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Sample records for ii nptii gene

  1. Cloning of the nptII gene of Escherichia coli and construction of a recombinant strain harboring functional recA and nptII antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, S

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to clone the ORF of the nptII gene of Escherichia coli K12 (ATCC 10798), two degenerate primers were designed based on the nptII sequence of its Tn5 transposon. The nptII ORF was placed under the control of the E. coli hybrid trc promoter, in the pKK388-1 vector, transformed into E. coli DH5α ΔrecA (recombinant, deficient strain). Transferred cells were tested for ampicillin, tetracycline, kanamycin, neomycin, geneticin, paromomycin, penicillin, and UV resistance. The neomycin phosphotransferase gene of E. coli was cloned successfully and conferred kanamycin, neomycin, geneticin, and paromomycin resistance to recombinant DH5α; this did not inhibit insertion of additional antibiotic resistance against ampicillin and tetracycline, meaning the trc promoter can express two different genes carried by two different plasmids harbored in the same cell. This resistance conferral process could be considered as an emulation of horizontal gene transfer occurring in nature and would be a useful tool for understanding mechanisms of evolution of multidrug-resistant strains.

  2. Heat-shock-mediated elimination of the nptII marker gene in transgenic apple (Malus×domestica Borkh.).

    PubMed

    Herzog, Katja; Flachowsky, Henryk; Deising, Holger B; Hanke, Magda-Viola

    2012-04-25

    Production of marker-free genetically modified (GM) plants is one of the major challenges of molecular fruit breeding. Employing clean vector technologies, allowing the removal of undesired DNA sequences from GM plants, this goal can be achieved. The present study describes the establishment of a clean vector system in apple Malus×domestica Borkh., which is based on the use of the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene (nptII) as selectable marker gene and kanamycin/paramomycin as selective agent. The nptII gene can be removed after selection of GM shoots via site-specific excision mediated by heat-shock-inducible expression of the budding yeast FLP recombinase driven by the soybean Gmhsp17.5-E promoter. We created a monitoring vector containing the nptII and the flp gene as a box flanked by two direct repeats of the flp recognition target (FRT) sites. The FRT-flanked box separates the gusA reporter gene from the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S (CaMV 35S) promoter. Consequently, GUS expression does only occur after elimination of the FRT-flanked box. Transformation experiments using the monitoring vector resulted in a total of nine transgenic lines. These lines were investigated for transgenicity by PCR, RT-PCR and Southern hybridization. Among different temperature regimes tested, exposure to 42 °C for 3.5 to 4h led to efficient induction of FLP-mediated recombination and removal of the nptII marker gene. A second round of shoot regeneration from leaf explants led to GM apple plants completely free of the nptII gene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Survival of plant seeds, their UV screens, and nptII DNA for 18 months outside the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Tepfer, David; Zalar, Andreja; Leach, Sydney

    2012-05-01

    The plausibility that life was imported to Earth from elsewhere can be tested by subjecting life-forms to space travel. Ultraviolet light is the major liability in short-term exposures (Horneck et al., 2001 ), and plant seeds, tardigrades, and lichens-but not microorganisms and their spores-are candidates for long-term survival (Anikeeva et al., 1990 ; Sancho et al., 2007 ; Jönsson et al., 2008 ; de la Torre et al., 2010 ). In the present study, plant seeds germinated after 1.5 years of exposure to solar UV, solar and galactic cosmic radiation, temperature fluctuations, and space vacuum outside the International Space Station. Of the 2100 exposed wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) seeds, 23% produced viable plants after return to Earth. Survival was lower in the Arabidopsis Wassilewskija ecotype and in mutants (tt4-8 and fah1-2) lacking UV screens. The highest survival occurred in tobacco (44%). Germination was delayed in seeds shielded from solar light, yet full survival was attained, which indicates that longer space travel would be possible for seeds embedded in an opaque matrix. We conclude that a naked, seed-like entity could have survived exposure to solar UV radiation during a hypothetical transfer from Mars to Earth. Chemical samples of seed flavonoid UV screens were degraded by UV, but their overall capacity to absorb UV was retained. Naked DNA encoding the nptII gene (kanamycin resistance) was also degraded by UV. A fragment, however, was detected by the polymerase chain reaction, and the gene survived in space when protected from UV. Even if seeds do not survive, components (e.g., their DNA) might survive transfer over cosmic distances.

  4. Expression of EGFP and NPTII protein is not associated with organ abnormalities in deceased transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Qian; Cui, Huiting; Li, Qinghe; Zhao, Yiqiang; Luo, Juan; Liu, Qiuyue; Sun, Xiuzhu; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2008-12-01

    Both enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase type II enzyme (NPTII) are widely used in transgenic studies, but their side effects have not been extensively investigated. In this study, we evaluated the expression profiles of the two marker genes and the relationship between their expression and organ abnormalities. Eight transgenic cloned cattle were studied, four harboring both EGFP and NPTII, and four harboring only the NPTII gene. Four age-matched cloned cattle were used as controls. EGFP and NPTII expression were measured and detected by Q-PCR, Western blot, ELISA, and RIA in heart, liver, and lungs, and the values ranged from 0.3 to 5 microg/g. The expression profiles exhibited differential or mosaic pattern between the organs, the pathologic symptoms of which were identified, but were similar to those of age-matched cloned cattle. All data indicated that the expression of EGFP and NPTII is not associated with organ abnormalities in transgenic cloned cattle.

  5. Lack of Detection of Bt Sugarcane Cry1Ab and NptII DNA and Proteins in Sugarcane Processing Products Including Raw Sugar

    PubMed Central

    Cheavegatti-Gianotto, Adriana; Gentile, Agustina; Oldemburgo, Danielle Angeloni; Merheb, Graciela do Amaral; Sereno, Maria Lorena; Lirette, Ron Peter; Ferreira, Thais Helena Silva; de Oliveira, Wladecir Salles

    2018-01-01

    Brazil is the largest sugarcane producer and the main sugar exporter in the world. The industrial processes applied by Brazilian mills are very efficient in producing highly purified sugar and ethanol. Literature presents evidence of lack of DNA/protein in these products, regardless of the nature of sugarcane used as raw material. Recently CTNBio, the Brazilian biosafety authority, has approved the first biotechnology-derived sugarcane variety for cultivation, event CTC175-A, which expresses the Cry1Ab protein to control the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis). The event also expresses neomycin-phosphotransferase type II (NptII) protein used as selectable marker during the transformation process. Because of the high purity of sugar and ethanol produced from genetically modified sugarcane, these end-products should potentially be classified as “pure substances, chemically defined,” by Brazilian Biosafety Law No. 11.105. If this classification is to be adopted, these substances are not considered as “GMO derivatives” and fall out of the scope of Law No. 11.105. In order to assess sugar composition and quality, we evaluate Cry1Ab and NptII expression in several sugarcane tissues and in several fractions from laboratory-scale processing of event CTC175-A for the presence of these heterologous proteins as well as for the presence of traces of recombinant DNA. The results of these studies show that CTC175-A presents high expression of Cry1Ab in leaves and barely detectable expression of heterologous proteins in stalks. We also evaluated the presence of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein and DNA in the fractions of the industrial processing of conventional Brazilian sugarcane cultivars. Results from both laboratory and industrial processing were concordant, demonstrating that DNA and protein are not detected in the clarified juice and downstream processed fractions, including ethanol and raw sugar, indicating that protein and DNA are

  6. Field performance of transgenic citrus trees: assessment of the long-term expression of uidA and nptII transgenes and its impact on relevant agronomic and phenotypic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pons, Elsa; Peris, Josep E; Peña, Leandro

    2012-07-15

    The future of genetic transformation as a tool for the improvement of fruit trees depends on the development of proper systems for the assessment of unintended effects in field-grown GM lines. In this study, we used eight transgenic lines of two different citrus types (sweet orange and citrange) transformed with the marker genes β-glucuronidase (uidA) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) as model systems to study for the first time in citrus the long-term stability of transgene expression and whether transgene-derived pleiotropic effects occur with regard to the morphology, development and fruit quality of orchard-grown GM citrus trees. The stability of the integration and expression of the transgenes was confirmed in 7-year-old, orchard-grown transgenic lines by Southern blot analysis and enzymatic assays (GUS and ELISA NPTII), respectively. Little seasonal variation was detected in the expression levels between plants of the same transgenic line in different organs and over the 3 years of analysis, confirming the absence of rearrangements and/or silencing of the transgenes after transferring the plants to field conditions. Comparisons between the GM citrus lines with their non-GM counterparts across the study years showed that the expression of these transgenes did not cause alterations of the main phenotypic and agronomic plant and fruit characteristics. However, when comparisons were performed between diploid and tetraploid transgenic citrange trees and/or between juvenile and mature transgenic sweet orange trees, significant and consistent differences were detected, indicating that factors other than their transgenic nature induced a much higher phenotypic variability. Our results indicate that transgene expression in GM citrus remains stable during long-term agricultural cultivation, without causing unexpected effects on crop characteristics. This study also shows that the transgenic citrus trees expressing the selectable marker genes that are most

  7. Field performance of transgenic citrus trees: Assessment of the long-term expression of uidA and nptII transgenes and its impact on relevant agronomic and phenotypic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The future of genetic transformation as a tool for the improvement of fruit trees depends on the development of proper systems for the assessment of unintended effects in field-grown GM lines. In this study, we used eight transgenic lines of two different citrus types (sweet orange and citrange) transformed with the marker genes β-glucuronidase (uidA) and neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) as model systems to study for the first time in citrus the long-term stability of transgene expression and whether transgene-derived pleiotropic effects occur with regard to the morphology, development and fruit quality of orchard-grown GM citrus trees. Results The stability of the integration and expression of the transgenes was confirmed in 7-year-old, orchard-grown transgenic lines by Southern blot analysis and enzymatic assays (GUS and ELISA NPTII), respectively. Little seasonal variation was detected in the expression levels between plants of the same transgenic line in different organs and over the 3 years of analysis, confirming the absence of rearrangements and/or silencing of the transgenes after transferring the plants to field conditions. Comparisons between the GM citrus lines with their non-GM counterparts across the study years showed that the expression of these transgenes did not cause alterations of the main phenotypic and agronomic plant and fruit characteristics. However, when comparisons were performed between diploid and tetraploid transgenic citrange trees and/or between juvenile and mature transgenic sweet orange trees, significant and consistent differences were detected, indicating that factors other than their transgenic nature induced a much higher phenotypic variability. Conclusions Our results indicate that transgene expression in GM citrus remains stable during long-term agricultural cultivation, without causing unexpected effects on crop characteristics. This study also shows that the transgenic citrus trees expressing the

  8. Antibiotic resistance marker genes as environmental pollutants in GMO-pristine agricultural soils in Austria.

    PubMed

    Woegerbauer, Markus; Zeinzinger, Josef; Gottsberger, Richard Alexander; Pascher, Kathrin; Hufnagl, Peter; Indra, Alexander; Fuchs, Reinhard; Hofrichter, Johannes; Kopacka, Ian; Korschineck, Irina; Schleicher, Corina; Schwarz, Michael; Steinwider, Johann; Springer, Burkhard; Allerberger, Franz; Nielsen, Kaare M; Fuchs, Klemens

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes may be considered as environmental pollutants if anthropogenic emission and manipulations increase their prevalence above usually occurring background levels. The prevalence of aph(3')-IIa/nptII and aph(3')-IIIa/nptIII - frequent marker genes in plant biotechnology conferring resistance to certain aminoglycosides - was determined in Austrian soils from 100 maize and potato fields not yet exposed to but eligible for GMO crop cultivation. Total soil DNA extracts were analysed by nptII/nptIII-specific TaqMan real time PCR. Of all fields 6% were positive for nptII (median: 150 copies/g soil; range: 31-856) and 85% for nptIII (1190 copies/g soil; 13-61600). The copy-number deduced prevalence of nptIII carriers was 14-fold higher compared to nptII. Of the cultivable kanamycin-resistant soil bacteria 1.8% (95% confidence interval: 0-3.3%) were positive for nptIII, none for nptII (0-0.8%). The nptII-load of the studied soils was low rendering nptII a typical candidate as environmental pollutant upon anthropogenic release into these ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficient transformation and regeneration of transgenic cassava using the neomycin phosphotransferase gene as aminoglycoside resistance marker gene.

    PubMed

    Niklaus, Michael; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Vanderschuren, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important crops in the tropics. Its industrial use for starch and biofuel production is also increasing its importance for agricultural production in tropical countries. In the last decade cassava biotechnology has emerged as a valuable alternative to the breeding constraints of this highly heterozygous crop for improved trait development of cassava germplasm. Cassava transformation remains difficult and time-consuming because of limitations in selecting transgenic tissues and regeneration of transgenic plantlets. We have recently reported an efficient and robust cassava transformation protocol using the hygromycin phosphotransferase II (hptII) gene as selection marker and the aminoglycoside hygromycin at optimal concentrations to maximize the regeneration of transgenic plantlets. In the present work, we expanded the transformation protocol to the use of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene as selection marker. Several aminoglycosides compatible with the use of nptII were tested and optimal concentrations for cassava transformation were determined. Given its efficiency equivalent to hptII as selection marker with the described protocol, the use of nptII opens new possibilities to engineer transgenic cassava lines with multiple T-DNA insertions and to produce transgenic cassava with a resistance marker gene that is already deregulated in several commercial transgenic crops.

  10. Transformation of Acinetobacter sp. Strain BD413(pFG4ΔnptII) with Transgenic Plant DNA in Soil Microcosms and Effects of Kanamycin on Selection of Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Kaare M.; van Elsas, Jan D.; Smalla, Kornelia

    2000-01-01

    Here we show that horizontal transfer of DNA, extracted from transgenic sugar beets, to bacteria, based on homologous recombination, can occur in soil. Restoration of a 317-bp-deleted nptII gene in Acinetobacter sp. strain BD413(pFG4) cells incubated in sterile soil microcosms was detected after addition of nutrients and transgenic plant DNA encoding a functional nptII gene conferring bacterial kanamycin resistance. Selective effects of the addition of kanamycin on the population dynamics of Acinetobacter sp. cells in soil were found, and high concentrations of kanamycin reduced the CFU of Acinetobacter sp. cells from 109 CFU/g of soil to below detection. In contrast to a chromosomal nptII-encoded kanamycin resistance, the pFG4-generated resistance was found to be unstable over a 31-day incubation period in vitro. PMID:10698801

  11. No impact of transgenic nptII-leafy Pinus radiata (Pinales: Pinaceae) on Pseudocoremia suavis (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) or its endoparasitoid Meteorus pulchricornis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Burgess, E P J; Barraclough, E I; Kean, A M; Walter, C; Malone, L A

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the biosafety to insects of transgenic Pinus radiata D. Don containing the antibiotic resistance marker gene nptII and the reproductive control gene leafy, bioassays were conducted with an endemic lepidopteran pest of New Zealand plantation pine forests and a hymenopteran endoparasitoid. Larvae of the common forest looper, Pseudocoremia suavis (Butler), were fed from hatching on P. radiata needles from either one of two nptII-leafy transgenic clones, or an isogenic unmodified control line. For both unparasitized P. suavis and those parasitized by Meteorus pulchricornis (Wesmael), consuming transgenic versus control pine had no impact on larval growth rate or mass at any age, larval duration, survival, pupation or successful emergence as an adult. Total larval duration was 1 d (3%) longer in larvae fed nptII-2 than nptII-1, but this difference was considered trivial and neither differed from the control. In unparasitized P. suavis larvae, pine type consumed did not affect rate of pupation or adult emergence, pupal mass, or pupal duration. Pine type had no effect on the duration or survival of M. pulchricornis larval or pupal stages, mass of cocoons, stage at which they died, adult emergence, or fecundity. Parasitism by M. pulchricornis reduced P. suavis larval growth rate, increased the duration of the third larval stadium, and resulted in the death of all host larvae before pupation. The lack of impact of an exclusive diet of nptII-leafy transgenic pines on the life history of P. suavis and M. pulchricornis suggests that transgenic plantation pines expressing nptII are unlikely to affect insect populations in the field.

  12. Syndromes associated with Homo sapiens pol II regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Bina, M; Demmon, S; Pares-Matos, E I

    2000-01-01

    The molecular basis of human characteristics is an intriguing but an unresolved problem. Human characteristics cover a broad spectrum, from the obvious to the abstract. Obvious characteristics may include morphological features such as height, shape, and facial form. Abstract characteristics may be hidden in processes that are controlled by hormones and the human brain. In this review we examine exaggerated characteristics presented as syndromes. Specifically, we focus on human genes that encode transcription factors to examine morphological, immunological, and hormonal anomalies that result from deletion, insertion, or mutation of genes that regulate transcription by RNA polymerase II (the Pol II genes). A close analysis of abnormal phenotypes can give clues into how sequence variations in regulatory genes and changes in transcriptional control may give rise to characteristics defined as complex traits.

  13. [Genetic transformation of flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) with chimeric GFP-TUA6 gene for visualisation of microtubules].

    PubMed

    Shisha, E N; Korkhovoĭ, V I; Baer, G Ia; Guzenko, E V; Lemesh, V A; Kartel', N A; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2013-01-01

    The data of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of some Linum usitatissimum cultivars zoned on the territories of Belarus and Ukraine with the plasmid carrying chimeric GFP-TUA6 gene and nptII gene as selectable marker conferring resistance to kanamycin are presented in this study. Transformation was affected by a number of factors including optical density (OD600), time of inoculation of explants with Agrobacterium and co-culture conditions. Transgenic nature of obtained lines was confirmed by PCR analysis. Expression of GFP-TUA6 gene was detected with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The obtained transgenic lines can be used for further functional studies the role of microtubules in the processes of building the flax fibres and resistance to wind.

  14. Overview of BioCreative II gene mention recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Larry; Tanabe, Lorraine K; Ando, Rie Johnson nee; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chung, I-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Yu-Shi; Klinger, Roman; Friedrich, Christoph M; Ganchev, Kuzman; Torii, Manabu; Liu, Hongfang; Haddow, Barry; Struble, Craig A; Povinelli, Richard J; Vlachos, Andreas; Baumgartner, William A; Hunter, Lawrence; Carpenter, Bob; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yifei; Sun, Chengjie; Katrenko, Sophia; Adriaans, Pieter; Blaschke, Christian; Torres, Rafael; Neves, Mariana; Nakov, Preslav; Divoli, Anna; Maña-López, Manuel; Mata, Jacinto; Wilbur, W John

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1 score of 0.8721. Here we present brief descriptions of all the methods used and a statistical analysis of the results. We also demonstrate that, by combining the results from all submissions, an F score of 0.9066 is feasible, and furthermore that the best result makes use of the lowest scoring submissions. PMID:18834493

  15. Overview of BioCreative II gene mention recognition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Larry; Tanabe, Lorraine K; Ando, Rie Johnson nee; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chung, I-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Yu-Shi; Klinger, Roman; Friedrich, Christoph M; Ganchev, Kuzman; Torii, Manabu; Liu, Hongfang; Haddow, Barry; Struble, Craig A; Povinelli, Richard J; Vlachos, Andreas; Baumgartner, William A; Hunter, Lawrence; Carpenter, Bob; Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Liu, Feng; Chen, Yifei; Sun, Chengjie; Katrenko, Sophia; Adriaans, Pieter; Blaschke, Christian; Torres, Rafael; Neves, Mariana; Nakov, Preslav; Divoli, Anna; Maña-López, Manuel; Mata, Jacinto; Wilbur, W John

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen teams presented results for the Gene Mention Task at the BioCreative II Workshop. In this task participants designed systems to identify substrings in sentences corresponding to gene name mentions. A variety of different methods were used and the results varied with a highest achieved F1 score of 0.8721. Here we present brief descriptions of all the methods used and a statistical analysis of the results. We also demonstrate that, by combining the results from all submissions, an F score of 0.9066 is feasible, and furthermore that the best result makes use of the lowest scoring submissions.

  16. Cloning and sequencing of the alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Conway, Tyrrell

    1992-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene from Zymomonas mobilis has been cloned and sequenced. This gene can be expressed at high levels in other organisms to produce acetaldehyde or to convert acetaldehyde to ethanol.

  17. [Construction of transgenic tobacco expressing tomato GGPS2 gene and analysis of its low light tolerance].

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Dong, Weihua; Zhang, Xingguo

    2015-05-01

    To explore the influence of low light on the synthesis of carotenoids, chlorophyll and the adaptability of transgenic plants with tomato Solanum lycopersicon L. GGPS2 gene, we constructed a vector containing a GGPS2 gene with green fluorescent protein (GFP) as report gene under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and introduced it into tobacco Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Wisconsin 38 by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. PCR analysis of the DNA from kanamycin resistant tobacco indicated that the transgenic tobacco containing the nptII gene, SlaGGPS2 gene and without contamination of Agrobacterium. We also detected the root tip of kanamycin resistant tobacco showing characteristic fluorescence. The contents of carotenoid, chlorophyll and photosynthesis of transgenic tobacco increased in comparison with wild tobacco after low light treatment. In addition, leaf mass per unit area, total dry weight, ratio of root to shoot in transgenic tobacco were all higher than that of the wild tobacco, which proved that the transgenic tobacco could increase the accumulation of biomass and promote it transport to root. The transgenic tobacco with SlaGGPS2 gene can increase the contents of carotenoid, chlorophyll, enhance the photosynthetic rate, promote the biomass accumulation and its distribution to root. Hence, the transgenic tobacco with SlaGGPS2 gene had increased low light tolerance and the SlaGGPS2 gene maybe can be used in other crops.

  18. Coexpression landscape in ATTED-II: usage of gene list and gene network for various types of pathways.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2010-05-01

    Gene coexpression analyses are a powerful method to predict the function of genes and/or to identify genes that are functionally related to query genes. The basic idea of gene coexpression analyses is that genes with similar functions should have similar expression patterns under many different conditions. This approach is now widely used by many experimental researchers, especially in the field of plant biology. In this review, we will summarize recent successful examples obtained by using our gene coexpression database, ATTED-II. Specifically, the examples will describe the identification of new genes, such as the subunits of a complex protein, the enzymes in a metabolic pathway and transporters. In addition, we will discuss the discovery of a new intercellular signaling factor and new regulatory relationships between transcription factors and their target genes. In ATTED-II, we provide two basic views of gene coexpression, a gene list view and a gene network view, which can be used as guide gene approach and narrow-down approach, respectively. In addition, we will discuss the coexpression effectiveness for various types of gene sets.

  19. Transformation of somatic embryos of Prunus incisa ‘February Pink’ with a visible reporter gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system was developed for the ornamental cherry species Prunus incisa. This system uses both an antibiotic resistance gene (NPTII) and a visible selectable marker, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), to select plants. Cells from leaf and root explants were tr...

  20. A Caenorhabditis elegans RNA polymerase II gene, ama-1 IV, and nearby essential genes.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, T M; Riddle, D L

    1988-01-01

    The amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans is encoded by the ama-1 gene, located approximately 0.05 map unit to the right of dpy-13 IV. Using the amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. Of the six ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants examined, two are arrested late in embryogenesis. One of these is a large deficiency, mDf9, but the second may be a novel point mutation. The four other mutants are hypomorphs, and presumably produce altered RNA polymerase II enzymes with some residual function. Two of these mutants develop into sterile adults at 20 degrees but are arrested as larvae at 25 degrees, and two others are fertile at 20 degrees and sterile at 25 degrees. Temperature-shift experiments performed with the adult sterile mutant, ama-1(m118m238ts), have revealed a temperature-sensitive period that begins late in gonadogenesis and is centered around the initiation of egg-laying. Postembryonic development at 25 degrees is slowed by 30%. By contrast, the amanitin-resistant allele of ama-1 has very little effect on developmental rate or fertility. We have identified 15 essential genes in an interval of 4.5 map units surrounding ama-1, as well as four gamma-ray-induced deficiencies and two duplications that include the ama-1 gene. The larger duplication, mDp1, may include the entire left arm of chromosome IV, and it recombines with the normal homologue at a low frequency. The smallest deficiency, mDf10, complements all but three identified genes: let-278, dpy-13 and ama-1, which define an interval of only 0.1 map unit. The terminal phenotype of mDf10 homozygotes is developmental arrest during the first larval stage, suggesting that there is sufficient maternal RNA polymerase II to complete embryonic development.

  1. Gene expression patterns during somatic embryo development and germination in maize Hi II callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Che, Ping; Love, Tanzy M; Frame, Bronwyn R; Wang, Kan; Carriquiry, Alicia L; Howell, Stephen H

    2006-09-01

    Gene expression patterns were profiled during somatic embryogenesis in a regeneration-proficient maize hybrid line, Hi II, in an effort to identify genes that might be used as developmental markers or targets to optimize regeneration steps for recovering maize plants from tissue culture. Gene expression profiles were generated from embryogenic calli induced to undergo embryo maturation and germination. Over 1,000 genes in the 12,060 element arrays showed significant time variation during somatic embryo development. A substantial number of genes were downregulated during embryo maturation, largely histone and ribosomal protein genes, which may result from a slowdown in cell proliferation and growth during embryo maturation. The expression of these genes dramatically recovered at germination. Other genes up-regulated during embryo maturation included genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes (nucleases, glucosidases and proteases) and a few storage genes (an alpha-zein and caleosin), which are good candidates for developmental marker genes. Germination is accompanied by the up-regulation of a number of stress response and membrane transporter genes, and, as expected, greening is associated with the up-regulation of many genes encoding photosynthetic and chloroplast components. Thus, some, but not all genes typically associated with zygotic embryogenesis are significantly up or down-regulated during somatic embryogenesis in Hi II maize line regeneration. Although many genes varied in expression throughout somatic embryo development in this study, no statistically significant gene expression changes were detected between total embryogenic callus and callus enriched for transition stage somatic embryos.

  2. A novel TBP-TAF complex on RNA polymerase II-transcribed snRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Zaborowska, Justyna; Taylor, Alice; Roeder, Robert G; Murphy, Shona

    2012-01-01

    Initiation of transcription of most human genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) requires the formation of a preinitiation complex comprising TFIIA, B, D, E, F, H and RNAP II. The general transcription factor TFIID is composed of the TATA-binding protein and up to 13 TBP-associated factors. During transcription of snRNA genes, RNAP II does not appear to make the transition to long-range productive elongation, as happens during transcription of protein-coding genes. In addition, recognition of the snRNA gene-type specific 3' box RNA processing element requires initiation from an snRNA gene promoter. These characteristics may, at least in part, be driven by factors recruited to the promoter. For example, differences in the complement of TAFs might result in differential recruitment of elongation and RNA processing factors. As precedent, it already has been shown that the promoters of some protein-coding genes do not recruit all the TAFs found in TFIID. Although TAF5 has been shown to be associated with RNAP II-transcribed snRNA genes, the full complement of TAFs associated with these genes has remained unclear. Here we show, using a ChIP and siRNA-mediated approach, that the TBP/TAF complex on snRNA genes differs from that found on protein-coding genes. Interestingly, the largest TAF, TAF1, and the core TAFs, TAF10 and TAF4, are not detected on snRNA genes. We propose that this snRNA gene-specific TAF subset plays a key role in gene type-specific control of expression.

  3. Chromosomal localization and structure of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.; Huberman, E.; Collart, F.

    1994-05-01

    We determined the chromosomal localization and structure of the gene encoding human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205), an enzyme associated with cellular proliferation, malignant transformation, and differentiation. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for type II IMPDH, we screened a panel of human-Chinese hamster cell somatic hybrids and a separate deletion panel of chromosome 3 hybrids and localized the gene to 3p21.1{yields}p24.2. Two overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones containing the full gene for type II IMPDH were isolated and a physical map of 117 kb of human genomic DNA in this region of chromosome 3 wasmore » constructed. The gene for type II IMPDH was localized and oriented on this map and found to span no more than 12.5 kb.« less

  4. The Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus Gene II Product Interacts with the Coat Protein Domain of the Viral Gene III Polyprotein

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Etienne; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Hohn, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) is a plant pararetrovirus whose DNA genome contains four genes encoding three proteins and a large polyprotein. The function of most of the viral proteins is still unknown. To investigate the role of the gene II product (P2), we searched for interactions between this protein and other RTBV proteins. P2 was shown to interact with the coat protein (CP) domain of the viral gene III polyprotein (P3) both in the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro. Domains involved in the P2-CP association have been identified and mapped on both proteins. To determine the importance of this interaction for viral multiplication, the infectivity of RTBV gene II mutants was investigated by agroinoculation of rice plants. The results showed that virus viability correlates with the ability of P2 to interact with the CP domain of P3. This study suggests that P2 could participate in RTBV capsid assembly. PMID:10666237

  5. Differential gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus exposed to Orange II and Sudan III azo dyes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongmiao; Xu, Joshua; Kweon, Oh-Gew; Zou, Wen; Feng, Jinhui; He, Gui-Xin; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2018-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the effects of azo dyes and their reduction metabolites on bacterial cell growth and cell viability. In this report, the effects of Orange II and Sudan III on gene expression profiling in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC BAA 1556 were analyzed using microarray and quantitative RT-PCR technology. Upon exposure to 6 μg/ml Orange II for 18 h, 21 genes were found to be differently expressed. Among them, 8 and 13 genes were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve stress response caused by drug metabolism, oxidation, and alkaline shock indicating that S. aureus could adapt to Orange II exposure through a balance between up and down regulated gene expression. Whereas, after exposure to 6 μg/ml Sudan III for 18 h, 57 genes were differentially expressed. In which, 51 genes were up-regulated and 6 were down-regulated. Most proteins encoded by these differentially expressed genes involve in cell wall/membrane biogenesis and biosynthesis, nutrient uptake, transport and metabolite, and stress response, suggesting that Sudan III damages the bacterial cell wall or/and membrane due to binding of the dye. Further analysis indicated that all differentially expressed genes encoded membrane proteins were up-regulated and most of them serve as transporters. The result suggested that these genes might contribute to survival, persistence and growth in the presence of Sudan III. Only one gene msrA, which plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance, was found to be down-regulated after exposure to both Orange II and Sudan III. The present results suggested that both these two azo dyes can cause stress in S. aureus and the response of the bacterium to the stress is mainly related to characteristics of the azo dyes. PMID:25720844

  6. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W.; Whittingham, Linda A.; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O.

