated with 1-3 courses of ALA PDT. ALA cream (3%) was freshly prepared and applied to acne lesions for 3-4 h. The lesions were irradiated by a 635 nm diode laser at dose levels of 60 - 80 J/cm2 at 100 mW/cm2. Clinical assessments were conducted before and after treatment up to 3 months. Results: All patents showed response to ALA PDT. Complete clearance was seen in 10 patients (62.5%) and partial clearance in 6 patients (37.5%). One case showed recurrence after complete clearance at 2 months and another two showed recurrence after complete clearance at 3 months. However, the number of new lesions were significantly reduced. Adverse effects were minimal. Conclusions: The results of this preliminary clinical study is encouraging. ALA PDT is a simple, safe and useful therapeutic option for the treatment of moderate to severe acne. Further studies to evaluate the treatment with a larger number of patients and for a longer period of follow-up are needed.

  11. Effects of the bile acid UDCA on PDT efficacy in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David; Castelli, Michelle; Sykes, Elizabeth; Garbo, Greta M.

    2004-06-01

    The phototoxicity of PDT in cell culture can be promoted by the relatively hydrophilic bile acid UDCA (ursodeoxycholic acid). This was attributed to a conformational change in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to an enhanced sensitivity to photodamage by sensitizers that target sites of Bcl-2 localization. UDCA also promoted the binding and inactivation of Bcl-2 by the non-peptidic antagonist HA14- 1, suggesting that UDCA may also be useful for promoting chemotherapy designed to target Bcl-2. In tumor-bearing animals, addition of UDCA to a PDT protocol involving the tin etiopurpurin SnET2 resulted in enhanced cancer control, but there was no effect on the extent of PDT-induced vascular shut-down. These results are consistent with the propo proposal that UDCA only promotes direct tumor cell kill. In this report, we have sal summarized recent research relating to mode of action of UDCA as it effects the on the efficacy of photodynamic therapy where Bcl-2 is among the PDT targets, and discuss the implications of the results.

  12. Assessment of biophysical tumor response to PDT in pancreatic cancer using localized reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, Martin; Klubben, William; He, Ting; Laughney, Ashley M.; Glaser, Adam; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-02-01

    Biophysical changes such as inflammation and necrosis occur immediately following PDT and may be used to assess the treatment response to PDT treatment in-vivo. This study uses localized reflectance measurements to quantify the scatter changes in tumor tissue occurring in response to verteporfin-based PDT treatment in xenograft pancreas tumors. Nude mice were implanted with subcutaneous AsPC-1 pancreatic tumors cells in matrigel, and allowed to establish solid tumors near 100mm3 volume. The mice were sensitized with 1mg/kg of the active component of verteporfin (benzoporphryin derivative, BPD), one hour before light delivery. The optical irradiation was performed using a 1 cm cylindrical interstitial diffusing tip fiber with 20J of red light (690nm). Tumor tissue was excised progressively and imaged, from 1 day to 4 weeks, after PDT treatment. The tissue sections were stained and analyzed by an expert veterinary pathologist, who provided information on tissue regions of interest. This information was correlated with variations in scattering and absorption parameters elucidated from the spectral images and the degree of necrosis and inflammation involvement was identified. Areas of necrosis and dead cells exhibited the lowest average scatter irradiance signature (3.78 and 4.07 respectively) compared to areas of viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (5.81 and 7.19 respectively). Bilirubin absorbance parameters also showed a lower absorbance value in necrotic tissue and areas of dead cells (0.05 and 0.1 respectively) compared to tissue areas for viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (0.28 and 0.35). These results demonstrate that localized reflectance spectroscopy is an imaging modality that can be used to identify tissue features associated with PDT treatment (e.g. necrosis and inflammation) that can be correlated with histopathologically-reviewed H&E stained slides. Further study of this technique may provide means for automated

  13. Identifying initial molecular targets of PDT: protein and lipid oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Kim, Junhwan; Rodriguez, Myriam E.; Xue, Liang-yan; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) generates singlet oxygen (1O2) which oxidizes biomolecules in the immediate vicinity of its formation. The phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 localizes to mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and the primary targets of Pc 4-PDT are expected to be lipids and proteins of those membranes. The initial damage then causes apoptosis in cancer cells via the release of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) from mitochondria into the cytosol, followed by the activation of caspases. That damage also triggers the induction of autophagy, an attempt by the cells to eliminate damaged organelles, or when damage is too extensive, to promote cell death. Cyt-c is bound to the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial inner membrane through association with cardiolipin (CL), a phospholipid containing four unsaturated fatty acids and thus easily oxidized by 1O2 or by other oxidizing agents. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidation of CL loosens its association with Cyt-c, and that the peroxidase activity of Cyt-c can oxidize CL. In earlier studies of Cyt-c in homogeneous medium by MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS, we showed that 1O2 generated by Pc 4-PDT oxidized histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and unexpectedly phenylalanine but not tyrosine. Most of the oxidation products were known to be formed by other oxidizing agents, such as hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical anion, and peroxynitrite. However, two products of histidine were unique to 1O2 and may be useful for reporting the action of 1O2 in cells and tissues. These products, as well as CL oxidation products, have now been identified in liposomes and mitochondria after Pc 4-PDT. In mitochondria, the PDT dose-dependent oxidations can be related to specific changes in mitochondrial function, Bcl-2 photodamage, and Cyt-c release. Thus, the role of PDT-generated 1O2 in oxidizing Cyt-c and CL and the interplay between protein and lipid targets may be highly relevant to understanding one mechanism for cell killing by PDT.

  14. Target and collection optimization for muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Noble, R.J.; Van Ginneken, A.

    1996-01-10

    To achieve adequate luminosity in a muon collider it is necessary to produce and collect large numbers of muons. The basic method used in this paper follows closely a proposed scheme which starts with a proton beam impinging on a thick target ({approximately} one interaction length) followed by a long solenoid which collects muons resulting mainly from pion decay. Production and collection of pions and their decay muons must be optimized while keeping in mind limitations of target integrity and of the technology of magnets and cavities. Results of extensive simulations for 8 GeV protons on various targets and with various collection schemes are reported. Besides muon yields results include-energy deposition in target and solenoid to address cooling requirements for these systems. Target composition, diameter, and length are varied in this study as well as the configuration and field strengths of the solenoid channel. A curved solenoid field is introduced to separate positive and negative pions within a few meters of the target. This permits each to be placed in separate RF buckets for acceleration which effectively doubles the number of muons per bunch available for collisions and increases the luminosity fourfold.

  15. The MICE Demonstration of Muon Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste; Hunt, Christopher; Palladino, Vittorio; Pasternak, Jaroslaw

    2016-06-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate muon ionization cooling, the technique proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam traverses a material (the absorber) loosing energy, which is replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). The configuration of MICE required to deliver the demonstration of ionization cooling is being prepared in parallel to the execution of a programme designed to measure the cooling properties of liquid-hydrogen and lithium hydride. The design of the cooling-demonstration experiment will be presented together with a summary of the performance of each of its components and the cooling performance of the experiment.

  16. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Hart, T. L.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S. J.; Perera, L. P.; Neuffer, D. V.

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  17. Optimization of targeted two-photon PDT triads for the treatment of head and neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Starkey, Jean R.; Dubinina, Galyna; Fahlstrom, Carl; Shepard, Joyce

    2012-02-01

    Synthesis of new PDT triads that incorporate a tumor-killing porphyrin with large two-photon cross-section for 150 fs laser pulses (2000 GM) in the Near-infrared (NIR) at 840 nm, a NIR imaging agent, and a small peptide that targets over-expressed EGF receptors on the tumor surface. This triad formulation has been optimized over the past year to treat FADU Head and Neck SCC xenograft tumors in SCID mice. Effective PDT triad dose (1-10 mg/Kg) and laser operating parameters (840 nm, 15-45 min, 900 mW) have been established. Light, dark and PDT treatment toxicities were determined, showing no adverse effects. Previous experiments in phantom and mouse models indicate that tumors can be treated directly through the skin to effective depths between 2 and 5 cm. Treated mice demonstrated rapid tumor regression with some complete cures in as little as 15-20 days. No adverse effects were observed in any healthy tissue through which the focused laser beam passed before reaching the tumor site, and excellent healing occurred post treatment including rapid hair re-growth. Not all irradiation protocols lead to complete cures. Since two-photon PDT is carried out by rastering focused irradiation throughout the tumor, there is the possibility that as the treatment depth increases, some parts of the tumor may escape irradiation due to increased scattering, thus raising the possibility that tumor re-growth could be triggered by small islands of untreated cells, especially at the rapidly growing tumor margins, a problem we hope to alleviate by using image-guided two-photon PDT.

  18. Efficacy of low-dose mTHPC-PDT for the treatment of basal cell carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Christian S.; Rauschning, Winrich; Stranadko, Evgueni P.; Riabov, Mikhail V.; Albrecht, Volker; Nifantiev, Nikolay E.; Hopper, Colin

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are the most common skin cancers, and incidence rates are still rising. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) with mTHPC (Foscan®) has shown to be a promising alternative to other treatments with good cosmetic results. This study was performed to determine optimal treatment parameters for this indication. Methods: 117 patients with a total of 460 BCCs received mTHPC-PDT. The treatment parameters were varied as follows: Foscan® dose 0.03 - 0.15 mg/kg, drug-light interval (DLI) 1 - 96 hours, total energy density 20 - 120 J/cm2. The clinical outcomes were assessed 8 weeks after PDT following WHO guidelines. Results: The rate of complete remissions (CR) was 96.7% and the general cosmetic outcome rated very good. In the largest subgroup (n=80) with low-dose mTHPC (0.05 mg/kg mTHPC; 48 hours DLI; 50 J/cm2 total energy density), a CR rate of 100% was accomplished. Minor changes of the parameters (0.04 mg/kg mTHPC or 24 hours DLI) yielded similar results. Side effects were encountered in 52 out of 133 PDT sessions. They were more common in patients who had received high drug doses (0.06 - 0.15 mg/kg) and comprised pain and phototoxic reactions. 3 patients developed severe sunburns with subsequent scarring at the injection site following sunlight exposure 2-3 weeks after mTHPC administration. Conclusions: The data suggests that low-dose mTHPC-PDT is an effective treatment option for BCCs. If sensibly applied, it is well tolerated and provides mostly excellent cosmetic results. The evaluation of long term results is still to be undertaken.

  19. Phase Rotation of Muon Beams for Producing Intense Low-Energy Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Bao, Y.; Hansen, G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for rare decay searches, which provide access to new physics that cannot be addressed at high-energy colliders. However, muons are produced within a broad energy spread unmatched to the low-energy required. In this paper we outline a phase rotation method to significantly increase the intensity of low-energy muons. The muons are produced from a short pulsed proton driver, and develop a time-momentum correlation in a drift space following production. A series of rf cavities is used to bunch the muons and phase-energy rotate the bunches to a momentum of around 100 MeV/c. Then another group of rf cavities is used to decelerate the muon bunches to low-energy. This obtains ~0.1 muon per 8 GeV proton, which is significantly higher than currently planned Mu2e experiments, and would enable a next generation of rare decay searches, and other intense muon beam applications.

  20. Modular detector for deep underwater registration of muons and muon groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demianov, A. I.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Sinyov, N. B.; Varadanyan, I. N.; Yershov, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Registration and identification of muons and muon groups penetrating into the ocean depth, can be performed using a modular multilayer detector with high resolution bidimensional readout - deep underwater calorimeter (project NADIR). Laboratory testing of a prototype sensor cell with liquid scintillator in light-tight casing, testifies to the practicability of the full-scale experiment within reasonable expences.

  1. DNA photocleavage by an osmium(II) complex in the PDT window.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujie; Joyce, Lauren E; Dickson, Nicole M; Turro, Claudia

    2010-09-28

    The extended pi-delocalization of dppn (benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2,3-c]phenazine) results in a (3)pipi* state as the lowest triplet excited state in [Os(bpy)(2)(dppn)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), which generates a (1)O(2) quantum yield of 0.42. Together with its (3)MLCT absorption, this new osmium complex shows efficient DNA cleavage under irradiation of lambda(irr) > or = 645 nm.

  2. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Low Energy Muon Science: LEMS`93

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, M.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains papers on research with low energy muons. Topics cover fundamental electroweak physics; muonic atoms and molecules, and muon catalyzed fusion; muon spin research; and muon facilities. These papers have been indexed and cataloged separately.

  3. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-03-20

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  4. Muon-fluorine entangled states in molecular magnets.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, T; Blundell, S J; Baker, P J; Brooks, M L; Hayes, W; Pratt, F L; Manson, J L; Conner, M M; Schlueter, J A

    2007-12-31

    The information accessible from a muon-spin relaxation experiment can be limited due to a lack of knowledge of the precise muon stopping site. We demonstrate here the possibility of localizing a spin polarized muon in a known stopping state in a molecular material containing fluorine. The muon-spin precession that results from the entangled nature of the muon spin and surrounding nuclear spins is sensitive to the nature of the stopping site. We use this property to identify three classes of sites that occur in molecular magnets and describe the extent to which the muon distorts its surroundings.

  5. Study of muon-induced neutron production using accelerator muon beam at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; Lin, C. J.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Draeger, E.; White, C. G.; Luk, K. B.; Steiner, H.

    2015-08-17

    Cosmogenic muon-induced neutrons are one of the most problematic backgrounds for various underground experiments for rare event searches. In order to accurately understand such backgrounds, experimental data with high-statistics and well-controlled systematics is essential. We performed a test experiment to measure muon-induced neutron production yield and energy spectrum using a high-energy accelerator muon beam at CERN. We successfully observed neutrons from 160 GeV/c muon interaction on lead, and measured kinetic energy distributions for various production angles. Works towards evaluation of absolute neutron production yield is underway. This work also demonstrates that the setup is feasible for a future large-scale experiment for more comprehensive study of muon-induced neutron production.

  6. Negative muon chemistry: the quantum muon effect and the finite nuclear mass effect.

    PubMed

    Posada, Edwin; Moncada, Félix; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-10-09

    The any-particle molecular orbital method at the full configuration interaction level has been employed to study atoms in which one electron has been replaced by a negative muon. In this approach electrons and muons are described as quantum waves. A scheme has been proposed to discriminate nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on chemical properties of muonic and regular atoms. This study reveals that the differences in the ionization potentials of isoelectronic muonic atoms and regular atoms are of the order of millielectronvolts. For the valence ionizations of muonic helium and muonic lithium the nuclear mass effects are more important. On the other hand, for 1s ionizations of muonic atoms heavier than beryllium, the quantum muon effects are more important. In addition, this study presents an assessment of the nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on the barrier of Heμ + H2 reaction.

  7. The new high field photoexcitation muon spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, K; Lord, J S; Murahari, P; Wang, K; Dunstan, D J; Waller, S P; McPhail, D J; Hillier, A D; Henson, J; Harper, M R; Heathcote, P; Drew, A J

    2016-12-01

    A high power pulsed laser system has been installed on the high magnetic field muon spectrometer (HiFi) at the International Science Information Service pulsed neutron and muon source, situated at the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The upgrade enables one to perform light-pump muon-probe experiments under a high magnetic field, which opens new applications of muon spin spectroscopy. In this report we give an overview of the principle of the HiFi laser system and describe the newly developed techniques and devices that enable precisely controlled photoexcitation of samples in the muon instrument. A demonstration experiment illustrates the potential of this unique combination of the photoexcited system and avoided level crossing technique.

  8. Histopathological and expression profiling studies of early tumor responses to near-infrared PDT treatment in SCID mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Jean R.; Rebane, Aleksander; Drobizhev, Mikhail A.; Meng, Fanqin; Gong, Aijun; Elliott, Aleisha; McInnerney, Kate; Pascucci, Elizabeth; Spangler, Charles W.

    2008-02-01

    A novel class of porphyrin-based near-infrared photodynamic therapy (PDT) sensitizers is studied. We achieve regressions of human small cell lung cancer (NCI-H69), non-small cell lung cancer (A 459) and breast cancer (MDAMB- 231) xenografts in SCID mice at significant tissue depth by irradiation with an amplified femtosecond pulsed laser at 800 nm wavelength. Significant tumor regressions were observed during the first 10-14 days post treatment. Tumor histopathology was consistent with known PDT effects, while no significant changes were noted in irradiated normal tissues. In vivo imaging studies using intravenous injections of fluorescent dextran demonstrated an early loss of tumor blood flow. RNA was isolated from NCI-H69 PDT treated SCID mouse xenografts and paired untreated xenografts at 4 hours post laser irradiation. Similarly RNA was isolated from PDT treated and untreated Lewis lung carcinomas growing in C57/Bl6 mice. Expression profiling was carried out using Affymetrix TM human and mouse GeneChips®. Cluster analysis of microarray expression profiling results demonstrated reproducible increases in transcripts associated with apoptosis, stress, oxygen transport and gene regulation in the PDT treated NCI-H69 samples. In addition, PDT treated Lewis lung carcinomas showed reproducible increases in transcripts associated with immune response and lipid biosynthesis. PDT treated C57/Bl6 mice developed cytotoxic T cell activity towards this tumor, while untreated tumor bearing mice failed to do so.

  9. Atmospheric Muon Lifetime, Standard Model of Particles and the Lead Stopping Power for Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Barazandeh, Cioli; Majewski, Walerian

    2017-01-01

    The muon is a fundamental particles of matter. It decays into three other leptons through an exchange of the weak vector bosons W +/W-. Muons are present in the atmosphere from cosmic ray showers. By detecting the time delay between arrival of the muon and an appearance of the decay electron in our detector, we'll measure muon's lifetime at rest. From the lifetime we should be able to find the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (a weak analog of the electric charge) to the mass of the W-boson MW. Vacuum expectation value v of the Higg's field, which determines the masses of all particles of the Standard Model (SM), could be then calculated from our muon experiment as v =2MWc2/gw =(τ m μc2/6 π3ĥ)1/4m μc2 in terms of muon mass mµand muon lifetime τ only. Using known experimental value for MWc2 = 80.4 GeV we'll find the weak coupling constant gw. Using the SM relation e =gwsin θ√ hc ɛ0 with the experimental value of the Z0-photon weak mixing angle θ = 29o we could find from our muon lifetime the value of the elementary electric charge e. We'll determine the sea-level fluxes of low-energy and high-energy cosmic muons, then we'll shield the detector with varying thicknesses of lead plates and find the energy-dependent muon stopping power in lead.

  10. Photodynamic therapy activated signaling from epidermal growth factor receptor and STAT3: Targeting survival pathways to increase PDT efficacy in ovarian and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Christine; Hagan, Sarah; Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M; Busch, Theresa M; Cengel, Keith A

    2012-12-01

    Patients with serosal (pleural or peritoneal) spread of malignancy have few definitive treatment options and consequently have a very poor prognosis. We have previously shown that photodynamic therapy (PDT) can be an effective treatment for these patients, but that the therapeutic index is relatively narrow. Here, we test the hypothesis that EGFR and STAT3 activation increase survival following PDT, and that inhibiting these pathways leads to increased PDT-mediated direct cellular cytotoxicity by examining BPD-PDT in OvCa and NSCLC cells. We found that BPD-mediated PDT stimulated EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, and that EGFR inhibition by erlotinib resulted in reduction of PDT-mediated EGFR activation and nuclear translocation. Nuclear translocation and PDT-mediated activation of EGFR were also observed in response to BPD-mediated PDT in multiple cell lines, including OvCa, NSCLC and head and neck cancer cells, and was observed to occur in response to porfimer sodium-mediated PDT. In addition, we found that PDT stimulates nuclear translocation of STAT3 and STAT3/EGFR association and that inhibiting STAT3 signaling prior to PDT leads to increased PDT cytotoxicity. Finally, we found that inhibition of EGFR signaling leads to increased PDT cytotoxicity through a mechanism that involves increased apoptotic cell death. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PDT stimulates the nuclear accumulation of both EGFR and STAT3 and that targeting these survival pathways is a potentially promising strategy that could be adapted for clinical trials of PDT for patients with serosal spread of malignancy.

  11. Testing model energy spectra of charged particles produced in hadron interactions on the basis of atmospheric muons

    SciTech Connect

    Dedenko, L. G.; Roganova, T. M.; Fedorova, G. F.

    2015-10-15

    An original method for calculating the spectrum of atmospheric muons with the aid of the CORSIKA 7.4 code package and numerical integration is proposed. The first step consists in calculating the energy distribution of muons for various fixed energies of primary-cosmic-ray particles and within several chosen hadron-interaction models included in the CORSIKA 7.4 code package. After that, the spectrum of atmospheric muons is calculated via integrating the resulting distribution densities with the chosen spectrum of primary-cosmic-ray particles. The atmospheric-muon fluxes that were calculated on the basis of the SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJET01, and QGSJET II-04 models exceed the predictions of the wellknown Gaisser approximation of this spectrum by a factor of 1.5 to 1.8 in the range of muon energies between about 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} GeV.Under the assumption that, in the region of extremely highmuon energies, a dominant contribution to the muon flux comes from one to two generations of charged π{sup ±} and K{sup ±} mesons, the production rate calculated for these mesons is overestimated by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5. This conclusion is confirmed by the results of the LHCf and TOTEM experiments.

  12. The application and challenges of clinical PD-PDT in the head and neck region: a short review.

    PubMed

    Bredell, Marius G; Besic, Emina; Maake, Caroline; Walt, Heinrich

    2010-12-02

    We review current clinical applications of photodiagnosis (PD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the head and neck field and highlight the actual status, problems, challenges as well as the future of this emerging treatment modality. In recent years literature presented input from many new developments and their applications. This is due to better awareness and developing knowledge about PD-PDT from the clinical staff, both nurses and doctors. But it is also a result of improved drug and hardware development such as lasers, LEDs and related optical devices. Current photo-medical applications in the head and neck region range from diagnostics, treatment of premalignant and malignant lesions, aesthetic and cosmetic applications to the ever expanding anti-microbial applications. Although treatment of premalignant and early malignant lesions of the oropharyngeal cavity have long been the favourite lesions to treat with PDT patients with unsalvageable tumors have also been responding remarkably well to PDT, adding significant quality of life. There is growing interest in anti-microbiological PDT and recent progress has shown that this application is able to significantly reduce the number or even eradicate specific microbial pathogens. During many surgical treatments better control of microbiological activity through PDT may lead to a better outcome. Despite progressive development in this field a few problems remain: prolonged phototoxicity, limited penetration of the photosensitizer and light, inadequate specificity, PDT-related pain as well as the lack of uniformly accepted protocols both for light application as well as photosensitizers. Recent studies have shown that PDT based pain can be separated from other forms of pain, offering hope that a specific management of pain will be possible. If PDT will become fully accepted by patients and doctors we must care about the negative factors such as pain and prolonged phototoxicity.

  13. In vivo suppression of solid Ehrlich cancer via chlorophyllin derivative mediated PDT: an albino mouse tumour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Iman; Saraya, Hend; Zekri, Maha; Abdel-Kader, Mahmoud

    2015-03-01

    In this study, copper chlorophyllin was used as a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in Ehrlich tumour mouse model. Six groups of animals comprising 5 animals per group were subcutaneously transplanted with 1x106 Ehrlich tumour cells. A single dose of 200 μg/gm body weight chlorophylin derivative was administered by intravenous (IV) or intratumoral (IT) routes. Mice were exposed to monochromatic red laser of 630 nm for 1 h, and tumour regression was followed up for three consecutive months post treatment. Several Biochemical, histological and molecular tests were performed in order to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the applied treatment. An interest has been also directed towards investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying chlorophyllin derivative mediated PDT. PDT-treated animals via either the IV or IT routes showed significant decrease in tumour size 72 h post-treatment. Tumours at the IV-PDT group disappeared totally within a week with no recurrence over three months follow up. In the IT-PDT, the decrease in tumour size at the first week was interrupted by a slight increase; however never reached the original size. Histological examination of tumour tissues of the IV-PDT group at 24 h post treatment demonstrated restoring the normal muscle tissue architecture, and the biochemical assays indicated normal liver functions. The immunohistochemical analysis of caspase-3, and the quantitative PCR results of caspases-8 and 9 proved the presence of extrinsic apoptotic pathway after cholorphyllin derivative-mediated PDT. In conclusion IV-PDT strategy proved better cure rate than the IT-PDT, with no recurrence over three months of follow up.

  14. Anticancer effect and cell cycle regulation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 9-hydroxypheophorbide-a and 660-nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Phil-Sang; Rhee, Chung-Ku; Oh, Chung-Hun; Kim, Han-Gyun; Jung, Sang-Oun; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2003-06-01

    Tumor hypoxia, either pre-existing or as a result of oxygen bleaching during Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) light irradiation, can significantly reduce the effectiveness of PDT induced cell killing. To overcome the effect of tumor hypoxia and improve tumor cell killing, we propose using supplemental hyperoxygenation during Photofrin PDT. Our previous study has demonstrated that, in an in vivo model, tumor control can be improved by normobaric or hyperbaric 100% oxygen supply. The mechanism for the tumor cure enhancement of the hyperoxygenation-PDT combined therapy is investigated in this study by using an in vivo/in vitro technique. A hypoxic tumor model was established by implanting mammary adenocarcinoma (MCA) in hind legs of C3H mice. Light irradiation (200 J/cm2 at either 75 or 150 mW/cm2), under various oxygen supplemental conditions (room air or carbogen or 100% normobaric or hyperbaric 100% oxygen), was delivered through an optical fiber with a microlens to animals who received 12.5 mg/kg Photofrin 24 hours prior to light irradiation. Tumors treated with PDT were harvested and grown in vitro for colony formation analysis. Treated tumors were also analyzed histologically. The results show that, when combined with hyperoxygenation, the cell killing rate immediately after a PDT treatment is significantly improved over that treated without hyperoxygenation, suggesting an enhanced direct cell killing. This study further confirms our earlier observation that when a PDT treatment is combined with hyperoxygenation, it can be more effective in controlling hypoxic tumors. H&E stain revealed that PDT induced tumor necrosis and hemorrhage. In conclusion, by using an in vivo/in vitro assay, we have shown that PDT combined with hyper-oxygenation can enhance direct cell killing and improve tumor cure.

  15. Neutrino mass implications for muon decay parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Erwin, Rebecca J.; Kile, Jennifer; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Wang Peng

    2007-02-01

    We use the scale of neutrino mass and naturalness considerations to obtain model-independent expectations for the magnitude of possible contributions to muon decay Michel parameters from new physics above the electroweak symmetry-breaking scale. Focusing on Dirac neutrinos, we obtain a complete basis of dimension four and dimension six effective operators that are invariant under the gauge symmetry of the standard model and that contribute to both muon decay and neutrino mass. We show that - in the absence of fine tuning - the most stringent neutrino-mass naturalness bounds on chirality-changing vector operators relevant to muon decay arise from one-loop operator mixing. The bounds we obtain on their contributions to the Michel parameters are 2 orders of magnitude stronger than bounds previously obtained in the literature. In addition, we analyze the implications of one-loop matching considerations and find that the expectations for the size of various scalar and tensor contributions to the Michel parameters are considerably smaller than derived from previous estimates of two-loop operator mixing. We also show, however, that there exist gauge-invariant operators that generate scalar and tensor contributions to muon decay but whose flavor structure allows them to evade neutrino-mass naturalness bounds. We discuss the implications of our analysis for the interpretation of muon-decay experiments.

  16. Analysis of Near Horizontal Muons at HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Ahron; HAWC Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) gamma ray observatory observes muons with nearly horizontal trajectories. HAWC is located at an altitude of 4100 meters a.s.l. on Sierra Negra in Mexico. The Gamma and Cosmic Ray detector is composed of 300 water tanks, 7.3 m in diameter and 4.5 m tall, spread over a physical area of 22,000 m2. Due to its thickness of 4.5 m, HAWC acts as a hodoscope capable of observing muons with trajectories at zenith angles greater than 75 degrees to just over 90 degrees. These muon trajectories have a unique signal in that they are linear and travel at nearly the speed of light. CORSIKA simulations indicate that these muons originate from high zenith angle cosmic ray events, where the air shower core is located at great distance from HAWC. I will present the angular distribution and rate at which HAWC observes these muon events. High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory.

  17. Pion production for neutrino factories and muon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Guidman, K.K.; Strait, J.B.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Optimization of pion and muon production/collection for neutrino factories and muon colliders is described along with recent developments of the MARS15 code event generators and effects influencing the choice of the optimal beam energy.

  18. STATUS OF THE INTERNATIONAL MUON IONIZATION COOLING EXPERIMENT(MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-07-18

    An international experiment to demonstrate muon ionization cooling is scheduled for beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2007. The experiment comprises one cell of the Study II cooling channel [1], along with upstream and downstream detectors to identify individual muons and measure their initial and final 6D phase-space parameters to a precision of 0.1%. Magnetic design of the beam line and cooling channel are complete and portions are under construction. The experiment will be described, including cooling channel hardware designs, fabrication status, and running plans. Phase 1 of the experiment will prepare the beam line and provide detector systems, including time-of-flight, Cherenkov, scintillating-fiber trackers and their spectrometer solenoids, and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The Phase 2 system will add the cooling channel components, including liquid-hydrogen absorbers embedded in superconducting Focus Coil solenoids, 201-MHz normal-conducting RF cavities, and their surrounding Coupling Coil solenoids. The MICE Collaboration goal is to complete the experiment by 2010; progress toward this is discussed.

  19. Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele; Moscato, Federica

    2003-12-01

    Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The 4th November event was the most powerful X event in the highest known rank category X28 just at horizons. The observed and estimated total flare energy (EFL ≃ 1031div 1033 erg) should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. These first earliest prompt solar neutrino burst might be observed, in a few neutrino clustered events, in present or future largest neutrino underground detectors as Super-Kamiokande one, in time correlation with the X-Radio flare. The onset in time correlation has great statistical significance. Our first estimate on the neutrino number events detection at the Super-Kamiokande II Laboratory for horizontal or hidden flare is found to be few events: NeV_bar{ν}_e≃ 0.63&etae ()/(35 MeV) ()/(1031 erg); and NeV_bar{ν}μ ≃ 3.58()/(200 MeV) ()/(1031erg) η,SUB>μ, where η≃ 1, Eνμ > 113 MeV. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with X, gamma, radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold Eν ≃ 113 MeV energy, or above the pion and Δ ° thresholds (Eν≃ 151 and 484 MeV). Any large neutrino flare event record might also verify the expected neutrino flavour mixing leading to a few as well as a comparable

  20. Synthesis of decacationic [60]fullerene decaiodides giving photoinduced production of superoxide radicals and effective PDT-mediation on antimicrobial photoinactivation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Maragani, Satyanarayana; Huang, Liyi; Jeon, Seaho; Canteenwala, Taizoon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Chiang, Long Y.

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel class of highly water-soluble decacationic methano[60]fullerene decaiodides C60[>M(C3N6+C3)2]-(I−)10[1-(I−)10] capable of co-producing singlet oxygen (Type-II) and highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, formed from superoxide radicals in Type-I photosensitizing reactions, upon illumination at both UVA and white light wavelengths. The O2-·-production efficiency of 1-(I−)10 was confirmed by using an O2-·-reactive bis(2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl)tetrafluorofluorescein probe and correlated to the photoinduced electron-transfer event going from iodide anions to C360∗[>M(C3N6+C3)2] leading to C60-·[>M(C3N6+C3)2]. Incorporation of a defined number (ten) of quaternary ammonium cationic charges per C60 in 1 was aimed to enhance its ability to target pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells. We used the well-characterized malonato[60]fullerene diester mono-adduct C60[>M(t-Bu)2] as the starting fullerene derivative to provide a better synthetic route to C60[>M(C3N6+C3)2] via transesterification reaction under trifluoroacetic acid catalyzed conditions. These compounds may be used as effective photosensitizers and nano-PDT drugs for photoinactivation of pathogens. PMID:23474903

  1. Studies of muon-induced radioactivity at NuMI

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnlein, David j.; Leveling, A.F.; Mokhov, N.V.; Vaziri, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Kasugai, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Nakashima, H.; Sakamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, Hiroshi; /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., KURRI /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Shimizu, Tokyo /Tohoku U.

    2009-12-01

    The JASMIN Collaboration has studied the production of radionuclides by muons in the muon alcoves of the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. Samples of aluminum and copper are exposed to the muon field and counted on HpGe detectors when removed to determine their content of radioactive isotopes. We compare the results to MARS simulations and discuss the radiological implications for neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  2. Spatial and temporal changes in Bax subcellular localization during NPe6-PDT-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R.; Wan, Qingling; Zhou, Feifan

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employing photosensiter N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6) can induce lysosome disruption and initiate the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Bax, a member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, is an essential regulator of apoptosis. Bax is normally found in the cytosol of healthy cells, and translocates to mitochondria in response to many apoptotic stimuli. In this study, using real-time single-cell analysis, we have investigated the kinetics of Bax distribution during NPe6-induced apoptosis in ASTC-a-1 cells. In order to monitor Bax subcellular distribution, cells were stained with GFP-Bax and Mito Tracker Red. The results show that Bax redistribution occurred at about 170 min after treated with NPe6-PDT, and then sequestered into clusters associated with the mitochondira within 30 min. Our data clearly showed the spatial and temporal changes in Bax distribution in living cells during NPe6-induced apoptosis.

  3. The potential of photodynamic therapy (PDT)-Experimental investigations and clinical use.

    PubMed

    Oniszczuk, Anna; Wojtunik-Kulesza, Karolina A; Oniszczuk, Tomasz; Kasprzak, Kamila

    2016-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an intensively studied part of medicine based on free radicals. These reactive species, extremely harmful for whole human organism, are used for eradication numerous diseases. Specific structure of ill tissues causes accumulation free radicals inside them without attack remaining healthy tissues. A rapid development of medicine and scientific research has led to extension of PDT towards treatment many diseases such as cancer, herpes, acne and based on antimicrobials. The presented review article is focused on the aforementioned disorders with accurate analysis of the newest available scientific achievements. The discussed cases explicitly indicate on high efficacy of the therapy. In most cases, free radicals turned out to be solution of many afflictions. Photodynamic therapy can be considered as promising treatment with comparable effectiveness but without side effects characteristic for chemotherapy.

  4. Real-time treatment light dose guidance of Pleural PDT: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Kim, Michele M.; Jacques, Steven L.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Simone, Charles B.; Cengel, Keith A.; Friedberg, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and improve an infrared (IR) navigation system to deliver light dose uniformly during intracavitory PDT by tracking the movement of the light source and providing real-time feedback on the light fluence rate on the entire cavity surface area. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, several detectors placed in selected locations in the pleural cavity monitor the light doses. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an IR camera system is used to track the motion of the light source as well as the surface contour of the pleural cavity. Monte- Carlo simulation is used to improve the calculation algorithm for the effect of light that undergoes multiple scattering along the surface in addition to an improvement of the direct light calculation using an improved model that accounts for the anisotropy of the light from the light source.

  5. Drug and light dose dependence of PDT on pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halkiotis, Konstantinos N.; Manolopoulos, L. D.; Uzunoglou, Nikolaos K.; Yova, Dido M.

    1998-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising new treatment for a variety of malignant tumors. Recently, PDT has been investigated as an alternative treatment for pancreatic carcinoma. The selection of photosensitizer and laser light are equally important for the treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate drug and light dose dependence of photodynamic effect in pancreatic cancer cells. Zinc tetrasulfonated phthalocyanines used as photosensitizer and a novel diode laser system terminated at alight shaping diffuser was used as light source. Viability was measured 24 and 72 hours after treatment and almost 100 percent lethality levels were achieved, by using low light doses independently of drug concentration. The results are discussed in correlation with light and drug doses.

  6. Real-time treatment light dose guidance of Pleural PDT: an update

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Kim, Michele M.; Jacques, Steve L.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Simone, Charles B.; Cengel, Keith A.; Friedberg, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop and improve an infrared (IR) navigation system to deliver light dose uniformly during intracavitory PDT by tracking the movement of the light source and providing real-time feedback on the light fluence rate on the entire cavity surface area. In the current intrapleural PDT protocol, several detectors placed in selected locations in the pleural cavity monitor the light doses. To improve the delivery of light dose uniformity, an IR camera system is used to track the motion of the light source as well as the surface contour of the pleural cavity. Monte-Carlo simulation is used to improve the calculation algorithm for the effect of light that undergoes multiple scattering along the surface in addition to an improvement of the direct light calculation using an improved model that accounts for the anisotropy of the light from the light source. PMID:25999654

  7. Photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) in the treatment of pathological states of the cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switka-Wieclawska, Iwona; Kecik, Tadeusz; Kwasny, Miroslaw; Graczyk, Alfreda

    2003-10-01

    Each year an increasing amount of research is published on the use of photodynamic therapy in medicine. The most recent research has focused mostly on the use of photosensitizer called vertoporphyrin (Visudyne) is the treatment of subretinal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or myopia, following a substantial amount of ophthalmology research mostly experimental on the application of the method in diagnosis and treatment of some eye tumors. In the Department of Ophthalmology of Polish Medical University in Warsaw, PDT was used as supplementary method in a selected group of patients with chronic virus ulcer of the cornea and keratopathies. During the treatment 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) was applied in ointment form as a photosensitizer activated with light wave of 633 nm. It appears, on the basis of the results obtained, that photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) may become in the future a valuable supplement to the methods being used at the present treating pathological states of the cornea.

  8. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  9. Muon Tracking to Detect Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, J. A.; Tibbitts, A.; Schotik, G.; Borozdin, K.; Bacon, J.; Midera, H.; Milner, C.; Morris, C.; Perry, J.; Barrett, S.; Perry, K.; Scott, A.; Wright, C.; Aberle, D.

    2013-03-18

    Previous experiments have proven that nuclear assemblies can be imaged and identified inside of shipping containers using vertical trajectory cosmic-ray muons with two-sided imaging. These experiments have further demonstrated that nuclear assemblies can be identified by detecting fission products in coincidence with tracked muons. By developing these technologies, advanced sensors can be designed for a variety of warhead monitoring and detection applications. The focus of this project is to develop tomographic-mode imaging using near-horizontal trajectory muons in conjunction with secondary particle detectors. This will allow imaging in-situ without the need to relocate the objects and will enable differentiation of special nuclear material (SNM) from other high-Z materials.

  10. Muon (g-2) Technical Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, J.

    2015-01-27

    The Muon (g-2) Experiment, E989 at Fermilab, will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment a factor-of-four more precisely than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS. The E821 result appears to be greater than the Standard-Model prediction by more than three standard deviations. When combined with expected improvement in the Standard-Model hadronic contributions, E989 should be able to determine definitively whether or not the E821 result is evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. After a review of the physics motivation and the basic technique, which will use the muon storage ring built at BNL and now relocated to Fermilab, the design of the new experiment is presented. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2/3 approval.

  11. Muon trackers for imaging a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, N.; Miyadera, H.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J.; Borozdin, K. N.; Durham, J. M.; Fuzita, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Izumi, M.; Nakayama, K.; Saltus, M.; Sugita, T.; Takakura, K.; Yoshioka, K.

    2016-09-01

    A detector system for assessing damage to the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors by using cosmic-ray muon tomography was developed. The system consists of a pair of drift-tube tracking detectors of 7.2× 7.2-m2 area. Each muon tracker consists of 6 x-layer and 6 y-layer drift-tube detectors. Each tracker is capable of measuring muon tracks with 12 mrad angular resolutions, and is capable of operating under 50-μ Sv/h radiation environment by removing gamma induced background with a novel time-coincidence logic. An estimated resolution to observe nuclear fuel debris at Fukushima Daiichi is 0.3 m when the core is imaged from outside the reactor building.

  12. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  13. Comparison between mALA- and ALA-PDT in the treatment of basal cell carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleier, Peter; Zenk, Witold; Hyckel, Peter; Berndt, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Introduction: The external application of aminoleavulinic acid (ALA), which is a substrate of physiologic cell metabolism, represents a possible treatment option in superficial basal cell carcinomas (BCC). The development of new ALA-esters (mALA) with potential for higher penetration depths promises higher therapeutic success. This research aimed to prove the following hypothesis: The cytotoxic effect of the mALA- photodynamic therapy (mALA-PDT), when compared to the ALA-PDT, leads to a higher clinical success rate. Material and Methods: 24 patients with multiple facial tumors, after having received several local surgical excisions with known histology, were treated with either ALA- or mALA-PDT, during the past two years. In total, 89 basal cell carcinoma, 45 actinic keratoses, 6 keratoacanthoma, and 2 squamous cell carcinomas were treated. ALA-PDT: A thermo gel with 40 % mALA or ALA was applied from a cooled syringe. Three to five hours after gel application the skin was cleaned from any gel residues. Irradiation was done with a diode laser and was performed in two sessions, each 10 min long. After intervals of 2, 4 and 12 weeks, the patients were recalled to assess therapeutic efficacy. This was followed by photographic documentation. Results: More than 80% of the tumors treated primarily were resolved successfully. A recurrence rate of approximately 15% was observed. Three per cent of the tumors showed no reaction to therapy. There were no statistically significant differences between the two therapeutic groups. Discussion: The advantage of the use of ALA lies foremost in the fast metabolic use of the body's own photosensitizer PpIX. There are no known side effects of this therapy. Moreover, external application is superior to systemic application with regard to patient management. The method can be combined with other therapies. Although the mALA should have a better penetration in tumor tissue, the therapeutic outcome is similar to the use of ALA.

  14. Islands of surviving cells within necrotic volume at liver induced by PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J.; Kurachi, C.; Zucoloto, S.; Castro e Silva, O., Jr.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2009-06-01

    Tissue heterogeneities as well as distinct metabolic status and cellular types within a tumor may results in a nonhomogenous necrosis. The possibility of PDT surviving cells within a treated volume has relevant clinical significance. The major aim of this study was to analyze, on normal rat liver, the cell viability and surviving after PDT. The porphyrin was injected through the cava vein at concentration of 1.5 mg/Kg. The induced necrosis was qualitatively investigated varying the used drug light interval (30 min, 1, 3, 6, 24 and 36 h) and total delivered dose (20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 J/cm2). A diode laser at 630 nm and irradiance of 150 mW/cm2 was employed. The exposed livers were removed after the animals were killed by anesthesia overdose, 30 h after illumination. Slides were processed by HE analysis for the determination of the overall aspects of the necrotic and non-treated liver. We observed necrosis of central vein and presence of surviving cell around the portal triad within the necrotic volume, suggesting PDT-resistant regions of the tissue. Possible hypothesis for the observation may be: the absence of photosensitizer; insufficient light dose (below threshold); and distinct metabolic status in the portal triad microregions decreases oxygen availability to photodynamic reaction. The cells surrounding portal triad presented a higher resistance even when 200 J/cm2 was applied. In contrast, the cells closer to the central vein after 20 J/cm2 were already susceptible to the action of PDT. Different aspects of the problem are presented.

  15. Growth inhibition effect of HMME-mediated PDT on hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lifeng; Song, Yuanjian; Ma, Limin; Zang, Lixin; Tao, Lili; Zhang, Zhiguo; Han, Jiwu

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered a promising new strategy for liver cancer treatment. Three elements of PDT--optical output power, irradiation time, and photosensitizer concentration--play important roles in promoting cell death. This research aimed to characterize the effects of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-based PDT on hepatocellular carcinoma cells HepG2 and thus elucidate the relationship between cell death and the three elements mentioned earlier. Furthermore, in this study, we present a parameter that represents the cumulative effects of these elements. The accumulation of HMME in HepG2 cells was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The absorption spectrum of HMME was detected using fluorescence spectral analysis. The viability of the treated cells was determined using the MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry. We found that the fluorescence intensity was positively correlated with the incubation time for up to 2 h. The cell growth inhibition rate was significantly high and gradually increased with increasing concentrations of HMME or increasing light intensity, which was calculated as optical output power × irradiation time. Further analysis revealed an e-exponential decay of the cell survival rate to the product of the HMME concentration and the light intensity. We defined the product as parameter B (B = optical output power × irradiation time × HMME concentration). Similarly, the rate of cell apoptosis showed roughly e-exponential growth to parameter B. In conclusion, HMME-mediated PDT can significantly kill HepG2 cells, and the killing effect was related to the cumulative effects of the optical output power, the irradiation time, and the HMME concentration. Therefore, the newly defined parameter B, as a comprehensive physical quantity, may be of great significance for the regulation of light and photosensitizer according to patient-specific conditions in clinical practice.