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  7. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—effects of selection and gene conversion

    PubMed Central

    Minias, P; Bateson, Z W; Whittingham, L A; Johnson, J A; Oyler-McCance, S; Dunn, P O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens. PMID:26860199

  8. Cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene in mitochondria of Oenothera has no intron

    PubMed Central

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Brennicke, Axel

    1983-01-01

    The cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene has been localized in the mitochondrial genome of Oenothera berteriana and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The coding sequence contains 777 bp and, unlike the corresponding gene in Zea mays, is not interrupted by an intron. No TGA codon is found within the open reading frame. The codon CGG, as in the maize gene, is used in place of tryptophan codons of corresponding genes in other organisms. At position 742 in the Oenothera sequence the TGG of maize is changed into a CGG codon, where Trp is conserved as the amino acid in other organisms. Homologous sequences occur more than once in the mitochondrial genome as several mitochondrial DNA species hybridize with DNA probes of the cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene. ImagesFig. 5. PMID:16453484

  9. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  10. Organization of genes required for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde in three type II methylotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, C.; Machlin, S.; Zhang, Y.

    Restriction maps of genes required for the synthesis of active methanol dehydrogenase in Methylobacterium organophilum XX and Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 have been completed and compared. In these two species of pink-pigmented, type II methylotrophs, 15 genes were identified that were required for the expression of methanol dehydrogenase activity. None of these genes were required for the synthesis of the prosthetic group of methanol dehydrogenase, pyrroloquinoline quinone. The structural gene required for the synthesis of cytochrome c{sub L}, an electron acceptor uniquely required for methanol dehydrogenase, and the genes encoding small basic peptides that copurified with methanol dehydrogenases were closelymore » linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. A cloned 22-kilobase DNA insert from Methylsporovibrio methanica 81Z, an obligate type II methanotroph, complemented mutants that contained lesions in four genes closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. The methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome c{sub L} structural genes were found to be transcribed independently in M. organophilum XX. Only two of the genes required for methanol dehydrogenase synthesis in this bacterium were found to be cotranscribed.« less

  11. Organization of Genes Required for the Oxidation of Methanol to Formaldehyde in Three Type II Methylotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Bastien, C.; Machlin, S.; Zhang, Y.; Donaldson, K.; Hanson, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    Restriction maps of genes required for the synthesis of active methanol dehydrogenase in Methylobacterium organophilum XX and Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1 have been completed and compared. In these two species of pink-pigmented, type II methylotrophs, 15 genes were identified that were required for the expression of methanol dehydrogenase activity. None of these genes were required for the synthesis of the prosthetic group of methanol dehydrogenase, pyrroloquinoline quinone. The structural gene required for the synthesis of cytochrome cL, an electron acceptor uniquely required for methanol dehydrogenase, and the genes encoding small basic peptides that copurified with methanol dehydrogenases were closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. A cloned 22-kilobase DNA insert from Methylsporovibrio methanica 81Z, an obligate type II methanotroph, complemented mutants that contained lesions in four genes closely linked to the methanol dehydrogenase structural genes. The methanol dehydrogenase and cytochrome cL structural genes were found to be transcribed independently in M. organophilum XX. Only two of the genes required for methanol dehydrogenase synthesis in this bacterium were found to be cotranscribed. PMID:16348074

  12. Identification of cis-elements conferring high levels of gene expression in non-green plastids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiang; Ruf, Stephanie; Hasse, Claudia; Childs, Liam; Scharff, Lars B; Bock, Ralph

    2012-10-01

    Although our knowledge about the mechanisms of gene expression in chloroplasts has increased substantially over the past decades, next to nothing is known about the signals and factors that govern expression of the plastid genome in non-green tissues. Here we report the development of a quantitative method suitable for determining the activity of cis-acting elements for gene expression in non-green plastids. The in vivo assay is based on stable transformation of the plastid genome and the discovery that root length upon seedling growth in the presence of the plastid translational inhibitor kanamycin is directly proportional to the expression strength of the resistance gene nptII in transgenic tobacco plastids. By testing various combinations of promoters and translation initiation signals, we have used this experimental system to identify cis-elements that are highly active in non-green plastids. Surprisingly, heterologous expression elements from maize plastids were significantly more efficient in conferring high expression levels in root plastids than homologous expression elements from tobacco. Our work has established a quantitative method for characterization of gene expression in non-green plastid types, and has led to identification of cis-elements for efficient plastid transgene expression in non-green tissues, which are valuable tools for future transplastomic studies in basic and applied research. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Three copies of a single protein II-encoding sequence in the genome of Neisseria gonorrhoeae JS3: evidence for gene conversion and gene duplication.

    PubMed

    van der Ley, P

    1988-11-01

    Gonococci express a family of related outer membrane proteins designated protein II (P.II). These surface proteins are subject to both phase variation and antigenic variation. The P.II gene repertoire of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain JS3 was found to consist of at least ten genes, eight of which were cloned. Sequence analysis and DNA hybridization studies revealed that one particular P.II-encoding sequence is present in three distinct, but almost identical, copies in the JS3 genome. These genes encode the P.II protein that was previously identified as P.IIc. Comparison of their sequences shows that the multiple copies of this P.IIc-encoding gene might have been generated by both gene conversion and gene duplication.

  14. Coupling two mercury resistance genes in Eastern cottonwood enhances the processing of organomercury.

    PubMed

    Lyyra, Satu; Meagher, Richard B; Kim, Tehryung; Heaton, Andrew; Montello, Paul; Balish, Rebecca S; Merkle, Scott A

    2007-03-01

    Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) trees were engineered to express merA (mercuric ion reductase) and merB (organomercury lyase) transgenes in order to be used for the phytoremediation of mercury-contaminated soils. Earlier studies with Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum showed that this gene combination resulted in more efficient detoxification of organomercurial compounds than did merB alone, but neither species is optimal for long-term field applications. Leaf discs from in vitro-grown merA, nptII (neomycin phosphotransferase) transgenic cottonwood plantlets were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58 carrying the merB and hygromycin resistance (hptII) genes. Polymerase chain reaction of shoots regenerated from the leaf discs under selection indicated an overall transformation frequency of 20%. Western blotting of leaves showed that MerA and MerB proteins were produced. In vitro-grown merA/merB plants were highly resistant to phenylmercuric acetate, and detoxified organic mercury compounds two to three times more rapidly than did controls, as shown by mercury volatilization assay. This indicates that these cottonwood trees are reasonable candidates for the remediation of organomercury-contaminated sites.

  15. An efficient and reproducible protocol for the production of salt tolerant transgenic wheat plants expressing the Arabidopsis AtNHX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Moghaieb, Reda E A; Sharaf, Ahmed N; Soliman, Mohamed H; El-Arabi, Nagwa I; Momtaz, Osama A

    2014-01-01

    We present an efficient method for the production of transgenic salt tolerant hexaploid wheat plants expressing the Arabidopsis AtNHX1 gene. Wheat mature zygotic embryos were isolated from two hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivars (namely: Gemmeiza 9 and Gemmeiza 10) and were transformed with the A. tumefaciens LBA4404 harboring the pBI-121 vector containing the AtNHX1 gene. Transgenic wheat lines that express the gus intron was obtained and used as control. The results confirmed that npt-II gene could be transmitted and expressed in the T2 following 3:1 Mendelian segregation while the control plant couldn't. The data indicate that, the AtNHX1 gene was integrated in a stable manner into the wheat genome and the corresponding transcripts were expressed. The transformation efficiency was 5.7 and 7.5% for cultivars Gemmeiza 10 and Gemmeiza 9, respectively. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of AtNHX1 gene in wheat salt tolerance. The transgenic wheat lines could maintain high growth rate under salt stress condition (350 mM NaCl) while the control plant couldn't. The results confirmed that Na(+)/H(+) antiporter gene AtNHX1 increased salt tolerance by increasing Na(+) accumulation and keeping K+/Na(+) balance. Thus, transgenic plants showed high tolerance to salt stress and can be considered as a new genetic resource in breeding programs.

  16. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  17. Characterization of class II alpha genes and DLA-D region allelic associations in the dog.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, U M; Storb, R F

    1988-10-01

    Human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) cDNA probes were used to analyze the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the alpha genes of the DLA-D region in dogs. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes of 23 unrelated DLA-D homozygous dogs representing nine DLA-D types (defined by mixed leucocyte reaction) was digested with restriction enzymes (BamHI, EcoRI, Hind III, Pvu II, Taq I, Rsa I, Msp I, Pst I and Bgl II), separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and transferred onto Biotrace membrane. The Southern blots were successively hybridized with radiolabelled HLA cDNA probes corresponding to DQ, DP, DZ and DR alpha genes. Clear evidence was obtained for the canine homologues of DQ and DR alpha genes with simple bi- or tri-allelic polymorphism respectively. Evidence for a single, nonpolymorphic DP alpha gene was also obtained. However, the presence of a DZ alpha gene could not be clearly demonstrated in canine genomic DNA. This report extends our previous RFLP analysis documenting polymorphism of DLA class II beta genes in the same panel of homozygous typing cell dogs, and provides the basis for DLA-D genotyping at a population level. This study also characterizes the RFLP-defined preferential allelic associations across the DLA-D region in nine different homozygous typing cell specificities.

  18. Genetic polymorphism of estrogen receptor alpha gene in Egyptian women with type II diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Motawi, Tarek M.K.; El-Rehany, Mahmoud A.; Rizk, Sherine M.; Ramzy, Maggie M.; el-Roby, Doaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen might play an important role in type 2 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis. A number of polymorphisms have been reported in the estrogen receptor alpha gene including the XbaI and PvuII restriction enzyme polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to determine if ESRα gene polymorphisms are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and correlated with lipid profile. Ninety diabetic Egyptian patients were compared with forty healthy controls. ESRα genotyping of PvuII and XbaI was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Our study showed that there is more significant difference in the frequency of C and G polymorphic allele between patients and control groups in PvuII and XbaI respectively. Also carriers of minor C and G alleles of PvuII and XbaI gene polymorphisms were associated with increased fasting blood glucose and disturbance in lipid profile as there is an increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides and Low density lipoprotein. So findings of present study suggest the possibility that PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms in ERα are related to T2DM and with increased serum lipids among Egyptian population. PMID:26401488

  19. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.; Yang, H.; Targan, S.

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CImore » (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.« less

  20. Transgenic rice plants harboring an introduced potato proteinase inhibitor II gene are insect resistant.

    PubMed

    Duan, X; Li, X; Xue, Q; Abo-el-Saad, M; Xu, D; Wu, R

    1996-04-01

    We introduced the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PINII) gene (pin2) into several Japonica rice varieties, and regenerated a large number of transgenic rice plants. Wound-inducible expression of the pin2 gene driven by its own promoter, together with the first intron of the rice actin 1 gene (act1), resulted in high-level accumulation of the PINII protein in the transgenic plants. The introduced pin2 gene was stably inherited in the second, third, and fourth generations, as shown by molecular analyses. Based on data from the molecular analyses, several homozygous transgenic lines were obtained. Bioassay for insect resistance with the fifth-generation transgenic rice plants showed that transgenic rice plants had increased resistance to a major rice insect pest, pink stem borer (Sesamia inferens). Thus, introduction of an insecticidal proteinase inhibitor gene into cereal plants can be used as a general strategy for control of insect pests.

  1. Microbe–microbe interactions trigger Mn(II)-oxidizing gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jinsong; Bai, Yaohui; Men, Yujie; Qu, Jiuhui

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an important metal in geochemical cycles. Some microorganisms can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn oxides, which can, in turn, affect the global cycles of other elements by strong sorption and oxidation effects. Microbe–microbe interactions have important roles in a number of biological processes. However, how microbial interactions affect Mn(II) oxidation still remains unknown. Here, we investigated the interactions between two bacteria (Arthrobacter sp. and Sphingopyxis sp.) in a co-culture, which exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity, although neither were able to oxidize Mn(II) in isolation. We demonstrated that the Mn(II)-oxidizing activity in co-culture was most likely induced via contact-dependent interactions. The expressed Mn(II)-oxidizing protein in the co-culture was purified and identified as a bilirubin oxidase belonging to strain Arthrobacter. Full sequencing of the bilirubin oxidase-encoding gene (boxA) was performed. The Mn(II)-oxidizing protein and the transcripts of boxA were detected in the co-culture, but not in either of the isolated cultures. This indicate that boxA was silent in Arthrobacter monoculture, and was activated in response to presence of Sphingopyxis in the co-culture. Further, transcriptomic analysis by RNA-Seq, extracellular superoxide detection and cell density quantification by flow cytometry indicate induction of boxA gene expression in Arthrobacter was co-incident with a stress response triggered by co-cultivation with Sphingopyxis. Our findings suggest the potential roles of microbial physiological responses to stress induced by other microbes in Mn(II) oxidation and extracellular superoxide production. PMID:27518809

  2. RNA polymerase II pausing can be retained or acquired during activation of genes involved in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Samarakkody, Ann; Abbas, Ata; Scheidegger, Adam; Warns, Jessica; Nnoli, Oscar; Jokinen, Bradley; Zarns, Kris; Kubat, Brooke; Dhasarathy, Archana; Nechaev, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Promoter-proximal RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pausing is implicated in the regulation of gene transcription. However, the mechanisms of pausing including its dynamics during transcriptional responses remain to be fully understood. We performed global analysis of short capped RNAs and Pol II Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing in MCF-7 breast cancer cells to map Pol II pausing across the genome, and used permanganate footprinting to specifically follow pausing during transcriptional activation of several genes involved in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). We find that the gene for EMT master regulator Snail (SNAI1), but not Slug (SNAI2), shows evidence of Pol II pausing before activation. Transcriptional activation of the paused SNAI1 gene is accompanied by a further increase in Pol II pausing signal, whereas activation of non-paused SNAI2 gene results in the acquisition of a typical pausing signature. The increase in pausing signal reflects increased transcription initiation without changes in Pol II pausing. Activation of the heat shock HSP70 gene involves pausing release that speeds up Pol II turnover, but does not change pausing location. We suggest that Pol II pausing is retained during transcriptional activation and can further undergo regulated release in a signal-specific manner. PMID:25820424

  3. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Castro, Sergio I; Hleap, Jose S; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS.

  4. Molecular organization of the 5S rDNA gene type II in elasmobranchs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Sergio I.; Hleap, Jose S.; Cárdenas, Heiber; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 5S rDNA gene is a non-coding RNA that can be found in 2 copies (type I and type II) in bony and cartilaginous fish. Previous studies have pointed out that type II gene is a paralog derived from type I. We analyzed the molecular organization of 5S rDNA type II in elasmobranchs. Although the structure of the 5S rDNA is supposed to be highly conserved, our results show that the secondary structure in this group possesses some variability and is different than the consensus secondary structure. One of these differences in Selachii is an internal loop at nucleotides 7 and 112. These mutations observed in the transcribed region suggest an independent origin of the gene among Batoids and Selachii. All promoters were highly conserved with the exception of BoxA, possibly due to its affinity to polymerase III. This latter enzyme recognizes a dT4 sequence as stop signal, however in Rajiformes this signal was doubled in length to dT8. This could be an adaptation toward a higher efficiency in the termination process. Our results suggest that there is no TATA box in elasmobranchs in the NTS region. We also provide some evidence suggesting that the complexity of the microsatellites present in the NTS region play an important role in the 5S rRNA gene since it is significantly correlated with the length of the NTS. PMID:26488198

  5. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. Results We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Conclusions Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South–north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia. PMID:23031405

  6. Evolution of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II genes in the brown bear.

    PubMed

    Kuduk, Katarzyna; Babik, Wiesław; Bojarska, Katarzyna; Sliwińska, Ewa B; Kindberg, Jonas; Taberlet, Pierre; Swenson, Jon E; Radwan, Jacek

    2012-10-02

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins constitute an essential component of the vertebrate immune response, and are coded by the most polymorphic of the vertebrate genes. Here, we investigated sequence variation and evolution of MHC class I and class II DRB, DQA and DQB genes in the brown bear Ursus arctos to characterise the level of polymorphism, estimate the strength of positive selection acting on them, and assess the extent of gene orthology and trans-species polymorphism in Ursidae. We found 37 MHC class I, 16 MHC class II DRB, four DQB and two DQA alleles. We confirmed the expression of several loci: three MHC class I, two DRB, two DQB and one DQA. MHC class I also contained two clusters of non-expressed sequences. MHC class I and DRB allele frequencies differed between northern and southern populations of the Scandinavian brown bear. The rate of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) exceeded the rate of synonymous substitutions (dS) at putative antigen binding sites of DRB and DQB loci and, marginally significantly, at MHC class I loci. Models of codon evolution supported positive selection at DRB and MHC class I loci. Both MHC class I and MHC class II sequences showed orthology to gene clusters found in the giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Historical positive selection has acted on MHC class I, class II DRB and DQB, but not on the DQA locus. The signal of historical positive selection on the DRB locus was particularly strong, which may be a general feature of caniforms. The presence of MHC class I pseudogenes may indicate faster gene turnover in this class through the birth-and-death process. South-north population structure at MHC loci probably reflects origin of the populations from separate glacial refugia.

  7. [Analysis of SOX10 gene mutation in a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Yan, Yousheng; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xuan; Hao, Shen

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To detect potential mutation of SOX10 gene in a pedigree affected with Warrdenburg syndrome type II. METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the proband and his family members. Exons and flanking sequences of MITF, PAX3, SOX10, SNAI2, END3 and ENDRB genes were analyzed by chip capturing and high throughput sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of the SOX10 gene was detected in the proband, for which both parents showed a wild-type genotype. CONCLUSION The c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of SOX10 gene probably underlies the ocular symptoms and hearing loss of the proband.

  8. Transgenic loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plants expressing a modified delta-endotoxin gene of Bacillus thuringiensis with enhanced resistance to Dendrolimus punctatus Walker and Crypyothelea formosicola Staud.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Tian, Yingchuan

    2003-02-01

    A synthetic version of the CRY1Ac gene of Bacillus thuringiensis has been used for the transformation of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using particle bombardment. Mature zygotic embryos were used to be bombarded and to generate organogenic callus and transgenic regenerated plants. Expression vector pB48.215 DNA contained a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) CRY1Ac coding sequence flanked by the double cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and nopaline synthase (NOS) terminator sequences, and the neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) gene controlled by the promoter of the nopaline synthase gene was introduced into loblolly pine tissues by particle bombardment. The transformed tissues were proliferated and selected on media with kanamycin. Shoot regeneration was induced from the kanamycin-resistant calli, and transgenic plantlets were then produced. More than 60 transformed plants from independent transformation events were obtained for each loblolly pine genotype tested. The integration and expression of the introduced genes in the transgenic loblolly pine plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reactions (PCR) analysis, by Southern hybridization, by Northern blot analysis, and by Western blot analysis. Effective resistance of transgenic plants against Dendrolimus punctatus Walker and Crypyothelea formosicola Staud was verified in feeding bioassays with the insects. The transgenic plants recovered could represent a good opportunity to analyse the impact of genetic engineering of pine for sustainable resistance to pests using a B. thuringiensis insecticidal protein. This protocol enabled the routine transformation of loblolly pine plants that were previously difficult to transform.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-II regulates bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jin; Sasaki, Yoko; Zhou, Liming; Takai, Hideki; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2016-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) have been found in bone extracts of several different species, and IGF-II is the most abundant growth factor stored in bone. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a noncollagenous extracellular matrix glycoprotein associated with mineralized connective tissues. In this study, we have investigated the regulation of BSP transcription by IGF-II in rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells. IGF-II (50 ng/ml) increased BSP mRNA and protein levels after 6-h stimulation, and enhanced luciferase activities of the constructs pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60), pLUC5 (-801 to +60) and pLUC6 (-938 to +60). Effects of IGF-II were inhibited by tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors, and abrogated by 2-bp mutations in cAMP response element (CRE), FGF2 response element (FRE) and homeodomain protein-binding site (HOX). The results of gel shift assays showed that nuclear proteins binding to CRE, FRE and HOX sites were increased by IGF-II (50 ng/ml) at 3 and 6 h. CREB1, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos and c-Jun antibodies disrupted the formation of the CRE-protein complexes. Dlx5 and Runx2 antibodies disrupted the FRE- and HOX-protein complex formations. These studies therefore demonstrated that IGF-II increased BSP transcription by targeting CRE, FRE and HOX elements in the proximal promoter of the rat BSP gene. Moreover, phospho-CREB1, c-Fos, c-Jun, Dlx5 and Runx2 transcription factors appear to be key regulators of IGF-II effects on BSP transcription.

  10. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes.

  11. Mechanism of selective recruitment of RNA polymerases II and III to snRNA gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Dergai, Oleksandr; Cousin, Pascal; Gouge, Jerome; Satia, Karishma; Praz, Viviane; Kuhlman, Tracy; Lhôte, Philippe; Vannini, Alessandro; Hernandez, Nouria

    2018-05-01

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) small nuclear RNA (snRNA) promoters and type 3 Pol III promoters have highly similar structures; both contain an interchangeable enhancer and "proximal sequence element" (PSE), which recruits the SNAP complex (SNAPc). The main distinguishing feature is the presence, in the type 3 promoters only, of a TATA box, which determines Pol III specificity. To understand the mechanism by which the absence or presence of a TATA box results in specific Pol recruitment, we examined how SNAPc and general transcription factors required for Pol II or Pol III transcription of SNAPc-dependent genes (i.e., TATA-box-binding protein [TBP], TFIIB, and TFIIA for Pol II transcription and TBP and BRF2 for Pol III transcription) assemble to ensure specific Pol recruitment. TFIIB and BRF2 could each, in a mutually exclusive fashion, be recruited to SNAPc. In contrast, TBP-TFIIB and TBP-BRF2 complexes were not recruited unless a TATA box was present, which allowed selective and efficient recruitment of the TBP-BRF2 complex. Thus, TBP both prevented BRF2 recruitment to Pol II promoters and enhanced BRF2 recruitment to Pol III promoters. On Pol II promoters, TBP recruitment was separate from TFIIB recruitment and enhanced by TFIIA. Our results provide a model for specific Pol recruitment at SNAPc-dependent promoters. © 2018 Dergai et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. The roles of MHC class II genes and post-translational modification in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-08-01

    Our increasing understanding of the etiology of celiac disease, previously considered a simple food hypersensitivity disorder caused by an immune response to cereal gluten proteins, challenges established concepts of autoimmunity. HLA is a chief genetic determinant, and certain HLA-DQ allotypes predispose to the disease by presenting posttranslationally modified (deamidated) gluten peptides to CD4 + T cells. The deamidation of gluten peptides is mediated by transglutaminase 2. Strikingly, celiac disease patients generate highly disease-specific autoantibodies to the transglutaminase 2 enzyme. The dual role of transglutaminase 2 in celiac disease is hardly coincidental. This paper reviews the genetic mapping and involvement of MHC class II genes in disease pathogenesis, and discusses the evidence that MHC class II genes, via the involvement of transglutaminase 2, influence the generation of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

  13. Chemosensory Gene Families in Ectropis grisescens and Candidates for Detection of Type-II Sex Pheromones.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bian, Lei; Xin, Zhao-Jun; Liu, Yan; Chu, Bo; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2017-01-01

    Tea grey geometrid ( Ectropis grisescens ), a devastating chewing pest in tea plantations throughout China, produces Type-II pheromone components. Little is known about the genes encoding proteins involved in the perception of Type-II sex pheromone components. To investigate the olfaction genes involved in E . grisescens sex pheromones and plant volatiles perception, we sequenced female and male antennae transcriptomes of E . grisescens . After assembly and annotation, we identified 153 candidate chemoreception genes in E. grisescens , including 40 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 30 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 59 odorant receptors (ORs), and 24 ionotropic receptors (IRs). The results of phylogenetic, qPCR, and mRNA abundance analyses suggested that three candidate pheromone-binding proteins (EgriOBP2, 3, and 25), two candidate general odorant-binding proteins (EgriOBP1 and 29), six pheromone receptors (EgriOR24, 25, 28, 31, 37, and 44), and EgriCSP8 may be involved in the detection of Type-II sex pheromone components. Functional investigation by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed that EgriOR31 was robustly tuned to the E . grisescens sex pheromone component (Z,Z,Z)-3,6,9-octadecatriene and weakly to the other sex pheromone component (Z,Z)-3,9-6,7-epoxyoctadecadiene. Our results represent a systematic functional analysis of the molecular mechanism of olfaction perception in E . grisescens with an emphasis on gene encoding proteins involved in perception of Type-II sex pheromones, and provide information that will be relevant to other Lepidoptera species.

  14. Chemosensory Gene Families in Ectropis grisescens and Candidates for Detection of Type-II Sex Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Bian, Lei; Xin, Zhao-Jun; Liu, Yan; Chu, Bo; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2017-01-01

    Tea grey geometrid (Ectropis grisescens), a devastating chewing pest in tea plantations throughout China, produces Type-II pheromone components. Little is known about the genes encoding proteins involved in the perception of Type-II sex pheromone components. To investigate the olfaction genes involved in E. grisescens sex pheromones and plant volatiles perception, we sequenced female and male antennae transcriptomes of E. grisescens. After assembly and annotation, we identified 153 candidate chemoreception genes in E. grisescens, including 40 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 30 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 59 odorant receptors (ORs), and 24 ionotropic receptors (IRs). The results of phylogenetic, qPCR, and mRNA abundance analyses suggested that three candidate pheromone-binding proteins (EgriOBP2, 3, and 25), two candidate general odorant-binding proteins (EgriOBP1 and 29), six pheromone receptors (EgriOR24, 25, 28, 31, 37, and 44), and EgriCSP8 may be involved in the detection of Type-II sex pheromone components. Functional investigation by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed that EgriOR31 was robustly tuned to the E. grisescens sex pheromone component (Z,Z,Z)-3,6,9-octadecatriene and weakly to the other sex pheromone component (Z,Z)-3,9-6,7-epoxyoctadecadiene. Our results represent a systematic functional analysis of the molecular mechanism of olfaction perception in E. grisescens with an emphasis on gene encoding proteins involved in perception of Type-II sex pheromones, and provide information that will be relevant to other Lepidoptera species. PMID:29209233

  15. Prdm5 Regulates Collagen Gene Transcription by Association with RNA Polymerase II in Developing Bone

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Carrara, Matteo; Hans, Wolfgang; Wuelling, Manuela; Mentz, Bettina; Multhaupt, Hinke Arnolda; Fog, Cathrine Kolster; Jensen, Klaus Thorleif; Rappsilber, Juri; Vortkamp, Andrea; Coulton, Les; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Couchman, John Robert; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2012-01-01

    PRDM family members are transcriptional regulators involved in tissue specific differentiation. PRDM5 has been reported to predominantly repress transcription, but a characterization of its molecular functions in a relevant biological context is lacking. We demonstrate here that Prdm5 is highly expressed in developing bones; and, by genome-wide mapping of Prdm5 occupancy in pre-osteoblastic cells, we uncover a novel and unique role for Prdm5 in targeting all mouse collagen genes as well as several SLRP proteoglycan genes. In particular, we show that Prdm5 controls both Collagen I transcription and fibrillogenesis by binding inside the Col1a1 gene body and maintaining RNA polymerase II occupancy. In vivo, Prdm5 loss results in delayed ossification involving a pronounced impairment in the assembly of fibrillar collagens. Collectively, our results define a novel role for Prdm5 in sustaining the transcriptional program necessary to the proper assembly of osteoblastic extracellular matrix. PMID:22589746

  16. Stem Cell-Like Gene Expression in Ovarian Cancer Predicts Type II Subtype and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Schwede, Matthew; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Bentink, Stefan; Hofmann, Oliver; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Harrington, David; Quackenbush, John; Culhane, Aedín C.

    2013-01-01

    Although ovarian cancer is often initially chemotherapy-sensitive, the vast majority of tumors eventually relapse and patients die of increasingly aggressive disease. Cancer stem cells are believed to have properties that allow them to survive therapy and may drive recurrent tumor growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells are a rare cell population and difficult to isolate experimentally. Genes that are expressed by stem cells may characterize a subset of less differentiated tumors and aid in prognostic classification of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was the genomic identification and characterization of a subtype of ovarian cancer that has stem cell-like gene expression. Using human and mouse gene signatures of embryonic, adult, or cancer stem cells, we performed an unsupervised bipartition class discovery on expression profiles from 145 serous ovarian tumors to identify a stem-like and more differentiated subgroup. Subtypes were reproducible and were further characterized in four independent, heterogeneous ovarian cancer datasets. We identified a stem-like subtype characterized by a 51-gene signature, which is significantly enriched in tumors with properties of Type II ovarian cancer; high grade, serous tumors, and poor survival. Conversely, the differentiated tumors share properties with Type I, including lower grade and mixed histological subtypes. The stem cell-like signature was prognostic within high-stage serous ovarian cancer, classifying a small subset of high-stage tumors with better prognosis, in the differentiated subtype. In multivariate models that adjusted for common clinical factors (including grade, stage, age), the subtype classification was still a significant predictor of relapse. The prognostic stem-like gene signature yields new insights into prognostic differences in ovarian cancer, provides a genomic context for defining Type I/II subtypes, and potential gene targets which following further validation may be valuable

  17. Persistent Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection occurs in the absence of functional major histocompatibility complex class II genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganta, Roman Reddy; Wilkerson, Melinda J.; Cheng, Chuanmin; Rokey, Aaron M.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease caused by the rickettsia Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We investigated the impact of two genes that control macrophage and T-cell function on murine resistance to E. chaffeensis. Congenic pairs of wild-type and toll-like receptor 4 (tlr4)- or major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-deficient mice were used for these studies. Wild-type mice cleared the infection within 2 weeks, and the response included macrophage activation and the synthesis of E. chaffeensis-specific Th1-type immunoglobulin G response. The absence of a functional tlr4 gene depressed nitric oxide and interleukin 6 secretion by macrophages and resulted in short-term persistent infections for > or =30 days. In the absence of MHC-II alleles, E. chaffeensis infections persisted throughout the entire 3-month evaluation period. Together, these data suggest that macrophage activation and cell-mediated immunity, orchestrated by CD4(+) T cells, are critical for conferring resistance to E. chaffeensis.

  18. Brain-targeted stem cell gene therapy corrects mucopolysaccharidosis type II via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gleitz, Hélène Fe; Liao, Ai Yin; Cook, James R; Rowlston, Samuel F; Forte, Gabriella Ma; D'Souza, Zelpha; O'Leary, Claire; Holley, Rebecca J; Bigger, Brian W

    2018-06-08

    The pediatric lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type II is caused by mutations in IDS, resulting in accumulation of heparan and dermatan sulfate, causing severe neurodegeneration, skeletal disease, and cardiorespiratory disease. Most patients manifest with cognitive symptoms, which cannot be treated with enzyme replacement therapy, as native IDS does not cross the blood-brain barrier. We tested a brain-targeted hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy approach using lentiviral IDS fused to ApoEII (IDS.ApoEII) compared to a lentivirus expressing normal IDS or a normal bone marrow transplant. In mucopolysaccharidosis II mice, all treatments corrected peripheral disease, but only IDS.ApoEII mediated complete normalization of brain pathology and behavior, providing significantly enhanced correction compared to IDS. A normal bone marrow transplant achieved no brain correction. Whilst corrected macrophages traffic to the brain, secreting IDS/IDS.ApoEII enzyme for cross-correction, IDS.ApoEII was additionally more active in plasma and was taken up and transcytosed across brain endothelia significantly better than IDS via both heparan sulfate/ApoE-dependent receptors and mannose-6-phosphate receptors. Brain-targeted hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy provides a promising therapy for MPS II patients. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Linkage of the gene that encodes the alpha 1 chain of type V collagen (COL5A1) to type II Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS II).

    PubMed

    Loughlin, J; Irven, C; Hardwick, L J; Butcher, S; Walsh, S; Wordsworth, P; Sykes, B

    1995-09-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders of connective tissue with skin, ligaments and blood vessels being the main sites affected. The commonest variant (EDS II) exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance and is characterized by joint hypermobility, cigarette paper scars, lax skin and excessive bruising. As yet no gene has been linked to EDS II, nor has linkage been established to a specific region of the genome. However, several candidate genes encoding proteins of the extracellular matrix have been excluded. Using an intragenic simple sequence repeat polymorphism, we report linkage of the COL5A1 gene, which encodes the alpha 1(V) chain of type V collagen, to EDS II. A maximum LOD score (Zmax) for linkage of 8.3 at theta = 0.00 was generated for a single large pedigree.

  20. Casein Kinase II Regulation of the Hot1 Transcription Factor Promotes Stochastic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Laura T.; Wente, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Hog1 MAPK is activated and induces a transcriptional program in response to hyperosmotic stress. Several Hog1-responsive genes exhibit stochastic transcription, resulting in cell-to-cell variability in mRNA and protein levels. However, the mechanisms governing stochastic gene activity are not fully defined. Here we uncover a novel role for casein kinase II (CK2) in the cellular response to hyperosmotic stress. CK2 interacts with and phosphorylates the Hot1 transcription factor; however, Hot1 phosphorylation is not sufficient for controlling the stochastic response. The CK2 protein itself is required to negatively regulate mRNA expression of Hot1-responsive genes and Hot1 enrichment at target promoters. Single-cell gene expression analysis reveals altered activation of Hot1-targeted STL1 in ck2 mutants, resulting in a bimodal to unimodal shift in expression. Together, this work reveals a novel CK2 function during the hyperosmotic stress response that promotes cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. PMID:24817120

  1. TDP2 suppresses chromosomal translocations induced by DNA topoisomerase II during gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Zagnoli-Vieira, Guido; Ntai, Ioanna; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Anderson, Rhona M; Herrero-Ruíz, Andrés; Caldecott, Keith W

    2017-08-10

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by abortive topoisomerase II (TOP2) activity are a potential source of genome instability and chromosome translocation. TOP2-induced DNA double-strand breaks are rejoined in part by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2)-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), but whether this process suppresses or promotes TOP2-induced translocations is unclear. Here, we show that TDP2 rejoins DSBs induced during transcription-dependent TOP2 activity in breast cancer cells and at the translocation 'hotspot', MLL. Moreover, we find that TDP2 suppresses chromosome rearrangements induced by TOP2 and reduces TOP2-induced chromosome translocations that arise during gene transcription. Interestingly, however, we implicate TDP2-dependent NHEJ in the formation of a rare subclass of translocations associated previously with therapy-related leukemia and characterized by junction sequences with 4-bp of perfect homology. Collectively, these data highlight the threat posed by TOP2-induced DSBs during transcription and demonstrate the importance of TDP2-dependent non-homologous end-joining in protecting both gene transcription and genome stability.DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by topoisomerase II (TOP2) are rejoined by TDP2-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) but whether this promotes or suppresses translocations is not clear. Here the authors show that TDP2 suppresses chromosome translocations from DSBs introduced during gene transcription.

  2. Structural features of diverse Pin-II proteinase inhibitor genes from Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Neha S; Dewangan, Veena; Lomate, Purushottam R; Joshi, Rakesh S; Mishra, Manasi; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2015-02-01

    The proteinase inhibitor (PI) genes from Capsicum annuum were characterized with respect to their UTR, introns and promoter elements. The occurrence of PIs with circularly permuted domain organization was evident. Several potato inhibitor II (Pin-II) type proteinase inhibitor (PI) genes have been analyzed from Capsicum annuum (L.) with respect to their differential expression during plant defense response. However, complete gene characterization of any of these C. annuum PIs (CanPIs) has not been carried out so far. Complete gene architectures of a previously identified CanPI-7 (Beads-on-string, Type A) and a member of newly isolated Bracelet type B, CanPI-69 are reported in this study. The 5' UTR (untranslated region), 3'UTR, and intronic sequences of both the CanPI genes were obtained. The genomic sequence of CanPI-7 exhibited, exon 1 (49 base pair, bp) and exon 2 (740 bp) interrupted by a 294-bp long type I intron. We noted the occurrence of three multi-domain PIs (CanPI-69, 70, 71) with circularly permuted domain organization. CanPI-69 was found to possess exon 1 (49 bp), exon 2 (551 bp) and a 584-bp long type I intron. The upstream sequence analysis of CanPI-7 and CanPI-69 predicted various transcription factor-binding sites including TATA and CAAT boxes, hormone-responsive elements (ABRELATERD1, DOFCOREZM, ERELEE4), and a defense-responsive element (WRKY71OS). Binding of transcription factors such as zinc finger motif MADS-box and MYB to the promoter regions was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay followed by mass spectrometric identification. The 3' UTR analysis for 25 CanPI genes revealed unique/distinct 3' UTR sequence for each gene. Structures of three domain CanPIs of type A and B were predicted and further analyzed for their attributes. This investigation of CanPI gene architecture will enable the better understanding of the genetic elements present in CanPIs.

  3. IGF-II gene region polymorphisms related to exertional muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Devaney, Joseph M; Hoffman, Eric P; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Kearns, Amy; Zambraski, Edward; Clarkson, Priscilla M

    2007-05-01

    We examined the association of a novel single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in IGF-I (IGF-I -C1245T located in the promoter) and eight SNPs in the IGF-II gene region with indicators of muscle damage [strength loss, muscle soreness, and increases in circulating levels of creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin] after eccentric exercise. We also examined two SNPs in the IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). The age, height, and body mass of the 151 subjects studied were 24.1 +/- 5.2 yr, 170.8 +/- 9.9 cm, and 73.3 +/- 17.0 kg, respectively. There were no significant associations of phenotypes with IGF-I. IGF-II SNP (G12655A, rs3213216) and IGFBP-3 SNP (A8618T, rs6670) were not significantly associated with any variable. The most significant finding in this study was that for men, IGF-II (C13790G, rs3213221), IGF-II (ApaI, G17200A, rs680), IGF-II antisense (IGF2AS) (G11711T, rs7924316), and IGFBP-3 (-C1592A, rs2132570) were significantly associated with muscle damage indicators. We found that men who were 1) homozygous for the rare IGF-II C13790G allele and rare allele for the ApaI (G17200A) SNP demonstrated the greatest strength loss immediately after exercise, greatest soreness, and highest postexercise serum CK activity; 2) homozygous wild type for IGF2AS (G11711T, rs7924316) had the greatest strength loss and most muscle soreness; and 3) homozygous wild type for the IGF2AS G11711T SNP showed the greatest strength loss, highest muscle soreness, and greater CK and myoglobin response to exercise. In women, fewer significant associations appeared.

  4. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class II B genes in cranes.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Tetsuo I; Akiyama, Takuya; Nishida, Chizuko; Takami, Kazutoshi; Onuma, Manabu; Momose, Kunikazu; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we isolated and characterized the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B genes in cranes. Genomic sequences spanning exons 1 to 4 were amplified and determined in 13 crane species and three other species closely related to cranes. In all, 55 unique sequences were identified, and at least two polymorphic MHC class II B loci were found in most species. An analysis of sequence polymorphisms showed the signature of positive selection and recombination. A phylogenetic reconstruction based on exon 2 sequences indicated that trans-species polymorphism has persisted for at least 10 million years, whereas phylogenetic analyses of the sequences flanking exon 2 revealed a pattern of concerted evolution. These results suggest that both balancing selection and recombination play important roles in the crane MHC evolution.

  5. Mutations in exons of the CYP17-II gene affect sex steroid concentration in male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruiqin; He, Feng; Wen, Haishen; Li, Jifang; Shi, Bao; Shi, Dan; Liu, Miao; Mu, Weijie; Zhang, Yuanqing; Hu, Jian; Han, Weiguo; Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Qingqing; Yuan, Yuren; Liu, Qun

    2012-03-01

    As a specific gene of fish, cytochrome P450c17-II ( CYP17-II) gene plays a key role in the growth, development an reproduction level of fish. In this study, the single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to characterize polymorphisms within the coding region of CYP17-II gene in a population of 75 male Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in CYP17-II gene of Japanese flounder. They were c.G594A (p.G188R), c.G939A and c.G1502A (p.G490D). SNP1 (c.G594A), located in exon 4 of CYP17-II gene, was significantly associated with gonadosomatic index (GSI). Individuals with genotype GG of SNP1 had significantly lower GSI ( P < 0.05) than those with genotype AA or AG. SNP2 (c.G939A) located at the CpG island of CYP17-II gene. The mutation changed the methylation of exon 6. Individuals with genotype AA of SNP2 had significantly lower serum testosterone (T) level and hepatosomatic index (HSI) compared to those with genotype GG. The results suggested that SNP2 could influence the reproductive endocrine of male Japanese flounder. However, the SNP3 (c.G1502A) located in exon 9 did not affect the four measured reproductive traits. This study showed that CYP17-II gene could be a potentially useful candidate gene for the research of genetic breeding and physiological aspects of Japanese flounder.

  6. Two novel mutations of CLCN7 gene in Chinese families with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (type II).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Shao, Chong; Zheng, Yan; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis ("bone-within-bone" structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed "probably damaging" with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense

  7. Structure of novel rat major histocompatibility complex class II genes RT1.Ha and Hb

    SciTech Connect

    Arimura, Yutaka; Tang, Wei Ran; Koda, Toshiaki

    1995-03-01

    We have cloned the novel rat MHC class II genes, RT1.Ha and Hb, which are homologous to human HLA-DPA and DPB. RT1.Hb is a pseudogene, whereas RT1.Ha is apparently intact and may have transcriptional potential. In addition, with an RT1.Ha probe, we detecteda single Southern hybridization band in the genome of the mouse. This finding may aford an opportunity to analyze the HLA-DPA homologue in the mouse genome. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus associated with a novel mutation in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene.

    PubMed

    Fujii, H; Iida, S; Moriwaki, K

    2000-03-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder of renal water conservation due to deficiency of arginine vasopressin as the result of mutations in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII) gene that encodes the hormone or its carrier protein. Thirty-one different mutations have been reported. In this study, we evaluated the AVP-NPII gene in a family with FNDI and identified a new mutation (1911Gright curved arrow A) in the coding sequence for NPII in affected family members. This mutation substitutes Tyr for 74 Cys in the NPII moiety. NPII is an intracellular carrier protein for AVP during the axonal transport from the hypothalamus to the posterior pituitary and contains 14 conserved cysteine residues forming 7 disulfide bonds. Because the mutation cosegregates with the phenotype, it is possible that this mutation causes neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in this family.

  9. NASA's GeneLab Phase II: Federated Search and Data Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Tran, Peter B.

    2017-01-01

    GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to accelerate 'open science' biomedical research in support of the human exploration of space and the improvement of life on earth. Phase I of the four-phase GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) project emphasized capabilities for submission, curation, search, and retrieval of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics ('omics') data from biomedical research of space environments. The focus of development of the GLDS for Phase II has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta-investigations are key to corroborating findings from many kinds of assays and translating them into systems biology knowledge and, eventually, therapeutics.

  10. NASAs GeneLab Phase II: Federated Search and Data Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Costes, Sylvain; Tran, Peter

    2017-01-01

    GeneLab is currently being developed by NASA to accelerate open science biomedical research in support of the human exploration of space and the improvement of life on earth. Phase I of the four-phase GeneLab Data Systems (GLDS) project emphasized capabilities for submission, curation, search, and retrieval of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics (omics) data from biomedical research of space environments. The focus of development of the GLDS for Phase II has been federated data search for and retrieval of these kinds of data across other open-access systems, so that users are able to conduct biological meta-investigations using data from a variety of sources. Such meta-investigations are key to corroborating findings from many kinds of assays and translating them into systems biology knowledge and, eventually, therapeutics.

  11. Expressed MHC class II genes in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from geographically disparate populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Lizabeth; Aldridge, B.M.; Miles, A. Keith; Stott, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is central to maintaining the immunologic vigor of individuals and populations. Classical MHC class II genes were targeted for partial sequencing in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from populations in California, Washington, and Alaska. Sequences derived from sea otter peripheral blood leukocyte mRNAs were similar to those classified as DQA, DQB, DRA, and DRB in other species. Comparisons of the derived amino acid compositions supported the classification of these as functional molecules from at least one DQA, DQB, and DRA locus and at least two DRB loci. While limited in scope, phylogenetic analysis of the DRB peptide‐binding region suggested the possible existence of distinct clades demarcated by geographic region. These preliminary findings support the need for additional MHC gene sequencing and expansion to a comprehensive study targeting additional otters.

  12. DMA and DMB are the only genes in the class II region of the human MHC needed for class II-associated antigen processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ceman, S.; Rudersdorf, R.A.; Petersen, J.M.

    1995-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that homozygous mutations between the LMP2 and DNA loci in the human MHC cause class II molecules to be abnormally conformed and unstable in the presence of SDS at low temperature, and impede class II-associated Ag processing and presentation. These abnormalities result from impaired ability to form intracellular class II/peptide complexes that predominate in normal cells. We show in this work that this defect results from deficient expression of either the DMA or the DMB gene. Human B-LCL.174 (DR3) cells, which have a deletion of all known expressible genes in the class II region, express transgene-encodedmore » HLA-DR3, but have the abnormalities. Transfer of cosmid HA14, which contains the DMA and DMB genes, into .174 (DR3) cells restored normal DR3 conformation, stability in 0.4% SDS at 0{degrees}, and ability to process and present tetanus toxoid, but only when both DMA and DMB mRNAs were present. The requirement for both genetic expressions in engendering normal phenotypes was confirmed by transferring the cloned genes into .174 (DR3) cells separately or together. Because normal phenotypes were fully restored in transferent cells expressing DMA plus DMB, other genes in the {approximately} 1-mb homozygous class II region deletion in .174 (DR3) cells either do not participate in or are dispensable for apparently normal production of intracellular class II/peptide complexes. The properties of DM-deficient EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) suggest ways of identifying humans in whom DM deficiency contributes to congenital immunodeficiency and malignancy. 67 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.« less

  13. Analysis of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2) gene in giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    PubMed

    Ling, S S; Zhu, Y; Lan, D; Li, D S; Pang, H Z; Wang, Y; Li, D Y; Wei, R P; Zhang, H M; Wang, C D; Hu, Y D

    2017-01-23

    The giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca (Ursidae), has a unique bamboo-based diet; however, this low-energy intake has been sufficient to maintain the metabolic processes of this species since the fourth ice age. As mitochondria are the main sites for energy metabolism in animals, the protein-coding genes involved in mitochondrial respiratory chains, particularly cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in electron transfer, could play an important role in giant panda metabolism. Therefore, the present study aimed to isolate, sequence, and analyze the COX2 DNA from individuals kept at the Giant Panda Protection and Research Center, China, and compare these sequences with those of the other Ursidae family members. Multiple sequence alignment showed that the COX2 gene had three point mutations that defined three haplotypes, with 60% of the sequences corresponding to haplotype I. The neutrality tests revealed that the COX2 gene was conserved throughout evolution, and the maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis, using homologous sequences from other Ursidae species, showed clustering of the COX2 sequences of giant pandas, suggesting that this gene evolved differently in them.

  14. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species.

  15. Recombination and mutation of class II histocompatibility genes in wild mice.

    PubMed

    Wakeland, E K; Darby, B R

    1983-12-01

    We have compared the tryptic peptide fingerprints of the A alpha, A beta, E alpha, and E beta subunits encoded by four wild-derived H-2 complexes expressing A molecules closely related to Ak. The A molecules encoded by these Ak-related mice have A alpha and A beta subunits that differ from A alpha k and A beta k by less than 10% of their tryptic peptides. Comparisons among the four wild-derived A molecules suggested that these contemporary A alpha and A beta alleles arose by sequential mutational events from common ancestor A alpha and A beta alleles. These results suggest that A alpha and A beta may co-evolve as an A beta A alpha gene duplex in wild mice. Tryptic peptide fingerprint comparisons of the E beta gene linked to these Ak-related A beta A alpha gene duplexes indicate that two encode E beta d-like subunits, whereas another encodes an E beta s-like subunit. These results strongly suggest that the A beta A alpha duplex and E beta recombine in wild mouse populations. The significantly different evolutionary patterns exhibited by the class II genes encoding A vs E molecules are discussed.

  16. [Detection of putative polysaccharide biosynthesis genes in Azospirillum brasilense strains from serogroups I and II].

    PubMed

    Petrova, L P; Prilipov, A G; Katsy, E I

    2017-01-01

    It is known that in Azospirillum brasilense strains Sp245 and SR75 included in serogroup I, the repeat units of their O-polysaccharides consist of five residues of D-rhamnose, and in strain SR15, of four; and the heteropolymeric O-polysaccharide of A. brasilense type strain Sp7 from serogroup II contains not less than five types of repeat units. In the present work, a complex of nondegenerate primers to the genes of A. brasilense Sp245 plasmids AZOBR_p6, AZOBR_p3, and AZOBR_p2, which encode putative enzymes for the biosynthesis of core oligosaccharide and O-polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide, capsular polysaccharides, and exopolysaccharides, was proposed. By using the designed primers, products of the expected sizes were synthesized in polymerase chain reactions on genomic DNA of A. brasilense Sp245, SR75, SR15, and Sp7 in 36, 29, 23, and 12 cases, respectively. As a result of sequencing of a number of amplicons, a high (86–99%) level of identity of the corresponding putative polysaccharide biosynthesis genes in three A. brasilense strains from serogroup I was detected. In a blotting-hybridization reaction with the biotin-labeled DNA of the A. brasilense gene AZOBR_p60122 coding for putative permease of the ABC transporter of polysaccharides, localization of the homologous gene in ~120-MDa plasmids of the bacteria A. brasilense SR15 and SR75 was revealed.

  17. Association analysis of class II cytokine and receptor genes in vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Traks, Tanel; Karelson, Maire; Reimann, Ene; Rätsep, Ranno; Silm, Helgi; Vasar, Eero; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli

    2016-05-01

    The loss of melanocytes in vitiligo is mainly attributed to defective autoimmune mechanisms and lately autoinflammatory mediators have become more emphasized. Among these, a number of class II cytokines and their receptors have displayed altered expression patterns in vitiligo. Thus, we selected 30 SNPs from the regions of respective genes to be genotyped in Estonian case-control sample (109 and 328 individuals, respectively). For more precise analyses, patients were divided into subgroups based on vitiligo progression activity, age of onset, sex, occurrence of vitiligo among relatives, extent of depigmented areas, appearance of Köbner's phenomenon, existence of halo nevi, occurrence of spontaneous repigmentation, and amount of thyroid peroxidase antibodies. No associations appeared in whole vitiligo group. In subgroups, several allelic and haplotype associations were found. The strongest involved SNPs rs12301088 (near IL26 gene), that was associated with familial vitiligo and existence of halo nevi, and rs2257167 (IFNAR1 gene), that was associated with female vitiligo. Additionally, haplotypes consisting of rs12301088 and rs12321603 alleles (IL26-IL22 genes), that were associated with familial vitiligo and existence of halo nevi. In conclusion, several genetic associations with vitiligo subphenotypes were revealed and functional explanations to these remain to be determined in respective studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Positive selection on MHC class II DRB and DQB genes in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus).

    PubMed

    Scherman, Kristin; Råberg, Lars; Westerdahl, Helena

    2014-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIB genes show considerable sequence similarity between loci. The MHC class II DQB and DRB genes are known to exhibit a high level of polymorphism, most likely maintained by parasite-mediated selection. Studies of the MHC in wild rodents have focused on DRB, whilst DQB has been given much less attention. Here, we characterised DQB genes in Swedish bank voles Myodes glareolus, using full-length transcripts. We then designed primers that specifically amplify exon 2 from DRB (202 bp) and DQB (205 bp) and investigated molecular signatures of natural selection on DRB and DQB alleles. The presence of two separate gene clusters was confirmed using BLASTN and phylogenetic analysis, where our seven transcripts clustered according to either DQB or DRB homologues. These gene clusters were again confirmed on exon 2 data from 454-amplicon sequencing. Our DRB primers amplify a similar number of alleles per individual as previously published DRB primers, though our reads are longer. Traditional d N/d S analyses of DRB sequences in the bank vole have not found a conclusive signal of positive selection. Using a more advanced substitution model (the Kumar method) we found positive selection in the peptide binding region (PBR) of both DRB and DQB genes. Maximum likelihood models of codon substitutions detected positively selected sites located in the PBR of both DQB and DRB. Interestingly, these analyses detected at least twice as many positively selected sites in DQB than DRB, suggesting that DQB has been under stronger positive selection than DRB over evolutionary time.

  19. A temperature-tolerant multiplex elements and genes screening system for genetically modified organisms based on dual priming oligonucleotide primers and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Wei, Shuang; Wang, Chenguang; Du, Zhixin; Zhu, Pengyu; Wu, Xiyang; Wu, Gang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2017-08-15

    High throughput screening systems are the preferred solution to meet the urgent requirement of increasing number of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, we have successfully developed a multiplex GMO element screening system with dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers. This system can detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S), terminator of nopaline synthase gene (NOS), figwort mosaic virus 35S (FMV 35S) promoter, neomycin phosphotransferaseII (NPTII), Bt Cry 1Ab, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase genes (bar) and Streptomyces viridochromogenes (pat) simultaneously, which covers more than 90% of all authorized GMO species worldwide. This system exhibits a high tolerance to annealing temperatures, high specificity and a limit of detection equal to conventional PCR. A total of 214 samples from markets, national entry-exit agencies, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurement (IRMM) and the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) were also tested for applicability. This screening system is therefore suitable for GMO screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A mixed group II/group III twintron in the Euglena gracilis chloroplast ribosomal protein S3 gene: evidence for intron insertion during gene evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Copertino, D W; Christopher, D A; Hallick, R B

    1991-01-01

    The splicing of a 409 nucleotide intron from the Euglena gracilis chloroplast ribosomal protein S3 gene (rps3) was examined by cDNA cloning and sequencing, and northern hybridization. Based on the characterization of a partially spliced pre-mRNA, the intron was characterized as a 'mixed' twintron, composed of a 311 nucleotide group II intron internal to a 98 nucleotide group III intron. Twintron excision is via a 2-step sequential splicing pathway, with removal of the internal group II intron preceding excision of the external group III intron. Based on secondary structural analysis of the twintron, we propose that group III introns may represent highly degenerate versions of group II introns. The existence of twintrons is interpreted as evidence that group II introns were inserted during the evolution of Euglena chloroplast genes from a common ancestor with eubacteria, archaebacteria, cyanobacteria, and other chloroplasts. Images PMID:1721702

  1. Progranulin gene variability influences the risk for bipolar I disorder, but not bipolar II disorder.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Daniela; Prunas, Cecilia; Paoli, Riccardo A; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Fenoglio, Chiara; Villa, Chiara; Palazzo, Carlotta; Cigliobianco, Michela; Camuri, Giulia; Serpente, Maria; Scarpini, Elio; Altamura, A Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Recent data have shown that genetic variability in the progranulin (GRN) gene may contribute to the susceptibility to developing bipolar disorder (BD). However, in regard to patients with BD, no information is available on the role of genetic variability and plasma progranulin levels in different types of this disorder. In this study, we performed an association analysis of GRN in an Italian population consisting of 134 patients with BD and 232 controls to evaluate progranulin plasma levels. The presence of the polymorphic variant of the rs5848 single nucleotide polymorphism is protective for the development of bipolar I disorder (BD-I) (odds ratio = 0.55, 95% confidence interval: 0.33-0.93; p = 0.024) but not bipolar II disorder (BD-II) (p > 0.05). In addition, plasma progranulin levels are significantly decreased in BD [mean ± standard deviation (SD) 112 ± 35 versus 183 ± 93 ng/mL in controls; p < 0.001]. Regarding the influence of GRN variability on BD susceptibility, the predisposing genetic background differs between BD-I and BD-II, possibly implying that pathogenic mechanisms differ between the two subtypes of BD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Genetic Diversity of the Flagellin Genes of Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II

    PubMed Central

    Woudstra, Cedric; Lambert, Dominic; Anniballi, Fabrizio; De Medici, Dario; Austin, John

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by phenotypically and genetically different Clostridium species, including Clostridium botulinum and some strains of Clostridium baratii (serotype F) and Clostridium butyricum (serotype E). BoNT-producing clostridia responsible for human botulism encompass strains of group I (secreting proteases, producing toxin serotype A, B, or F, and growing optimally at 37°C) and group II (nonproteolytic, producing toxin serotype E, B, or F, and growing optimally at 30°C). Here we report the development of real-time PCR assays for genotyping C. botulinum strains of groups I and II based on flaVR (variable region sequence of flaA) sequences and the flaB gene. Real-time PCR typing of regions flaVR1 to flaVR10 and flaB was optimized and validated with 62 historical and Canadian C. botulinum strains that had been previously typed. Analysis of 210 isolates of European origin allowed the identification of four new C. botulinum flaVR types (flaVR11 to flaVR14) and one new flaVR type specific to C. butyricum type E (flaVR15). The genetic diversity of the flaVR among C. botulinum strains investigated in the present study reveals the clustering of flaVR types into 5 major subgroups. Subgroups 1, 3, and 4 contain proteolytic Clostridium botulinum, subgroup 2 is made up of nonproteolytic C. botulinum only, and subgroup 5 is specific to C. butyricum type E. The genetic variability of the flagellin genes carried by C. botulinum and the possible association of flaVR types with certain geographical areas make gene profiling of flaVR and flaB promising in molecular surveillance and epidemiology of C. botulinum. PMID:23603687

  3. A comparative gene analysis with rice identified orthologous group II HKT genes and their association with Na(+) concentration in bread wheat.