  16. Monitoring PDT effects in murine tumors by spectroscopic and imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprasad, Subbaraya; Rzepka, Elzbieta; Pi, Jiaxiong; Joshi, Shantaram S.; Dobhal, Mahabeer; Missert, Joseph; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2004-04-01

    The changes in the tumor that occur following photodynamic therapy (PDT) were studied using a small animal MR imager operating at 7Tesla. The animal model used in these studies was mice bearing radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumor on the foot dorsum. The mice were injected with 10μM/kg of one of the photosensitizers: (1) Photofrin, (2) Non-fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-1), (3) Fluorinated porphyrin photosensitizer (DOD-2) and, (4) Fluorinated chlorin photosensitizer (DOD-6). Laser light at 630 or 650 nm (150 mW/cm2, 270 joules/cm2) was delivered to the tumor at 2-24 hours of photosensitizer administration. The MR spectroscopic and imaging examination of the tumors involved both the 1H and 31P nuclei. The tumor bioenergetics was measured by 31P spectroscopy. The water proton relaxivity and diffusion measurements were used to obtain local changes in different regions of the tumor. Changes in 31P MR spectra were observed following PDT using Photofrin and fluorinated chlorin sensitizer (DOD-6). However, no significant changes were observed when the fluorinated porphyrin and its nonfluorinated analog were used. The PDT induced changes in tumor volumes showed significant tumor regression with Photofrin, fluorinated porphyrin and chlorin sensitizers. No tumor regression was observed with the non labeled porphyrin sensitizer and the growth profile followed the general pattern of unperturbed tumors. Serial noninvasive measurements of tumor response to PDT are measurable by both MRI and MRS. The MR derived parameters that are characteristic of the tumor status before and after the therapy are discussed here.

  17. The tools of PDT: light sources and devices. Can they help in getting better therapeutic results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Didier

    2011-08-01

    PDT is a drug and device therapy using photosensitizing drugs activated by laser light, for tissue ablation. PDT light sources must deliver wavelengths matching the absorption of photosensitizers' compound without any side thermal effect. According to applications, these sources need to be: - pled to relatively small optical fibres so as to bring the light energy, of specific wavelength, inside of the body (gastroenterology, head & neck, urology, pneumology), - coupled to a slit lamp adapter to transmit the light to the eye (AMD) - or allow a direct illumination of tissues when large areas must be treated (dermatology). But they also need to be user-friendly with limited investment and installation costs. So as to achieve the required effects, several light sources are available and will be used but practical and economical reasons have limited the number and types of these sources. For PDT oncology applications, besides dermatology, it has also been necessary to develop specific light delivery systems based on optical fibres. These devices allow the treatment: - of circular lumens such as oesophagus, bile ducts, lungs - of solid volumes such as prostate, pancreas - of surfaces such as in head and neck - of empty volumes such as bladder, uterus, cervix. Due to the variety of these treatments, a full family of sources has been developed from original sophisticated costly lasers to more recent easy-to-use diode laser systems. The aim of this presentation is to present the actual state of the art of actual available PDT tools, analyze their qualities and weaknesses, analyze the consequences of a good and/or bad choice or good and/or bad utilization on the quality of the therapeutic results and resulting side effects. It will also evaluate the short and medium term developments of new tools and their effect on the development of the therapy including economical aspects.

  18. Higgs boson and Z physics at the first muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; Han, T.

    1998-01-01

    The potential for the Higgs boson and Z-pole physics at the first muon collider is summarized, based on the discussions at the ``Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider``.

  19. Jet production in muon-proton and muon-nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Proton Muon- Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Proton deep-inelastic scattering are compared to perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD) and Monte Carlo model predictions. We observe hadronic (2+1)-jet rates which are a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the partonic level. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a suppression of the jet rates as compared to deuterium. The two- forward jet sample present higher suppression as compared to the one-forward jet sample.

  20. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  1. PDT in non-surgical treatment of periodontitis in kidney transplanted patients: a split-mouth, randomized clinical trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, Kelly C. T.; Giovani, Elcio M.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to evaluate clinical and microbiological effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontal disease in kidney-transplanted patients. Eight kidney transplanted patients treated at Paulista University were arranged in two groups: SRP performed scaling and root planning by ultrasound; SRP+PDT- in the same patient, which was held to PDT in the opposite quadrant, with 0.01% methylene blue and red laser gallium aluminum arsenide, wavelength 660 nm, power 100 mW. There was reduction in probing pocket depth after 45 days and 3 months regardless the group examined; plaque and bleeding index showed improvement over time, regardless the technique used, and bleeding index in the SRP+PDT group was lower when compared with the baseline the other times. There was no difference in the frequency of pathogens. Photodynamic therapy may be an option for treatment of periodontal disease in renal-transplanted patients and its effectiveness is similar to conventional therapy.

  2. Evaluation with mTHPC of early squamous cell carcinomas of the cheek pouch mucosa of Golden Syrian hamsters as a model for clinical PDT of early cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanzmann, Thomas M.; Theumann, Jean-Francois; Forrer, Martin; Braichotte, Daniel; Wagnieres, Georges A.; van den Bergh, Hubert; Andrejevic-Blant, Snezana; Savary, Jean-Francois; Monnier, Philippe

    1995-03-01

    Golden Syrian hamsters are evaluated as an animal model for light induced fluorescence (LIF) photodetection and phototherapy of early squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, the esophagus, and the traecheo-bronchial tree. Carcinomas of this type are induced on the hamster cheek pouch mucosa by the application of the carcinogen 7,12-DMBA. For phototherapeutic experiments on the animals we utilized meso-(tetrahydoxyphenyl) chlorin (mTHPC). This drug is currently in phase I and II clinical trials for ENT patients presenting superficial `early' squamous cell carcinomas. By means of LIF we measured in vivo the kinetics of the uptake and removal of mTHPC in the normal and tumoral cheek mucosa and in the skin. The photodynamic therapy (PDT) reaction of the tissue after excitation of the photosensitizer with laser light at 652 nm was studied. Both pharmacokinetics and PDT efficacy are compared between animal model and clinical results with special emphasis on selectivity between normal and tumoral mucosa. These first experiments show that this tumor model in the hamster cheek pouch seems to be suitable for testing new photosensitizers preceding their clinical application as well as for optimization of the multiple parameters of clinical PDT.

  3. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) to treat a chronic skin wound in a dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Raduan; Plapler, Hélio; Bitar, Renata A.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is an emerging and promising therapeutic modality for treatment of a wide variety of malignant and nononcologic tumors, as well as in the treatment of infected skin ulcers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the PDT to treat a chronic skin wound that had been already subjected to several clinical and surgical type treatments in a dog. The animal with an infected chronic skin wound with 8 cm diameter in the left leg received an injection of an aqueous solution of 1% methylene blue (MB) with 2% lidocaine into the lesion. After MB injection the wound was irradiated using a LED (LED-VET MMOptics(r)) with a wavelength between 600 and 700 nm, 2 cm diameter circular light beam, of 150 mW of power, light dose of 50 J/cm2. After 3 and 6 weeks PDT was repeated and the wound was re-evaluated. Complete healing was achieved 10 weeks after the first procedure.

  4. PDT-induced apoptosis in brain tissue in vivo: a retrospective study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar D.; Portnoy, Michelle; Wilson, Brian C.

    1999-07-01

    The apoptotic response of normal brain and intracranial VX2 tumor following photodynamic therapy mediated by five different photodynamic drugs, Photofrin, ALA, AlClPc, SnET2 and mTHPC, was evaluated in a preliminary retrospective analysis. Rabbit brain, with or without tumor, was treated by PDT with interstitial light delivery. Histological sections at 24 h post PDT were assessed by the TUNEL assay. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the total apoptotic cell count and the spatial distribution of apoptotic bodies within the tissue. The data were confirmed qualitatively by light microscopy on adjacent H&E-stained sections. Light-only and drug-only controls produced background levels. The highest apoptotic count was seen with Photofrin. The counts in AlClPc-treated animals were not above the background level, while the other 3 photosensitizers gave intermediate levels. With some, but not all, drugs the spatial distribution of apoptotic bodies correlated well with the light fluence distribution. Apoptosis was seen outside the zone of frank coagulative necrosis. There was not apparent drug-dose dependency at the relatively high doses used here. The retrospective nature of this study did not allow optimization of the treatment parameters. Nevertheless, the findings have potentially significant implications, both for understanding the mechanisms of apoptosis in brain tissue and for improving the clinical use of PDT for treatment of patients with malignant brain tumors.

  5. Pulse mode irradiation at Radachlorin PDT shifted cell death to apoptosis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, Vladimir V.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Knyazev, Nickolay A.; Dubina, Michael V.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that can exhibit onsite cytotoxic activity toward tumor cells. One of the main factors limiting PDT efficiency is tissue hypoxia derived from photodynamic action. PDT with pulse mode irradiation at the same peak fluence rates as in continuous wave (CW) mode and with appropriate irradiation parameters could be more effective in the potency of 1O2 generation and the cytotoxic effect enhancement by tissue reoxygenation. In this study, we demonstrated theoretically that the main parameter of pulse mode irradiation is the intermittency factor, which makes it possible to maintain the intended 3O2 concentration and to regulate the efficiency of 1O2 generation. We also showed experimentally that photodynamic treatment with pulse mode irradiation has congruent cytotoxicity to CW mode but induces preferable cell apoptosis. We assume that not only is cumulative 1O2 concentration is important in photodynamic cytotoxicity, but so is the temporal distribution of 1O2 generation, which determines the types of cell death.

  6. Designing PDT-based combinations to overcome chemoresistance in heterocellular 3D tumor models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Imran; Briars, Emma A.; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Anbil, Sriram; Vecchio, Daniela; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Hanna, William R.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    A major barrier to treating advanced-stage cancers is heterogeneity in the responsiveness of metastatic disease to conventional therapies leading to resistance and treatment failure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to synergize with conventional agents and to overcome the evasion pathways that cause resistance. Developing PDT-based combinations that target resistant tumor populations and cooperate mechanistically with conventional agents is an increasingly promising approach to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity, particularly in complex disease sites. Identifying the molecular, cellular, and microenvironmental cues that lead to heterogeneity and treatment resistance is critical to developing strategies to target unresponsive regions of stubborn disease. Cell-based research platforms that integrate key microenvironmental cues are emerging as increasingly important tools to improve the translational efficiency of new agents, and to design combination regimens. Among the challenges associated with developing and scaling complex cell-based screening platforms is the need to integrate, and balance, biological relevance with appropriate, high-content imaging routines that provide meaningful quantitative readouts of therapeutic response. The benefits and challenges associated with deriving meaningful insights from complex cell-based models will be presented, with a particular emphasis on overcoming chemoresistance mediated by physical stress and communication with stromal partners (e.g. tumor endothelial cells, which are emerging as dynamic regulators of treatment resistance) using PDT-based combinations.

  7. Simple model for the effectiveness of PDT with pulsed-laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Heck, Ansgar; Diddens, Heyke C.

    1994-08-01

    Irradiation with pulsed lasers can change mechanisms and efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) depending on the laser pulse parameters. Since most photosensitizers have a relatively high triplet quantum yield and triplet lifetimes of tens of microseconds, even moderate power densities below 100 kW/cm2 can lead to a saturation of the singlet oxygen production, thereby reducing the PDT effect. A simple quantitative model is developed to estimate this effect. According to this, for laser pulses not longer than the triplet lifetime, the PDT efficacy depends on the product of single pulse energy, irradiation wavelength, and the extinction coefficient of the photosensitizer. Peak irradiance and pulse width have minor influence on the efficacy of pulsed irradiation, which decreases as the triplet quantum yield reaches one. The model is supported by in vitro experiments with Photosan 3 and in vivo and in vitro experiments with Photosan 3, Photofrin, aluminum sulphonated phthalocyanine (AlSPc) and benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA) reported in the literature.

  8. An IR navigation system for real-time treatment guidance of pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Chang, Chang; Sandell, Julia; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Cengel, Keith; Friedberg, Joseph; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2011-02-01

    Uniform light fluence distribution for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is critical to ensure predictable PDT outcome. However, common practice uses a point source to deliver light to the pleural cavity with the light uniformity monitored by 7 detectors placed within the pleural cavity. To improve the uniformity of light fluence rate distribution, we have used a real-time infrared (IR) tracking camera to track the movement of the light point source. The same tracking device is used to determine the surface contour of the treatment area. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered between the measurement and calculation in phantom studies. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. Light fluence rate in the pleural cavity is calculated and compared with the in-vivo calculation. Phantom studies show that the surface contour can be determined with an accuracy of 2 mm, with maximum deviation of 5 mm. We can successfully match the calculated light fluence rates with the in-vivo measurements. Preliminary results indicate that the light fluence rate can have up to 50% deviation compared to the prescription in phantom experiments. The IR camera has been used successfully in pleural PDT patient treatment to track the motion of light source in realtime. We concluded that it is feasible to develop an IR camera based system to guide the motion of the light source to improve the uniformity of light distribution.

  9. An IR navigation system for real-time treatment guidance of Pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Chang, Chang; Sandell, Julia; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodrigeus, Carmen; Cengel, Keith; Friedberg, Joseph; Glatstein, Eli; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Uniform light fluence distribution for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is critical to ensure predictable PDT outcome. However, common practice uses a point source to deliver light to the pleural cavity with the light uniformity monitored by 7 detectors placed within the pleural cavity. To improve the uniformity of light fluence rate distribution, we have used a real-time infrared (IR) tracking camera to track the movement of the light point source. The same tracking device is used to determine the surface contour of the treatment area. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered between the measurement and calculation in phantom studies. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. Light fluence rate in the pleural cavity is calculated and compared with the in-vivo calculation. Phantom studies show that the surface contour can be determined with an accuracy of 2 mm, with maximum deviation of 5 mm. We can successfully match the calculated light fluence rates with the in-vivo measurements. Preliminary results indicate that the light fluence rate can have up to 50% deviation compared to the prescription in phantom experiments. The IR camera has been used successfully in pleural PDT patient treatment to track the motion of light source in real-time. We concluded that it is feasible to develop an IR camera based system to guide the motion of the light source to improve the uniformity of light distribution. PMID:26005244

  10. Feasibility of interstitial diffuse optical tomography using cylindrical diffusing fiber for prostate PDT

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been used to characterize spatial distribution of optical properties for prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT) dosimetry. We have developed an interstitial DOT method using cylindrical diffuse fibers (CDFs) as light sources, so that the same light sources can be used for both DOT measurement and PDT treatment. In this novel interstitial CDF-DOT method, absolute light fluence per source strength (in unit of 1/cm2) is used to separate absorption and scattering coefficients. A mathematical phantom and a solid prostate phantom including anomalies with known optical properties were used, respectively, to test the feasibility of reconstructing optical properties using interstitial CDF-DOT. Three dimension spatial distributions of the optical properties were reconstructed for both scenarios. Our studies show that absorption coefficient can be reliably extrapolated while there are some cross talks between absorption and scattering properties. Even with the suboptimal reduced scattering coefficients, the reconstructed light fluence rate agreed with the measured values to within ±10%, thus the proposed CDF-DOT allows greatly improved light dosimetry calculation for interstitial PDT. PMID:23629149

  11. The difference of the PDT's effects between interstitial lighting and continuous lighting in low oxygen density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiumin; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Tiegen; Xu, Tao

    2008-02-01

    Tumor oxygen depletion plays an important role in the process of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). The paper focuses on the improvement of the lighting mode to carry out this cancer therapy more effectively in low oxygen content. The effect of interstitial lighting was compared with that of continuous lighting in different oxygen density measured with a homemade device in PDT. 90 mice were divided into 3 groups: the contrast group, the continuous lighting group and the interstitial lighting group. The initial oxygen content was measured with a homemade device before the treatment. To examine the different effects, both the interstitial lighting and the continuous lighting have the same fluent rates (30mW/cm2, 32.4J/ cm2). The continuous lighting lasted 18 minutes while the interstitial lighting lasted 36 minutes with 1 second's idle time and 1 second's effective time of each pulse. The result shows that the volume of tumor doubling duration in interstitial lighting group is longer in the condition of low initial oxygen content. Thus with low initial oxygen content, the interstitial lighting is more effective than the continuous lighting during PDT.

  12. Squaraine PDT induces oxidative stress in skin tumor of swiss albino mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibin, T. R.; Gayathri, Devi D.; Ramaiah, D.; Abraham, Annie

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using a sensitizing drug is recognized as a promising medical technique for cancer treatment. It is a two step process that requires the administration of a photosensitizer followed by light exposure to treat a disease. Following light exposure the photosensitizer is excited to a higher energy state which generates free radicals and singlet oxygen. The present study was carried out to assess the oxidative damage induced by bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6- trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine in skin tumor tissues of mice with/ without light treatment. Skin tumor was induced using 7, 12-Dimethyl Benz(a)anthracene and croton oil. The tumor bearing mice were given an intraperitoneal injection with the squaraine dye. After 24h, the tumor area of a few animals injected with the dye, were exposed to visible light from a 1000 W halogen lamp and others kept away from light. All the mice were sacrificed one week after the PDT treatment and the oxidative profile was analyzed (TBARS, SOD, catalase, GSH, GPx and GR) in tumor/ skin tissues. The dye induces oxidative stress in the tumor site only on illumination and the oxidative status of the tumor tissue was found to be unaltered in the absence of light. The results of the study clearly shows that the tumor destruction mediated by PDT using bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6-trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine as a photosensitizer is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species, produced by the light induced changes in the dye.

  13. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumors by photosensitzer photosens: results of 45 clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Yakubovskaya, Raisa I.; Aristarkhova, E. I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Belous, T. A.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Smirnov, V. V.; Zhitkova, Margarita B.

    1996-01-01

    Photosensitizer Photosens is a mixture of sulphonated Al-phthalocyanines with a different number of substituents per phthalocyanine molecule. In the beginning of 1994, this photosensitizer was approved for clinical trials. Since that time till May 1995, 45 patients with 120 tumors were treated by PDT-Photosens. The main tumor localizations were lung (5/6), head and neck (4/4), esophagus (8/8), stomach (2/2), vulva (2/2), bladder (1/1), breast cancer (3/3), skin (basalioma, melanoma, sarcoma Kaposi, mts breast cancer) (20 patients/94 tumors). The lesions were photoirradiated 48-72 h after intravenous injection of Photosens in doses from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/kg b.w. (1.0 mg/kg b.w., on average). PDT was performed by laser power density from 20 to 1400 mW/sq cm (300 mW/sq.cm, on average), energy density varying from 15 to 200 J/sq cm (100 J/sq.cm, on average). The therapeutical effect of PDT was evaluated histologically, endoscopically, roentgenologically and sonographically 3 - 4 weeks after the treatment. Complete regression of tumors was reached in 56%, significant remission was reached in 34%, and partial remission was observed in 10% of cases. The follow-up of patients with complete tumor regression was to 15 months.

  14. Delivery of the photosensitizer Pc 4 in PEG-PCL micelles for in vitro PDT studies.

    PubMed

    Master, Alyssa M; Rodriguez, Myriam E; Kenney, Malcolm E; Oleinick, Nancy L; Gupta, Anirban Sen

    2010-05-01

    The silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 is a second-generation photosensitizer that has several properties superior to other photosensitizers currently approved by the FDA, and it has shown significant promise for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in several cancer cells in vitro and model tumor systems in vivo. However, because of the high hydrophobicity of Pc 4, its formulation for in vivo delivery and favorable biodistribution become challenging. To this end, we are studying encapsulation and delivery of Pc 4 in block copolymer micelles. Here, we report the development of biocompatible PEG-PCL micelle nanoparticles, encapsulation of Pc 4 within the micelle core by hydrophobic association with the PCL block, and in vitro PDT studies of the micelle-formulated Pc 4 in MCF-7c3 human breast cancer cells. Our studies demonstrate efficient encapsulation of Pc 4 in the micelles, intracellular uptake of the micelle-formulated Pc 4 in cells, and significant cytotoxic effect of the formulation upon photoirradiation. Quantitative estimation of the extent of Pc 4 loading in the micelles and the photocytotoxicity of the micelle-incorporated Pc 4 demonstrate the promise of our approach to develop a biocompatible nanomedicine platform for tumor-targeted delivery of Pc 4 for site-selective PDT.

  15. The role of NO synthase isoforms in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger, involved in the implementation of various cell functions. It regulates various physiological and pathological processes such as neurotransmission, cell responses to stress, and neurodegeneration. NO synthase is a family of enzymes that synthesize NO from L-arginine. The activity of different NOS isoforms depends both on endogenous and exogenous factors. In particular, it is modulated by oxidative stress, induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have studied the possible role of NOS in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Antinecrotic and proapoptotic effects of NO on the glial cells were found using inhibitory analysis. We have shown the role of inducible NO synthase in photoinduced apoptosis and involvement of neuronal NO synthase in photoinduced necrosis of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The activation of NO synthase was evaluated using NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of neurons expressing the enzyme. The activation of NO synthase in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was evaluated as a function of time after PDT. Photodynamic treatment induced transient increase in NO synthase activity and then slowly inhibited this enzyme.

  16. Muon neutrino CCQE at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Betancourt, M.

    2016-12-13

    A precise understanding of quasi-elastic interactions is crucial to measure neutrino oscillations. The MINERvA experiment is currently working on different analyses of muon neutrino charged current quasi-elastic interactions. Here, we present updates to the previous quasi-elastic measurement, using a new flux, and we present the status of several analyses in progress; including double differential cross sections, a study of final state interactions using a sample with muon and a proton and the status of the CCQE analysis in the medium energy neutrino beam.

  17. Muon production in extended air shower simulations.

    PubMed

    Pierog, T; Werner, K

    2008-10-24

    Whereas air shower simulations are very valuable tools for interpreting cosmic ray data, there is a long-standing problem: it is difficult to accommodate at the same time the longitudinal development of air showers and the number of muons measured on the ground. Using a new hadronic interaction model (EPOS) in air shower simulations produces much more muons, in agreement with results from the HiRes-MIA experiment. We find that this is mainly due to a better description of (anti) baryon production in hadronic interactions. This is an aspect of air shower physics which has been neglected so far.

  18. Muon Neutrino Disappearance Measurement at MINOS+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Thomas; Minos+ Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The MINOS experiment ran from 2003 until 2012 and produced some of the best precision measurements of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters Δm322 and θ23 using muon neutrino disappearance of beam and atmospheric neutrinos and electron neutrino appearance of beam neutrinos. The MINOS+ experiment succeeded MINOS in September 2013. For almost three years MINOS+ collected data from the Medium Energy NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. Results of the muon neutrino disappearance analysis from the first two years of MINOS+ data will be presented. These results will be compared to and combined with the MINOS measurement.

  19. A COMPLETE SCHEME FOR A MUON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.; ALEXAHIN, Y.; NEUFFER, D.; KAHN, S.A.; SUMMERS, D.

    2007-09-01

    A complete scheme for production, cooling, acceleration, and ring for a 1.5 TeV center of mass muon collider is presented, together with parameters for two higher energy machines. The schemes starts with the front end of a proposed neutrino factory that yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling in long-period helical lattices reduces the longitudinal emittance until it becomes possible to merge the trains into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in all dimensions is applied to the single bunches in further helical lattices. Final transverse cooling to the required parameters is achieved in 50 T solenoids.