    PubMed

    Ariyarathna, H A Chandima K; Oldach, Klaus H; Francki, Michael G

    2016-01-19

    Although the HKT transporter genes ascertain some of the key determinants of crop salt tolerance mechanisms, the diversity and functional role of group II HKT genes are not clearly understood in bread wheat. The advanced knowledge on rice HKT and whole genome sequence was, therefore, used in comparative gene analysis to identify orthologous wheat group II HKT genes and their role in trait variation under different saline environments. The four group II HKTs in rice identified two orthologous gene families from bread wheat, including the known TaHKT2;1 gene family and a new distinctly different gene family designated as TaHKT2;2. A single copy of TaHKT2;2 was found on each homeologous chromosome arm 7AL, 7BL and 7DL and each gene was expressed in leaf blade, sheath and root tissues under non-stressed and at 200 mM salt stressed conditions. The proteins encoded by genes of the TaHKT2;2 family revealed more than 93% amino acid sequence identity but ≤52% amino acid identity compared to the proteins encoded by TaHKT2;1 family. Specifically, variations in known critical domains predicted functional differences between the two protein families. Similar to orthologous rice genes on chromosome 6L, TaHKT2;1 and TaHKT2;2 genes were located approximately 3 kb apart on wheat chromosomes 7AL, 7BL and 7DL, forming a static syntenic block in the two species. The chromosomal region on 7AL containing TaHKT2;1 7AL-1 co-located with QTL for shoot Na(+) concentration and yield in some saline environments. The differences in copy number, genes sequences and encoded proteins between TaHKT2;2 homeologous genes and other group II HKT gene families within and across species likely reflect functional diversity for ion selectivity and transport in plants. Evidence indicated that neither TaHKT2;2 nor TaHKT2;1 were associated with primary root Na(+) uptake but TaHKT2;1 may be associated with trait variation for Na(+) exclusion and yield in some but not all saline environments.

  4. Changes in RNA polymerase II progression influence somatic hypermutation of Ig-related genes by AID

    PubMed Central

    Kodgire, Prashant; Mukkawar, Priyanka; Ratnam, Sarayu; Martin, Terence E.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of Ig genes is initiated by the activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and requires target gene transcription. We previously proposed that AID may associate with the RNA polymerase II (Pol). Here, to determine aspects of the transcription process required for SHM, we knocked-in a transcription terminator into an Ig gene variable region in DT40 chicken B cell line. We found that the human β-globin terminator was an efficient inhibitor of downstream transcription in these cells. The terminator reduced mutations downstream of the poly(A) signal, suggesting that the process of transcription is essential for efficient SHM and that AID has better access to its target when Pol is in the elongating rather than terminating mode. Mutations upstream of the poly(A) site were almost doubled in the active terminator clones compared with an inactivated terminator, and this region showed more single-stranded DNA, indicating that Pol pausing assists SHM. Moreover, the nontranscribed DNA strand was the preferred SHM target upstream of the active terminator. Pol pausing during poly(A) site recognition may facilitate persistence of negative supercoils, exposing the coding single strand and possibly allowing the nascent RNA intermittent reannealing with the template strand, for prolonged access of AID. PMID:23752228

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes in response to mercury I and II stress in Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Ivana; Faedda, Roberto; Sanzaro, Vincenzo; Lo Piero, Angela R; Petrone, Goffredo; Cacciola, Santa O

    2012-09-15

    Filamentous fungi are very promising organisms in both the control and the reduction of the amount of heavy metal released by human and industrial activities. In particular, Trichoderma harzianum demonstrated to be tolerant towards different heavy metals, such as mercury and cadmium, even though the mechanism underlying this tolerance is not fully understood. By using a particular strategy of the suppression subtractive hybridization technique, we were able to identify in the strain IMI 393899 of T. harzianum eight different genes up-regulated in the presence of mercury II with respect to cadmium. Among the genes identified, a possible role in the tolerance mechanism could be envisaged for hydrophobin, due to its ability to dissolve hydrophobic molecules into aqueous media. We also show that IMI 393899 grows at the same rate of control culture in the presence of mercury I and that all eight genes isolated were also up-regulated in this condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Zn(II)-dipicolylamine-based metallo-lipids as novel non-viral gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Rong-Chuan; Liu, Qiang; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a series of Zn(II)-dipicolylamine (Zn-DPA) based cationic lipids bearing different hydrophobic tails (long chains, α-tocopherol, cholesterol or diosgenin) were synthesized. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these lipids was studied in detail by investigating the effects of several structural aspects including the type of hydrophobic tails, the chain length and saturation degree. In addition, several assays were used to study their interactions with plasmid DNA, and results reveal that these lipids could condense DNA into nanosized particles with appropriate size and zeta-potentials. MTT-based cell viability assays showed that lipoplexes 5 had low cytotoxicity. The in vitro gene transfection studies showed the hydrophobic tails clearly affected the TE, and hexadecanol-containing lipid 5b gives the best TE, which was 2.2 times higher than bPEI 25k in the presence of 10% serum. The results not only demonstrate that these lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, but also afford us clues for further optimization of lipidic gene delivery materials.

  7. The zntA gene of Escherichia coli encodes a Zn(II)-translocating P-type ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, Christopher; Mitra, Bharati; Rosen, Barry P.

    1997-01-01

    The first Zn(II)-translocating P-type ATPase has been identified as the product of o732, a potential gene identified in the sequencing of the Escherichia coli genome. This gene, termed zntA, was disrupted by insertion of a kanamycin gene through homologous recombination. The mutant strain exhibited hypersensitivity to zinc and cadmium salts but not salts of other metals, suggesting a role in zinc homeostasis in E. coli. Everted membrane vesicles from a wild-type strain accumulated 65Zn(II) and 109Cd(II) by using ATP as an energy source. Transport was sensitive to vanadate, an inhibitor of P-type ATPases. Membrane vesicles from the zntA∷kan strain did not accumulate those metal ions. Both the sensitive phenotype and transport defect of the mutant were complemented by expression of zntA on a plasmid. PMID:9405611

  8. Genetic Contribution of MHC Class II Genes in Susceptibility to West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sarri, Constantina A.; Markantoni, Maria; Stamatis, Costas; Papa, Anna; Tsakris, Athanasios; Pervanidou, Danai; Baka, Agoritsa; Politis, Constantina; Billinis, Charalambos; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Mamuris, Zissis

    2016-01-01

    WNV is a zoonotic neurotropic flavivirus that has recently emerged globally as a significant cause of viral encephalitis. The last five years, 624 incidents of WNV infection have been reported in Greece. The risk for severe WNV disease increases among immunosuppressed individuals implying thus the contribution of the MHC locus to the control of WNV infection. In order to investigate a possible association of MHC class II genes, especially HLA-DPA1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DRB1, we examined 105 WNV patients, including 68 cases with neuroinvasive disease and 37 cases with mild clinical phenotype, collected during the period from 2010 to2013, and 100 control individuals selected form the Greek population. Typing was performed for exon 2 for all three genes. DQA1*01:01 was considered to be "protective" against WNV infection (25.4% vs 40.1%, P = 0.004) while DQA1*01:02 was associated with increased susceptibility (48.0% vs 32.1%, P = 0.003). Protection against neuroinvasion was associated with the presence of DRB1*11:02 (4.99% vs 0.0%, P = 0.018). DRB1*16:02 was also absent from the control cohort (P = 0.016). Three additional population control groups were used in order to validate our results. No statistically significant association with the disease was found for HLA-DPA alleles. The results of the present study provide some evidence that MHC class II is involved in the response to WNV infection, outlining infection "susceptibility" and "CNS-high-risk" candidates. Furthermore, three new alleles were identified while the frequency of all alleles in the study was compared with worldwide data. The characterization of the MHC locus could help to estimate the risk for severe WNV cases in a country. PMID:27812212

  9. Association between angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism and essential hypertension: the Ohasama Study.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Ken; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Hozawa, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Koichi; Matsuo, Akiko; Rakugi, Hiromi; Tsuji, Ichiro; Imai, Yutaka; Ogihara, Toshio

    2004-08-01

    Gene targeting approaches have suggested that the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is involved in blood pressure (BP) regulation and modulation of the effect of angiotensin II. The A1166C polymorphism of the AT1 receptor gene (AT1R/A1166C) is associated with hypertension in Caucasians, but not in Japanese. The goal of this study, the Ohasama Study, was to examine the association between AT1R/A1166C and hypertension, especially home BP, in the Japanese general population. The Ohasama Study was a cohort study based on Japanese rural residents of Ohasama Town in the northern part of Japan. Subjects who gave informed consent to the study protocol and genetic analysis were recruited. Home BP was measured twice in the morning within 1 h of waking up and in the evening just before going to bed. The TaqMan polimerase chain reaction (PCR) method clearly determined AT1R/A1166C genotypes (n =1,207). The genotype distribution of AT1R/A1166C was as follows: AA 84%; AC 15%; CC 1%. There was almost no difference in baseline characteristics among the AT1R genotypes (AA, AC, CC). In the subjects not receiving antihypertensive medication (n =817), both casual BP and home BP were not different among the AT1R genotypes after adjusting for confounding factors (age, sex, body mass index, current smoking habit and current alcohol consumption). The frequency of hypertension showed no difference among AT1R genotypes after adjusting for confounding factors, though the AC and CC genotypes were more frequent in hypertensives than in normotensives. Our data suggested that the AT1R/A1166C polymorphism is not a major genetic predisposing factor for hypertension in Japanese.

  10. Variation of Metallothionein I and II Gene Expression in the Bank Vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) Under Environmental Zinc and Cadmium Exposure.

    PubMed

    Mikowska, Magdalena; Dziublińska, Barbara; Świergosz-Kowalewska, Renata

    2018-07-01

    The main idea of the study was to assess how environmental metal pollution activates defence responses at transcription levels in the tissues of bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus). For this purpose, the metallothioneine (MT) genes expression (a well known biomarker of exposure and response to various metals) was measured. The real-time PCR method was used for relative quantification of metallothionein I and metallothionein II expressions in the livers, kidneys and testes of bank voles from six populations exposed to different contaminants, mainly zinc, cadmium and iron. The assessment of Zn, Cu and Fe concentrations in the tissues allowed to study the MTs gene expression responses to these metals. ANOVA analysis showed differences between populations in terms of metal concentration in tissues, livers and kidneys. Student T test showed significant differences in metal concentration between unpolluted and polluted sites only for the liver tissue: significantly lower Zn levels and significantly higher Fe levels in the unpolluted sites. Kruskal-Wallis test performed on C T data shows differences in the gene expressions between populations for both MT genes for liver and testes. In the liver metallothionein I gene expression was upregulated in populations considered as more polluted (up to 7.5 higher expression in Miasteczko Śląskie comparing to Mikołajki). Expression of metallothionein II revealed a similar pattern. In kidneys, differences in expression of both MT genes were not that evident. In testes, MT upregulation in polluted sites was noted for metallothionein II. For metallothionein however, we found downregulation in populations from more contaminated sites. The expressions of both MTs were positively influenced by cadmium in kidney (concentration data from the previous study) and zinc and copper in liver, while cadmium had effects only on the liver MT II gene expression. Positive relationship was obtained for lead and metallothionein II expression in the

  11. Interfacial stress affects rat alveolar type II cell signaling and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hobi, Nina; Ravasio, Andrea; Haller, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Previous work from our group (Ravasio A, Hobi N, Bertocchi C, Jesacher A, Dietl P, Haller T. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 300: C1456-C1465, 2011.) showed that contact of alveolar epithelial type II cells with an air-liquid interface (I(AL)) leads to a paradoxical situation. It is a potential threat that can cause cell injury, but also a Ca(2+)-dependent stimulus for surfactant secretion. Both events can be explained by the impact of interfacial tensile forces on cellular structures. Here, the strength of this mechanical stimulus became also apparent in microarray studies by a rapid and significant change on the transcriptional level. Cells challenged with an I(AL) in two different ways showed activation/inactivation of cellular pathways involved in stress response and defense, and a detailed Pubmatrix search identified genes associated with several lung diseases and injuries. Altogether, they suggest a close relationship of interfacial stress sensation with current models in alveolar micromechanics. Further similarities between I(AL) and cell stretch were found with respect to the underlying signaling events. The source of Ca(2+) was extracellular, and the transmembrane Ca(2+) entry pathway suggests the involvement of a mechanosensitive channel. We conclude that alveolar type II cells, due to their location and morphology, are specific sensors of the I(AL), but largely protected from interfacial stress by surfactant release.

  12. Distinct mutations in yeast TAF(II)25 differentially affect the composition of TFIID and SAGA complexes as well as global gene expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Doris B; vom Baur, Elmar; Thibault, Christelle; Sanders, Steven L; Gangloff, Yann-Gaël; Davidson, Irwin; Weil, P Anthony; Tora, Làszlò

    2002-05-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription factor TFIID, composed of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAF(II)s), nucleates preinitiation complex formation at protein-coding gene promoters. SAGA, a second TAF(II)-containing multiprotein complex, is involved in transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the essential protein components common to SAGA and TFIID is yTAF(II)25. We define a minimal evolutionarily conserved 91-amino-acid region of TAF(II)25 containing a histone fold domain that is necessary and sufficient for growth in vivo. Different temperature-sensitive mutations of yTAF(II)25 or chimeras with the human homologue TAF(II)30 arrested cell growth at either the G(1) or G(2)/M cell cycle phase and displayed distinct phenotypic changes and gene expression patterns. Immunoprecipitation studies revealed that TAF(II)25 mutation-dependent gene expression and phenotypic changes correlated at least partially with the integrity of SAGA and TFIID. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that the five TAF(II)25 temperature-sensitive mutant alleles individually affect the expression of between 18 and 33% of genes, whereas taken together they affect 64% of all class II genes. Thus, different yTAF(II)25 mutations induce distinct phenotypes and affect the regulation of different subsets of genes, demonstrating that no individual TAF(II) mutant allele reflects the full range of its normal functions.

  13. Mobile group II intron based gene targeting in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Paul, Eldho; Gomathi, Sivasamy; Abhishek, Albert; Sasikumar, Sundaresan; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2016-10-01

    The usage of recombinant lactic acid bacteria for delivery of therapeutic proteins to the mucosa has been emerging. In the present study, an attempt was made to engineer a thyA mutant of Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) using lactococcal group II intron Ll.LtrB for the development of biologically contained recombinant L. plantarum for prevention of calcium oxalate stone disease. The 3 kb Ll.LtrB intron donor cassettes from the source vector pACD4C was PCR amplified, ligated into pSIP series of lactobacillus vector pLp_3050sAmyA, yielding a novel vector pLpACD4C (8.6 kb). The quantitative real-time PCR experiment shows 94-fold increased expression of Ll.LtrB intron and 14-fold increased expression of ltrA gene in recombinant L. plantarum containing pLpACD4C. In order to target the thyA gene, the potential intron RNA binding sites in the thyA gene of L. plantarum was predicted with help of computer algorithm. The insertion location 188|189s of thyA gene (lowest E-0.134) was chosen and the wild type intron Ll.LtrB was PCR modified, yielding a retargeted intron of pLpACDthyA. The retargeted intron was expressed by using induction peptide (sppIP), subsequently the integration of intron in thyA gene was identified by PCR screening and finally ThyA - mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) was detected. In vitro growth curve result showed that in the absence of thymidine, colony forming units of mutant ThyA18 was decreased, whereas high thymidine concentration (10 μM) supported the growth of the culture until saturation. In conclusion, ThyA - mutant of L. plantarum (ThyA18) constructed in this study will be used as a biologically contained recombinant probiotic to deliver oxalate decarboxylase into the lumen for treatment of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate stone deposition. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Variations of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are associated with extreme human longevity.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Ariela; Orisio, Silvia; Noris, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Castaldi, Davide; Kamide, Kei; Rakugi, Hiromi; Arai, Yasumichi; Todeschini, Marta; Ogliari, Giulia; Imai, Enyu; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Mari, Daniela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Longevity phenotype in humans results from the influence of environmental and genetic factors. Few gene polymorphisms have been identified so far with a modest effect on lifespan leaving room for the search of other players in the longevity game. It has been recently demonstrated that targeted disruption of the mouse homolog of the human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene (AGTR1) translates into marked prolongation of animal lifespan (Benigni et al., J Clin Invest 119(3):524-530, 2009). Based on the above study in mice, here we sought to search for AGTR1 variations associated to reduced AT1 receptor protein levels and to prolonged lifespan in humans. AGTR1 was sequenced in 173 Italian centenarians and 376 younger controls. A novel non-synonymous mutation was detected in a centenarian. Two polymorphisms in AGTR1 promoter, rs422858 and rs275653, in complete linkage disequilibrium, were significantly associated with the ability to attain extreme old age. We then replicated the study of rs275653 in a large independent cohort of Japanese origin (598 centenarians and semi-supercentenarians, 422 younger controls) and indeed confirmed its association with exceptional old age. In combined analyses, rs275653 was associated to extreme longevity either at recessive model (P = 0.007, odds ratio (OR) 3.57) or at genotype level (P = 0.015). Significance was maintained after correcting for confounding factors. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that subjects homozygous for the minor allele of rs275653 had less AT1R-positive peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells. Moreover, rs275653 was associated to lower blood pressure in centenarians. These findings highlight the role of AGTR1 as a possible candidate among longevity-enabling genes.

  15. No association between the neuronal pentraxin II gene polymorphism and autism.

    PubMed

    Marui, Tetsuya; Koishi, Shinko; Funatogawa, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Matsumoto, Hideo; Hashimoto, Ohiko; Ishijima, Michiko; Nanba, Eiji; Nishida, Hisami; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Kasai, Kiyoto; Watanabe, Keiichiro; Kano, Yukiko; Kato, Nobumasa; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2007-05-09

    Autism (MIM 209850) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by difficulties with verbal and non-verbal communication, impairments in reciprocal social interactions, and displays of stereotypic behaviors, interests and activities. Twin and family studies have indicated a robust role of genetic factors in the development of autism. Neuronal Pentraxin II (NPTX2) is located in chromosome 7q21.3-q22.1, where it is a candidate region for autism. NPTX2 promotes neuritic outgrowth and is suggested to mediate uptake of degraded synaptic material during synapse formation and remodeling. NPTX2 is also associated with the clustering of synaptic AMPA receptors. It was reported that glutamate systems including AMPA receptor was associated to the pathophysiology of autism. Thus, the NPTX2 gene is involved in neuritic outgrowth, synapse remodeling and the aggregation of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses. These functions play an important role in the mechanisms of learning and brain development. In the present study, we tested for the presence of the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NPTX2 and haplotypes consisting of the SNPs with autism, between autistic patients (n=170) and normal controls (n=214) in a Japanese population. No significant difference was observed in the allele, genotype or haplotype frequencies between the patients and controls. Thus, the NPTX2 locus is not likely to play a major role in the development of autism. However, further studies with larger sample size and sequencing of NPTX2 gene are needed to exclude a role of NPTX2 gene in autism.

  16. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  17. Trans-species polymorphism and selection in the MHC class II DRA genes of domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Ballingall, Keith T; Rocchi, Mara S; McKeever, Declan J; Wright, Frank

    2010-06-30

    Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries). We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201) differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901), which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T-cells and the

  18. Trans-Species Polymorphism and Selection in the MHC Class II DRA Genes of Domestic Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Ballingall, Keith T.; Rocchi, Mara S.; McKeever, Declan J.; Wright, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries). We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201) differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901), which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T-cells and the

  19. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome previously diagnosed as Seckel syndrome: report of a novel mutation of the PCNT gene.

    PubMed

    Piane, Maria; Della Monica, Matteo; Piatelli, Gianluca; Lulli, Patrizia; Lonardo, Fortunato; Chessa, Luciana; Scarano, Gioacchino

    2009-11-01

    We report on a 3-year-old boy with prenatal onset of proportionate dwarfism, postnatal severe microcephaly, high forehead with receded hairline, sparse scalp hair, beaked nose, mild retrognathia and hypotonia diagnosed at birth as Seckel syndrome. At age 3 years, he became paralyzed due to a cerebrovascular malformation. Based on the clinical and radiological features showing evidence of skeletal dysplasia, the diagnosis was revised to Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome. Western blot analysis of the patient's lymphoblastoid cell line lysate showed the absence of the protein pericentrin. Subsequent molecular analysis identified a novel homozygous single base insertion (c.1527_1528insA) in exon 10 of the PCNT gene, which leads to a frameshift (Treo510fs) and to premature protein truncation. PCNT mutations must be considered diagnostic of MOPD II syndrome. A possible role of pericentrin in the development of cerebral vessels is suggested. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Storage time does not modify the gene expression profile of cryopreserved human metaphase II oocytes.

    PubMed

    Stigliani, Sara; Moretti, Stefano; Anserini, Paola; Casciano, Ida; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Scaruffi, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Does storage time have any impact on the transcriptome of slowly frozen cryopreserved human metaphase II (MII) oocytes? The length of cryostorage has no effect on the gene expression profile of human MII oocytes. Oocyte cryopreservation is a widely used technique in IVF for storage of surplus oocytes, as well as for fertility preservation (i.e. women undergoing gonadotoxic therapies) and oocyte donation programs. Although cryopreservation has negative impacts on oocyte physiology and it is associated with decrease of transcripts, no experimental data about the effect of storage time on the oocyte molecular profile are available to date. This study included 27 women, ≤38 years aged, without any ovarian pathology, undergoing IVF treatment. Surplus MII oocytes were donated after written informed consent. A total of 31 non-cryopreserved oocytes and 68 surviving slow-frozen/rapid-thawed oocytes (32 oocytes cryostored for 3 years and 36 cryostored for 6 years) were analyzed. Pools of ≈10 oocytes for each group were prepared. Total RNA was extracted from each pool, amplified, labeled and hybridized on oligonucleotide microarrays. Analyses were performed by R software using the limma package. Comparison of gene expression profiles between surviving thawed oocytes after 3 and 6 years of storage in liquid nitrogen found no differently expressed genes. The expression profiles of cryopreserved MII oocytes significantly differed from those of non-cryopreserved oocytes in 107 probe sets corresponding to 73 down-regulated and 29 up-regulated unique transcripts. Gene Ontology analysis by DAVID bioinformatics resource disclosed that cryopreservation deregulates genes involved in oocyte function and early embryo development, such as chromosome organization, RNA splicing and processing, cell cycle, cellular response to DNA damage and to stress, DNA repair, calcium ion binding, malate dehydrogenase activity and mitochondrial activity. Among the probes significantly up-regulated in

  1. Incomplete synthesis of N-glycans in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II caused by a defect in the gene encoding. alpha. -mannosidase II

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.N.; Masri, K.A.; Dell, A.

    1990-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with a positive acidified-serum-lysis test (HEMPAS), is a genetic anemia in humans inherited by an autosomally recessive mode. The enzyme defect in most HEMPAS patients has previously been proposed as a lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, resulting in a lack of polylactosamine on proteins and leading to the accumulation of polylactosaminyl lipids. A recent HEMPAS case, G.C., has now been analyzed by cell-surface labeling, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, and activity assay of glycosylation enzymes. Significantly decreased glycosylation of polylactosaminoglycan proteins and incompletely processed asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were detected in the erythrocytemore » membranes of G.C. These results suggest that G.C. cells contain a mutation in {alpha}-ManII-encoding gene that results in inefficient expression of {alpha}-ManII mRNA, either through reduced transcription or message instability. This report demonstrates that HEMPAS is caused by a defective gene encoding an enzyme necessary for the synthesis of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides.« less

  2. BMP type II receptors have redundant roles in the regulation of hepatic hepcidin gene expression and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mayeur, Claire; Leyton, Patricio A; Kolodziej, Starsha A; Yu, Binglan; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2014-09-25

    Expression of hepcidin, the hepatic hormone controlling iron homeostasis, is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. We sought to identify which BMP type II receptor expressed in hepatocytes, ActR2a or BMPR2, is responsible for regulating hepcidin gene expression. We studied Bmpr2 heterozygous mice (Bmpr2(+/-)), mice with hepatocyte-specific deficiency of BMPR2, mice with global deficiency of ActR2a, and mice in which hepatocytes lacked both BMPR2 and ActR2a. Hepatic hepcidin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, serum hepcidin and iron levels, and tissue iron levels did not differ in wild-type mice, Bmpr2(+/-) mice, and mice in which either BMPR2 or ActR2a was deficient. Deficiency of both BMP type II receptors markedly reduced hepatic hepcidin gene expression and serum hepcidin levels leading to severe iron overload. Iron injection increased hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels in mice deficient in either BMPR2 or ActR2a, but not in mice deficient in both BMP type II receptors. In addition, in mouse and human primary hepatocytes, deficiency of both BMPR2 and ActR2a profoundly decreased basal and BMP6-induced hepcidin gene expression. These results suggest that BMP type II receptors, BMPR2 and ActR2a, have redundant roles in the regulation of hepatic hepcidin gene expression and iron metabolism. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. A comparison of 12-gene colon cancer assay gene expression in African American and Caucasian patients with stage II colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Posey, James; Chao, Calvin Y; Lu, Ruixiao; Jadhav, Trafina; Javed, Ahmed Y; Javed, Awais; Mahmoud, Fade A; Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Manne, Upender

    2016-06-18

    African American (AA) colon cancer patients have a worse prognosis than Caucasian (CA) colon cancer patients, however, reasons for this disparity are not well understood. To determine if tumor biology might contribute to differential prognosis, we measured recurrence risk and gene expression using the Oncotype DX® Colon Cancer Assay (12-gene assay) and compared the Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles between AA patients and CA patients with stage II colon cancer. We retrieved demographic, clinical, and archived tumor tissues from stage II colon cancer patients at four institutions. The 12-gene assay and mismatch repair (MMR) status were performed by Genomic Health (Redwood City, California). Student's t-test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to compare Recurrence Score data and gene expression data from AA and CA patients (SAS Enterprise Guide 5.1). Samples from 122 AA and 122 CA patients were analyzed. There were 118 women (63 AA, 55 CA) and 126 men (59 AA, 67 CA). Median age was 66 years for AA patients and 68 for CA patients. Age, gender, year of surgery, pathologic T-stage, tumor location, the number of lymph nodes examined, lymphovascular invasion, and MMR status were not significantly different between groups (p = 0.93). The mean Recurrence Score result for AA patients (27.9 ± 12.8) and CA patients (28.1 ± 11.8) was not significantly different and the proportions of patients with high Recurrence Score values (≥41) were similar between the groups (17/122 AA; 15/122 CA). None of the gene expression variables, either single genes or gene groups (cell cycle group, stromal group, BGN1, FAP, INHBA1, Ki67, MYBL2, cMYC and GADD45B), was significantly different between the racial groups. After controlling for clinical and pathologic covariates, the means and distributions of Recurrence Score results and gene expression profiles showed no statistically significant difference between patient groups. The distribution of

  4. Genetic differentiation and phylogeny relationships of functional ApoVLDL-II gene in red jungle fowl and domestic chicken populations.

    PubMed

    Musa, Hassan H; Cheng, Jin H; Bao, Wen B; Li, Bi C; Mekki, Dafaalla M; Chen, Guo H

    2007-08-01

    A total of 243 individuals from Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus spadiceus), Rugao, Anka, Wenchang and Silikes chicken populations were used for polymorphism analysis in functional apoVLDL-II gene by Restriction fragment length polymorphism and single strand conformation polymorphism markers. The results show that Anka population has highest gene diversity and Shannon information index, while Red jungle fowl shows highest effective number of allele. In addition, the higher coefficient of genetic differentiation (Gst) across all loci in apoVLDL-II was indicating that high variation is proportioned among populations. As expected total gene diversity (Ht) has upper estimate compared with within population genetic diversity (Hs) across all loci. The mean Gst value across all loci was (0.194) indicating about 19.4% of total genetic variation could be explained by breeds differences, while the remaining 80.6% was accounted for differences among individuals. The average apoVLDL-II gene flow across all loci in five chicken populations was 1.189. The estimates of genetic identity and distance confirm that these genes are significantly different between genetically fat and lean population, because fat type breed Anka shows highest distance with the other Silikes and Rugao whish are genetically lean. In addition, Wenchang and Red jungle fowl were found more closely and genetically related than the other breeds with 49.4% bootstrapping percentages, then they were related to Silikes by 100% bootstrapping percentages followed by Rugao and finally all of them are related with exotic fat breed Anka.

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of the gene encoding the kinetoplast-associated type II DNA topoisomerase of Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed

    Pasion, S G; Hines, J C; Aebersold, R; Ray, D S

    1992-01-01

    A type II DNA topoisomerase, topoIImt, was shown previously to be associated with the kinetoplast DNA of the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata. The gene encoding this kinetoplast-associated topoisomerase has been cloned by immunological screening of a Crithidia genomic expression library with monoclonal antibodies raised against the purified enzyme. The gene CfaTOP2 is a single copy gene and is expressed as a 4.8-kb polyadenylated transcript. The nucleotide sequence of CfaTOP2 has been determined and encodes a predicted polypeptide of 1239 amino acids with a molecular mass of 138,445. The identification of the cloned gene is supported by immunoblot analysis of the beta-galactosidase-CfaTOP2 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli and by analysis of tryptic peptide sequences derived from purified topoIImt. CfaTOP2 shares significant homology with nuclear type II DNA topoisomerases of other eukaryotes suggesting that in Crithidia both nuclear and mitochondrial forms of topoisomerase II are encoded by the same gene.