  20. Searches for violation of muon number conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Redwine, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    The question of violation of muon number conservation is one which has occupied considerable attention and resources in recent years. The first generation of experiments at the medium energy accelerators has now been completed and the next generation of experiments is ready to begin. The history of muon number conservation is reviewed, including the reasons for the present belief that the conservation law may not be exact. The experiments that have been completed in the last few years are discussed. The new experiments that are being mounted and planned at several laboratories are discussed, and the relationship of these types of experiments to other studies, such as searches for neutrino oscillations, are considered.

  1. Muon Neutrino CCQE at MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, M.

    A precise understanding of quasi-elastic interactions is crucial to measure neutrino oscillations. The MINERvA experiment is currently working on different analyses of muon neutrino charged current quasi-elastic interactions. We present updates to the previous quasi-elastic measurement, using a new flux, and we present the status of several analyses in progress; including double differential cross sections, a study of final state interactions using a sample with muon and a proton and the status of the CCQE analysis in the medium energy neutrino beam.

  2. Flavor tagging with muons at SLAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prepost, R.

    1984-05-01

    Identification of muons in hadronic events from e+e- annihilation observed in the MAC detector at PEP at √s=29 GeV provides flavor tagging of heavy quark mesons. A sample enriched in events from bb production is obtained and the b quark fragmentation function is determined. The b quark is found to fragment predominantly with high values of z, with =0.8+/-0.1 and to have an overall semileptonic branching ratio to muons of (15.5+5.4-2.9)%. The sample also provides flavor tagged hadronic jets. Invariant mass and charged multiplicity distributions are presented.

  3. Fluorescent-spectroscopic and imaging methods of investigations for diagnostics of head and neck tumors and control of PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinak, N. J.; Shental, Victor V.; Komov, D. V.; Vacoulovskaia, E. G.; Tabolinovskaia, T. D.; Abdullin, N. A.; Pustynsky, I.; Chatikchine, V. H.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Meerovich, Gennadii A.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Agafonov, Vladimir I.; Zuravleva, V.; Lukjanets, Eugeny A.

    1996-01-01

    Methodics of PDT control and fluorescent-spectroscopic diagnostic of head and neck tumors and mammary gland cancer (nodular) with the use of Kr, He-Ne and semiconductor lasers and photosensitizer (PS) -- Al phtalocyanin (Photosense) are discussed. The results show that applied diagnostic methods permit us not only to identify the topology and malignancy of a tumor but also to correct PDT process directly during irradiation.

  4. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  5. Photodynamic therapy combined with terbinafine against chromoblastomycosis and the effect of PDT on Fonsecaea monophora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongxuan; Huang, Xiaowen; Lu, Sha; Hamblin, Michael R; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Zhang, Junmin; Xi, Liyan

    2015-02-01

    Chromoblastomycosis, a chronic fungal infection of skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by dematiaceous fungi, is associated with low cure and high relapse rates. Among all factors affecting clinical outcome, etiological agents have an important position. In southern China, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Fonsecaea monophora are main causative agents causing Chromoblastomycosis. We treated one case of chromoblastomycosis by photodynamic therapy (PDT) of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) irradiation combined with terbinafine 250 mg a day. The lesions were improved after two sessions of ALA-PDT treatment, each including nine times, at an interval of 1 week, combined with terbinafine 250 mg/day oral, and clinical improvement could be observed. In the following study, based on the clinical treatment, the effect of PDT and antifungal drugs on this isolate was detected in vitro. It showed sensitivity to terbinafine, itraconazole or voriconazole, and PDT inhibited the growth. Both the clinic and experiments in vitro confirm the good outcome of ALA-PDT applied in the inhibition of F. monophora. It demonstrated that combination of antifungal drugs with ALA-PDT arises as a promising alternative method for the treatment of these refractory cases of chromoblastomycosis.

  6. A theoretical comparison of macroscopic and microscopic modeling of singlet oxygen during Photofrin and HPPH mediated-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baochang; Kim, Michele M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2013-03-01

    Mathematic models were developed to simulate the complex dynamic process of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Macroscopic or microscopic modeling of singlet oxygen (1O2) is particularly of interest because it is the major cytotoxic agent causing biological effects during PDT. Our previously introduced macroscopic PDT model incorporates the diffusion equation for the light propagation in tissue and the macroscopic kinetic equations for the production of the 1O2. The distance-dependent distribution of 3O2 and reacted 1O2 can be numerically calculated using finite-element method (FEM). We recently improved the model to include microscopic kinetic equations of oxygen diffusion from uniformly distributed blood vessels and within tissue. In the model, the cylindrical blood capillary has radius in the range of 2-5 μm and a mean length of 300 μm, and supplies oxygen into tissue. The blood vessel network is assumed to form a 2-D square grid perpendicular to a linear light source. The spacing of the grid is 60 μm. Oxygen can also diffuse along the radius and the longitudinal axial of the cylinder within tissue. The oxygen depletion during Photofrin-PDT PDT can be simulated using both macroscopic and microscopic approaches. The comparison of the simulation results have reasonable agreements when velocity of blood flow is reduced during PDT.

  7. Flux modulations seen by the muon veto of the GERDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GERDA Collaboration; Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Borowicz, D.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; D'Andrea, V.; Demidova, E. V.; di Vacri, A.; Domula, A.; Doroshkevich, E.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Fedorova, O.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Janicsk'o Cs'athy, J.; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kazalov, V.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knapp, M.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Medinaceli, E.; Misiaszek, M.; Moseev, P.; Nemchenok, I.; Palioselitis, D.; Panas, K.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Ritter, F.; Rumyantseva, N.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schneider, B.; Schönert, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schütz, A.-K.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Selivanenko, O.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stepaniuk, M.; Strecker, H.; Vanhoefer, L.; Vasenko, A. A.; Veresnikova, A.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wiesinger, C.; Wilsenach, H.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-11-01

    The GERDA experiment at LNGS of INFN is equipped with an active muon veto. The main part of the system is a water Cherenkov veto with 66 PMTs in the water tank surrounding the GERDA cryostat. The muon flux recorded by this veto shows a seasonal modulation. Two causes have been identified: (i) secondary muons from the CNGS neutrino beam (2.2%) and (ii) a temperature modulation of the atmosphere (1.4%). A mean cosmic muon rate of Iμ0 =(3.477 ± 0 .002stat ± 0 .067sys) ×10-4 /(s · m2) was found in good agreement with other experiments at LNGS. Combining the present result with those from previous experiments at LNGS the effective temperature coefficient αT , Lngs is determined to 0.93 ± 0.03. A fit of the temperature coefficients measured at various underground sites yields a kaon to pion ratio rK/π of 0.10 ± 0.03.

  8. PDT in the thoracic cavity: Spectroscopic methods and fluence modeling for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, Julia Lauren

    PDT for the thoracic cavity provides a promising cancer treatment modality, but improvements in treatment planning, particularly in PDT dosimetry, can be made to improve uniformity of light delivery. When a cavity of arbitrary geometry is illuminated, the fluence increases due to multiple-scattered photons, referred to as the Integrating Sphere Effect (ISE). Current pleural PDT treatment protocol at the University of Pennsylvania monitors light fluence (hereafter simply fluence, measured in W/cm2) via seven isotropic detectors sutured at different locations in thoracic cavity of a patient. This protocol monitors light at discrete locations, but does not provide a measurement of fluence for the thoracic cavity as a whole. Current calculation of light fluence includes direct light only and thus does not account for the unique optical properties of each tissue type present, which in turn affects the accuracy of the calculated light distribution in the surrounding tissue and, in turn, the overall cell death and treatment efficacy. Treatment planning for pleural PDT can be improved, in part, by considering the contribution of scattered light, which is affected by the two factors of geometry and in vivo optical properties. We expanded the work by Willem Star in regards to the ISE in a spherical cavity. A series of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were run for semi-infinite planar, spherical, and ellipsoidal geometries for a range of optical properties. The results of these simulations are compared to theory and numerical solutions for fluence in the cavity and at the cavity-medium boundary. The development via MC simulations offers a general method of calculating the required light fluence specialized to each patient, based on the treatment surface area. The scattered fluence calculation is dependent on in vivo optical properties (μa and μs') of the tissues treated. Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy methods are used to determine the optical properties and

  9. Cosmogenic Chlorine-36 Production in Calcite by Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. O. H.; Evans, J. M.; Fifield, L. K.; Allan, G. L.; Cresswell, R. G.

    1998-02-01

    At depths below a few metres, 36Cl production in calcite is initiated almost entirely by cosmic ray muons. The principal reactions are (1) direct negative muon capture by Ca; 40Ca(μ -,α) 36Cl, and (2) capture by 35Cl of secondary neutrons produced in muon capture and muon-induced photodisintegration reactions. We have determined rates for 36Cl and neutron production due to muon capture in calcite from a 20 m (5360 g cm -2) depth profile in limestone. The 36Cl yield from muon capture by Ca in pure calcite is 0.012 ± 0.002 atom per stopped negative muon. The surface production rate of 36Cl by muon capture on Ca in calcite is, therefore, 2.1 ± 0.4 atom g -1a -1 at sea level and high latitude, approximately 11% of the production rate by Ca spallation. If it is assumed that 34% of the negative muons are captured by the Ca atom in calcite, the α-yield from 40Ca following muon capture is 0.043 ± 0.008, somewhat lower than the result of a recent muon irradiation experiment (0.062 ± 0.020), but well within the extremes of existing theoretical predictions (0.0033-0.15). The average neutron yield following muon capture in pure calcite is 0.44 ± 0.15 secondary neutrons per stopped negative muon, in good agreement with existing theoretical predictions. Cosmogenic isotope production by muons must be taken into account when dating young geomorphic surfaces, especially those created by excavation of only a few metres of overlying rock. Attention to isotope production by muons is also crucial to determining surface erosion rates accurately. Due to the deep penetration of muons compared to cosmic ray hadrons, the accumulation of muon-produced 36Cl is less sensitive to erosion than that of spallogenic 36Cl. Although production by muons at the surface is only a small fraction of production by spallation, the fraction of muon-produced 36Cl in rapidly eroding limestone surfaces can approach 50%. In such cases, erosion rates estimated using conventional models which attribute

  10. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  11. Precision measurements of fundamental muon properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debevec, P. T.

    2003-02-01

    The g-factor of the muon differs from two due to the excitation of virtual field quanta and particles. The deviation from two, the g-factor anomaly, can be calculated with high precision in the Standard Model of particle physics. The g-factor anomaly can be measured with high precision by determining the rate at which the spin direction of high-energy muons circulating in a storage ring precesses. The Brookhaven National Laboratory g-2 experiment (BNL g-2 collaboration) has measured g-2 to 1.3 ppm. The result is essentially in agreement with the Standard Model. The result puts interesting constraints on Standard Model extensions. Data under analysis will reduce the uncertainty to the order of 0.5 ppm. The precision timing techniques used in the g-2 experiment are a central element of a new experiment to measure the lifetime of the positive muon. The goal of this experiment is to determine the lifetime to 1 ppm, and the Fermi coupling constant to 0.5 ppm. The high statistics demand of this measurement is satisfied by one of the surface muon beams of the Paul Scherrer Institute. An artificial time structure is imposed on the continuous beam by an electrostatic kicker. The decay positrons are detected in a 180 element quasi-spherical detector. The effective counting rate is of the order of 1 MHz. The experiment is designed to control systematic errors to a level below 1 ppm.

  12. Neutrino masses, Majorons, and muon decay

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria, A.; Bernabeu, J.; Pich, A.

    1987-09-01

    The contributions to the parameters xi, delta, rho, and eta in muon decay coming from double Majoron emission, Majorana neutrino masses, and effects of charged scalars are evaluated in the scalar-triplet model. The relevance of these effects for planned experiments is discussed.

  13. ICOOL: A TOOL FOR MUON COLLIDER SIMULATIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.

    2001-09-28

    Current ideas for designing neutrino factories [ 1,2] and muon colliders [3] require unique configurations of fields and materials to prepare the muon beam for acceleration. This so-called front end system must accomplish the goals of phase rotation, bunching and cooling. We have continued the development of a 3-D tracking code, ICOOL [4], for examining possible muon collider front end configurations. A system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of {approx}50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary codes can be used for pre-processing, post-processing and optimization.

  14. Muon Acceleration Concepts for Future Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex

    2016-05-01

    Here, we summarize current state of concept for muon acceleration aimed at future Neutrino Factory. The main thrust of these studies was to reduce the overall cost while maintaining performance through exploring interplay between complexity of the cooling systems and the acceptance of the accelerator complex. To ensure adequate survival of the short-lived muons, acceleration must occur at high average gradient. The need for large transverse and longitudinal acceptances drives the design of the acceleration system to initially low RF frequency, e.g. 325 MHz, and then increased to 650 MHz, as the transverse size shrinks with increasing energy. High-gradient normal conducting RF cavities at these frequencies require extremely high peak-power RF sources. Hence superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are chosen. Here, we considered two cost effective schemes for accelerating muon beams for a stagable Neutrino Factory: Exploration of the so-called 'dual-use' linac concept, where the same linac structure is used for acceleration of both H- and muons and alternatively, the SRF efficient design based on multi-pass (4.5) 'dogbone' RLA, extendable to multi-pass FFAG-like arcs.

  15. Reconstruction of muon tracks in a buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, S.; Insolia, A.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Trovato, E.

    2012-10-01

    The BATATA muon counter was designed as one of the foreseen detector upgrades of the Pierre Auger Observatory with the main goal of quantifying the electromagnetic contamination of the muon signal as a function of the depth for cosmic ray shower energies above 10 PeV. Nevertheless BATATA offers also the possibility of measuring the incoming direction of secondary muons from both GeV and PeV primary cosmic rays. Large efforts have been already done to quantify from simulations the amount of the electromagnetic contamination and the expected muon identification performances. The present work is focused on the evaluation of the detector performances for muon track reconstruction. To this aim and in view of the detector installation in the field, expected to be completed by the first half of current year, we performed a GEANT4 end-to-end simulation of such device and set up a track reconstruction procedure. Typical results concerning achieved acceptance and angular resolution for muons are presented.

  16. Measurements of Beam Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohayai, Tanaz; Snopok, Pavel; Rogers, Chris; Neuffer, David; Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Cooled muon beams are essential for production of high-flux neutrino beams at the Neutrino Factory and high luminosity muon beams at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, MICE aims to demonstrate muon beam cooling through ionization energy loss of muons in material. The standard figure of merit for cooling in MICE is the transverse RMS emittance reduction and to measure this, the individual muon positions and momenta are reconstructed using scintillating-fiber tracking detectors, before and after a low-Z absorbing material. In this study, in addition to a preview on the standard measurement technique, an alternative technique is described, which is the measurement of phase-space density using the novel Kernel Density Estimation method. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE - AC05 - 06OR23100.

  17. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  18. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  19. Low dose Photofrin PDT for recurrent in-situ squamous cell tumors of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, R. R.; Austerlitz, C.; Sheng, C.; Mota, H.; Brodish, B.; Camnitz, P.; Sibata, C. H.

    2009-06-01

    Multifocal recurrence of in-situ squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx and vocal cord following surgical failure can be a therapeutic dilemma. Salvage surgery or radiation may be an option but morbidity can be significant. We evaluated the potential role of low dose Photofrin (1.2mg/Kg) Photodynamic Therapy for this cohort of patients. A total of 25 patients with multifocal recurrent in-situ squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx and vocal cord who had failed local resection, and where additional surgery or radiation therapy would likely result in permanent morbidity, were offered Photodynamic Therapy. PDT consisted of off label infusion of Photofrin (1.2mg/kg) followed 48 hours later by illumination at 630nm employing a light diffuser (300J) and/or microlens (150Jcm2). All patients completed their prescribed PDT and no patient has been lost to follow up (minimum 1 year). No photosensitivity reactions were noted. No significant morbidity was seen. All patients were able to maintain oral nutrition. Procedure related pain was well controlled by one week of oral narcotics. At one month post PDT all patients were biopsy negative in the treatment region and no failures within the treatment region have been noted. No fibrosis or permanent PDT morbidity has been seen with follow up to three years. Vocal cord and voice function were excellent. Three patients developed new regions of in-situ disease outside the PDT fields, two underwent additional PDT and one had laser resection. Low dose Photofrin PDT offers excellent palliation and durable local control of recurrent in-situ squamous cell cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx and true cords. This is a well tolerated therapy. Low dose Photofrin appears to improve selectivity and minimize normal tissue injury. It should be tested in a larger patient population.

  20. Fractionation of the Hypericum perforatum L. extract: PMF, and PDT effects of the fractions against HL-60 leukemic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsontou, M.; Dimitriou, H.; Filippidis, G.; Tsimaris, I.; Kalmanti, M.; Skalkos, D.

    2007-02-01

    In the last three years we have prepared and studied the polar methanolic extract PMF, of the herb Hypericum perforatum L, and studied as a new, alternative photosensitizing substance for PDT. Hypericum perforatum L., as well as PMF, contains a number of naphthodianthrone derivatives (hypericins), such as hypericin and pseudohypericin, as its main photosensitizing constituents. PMF has been tested as a PDT agent in vitro in bladder cancer cells, leukemia cells, and in vivo in rat tumor bearing urinary bladder. In order to evaluate the contribution of the hypericins in the overall PDT action, and prepare a better photosensitizing extract than PMF, we have separated the extract in four main fractions (1,2,3,4), and tested their PDT effects against the HL-60 leukemic cells. The concentration of hypericins in the extracts was found 0.08% for fraction 1, 0.09% for fraction 2, 0.8% for fraction 3, and 2,8% for fraction 4. The PDT activity observed among the fractions was proportional to their hypericins concentration, thus increasing in the order of increasing number: fraction 4 > fraction 3 > fraction 2 > fraction 1. Fraction 4 proved to be the most powerful fraction. However, despite its relatively high hypericins concentration (2.8%), compared with the total extract PMF (1.37%), fraction 4 proved to be less active in the cell line tested. This result indicates that there are other photosensitizing constituents within the PMF extract which contribute significantly in the overall PDT action, and therefore the extract should be used as it is for further PDT studies, without any further purification.

  1. 5-ALA Fluorescence in Native Pituitary Adenoma Cell Lines: Resection Control and Basis for Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)?

    PubMed Central

    Poeschke, Stephan; Greve, Burkhard; Prevedello, Daniel; Santacroce, Antonio; Stummer, Walter; Senner, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pituitary adenomas (PA), especially invasive ones, are often not completely resectable. Usage of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) for fluorescence guided surgery could improve the rate of total resection and, additionally, open the doors for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in case of unresectable or partially resected PAs. The aim of this study was to investigate the uptake of 5-ALA and the effect of 5-ALA based PDT in cell lines. Methods: GH3 and AtT-20 cell lines were incubated with different concentrations of 5-ALA, protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) fluorescence was measured by flow cytometry and fluorescencespectrometry. WST-1 assays were performed to determine the surviving fraction of cells after PDT. PPIX fluorescence intensities and PDT effect of the pituitary adenoma cells were compared to U373MG, a well-known glioblastoma cell line. Results: Both cell lines showed a 5-ALA dependent intracellular PPIX fluorescence. Significant differences after 24hrs of incubation were observed in AtT-20 cells in comparison to GH3. Regardless of the incubation or metabolism time, there was a proliferation inhibiting effect after PDT, with no statistical significance. Conclusion: Since GH3 cells showed a heterogenous uptake of 5-ALA in the flow cytometry profile, but not constantly high concentrations they might have a 5-ALA efflux mechanism, which still needs to be determined. In the case of AtT-20, the cells might need a longer time for the uptake due to their size or slow metabolism. We showed that the different cell lines have different uptake and metabolism mechanisms, which needs to be further investigated. The general uptake of 5-ALA allows the possibility of resection control and PDT for pituitary adenomas. But, the role of PDT for unresectable pituitary adenomas deserves further investigations. PMID:27583461

  2. Paramagnetic-diamagnetic phase transition accompanied by coordination bond formation-dissociation in the dithiolate complex Na[Ni(pdt)2]·2H2O.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Shinya; Ishihara, Nozomi; Kubo, Kazuya; Katoh, Keiichi; Breedlove, Brian K; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2011-07-18

    Bis(2,3-pyrazinedithiolate)nickel complex Na[Ni(pdt)(2)]·2H(2)O formed one-dimensional stacks of the Ni(pdt)(2) units and showed strong antiferromagnetic interactions along the stacking direction. A first-order phase transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states, which was driven by dimerization of the Ni(pdt)(2) units, accompanied by coordination bond formation, was observed.

  3. Symmetrical diiodinated squaraine as an efficient photosensitizer for PDT applications: Evidence from photodynamic and toxicological aspects.

    PubMed

    Soumya, M S; Shafeekh, K M; Das, Suresh; Abraham, Annie

    2014-10-05

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a promising non-invasive treatment for cancers. It involves three key components; a photosensitizer, light and tissue oxygen. Even though several photosensitizers have been investigated for their use in PDT, they have several disadvantages and hence the search for more effective sensitizers has become important in recent years. The dye selected in our study - symmetrical diiodinated benzothiazolium squaraine (SQDI) - is one of the newly developed photosensitizers. The study aimed to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of the dye on Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) cells and to assess the in vivo toxicity on Swiss Albino mice. The EAC cells were maintained in the peritoneum of mice and used to study the dark toxicity and phototoxicity by Trypan blue dye exclusion method, estimation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), caspase activity and levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The in vitro studies revealed that the dye induces toxicity in the presence of light and mediates cell death. The in vivo part of the study, which dealt with the toxicity evaluation in the body of Swiss Albino mice, was done by analyzing the parameters like serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). No significant change was observed in the above mentioned parameters in the dye administered group when compared to control. Altogether, this experiment indicates that the SQDI selected for our study may be used as an efficient photosensitizer for PDT applications and does not elicit acute toxicity to normal tissues in the absence of light.

  4. Measurement and modelling of protoporphyrin IX photo-oxidation during superficial PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Dominic J.; Stringer, Mark R.; Crum, William R.; Collins, P.

    1996-12-01

    The oxidation of photosensitizers during photodynamic therapy (PDT) has important implications for their therapeutic and diagnostic potential. The reduction in sensitizer concentration during illumination progressively reduces the effectiveness of therapy and, ultimately, limits the destruction of the host tissue. In the course of our studies of the effects of PDT upon superficial skin disorders, following topical application of 5- aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), we routinely record the surface fluorescence emission of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) before, during, and after therapy, in order to monitor the sensitizer photo-oxidation. It is important, therefore, to establish that measurements made in this way are representative of the variation in sensitizer concentration throughout the illuminated volume. We have developed a time- dependent Monte-Carlo model to simulate PpIX photo-oxidation during either low intensity laser (488 nm) or white light irradiation of plaque psoriasis. We have assessed the effect of differences in the optical properties of tissue at sites on different patients prior to treatment, and the effect of these variations on the surface fluorescence signal detected during treatment, at sites within the same plaque. The results show that the PpIX fluorescence intensity recorded from plaque psoriasis is an accurate indicator of the relative concentration of the sensitizer and can be used as a direct comparison between different sites and different patients. Also, the reduction in fluorescence emission during PDT is an effective measure of the depletion in sensitizer concentration throughout the illuminated volume. These results illustrate that the light dose required to achieve significant PpIX photo-oxidation is significantly lower than that often adopted for the treatment of superficial skin conditions.

  5. Imaging a vertical shaft from a tunnel using muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.; Dorsey, D. J.; Schwellenbach, D.; Green, A.; Smalley, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use muon technology to image a vertical shaft from a tunnel. The density of the materials through which cosmic ray muons pass influences the flux of muons because muons are more attenuated by higher density material. Additionally, muons can travel several kilometers allowing measurements through deep rock. Density maps are generated from muon flux measurements to locate subsurface features like tunnel structures and ore bodies. Additionally, muon data can be jointly inverted with other data such as gravity and seismic to produce higher quality earth models than produced from a single method. We collected several weeks of data in a tunnel to image a vertical shaft. The minimum length of rock between the vertical shaft and the detector is 120 meters and the diameter of the vertical shaft is 4.6 meters. The rock the muons traveled through consists of Tertiary age volcanic tuff and steeply dipping, small-displacement faults. Results will be presented for muon flux in the tunnel and Monte-Carlo simulations of this experiment. Simulations from both GEANT4 (Geometry And Tracking version 4) and MCNP6 (Monte-Carlo N-Particle version 6) models will be compared. The tunnel overburden from muon measurements is also estimated and compared with actual the overburden. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Detection of recent holding of firearms: improving the sensitivity of the PDT test.

    PubMed

    Almog, Joseph; Bar-Or, Karni L; Leifer, Amihud; Delbar, Yair; Harush-Brosh, Yinon

    2014-08-01

    Despite the significant improvement of the PDT test for detecting recent contact with firearms, there are still many occasions in which the modified reagent (Ferrotrace™) shows insufficient sensitivity. Two techniques have been devised and tested for the enhancement of the sensitivity of this process: exposure to water vapors and accelerated sweating. Exposure of the hand to water vapors after spraying with the reagent significantly improved the quality of the colored impressions. The average increase was by 1 quality-grade (on an arbitrary scale of 4 grades). The technique is very simple and does not require any particular skill or equipment. Mechanistic aspects of the process are also discussed.

  7. Efficacy of lasers and PDT for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Gold, M H

    Acne vulgaris can represent a therapeutic challenge in terms of managing ongoing symptoms and preventing scar formation. While the copious variations of available treatments address milder forms of the disease, until recently, therapies for resistant or moderate-to-severe forms were limited to systemic agents that were accompanied by potentially severe side-effects. With the addition of lasers, light sources, and aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) therapies, dermatologists may now have viable new alternatives for treating all grades of acne severity that circumvent the negative side-effects associated with many conventional options.

  8. Mechanism of cell destruction and cell protection during methylene-blue-induced PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueck, Angelika C.; Beck, G.; Heckelsmiller, K.; Knoedlsdorfer, U.; Genze, Felicitas; Orth, K.

    1999-02-01

    Methylene Blue (MB+) is a well-known dye in medicine and has been discussed as an easily applicable drug for the topical treatment in photodynamic therapy (PDT). MB+ can potentially be used as a redox indicator to detect the important redox reactions that are induced during PDT. MB+ induced PDT was successful in the intraluminal treatment of inoperable esophageal tumors and in the topical treatment of psoriasis. In order to improve the therapy, the reaction mechanism of MB+ was investigated in vivo by local injection of MB+ in a xenotransplanted subcutaneous tumor (adeno-carcinoma, G-3) in female nude mice. The MB+ preparation 'MB+1%' was applied both undiluted and diluted to 0.1% and 0.01% with isotonic sodium chloride. After an incubation period of 1 h, the tumors were irradiated at 662 nm. Treatment with 1% MB+ and subsequent irradiation with 100 J/cm2 led to complete tumor destruction in 79% of the treated animals. A decrease of the fluence rate from 100 mW/cm2 to 50 mW/cm2 significantly increased the phototoxic response, which was attributed to oxygen depletion but also to nonlinear redox reactions. In addition, fractionated light application with 15 s interruption intervals enhanced the effect. When 0.1% MB+ was used, complete tumor destruction was observed only in 10% of the treated animals. Below a relatively high threshold dose the therapeutic response was not significant. The efficiency of the therapy was correlated with nonlinear dynamics of MB+ on a subcellular level, using laser scanning microscopy. During MB+-PDT nonlinear redox- reactions were induced. This could be deduced from local fast changes of the MB+-fluorescence as well as the pH-value during irradiation of single cells. The light induced reaction of MB+ seems to be correlated with the nonlinear production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As a consequence below a threshold dose the reducing ability of MB+ prevents tissue from oxidative damage. However, above this dose, as a point of no

  9. Trigger electronics upgrade of PHENIX muon tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, S.; Akiyama, T.; Aoki, K.; Asano, H.; Ebesu, S.; Fukao, Y.; Haki, Y.; Hata, M.; Ichikawa, Y.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kim, E.; Kurita, K.; Mibe, T.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakanishi, R.; Ninomiya, K.; Nitta, M.; Ogawa, N.; Onishi, J.; Park, S.; Sada, Y.; Saito, N.; Sameshima, R.; Sasaki, O.; Sato, A.; Seitaibashi, E.; Senzaka, K.; Shoji, K.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Toyoda, T.; Watanabe, K.

    2013-03-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) offers the unique capability to collide polarized protons at high energies. One of the highlights of the polarized proton program performed at √{s}=500 GeV is that it affords the direct measurement of sea quark contribution to the proton spin via W-boson production through the measurement of the parity violating single spin asymmetry. A new trigger electronics system for forward muons, which is especially capable of W-boson detection, was developed for the PHENIX experiment. The trigger was installed as an additional electronic circuit, and it was connected in parallel with the existing cathode readout electronics of the muon tracking chamber.

  10. Muon-catalyzed fusion experiments at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Anderson, A.N.; Van Siclen, C.D.W.; Watts, K.D.; Bradbury, J.N.; Gram, P.A.M.; Leon, M.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.; Jones, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    Our collaboration has conducted a series of muon-catalysis experiments over broad temperature and density ranges at the LAMPF accelerator in Los Alamos. We have discovered surprising effects on the normalized muon-catalysis cycling rate, lambda/sub c/, and the apparent alpha-particle sticking coefficient, ..omega../sub s/, that depend on the d-t mixture density. This paper reviews our experimental approach, analysis methods, and results for tests with targets varying in density from 0.12 to 1.30, normalized to liquid hydrogen density, and in temperature from 15K to 800K. In particular, results will be presented on the cycling rate, sticking coefficient, and /sup 3/He scavenging rate, as functions of temperature, mixture density, or tritium concentration.

  11. PHENIX Muon Tracking Detector Gas System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Pisani, R. P.; Tretiakov, G.; Trofimov, V.

    2007-07-01

    The Muon Tracking Detector Gas System was designed and fabricated to supply Ar+30% CO 2+20% CF 4 mixture to the PHENIX [K. Adcox, S.S. Adler, M. Aizam, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 499 (2003) 669.] [1]. Muon Tracking (MuTr) chambers located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Nation Lab (BNL). The gas system purpose is to provide gas at the requested mixture at a constant controlled pressure and at various flow rates. The system can do this while monitoring the mixture's temperature, pressure, flow rate, and CO 2, oxygen, and moisture content. A custom computer data acquisition system collects and logs the gas system operating parameters. This system can also be alarmed to provide automatic responses to undesired system conditions.

  12. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E.; Becker Tjus, Julia

    2013-12-20

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  13. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Michael; MUSE Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The proton is not an elementary particle but has a substructure governed by the interaction of quarks and gluons. The size of the proton is manifest in the spatial distributions of the electric charge and magnetization, which determine the response to electromagnetic interaction. Recently, contradictory measurements of the proton charge radius between muonic hydrogen and electronic probes have constituted the proton radius puzzle, which has been challenging our basic understanding of the proton. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) in preparation at the Paul-Scherrer Institute (PSI) has the potential to resolve the puzzle by measuring the proton charge radius with electron and muon scattering simultaneously and with high precision, including any possible difference between the two, and with both beam charges. The status of the MUSE experiment will be reported. Supported by NSF and DOE.

  14. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  15. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozza, Luigi; Compass Collaboration

    2012-10-01

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  16. Seasonal modulations of the underground cosmic-ray muon energy

    SciTech Connect

    Malgin, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    The parameters of the seasonal modulations in the intensity of muons and cosmogenic neutrons generated by them at a mean muon energy of 280 GeV have been determined in the LVD (Large Volume Detector) experiment. The modulations of muons and neutrons are caused by a temperature effect, the seasonal temperature and density variations of the upper atmospheric layers. The analysis performed here leads to the conclusion that the variations in the mean energy of the muon flux are the main source of underground cosmogenic neutron variations, because the energy of muons is more sensitive to the temperature effect than their intensity. The parameters of the seasonal modulations in the mean energy of muons and the flux of cosmogenic neutrons at the LVD depth have been determined from the data obtained over seven years of LVD operation.

  17. SSC detector muon sub-system beam tests

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.; Errede, S.; Gauthier, A.; Haney, M.; Karliner, I.; Liss, T.; O`Halloran, T.; Sheldon, P.; Simiatis, V.; Thaler, J.; Wiss, J.; Green, D.; Martin, P.; Morfin, J.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Okusawa, T.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Asano, Y.; Mann, T.; Davisson, R.; Liang, G.; Lubatti, H.; Wilkes, R.; Zhao, T.; Carlsmith, D.

    1993-08-01

    We propose to start a test-beam experiment at Fermilab studying the problems associated with tracking extremely high energy muons through absorbers. We anticipate that in this energy range the observation of the muons will be complicated by associated electromagnetic radiation Monte Carlo simulations of this background need to be tuned by direct observations. These beam tests are essential to determine important design parameters of a SSC muon detector, such as the choice of the tracking, geometry, hardware triggering schemes, the number of measuring stations, the amount of iron between measuring stations, etc. We intend to begin the first phase of this program in November of 1990 utilizing the Tevatron muon beam. We plan to measure the multiplicity, direction, and separation of secondary particles associated with the primary muon track as it emerges from an absorber. The second phase of beam test in 1992 or later will be a full scale test for the final design chosen in our muon subsystem proposal.

  18. Analytical calculation of muon intensities under deep sea-water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inazawa, H.; Kobayakawa, K.

    1985-01-01

    The study of the energy loss of high energy muons through different materials, such as rock and sea-water can cast light on characteristics of lepton interactions. There are less ambiguities for the values of atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) in sea-water than in rock. Muon intensities should be measured as fundamental data and as background data for searching the fluxes of neutrino. The average range energy relation in sea-water is derived. The correction factors due to the range fluctuation is also computed. By applying these results, the intensities deep under sea are converted from a given muon energy spectra at sea-level. The spectra of conventional muons from eta, K decays have sec theta enhancement. The spectrum of prompt muons from charmed particles is almost isotropic. The effect of prompt muons is examined.

  19. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  20. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M.; Hartline, Robert; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas J.; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Barzi, Emanuela; Del Frate, Licia; Gonin, Ivan; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David; Popovic, Milorad; Romanov, Gennady; Turrioni, Daniele; Yarba, Victor; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S. Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2006-03-20

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  1. Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    A new experiment at Fermilab will measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon with a precision of 140 parts per billion (ppb). This measurement is motivated by the results of the Brookhaven E821 experiment that were first released more than a decade ago, which reached a precision of 540 ppb. As the corresponding Standard Model predictions have been refined, the experimental and theoretical values have persistently differed by about 3 standard deviations. If the Brookhaven result is confirmed at Fermilab with this improved precision, it will constitute definitive evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment observes the muon spin precession frequency in flight in a well-calibrated magnetic field; the improvement in precision will require both 20 times as many recorded muon decay events as in E821 and a reduction by a factor of 3 in the systematic uncertainties. This paper describes the current experimental status as well as the plans for the upgraded magnet, detector and storage ring systems that are being prepared for the start of beam data collection in 2017.

  2. Applications of Cosmic Ray Muon Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardincerri, E.; Durham, J. M.; Morris, C. L.; Rowe, C. A.; Poulson, D. C.; Bacon, J. D.; Plaud-Ramos, K.; Morley, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence Cathedral, was built between 1420 and 1436 by architect Filippo Brunelleschi and it is now cracking under its own weight. Engineering efforts are underway to model the dome's structure and reinforce it against further deterioration. According to some scholars, Brunelleschi might have built reinforcement structures into the dome itself; however, the only confirmed known subsurface reinforcement is a chain of iron and stone around the dome's base. Tomography with cosmic ray muons is a non-destructive imaging method that can be used to image the interior of the wall and therefore ascertain the layout and status of any iron substructure in the dome. We will show the results from a muon tomography measurement of iron hidden in a mockup of the dome's wall performed at Los Alamos National Lab in 2015. The sensitivity of this technique, and the status of this project will be also discussed. At last, we will show results on muon attenuation radiography of larger shallow targets.

  3. Next Generation Muon g-2 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, David W.

    2015-12-02

    I report on the progress of two new muon anomalous magnetic moment experiments, which are in advanced design and construction phases. The goal of Fermilab E989 is to reduce the experimental uncertainty of $a_\\mu$ from Brookhaven E821 by a factor of 4; that is, $\\delta a_\\mu \\sim 16 \\times 10^{-11}$, a relative uncertainty of 140~ppb. The method follows the same magic-momentum storage ring concept used at BNL, and pioneered previously at CERN, but muon beam preparation, storage ring internal hardware, field measuring equipment, and detector and electronics systems are all new or upgraded significantly. In contrast, J-PARC E34 will employ a novel approach based on injection of an ultra-cold, low-energy, muon beam injected into a small, but highly uniform magnet. Only a small magnetic focusing field is needed to maintain storage, which distinguishes it from CERN, BNL and Fermilab. E34 aims to roughly match the previous BNL precision in their Phase~1 installation.

  4. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland P. Johnson; Mohammad Alsharo'a; Charles Ankenbrandt; Emanuela Barzi; Kevin Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Licia Del Frate; Ivan Gonin; Pierrick M. Hanlet; Robert Hartline; Daniel M. Kaplan; Moyses Kuchnir; Alfred Moretti; David Neuffer; Kevin Paul; Milorad Popovic; Thomas J. Roberts; Gennady Romanov; Daniele Turrioni; Victor Yarba; and Katsuya Yonehara

    2006-03-01

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  5. Targeted two-photon PDT photo-sensitizers for the treatment of subcutaneous tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, C. W.; Rebane, A.; Starkey, J.; Drobizhev, M.

    2009-06-01

    New porphyrin-based photo-sensitizers have been designed, synthesized and characterized that exhibit greatly enhanced intrinsic two-photon absorption. These new photo-sensitizers have been incorporated into triad formulations that also incorporate Near-infrared (NIR) imaging agents, and small-molecule targeting agents that direct the triads to cancerous tumors' over-expressed receptor sites. PDT can be initiated deep into the tissue transparency window at 780-800 nm utilizing a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser using 100-150 fs pulses of 600-800 mW. Human tumor xenografts of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and both small SCLC (NCI-H69) and NSCLC (A-459) have been successfully treated using octreotate targeting of over-expressed SST2 receptors. In particular, the lung cancer xenografts can be successfully treated by irradiating from the side of the mouse opposite the implanted tumor, thereby passing through ca. 2 cm of mouse skin, tissue and organs with no discernible damage to healthy tissue while causing regression in the tumors. These results suggest a new PDT paradigm for the noninvasive treatment of subcutaneous tumors, including the possibility that the targeting moiety could be matched to individual patient genetic profiles (patient-specific therapeutics).

  6. Modulation of PDT-induced apoptosis by protein kinases and phosphatases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Chang, Chi K.; Kessel, David

    1996-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy of neoplastic cell lines can lead to the rapid initiation of apoptosis, a mode of cell death that results in a characteristic pattern of cellular and DNA fragmentation. In this study, we examine the effects of protein tyrosine- and serine/threonine phosphatases and kinases on the fragmentation of DNA to 50 kb and photodynamic effects of lysosomal and mitochondrial photosensitizers on murine leukemia P388 cells. The data are consistent with the proposal that maintenance of phosphorylated tyrosine residues is essential for the PDT- induced processing of 50 kb DNA to nucleosomes, while maintenance of serine phosphorylation inhibits such processing. Factors involved in chromatin fragmentation to 50 kb particles have yet to be elucidated. Several agents which mediate membrane photodamage mimic the effect of protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors, i.e., they inhibit further processing of the 50 kb DNA formed as a consequence of lysosomal or mitochondrial photodamage. These results indicate that even the rapid initiation of apoptosis by PDT is modulated by phosphatase and kinase activities.

  7. Determination of tissue optical properties in PDT treated Head & Neck patients

    PubMed Central

    Dimofte, Andreea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Sharikova, Anna V.; Cengel, Keith A.; Ahn, Peter; Busch, Theresa M.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Determination of optical properties (absorption (μa) and scattering (μs′) coefficients) in human tissue is important when it comes to accurate calculation of fluence rate in and around tissue area. ALA application to the tissue induces production of protoporphyrin IX when activated by red light. Changes in the tissue optical properties can send information such as treatment outcome and tissue drug concentration. Patients in this study were treated with PDT for head and neck mucosal dysplasia. They were enrolled in a phase I study of escalating light doses and oral ALA with 60mg/kg. Red light at 630nm was administered to the tumor from a laser. The light dose was escalated from 50–200J/cm2 with a measured fluence rate at tissue surface of 100mW/cm2. We developed a light detection device for the purpose of determining optical properties in vivo using the semi-infinite method. The light detection device consists of two parallel, placed 5mm apart. In one of the catheters a 2 mm long linear diffusing light source is placed while in the second catheter, a calibrated isotropic detector is placed. The detector is scanned along the length of the light source containing catheter. Scans are done with the device placed on the treatment area (tumor) and on the normal tissue. Optical properties were measured in-vivo before and after PDT delivery for both normal tissue and tumor. PMID:25999648

  8. Comparative analysis of different phthalocyanine photosensitizers for experimental PDT of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galpern, Maria G.; Novozhilova, Irina; Sokolova, Galina; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Kozlov, Dmitrij N.; Sokolov, Victor V.; Sukhin, Garry M.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary biological screening has resulted in data about the considerable difference in photodynamic activity of sulfuric acids of aluminum phthalocyanine and their different salts have been obtained. The photosensitizers have been introduced intravenously in laboratory male mice 24 hours before direct laser irradiation of the liver area through the front abdominal side. Seven-day Erlich carcinomas with a diameter of 0.5 cm transplanted hypodermically to the mice have been used as an experimental tumor model. Obtained data of preliminary biological screening on photodynamic activity and tumor selectivity of different photosensitizers has been confirmed by direct experiments on the PDT experimental tumor in mice with the use of a laser system on the basis of yttrium aluminate with the wavelength 670 nm. Preparations have been introduced as a solution 2 mg/ml intravenous with a dose 10 mg/kg 48 hours before irradiation with the laser. Irradiation dose was 90 J with a spot diameter of 1 cm. Efficiency of anti-tumor PDT has been estimated by sight and with morphological study of the material.

  9. Jet production in muon scattering at Fermilab E665

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates from Muon-Nucleon and Muon-Nuclei scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates are defined by the JADE clustering algorithm. Rates in Muon-Nucleon deep-inelastic scattering are compared to Monte Carlo model predictions. Preliminary results from jet production on heavy targets, in the shadowing region, show a higher suppression of two-forward jets as compared to one-forward jet production.

  10. Muon Cooling R&D Progress in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Derun

    2008-02-01

    Muon ionization cooling R&D is important for a neutrino factory and future muon collider. In addition to theoretical studies, much progress has been made in muon cooling channel hardware R&D since NuFact-2006. This paper reports the progress on hardware R&D that includes experimental RF test programs using 805-MHz RF cavity, superconducting (SC) solenoids (coupling coils), 201-MHz RF cavity, liquid hydrogen absorber and MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) experiment preparation for beam tests.

  11. Aligning the CMS muon chambers with the muon alignment system during an extended cosmic ray run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CMS Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The alignment system for the muon spectrometer of the CMS detector comprises three independent subsystems of optical and analog position sensors. It aligns muon chambers with respect to each other and to the central silicon tracker. System commissioning at full magnetic field began in 2008 during an extended cosmic ray run. The system succeeded in tracking muon detector movements of up to 18 mm and rotations of several milliradians under magnetic forces. Depending on coordinate and subsystem, the system achieved chamber alignment precisions of 140-350 μm and 30-200 μrad, close to the precision requirements of the experiment. Systematic errors on absolute positions are estimated to be 340-590 μm based on comparisons with independent photogrammetry measurements.

  12. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  13. Muon SR Newsletter, No. 29, April 5, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, K.M.; Portis, A.M.; Yamazaki, T.

    1984-04-05

    Muon SR stands for Muon Spin Relaxation, Rotation, Resonance, Research, or what have you. The intention of the mnemonic acronym is to draw attention to the analogy with NMR and ESR, the range of whose applications is well known. Any study of the interactions of the muon spin by virtue of the asymmetric decay is considered ..mu..SR, but this definition is not intended to exclude any peripherally related phenomena, especially if relevant to the use of the muon's mganetic moment as a delicate probe of matter. Abstracts of individual items from this issue were prepared separately for the data base.

  14. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  15. Muons probe strong hydrogen interactions with defective graphene.

    PubMed

    Riccò, Mauro; Pontiroli, Daniele; Mazzani, Marcello; Choucair, Mohammad; Stride, John A; Yazyev, Oleg V

    2011-11-09

    Here, we present the first muon spectroscopy investigation of graphene, focused on chemically produced, gram-scale samples, appropriate to the large muon penetration depth. We have observed an evident muon spin precession, usually the fingerprint of magnetic order, but here demonstrated to originate from muon-hydrogen nuclear dipolar interactions. This is attributed to the formation of CHMu (analogous to CH(2)) groups, stable up to 1250 K where the signal still persists. The relatively large signal amplitude demonstrates an extraordinary hydrogen capture cross section of CH units. These results also rule out the formation of ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic order in chemically synthesized graphene samples.

  16. Investigation into the feasibility of a soft muon experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tincknell, M.L.