  6. Selection and Trans-Species Polymorphism of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Genes in the Order Crocodylia

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Miles, Lee G.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II genes encode for molecules that aid in the presentation of antigens to helper T cells. MHC characterisation within and between major vertebrate taxa has shed light on the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the diversity within this genomic region, though little characterisation has been performed within the Order Crocodylia. Here we investigate the extent and effect of selective pressures and trans-species polymorphism on MHC class II α and β evolution among 20 extant species of Crocodylia. Selection detection analyses showed that diversifying selection influenced MHC class II β diversity, whilst diversity within MHC class II α is the result of strong purifying selection. Comparison of translated sequences between species revealed the presence of twelve trans-species polymorphisms, some of which appear to be specific to the genera Crocodylus and Caiman. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered MHC class II α sequences into two major clades representing the families Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae. However, no further subdivision within these clades was evident and, based on the observation that most MHC class II α sequences shared the same trans-species polymorphisms, it is possible that they correspond to the same gene lineage across species. In contrast, phylogenetic analyses of MHC class II β sequences showed a mixture of subclades containing sequences from Crocodilidae and/or Alligatoridae, illustrating orthologous relationships among those genes. Interestingly, two of the subclades containing sequences from both Crocodilidae and Alligatoridae shared specific trans-species polymorphisms, suggesting that they may belong to ancient lineages pre-dating the divergence of these two families from the common ancestor 85–90 million years ago. The results presented herein provide an immunogenetic resource that may be used to further assess MHC diversity and functionality in Crocodylia. PMID:24503938

  7. Molecular analysis of pericentrin gene (PCNT) in a series of 24 Seckel/microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) families.

    PubMed

    Willems, M; Geneviève, D; Borck, G; Baumann, C; Baujat, G; Bieth, E; Edery, P; Farra, C; Gerard, M; Héron, D; Leheup, B; Le Merrer, M; Lyonnet, S; Martin-Coignard, D; Mathieu, M; Thauvin-Robinet, C; Verloes, A; Colleaux, L; Munnich, A; Cormier-Daire, V

    2010-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II, MIM 210720) and Seckel syndrome (SCKL, MIM 210600) belong to the primordial dwarfism group characterised by intrauterine growth retardation, severe proportionate short stature, and pronounced microcephaly. MOPD II is distinct from SCKL by more severe growth retardation, radiological abnormalities, and absent or mild mental retardation. Seckel syndrome is associated with defective ATR dependent DNA damage signalling. In 2008, loss-of-function mutations in the pericentrin gene (PCNT) have been identified in 28 patients, including 3 SCKL and 25 MOPDII cases. This gene encodes a centrosomal protein which plays a key role in the organisation of mitotic spindles. The aim of this study was to analyse PCNT in a large series of SCKL-MOPD II cases to further define the clinical spectrum associated with PCNT mutations. Among 18 consanguineous families (13 SCKL and 5 MOPDII) and 6 isolated cases (3 SCKL and 3 MOPD II), 13 distinct mutations were identified in 5/16 SCKL and 8/8 MOPDII including five stop mutations, five frameshift mutations, two splice site mutations, and one apparent missense mutation affecting the last base of exon 19. Moreover, we demonstrated that this latter mutation leads to an abnormal splicing with a predicted premature termination of translation. The clinical analysis of the 5 SCKL cases with PCNT mutations showed that they all presented minor skeletal changes and clinical features compatible with MOPDII diagnosis. It is therefore concluded that, despite variable severity, MOPDII is a genetically homogeneous condition due to loss-of-function of pericentrin.

  8. ColoLipidGene: signature of lipid metabolism-related genes to predict prognosis in stage-II colon cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B.; Machado, Isidro; Ramos, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Espinosa-Salinas, Isabel; Ramos, Ricardo; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Risueño, Alberto; De Las Rivas, Javier; Reglero, Guillermo; Yaya, Ricardo; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Aparicio, Jorge; Maurel, Joan; Feliu, Jaime; de Molina, Ana Ramírez

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism plays an essential role in carcinogenesis due to the requirements of tumoral cells to sustain increased structural, energetic and biosynthetic precursor demands for cell proliferation. We investigated the association between expression of lipid metabolism-related genes and clinical outcome in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients with the aim of identifying a metabolic profile associated with greater malignancy and increased risk of relapse. Expression profile of 70 lipid metabolism-related genes was determined in 77 patients with stage II colon cancer. Cox regression analyses using c-index methodology was applied to identify a metabolic-related signature associated to prognosis. The metabolic signature was further confirmed in two independent validation sets of 120 patients and additionally, in a group of 264 patients from a public database. The combined analysis of these 4 genes, ABCA1, ACSL1, AGPAT1 and SCD, constitutes a metabolic-signature (ColoLipidGene) able to accurately stratify stage II colon cancer patients with 5-fold higher risk of relapse with strong statistical power in the four independent groups of patients. The identification of a group of 4 genes that predict survival in intermediate-stage colon cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy, and avoids the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low-risk group. PMID:25749516

  9. Resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus in Gladiolus plants transformed with either a defective replicase of coat protein subgroup II gene from Cucumber mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic Gladiolus plants that contain either Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I coat protein, CMV subgroup II coat protein, CMV replicase, a combination of the CMV subgroups I and II coat proteins, or a combination of the CMV subgroup II coat protein and replicase genes were developed. These...

  10. A Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein regulates the sirodesmin PL biosynthetic gene cluster in Leptosphaeria maculans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen M.; Gardiner, Donald M.; Keller, Nancy P.; Howlett, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    A gene, sirZ, encoding a Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding protein is present in a cluster of genes responsible for the biosynthesis of the epipolythiodioxopiperazine (ETP) toxin, sirodesmin PL in the ascomycete plant pathogen, Leptosphaeria maculans. RNA-mediated silencing of sirZ gives rise to transformants that produce only residual amounts of sirodesmin PL and display a decrease in the transcription of several sirodesmin PL biosynthetic genes. This indicates that SirZ is a major regulator of this gene cluster. Proteins similar to SirZ are encoded in the gliotoxin biosynthetic gene cluster of Aspergillus fumigatus (gliZ) and in an ETP-like cluster in Penicillium lilacinoechinulatum (PlgliZ). Despite its high level of sequence similarity to gliZ, PlgliZ is unable to complement the gliotoxin-deficiency of a mutant of gliZ in A. fumigatus. Putative binding sites for these regulatory proteins in the promoters of genes in these clusters were predicted using bioinformatic analysis. These sites are similar to those commonly bound by other proteins with Zn(II)2Cys6 DNA binding domains. PMID:18023597

  11. Case reports of juvenile GM1 gangliosidosisis type II caused by mutation in GLB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Naderi, Samaneh; Modarresi, Farzaneh; Dastsooz, Hassan; Nemati, Hamid; Farokhashtiani, Tayebeh; Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Inaloo, Soroor; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-07-17

    Type II or juvenile GM1-gangliosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, which is clinically distinct from infantile form of the disease by the lack of characteristic cherry-red spot and hepatosplenomegaly. The disease is characterized by slowly progressive neurodegeneration and mild skeletal changes. Due to the later age of onset and uncharacteristic presentation, diagnosis is frequently puzzled with other ataxic and purely neurological disorders. Up to now, 3-4 types of GM1-gangliosidosis have been reported and among them type I is the most common phenotype with the age of onset around 6 months. Various forms of GM1-gangliosidosis are caused by GLB1 gene mutations but severity of the disease and age of onset are directly related to the position and the nature of deleterious mutations. However, due to its unique genetic cause and overlapping clinical features, some researchers believe that GM1 gangliosidosis represents an overlapped disease spectrum instead of four distinct types. Here, we report a less frequent type of autosomal recessive GM1 gangliosidosis with perplexing clinical presentation in three families in the southwest part of Iran, who are unrelated but all from "Lurs" ethnic background. To identify disease-causing mutations, Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) utilizing next generation sequencing was performed. Four patients from three families were investigated with the age of onset around 3 years old. Clinical presentations were ataxia, gate disturbances and dystonia leading to wheelchair-dependent disability, regression of intellectual abilities, and general developmental regression. They all were born in consanguineous families with no previous documented similar disease in their parents. A homozygote missense mutation in GLB1 gene (c. 601 G > A, p.R201C) was found in all patients. Using Sanger sequencing this identified mutation was confirmed in the proband, their parents, grandparents, and extended family members, confirming

  12. Regeneration of multiple shoots from transgenic potato events facilitates the recovery of phenotypically normal lines: assessing a cry9Aa2 gene conferring insect resistance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The recovery of high performing transgenic lines in clonal crops is limited by the occurrence of somaclonal variation during the tissue culture phase of transformation. This is usually circumvented by developing large populations of transgenic lines, each derived from the first shoot to regenerate from each transformation event. This study investigates a new strategy of assessing multiple shoots independently regenerated from different transformed cell colonies of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Results A modified cry9Aa2 gene, under the transcriptional control of the CaMV 35S promoter, was transformed into four potato cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer using a nptII gene conferring kanamycin resistance as a selectable marker gene. Following gene transfer, 291 transgenic lines were grown in greenhouse experiments to assess somaclonal variation and resistance to potato tuber moth (PTM), Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller). Independently regenerated lines were recovered from many transformed cell colonies and Southern analysis confirmed whether they were derived from the same transformed cell. Multiple lines regenerated from the same transformed cell exhibited a similar response to PTM, but frequently exhibited a markedly different spectrum of somaclonal variation. Conclusions A new strategy for the genetic improvement of clonal crops involves the regeneration and evaluation of multiple shoots from each transformation event to facilitate the recovery of phenotypically normal transgenic lines. Most importantly, regenerated lines exhibiting the phenotypic appearance most similar to the parental cultivar are not necessarily derived from the first shoot regenerated from a transformed cell colony, but can frequently be a later regeneration event. PMID:21995716

  13. Plant genetic transformation efficiency of selected Malaysian rice based on selectable marker gene (hptII).

    PubMed

    Htwe, Nwe Nwe; Ling, Ho Chai; Zaman, Faridah Qamaruz; Maziah, Mahmood

    2014-04-01

    Rice is one of the most important cereal crops with great potential for biotechnology progress. In transformation method, antibiotic resistance genes are routinely used as powerful markers for selecting transformed cells from surrounding non-transformed cells. In this study, the toxicity level of hygromycin was optimized for two selected mutant rice lines, MR219 line 4 and line 9. The mature embryos were isolated and cultured on an MS medium with different hygromycin concentrations (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg L(-1)). Evidently, above 60 mg L(-1) was effective for callus formation and observed completely dead. Further there were tested for specific concentration (0-60). Although, 21.28% calli survived on the medium containing 45 mg L(-1) hygromycin, it seemed suitable for the identification of putative transformants. These findings indicated that a system for rice transformation in a relatively high frequency and the transgenes are stably expressed in the transgenic plants. Green shoots were regenerated from the explant under hygromycin stress. RT-PCR using hptII and gus sequence specific primer and Southern blot analysis were used to confirm the presence of the transgene and to determine the transformation efficiency for their stable integration in regenerated plants. This study demonstrated that the hygromycin resistance can be used as an effective marker for rice transformation.

  14. Construction of a standard reference plasmid containing seven target genes for the detection of transgenic cotton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xujing; Tang, Qiaoling; Dong, Lei; Dong, Yufeng; Su, Yueyan; Jia, Shirong; Wang, Zhixing

    2014-07-01

    Insect resistance and herbicide tolerance are the dominant traits of commercialized transgenic cotton. In this study, we constructed a general standard reference plasmid for transgenic cotton detection. Target genes, including the cowpea trypsin gene cptI, the insect resistance gene cry1Ab/1Ac, the herbicide tolerance gene cp4-epsps, the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline synthase (Nos) terminator that exists in transgenic cotton and part of the endogenous cotton SadI gene were amplified from plasmids pCPT1, pBT, pCP4 and pBI121 and from DNA of the nontransgenic cotton line K312, respectively. The genes cry1Ab/1Ac and cptI, as well as cp4-epsps and the Nos terminator gene, were ligated together to form the fusion genes cptI-Bt and cp4-Nos, respectively, by overlapping PCR. We checked the validity of genes Sad1, cptI-Bt and cp4-Nos by DNA sequencing. Then, positive clones of cptI-Bt, cp4-Nos and Sad1 were digested with the corresponding restriction enzymes and ligated sequentially into vector pCamBIA2300, which contains the CAMV 35S promoter and nptII gene, to form the reference plasmid pMCS. Qualitative detection showed that pMCS is a good positive control for transgenic cotton detection. Real-time PCR detection efficiencies with pMCS as a calibrator ranged from 94.35% to 98.67% for the standard curves of the target genes (R(2)⩾0.998). The relative standard deviation of the mean value for the known sample was 11.95%. These results indicate that the strategy of using the pMCS plasmid as a reference material is feasible and reliable for the detection of transgenic cotton. Therefore, this plasmid can serve as a useful reference tool for qualitative and quantitative detection of single or stacked trait transgenic cotton, thus paving the way for the identification of various products containing components of transgenic cotton. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. DSIF and RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation coordinate the recruitment of Rpd3S to actively transcribed genes.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Simon; Laramée, Louise; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Forest, Audrey; Bergeron, Maxime; Robert, François

    2010-10-28

    Histone deacetylase Rpd3 is part of two distinct complexes: the large (Rpd3L) and small (Rpd3S) complexes. While Rpd3L targets specific promoters for gene repression, Rpd3S is recruited to ORFs to deacetylate histones in the wake of RNA polymerase II, to prevent cryptic initiation within genes. Methylation of histone H3 at lysine 36 by the Set2 methyltransferase is thought to mediate the recruitment of Rpd3S. Here, we confirm by ChIP-Chip that Rpd3S binds active ORFs. Surprisingly, however, Rpd3S is not recruited to all active genes, and its recruitment is Set2-independent. However, Rpd3S complexes recruited in the absence of H3K36 methylation appear to be inactive. Finally, we present evidence implicating the yeast DSIF complex (Spt4/5) and RNA polymerase II phosphorylation by Kin28 and Ctk1 in the recruitment of Rpd3S to active genes. Taken together, our data support a model where Set2-dependent histone H3 methylation is required for the activation of Rpd3S following its recruitment to the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain.

  17. Mutations That Affect the Efficiency of Translation of mRNA for the cII Gene of Coliphage Lambda

    PubMed Central

    Dul, Ed; Mahoney, Michael E.; Wulff, Daniel L.

    1987-01-01

    Starting with the λ pRE- strain λctr1 cy3008, which forms clear plaques, we have isolated two mutant strains, λdya2 ctr1 cy3008 and λ dya3 ctr1 cy3008, that form plaques with very slightly turbid centers. The dya2 and dya3 mutations lie in the region of overlap between the PRE promoter and the ribosome recognition region of the cII gene, and have nucleotide alterations at positions -1 and +5 of pRE, and alterations of cII mRNA at -16 and -21 nucleotides before the initial AUG codon of the gene. Both mutations destabilize a stem structure that may be formed by cII mRNA, and dya2 also changes the sequence on cII mRNA that is complementary to the 3'-end of 16 S rRNA from 5'-UAAGGA-3' to 5'-UGAGGA-3'.—The dya2 and dya3 mutations, along with the ctr1 mutation, which destabilizes either of two alternate stem structures which may be formed by cII mRNA (these being more stable stem structures than the one affected by dya2 and dya3), were tested for their ability to reverse two cII- mutations that are characterized by inefficient translation of cII mRNA. These are cII3088, an A → G mutation four bases before the initial AUG codon, and cII3059 , a GUU → GAU (Val2 → Asp) second codon mutation. It was found that ctr1 completely reverses the translation defects of these two mutations, while dya2 partially reverses these translation defects. The dya3 mutation has no effect on translation efficiency under any condition tested. However neither the ctr1 mutation nor the dya2 mutation has much effect on translation efficiency in an otherwise cII+ background, indicating that other factors must limit the rate of translation of cII mRNA under these conditions. PMID:2953647

  18. Genomic localization of the human gene encoding Dr1, a negative modulator of transcription of class II and class III genes.

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Viola, A; Corsaro, C; Motta, S; Grzeschik, K H; Sichel, G

    1996-01-01

    Dr1 is a nuclear protein of 19 kDa that exists in the nucleoplasm as a homotetramer. By binding to TBP (the DNA-binding subunit of TFIID, and also a subunit of SL1 and TFIIIB), the protein blocks class II and class III preinitiation complex assembly, thus repressing the activity of the corresponding promoters. Since transcription of class I genes is unaffected by Dr1. it has been proposed that the protein may coordinate the expression of class I, class II and class III genes. By somatic cell genetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have localized the gene (DR1), present in the genome of higher eukaryotes as a single copy, to human chromosome region 1p21-->p13. The nucleotide sequence conservation of the coding segment of the gene, as determined by Noah's ark blot analysis, and its ubiquitous transcription suggest that Dr1 has an important biological role, which could be related to the negative control of cell proliferation.

  19. Over-expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptor gene induces cell death in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pickel, Lara; Matsuzuka, Takaya; Doi, Chiyo; Ayuzawa, Rie; Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Xie, Sheng-Xue; Berkland, Cory; Tamura, Masaaki

    2010-02-01

    The endogenous angiotensin II (Ang II) type 2 receptor (AT 2) has been shown to mediate apoptosis in cardiovascular tissues. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the anti-cancer effect of AT 2 over-expression on lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro using adenoviral (Ad), FuGENE, and nanoparticle vectors. All three gene transfection methods efficiently transfected AT 2 cDNA into lung cancer cells but caused minimal gene transfection in normal lung epithelial cells. Ad-AT 2 significantly attenuated multiple human lung cancer cell growth (A549 and H358) as compared to the control viral vector, Ad-LacZ, when cell viability was examined by direct cell count. Examination of annexin V by flow cytometry revealed the activation of the apoptotic pathway via AT 2 over-expression. Western Blot analysis confirmed the activation of caspase-3. Similarly, poly (lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) biodegradable nanoparticles encapsulated AT 2 plasmid DNA were shown to be effectively taken up into the lung cancer cell. Nanoparticle-based AT 2 gene transfection markedly increased AT 2 expression and resultant cell death in A549 cells. These results indicate that AT 2 over-expression effectively attenuates growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells through intrinsic apoptosis. Our results also suggest that PLGA nanoparticles can be used as an efficient gene delivery vector for lung adenocarcinoma targeted therapy.

  20. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family.

  1. The great diversity of major histocompatibility complex class II genes in Philippine native cattle

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, S.N.; Miyasaka, T.; Polat, M.; Kikuya, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Mingala, C.N.; Villanueva, M.A.; Salces, A.J.; Onuma, M.; Aida, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) are extensively used as markers for bovine disease and immunological traits. However, none of the BoLA genes in Southeast Asian breeds have been characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-based typing (SBT). Therefore, we sequenced exon 2 of the BoLA class II DRB3 gene from 1120 individual cows belonging to the Holstein, Sahiwal, Simbrah, Jersey, Brahman, and Philippine native breeds using PCR-SBT. Several cross-breeds were also examined. BoLA-DRB3 PCR-SBT identified 78 previously reported alleles and five novel alleles. The number of BoLA-DRB3 alleles identified in each breed from the Philippines was higher (71 in Philippine native cattle, 58 in Brahman, 46 in Holstein × Sahiwal, and 57 in Philippine native × Brahman) than that identified in breeds from other countries (e.g., 23 alleles in Japanese Black and 35 in Bolivian Yacumeño cattle). A phylogenetic tree based on the DA distance calculated from the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency showed that Philippine native cattle from different Philippine islands are closely related, and all of them are closely similar to Philippine Brahman cattle but not to native Japanese and Latin American breeds. Furthermore, the BoLA-DRB3 allele frequency in Philippine native cattle from Luzon Island, located in the Northern Philippines was different from that in cattle from Iloilo, Bohol, and Leyte Islands, which are located in the Southern Philippines. Therefore, we conclude that Philippine native cattle can be divided into two populations, North and South areas. Moreover, a neutrality test revealed that Philippine native cattle from Leyte showed significantly greater genetic diversity, which may be maintained by balancing selection. This study shows that Asian breeds have high levels of BoLA-DRB3 polymorphism. This finding, especially the identification of five novel BoLA-DRB3 alleles, will be helpful for future SBT studies of BoLA-DRB3 alleles in East Asian cattle. PMID:25606401

  2. Association between angiotensin II receptor gene polymorphism and serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) activity in patients with sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Y.; Sakatani, M.; Takami, S.; Tachibana, T.; Higaki, J.; Ogihara, T.; Miki, T.; Katsuya, T.; Tsuchiyama, T.; Yoshida, A.; Yu, H.; Tanio, Y.; Ueda, E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) is considered to reflect disease activity in sarcoidosis. SACE activity is increased in many patients with active sarcoid lesions. The mechanism for the increased SACE activity in this disease has not been clarified. ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism has been reported to have an association with SACE levels in sarcoidosis, but no evidence of an association between angiotensin II receptor gene polymorphism and SACE in this disease has been found. A study of the association of angiotensin II receptor gene polymorphisms with sarcoidosis was therefore undertaken.
METHODS—ACE (I/D), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1), and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AGTR2 ) gene polymorphisms were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and SACE levels were measured in three groups of patients: those with sarcoidosis or tuberculosis and normal controls.
RESULTS—There was no difference in allele frequency of AGTR1 and AGTR2 polymorphism among the three groups. Neither AGTR1 nor AGTR2 polymorphisms were associated with sarcoidosis. SACE activity was higher in patients with sarcoidosis with the AGTR1 A/C genotype than in others. However, this tendency was not detected in patients with tuberculosis.
CONCLUSIONS—The AGTR1 allele C is associated with high activity of SACE in patients with sarcoidosis. It is another predisposing factor for high levels of SACE in patients with sarcoidosis and is considered to be an independent factor from the ACE D allele for high levels of SACE in sarcoidosis. This fact could be one of the explanations for the increased SACE activity in sarcoidosis.

 PMID:9713444

  3. Association between angiotensin II receptor gene polymorphism and serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) activity in patients with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Y; Sakatani, M; Takami, S; Tachibana, T; Higaki, J; Ogihara, T; Miki, T; Katsuya, T; Tsuchiyama, T; Yoshida, A; Yu, H; Tanio, Y; Ueda, E

    1998-06-01

    Serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) is considered to reflect disease activity in sarcoidosis. SACE activity is increased in many patients with active sarcoid lesions. The mechanism for the increased SACE activity in this disease has not been clarified. ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) gene polymorphism has been reported to have an association with SACE levels in sarcoidosis, but no evidence of an association between angiotensin II receptor gene polymorphism and SACE in this disease has been found. A study of the association of angiotensin II receptor gene polymorphisms with sarcoidosis was therefore undertaken. ACE (I/D), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1), and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AGTR2) gene polymorphisms were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and SACE levels were measured in three groups of patients: those with sarcoidosis or tuberculosis and normal controls. There was no difference in allele frequency of AGTR1 and AGTR2 polymorphism among the three groups. Neither AGTR1 nor AGTR2 polymorphisms were associated with sarcoidosis. SACE activity was higher in patients with sarcoidosis with the AGTR1 A/C genotype than in others. However, this tendency was not detected in patients with tuberculosis. The AGTR1 allele C is associated with high activity of SACE in patients with sarcoidosis. It is another predisposing factor for high levels of SACE in patients with sarcoidosis and is considered to be an independent factor from the ACE D allele for high levels of SACE in sarcoidosis. This fact could be one of the explanations for the increased SACE activity in sarcoidosis.

  4. Transformation of miniature potted rose (Rosa hybrida cv. Linda) with P( SAG12 )-ipt gene delays leaf senescence and enhances resistance to exogenous ethylene.

    PubMed

    Zakizadeh, Hedayat; Lütken, Henrik; Sriskandarajah, Sridevy; Serek, Margrethe; Müller, Renate

    2013-02-01

    KEY MESSAGE : The P ( SAG12 ) -ipt gene was transferred to miniature rose, as the first woody species, resulting in increased ethylene resistance due to specific up-regulation of the ipt gene under senescence promoting conditions. Transgenic plants of Rosa hybrida 'Linda' were obtained via transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain harboring the binary vector pSG529(+) containing the P( SAG12 )-ipt construct. A. tumefaciens strains AGL1, GV3850 and LBA4404 (containing P(35S)-INTGUS gene) were used for transformation of embryogenic callus, but transgenic shoots were obtained only when AGL1 was applied. The highest transformation frequency was 10 % and it was achieved when half MS medium was used for the dilution of overnight culture of Agrobacterium. Southern blot confirmed integration of 1-6 copies of the nptII gene into the rose genome in the tested lines. Four transgenic lines were obtained which were morphologically true-to-type and indistinguishable from Wt shoots while they were in in vitro cultures. Adventitious root induction was more difficult in transgenic shoots compared to the Wt shoots, however, one of the transgenic lines (line 6) was rooted and subsequently analyzed phenotypically. The ipt expression levels were determined in this line after exposure to exogenous ethylene (3.5 μl l(-1)) and/or darkness. Darkness resulted in twofold up-regulation of ipt expression, whereas darkness combined with ethylene caused eightfold up-regulation in line 6 compared to Wt plants. The transgenic line had significantly higher content of chlorophyll at the end of the treatment period compared to Wt plants.

  5. [Mutational frequencies in usherin(USH2A gene) in 26 Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II].

    PubMed

    López, Greizy; Gelvez, Nancy Yaneth; Tamayo, Martalucía

    2011-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a disorder characterized by progressive retinitis pigmentosa, prelingual sensory hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in humans. Three clinical types and twelve genetic subtypes have been characterized. Type II is the most common, and among these cases, nearly 80% have mutations in the USH2A gene. The aim of the study was to establish the mutational frequencies for the short isoform of USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II. Twenty-six Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II were included. SSCP analysis for 20 exons of the short isoform was performed and abnormal patterns were sequenced. Sequencing of exon 13 of the USH2A gene was performed for all the individuals because the most frequent mutation is located in this exon. The most frequent mutation was c.2299delG, identified in the 27% (n=8) of the sample. The second mutation, p.R334W, showed a frequency of 15%. A new variant identified in the 5’UTR region, g.129G>T, was present in 1 individual (4%). Four polymorphisms were identified; one of them is a new deletion in exon 20, first reported in this study. Mutations in the usherin short isoform were identified in 38% of a sample of 26 USH2 cases. Molecular diagnosis was established in 7 of the 26.

  6. DNA methylation induced changes in chromatin conformation of the promoter of the vitellogenin II gene of Japanese quail during aging.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjay; Pathak, Rashmi U; Kanungo, Madhu S

    2006-08-01

    One approach to the understanding of the molecular basis of aging in higher organisms may be to use genes whose timing and rate of expression during the life span run parallel with specific functions that can be monitored. The genes for egg proteins, such as vitellogenin (VTG), which is expressed in the liver, and ovalbumin, lysozyme etc. that are expressed in the oviduct of birds, meet these requirements. Egg laying function is dependent on the production of these proteins, which, in turn, depends on the expression of their genes. In this communication we present the age-related studies on the VTG II gene of the bird, Japanese quail. The gene is expressed only in the liver and its expression is considerably lower in old birds that do not lay eggs. Comparison of the promoter region of the gene carrying the two important cis-acting elements, estrogen responsive element (ERE) and progesterone responsive element (PRE), shows it to be 100% homologous to the corresponding region of the chicken VTG II gene. Methylation of DNA and conformation of chromatin of this region were studied, as they are known to be important for regulation of expression of genes. Our studies show that in the liver of adult female quails which lay eggs, a -CCGG- sequence located in this region is hypomethylated, and the chromatin encompassing this region of the gene is relaxed. In the old, the -CCGG- sequence is hypermethylated and the chromatin is compact. This is correlated with a decrease in the expression of the gene and decrease in egg production. Further, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) shows that the levels/affinity of specific trans-acting factors that bind to ERE and PRE present in the region, are not different in adult and old birds. Hence the methylation status of the -CCGG- sequence that is located in-between the ERE and the PRE may be crucial for the conformation of chromatin and availability of these two important cis-acting elements for the binding of the trans

  7. Genes of the class II and class III major histocompatibility complex are associated with typhoid fever in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Dunstan, S J; Stephens, H A; Blackwell, J M; Duc, C M; Lanh, M N; Dudbridge, F; Phuong, C X; Luxemburger, C; Wain, J; Ho, V A; Hien, T T; Farrar, J; Dougan, G

    2001-01-15

    The influence of genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and class III loci on typhoid fever susceptibility was investigated. Individuals with blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever and control subjects from 2 distinct geographic locations in southern Vietnam were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles, the gene that encodes tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (TNFA [-238] and TNFA [-308]), the gene that encodes lymphotoxin-alpha, and alleles of the TNF-alpha microsatellite. HLA-DRB1*0301/6/8, HLA-DQB1*0201-3, and TNFA*2 (-308) were associated with susceptibility to typhoid fever, whereas HLA-DRB1*04, HLA-DQB1*0401/2, and TNFA*1 (-308) were associated with disease resistance. The frequency of all possible haplotypes of the 3 individually associated loci were estimated and were found to be significantly different in typhoid case patients and control subjects (chi2=55.56, 32 df; P=.006). Haplotypes that were either protective (TNFA*1 [-308].DRB1*04) or predisposed individuals to typhoid fever (TNFA*2 [-308].DRB1*0301) were determined. This report identifies a genetic association in humans between typhoid fever and MHC class II and III genes.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the core histone doublet and DNA topo II genes of Marseilleviridae: evidence of proto-eukaryotic provenance.