    1990-06-01

    Issues relevant in a soft ({lt} 5 GeV) muon pair experiment at the AGS or the RHIC central region are investigated. Observation of direct muon pairs is difficult because the muon pair to pion ratio is {omicron} (10{sup {minus}4}). Absorber penetration is the only means available to identify high energy muons among a large number of hadrons. Three important sources of background are sail-through hadrons that fail to interact in the absorber, the decays of pions and kaons to muons in the absorber, and leakage of hadronic shower products through the absorber. An absorber thick enough to limit the ratio of combinatorical background pairs to pions to {omicron} (10{sup {minus}4}) imposes a significant muon kinetic energy threshold due to muon range in the absorber. Absorbers with low atomic number Z are preferred to keep this threshold low, and to avoid loss of invariant mass resolution due to energy loss straggling and multiple coulomb scattering. Long-lived meson to muon decays can be directly suppressed only by picking an absorber with short interaction length, which implies a high density, high Z material. With sufficiently high statistics, a subtraction of the spectra of like-sign pairs from the spectrum of opposite-sign pairs should recover the direct muon pair spectrum. 9 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Cosmic muon flux measurements at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousis, L. N.; Guarnaccia, E.; Link, J. M.; Mariani, C.; Pelkey, R.

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the results from a series of muon flux measurements conducted at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF), Virginia, United States, are presented. The detector employed for these investigations, is made of plastic scintillator bars readout by wavelength shifting fibers and multianode photomultiplier tubes. Data was taken at several locations inside KURF, spanning rock overburden values from ~ 200 to 1450 m.w.e. From the extracted muon rates an empirical formula was devised, that estimates the muon flux inside the mine as a function of the overburden. The results are in good agreement with muon flux calculations based on analytical models and MUSIC.

  18. Imaging a nuclear reactor using cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, John; Azzouz, Mara; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Chen, Elliott; Fabritius, Joseph II; Milner, Edward; Miyadera, Haruo; Morris, Christopher; Roybal, Jonathan; Wang, Zhehui; Busch, Bob; Carpenter, Ken; Hecht, Adam A.; Masuda, Koji; Spore, Candace; Toleman, Nathan; Aberle, Derek; Lukic, Zarija

    2013-05-14

    The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei. The muon interaction with electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The muon interaction with nuclei leads to angular diffusion. We present experimental images of a nuclear reactor, the AGN-201M reactor at the University of New Mexico, using data measured with a particle tracker built from a set of sealed drift tubes. The data are compared with a geant4 model. In both the data and simulation, we identify specific regions corresponding to elements of the reactor structure, including its core, moderator, and shield.

  19. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOEpatents

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  20. Muons probe magnetism and hydrogen interaction in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccò, M.; Aramini, M.; Mazzani, M.; Pontiroli, D.; Gaboardi, M.; Yazyev, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    Muon spin resonance (μSR) is a powerful technique for investigating the local magnetic fields in materials through implanted muons. Here we report a μSR study of chemically produced thermally exfoliated graphene. Our results provide an experimental answer to the many theoretical investigations of magnetic properties of graphene. The observed muon spin precession is attributed to a localized muon-hydrogen nuclear dipolar interaction rather than to a hyperfine interaction with magnetic electrons. This proves the absence of magnetism in chemically produced thermally exfoliated graphene.

  1. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons and muon-induced neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, S. C.; Chan, Y. L.; Chen, X. C.; Chu, M. C.; Cui, K. X.; Hahn, R. L.; Ho, T. H.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lau, Y. P.; Leung, J. K. C.; Leung, K. Y.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, Y. C.; Luk, K. B.; Luk, W. H.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngan, S. Y.; Pun, C. S. J.; Shih, K.; Tam, Y. H.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wang, C. H.; Wong, C. M.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, K. K.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, B. J.; Aberdeen Tunnel Experiment Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We have measured the muon flux and production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 m water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons and 760 L of a gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for producing and detecting neutrons. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be Iμ=(5.7 ±0.6 )×10-6 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 . The yield of muon-induced neutrons in the liquid scintillator was determined to be Yn=(1.19 ±0.08 (stat)±0.21 (syst))×10-4 neutrons /(μ .g .cm-2 ) . A fit to the recently measured neutron yields at different depths gave a mean muon energy dependence of ⟨Eμ⟩ 0.76 ±0.03 for liquid-scintillator targets.

  2. Measurement of cosmic-ray muons and muon-induced neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Yeh, M.; Chan, Y. L.; Chen, X. C.; ...

    2016-04-07

    In this study, we have measured the muon flux and production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 m water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons and 760 L of a gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for producing and detecting neutrons. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be Iμ = (5.7±0.6)×10–6 cm–2 s–1 sr–1. The yield of muon-induced neutrons in the liquid scintillator was determined to be Yn = (1.19 ± 0.08(stat) ± 0.21(syst)) × 10–4 neutrons/(μ•g•cm–2). A fit to the recently measured neutron yields at different depthsmore » gave a mean muon energy dependence of < Eμ >0.76±0.03 for liquid-scintillator targets.« less

  3. Studies on Muon Induction Acceleration and an Objective Lens Design for Transmission Muon Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artikova, Sayyora; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Naito, Fujio

    Muon acceleration will be accomplished by a set of induction cells, where each increases the energy of the muon beam by an increment of up to 30 kV. The cells are arranged in a linear way resulting in total accelerating voltage of 300 kV. Acceleration time in the linac is about hundred nanoseconds. Induction field calculation is based on an electrostatic approximation. Beam dynamics in the induction accelerator is investigated and final beam focusing on specimen is realized by designing a pole piece lens.

  4. Children and guns: The detection of recent contact with firearms on children's hands by the PDT reagent.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Karni L; Almog, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Throughout the world, young children are worryingly found to be involved in both unintentional and intentional gun violence, rendering the forensic investigation of gun handling by children a highly important matter. The effectiveness of the PDT reaction for mapping iron traces on hands of children has been tested and compared to its application on adults. Counter-intuitively, children were found to produce considerably more intense PDT impressions than adults. A plausible explanation which is based on physiological differences between children and adolescents is suggested.

  5. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  6. Highly Charged Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes as Lysosome-Localized Photosensitizers for Two-Photon Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Yu, Bole; Zhang, Pingyu; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Gasser, Gilles; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-11-16

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive medical technique that has received increasing attention over the last years and been applied for the treatment of certain types of cancer. However, the currently clinically used PDT agents have several limitations, such as low water solubility, poor photostability, and limited selectivity towards cancer cells, aside from having very low two-photon cross-sections around 800 nm, which limits their potential use in TP-PDT. To tackle these drawbacks, three highly positively charged ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes were synthesized. These complexes selectively localize in the lysosomes, an ideal localization for PDT purposes. One of these complexes showed an impressive phototoxicity index upon irradiation at 800 nm in 3D HeLa multicellular tumor spheroids and thus holds great promise for applications in two-photon photodynamic therapy.

  7. Muon to electron conversion: how to find an electron in a muon haystack

    SciTech Connect

    Kurup, A.

    2010-07-05

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics describes how the Universe works at a fundamental level. Even though this theory has proven to be very successful over the past 50 years, we know it is incomplete. Many theories that go beyond the SM predict the occurrence of certain processes that are forbidden by the SM, such as muon to electron conversion. This paper will briefly review the history of muon to electron conversion and focus on the high-precision experiments currently being proposed, COMET (Coherent Muon to Electron Transition) and Mu2e, and a next-generation experiment, PRISM. The PRISM experiment intends to use a novel type of accelerator called a fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) accelerator. There has recently been renewed interest in FFAGs for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider, and because they have applications in many areas outside of particle physics, such as energy production and cancer therapy. The synergies between these particle physics experiments and other applications will also be discussed.

  8. The Muon Portal Project: Design and construction of a scanning portal based on muon tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuccio, V.; Bandieramonte, M.; Becciani, U.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bonanno, G.; Bongiovanni, D.; Fallica, P. G.; Garozzo, S.; Grillo, A.; La Rocca, P.; Leonora, E.; Longhitano, F.; Lo Presti, D.; Marano, D.; Parasole, O.; Pugliatti, C.; Randazzo, N.; Riggi, F.; Riggi, S.; Romeo, G.; Romeo, M.; Russo, G. V.; Santagati, G.; Timpanaro, M. C.; Valvo, G.

    2017-02-01

    Cosmic ray tomography is a technique which exploits the multiple Coulomb scattering of highly penetrating cosmic ray-produced muons to perform non-destructive inspection of high-Z materials without the use of artificial radiation. A muon tomography detection system can be used as a portal monitor at border crossing points for detecting illegal targeted objects. The Muon Portal Project is a joint initiative between Italian research and industrial partners, aimed at the construction of a real size detector prototype (6×3×7 m3) for the inspection of cargo containers by the muon scattering technique. The detector consists of four XY tracking planes, two placed above and two below the container to be inspected. After a research and development phase, which led to the choice and test of the individual components, the construction and installation of the detection modules is almost completed. In this paper the present status of the Project is reported, focusing on the design and construction phase, as well as on the preliminary results obtained with the first detection planes.

  9. Muon to electron conversion: how to find an electron in a muon haystack.

    PubMed

    Kurup, A

    2010-08-13

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics describes how the Universe works at a fundamental level. Even though this theory has proven to be very successful over the past 50 years, we know it is incomplete. Many theories that go beyond the SM predict the occurrence of certain processes that are forbidden by the SM, such as muon to electron conversion. This paper will briefly review the history of muon to electron conversion and focus on the high-precision experiments currently being proposed, COMET (Coherent Muon to Electron Transition) and Mu2e, and a next-generation experiment, PRISM. The PRISM experiment intends to use a novel type of accelerator called a fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) accelerator. There has recently been renewed interest in FFAGs for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider, and because they have applications in many areas outside of particle physics, such as energy production and cancer therapy. The synergies between these particle physics experiments and other applications will also be discussed.

  10. Chromaticity correction for a muon collider optics

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Muon Collider (MC) is a promising candidate for the next energy frontier machine. However, in order to obtain peak luminosity in the 10{sup 34} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} range the collider lattice designmust satisfy a number of stringent requirements. In particular the expected large momentum spread of the muon beam and the very small {beta}* call for a careful correction of the chromatic effects. Here we present a particular solution for the interaction region (IR) optics whose distinctive feature is a three-sextupole local chromatic correction scheme. The scheme may be applied to other future machines where chromatic effects are expected to be large. The expected large muon energy spread requires the optics to be stable over a wide range of momenta whereas the required luminosity calls for {beta}* in the mm range. To avoid luminosity degradation due to hour-glass effect, the bunch length must be comparatively small. To keep the needed RF voltage within feasible limits the momentum compaction factor must be small over the wide range of momenta. A low {beta}* means high sensitivity to alignment and field errors of the Interaction Region (IR) quadrupoles and large chromatic effects which limit the momentum range of optics stability and require strong correction sextupoles, which eventually limit the Dynamic Aperture (DA). Finally, the ring circumference should be as small as possible, luminosity being inversely proportional to the collider length. A promising solution for a 1.5 TeV center of mass energy MC with {beta}* = 1 m in both planes has been proposed. This {beta}* value has been chosen as a compromise between luminosity and feasibility based on the magnet design and energy deposition considerations. The proposed solution for the IR optics together with a new flexible momentum compaction arc cell design allows to satisfy all requirements and is relatively insensitive to the beam-beam effect.

  11. Densitometric tomography using the measurement of muon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, F.; Busto, J.; Brunner, J.; Salin, P.; Gaffet, S.

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g. seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The present work develops a recent method to investigate the in situ density of rocks using atmospheric the muon flux measurement , its attenuation depending on the rock density and thickness. This new geophysical technique have been mainly applied in volcanology (Lesparre N., 2011) using scintillator detectors. The present project (T2DM2) aims to realize underground muons flux measurements in order to characterizing the rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measure with a new Muon telescope instrumentation using Micromegas detectors in Time Projection Chambers (TPC) configuration. The first step of the work presented considers the muon flux simulation using the Gaisser model, for the interactions between muons and atmospheric particles, and the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the muons/rock interactions. The results show that the muon flux attenuation caused by density variations are enough significant to be observed until around 500 m depth and for period of time in the order of one month. Such a duration scale and depth of investigation is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes involved within the Karst unsaturated zone where LSBB is located. Our work now concentrates on the optimization of the spatial distribution of detectors that will be deployed in future.

  12. Silicon meets cyclotron: muon spin resonance of organosilicon radicals.

    PubMed

    West, Robert; Samedov, Kerim; Percival, Paul W

    2014-07-21

    Muons, generated at a high-powered cyclotron, can capture electrons to form muonium atoms. Muon spin resonance spectra can be recorded for organosilyl radicals obtained by addition of muonium atoms to silylenes and silenes. We present a brief summary of progress in this new area since the first such experiments were reported in 2008.

  13. Radiative muon capture in hydrogen and nucleon excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Beder, D. S.; Fearing, H. W.

    1989-06-01

    We extend our previous calculations of radiative muon capture on a nucleonand present detailed calculations of the role of the ..delta..(1232) using animproved ..delta..-nucleon-..gamma.. vertex and for a variety of values of theinduced pseudoscalar coupling /ital g//sub /ital P//. We also present calculations ofthe photon-muon spin asymmetry and examine effects of the ..delta..(1232)there.

  14. Alignment of the Muon System at the CMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ryan; Perniè, Luca; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Kamon, Teruki; Safonov, Alexei; Brown, Malachi

    2017-01-01

    The muon detectors of the CMS experiment provide fast trigger decisions, muon identifications and muon track measurements. Alignment of the muon detectors is crucial for accurate reconstruction of events with high pT muons that are present in signatures for many new physics scenarios. The muon detector's relative positions and orientations with respect to the inner silicon tracker may be precisely measured using reconstructed tracks propagating from the interaction point. This track-based alignment procedure is capable of aligning individual muon detectors to within 100 microns along sensitive modes. However, weak (insensitive) modes may not be well measured due to the system's design and cause systematic miss-measurements. In this report, we present a new track-based procedure which enables all 6 alignment parameters - 3 positions and 3 rotations for each individual muon detector. The improved algorithm allows for measurement of weak modes and considerably reduced related systematic uncertainties. We describe results of the alignment procedure obtained with 2016 data.

  15. Participation in Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, Yagmur

    2013-03-20

    Muon accelerators hold great promise for the future of high energy physics and their construction can be staged to support a broad physics program. Great progress was made over the past decade toward developing the technology for muon beam cooling which is one of the main challenges for building such facilities.

  16. Helical Channel Design and Technology for Cooling of Muon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonehara, K.; Derbenev, Y. S.; Johnson, R. P.

    2010-11-01

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  17. Muon tomography of rock density using Micromegas-TPC telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivert, Fanny; Busto, José; Gaffet, Stéphane; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Brunner, Jurgen; Salin, Pierre; Decitre, Jean-Baptiste; Lázaro Roche, Ignacio; Martin, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge of the subsurface properties is essentially obtained by geophysical methods, e.g., seismic imaging, electric prospection or gravimetry. The current work is based on a recently developed method to investigate in situ the density of rocks using a measurement of the muon flux, whose attenuation depends on the quantity of matter the particles travel through and hence on the rock density and thickness. The present project (T2DM2) aims at performing underground muon flux measurements in order to characterize spatial and temporal rock massif density variations above the LSBB underground research facility in Rustrel (France). The muon flux will be measured with a new muon telescope device using Micromegas-Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detectors. The first step of the work presented covers the muon flux simulation based on the Gaisser model (Gaisser T., 1990), for the muon flux at the ground level, and on the MUSIC code (Kudryavtsev V. A., 2008) for the propagation of muons through the rock. The results show that the muon flux distortion caused by density variations is enough significant to be observed at 500 m depth for measurement times of about one month. This time-scale is compatible with the duration of the water transfer processes within the unsaturated Karst zone where LSBB is located. The work now focuses on the optimization of the detector layout along the LSBB galleries in order to achieve the best sensitivity.

  18. Characteristics of neutrons produced by muons in a standard rock

    SciTech Connect

    Malgin, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Characteristics of cosmogenic neutrons, such as the yield, production rate, and flux, were determined for a standard rock. The dependences of these quantities on the standard-rock depth and on the average muon energy were obtained. These properties and dependences make it possible to estimate easy the muon-induced neutron background in underground laboratories for various chemical compositions of rock.

  19. Determination of the low concentration correction in the macroscopic singlet oxygen model for PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    The macroscopic singlet oxygen model has been used for singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The photophysical parameters for commonly used sensitizers, HPPH and BPD, have been investigated in pre-clinical studies using mouse models. So far, studies have involved optimizing fitting algorithms to obtain the some of the photophysical parameters (ξ, σ, g) and the threshold singlet oxygen dose ([1O2]rx,sh), while other parameters such as the low concentration correction, δ, has been kept as a constant. In this study, using photobleaching measurements of mice in vivo, the value of δ was also optimized and fit to better describe experimental data. Furthermore, the value of the specific photobleaching ratio (σ) was also fine-tuned using the photobleaching results. Based on literature values of δ, σ for photosensitizers can be uniquely determined using the additional photobleaching measurements. This routine will further improve the macroscopic model of singlet oxygen production for use in explicit dosimetry.

  20. Effective treatment of d-penicillamine induced elastosis perforans serpiginosa with ALA-PDT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duoqin; Liang, Jun; Xu, Jinhua; Chen, Lianjun

    2015-03-01

    A case of D-penicillamine(DPA) induced elastosis perforans serpiginosa(EPS) in a 32-year-old Chinese man was reported. The presentation lasted two years and was refractory to traditional medical treatment. He was then commenced on 7.6% 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced photodynamic therapy(PDT) by a LED light of 633 nm at dose levels of 130J/ cm2 for each session with total 3 sessions at one week interval. The patient was tolerated and responded well to this new approach for DPA-induced EPS without any adverse events. The etiology, pathophysiology, natural history, and treatment options for DPA-induced EPS are reviewed, and the authors suggest this method of treatment to be effective and safe for patients of DPA-induced EPS refractory to conventional therapy.

  1. The role of sensitivity of ALA (PpIX)-based PDT on Human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Atif, M.; Rehman, T.; Sadia, H.; Firdous, S.

    2011-08-01

    Present study evaluates the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) with aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) as photo sensitizer using Human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cell line as an experimental model. Porphyrins derivatives are used as active cytotoxic antitumor agents in PDT. Above mentioned cell line were irradiated with red light (a diode laser, λ = 635 nm) at different doses (0-160 J/cm2) of light. The influence/effectiveness of incubation time, various concentrations of aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and light doses on the cellular viability was studied. HEK293T cells were deliberated by exposing the ALA-PpIX (0-1000 μg/ml) of concentrations. The optimal uptakes of photosensitizer (PS) in cell lines were investigated by means of spectro photo metric measurements. Cells viability was determined by means of neutral red assay (NRA). It was observed that alone, neither photosensitizer nor light dose have significant effect on cells viability, but optimal concentration of PS along with suitable dose of light exhibit effective impact on the viability of cell. Our results showed that light doses of 40 J/cm2 demonstrates effective PDT outcome for HEK293T cell line when incubated with 400 μg/ml, with wrapping up view that HEK293T cell line is very sensitive to ALA-mediated PDT as compared to cell line published in our data. At the end results has been verified by using reactive oxygen species (ROS) measure test.

  2. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodiagnosis (PD) using endogenous photosensitization induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA): current clinical and development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Stuart L.; Sobel, Russel S.; Golub, Allyn L.; Carroll, Ronald L.; Lundahl, Scott L.; Shulman, D. Geoffrey

    1996-04-01

    Exogenous provision of ALA to many tissues results in the accumulation of sufficient quantities of the endogenous photosensitizer protoporphyrin IX, (PpIX), to produce a photodynamic effect. Therefore, ALA may be considered the only current PDT agent in clinical development which is a biochemical precursor of a photosensitizer. Topical ALA application, followed by exposure to activating light (ALA PDT), has been reported effective for the treatment of a variety of dermatologic diseases including cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, superficial basal cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and actinic (solar) keratoses, and is also being examined for treatment of acne and hirsutism. PpIX induced by ALA application also may serve as a fluorescence detection marker for photodiagnosis (PD) of malignant and pre- malignant conditions of the urinary bladder and other organs. Local internal application of ALA has also been used for selective endometrial ablation in animal model systems and is beginning to be examined in human clinical studies. Systemic, oral administration of ALA has been used for ALA PDT of superficial head and neck cancer, various gastrointestinal cancers, and the condition known as Barrett's esophagus. This brief paper reviews the current clinical and development status of ALA PDT.

  3. Self-assembled IR780-loaded transferrin nanoparticles as an imaging, targeting and PDT/PTT agent for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kaikai; Zhang, Yifan; Wang, Juan; Yuan, Ahu; Sun, Minjie; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    Combination of photothermal and photodynamic therapy (PTT/PDT) offer unique advantages over PDT alone. However, to achieve synergetic PDT/PTT effect, one generally needs two lasers with different wavelengths. Near-infrared dye IR-780 could be used as photosensitizer both for PTT and PDT, but its lipophilicity limits its practical use and in vivo efficiency. Herein, a simple multifunctional IR780-loaded nanoplatform based on transferrin was developed for targeted imaging and phototherapy of cancer compatible with a single-NIR-laser irradiation. The self-assembled transferrin-IR780 nanoparticles (Tf-IR780 NPs) exhibited narrow size distribution, good photo-stability, and encouraging photothermal performance with enhanced generation of ROS under laser irradiation. Following intravenous injection, Tf-IR780 NPs had a high tumor-to-background ratio in CT26 tumor-bearing mice. Treatment with Tf-IR780 NPs resulted in significant tumor suppression. Overall, the Tf-IR780 NPs show notable targeting and theranostic potential in cancer therapy. PMID:27263444

  4. A prospective study of visual function and quality of life following PDT in patients with wet age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Armbrecht, A M; Aspinall, P A; Dhillon, B

    2004-01-01

    Aims: (1) A prospective study to assess visual function measures and quality of life (QoL) in patients with wet age related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT). (2) To assess if PDT prevents severe visual loss (loss of six or more lines of distance visual acuity) in the treated eye. Methods: 48 of 51 recruited patients with predominantly classic subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) secondary AMD who were treated with PDT were followed up for 1 year. Assessment included distance and near visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, vision related quality of life and fluorescein angiography. Photodynamic therapy using Visudyne was carried out according to standard protocol. Patients were followed up every 3 months and treatment repeated if there was significant leakage from CNV. Results: At the 12 month follow up, 71% (n = 34) of the patients lost less than three lines of best corrected distance visual acuity. Although there were significant decreases in some of the QoL items tested, patients were significantly less anxious and more independent outdoors at the 12 month follow up. Conclusion: This study is in keeping with published literature with PDT preventing severe visual loss in two thirds of treated patients with predominantly classic CNV. PMID:15377549

  5. The involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced death of crayfish glial and nerve cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnaya, E. V.; Neginskaya, M. A.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for selective destruction of cells, in particular, for treatment of brain tumors. However, photodynamic treatment damages not only tumor cells, but also healthy neurons and glial cells. To study the possible role of NF-κB in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells, we investigated the combined effect of photodynamic treatment and NF-κB modulators: activator betulinic acid, or inhibitors parthenolide and CAPE on an isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. A laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used as a light source. The inhibition of NF-κB during PDT increased the duration of neuron firing and glial necrosis and decreased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis. The activation of NF-κB during PDT increased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis and decreased glial necrosis. The difference between the effects of NF-κB modulators on photosensitized neurons and glial cells indicates the difference in NF-κB-mediated signaling pathways in these cell types. Thus, NF-κB is involved in PDT-induced shortening of neuron firing, neuronal and glial necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells.