    PubMed

    Erives, Albert J

    2017-11-28

    While the genomes of eukaryotes and Archaea both encode the histone-fold domain, only eukaryotes encode the core histone paralogs H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. With DNA, these core histones assemble into the nucleosomal octamer underlying eukaryotic chromatin. Importantly, core histones for H2A and H3 are maintained as neofunctionalized paralogs adapted for general bulk chromatin (canonical H2 and H3) or specialized chromatin (H2A.Z enriched at gene promoters and cenH3s enriched at centromeres). In this context, the identification of core histone-like "doublets" in the cytoplasmic replication factories of the Marseilleviridae (MV) is a novel finding with possible relevance to understanding the origin of eukaryotic chromatin. Here, we analyze and compare the core histone doublet genes from all known MV genomes as well as other MV genes relevant to the origin of the eukaryotic replisome. Using different phylogenetic approaches, we show that MV histone domains encode obligate H2B-H2A and H4-H3 dimers of possible proto-eukaryotic origin. MV core histone moieties form sister clades to each of the four eukaryotic clades of canonical and variant core histones. This suggests that MV core histone moieties diverged prior to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations associated with paired linear chromosomes and variant histone octamer assembly. We also show that MV genomes encode a proto-eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II enzyme that forms a sister clade to eukaryotes. This is a relevant finding given that DNA topo II influences histone deposition and chromatin compaction and is the second most abundant nuclear protein after histones. The combined domain architecture and phylogenomic analyses presented here suggest that a primitive origin for MV histone genes is a more parsimonious explanation than horizontal gene transfers + gene fusions + sufficient divergence to eliminate relatedness to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations within the H2A and H3 clades without loss of relatedness to each of

  9. Transcriptome-Wide Survey and Expression Profile Analysis of Putative Chrysanthemum HD-Zip I and II Genes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Xin, Jingjing; Chen, Sumei; Zhao, Kunkun; Wu, Dan; Fan, Qingqing; Gao, Tianwei; Chen, Fadi; Guan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor family is a key transcription factor family and unique to the plant kingdom. It consists of a homeodomain and a leucine zipper that serve in combination as a dimerization motif. The family can be classified into four subfamilies, and these subfamilies participate in the development of hormones and mediation of hormone action and are involved in plant responses to environmental conditions. However, limited information on this gene family is available for the important chrysanthemum ornamental species (Chrysanthemum morifolium). Here, we characterized 17 chrysanthemum HD-Zip genes based on transcriptome sequences. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that 17 CmHB genes were distributed in the HD-Zip subfamilies I and II and identified two pairs of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and four pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. The software MEME was used to identify 7 putative motifs with E values less than 1e-3 in the chrysanthemum HD-Zip factors, and they can be clearly classified into two groups based on the composition of the motifs. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that 8 CmHB genes could be targeted by 10 miRNA families, and the expression of these 17 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized. The results presented here will promote research on the various functions of the HD-Zip gene family members in plant hormones and stress responses. PMID:27196930

  10. Single mage gene in the chicken genome encodes CMage, a protein with functional similarities to mammalian type II Mage proteins.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Noelia; González-Fernández, Zaira; Niinobe, Michio; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Frade, José María

    2007-07-18

    In mammals, the type II melanoma antigen (Mage) protein family is constituted by at least 10 closely related members that are expressed in different tissues, including the nervous system. These proteins are believed to regulate cell cycle withdrawal, neuronal differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the analysis of their specific function has been complicated by functional redundancy. In accordance with previous studies in teleosts and Drosophila, we present evidence that only one mage gene exists in genomes from protists, fungi, plants, nematodes, insects, and nonmammalian vertebrates. We have identified the chicken mage gene and cloned the cDNA encoding the chick Mage protein (CMage). CMage shares close homology with the type II Mage protein family, and, as previously shown for the type II Mage proteins Necdin and Mage-G1, it can interact with the transcription factor E2F-1. CMage is expressed in specific regions of the developing nervous system including the retinal ganglion cell layer, the ventral horn of the spinal cord, and the dorsal root ganglia, coinciding with the expression of the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)) in these regions. We show that the intracellular domain of p75(NTR) can interact with both CMage and Necdin, thus preventing the binding of the latter proteins to the transcription factor E2F-1, and facilitating the proapoptotic activity of E2F-1 in N1E-115 differentiating neurons. The presence of a single mage gene in the chicken genome, together with the close functional resemblance between CMage and Necdin, makes this species ideal to further analyze signal transduction through type II Mage proteins.

  11. MSCs with ACE II gene affect apoptosis pathway of acute lung injury induced by bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomiao; Gao, Fengying; Li, Qian; Dong, Zhixia; Sun, Bo; Hou, Lili; Li, Zhuozhe; Liu, Zhenwei

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and related mechanisms of Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and Angiotensin converting enzyme II (ACE II) on acute lung injury (ALI). MSCs were separated from umbilical cord cells, and the changes of phenotype before and after ACE II silence were observed using Flow Cytometer. ALI model was induced by 10 mg/mL bleomycin in 60 Balb/c mice, and the rest 8 mice were regarded as the baseline group. The mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 15): control, ACE II, stem, and stem + ACE II. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated using TUNEL, and the detection of protein and mRNA of Bax, Bak and p53, Bcl-2, Grp78, CHOP and Caspase 12 were used by western-blot and RT-PCR, respectively. The umbilical cord cells differentiated into stable MSCs about 14 days, and ACE II transfection reached a peak at the 5th day after transfection. ACE II silence did not affect the phenotype of MSCs. All the proteins and mRNAs expression except Bcl-2 in the stem and stem + ACE II were significantly lower than those in control from 8 h (p < 0.05, p < 0.01), while Bcl-2 exhibited an opposite trend. Stem + ACE II performed a better effect than single stem in most indexes, including AI (p < 0.05, p < 0.01). The co-administration of MSCs and ACE II can significantly suppress apoptosis in ALI mice, and may be an effective clinical treatment for ALI.

  12. Activation of vitellogenin II gene expression by steroid hormones in the old Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Upadhyay, R; Kanungo, M S

    1998-11-01

    Alterations in the basal transcription rates of eukaryotic genes are believed to involve the binding of trans-acting factor(s) with specific DNA sequences in the promoter. We show here two interrelated events for the VTGII gene of the old, non-egg laying Japanese quail: alterations in the structure of the chromatin encompassing the gene, and binding of trans-acting factors to the promoter of the gene. Estradiol/progesterone alone or together cause alterations in the conformation of the chromatin of the promoter region of the gene. This may allow free access of nuclear protein(s) to the cis-acting elements, ERE, PRE and NF1, in the promoter of the gene and cause activation of transcription.

  13. Fine structure of OXI1, the mitochondrial gene coding for subunit II of yeast cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Weiss-Brummer, B; Guba, R; Haid, A; Schweyen, R J

    1979-12-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have been performed with 110 mutants which are defective in cytochrome a·a3 and map in the regions on mit DNA previously designated OXI1 and OXI2. With 88 mutations allocated to OXI1 fine structure mapping was achieved by the analysis of rho (-) deletions. The order of six groups of mutational sites (A 1, A2, B 1, B2, C 1, C2) thus determined was confirmed by oxi i x oxi j recombination analysis.Analysis of mitochondrially translated polypeptides of oxil mutants by SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis reveals three classes of mutant patterns: i) similar to wild-tpye (19 mutants); ii) lacking SU II of cytochrome c oxidase (53 mutants); iii) lacking this subunit and exhibiting a single new polypeptide of lower Mr (16 mutants). Mutations of each of these classes are scattered over the OXI1 region without any detectable clustering; this is consistent with the assumption that all oxil mutations studied are within the same gene.New polypeptides observed in oxil mutants of class iii) vary in Mr in the range from 10,500 to 33,000. Those of Mr 17,000 to 33,000 are shown to be antigenically related to subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase. Colinearity is established between the series of new polypeptides of Mr values increasing from 10,500 to 31,500 and the order of the respective mutational sites on the map, e.g. mutations mapping in A 1 generate the smallest and mutations mapping in C2 the largest mutant fragments.From these data we conclude that i) all mutations allocated to the OXI1 region are in the same gene; ii) this gene codes for subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase; iii) the direction of translation is from CAP to 0X12. Out of 19 mutants allocated to OXI2 three exhibit a new polypeptide; these and all the other oxi2 mutants lack subunit III of cytochrome oxidase. This result provides preliminary evidence that the OXI2 region harbours the structural gene for this subunit III.

  14. Stable integration and expression of wasabi defensin gene in "Egusi" melon (Colocynthis citrullus L.) confers resistance to Fusarium wilt and Alternaria leaf spot.

    PubMed

    Ntui, Valentine Otang; Thirukkumaran, Gunaratnam; Azadi, Pejman; Khan, Raham Sher; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2010-09-01

    Production of "Egusi" melon (Colocynthis citrullus L.) in West Africa is limited by fungal diseases, such as Alternaria leaf spot and Fusarium wilt. In order to engineer "Egusi" resistant to these diseases, cotyledonary explants of two "Egusi" genotypes, 'Ejagham' and NHC1-130, were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 harbouring wasabi defensin gene (isolated from Wasabia japonica L.) in a binary vector pEKH1. After co-cultivation for 3 days, infected explants were transferred to MS medium containing 100 mg l(-l) kanamycin to select transformed tissues. After 3 weeks of culture, adventitious shoots appeared directly along the edges of the explants. As much as 19 out of 52 (36.5%) and 25 out of 71 (35.2%) of the explants in genotype NHC1-130 and 'Ejagham', respectively, formed shoots after 6 weeks of culture. As much as 74% (14 out of 19) of the shoots regenerated in genotype NHC1-130 and 72% (18 out of 25) of those produced in genotype 'Ejagham' were transgenic. A DNA fragment corresponding to the wasabi defensin gene or the selection marker nptII was amplified by PCR from the genomic DNA of all regenerated plant clones rooted on hormone-free MS medium under the same selection pressure, suggesting their transgenic nature. Southern blot analysis confirmed successful integration of 1-5 copies of the transgene. RT-PCR, northern and western blot analyses revealed that wasabi defensin gene was expressed in transgenic lines. Transgenic lines showed increased levels of resistance to Alternaria solani, which causes Alternaria leaf spot and Fusarium oxysporum, which causes Fusarium wilt, as compared to that of untransformed plants.

  15. Comprehensive analysis of MHC class II genes in teleost fish genomes reveals dispensability of the peptide-loading DM system in a large part of vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules play an essential role in presenting peptide antigens to CD4+ T lymphocytes in the acquired immune system. The non-classical class II DM molecule, HLA-DM in the case of humans, possesses critical function in assisting the classical MHC class II molecules for proper peptide loading and is highly conserved in tetrapod species. Although the absence of DM-like genes in teleost fish has been speculated based on the results of homology searches, it has not been definitively clear whether the DM system is truly specific for tetrapods or not. To obtain a clear answer, we comprehensively searched class II genes in representative teleost fish genomes and analyzed those genes regarding the critical functional features required for the DM system. Results We discovered a novel ancient class II group (DE) in teleost fish and classified teleost fish class II genes into three major groups (DA, DB and DE). Based on several criteria, we investigated the classical/non-classical nature of various class II genes and showed that only one of three groups (DA) exhibits classical-type characteristics. Analyses of predicted class II molecules revealed that the critical tryptophan residue required for a classical class II molecule in the DM system could be found only in some non-classical but not in classical-type class II molecules of teleost fish. Conclusions Teleost fish, a major group of vertebrates, do not possess the DM system for the classical class II peptide-loading and this sophisticated system has specially evolved in the tetrapod lineage. PMID:24279922

  16. Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II regulates nuclear receptor, myogenic, and metabolic gene expression in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Lisa M; Wang, Shu-Ching Mary; Eriksson, Natalie A; Myers, Stephen A; Murray, Lauren A; Muscat, George E O

    2011-02-24

    We demonstrate that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) mRNA is more abundantly expressed (than COUP-TFI mRNA) in skeletal muscle C2C12 cells and in (type I and II) skeletal muscle tissue from C57BL/10 mice. Consequently, we have utilized the ABI TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) platform to analyze gene expression changes specifically attributable to ectopic COUP-TFII (relative to vector only) expression in muscle cells. Utilizing a TLDA-based platform and 5 internal controls, we analyze the entire NR superfamily, 96 critical metabolic genes, and 48 important myogenic regulatory genes on the TLDA platform utilizing 5 internal controls. The low density arrays were analyzed by rigorous statistical analysis (with Genorm normalization, Bioconductor R, and the Empirical Bayes statistic) using the (integromics) statminer software. In addition, we validated the differentially expressed patho-physiologically relevant gene (identified on the TLDA platform) glucose transporter type 4 (Glut4). We demonstrated that COUP-TFII expression increased the steady state levels of Glut4 mRNA and protein, while ectopic expression of truncated COUP-TFII lacking helix 12 (COUP-TFΔH12) reduced Glut4 mRNA expression in C2C12 cells. Moreover, COUP-TFII expression trans-activated the Glut4 promoter (-997/+3), and ChIP analysis identified selective recruitment of COUP-TFII to a region encompassing a highly conserved SP1 binding site (in mouse, rat, and human) at nt positions -131/-118. Mutation of the SpI site ablated COUP-TFII mediated trans-activation of the Glut4 promoter. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that in skeletal muscle cells, COUP-TFII regulates several nuclear hormone receptors, and critical metabolic and muscle specific genes.

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence of the gene for human heparin cofactor II and mapping to chromosomal band 22q11

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, R.; Lutz, S.; Blin, N.

    1991-02-05

    Heparin cofactor II (HCII) is a 66-kDa plasma glycoprotein that inhibits thrombin rapidly in the presence of dermatan sulfate or heparin. Clones comprising the entire HCII gene were isolated from a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL-3 {lambda} phage. The sequence of the gene was determined on both strands of DNA (15,849 bp) and included 1,749 bp of 5{prime}-flanking sequence, five exons, four introns, and 476 bp of DNA 3{prime} to the polyadenylation site. Ten complete and one partial Alu repeats were identified in the introns and 5{prime}-flanking region. The HCII gene was regionally mapped on chromosome 22 using rodent-humanmore » somatic cell hybrids, carrying only parts of human chromosome 22, and the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. With the cDNA probe HCII7.2, containing the entire coding region of the gene, the HCII gene was shown to be amplified 10-20-fold in K562 cells by Southern analysis and in situ hybridization. From these data, the authors concluded that the HCII gene is localized on the chromosomal band 22q11 proximal to the breakpoint cluster region (BCR). Analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis indicated that the amplified HCII gene in K562 cells maps at least 2 Mbp proximal to BCR-1. Furthermore, the HCII7.2 cDNA probe detected two frequent restriction fragment length polymorphisms with the restriction enzymes BamHI and Hind III.« less

  18. Identification of a melanosomal membrane protein encoded by the pink-eyed dilution (type II oculocutaneous albinism) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemblat, S; Durham-Pierre, D; Gardner, J M; Nakatsu, Y; Brilliant, M H; Orlow, S J

    1994-01-01

    The pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in the mouse is critical to melanogenesis; mutations in the homologous locus in humans, P, are a cause of type II oculocutaneous albinism. Although a cDNA encoded by the p gene has recently been identified, nothing is known about the protein product of this gene. To characterize the protein encoded by the p gene, we performed immunoblot analysis of extracts of melanocytes cultured from wild-type mice with an antiserum from rabbits immunized with a peptide corresponding to amino acids 285-298 of the predicted protein product of the murine p gene. This antiserum recognized a 110-kDa protein. The protein was absent from extracts of melanocytes cultured from mice with two mutations (pcp and p) in which transcripts of the p gene are absent or greatly reduced. Introduction of the cDNA for the p gene into pcp melanocytes by electroporation resulted in expression of the 3.3-kb mRNA and the 110-kDa protein. Upon subcellular fractionation of cultured melanocytes, the 110-kDa protein was found to be present in melanosomes but absent from the vesicular fraction; phase separation performed with the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 confirmed the predicted hydrophobic nature of the protein. These results demonstrate that the p gene encodes a 110-kDa integral melanosomal membrane protein and establish a framework by which mutations at this locus, which diminish pigmentation, can be analyzed at the cellular and biochemical levels. Images PMID:7991586

  19. Gene Identification of Pheromone Gland Genes Involved in Type II Sex Pheromone Biosynthesis and Transportation in Female Tea Pest Ectropis grisescens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhao-Qun; Ma, Long; Yin, Qian; Cai, Xiao-Ming; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Xin, Zhao-Jun; He, Peng; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2018-01-01

    Moths can biosynthesize sex pheromones in the female sex pheromone glands (PGs) and can distinguish species-specific sex pheromones using their antennae. However, the biosynthesis and transportation mechanism for Type II sex pheromone components has rarely been documented in moths. In this study, we constructed a massive PG transcriptome database (14.72 Gb) from a moth species, Ectropis grisescens, which uses type II sex pheromones and is a major tea pest in China. We further identified putative sex pheromone biosynthesis and transportation-related unigenes: 111 cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), 25 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), and 20 chemosensory proteins (CSPs). Tissue expression and phylogenetic tree analyses showed that one CYP (EgriCYP341-fragment3), one OBP (EgriOBP4), and one CSP (EgriCSP10) gene displayed an enriched expression in the PGs, and that EgriOBP2, 3, and 25 are clustered in the moth pheromone-binding protein clade. We considered these our candidate genes. Our results yielded large-scale PG sequence information for further functional studies. PMID:29317471

  20. Hypomorphic mutations of SEC23B gene account for mild phenotypes of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Roberta; Langella, Concetta; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Gambale, Antonella; Vitiello, Francesco; Vallefuoco, Fara; Ek, Torben; Yang, Elizabeth; Iolascon, Achille

    2013-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, a recessive disorder of erythroid differentiation, is due to mutations in SEC23B, a component of the core trafficking machinery COPII. In no case homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutation(s) was found. This study represents the first description of molecular mechanisms underlying SEC23B hypomorphic genotypes by the analysis of five novel mutations. Our findings suggest that reduction of SEC23B gene expression is not associated with CDA II severe clinical presentation; conversely, the combination of a hypomorphic allele with one functionally altered results in more severe phenotypes. We propose a mechanism of compensation SEC23A-mediated which justifies these observations. PMID:23453696

  1. AP2/ERF Transcription Factor, Ii049, Positively Regulates Lignan Biosynthesis in Isatis indigotica through Activating Salicylic Acid Signaling and Lignan/Lignin Pathway Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ruifang; Xiao, Ying; Lv, Zongyou; Tan, Hexin; Chen, Ruibing; Li, Qing; Chen, Junfeng; Wang, Yun; Yin, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Wansheng

    2017-01-01

    Lignans, such as lariciresinol and its derivatives, have been identified as effective antiviral ingredients in Isatis indigotica. Evidence suggests that the APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) family might be related to the biosynthesis of lignans in I. indigotica. However, the special role played by the AP2/ERF family in the metabolism and its underlying putative mechanism still need to be elucidated. One novel AP2/ERF gene, named Ii049, was isolated and characterized from I. indigotica in this study. The quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that Ii049 was expressed highest in the root and responded to methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid treatments to various degrees. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that Ii049 protein was localized in the nucleus. Knocking-down the expression of Ii049 caused a remarkable reduction of lignan/lignin contents and transcript levels of genes involved in the lignan/lignin biosynthetic pathway. Ii049 bound to the coupled element 1, RAV1AAT and CRTAREHVCBF2 motifs of genes IiPAL and IiCCR, the key structural genes in the lignan/lignin pathway. Furthermore, Ii049 was also essential for SA biosynthesis, and SA induced lignan accumulation in I. indigotica. Notably, the transgenic I. indigotica hairy roots overexpressing Ii049 showed high expression levels of lignan/lignin biosynthetic genes and SA content, resulting in significant accumulation of lignan/lignin. The best-engineered line (OVX049-10) produced 425.60 μg·g−1 lariciresinol, an 8.3-fold increase compared with the wild type production. This study revealed the function of Ii049 in regulating lignan/lignin biosynthesis, which had the potential to increase the content of valuable lignan/lignin in economically significant medicinal plants. PMID:28824690

  2. The Bacillus subtilis ywjI (glpX) gene encodes a class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, functionally equivalent to the class III Fbp enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jules, Matthieu; Le Chat, Ludovic; Aymerich, Stéphane; Le Coq, Dominique

    2009-05-01

    We present here experimental evidence that the Bacillus subtilis ywjI gene encodes a class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, functionally equivalent to the fbp-encoded class III enzyme, and constitutes with the upstream gene, murAB, an operon transcribed at the same level under glycolytic or gluconeogenic conditions.

  3. The Bacillus subtilis ywjI (glpX) Gene Encodes a Class II Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphatase, Functionally Equivalent to the Class III Fbp Enzyme▿

    PubMed Central

    Jules, Matthieu; Le Chat, Ludovic; Aymerich, Stéphane; Le Coq, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    We present here experimental evidence that the Bacillus subtilis ywjI gene encodes a class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, functionally equivalent to the fbp-encoded class III enzyme, and constitutes with the upstream gene, murAB, an operon transcribed at the same level under glycolytic or gluconeogenic conditions. PMID:19270101

  4. Vaccinia Virus Blocks Stat1-Dependent and Stat1-Independent Gene Expression Induced by Type I and Type II Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Brandon A.; Huang, Julia He; Li, Ping; Chang, Hua-Chen; Slee, Roger B.; O'Sullivan, Audrey; Mathur, Anita; Yeh, Norman; Klemsz, Michael J.; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Blum, Janice S.

    2008-01-01

    Blocking the function of Stat (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins, which are critical for antiviral responses, has evolved as a common mechanism for pathogen immune evasion. The poxvirus-encoded phosphatase H1 is critical for viral replication, and may play an additional role in the evasion of host defense by dephosphorylating Stat1 and blocking interferon (IFN)-stimulated innate immune responses. Vaccinia virus (VACV) H1 can inhibit the phosphorylation of the transcription factor Stat1 after IFN-γ stimulation of epithelial cells, greatly attenuating IFN-induced biological functions. In this study, we demonstrate that VACV infection is capable of inhibiting the phosphorylation of Stat1 and Stat2 after stimulation of fibroblasts or bone marrow-derived macrophages with either type I or type II IFNs, but did not inhibit the activation of Stat3 or Stat5 in either cell type. By using recombinant proteins for in vitro assays, we observe that variola virus H1 is more active than VACV H1, although it has similar selectivity for Stat targets. Differential effects of VACV infection were observed on the induction of IFN-stimulated genes, with complete inhibition of some genes by VACV infection, while others were less affected. Despite the IFN-γ-induced expression of some genes in VACV-infected cells, IFN-γ was unable to rescue the VACV-mediated inhibition of MHC class II antigen presentation. Moreover, VACV infection can affect the IFN-induced expression of Stat1-dependent and Stat1-independent genes, suggesting that the virus may target additional IFN-activated pathways. Thus, VACV targets multiple signaling pathways in the evasion of antiviral immune responses. PMID:18593332

  5. A specific collagen type II gene (COL2A1) mutation presenting as spondyloperipheral dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, B.; Hilbert, K.; Spranger, J.

    1996-05-03

    We report on a patient with a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, spondylo-epiphyseal involvement, and brachydactyly E-like changes. This condition has been described as spondyloperipheral dysplasia and the few published cases suggest autosomal dominant inheritance with considerable clinical variability. We found our sporadic case to be due to a collagen type II defect resulting from a specific COL2A1 mutation. This mutation is the first to be located at the C-terminal outside the helical domain of COL2A1. A frameshift as consequence of a 5 bp duplication in exon 51 leads to a stop codon. The resulting truncated C-propeptide region seemsmore » to affect helix formation and produces changes of chondrocyte morphology, collagen type II fibril structure and cartilage matrix composition. Our case with its distinct phenotype adds another chondrodysplasia to the clinical spectrum of type II collagenopathies. 16 refs., 4 figs.« less

  6. Transcriptome-wide effects of inverted SINEs on gene expression and their impact on RNA polymerase II activity.

    PubMed

    Tajaddod, Mansoureh; Tanzer, Andrea; Licht, Konstantin; Wolfinger, Michael T; Badelt, Stefan; Huber, Florian; Pusch, Oliver; Schopoff, Sandy; Janisiw, Michael; Hofacker, Ivo; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-10-25

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) represent the most abundant group of non-long-terminal repeat transposable elements in mammalian genomes. In primates, Alu elements are the most prominent and homogenous representatives of SINEs. Due to their frequent insertion within or close to coding regions, SINEs have been suggested to play a crucial role during genome evolution. Moreover, Alu elements within mRNAs have also been reported to control gene expression at different levels. Here, we undertake a genome-wide analysis of insertion patterns of human Alus within transcribed portions of the genome. Multiple, nearby insertions of SINEs within one transcript are more abundant in tandem orientation than in inverted orientation. Indeed, analysis of transcriptome-wide expression levels of 15 ENCODE cell lines suggests a cis-repressive effect of inverted Alu elements on gene expression. Using reporter assays, we show that the negative effect of inverted SINEs on gene expression is independent of known sensors of double-stranded RNAs. Instead, transcriptional elongation seems impaired, leading to reduced mRNA levels. Our study suggests that there is a bias against multiple SINE insertions that can promote intramolecular base pairing within a transcript. Moreover, at a genome-wide level, mRNAs harboring inverted SINEs are less expressed than mRNAs harboring single or tandemly arranged SINEs. Finally, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which inverted SINEs can impact on gene expression by interfering with RNA polymerase II.

  7. Characterization of class II β chain major histocompatibility complex genes in a family of Hawaiian honeycreepers: 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens).

    PubMed

    Jarvi, Susan I; Bianchi, Kiara R; Farias, Margaret Em; Txakeeyang, Ann; McFarland, Thomas; Belcaid, Mahdi; Asano, Ashley

    2016-07-01

    Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae) have evolved in the absence of mosquitoes for over five million years. Through human activity, mosquitoes were introduced to the Hawaiian archipelago less than 200 years ago. Mosquito-vectored diseases such as avian malaria caused by Plasmodium relictum and Avipoxviruses have greatly impacted these vulnerable species. Susceptibility to these diseases is variable among and within species. Due to their function in adaptive immunity, the role of major histocompatibility complex genes (Mhc) in disease susceptibility is under investigation. In this study, we evaluate gene organization and levels of diversity of Mhc class II β chain genes (exon 2) in a captive-reared family of Hawaii 'amakihi (Hemignathus virens). A total of 233 sequences (173 bp) were obtained by PCR+1 amplification and cloning, and 5720 sequences were generated by Roche 454 pyrosequencing. We report a total of 17 alleles originating from a minimum of 14 distinct loci. We detected three linkage groups that appear to represent three distinct haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed one variable cluster resembling classical Mhc sequences (DAB) and one highly conserved, low variability cluster resembling non-classical Mhc sequences (DBB). High net evolutionary divergence values between DAB and DBB resemble that seen between chicken BLB system and YLB system genes. High amino acid identity among non-classical alleles from 12 species of passerines (DBB) and four species of Galliformes (YLB) was found, suggesting that these non-classical passerine sequences may be related to the Galliforme YLB sequences.

  8. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli.

  10. Characterization of MHC class I and II genes in a subantarctic seabird, the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes).

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Lannefors, Mimi; Bonadonna, Francesco; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The great polymorphism observed in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is thought to be maintained by pathogen-mediated selection possibly combined with MHC-disassortative mating, guided by MHC-determined olfactory cues. Here, we partly characterize the MHC class I and II B of the blue petrel, Halobaena caerulea (Procellariiformes), a bird with significant olfactory abilities that lives under presumably low pathogen burdens in Subantarctica. Blue petrels are long-lived, monogamous birds which suggest the necessity of an accurate mate choice process. The species is ancestral to songbirds (Passeriformes; many MHC loci), although not to gamefowls (Galliformes; few MHC loci). Considering the phylogenetic relationships and the low subantarctic pathogen burden, we expected few rather than many MHC loci in the blue petrel. However, when we analysed partial MHC class I and class II B cDNA and gDNA sequences we found evidence for as many as at least eight MHC class I loci and at least two class II B loci. These class I and II B sequences showed classical MHC characteristics, e.g. high nucleotide diversity, especially in putative peptide-binding regions where signatures of positive selection was detected. Trans-species polymorphism was found between MHC class II B sequences of the blue petrel and those of thin-billed prion, Pachyptila belcheri, two species that diverged ∼25 MYA. The observed MHC allele richness in the blue petrel may well serve as a basis for mate choice, especially since olfactory discrimination of MHC types may be possible in this species.