  6. Muon-induced spallation backgrounds in DUNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanying; Li, Shirley; Beacom, John

    2017-01-01

    Galactic supernovae are rare, just a few per century, so it is important to be prepared. If we are, then the long-baseline detector DUNE could detect thousands of events, compared to the tens from SN 1987A. An important question is backgrounds from muon-induced spallation reactions. We simulate particle energy-loss processes in liquid argon, and compare relevant isotope yields with those in the water-Cherenkov detector SuperK. Our approach will help optimize the design of DUNE and further benefit the study of supernova neutrinos. GZ, SWL, and JFB are supported by NSF Grant PHY-1404311.

  7. Atmospheric effects on the underground muon intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenton, A. G.; Fenton, K. B.; Humble, J. E.; Hyland, G. B.

    1985-01-01

    It has previously been reported that the barometric pressure coefficient observed for muons at Poatina (vertical absorber depth 357 hg/sq cm) appears to be appreciably higher than would be expected from atmospheric absorption alone. There is a possibility that the effect is due to an upper atmospheric temperature effect arising from an inverse correlation of surface pressure with stratospheric temperature. A new proportional telescope is discussed which has been operating at Poatina since about the beginning of 83 and which has a long term stability suitable for studying variations of atmospheric origin.

  8. The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapelain, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    The upcoming Fermilab E989 experiment will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment aμ. This measurement is motivated by the previous measurement performed in 2001 by the BNL E821 experiment that reported a 3-4 standard deviation discrepancy between the measured value and the Standard Model prediction. The new measurement at Fermilab aims to improve the precision by a factor of four reducing the total uncertainty from 540 parts per billion (BNL E821) to 140 parts per billion (Fermilab E989). This paper gives the status of the experiment.

  9. (Studies of high energy phenomena using muons)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the NIU high energy physics group as supported by DOE contract FG02-91ER40641 during the period from March 1991 to December 1991. Our group has three main efforts. The first is the D0 experiment at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider, with major emphasis on its muon system. The second is the involvement of a portion of the group in Fermilab Experiment 789. Finally, we are also members of the SDC collaboration at the SSC.

  10. Stochastic processes in muon ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errede, D.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Johnstone, C. J.; Van Ginneken, A.

    2004-02-01

    A muon ionization cooling channel consists of three major components: the magnet optics, an acceleration cavity, and an energy absorber. The absorber of liquid hydrogen contained by thin aluminum windows is the only component which introduces stochastic processes into the otherwise deterministic acceleration system. The scattering dynamics of the transverse coordinates is described by Gaussian distributions. The asymmetric energy loss function is represented by the Vavilov distribution characterized by the minimum number of collisions necessary for a particle undergoing loss of the energy distribution average resulting from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Examples of the interplay between stochastic processes and deterministic beam dynamics are given.

  11. Leptomeson contribution to the muon g -2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuridov, Dmitry

    2016-02-01

    Many models on the market allow for particles carrying both lepton number and color, e.g., leptoquarks and leptogluons. Some of the models with this feature can also accommodate color-singlet leptohadrons. We have found that the long-standing discrepancy between the experimental result and the Standard Model prediction for the muon anomalous magnetic moment can be explained by the effect of leptomesons with masses of a few hundred GeV and couplings to the leptons and mesons either of O (1 0-2) (vector-meson case) or of O (1 ) (scalar case). These new particles are testable at the current run of the LHC.

  12. Can galileons solve the muon problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamm, Henry

    2015-09-01

    The leptonic bound states positronium and muonium are used to constrain Galileon contributions to the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen. Through the application of a variety of bounds on lepton compositeness, it is shown that either the assumption of equating the charge radius of a particle with its Galileon scale radius is incompatible with experiments, or the scale of Galileons must be M >1.33 GeV , too large to solve the muon problem. The possibility of stronger constraints in the future from true muonium is discussed.

  13. Photophysical and photochemical properties of Bauhinia megalandra (Caesalpinaceae) extracts as new PDT photosensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Tovar, Franklin R.; Rivas, C.; Estrada, O.; Marcano O., Aristides A.; Echevarria, Lorenzo; Diaz, Yrene; Alexander, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Padron, L.; Rivera, I. R.

    2004-10-01

    Recently new photosensitizers, chlorophyll "a and b" derivatives, for photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been presented. It already passed complete pre-clinical investigations. This prompted us to carry out an extensive study of photophysical properties of chlorine derivatives, important both for optimization of their clinic applications and for study of mechanisms of chlorine PDT&. The fresh leaves of Bauhinia megalandra (Caesalpinaceae) were extracted with methanol by percolation, and re-extract with a mixture of methanol-water (1:1), the insoluble fraction was then separated by column chromatography [RP18/hexane-ethylacetate (9:1)] to obtain four fractions named 1 to 4. These compounds were identified by NMR data. We found that 3 and 4 efficiently generates singlet oxygen when irradiated with visible light. Detection of the singlet oxygen was fulfilled by its reaction with histidine and detected by bleaching p-nitrosodimethylaniline under 440 nm irradiation. The quantum yields of singlet oxygen determined by us were 0.088 (1), 0.151 (2), 0.219 (3) and 0.301 (4). We measured absorption and fluorescence spectra of compounds 1 to 4 (Mg-chlorophyll-a, Pheophytin, Mg-chlorophyll-b and chlorophyll-b respectively) in different media and in aqueous solutions of human serum albumin. The association constant of the compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4 in the presence of HSA were estimated. The binding and quenching studies suggest that only 1 and 3 may serve as a useful fluorescence probe for structure/function studies of different chlorophyll binding proteins. No photoinduced binding was observed after irradiation by all the studied compounds in presence of human serum albumin.

  14. Tissue photosensitizer dosimetry using spectrally-resolved fluorescence for pre-clinical and clinical verteporfin-PDT of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isabelle, Martin; Davis, Scott; Li, Zan; Gunn, Jason; Hoopes, P. J.; Pereira, S.; Mosse, C. A.; Hasan, T.; Pogue, B. W.

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with verteporfin is currently being investigated to treat pancreatic cancer in patients who are not surgical candidates. Clinically, interstitial light delivery is administered through a fiber, via percutaneous needle implantation guided by ultrasound and/or verified by CT. Tumor response to PDT is based on photosensitizer (PS) dose, light dose, light dose rate and the timing of light application following PS injection. However, studies have shown that even when matching administered PDT treatment parameters such as drug dose and light level, there can be significant inter-patient variation in tissue damage post-PDT, and this has been primarily attributed to imprecise PS concentration at the target tissue site. In order to achieve optimal tumor response from PDT without causing major damage to surrounding tissue, it would be advantageous to measure the PS concentration in the target tissue just prior to light application. From these measurements, the clinician can adapt the light application dose to the measured target tissue PS concentration (i.e. insufficient target tissue PS concentrations compensated by higher light doses and vice versa.) in order to provide an optimal light dose for each patient. In animal studies, a spectrometer-based in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry system has been used to assess accumulated PS levels (verteporfin) in situ. Measurements are taken from skin, leg muscle, buccal mucosa and tumor tissue locations one hour after injection of the photosensitizer. Real-time spectral fitting, subtraction of background autofluorescence and ratiometric analysis is performed on the raw data to extract out only the photosensitizer fluorescence and therefore concentration. Using a pre-measured calibration data set of varying concentrations for verteporfin in tissue phantoms composed of intralipid and whole blood, it was possible detect concentrations of the photosensitizer below 0.5nM. In the clinical studies being

  15. Cosmic rays muon flux measurements at Belgrade shallow underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Veselinović, N. Dragić, A. Maletić, D. Joković, D. Savić, M. Banjanac, R. Udovičić, V. Aničin, I.

    2015-02-24

    The Belgrade underground laboratory is a shallow underground one, at 25 meters of water equivalent. It is dedicated to low-background spectroscopy and cosmic rays measurement. Its uniqueness is that it is composed of two parts, one above ground, the other bellow with identical sets of detectors and analyzing electronics thus creating opportunity to monitor simultaneously muon flux and ambient radiation. We investigate the possibility of utilizing measurements at the shallow depth for the study of muons, processes to which these muons are sensitive and processes induced by cosmic rays muons. For this purpose a series of simulations of muon generation and propagation is done, based on the CORSIKA air shower simulation package and GEANT4. Results show good agreement with other laboratories and cosmic rays stations.

  16. Bayesian image reconstruction for improving detection performance of muon tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guobao; Schultz, Larry J; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-05-01

    Muon tomography is a novel technology that is being developed for detecting high-Z materials in vehicles or cargo containers. Maximum likelihood methods have been developed for reconstructing the scattering density image from muon measurements. However, the instability of maximum likelihood estimation often results in noisy images and low detectability of high-Z targets. In this paper, we propose using regularization to improve the image quality of muon tomography. We formulate the muon reconstruction problem in a Bayesian framework by introducing a prior distribution on scattering density images. An iterative shrinkage algorithm is derived to maximize the log posterior distribution. At each iteration, the algorithm obtains the maximum a posteriori update by shrinking an unregularized maximum likelihood update. Inverse quadratic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Laplacian priors and inverse cubic shrinkage functions are derived for generalized Gaussian priors. Receiver operating characteristic studies using simulated data demonstrate that the Bayesian reconstruction can greatly improve the detection performance of muon tomography.

  17. Noise reduction in muon tomography for detecting high density objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettoni, M.; Bettella, G.; Bonomi, G.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Cortelazzo, G.; Cossutta, L.; Donzella, A.; Furlan, M.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Rigoni Garola, A.; Ronchese, P.; Squarcia, S.; Subieta, M.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zanuttigh, P.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2013-12-01

    The muon tomography technique, based on multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed as a tool to detect the presence of high density objects inside closed volumes. In this paper a new and innovative method is presented to handle the density fluctuations (noise) of reconstructed images, a well known problem of this technique. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated using experimental data obtained with a muon tomography prototype located at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The results reported in this paper, obtained with real cosmic ray data, show that with appropriate image filtering and muon momentum classification, the muon tomography technique can detect high density materials, such as lead, albeit surrounded by light or medium density material, in short times. A comparison with algorithms published in literature is also presented.

  18. Muon background studies for shallow depth Double - Chooz near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, H.

    2015-08-17

    Muon events are one of the main concerns regarding background in neutrino experiments. The placement of experimental set-ups in deep underground facilities reduce considerably their impact on the research of the expected signals. But in the cases where the detector is installed on surface or at shallow depth, muon flux remains high, being necessary their precise identification for further rejection. Total flux, mean energy or angular distributions are some of the parameters that can help to characterize the muons. Empirically, the muon rate can be measured in an experiment by a number of methods. Nevertheless, the capability to determine the muons angular distribution strongly depends on the detector features, while the measurement of the muon energy is quite difficult. Also considering that on-site measurements can not be extrapolated to other sites due to the difference on the overburden and its profile, it is necessary to find an adequate solution to perform the muon characterization. The method described in this work to obtain the main features of the muons reaching the experimental set-up, is based on the muon transport simulation by the MUSIC software, combined with a dedicated sampling algorithm for shallow depth installations based on a modified Gaisser parametrization. This method provides all the required information about the muons for any shallow depth installation if the corresponding overburden profile is implemented. In this work, the method has been applied for the recently commissioned Double - Chooz near detector, which will allow the cross-check between the simulation and the experimental data, as it has been done for the far detector.

  19. Differences of response of human bladder cancer cells to photodynamic therapy (PDT) with Hypericum perforantum L extract and Photofrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nseyo, Unyime; Kim, Albert; Stavropoulos, Nikos E.; Skalkos, Dimitris; Nseyo, Unwana U.; Chung, Theodore D.

    2005-04-01

    Refractory carcinoma in situ and resistant multifocal transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the human urinary bladder respond modestly to PHOTOFRIN (PII) PDT. Hypericum perforatum L., (St. John"s wort /Epirus" Vasalmo, Greece), a medicinal plant used for many human ailments, is under investigation as a new photosensitizer. We have reported on the antiproliferative activity of the lipophilic extract of the Hypericum perforatum L. (HP) against cultured T-24, and NBT-11 bladder cancer cells. We investigated response of the polar methanolic fraction (PMF) of the HP extract versus PHOTOFRIN in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of human bladder cancer cells, RT-4 and T-24.The PMF was extracted from the dry herb with methanol, followed by liquid extraction with petroleum ether. RT-4/T-24, were plated (105 cells/well) and placed in the incubator (370 C, 5%CO) for 24 hours prior to addition of drugs. PII 2ug/ml, or PMF 60ug /ml was added and incubation continued. After 24 hours, the cells were treated with laser light (630nm) with 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules. The cells were then washed and reincubated for another 24 hours. After this incubation cell survival was assessed by the MTT assay. PMF-PDT induced percent cell kill of 0%, 0%, 0%, 29% and 75%, in RT-4 cells (primary noninvasive urinary bladder TCC) versus 5%, 9%, 13%, 69% and 86%, in T-24 cells(metastatic TTC) at 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules respectively. PII-PDT induced cell kill of 0 %, 0% ,0%,0% and 9 %, in RT-4 cells versus 0%,10%,0%,21% and 77%, in T-24 cells at 0,1,2,4 and 8 Joules respectively.RT-24 cells were relatively more resistant than T-24 cells to PMF and PII-PDT. Understanding mechanisms of such differential responses might prove useful

  20. Fluence- and time-dependant lysosomal and mitochondrial damage induced by LS11 PDT characterized with light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeremy D.; Foster, Thomas H.

    2007-02-01

    Light scattering from cells originates from sub-cellular organelles. Our measurements of angularly resolved light scattering have demonstrated that at 633 nm, the dominant scattering centers within EMT6 cells are mitochondria and lysosomes. To assess their specific contributions, we have used photodynamic therapy (PDT) to induce organelle-specific perturbations within intact cells. We have developed a coated sphere scattering model for mitochondrial swelling in response to ALA- and Pc 4-PDT, and in the case of Pc 4-PDT we have used this model to map the scattering responses into clonogenic cell survival. More recently, we demonstrated the ability to measure the size, scattering contribution, and refractive index of lysosomes within cells by exploiting the localization and high extinction of the photosensitizer LS11 and an absorbing sphere scattering model. Here we report on time- and fluence-dependant scattering measurements from cells treated with LS11-PDT. LS11-PDT causes rapid lysosomal disruption, as quantified by uptake of acridine orange, and can induce downstream effects including release of mitochondrial cytochrome c preceding the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Reiners et al., Cell Death Differ. 9:934, 2002). Using scattering and these various methods of analysis, we observed that the induction of lysosomal morphology changes requires a fluence significantly higher than that reported for cell killing. At lower fluences, we observe that at 1 h after irradiation there is significant mitochondrial swelling, consistent with the onset of cytochrome c-induced cell death, while the morphology of lysosomes remains unchanged. We also expand on the ideas of lysosomal staining to demonstrate the sensitivity of scattering measurements at different wavelengths to different organelle populations.

  1. Frontiers of muon spectroscopy—25 years of muon science at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    The ISIS muon source developed with support from the European Community (EC) and groups at Grenoble, Parma, Uppsala and Munich in the late 1980s, with a single instrument providing many scientists with their first opportunity to explore the unique capabilities of muon spectroscopy. The timing was opportune, as the muon technique was making an important contribution to the study of the then recently discovered cuprate high T c superconductors. The ISIS user community developed rapidly over subsequent years, with the technique finding a broad range of applications in condensed matter physics, materials science and chemistry. The single instrument was hugely oversubscribed, and the importance of the technique was recognized in 1993 with a further grant from the EC to develop the triple beamline facility that is currently available at ISIS. During 2009 the suite of spectrometers available at the facility received a major upgrade, with the Science and Technology Facilities Council funding the development of a 5 T high field instrument that has enabled entirely new applications of muon spectroscopy to be explored. The facility continues to flourish, with a strong user community exploiting the technique to support research across an increasingly broad range of subject areas. Condensed matter science continues to be a major area of interest, with applications including semiconductors and dielectrics, superconductors, magnetism, interstitial diffusion and charge transport. Recently, however, molecular science and radical chemistry have become prominent in the ISIS programme, applications where the availability of high magnetic fields is frequently vital to the success of the experiments. For ISIS, 23 March 2012 marked a significant milestone, it being 25 years since muons were first produced at the facility for research in condensed matter and molecular science. To celebrate, the ISIS muon group organized a science symposium with the theme 'Frontiers of Muon Spectroscopy

  2. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, R.; de Donato, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Guzmán, A.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Paic, G.; Patiño Salazar, E.; Salazar Ibarguen, H.; Sánchez, F. A.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vargas Treviño, A. D.; Vergara Limón, S.; Villaseñor, L. M.; Auger Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm2. Each layer is 4m2 and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cm×2m, oriented at a 90∘ angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4×4cm2. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2μs data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).

  3. Requirements for functional models of the iron hydrogenase active site: D2/H2O exchange activity in ((mu-SMe)(mu-pdt)[Fe(CO)2(PMe3)]2+)[BF4-].

    PubMed

    Georgakaki, Irene P; Miller, Matthew L; Darensbourg, Marcetta Y

    2003-04-21

    Hydrogen uptake in hydrogenase enzymes can be assayed by H/D exchange reactivity in H(2)/D(2)O or H(2)/D(2)/H(2)O mixtures. Diiron(I) complexes that serve as structural models for the active site of iron hydrogenase are not active in such isotope scrambling but serve as precursors to Fe(II)Fe(II) complexes that are functional models of [Fe]H(2)ase. Using the same experimental protocol as used previously for ((mu-H)(mu-pdt)[Fe(CO)(2)(PMe(3))](2)(+)), 1-H(+) (Zhao et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 9710), we now report the results of studies of ((mu-SMe)(mu-pdt)[Fe(CO)(2)(PMe(3))](2)(+)), 1-SMe(+), toward H/D exchange. The 1-SMe(+) complex can take up H(2) and catalyze the H/D exchange reaction in D(2)/H(2)O mixtures under photolytic, CO-loss conditions. Unlike 1-H(+), it does not catalyze H(2)/D(2) scrambling under anhydrous conditions. The molecular structure of 1-SMe(+) involves an elongated Fe.Fe separation, 3.11 A, relative to 2.58 A in 1-H(+). It is proposed that the strong SMe(-) bridging ligand results in catalytic activity localized on a single Fe(II) center, a scenario that is also a prominent possibility for the enzyme active site. The single requirement is an open site on Fe(II) available for binding of D(2) (or H(2)), followed by deprotonation by the external base H(2)O (or D(2)O).

  4. Cosmic ray muons for spent nuclear fuel monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidakis, Stylianos

    There is a steady increase in the volume of spent nuclear fuel stored on-site (at reactor) as currently there is no permanent disposal option. No alternative disposal path is available and storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry storage containers is anticipated for the near future. In this dissertation, a capability to monitor spent nuclear fuel stored within dry casks using cosmic ray muons is developed. The motivation stems from the need to investigate whether the stored content agrees with facility declarations to allow proliferation detection and international treaty verification. Cosmic ray muons are charged particles generated naturally in the atmosphere from high energy cosmic rays. Using muons for proliferation detection and international treaty verification of spent nuclear fuel is a novel approach to nuclear security that presents significant advantages. Among others, muons have the ability to penetrate high density materials, are freely available, no radiological sources are required and consequently there is a total absence of any artificial radiological dose. A methodology is developed to demonstrate the applicability of muons for nuclear nonproliferation monitoring of spent nuclear fuel dry casks. Purpose is to use muons to differentiate between spent nuclear fuel dry casks with different amount of loading, not feasible with any other technique. Muon scattering and transmission are used to perform monitoring and imaging of the stored contents of dry casks loaded with spent nuclear fuel. It is shown that one missing fuel assembly can be distinguished from a fully loaded cask with a small overlapping between the scattering distributions with 300,000 muons or more. A Bayesian monitoring algorithm was derived to allow differentiation of a fully loaded dry cask from one with a fuel assembly missing in the order of minutes and negligible error rate. Muon scattering and transmission simulations are used to reconstruct the stored contents of sealed dry casks

  5. Status of the International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-02-02

    An international experiment to demonstrate muonionization cooling is scheduled for beam at RutherfordAppleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2007. The experimentcomprises one cell of the Study II cooling channel [1],along with upstream and downstream detectors to identifyindividual muons and measure their initial and final 6Dphase-space parameters to a precision of 0.1percent. Magneticdesign of the beam line and cooling channel are completeand portions are under construction. The experiment willbe described, including cooling channel hardware designs,fabrication status, and running plans. Phase 1 of theexperiment will prepare the beam line and providedetector systems, including time-of-flight, Cherenkov,scintillating-fiber trackers and their spectrometersolenoids, and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The Phase2 system will add the cooling channel components,including liquid-hydrogen absorbers embedded insuperconducting Focus Coil solenoids, 201-MHz normalconductingRF cavities, and their surrounding CouplingCoil solenoids. The MICE Collaboration goal is tocomplete the experiment by 2010; progress toward this isdiscussed.

  6. Studies of superconducting materials with muon spin rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Michael R.; Stronach, Carey E.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Yu, X. H.; Uemura, Y. J.; Sternlieb, B. J.; Kempton, J. R.; Oostens, J.; Lankford, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    The muon spin rotation/relaxation technique was found to be an exceptionally effective means of measuring the magnetic properties of superconductors, including the new high temperature superconductor materials, at the microscopic level. The technique directly measures the magnetic penetration depth (type II superconductors (SC's)) and detects the presence of magnetic ordering (antiferromagnetism or spin-glass ordering were observed in some high temperature superconductor (HTSC's) and in many closely related compounds). Extensive studies of HTSC materials were conducted by the Virginia State University - College of William and Mary - Columbia University collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory and TRIUMF (Vancouver). A survey of LaSrCuO and YBaCaCuO systems shows an essentially linear relationship between the transition temperature T(sub c) and the relaxation rate. This appears to be a manifestation of the proportionality between T(sub c) and the Fermi energy, which suggests a high energy scale for the SC coupling, and which is not consistent with the weak coupling of phonon-mediated SC. Studies of LaCuO and YBaCuO parent compounds show clear evidence of antiferromagnetism. YBa2Cu(3-x)CO(x)O7 shows the simultaneous presence of spin-glass magnetic ordering and superconductivity. Three-dimensional SC, (Ba, K) BiO3, unlike the layered CuO-based compounds, shows no suggestion of magnetic ordering. Experimental techniques and theoretical implications are discussed.