  11. Prevalence and Evolution of Core Photosystem II Genes in Marine Cyanobacterial Viruses and Their Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica A; Thompson, Luke R; Bielawski, Joseph P

    2006-01-01

    Cyanophages (cyanobacterial viruses) are important agents of horizontal gene transfer among marine cyanobacteria, the numerically dominant photosynthetic organisms in the oceans. Some cyanophage genomes carry and express host-like photosynthesis genes, presumably to augment the host photosynthetic machinery during infection. To study the prevalence and evolutionary dynamics of this phenomenon, 33 cultured cyanophages of known family and host range and viral DNA from field samples were screened for the presence of two core photosystem reaction center genes, psbA and psbD. Combining this expanded dataset with published data for nine other cyanophages, we found that 88% of the phage genomes contain psbA, and 50% contain both psbA and psbD. The psbA gene was found in all myoviruses and Prochlorococcus podoviruses, but could not be amplified from Prochlorococcus siphoviruses or Synechococcus podoviruses. Nearly all of the phages that encoded both psbA and psbD had broad host ranges. We speculate that the presence or absence of psbA in a phage genome may be determined by the length of the latent period of infection. Whether it also carries psbD may reflect constraints on coupling of viral- and host-encoded PsbA–PsbD in the photosynthetic reaction center across divergent hosts. Phylogenetic clustering patterns of these genes from cultured phages suggest that whole genes have been transferred from host to phage in a discrete number of events over the course of evolution (four for psbA, and two for psbD), followed by horizontal and vertical transfer between cyanophages. Clustering patterns of psbA and psbD from Synechococcus cells were inconsistent with other molecular phylogenetic markers, suggesting genetic exchanges involving Synechococcus lineages. Signatures of intragenic recombination, detected within the cyanophage gene pool as well as between hosts and phages in both directions, support this hypothesis. The analysis of cyanophage psbA and psbD genes from field

  12. Sequence, distribution and chromosomal context of class I and class II pilin genes of Neisseria meningitidis identified in whole genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neisseria meningitidis expresses type four pili (Tfp) which are important for colonisation and virulence. Tfp have been considered as one of the most variable structures on the bacterial surface due to high frequency gene conversion, resulting in amino acid sequence variation of the major pilin subunit (PilE). Meningococci express either a class I or a class II pilE gene and recent work has indicated that class II pilins do not undergo antigenic variation, as class II pilE genes encode conserved pilin subunits. The purpose of this work was to use whole genome sequences to further investigate the frequency and variability of the class II pilE genes in meningococcal isolate collections. Results We analysed over 600 publically available whole genome sequences of N. meningitidis isolates to determine the sequence and genomic organization of pilE. We confirmed that meningococcal strains belonging to a limited number of clonal complexes (ccs, namely cc1, cc5, cc8, cc11 and cc174) harbour a class II pilE gene which is conserved in terms of sequence and chromosomal context. We also identified pilS cassettes in all isolates with class II pilE, however, our analysis indicates that these do not serve as donor sequences for pilE/pilS recombination. Furthermore, our work reveals that the class II pilE locus lacks the DNA sequence motifs that enable (G4) or enhance (Sma/Cla repeat) pilin antigenic variation. Finally, through analysis of pilin genes in commensal Neisseria species we found that meningococcal class II pilE genes are closely related to pilE from Neisseria lactamica and Neisseria polysaccharea, suggesting horizontal transfer among these species. Conclusions Class II pilins can be defined by their amino acid sequence and genomic context and are present in meningococcal isolates which have persisted and spread globally. The absence of G4 and Sma/Cla sequences adjacent to the class II pilE genes is consistent with the lack of pilin subunit variation in these

  13. TALE-PvuII fusion proteins--novel tools for gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Mert; Alzubi, Jamal; Lahaye, Thomas; Cathomen, Toni; Pingoud, Alfred; Wende, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) consist of zinc fingers as DNA-binding module and the non-specific DNA-cleavage domain of the restriction endonuclease FokI as DNA-cleavage module. This architecture is also used by TALE nucleases (TALENs), in which the DNA-binding modules of the ZFNs have been replaced by DNA-binding domains based on transcription activator like effector (TALE) proteins. Both TALENs and ZFNs are programmable nucleases which rely on the dimerization of FokI to induce double-strand DNA cleavage at the target site after recognition of the target DNA by the respective DNA-binding module. TALENs seem to have an advantage over ZFNs, as the assembly of TALE proteins is easier than that of ZFNs. Here, we present evidence that variant TALENs can be produced by replacing the catalytic domain of FokI with the restriction endonuclease PvuII. These fusion proteins recognize only the composite recognition site consisting of the target site of the TALE protein and the PvuII recognition sequence (addressed site), but not isolated TALE or PvuII recognition sites (unaddressed sites), even at high excess of protein over DNA and long incubation times. In vitro, their preference for an addressed over an unaddressed site is > 34,000-fold. Moreover, TALE-PvuII fusion proteins are active in cellula with minimal cytotoxicity.

  14. TALE-PvuII Fusion Proteins – Novel Tools for Gene Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yanik, Mert; Alzubi, Jamal; Lahaye, Thomas; Cathomen, Toni; Pingoud, Alfred; Wende, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) consist of zinc fingers as DNA-binding module and the non-specific DNA-cleavage domain of the restriction endonuclease FokI as DNA-cleavage module. This architecture is also used by TALE nucleases (TALENs), in which the DNA-binding modules of the ZFNs have been replaced by DNA-binding domains based on transcription activator like effector (TALE) proteins. Both TALENs and ZFNs are programmable nucleases which rely on the dimerization of FokI to induce double-strand DNA cleavage at the target site after recognition of the target DNA by the respective DNA-binding module. TALENs seem to have an advantage over ZFNs, as the assembly of TALE proteins is easier than that of ZFNs. Here, we present evidence that variant TALENs can be produced by replacing the catalytic domain of FokI with the restriction endonuclease PvuII. These fusion proteins recognize only the composite recognition site consisting of the target site of the TALE protein and the PvuII recognition sequence (addressed site), but not isolated TALE or PvuII recognition sites (unaddressed sites), even at high excess of protein over DNA and long incubation times. In vitro, their preference for an addressed over an unaddressed site is > 34,000-fold. Moreover, TALE-PvuII fusion proteins are active in cellula with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:24349308

  15. Variation in MHC class II B genes in marbled murrelets: implications for delineating conservation units

    Treesearch

    C. Vásquez-Carrillo; V. Friesen; L. Hall; M.Z. Peery

    2013-01-01

    Conserving genetic variation is critical for maintaining the evolutionary potential and viability of a species. Genetic studies seeking to delineate conservation units, however, typically focus on characterizing neutral genetic variation and may not identify populations harboring local adaptations. Here, variation at two major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II...

  16. MHC class I and MHC class II DRB gene variability in wild and captive Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Ina; Sharma, Reeta; Goyal, Surendra Prakash; Mishra, Sudanshu; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2010-10-01

    Bengal tigers are highly endangered and knowledge on adaptive genetic variation can be essential for efficient conservation and management. Here we present the first assessment of allelic variation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II DRB genes for wild and captive tigers from India. We amplified, cloned, and sequenced alpha-1 and alpha-2 domain of MHC class I and beta-1 domain of MHC class II DRB genes in 16 tiger specimens of different geographic origin. We detected high variability in peptide-binding sites, presumably resulting from positive selection. Tigers exhibit a low number of MHC DRB alleles, similar to other endangered big cats. Our initial assessment-admittedly with limited geographic coverage and sample size-did not reveal significant differences between captive and wild tigers with regard to MHC variability. In addition, we successfully amplified MHC DRB alleles from scat samples. Our characterization of tiger MHC alleles forms a basis for further in-depth analyses of MHC variability in this illustrative threatened mammal.

  17. The Class II Trehalose 6-phosphate Synthase Gene PvTPS9 Modulates Trehalose Metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Barraza, Aarón; Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; Estrada-Navarrete, Georgina; Reyes, José L.; Juárez-Verdayes, Marco A.; Avonce, Nelson; Quinto, Carmen; Díaz-Camino, Claudia; Sanchez, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Legumes form symbioses with rhizobia, producing nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of the plant host. The network of plant signaling pathways affecting carbon metabolism may determine the final number of nodules. The trehalose biosynthetic pathway regulates carbon metabolism and plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, as well as in plant-microbe interactions. The expression of genes for trehalose synthesis during nodule development suggests that this metabolite may play a role in legume-rhizobia symbiosis. In this work, PvTPS9, which encodes a Class II trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), was silenced by RNA interference in transgenic nodules. The silencing of PvTPS9 in root nodules resulted in a reduction of 85% (± 1%) of its transcript, which correlated with a 30% decrease in trehalose contents of transgenic nodules and in untransformed leaves. Composite transgenic plants with PvTPS9 silenced in the roots showed no changes in nodule number and nitrogen fixation, but a severe reduction in plant biomass and altered transcript profiles of all Class II TPS genes. Our data suggest that PvTPS9 plays a key role in modulating trehalose metabolism in the symbiotic nodule and, therefore, in the whole plant. PMID:27847509

  18. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    PubMed

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  19. Association of SNP variants of MHC Class II DRB gene with thermo-physiological traits in tropical goats.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, Abdulmojeed; Salako, Adebowale E; De Donato, Marcos; Peters, Sunday O; Takeet, Michael I; Wheto, Mathew; Okpeku, Moses; Imumorin, Ikhide G

    2017-02-01

    Host defense in vertebrates depend on many secreted regulatory proteins such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II which provide important regulatory and effector functions of T cells. Gene polymorphism in the second exon of Capra-DRB gene in three major Nigerian goat breeds [West African Dwarf (WAD), Red Sokoto (RS), and Sahel (SH)] was analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). Four restriction enzymes, BsaHI, AluI, HaeIII, and SacII, were utilized. The association between the polymorphic sites and some heat tolerance traits were also investigated in a total of 70 WAD, 90 RS, and 50 SH goats. Fourteen different types of alleles identified in the Nigerian goats, four of which were found in the peptide coding region (A57G, Q89R, G104D, and T112I), indicate a high degree of polymorphism at the DRB locus in this species. An obvious excess (P < 0.01) of non-synonymous substitutions than synonymous (dN/dS) in this locus is a reflection of adaptive evolution and positive selection. The phylogenetic trees revealed largely species-wise clustering in DRB gene. BsaHI, AluI, HaeIII, and SacII genotype frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05), except AluI in RS goats and HaeIII in WAD goats (P < 0.05). The expected heterozygosity (H), which is a measure of gene diversity in the goat populations, ranged from 0.16 to 0.50. Genotypes AA (BsaHI), GG, GC and CC (AluI) and GG, GA, AA (HaeIII) appeared better in terms of heat tolerance. The heat-tolerant ability of SH and RS goats to the hot and humid tropical environment of Nigeria seemed better than that of the WAD goats. Sex effect (P < 0.05) was mainly on pulse rate and heat stress index, while there were varying interaction effects on heat tolerance. Variation at the DRB locus may prove to be important in possible selection and breeding for genetic resistance to heat stress in the tropics.

  20. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from hyperoxia-induced DNA damage and cell death.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongmin; Zhang, Tiesong; Huang, Rongwei; Yang, Zhen; Liu, Chunming; Li, Ming; Fang, Fang; Xu, Feng

    2017-04-01

    Hyperoxia therapy for acute lung injury (ALI) may unexpectedly lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cause additional ALI. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide that regulates inflammasome activation. However, the role of CGRP in DNA damage during hyperoxia is unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of CGRP on DNA damage and the cell death of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AEC II) exposed to 60% oxygen. AEC II were isolated from 19-20 gestational day fetal rat lungs and were exposed to air or to 60% oxygen during treatment with CGRP or the specific CGRP receptor antagonist CGRP 8-37 . The cells were evaluated using immunofluorescence to examine surfactant protein-C and ROS levels were measured by probing with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. The apoptosis rate and cell cycle of AEC II were analyzed by flow cytometry, and apoptosis was determined by western blotting analysis of activated caspase 3. The DNA damage was confirmed with immunofluorescence of H2AX via high-content analysis. The ROS levels, apoptotic cell number and the expression of γH2AX were markedly increased in the hyperoxia group compared with those in the air group. Concordantly, ROS levels, apoptotic cell number and the expression of γH2AX were significantly lower with a significant arrest of S and G2/M phases in the CGRP/O 2 group than in the hyperoxia or CGRP 8-37 /O 2 groups. CGRP was concluded to protect lung epithelium cells against hyperoxic insult, and upregulation of CGRP may be a possible novel therapeutic target to treat hyperoxic lung injury.

  2. Members of the amylovora group of Erwinia are cellulolytic and possess genes homologous to the type II secretion pathway.

    PubMed

    Riekki, R; Palomäki, T; Virtaharju, O; Kokko, H; Romantschuk, M; Saarilahti, H T

    2000-07-01

    A cellulase-producing clone was isolated from a genomic library of the Erwinia rhapontici (Millard) Burkholder strain NCPPB2989. The corresponding gene, named celA, encodes an endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4) with the extremely low pH optimum of 3.4 and a temperature optimum between 40 and 50 degrees C. A single ORF of 999 nt was found to be responsible for the Cel activity. The corresponding protein, named CelA, showed 67% identity to the endoglucanase Y of E. chrysanthemi and 51.5% identity to the endoglucanase of Cellulomonas uda, and thus belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase family 8. The celA gene, or its homologue, was found to be present in all E. rhapontici isolates analysed, in E. chrysanthemi, and in E. amylovora. The presence of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in the amylovora group of Erwinia spp. had not previously been established. Furthermore, the DNA of both E. rhapontici and E. amylovora was found to exhibit homology to genes encoding the type II (GSP) secretion pathway, which is known to be responsible for extracellular targeting of cellulases and pectinases in Erwinia spp. that cause soft rotting, such as E. carotovora and E. chrysanthemi. Secretion of the CelA protein by E. rhapontici could not be verified. However, the CelA protein itself was found to include the information necessary for heterologous secretion by E. chrysanthemi.

  3. [Identification of novel compound heterozygous mutations of USH2A gene in a family with Usher syndrome type II].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haiou; Ge, Chuanqin; Wang, Yiwang; Tang, Genyun; Quan, Qingli

    2015-06-01

    To identify potential mutations in a Chinese family with Usher syndrome type II. Genomic DNA was obtained from two affected and four unaffected members of the family and subjected to amplification of the entire coding sequence and splicing sites of USH2A gene. Mutation detection was conducted by direct sequencing of the PCR products. A total of 100 normal unrelated individuals were used as controls. The patients were identified to be a compound heterozygote for two mutations: c.8272G>T (p.E2758X) in exon 42 from his mother and c.12376-12378ACT>TAA(p.T4126X) in exon 63 of the USH2A gene from his father. Both mutations were not found in either of the two unaffected family members or 100 unrelated controls, and had completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Neither mutation has been reported in the HGMD database. The novel compound heterozygous mutations c.8272G>T and c.12376-12378ACT>TAA within the USH2A gene may be responsible for the disease. This result may provide new clues for molecular diagnosis of this disease.

  4. 9-cis-retinoic acid represses estrogen-induced expression of the very low density apolipoprotein II gene.

    PubMed

    Schippers, I J; Kloppenburg, M; Snippe, L; Ab, G

    1994-11-01

    The chicken very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) gene is estrogen-inducible and specifically expressed in liver. We examined the possible involvement of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its ligand 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) in the activation of the apoVLDLII promoter. We first concentrated on a potential RXR recognition site, which deviates at only one position from a perfect direct A/GGGTCA repeat spaced by one nucleotide (DR-1) and was earlier identified as a common HNF-4/COUP-TF recognition site. However, band shift analysis revealed that this imperfect DR-1 motif does not interact with RXR alpha-homodimers. In accordance with this observation we found that this regulatory element does not mediate transactivation through RXR alpha in the presence of 9-cis-RA. However, our experiments revealed another, unexpected, effect of 9-cis-RA. Instead of stimulating, 9-cis-RA attenuated estrogen-induced expression of transfected estrogen-responsive VLDL-CAT reporter plasmids. This repression appeared to take place through the main estrogen response element (ERE) of the gene. Importantly, 9-cis-RA also strongly repressed the estrogen-induced expression of the endogenous apoVLDLII gene in cultured chicken hepatoma cells.

  5. Bioreducible Zinc(II)-Coordinative Polyethylenimine with Low Molecular Weight for Robust Gene Delivery of Primary and Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Zhou, Dezhong; Yang, Jixiang; Zhou, Hao; Chen, Jiatong; Guo, Tianying

    2017-03-30

    To transform common low-molecular-weight (LMW) cationic polymers, such as polyethylenimine (PEI), to highly efficient gene vectors would be of great significance but remains challenging. Because LMW cationic polymers perform far less efficiently than their high-molecular-weight counterparts, mainly due to weaker nucleic acid encapsulation, herein we report the design and synthesis of a dipicolylamine-based disulfide-containing zinc(II) coordinative module (Zn-DDAC), which is used to functionalize LMW PEI (M w ≈ 1800 Da) to give a non-viral vector (Zn-PD) with high efficiency and safety in primary and stem cells. Given its high phosphate binding affinity, Zn-DDAC can significantly promote the DNA packaging functionality of PEI 1.8k and improve the cellular uptake of formulated polyplexes, which is particularly critical for hard-to-transfect cell types. Furthermore, Zn-PD polymer can be cleaved by glutathione in cytoplasm to facilitate DNA release post internalization and diminish the cytotoxicity. Consequently, the optimal Zn-PD mediates 1-2 orders of magnitude higher gluciferase activity than commercial transfection reagents, Xfect and PEI 25k , across diverse cell types, including primary and stem cells. Our findings provide a valuable insight into the exploitation of LMW cationic polymers for gene delivery and demonstrate great promise for the development of next-generation non-viral vectors for clinically viable gene therapy.

  6. The wheat cytochrome oxidase subunit II gene has an intron insert and three radical amino acid changes relative to maize

    PubMed Central

    Bonen, Linda; Boer, Poppo H.; Gray, Michael W.

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the sequence of the wheat mitochondrial gene for cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) and find that its derived protein sequence differs from that of maize at only three amino acid positions. Unexpectedly, all three replacements are non-conservative ones. The wheat COII gene has a highly-conserved intron at the same position as in maize, but the wheat intron is 1.5 times longer because of an insert relative to its maize counterpart. Hybridization analysis of mitochondrial DNA from rye, pea, broad bean and cucumber indicates strong sequence conservation of COII coding sequences among all these higher plants. However, only rye and maize mitochondrial DNA show homology with wheat COII intron sequences and rye alone with intron-insert sequences. We find that a sequence identical to the region of the 5' exon corresponding to the transmembrane domain of the COII protein is present at a second genomic location in wheat mitochondria. These variations in COII gene structure and size, as well as the presence of repeated COII sequences, illustrate at the DNA sequence level, factors which contribute to higher plant mitochondrial DNA diversity and complexity. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453565

  7. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus) suggest trans-species polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Andrea K.; Sepil, Irem; Nishiumi, Isao; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP), in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis) American crows (C. brachyrhynchos) and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis). Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While clustering of

  8. Molecular evidence of RNA polymerase II gene reveals the origin of worldwide cultivated barley

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonggang; Ren, Xifeng; Sun, Dongfa; Sun, Genlou

    2016-01-01

    The origin and domestication of cultivated barley have long been under debate. A population-based resequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the single copy of RPB2 gene was used to address barley domestication, to explore genetic differentiation of barley populations on the worldwide scale, and to understand gene-pool exchanges during the spread and subsequent development of barley cultivation. Our results revealed significant genetic differentiation among three geographically distinct wild barley populations. Differences in haplotype composition among populations from different geographical regions revealed that modern cultivated barley originated from two major wild barley populations: one from the Near East Fertile Crescent and the other from the Tibetan Plateau, supporting polyphyletic origin of cultivated barley. The results of haplotype frequencies supported multiple domestications coupled with widespread introgression events that generated genetic admixture between divergent barley gene pools. Our results not only provide important insight into the domestication and evolution of cultivated barley, but also enhance our understanding of introgression and distinct selection pressures in different environments on shaping the genetic diversity of worldwide barley populations, thus further facilitating the effective use of the wild barley germplasm. PMID:27786300

  9. Optimization of Streptomyces bacteriophage phi C31 integrase system to prevent post integrative gene silencing in pulmonary type II cells.

    PubMed

    Aneja, Manish Kumar; Geiger, Johannes; Imker, Rabea; Uzgun, Senta; Kormann, Michael; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Maucksch, Christof; Rudolph, Carsten

    2009-12-31

    phi C31 integrase has emerged as a potent tool for achieving long-term gene expression in different tissues. The present study aimed at optimizing elements of phi C31 integrase system for alveolar type II cells. Luciferase and beta-galactosidase activities were measured at different time points post transfection. 5-Aza-2'deoxycytidine (AZA) and trichostatin A (TSA) were used to inhibit DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) respectively. In A549 cells, expression of the integrase using a CMV promoter resulted in highest integrase activity, whereas in MLE12 cells, both CAG and CMV promoter were equally effective. Effect of polyA site was observed only in A549 cells, where replacement of SV40 polyA by bovine growth hormone (BGH) polyA site resulted in an enhancement of integrase activity. Addition of a C-terminal SV40 nuclear localization signal (NLS) did not result in any significant increase in integrase activity. Long-term expression studies with AZA and TSA, provided evidence for post-integrative gene silencing. In MLE12 cells, both DNA methylases and HDACs played a significant role in silencing, whereas in A549 cells, it could be attributed majorly to HDAC activity. Donor plasmids comprising cellular promoters ubiquitin B (UBB), ubiquitin C (UCC) and elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) in an improved backbone prevented post-integrative gene silencing. In contrast to A549 and MLE12 cells, no silencing could be observed in human bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B. Donor plasmid coding for murine erythropoietin under the EF1 alpha promoter when combined with phi C31 integrase resulted in higher long-term erythropoietin expression and subsequently higher hematocrit levels in mice after intravenous delivery to the lungs. These results provide evidence for cell specific post integrative gene silencing with C31 integrase and demonstrate the pivotal role of donor plasmid in long-term expression attained with this system.

  10. Analyses of RNA Polymerase II genes from free-living protists: phylogeny, long branch attraction, and the eukaryotic big bang.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Joel B; Marinets, Alexandra; Ford Doolittle, W; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Logsdon, John M

    2002-06-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among major eukaryotic protist lineages are largely uncertain. Two significant obstacles in reconstructing eukaryotic phylogeny are long-branch attraction (LBA) effects and poor taxon sampling of free-living protists. We have obtained and analyzed gene sequences encoding the largest subunit of RNA Polymerase II (RPB1) from Naegleria gruberi (a heterolobosean), Cercomonas ATCC 50319 (a cercozoan), and Ochromonas danica (a heterokont); we have also analyzed the RPB1 gene from the nucleomorph (nm) genome of Guillardia theta (a cryptomonad). Using a variety of phylogenetic methods our analysis shows that RPB1s from Giardia intestinalis and Trichomonas vaginalis are probably subject to intense LBA effects. Thus, the deep branching of these taxa on RPB1 trees is questionable and should not be interpreted as evidence favoring their early divergence. Similar effects are discernable, to a lesser extent, with the Mastigamoeba invertens RPB1 sequence. Upon removal of the outgroup and these problematic sequences, analyses of the remaining RPB1s indicate some resolution among major eukaryotic groups. The most robustly supported higher-level clades are the opisthokonts (animals plus fungi) and the red algae plus the cryptomonad nm-the latter result gives added support to the red algal origin of cryptomonad chloroplasts. Clades comprising Dictyostelium discoideum plus Acanthamoeba castellanii (Amoebozoa) and Ochromonas plus Plasmodium falciparum (chromalveolates) are consistently observed and moderately supported. The clades supported by our RPB1 analyses are congruent with other data, suggesting that bona fide phylogenetic relationships are being resolved. Thus, the RPB1 gene has apparently retained some phylogenetically meaningful signal, making it worthwhile to obtain sequences from more diverse protist taxa. Additional RPB1 data, especially in combination with other genes, should provide further resolution of branching orders among protist

  11. Association of variants in genes related to the immune response and obesity with BPH in CLUE II.

    PubMed

    Lopez, D S; Peskoe, S B; Tsilidis, K K; Hoffman-Bolton, J; Helzlsouer, K J; Isaacs, W B; Smith, M W; Platz, E A

    2014-12-01

    Chronic inflammation and obesity may contribute to the genesis or progression of BPH and BPH-associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The influence of variants in genes related to these states on BPH has not been studied extensively. Thus, we evaluated the association of 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes (IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL10, TNF, CRP, TLR4 and RNASEL) and genes involved in obesity, including insulin regulation (LEP, ADIPOQ, PPARG and TCF7L2), with BPH. BPH cases (N = 568) and age-frequency matched controls (N=568) were selected from among adult male CLUE II cohort participants who responded in 2000 to a mailed questionnaire. BPH was defined as BPH surgery, use of BPH medications or symptomatic BPH (American Urological Association Symptom Index Score ⩾ 15). Controls were men who had not had BPH surgery, did not use BPH medications and whose symptom score was ⩽ 7. Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. None of the candidate SNPs was statistically significantly associated with BPH. However, we could not rule out possible weak associations for CRP rs1205 (1082C>T), ADIPOQ rs1501299 (276C>A), PPARG rs1801282 (-49C>G) and TCF7L2 rs7903146 (47833T>C). After summing risk alleles, men with ⩾ 4 had an increased BPH risk compared with those with ⩽ 1 (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.10-2.89; P(trend) = 0.006). SNPs in genes related to immune response and obesity, especially in combination, may be associated with BPH.

  12. MHC class II genes in European wolves: a comparison with dogs.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Jennifer M; Ellegren, Hans

    2002-10-01

    The genome of the grey wolf, one of the most widely distributed land mammal species, has been subjected to both stochastic factors, including biogeographical subdivision and population fragmentation, and strong selection during the domestication of the dog. To explore the effects of drift and selection on the partitioning of MHC variation in the diversification of species, we present nine DQA, 10 DQB, and 17 DRB1 sequences of the second exon for European wolves and compare them with sequences of North American wolves and dogs. The relatively large number of class II alleles present in both European and North American wolves attests to their large historical population sizes, yet there are few alleles shared between these regions at DQB and DRB1. Similarly, the dog has an extensive array of class II MHC alleles, a consequence of a genetically diverse origin, but allelic overlap with wolves only at DQA. Although we might expect a progression from shared alleles to shared allelic lineages during differentiation, the partitioning of diversity between wolves and dogs at DQB and DRB1 differs from that at DQA. Furthermore, an extensive region of nucleotide sequence shared between DRB1 and DQB alleles and a shared motif suggests intergenic recombination may have contributed to MHC diversity in the Canidae.

  13. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPAR{delta} inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516 significantly inhibited Ang II-induced premature senescence in hVSMCs. {yields} Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed generation of Ang II-triggered ROS with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. {yields} GW501516 up-regulated expression of antioxidant genes, such as GPx1, Trx1, Mn-SOD and HO-1. {yields} Knock-down of these antioxidant genes abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence. -- Abstract: This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) {delta} as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPAR{delta} by GW501516, a specific agonist ofmore » PPAR{delta}, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPAR{delta} suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPAR{delta}-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II.« less

  14. --RNA Polymerase II Transcription Attenuation at the Yeast DNA Repair Gene, DEF1, Involves Sen1-Dependent and Polyadenylation Site-Dependent Termination.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Courtney; Tuohy, Christine; Tallo, Thomas; Kaufman, James W; Moore, Claire; Kuehner, Jason N

    2018-04-23

    Termination of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) activity serves a vital cellular function by separating ubiquitous transcription units and influencing RNA fate and function. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Pol II termination is carried out by cleavage and polyadenylation factor (CPF-CF) and Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 (NNS) complexes, which operate primarily at mRNA and non-coding RNA genes, respectively. Premature Pol II termination (attenuation) contributes to gene regulation, but there is limited knowledge of its prevalence and biological significance. In particular, it is unclear how much crosstalk occurs between CPF-CF and NNS complexes and how Pol II attenuation is modulated during stress adaptation. In this study, we have identified an attenuator in the DEF1 DNA repair gene, which includes a portion of the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and upstream open reading frame (ORF). Using a plasmid-based reporter gene system, we conducted a genetic screen of 14 termination mutants and their ability to confer Pol II read-through defects. The DEF1 attenuator behaved as a hybrid terminator, relying heavily on CPF-CF and Sen1 but without Nrd1 and Nab3 involvement. Our genetic selection identified 22 cis -acting point mutations that clustered into four regions, including a polyadenylation site efficiency element that genetically interacts with its cognate binding-protein Hrp1. Outside of the reporter gene context, a DEF1 attenuator mutant increased mRNA and protein expression, exacerbating the toxicity of a constitutively active Def1 protein. Overall, our data support a biologically significant role for transcription attenuation in regulating DEF1 expression, which can be modulated during the DNA damage response. Copyright © 2018, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics.

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of the IGF-II gene intron 8 coding region and its association with growth and carcass traits in yak.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y F; Ding, X Z; Cheng, S R; Yu, S J

    2013-12-11

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) plays a key role in mammalian growth and is involved in stimulating fetal cell division, differentiation, and metabolic regulation. IGF-II is considered a candidate gene for genetic markers of growth and carcass traits. Therefore, in this study, the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IGF-II gene region with growth and carcass characteristics in five yak breeds were investigated. Two SNPs, G(330)C and A(358)G, were identified by sequencing intron 8 of the IGF-II gene in homozygotes. Two alleles, A and B, and three genotypes, AA, AB, and BB, were identified by polymerase chain reaction. Genotypic frequencies of IGF-II allele B were 0.8623, 0.8936, 0.8535, 0.8676, and 0.8300 for Datong yak, Gannan yak, Tianzhu white yak, Qinghai Plateau yak, and Xinjiang yak, respectively. Allele and the genotype of IGF-II were strongly associated with growth and carcass traits. Least square analysis revealed a significant effect (P < 0.01) of genotypes AA and AB compared with genotype BB on live-weight (at 12, 13-24, and 25-36 months of age), average daily weight gain (P < 0.01) and carcass weight (P < 0.05). Animals with genotype AB had a higher mean rib eye area, and a lower mean yield grade. The results indicated that the IGF-II gene acts by a primarily additive biological mechanism by adding weight independently of skeletal growth.

  16. The type II pullulanase of Thermococcus hydrothermalis: molecular characterization of the gene and expression of the catalytic domain.

    PubMed

    Erra-Pujada, M; Debeire, P; Duchiron, F; O'Donohue, M J

    1999-05-01

    The gene encoding a hyperthermostable type II pullulanase produced by Thermococcus hydrothermalis (Th-Apu) has been isolated. Analysis of a total of 5.2 kb of genomic DNA has revealed the presence of three open reading frames, one of which (apuA) encodes the pullulanase. This enzyme is composed of 1,339 amino acid residues and exhibits a multidomain structure. In addition to a typical N-terminal signal peptide, Th-Apu possesses a catalytic domain, a domain bearing S-layer homology-like motifs, a Thr-rich region, and a potential C-terminal transmembrane domain. The presence of these noncatalytic domains suggests that Th-Apu may be anchored to the cell surface and be O glycosylated.