  7. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10-9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×1013 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  8. Muon simulations for Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Alfred; Horton-Smith, Glenn; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.; Tonazzo, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Muon backgrounds at Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ are calculated using MUSIC. A modified version of the Gaisser sea-level muon distribution and a well-tested Monte Carlo integration method are introduced. Average muon energy, flux, and rate are tabulated. Plots of average energy and angular distributions are given. Implications for muon tracker design in future experiments are discussed.

  9. A method for detection of muon induced electromagnetic showers with the ANTARES detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J. J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigi, A.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J. L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J. P.; Schüssler, F.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary aim of ANTARES is neutrino astronomy with upward going muons created in charged current muon neutrino interactions in the detector and its surroundings. Downward going muons are background for neutrino searches. These muons are the decay products of cosmic-ray collisions in the Earth's atmosphere far above the detector. This paper presents a method to identify and count electromagnetic showers induced along atmospheric muon tracks with the ANTARES detector. The method is applied to both cosmic muon data and simulations and its applicability to the reconstruction of muon event energies is demonstrated.

  10. Vascular targeting to the SST2 receptor improves the therapeutic response to near-IR two-photon activated PDT for deep-tissue cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Jean R.; Pascucci, Elizabeth M.; Drobizhev, Mikhail A.; Elliott, Aleisha; Rebane, Aleksander K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Broader clinical acceptance of photodynamic therapy is currently hindered by (a) poor depth efficacy, and (b) predisposition towards establishment of an angiogenic environment during the treatment. Improved depth efficacy is being sought by exploiting the NIR tissue transparency window and by photo-activation using two-photon absorption (2PA). Here, we use two photon activation of PDT sensitizers, untargeted, targeted to SST2 receptors or EGF receptors, to achieve deep tissue treatment. Methods Human tumor lines, positive or negative for SST2r expression were used, as well as murine 3LL cells and bovine aortic endothelial cells. Expression of SST2 receptors on cancer cells and tumor vasculature was evaluated in vitro and frozen xenograft sections. PDT effects on tumor blood flow were followed using in vivo scanning after intravenous injection of FITC conjugated dextran 150K. Dependence of the PDT efficacy on the laser pulse duration was evaluated. Effectiveness of targeting to vascular SST2 receptors was compared to that of EGF receptors, or no targeting. Results Tumor vasculature stained for SST2 receptors even in tumors from SST2 receptor negative cell lines, and SST2r targeted PDT led to tumor vascular shutdown. Stretching the pulse from ~120 fs to ~3 ps led to loss of the PDT efficacy especially at greater depth. PDT targeted to SST2 receptors was much more effective than untargeted PDT or PDT targeted to EGF receptors. General significance The use of octreotate to target SST2 receptors expressed on tumor vessels is an excellent approach to PDT with few recurrences and some long term cures. PMID:23747302

  11. Muon spin spectroscopy of ferrocene: characterization of muoniated ferrocenyl radicals.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Iain

    2014-06-14

    Radicals formed by the reaction of muonium (Mu), a light isotope of hydrogen, with ferrocene and ferrocene-d10 have been studied with the avoided level crossing muon spin resonance (ALC-μSR) and longitudinal field muon spin relaxation (LF-μSR) techniques between 10 and 100 K. A single type of radical was observed in each compound and the muon hyperfine coupling constants (hfcc) and the muon spin relaxation rates were measured as a function of temperature. A previous report concerning the observation of Mu adducts of ferrocene (U. A. Jayasooriya et al. Chem. - Eur. J., 2007, 13, 2266-2276) appears to be incorrect. DFT calculations were performed to aid in the assignment of the ALC-μSR spectra. A tentative assignment is that the observed radicals were formed by Mu addition to the exterior of the cyclopentadienyl rings and that the structures are distorted due to interactions with neighbouring molecules. The temperature dependence of the muon hfcc can be explained assuming the population of two levels with different muon hfccs separated by 1.4 ± 0.1 kJ mol(-1). The temperature dependence of the width and amplitude of the Δ1 resonance and the muon spin relaxation rate suggests that the electron spin relaxation rate increase with temperature, but the relaxation mechanism is unknown.

  12. MUSE, the goddess of muons, and her future.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Ryosuke; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2012-02-01

    The Muon Science Establishment (MUSE) is one of the major experimental facilities, along with those for neutron, hadron and neutrino experiments, in J-PARC. It makes up a part of the Materials and Life Science Experiment Facility (MLF) that hosts a tandem neutron facility (JSNS) driven by a single proton beam. The facility consists of a superconducting solenoid (for pion confinement) with a modest-acceptance (about 45 mSr) injector of pions and muons obtained from a 20 mm thick edge-cooled stationary graphite target, delivering a 'surface muon' beam (μ(+)) and a 'decay muon' beam (μ(+)/μ(-)) for a wide variety of applications. It has recently been confirmed that the beamline has the world's highest muon intensity (∼10(6) μ(+)/s) at a proton beam power of 120 kW. The beamline is furnished with two experimental areas (D1 and D2) at the exit branches, where an apparatus for muon spin rotation/relaxation experiments (μSR) is currently installed at the D1 area while test experiments are conducted at the D2 area. In this paper, the current performance of the MUSE facility as a whole is reviewed. The facility is still in the early stage of development, including both beamlines and infrastructure for experiments, and plans for upgrading it are discussed together with perspectives for research works envisaged with unprecedented high-intensity muons.

  13. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mohayai, Tanaz; Rogers, Chris; Snopok, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  14. Where to place the positive muon in the Periodic Table?

    PubMed

    Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2015-03-14

    In a recent study it was suggested that the positively charged muon is capable of forming its own "atoms in molecules" (AIM) in the muonic hydrogen-like molecules, composed of two electrons, a muon and one of the hydrogen's isotopes, thus deserves to be placed in the Periodic Table [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 6602]. In the present report, the capacity of the positively charged muon in forming its own AIM is considered in a large set of molecules replacing muons with all protons in the hydrides of the second and third rows of the Periodic Table. Accordingly, in a comparative study the wavefunctions of both sets of hydrides and their muonic congeners are first derived beyond the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) paradigm, assuming protons and muons as quantum waves instead of clamped particles. Then, the non-BO wavefunctions are used to derive the AIM structures of both hydrides and muonic congeners within the context of the multi-component quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The results of the analysis demonstrate that muons are generally capable of forming their own atomic basins and the properties of these basins are not fundamentally different from those AIM containing protons. Particularly, the bonding modes in the muonic species seem to be qualitatively similar to their congener hydrides and no new bonding model is required to describe the bonding of muons to a diverse set of neighboring atoms. All in all, the positively charged muon is similar to a proton from the structural and bonding viewpoint and deserves to be placed in the same box of hydrogen in the Periodic Table. This conclusion is in line with a large body of studies on the chemical kinetics of the muonic molecules portraying the positively charged muon as a lighter isotope of hydrogen.

  15. Feasibility of using backscattered muons for archeological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Use of nondestructive methods to accurately locate and characterize underground objects such as rooms and tools found at archeological sites is ideal to preserve these historic sites. High-energy cosmic ray muons are very sensitive to density variation and have been used to image volcanoes and archeological sites such as the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids. Muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere that penetrate the earth's crust up to few kilometers. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale making it useful for this type of work. However, the muon detector must be placed below the target of interest. For imaging volcanoes, the upper portion is imaged when the detector is placed on the earth's surface at the volcano's base. For sites of interest beneath the ground surface, the muon detector would need to be placed below the site in a tunnel or borehole. Placing the detector underground can be costly and may disturb the historical site. We will assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upward traveling muons, to eliminate the current constraint of positioning the detector below the target. This work consists of three parts 1) determine the backscattered flux rate from theory, 2) distinguish backscattered from forward scattered muons at the detector, and 3) validate the theoretical results with field experimentation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Measuring the Disappearance of Muon Neutrinos with the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It measures the flux from the predominately muon neutrino NuMI beam first 1 km from beam start and then again 735 km later using a pair of steel scintillator tracking calorimeters. The comparison of measured neutrino energy spectra at our Far Detector with the prediction based on our Near Detector measurement allows for a measurement of the parameters which define neutrino oscillations. This thesis will describe the most recent measurement of muon neutrino disappearance in the NuMI muon neutrino beam using the MINOS experiment.

  17. Front End and HFOFO Snake for a Muon Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Alexahin, Y.

    2015-09-01

    A neutrino factory or muon collider requires the capture and cooling of a large number of muons. Scenarios for capture, bunching, phase-energy rotation and initial cooling of μ’s produced from a proton source target have been developed, for neutrino factory and muon collider scenarios. They require a drift section from the target, a bunching section and a $\\phi-\\delta E$ rotation section leading into the cooling channel. The currently preferred cooling channel design is an “HFOFO Snake” configuration that cools both $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ transversely and longitudinally. The status of the design is presented and variations are discussed.

  18. Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.V.; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.

  19. Muon multiplicities measured using an underground cosmic-ray array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusiniemi, P.; Enqvist, T.; Bezrukov, L.; Fynbo, H.; Inzhechik, L.; Joutsenvaara, J.; Loo, K.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Petkov, V.; Slupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Virkajärvi, A.

    2016-05-01

    EMMA (Experiment with Multi-Muon Array) is an underground detector array designed for cosmic-ray composition studies around the knee energy (or ~ 1 — 10 PeV). It operates at the shallow depth in the Pyhasalmi mine, Finland. The array consists of eleven independent detector stations ~ 15 m2 each. Currently seven stations are connected to the DAQ and the rest will be connected within the next few months. EMMA will determine the multiplicity, the lateral density distribution and the arrival direction of high-energy muons event by event. The preliminary estimates concerning its performance together with an example of measured muon multiplicities are presented.

  20. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Littenberg, L.; Pearson, C. E.; Qian, X.; Theman, H.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  1. The muon content of gamma-ray showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a calculation of the expected number of muons in gamma ray initiated and cosmic ray initiated air showers using a realistic model of hadronic collisions in an effort to understand the available experimental results and to assess the feasibility of using the muon content of showers as a veto to reject cosmic ray initiated showers in ultra-high energy gamma ray astronomy are reported. The possibility of observing very-high energy gamma-ray sources by detecting narrow angle anisotropies in the high energy muon background radiation are considered.

  2. Range fluctuations of high energy muons passing through matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minorikawa, Y.; Mitsui, K.

    1985-01-01

    The information about energy spectrum of sea level muons at high energies beyond magnetic spectrographs can be obtained from the underground intensity measurements if the fluctuations problems are solved. The correction factor R for the range fluctuations of high energy muons were calculated by analytical method of Zatsepin, where most probable energy loss parameter are used. It is shown that by using the R at great depth together with the slope, lambda, of the vertical depth-intensity (D-I) curve in the form of exp(-t/lambda), the spectral index, gamma, in the power law energy spectrum of muons at sea level can be obtained.

  3. Efficiency Studies for the new Muon Telescope Detector at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Hannah; STAR Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) is a new detector subsystem in STAR at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The MTD will contribute to studies of the matter being created in heavy-ion collisions by allowing measurements of the J/Psi meson and the different Upsilon states over a broad transverse momentum range via the reconstruction of their di-muon decays. Simulations to estimate the efficiency of the MTD for detecting muons were performed. The results of these simulations will be presented.

  4. Toward the Computational Prediction of Muon Sites and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfà, Pietro; De Renzi, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The rapid developments of computational quantum chemistry methods and supercomputing facilities motivate the renewed interest in the analysis of the muon/electron interactions in μSR experiments with ab initio approaches. Modern simulation methods seem to be able to provide the answers to the frequently asked questions of many μSR experiments: where is the muon? Is it a passive probe? What are the interaction parameters governing the muon-sample interaction? In this review we describe some of the approaches used to provide quantitative estimations of the aforementioned quantities and we provide the reader with a short discussion on the current developments in this field.

  5. Muonic alchemy: Transmuting elements with the inclusion of negative muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moncada, Félix; Cruz, Daniel; Reyes, Andrés

    2012-06-01

    In this Letter we present a theoretical study of atoms in which one electron has been replaced by a negative muon. We have treated these muonic systems with the Any Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) method. A comparison between the electronic and muonic radial distributions revealed that muons are much more localized than electrons. Therefore, the muonic cloud is screening effectively one positive charge of the nucleus. Our results have revealed that by replacing an electron in an atom by a muon there is a transmutation of the electronic properties of that atom to those of the element with atomic number Z - 1.

  6. Helical FOFO Snake for 6D Ionization Cooling of Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.

    2010-03-30

    A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside the solenoids and RF cavities between them. An important feature of such a channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4beamline are presented which show that a 200 MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

  7. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Brown, R. E.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Carr, R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, X. H.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. X.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; Dale, E.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fu, J. Y.; Ge, L. Q.; Gill, R.; Goett, J.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, G. H.; Hans, S.; He, M.; He, Q.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Hinrichs, P.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. L.; Ji, X. P.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kebwaro, J. M.; Kettell, S. H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, W. C.; Lai, W. H.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, A.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. Q.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Mohapatra, D.; Morgan, J. E.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nemchenok, I.; Newsom, C.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngai, W. K.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Pearson, C. E.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tam, Y. H.; Tang, X.; Themann, H.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viren, B.; Virostek, S.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, G. H.; Xu, J.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, J. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  8. Overview of the Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, SeungCheon

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of muon provides a precision test of the Standard Model. The Brookhaven muon g-2 experiment (E821) measured the muon magnetic moment anomaly with 0.54 ppm precision, a more than 3 deviation from the Standard Model predictions, spurring speculation about the possibility of new physics. The new g-2 experiment at Fermilab (E989) will reduce the combined statistical and systematic error of the BNL experiment by a factor of 4. An overview of the new experiment is described in this article.

  9. Advanced applications of cosmic-ray muon radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, John

    The passage of cosmic-ray muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and atomic nuclei. The muon's interaction with electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping through the process of ionization. The muon's interaction with nuclei leads to angular diffusion. If a muon stops in matter, other processes unfold, as discussed in more detail below. These interactions provide the basis for advanced applications of cosmic-ray muon radiography discussed here, specifically: 1) imaging a nuclear reactor with near horizontal muons, and 2) identifying materials through the analysis of radiation lengths weighted by density and secondary signals that are induced by cosmic-ray muon trajectories. We have imaged a nuclear reactor, type AGN-201m, at the University of New Mexico, using data measured with a particle tracker built from a set of sealed drift tubes, the Mini Muon Tracker (MMT). Geant4 simulations were compared to the data for verification and validation. In both the data and simulation, we can identify regions of interest in the reactor including the core, moderator, and shield. This study reinforces our claims for using muon tomography to image reactors following an accident. Warhead and special nuclear materials (SNM) imaging is an important thrust for treaty verification and national security purposes. The differentiation of SNM from other materials, such as iron and aluminum, is useful for these applications. Several techniques were developed for material identification using cosmic-ray muons. These techniques include: 1) identifying the radiation length weighted by density of an object and 2) measuring the signals that can indicate the presence of fission and chain reactions. By combining the radiographic images created by tracking muons through a target plane with the additional fission neutron and gamma signature, we are able to locate regions that are fissionable from a single side. The following materials were imaged

  10. Helical FOFO snake for 6D ionization cooling of muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside solenoids and RF cavities between them. Important feature of such channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4Beamline are presented which show that 200MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

  11. Search for Time-Independent Lorentz Violation using Muon Neutrino to Muon Antineutrino Transitions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2016-05-10

    Data from the MINOS experiment has been used to search for mixing between muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos using a time-independent Lorentz-violating formalism derived from the Standard-Model Extension (SME). MINOS is uniquely capable of searching for muon neutrino-antineutrino mixing given its long baseline and ability to distinguish between neutrinos and antineutrinos on an event-by-event basis. Neutrino and antineutrino interactions were observed in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors from an exposure of 10.56$\\times10^{20}$ protons-on-target from the NuMI neutrino-optimized beam. No evidence was found for such transitions and new, highly stringent limits were placed on the SME coefficients governing them. We place the first limits on the SME parameters $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} $ and $(c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau}$ at $-8.4\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\mu\\mu} < 8.0\\times10^{-23}$ and $-8.0\\times10^{-23} < (c_{L})^{TT}_{\\tau\\tau} < 8.4\\times10^{-23}$, and the world's best limits on the $\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\mu\\overline{\\mu}}$ and $\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\tau\\overline{\\tau}}$ parameters at $|\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\mu\\overline{\\mu}}| < 3.3\\times 10^{-23}$ and $|\\tilde{g}^{ZT}_{\\tau\\overline{\\tau}}| < 3.3\\times 10^{-23}$, all limits quoted at $3\\sigma$.

  12. Performance of new 8-inch photomultiplier tube used for the Tibet muon-detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.; Zhai, L.-M.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.-B.; Lin, Y.-H.; Jin, H.-B.; Zhang, X.-Y.; Feng, C.-F.; Jia, H.-Y.; Zhou, X.-X.; Danzengluobu; Chen, T.-L.; Labaciren; Liu, M.-Y.; Gao, Q.; Zhaxiciren

    2016-06-01

    Since 2014, a new hybrid experiment consisting of a high-energy air-shower-core array (YAC-II), a high-density air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD) has been continued by the Tibet ASγ collaboration to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays in the wide energy range including the ``knee''. In this experiment, YAC-II is used to select high energy core events induced by cosmic rays in the above energy region, while MD is used to estimate the type of nucleus of primary particles by measuring the number of muons contained in the air showers. However, the dynamic range of each MD cell is only 5 to 2000 photoelectrons (PEs) which is mainly designed for observation of high-energy celestial gamma rays. In order to obtain the primary proton, helium and iron spectra and their ``knee'' positions with energy up to 1016 eV, each of PMTs equipped to the MD cell is required to measure the number of photons capable of covering a wide dynamic range of 100-106 PEs according to Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we firstly compare the characteristic features between R5912-PMT made by Japan Hamamatsu and CR365-PMT made by Beijing Hamamatsu. If there exists no serious difference, we will then add two 8-inch-in-diameter PMTs to meet our requirements in each MD cell, which are responsible for the range of 100-10000 PEs and 2000-1000000 PEs, respectively. That is, MD cell is expected to be able to measure the number of muons over 6 orders of magnitudes.

  13. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  14. Elliptical Muon Helical Cooling Channel Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S. A.; Flanagan, G.; Lopes, M. L.; Yonehara, K.

    2013-09-01

    A helical cooling channel (HCC) consisting of a pressurized gas absorber imbedded in a magnetic channel that provides solenoid, helical dipole and helical quadrupole fields has shown considerable promise in providing six-dimensional phase space reduction for muon beams. The most effective approach to implementing the desired magnetic field is a helical solenoid (HS) channel composed of short solenoid coils arranged in a helical pattern. The HS channel along with an external solenoid allows the B$_z$ and B$_{\\phi}$ components along the reference orbit to be set to any desired values. To set dB$_{\\phi}$/dr to the desired value for optimum focusing requires an additional variable to tune. We shall show that using elliptical shaped coils in the HS channel allows the flexibility to achieve the desired dB$_{\\phi}$/dr on the reference orbit without significant change to B$_z$ and B$_{\\phi}$.

  15. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to μν decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance of the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.

  16. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to μν decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance ofmore » the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.« less

  17. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gohn, W.

    2016-11-15

    A new measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, $a_{\\mu} \\equiv (g-2)/2$, will be performed at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with data taking beginning in 2017. The most recent measurement, performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory and completed in 2001, shows a 3.5 standard deviation discrepancy with the standard model prediction of $a_\\mu$. The new measurement will accumulate 21 times those statistics using upgraded detection and storage ring systems, enabling a measurement of $a_\\mu$ to 140 ppb, a factor of 4 improvement in the uncertainty the previous measurement. This improvement in precision, combined with recent and ongoing improvements in the evaluation of the QCD contributions to the $a_\\mu$, could provide a 7.5$\\sigma$ discrepancy from the standard model if the current difference between experiment and theory is confirmed, a possible indication of new physics.

  18. First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance

    DOE PAGES

    Adamson, P.

    2011-07-05

    This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ν¯μ production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ν¯μ events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3σ. The best fit to oscillation yields |Δm¯2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 θ¯) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS νμ and ν¯μ measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

  19. Intermediate vector bosons in the muon channel

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.A.

    1989-12-01

    Description of the W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0} mass measurement in the muon decay channel, using 4.4 pb{sup {minus}1} of proton-antiproton collision data from the Fermilab Tevatron and CDF. A preliminary result of M{sub w} = 79.9 {plus minus} 0.4 {plus minus} 0.6 GeV/c{sup 2} is presented, and the published values of M{sub z} = 90.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {plus minus} 0.2 GeV/c{sup 2} and {Gamma}{sub z} = 3.8 {plus minus} 1.1 {plus minus} 1.0 GeV/c{sup 2} are described. 8 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. The Atmospheric Muon Lifetime, with the Lead Absorption Potential for Muons and References to the Standard Model of Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazandeh, Cioli; Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Majewski, Walerian

    2017-01-01

    Muon is one of twelve fundamental particles and has the longest free-particle lifetime. It decays into three leptons through an exchange of weak vector bosons W +/W-. Muons are present in atmospheric secondary cosmic rays and reach the sea level. By detecting the time delay between arrival of muons and appearance of decay electrons in a scintillation detector, we will measure muon's lifetime at rest. From the lifetime we can find the ratio gw /MW of the weak coupling constant gw (a weak analog of the electric charge) to mass of the W-boson MW. Vacuum expectation value v of the Higgs field, which determines masses Standard Model (SM) particles, can be calculated as v =2MWc2/gw =(τmμc2/6π3\\hcirc)1/4mμc2 regarding muon mass mμ and muon lifetime τ only. Using the experimental value for MWc2 = 80.4 GeV, we will find weak coupling constant gw. With the SM relation e =gwsin θ√ hcε0 and experimental value of the Z0-photon weak mixing angle θ = 29o we use our muon lifetime to find the elementary electric charge e value. In this experiment we will also determine the sea level fluxes of low-energy (<160 MeV) and high-energy cosmic muons, then will shield the detector with varying thicknesses of lead plates and from the new values of fluxes find the energy-dependent muon stopping power in lead.