  17. The Type II Pullulanase of Thermococcus hydrothermalis: Molecular Characterization of the Gene and Expression of the Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Erra-Pujada, Marta; Debeire, Philippe; Duchiron, Francis; O’Donohue, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding a hyperthermostable type II pullulanase produced by Thermococcus hydrothermalis (Th-Apu) has been isolated. Analysis of a total of 5.2 kb of genomic DNA has revealed the presence of three open reading frames, one of which (apuA) encodes the pullulanase. This enzyme is composed of 1,339 amino acid residues and exhibits a multidomain structure. In addition to a typical N-terminal signal peptide, Th-Apu possesses a catalytic domain, a domain bearing S-layer homology-like motifs, a Thr-rich region, and a potential C-terminal transmembrane domain. The presence of these noncatalytic domains suggests that Th-Apu may be anchored to the cell surface and be O glycosylated. PMID:10322035

  18. Epigenetic modification of DRG neuronal gene expression subsequent to nerve injury: etiological contribution to complex regional pain syndromes (Part II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuzhou; Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2014-07-12

    Cumulating evidence indicated that nerve injury-associated cellular and molecular changes play an essential role in contributing to the development of pathological pain, and more recent findings implicated the critical role of epigenetic mechanisms in pain-related sensitization in the DRG subsequent to nerve injury. In this part of the dyad review (Part II), we reviewed and paid special attention on the etiological contribution of DGR gene expression modulated by epigenetic mechanisms of CRPS. As essential effectors to different molecular activation, we first discussed the activation of various signaling pathways that subsequently from nerve injury, and in further illustrated the fundamental and functional underpinnings of nerve injury-induced pain, in which we argued for the potential epigenetic mechanisms in response to sensitizing stimuli or injury. Therefore, understanding the specific mediating factors that influence individual epigenetic differences contributing to pain sensitivity and responsiveness to analgesics possesses crucial clinical implications.

  19. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in the selective loss of urotensin-II contractile activity in aortae isolated from UT receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Behm, David J; Harrison, Stephen M; Ao, Zhaohui; Maniscalco, Kristeen; Pickering, Susan J; Grau, Evelyn V; Woods, Tina N; Coatney, Robert W; Doe, Christopher P A; Willette, Robert N; Johns, Douglas G; Douglas, Stephen A

    2003-01-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) is among the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictors identified and may play a role in the aetiology of essential hypertension. Currently, only one mouse U-II receptor (UT) gene has been cloned. It is postulated that this protein is solely responsible for mediating U-II-induced vasoconstriction. This hypothesis has been investigated in the present study, which assessed basal haemodynamics and vascular reactivity to hU-II in wild-type (UT(+/+)) and UT receptor knockout (UT(−/−)) mice. Basal left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes/pressures, stroke volumes, mean arterial blood pressures, heart rates, cardiac outputs and ejection fractions in UT(+/+) mice and in UT(−/−) mice were similar. Relative to UT(+/+) mouse isolated thoracic aorta, where hU-II was a potent spasmogen (pEC50=8.26±0.08) that evoked relatively little vasoconstriction (17±2% 60 mM KCl), vessels isolated from UT(−/−) mice did not respond to hU-II. However, in contrast, the superior mesenteric artery isolated from both the genotypes did not contract in the presence of hU-II. Reactivity to unrelated vasoconstrictors (phenylephrine, endothelin-1, KCl) and endothelium-dependent/independent vasodilator agents (carbachol, sodium nitroprusside) was similar in the aorta and superior mesenteric arteries isolated from both the genotypes. The present study is the first to directly link hU-II-induced vasoconstriction with the UT receptor. Deletion of the UT receptor gene results in loss of hU-II contractile action with no ‘nonspecific' alterations in vascular reactivity. However, as might be predicted based on the limited contractile efficacy recorded in vitro, the contribution that hU-II and its receptor make to basal systemic haemodynamics appears to be negligible in this species. PMID:12770952

  20. DNA methylation of angiotensin II receptor gene in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Asada, Kiyoshi; Aihara, Yosuke; Takaya, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Ryuichi; Namisaki, Tadashi; Moriya, Kei; Uejima, Masakazu; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Mashitani, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Kosuke; Kawaratani, Hideto; Okura, Yasushi; Kaji, Kosuke; Douhara, Akitoshi; Sawada, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Norihisa; Seki, Kenichiro; Mitoro, Akira; Yamao, Junichi; Yoshiji, Hitoshi

    2016-10-08

    To clarify whether Agtr1a methylation is involved in the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)-related liver fibrosis in adult rats. A choline-deficient amino acid (CDAA) diet model was employed for methylation analysis of NASH-related liver fibrosis. Agtr1a methylation levels were measured in the livers of CDAA- and control choline-sufficient amino acid (CSAA)-fed rats for 8 and 12 wk using quantitative methylation-specific PCR. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated by collagenase digestion of the liver, followed by centrifugation of the crude cell suspension through a density gradient. Agtr1a methylation and its gene expression were also analyzed during the activation of HSCs. The mean levels of Agtr1a methylation in the livers of CDAA-fed rats (11.5% and 18.6% at 8 and 12 wk, respectively) tended to be higher ( P = 0.06 and 0.09, respectively) than those in the livers of CSAA-fed rats (2.1% and 5.3% at 8 and 12 wk, respectively). Agtr1a was not methylated at all in quiescent HSCs, but was clearly methylated in activated HSCs (13.8%, P < 0.01). Interestingly, although Agtr1a was hypermethylated, the Agtr1a mRNA level increased up to 2.2-fold ( P < 0.05) in activated HSCs compared with that in quiescent HSCs, suggesting that Agtr1a methylation did not silence its expression but instead had the potential to upregulate its expression. These findings indicate that Agtr1a methylation and its upregulation of gene expression are associated with the development of NASH-related liver fibrosis. This is the first study to show that DNA methylation is potentially involved in the regulation of a renin-angiotensin system-related gene expression during liver fibrosis.

  1. Identification and Construction of Combinatory Cancer Hallmark-Based Gene Signature Sets to Predict Recurrence and Chemotherapy Benefit in Stage II Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanwu; Tibiche, Chabane; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Trifiro, Mark; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen; Wang, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Decisions regarding adjuvant therapy in patients with stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) have been among the most challenging and controversial in oncology over the past 20 years. To develop robust combinatory cancer hallmark-based gene signature sets (CSS sets) that more accurately predict prognosis and identify a subset of patients with stage II CRC who could gain survival benefits from adjuvant chemotherapy. Thirteen retrospective studies of patients with stage II CRC who had clinical follow-up and adjuvant chemotherapy were analyzed. Respective totals of 162 and 843 patients from 2 and 11 independent cohorts were used as the discovery and validation cohorts, respectively. A total of 1005 patients with stage II CRC were included in the 13 cohorts. Among them, 84 of 416 patients in 3 independent cohorts received fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Identification of CSS sets to predict relapse-free survival and identify a subset of patients with stage II CRC who could gain substantial survival benefits from fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Eight cancer hallmark-based gene signatures (30 genes each) were identified and used to construct CSS sets for determining prognosis. The CSS sets were validated in 11 independent cohorts of 767 patients with stage II CRC who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The CSS sets accurately stratified patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups. Five-year relapse-free survival rates were 94%, 78%, and 45%, respectively, representing 60%, 28%, and 12% of patients with stage II disease. The 416 patients with CSS set-defined high-risk stage II CRC who received fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy showed a substantial gain in survival benefits from the treatment (ie, recurrence reduced by 30%-40% in 5 years). The CSS sets substantially outperformed other prognostic predictors of stage 2 CRC. They are more accurate and robust for prognostic predictions and facilitate the identification of patients with stage

  2. Type II thioesterase gene (ECO-orf27) from Amycolatopsis orientalis influences production of the polyketide antibiotic, ECO-0501 (LW01).

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Huang, He; Zhu, Li; Luo, Minyu; Chen, Daijie

    2012-11-01

    ECO-orf27 associated with the cluster of ECO-0501 (LW01) from Amycolatopsis orientalis is deduced to encode a type II thioesterase. Disruption of ECO-orf27 reduced LW01 production by 95 %. Complementation of the disrupted mutant with intact ECO-orf27 restored the production of LW01 suggesting that ECO-orf27 is crucial for LW01 biosynthesis. ECO-TE I, the gene encoding type I thioesterase from LW01 polyketide synthases, cannot complement ECO-orf27 deficient mutant distinguishing ECO-orf27 from type I thioesterase gene. Type II thioesterase gene pikAV from Streptomyces venezuelae could complement ECO-orf27 in A. orientalis indicating that the two genes are equivalent in their function. Overexpression of ECO-orf27 resulted in a 20 % increase in LW01 production providing an alternative approach for yield improvement.

  3. Mediator, TATA-binding protein, and RNA polymerase II contribute to low histone occupancy at active gene promoters in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Suraiya A; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z; Rode, Kara A; Barber, Wesley T; Ellis, Laura C; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H

    2014-05-23

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Glucocorticoids enhance activation of the human type II 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta5-Delta4 isomerase gene.

    PubMed

    Feltus, F Alex; Cote, Stephanie; Simard, Jacques; Gingras, Sebastien; Kovacs, William J; Nicholson, Wendell E; Clark, Barbara J; Melner, Michael H

    2002-09-01

    Glucocorticoids indirectly alter adrenocortical steroid output through the inhibition of ACTH secretion by the anterior pituitary. However, previous studies suggest that glucocorticoids can directly affect adrenocortical steroid production. Therefore, we have investigated the ability of glucocorticoids to affect transcription of adrenocortical steroid biosynthetic enzymes. One potential target of glucocorticoid action in the adrenal is an enzyme critical for adrenocortical steroid production: 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta5-Delta4 isomerase (3beta-HSD). Treatment of the adrenocortical cell line (H295R) with the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone (DEX) increased cortisol production and 3beta-HSD mRNA levels alone or in conjunction with phorbol ester. This increase in 3beta-HSD mRNA was paralleled by increases in Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR) mRNA levels. The human type II 3beta-HSD promoter lacks a consensus palindromic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) but does contain a Stat5 response element (Stat5RE) suggesting that glucocorticoids could affect type II 3beta-HSD transcription via interaction with Stat5. Transfection experiments show enhancement of human type II 3beta-HSD promoter activity by coexpression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and Stat5A and treatment with 100nM dexamethasone. Furthermore, removal of the Stat5RE either by truncation of the 5' flanking sequence in the promoter or introduction of point mutations to the Stat5RE abolished the ability of DEX to enhance 3beta-HSD promoter activity. These studies demonstrate the ability of glucocorticoids to directly enhance the expression of an adrenal steroidogenic enzyme gene albeit independent of a consensus palindromic glucocorticoid response element.

  5. Phase I/II study of alectinib in lung cancer with RET fusion gene: study protocol.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shinji; Murayama, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Kawakami, Takahiro; Takahara, Shizuko; Imai, Yasuhito; Kuribayashi, Yoshikazu; Nagase, Katsuhiko; Goto, Koichi; Nishio, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Satouchi, Miyako; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Seto, Takashi; Yano, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    The rearranged during transfection (RET) fusion gene was discovered as a driver oncogene in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Alectinib is an approved anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor that may also be effective for RET fusion-positive NSCLC. RET fusion-positive NSCLC patients treated with at least one regimen of chemotherapy are being recruited. In step 1, alectinib (600 or 450 mg, twice daily) will be administered following a 3+3 design. The primary endpoint is safety. In step 2, alectinib will be administered at the recommended dose (RD) defined by step 1. The primary endpoint is the response rate of RET inhibitor treatment-naïve patients. This is the first study to investigate the safety and preliminary efficacy of alectinib in RET fusion-positive NSCLC patients. If successful, alectinib treatment may lead to substantial and important changes in the management of NSCLC with RET fusion genes. J. Med. Invest. 64: 317-320, August, 2017.

  6. Carbon nanotubes part II: a remarkable carrier for drug and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mahdi; Solati, Navid; Ghasemi, Amir; Estiar, Mehrdad Asghari; Hashemkhani, Mahshid; Kiani, Parnian; Mohamed, Elmira; Saeidi, Ahad; Taheri, Mahdiar; Avci, Pinar; Aref, Amir R; Amiri, Mohammad; Baniasadi, Fazel; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently been studied as novel and versatile drug and gene delivery vehicles. When CNT are suitably functionalized, they can interact with various cell types and are taken up by endocytosis. Areas covered Anti-cancer drugs cisplatin and doxorubicin have been delivered by CNT, as well as methotrexate, taxol and gemcitabine. The delivery of the antifungal compound amphotericin B and the oral administration of erythropoietin have both been assisted using CNT. Frequently, targeting moieties such as folic acid, epidermal growth factor or various antibodies are attached to the CNT-drug nanovehicle. Different kinds of functionalization (e.g., polycations) have been used to allow CNT to act as gene delivery vectors. Plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA and micro-RNA have all been delivered by CNT vehicles. Significant concerns are raised about the nanotoxicology of the CNT and their potentially damaging effects on the environment. Expert opinion CNT-mediated drug delivery has been studied for over a decade, and both in vitro and in vivo studies have been reported. The future success of CNTs as vectors in vivo and in clinical application will depend on achievement of efficacious therapy with minimal adverse effects and avoidance of possible toxic and environmentally damaging effects. PMID:25613837

  7. The Mhc class II of the Black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) consists of low numbers of B and Y genes with variable diversity and expression.

    PubMed

    Strand, Tanja; Westerdahl, Helena; Höglund, Jacob; V Alatalo, Rauno; Siitari, Heli

    2007-09-01

    We found that the Black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) possess low numbers of Mhc class II B (BLB) and Y (YLB) genes with variable diversity and expression. We have therefore shown, for the first time, that another bird species (in this case, a wild lek-breeding galliform) shares several features of the simple Mhc of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). The Black grouse BLB genes showed the same level of polymorphism that has been reported in chicken, and we also found indications of balancing selection in the peptide-binding regions. The YLB genes were less variable than the BLB genes, also in accordance with earlier studies in chicken, although their functional significance still remains obscure. We hypothesize that the YLB genes could have been under purifying selection, just as the mammal Mhc-E gene cluster.

  8. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of the USH2A Gene in a Korean Patient with Usher Syndrome Type II.

    PubMed

    Boo, Sung Hyun; Song, Min-Jung; Kim, Hee-Jin; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chu, Hosuk; Ko, Moon-Hee; Chung, Won-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-03-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. It has been shown that mutations in the USH2A gene are responsible for USH2. The authors herein describe a 34-year-old Korean woman with the typical clinical manifestation of USH2; she had bilateral hearing disturbance and progressive visual deterioration, without vestibular dysfunction. Molecular genetic study of the USH2A gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation (c.2310delA; Glu771LysfsX17). She was heterozygous for this mutation, and no other mutation was found in USH2A, suggesting the possibility of an intronic or large genomic rearrangement mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically confirmed case of USH2 in Korea. More investigations are needed to delineate genotype-phenotype correlations and ethnicity-specific genetic background of Usher syndrome.

  9. A Novel Frameshift Mutation of the USH2A Gene in a Korean Patient with Usher Syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Sung Hyun; Song, Min-Jung; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chu, Hosuk; Ko, Moon-Hee; Chung, Won-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2013-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, characterized by moderate to severe hearing impairment and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. It has been shown that mutations in the USH2A gene are responsible for USH2. The authors herein describe a 34-year-old Korean woman with the typical clinical manifestation of USH2; she had bilateral hearing disturbance and progressive visual deterioration, without vestibular dysfunction. Molecular genetic study of the USH2A gene revealed a novel frameshift mutation (c.2310delA; Glu771LysfsX17). She was heterozygous for this mutation, and no other mutation was found in USH2A, suggesting the possibility of an intronic or large genomic rearrangement mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genetically confirmed case of USH2 in Korea. More investigations are needed to delineate genotype-phenotype correlations and ethnicity-specific genetic background of Usher syndrome. PMID:23526569

  10. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ilchung; Ray, Judhajeet; Gupta, Vinayak

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from themore » GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.« less

  11. Alteration of topoisomerase II-alpha gene in human breast cancer: association with responsiveness to anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Press, Michael F; Sauter, Guido; Buyse, Marc; Bernstein, Leslie; Guzman, Roberta; Santiago, Angela; Villalobos, Ivonne E; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Pienkowski, Tadeusz; Martin, Miguel; Robert, Nicholas; Crown, John; Bee, Valerie; Taupin, Henry; Flom, Kerry J; Tabah-Fisch, Isabelle; Pauletti, Giovanni; Lindsay, Mary-Ann; Riva, Alessandro; Slamon, Dennis J

    2011-03-01

    Approximately 35% of HER2-amplified breast cancers have coamplification of the topoisomerase II-alpha (TOP2A) gene encoding an enzyme that is a major target of anthracyclines. This study was designed to evaluate whether TOP2A gene alterations may predict incremental responsiveness to anthracyclines in some breast cancers. A total of 4,943 breast cancers were analyzed for alterations in TOP2A and HER2. Primary tumor tissues from patients with metastatic breast cancer treated in a trial of chemotherapy plus/minus trastuzumab were studied for amplification/deletion of TOP2A and HER2 as a test set followed by evaluation of malignancies from two separate, large trials for changes in these same genes as a validation set. Association between these alterations and clinical outcomes was determined. Test set cases containing HER2 amplification treated with doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) plus trastuzumab, demonstrated longer progression-free survival compared to those treated with AC alone (P = .0002). However, patients treated with AC alone whose tumors contain HER2/TOP2A coamplification experienced a similar improvement in survival (P = .004). Conversely, for patients treated with paclitaxel, HER2/TOP2A coamplification was not associated with improved outcomes. These observations were confirmed in a larger validation set, where HER2/TOP2A coamplification was again associated with longer survival when only anthracycline-containing chemotherapy was used for treatment compared with outcome in HER2-positive cancers lacking TOP2A coamplification. In a study involving nearly 5,000 breast malignancies, both test set and validation set demonstrate that TOP2A coamplification, not HER2 amplification, is the clinically useful predictive marker of an incremental response to anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Absence of HER2/TOP2A coamplification may indicate a more restricted efficacy advantage for breast cancers than previously thought.

  12. Novel genetic markers of the carbonic anhydrase II gene associated with egg production and reproduction traits in Tsaiya ducks.

    PubMed

    Chang, M-T; Cheng, Y-S; Huang, M-C

    2013-02-01

    In our previous cDNA microarray study, we found that the carbonic anhydrase II (CA2) gene is one of the differentially expressed transcripts in the duck isthmus epithelium during egg formation period. The aim of this study was to identify the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CA2 gene of Tsaiya ducks. The relationship of SNP genotype with egg production and reproduction traits was also investigated. A total of 317 ducks from two lines, a control line with no selection and a selected line, were employed for testing. Three SNPs (C37T, A62G and A65G) in the 3'-untranslated region of the CA2 gene were found. SNP-trait association analysis showed that SNP C37T and A62G were associated with duck egg weight besides fertility. The ducks with the CT and AG genotypes had a 1.46 and 1.62 g/egg lower egg weight as compared with ducks with the CC and AA genotypes, respectively (p < 0.05). But the ducks with CT and AG genotypes had 5.20% and 4.22% higher fertility than those with CC and AA genotypes, respectively (p < 0.05). Diplotype constructed on these three SNPs was associated with duck fertility, and the diplotype H1H4 was dominant for duck fertility. These findings might provide the basis for balanced selection and may be used in marker-assisted selection to improve egg weight and fertility simultaneously in the Tsaiya ducks. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Comprehensive screening of the USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II and non-syndromic recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Rivolta, Carlo; Keene, Julia A; Berson, Eliot L; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2004-08-01

    A screen of the entire coding region of the USH2A gene in 129 unrelated patients with Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and in 146 unrelated patients with non-syndromic autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) uncovered 54 different sequence variations, including 18 likely pathogenic mutations (13 frameshift, three nonsense, and two missense), 12 changes of uncertain pathogenicity (11 missense changes and one in-frame deletion), and 24 non-pathogenic rare variants or polymorphisms. Of the 18 likely pathogenic mutations, nine were novel. Among the USH2 patients, 50 (39%) had one or two likely pathogenic mutations. The most common mutant allele in USH2 patients was E767fs, which was found in 29 patients, including one homozygote. Among the ARRP patients, we found 17 (12%) with one or two likely pathogenic mutations. The most common mutant allele in ARRP patients was C759F and it was found in 10 patients. The C759F allele was also found in two USH2 patients; in neither of them was a change in the other allele found. The second most common mutant allele in both patient groups was L1447fs (found in 6/50 USH2 patients and 6/17 ARRP patients). Of the 50+17=67 patients with identified USH2A mutations, only one mutation in one allele was found in 41+12=53 (79%); the reason for the high proportion of patients with only one identified mutation is obscure. Our results indicate that USH2A mutations are found in about 7% of all cases of RP in North America, a frequency similar to the RPGR gene (8%) and the rhodopsin gene (10%).

  14. Angiotensinogen gene M235T and angiotensin II-type 1 receptor gene A/C1166 polymorphisms in chronic obtructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ayada, Ceylan; Toru, Ümran; Genç, Osman; Şahin, Server; Turgut, Sebahat; Turgut, Günfer

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) occurs irreversibly and is characterized by progressive airflow obstruction. Renin angiotensin system (RAS) has many different key enzymes and receptors that have a role for different systemic processes. We aimed to determine genotype and allele frequencies of angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T and angiotensin II-type 1 receptor (AT1-R) A/C1166 polymorphisms in patients with COPD. This study was performed on 56 unrelated COPD patients and 29 healthy subjects. DNA samples for each individual were isolated from peripheral blood by phenol/chloroform method, analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic digestion methodologies. The distribution for each of AGT genotypes were 23.2% for MM (13), 75.0% for MT (42) and 1.8% for TT (1) in the COPD group; 37.9% for MM (11), 34.5% for MT (10) and 27.6% for TT (8) in the control group. The distribution of AGT genotypes was found significantly different between groups (X2 = 18.604; df = 2; P = 0.000). The frequencies for each of the AT1-R genotypes were found as 53.6% for AA (30), 42.9% for AC (24), 3.6% for CC (2) in the COPD group; 55.2% for AA (16), 41.4% for AC (12) and 3.4% for CC (1) in the control group. The distribution of AT1-R genotypes did not change significantly between groups. Allele frequencies of interested genes were not significantly different between groups. We suggest that AGT polymorphism may play a role for the development of COPD. We believe these data can be served for large scale population genetics research, considering the frequency of AGT and AT1-R genes and alleles in COPD patients in the Turkish population. PMID:26064378

  15. Genes associated with metabolic syndrome predict disease-free survival in stage II colorectal cancer patients. A novel link between metabolic dysregulation and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Teodoro; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Herranz, Jesús; Cejas, Paloma; Molina, Susana; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Ramos, Ricardo; Burgos, Emilio; Aguayo, Cristina; Custodio, Ana B; Reglero, Guillermo; Feliu, Jaime; Ramírez de Molina, Ana

    2014-12-01

    Studies have recently suggested that metabolic syndrome and its components increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Both diseases are increasing in most countries, and the genetic association between them has not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to assess the association between genetic risk factors of metabolic syndrome or related conditions (obesity, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes mellitus type 2) and clinical outcome in stage II colorectal cancer patients. Expression levels of several genes related to metabolic syndrome and associated alterations were analysed by real-time qPCR in two equivalent but independent sets of stage II colorectal cancer patients. Using logistic regression models and cross-validation analysis with all tumour samples, we developed a metabolic syndrome-related gene expression profile to predict clinical outcome in stage II colorectal cancer patients. The results showed that a gene expression profile constituted by genes previously related to metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with clinical outcome of stage II colorectal cancer patients. This metabolic profile was able to identify patients with a low risk and high risk of relapse. Its predictive value was validated using an independent set of stage II colorectal cancer patients. The identification of a set of genes related to metabolic syndrome that predict survival in intermediate-stage colorectal cancer patients allows delineation of a high-risk group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy and avoid the toxic and unnecessary chemotherapy in patients classified as low risk. Our results also confirm the linkage between metabolic disorder and colorectal cancer and suggest the potential for cancer prevention and/or treatment by targeting these genes. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mhc class II B gene evolution in East African cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, F; Mayer, W E; Sültmann, H; O'hUigin, C; Tichy, H; Satta, Y; Takezaki, N; Takahata, N; Klein, J

    2000-06-01

    A distinctive feature of essential major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) loci is their polymorphism characterized by large genetic distances between alleles and long persistence times of allelic lineages. Since the lineages often span several successive speciations, we investigated the behavior of the Mhc alleles during or close to the speciation phase. We sequenced exon 2 of the class II B locus 4 from 232 East African cichlid fishes representing 32 related species. The divergence times of the (sub)species ranged from 6,000 to 8.4 million years. Two types of evolutionary analysis were used to elucidate the pattern of exon 2 sequence divergence. First, phylogenetic methods were applied to reconstruct the most likely evolutionary pathways leading from the last common ancestor of the set to the extant sequences, and to assess the probable mechanisms involved in allelic diversification. Second, pairwise comparisons of sequences were carried out to detect differences seemingly incompatible with origin by nonparallel point mutations. The analysis revealed point mutations to be the most important mechanism behind allelic divergences, with recombination playing only an auxiliary part. Comparison of sequences from related species revealed evidence of random allelic (lineage) losses apparently associated with speciation. Sharing of identical alleles could be demonstrated between species that diverged 2 million years ago. The phylogeny of the exon was incongruent with that of the flanking introns, indicating either a high degree of convergent evolution at the peptide-binding region-encoding sites, or intron homogenization.

  17. Horizontal gene transfer of chromosomal Type II toxin-antitoxin systems of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar Chandra Mohan; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini

    2016-02-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are small autoregulated bicistronic operons that encode a toxin protein with the potential to inhibit metabolic processes and an antitoxin protein to neutralize the toxin. Most of the bacterial genomes encode multiple TAs. However, the diversity and accumulation of TAs on bacterial genomes and its physiological implications are highly debated. Here we provide evidence that Escherichia coli chromosomal TAs (encoding RNase toxins) are 'acquired' DNA likely originated from heterologous DNA and are the smallest known autoregulated operons with the potential for horizontal propagation. Sequence analyses revealed that integration of TAs into the bacterial genome is unique and contributes to variations in the coding and/or regulatory regions of flanking host genome sequences. Plasmids and genomes encoding identical TAs of natural isolates are mutually exclusive. Chromosomal TAs might play significant roles in the evolution and ecology of bacteria by contributing to host genome variation and by moderation of plasmid maintenance. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack): role of the binary vector system and selection cassettes.

    PubMed

    Bińka, Agnieszka; Orczyk, Wacław; Nadolska-Orczyk, Anna

    2012-02-01

    The influence of two binary vector systems, pGreen and pCAMBIA, on the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation ability of wheat and triticale was studied. Both vectors carried selection cassettes with bar or nptII driven by different promoters. Two cultivars of wheat, Kontesa and Torka, and one cultivar of triticale, Wanad, were tested. The transformation rates for the wheat cultivars ranged from 0.00 to 3.58% and from 0.00 to 6.79% for triticale. The best values for wheat were 3.58% for Kontesa and 3.14% for Torka, and these were obtained after transformation with the pGreen vector carrying the nptII selection gene under the control of 35S promoter. In the case of the bar selection system, the best transformation rates were, respectively, 1.46 and 1.79%. Such rates were obtained when the 35S::bar cassette was carried by the pCAMBIA vector; they were significantly lower with the pGreen vector. The triticale cultivar Wanad had its highest transformation rate after transformation with nptII driven by 35S in pCAMBIA. The bar selection system for the same triticale cultivar was better when the gene was driven by nos and the selection cassette was carried by pGreen. The integration of the transgenes was confirmed with at least three pairs of specific starters amplifying the fragments of nptII, bar, or gus. The expression of selection genes, measured by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in relation to the actin gene, was low, ranging from 0.00 to 0.63 for nptII and from 0.00 to 0.33 for bar. The highest relative transcript accumulation was observed for nptII driven by 35S and expressed in Kontesa that had been transformed with pGreen.

  19. The gene responsible for borate cross-linking of pectin Rhamnogalacturonan-II is required for plant reproductive tissue development and fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Hiroaki; Hokura, Akiko; Oishi, Masahiro; Chida, Hiroshi; Ishii, Tadashi; Sakai, Shingo; Satoh, Shinobu

    2006-01-01

    Deficiencies in boron, a microelement that is essential for the growth and development of higher plants, often cause problems in reproductive growth. Rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) in cell wall pectin acts as the sole receptor for boron in plant cells, forming a borate cross-linked RG-II dimer (dRG-II-B), but the physiological functions of dRG-II-B remain unknown. We have previously shown that the pectin glucuronyltransferase 1 gene NpGUT1, which is involved in the biosynthesis of RG-II sugar chains, is essential for the formation of the RG-II-B complex, resulting in tight intercellular attachment in meristematic tissues. Because NpGUT1 expression was found to be abundant in reproductive organs in addition to meristematic tissues, we analyzed the expression and functions of NpGUT1 in more detail in tobacco reproductive tissues. Specific NpGUT1 expression was detected in the tapetum of flower buds and in the pollen, pollen tube tips, and transmitting tissue of the pistils of flowers. Dexamethasone-induced expression of the NpGUT1 antisense gene in flower buds resulted in the formation of sterile flowers with aberrant development of pollen and transmitting tissue. Pollen tubes could not pass through pistils with aborted transmitting tissue, and expression of an NpGUT1 antisense gene in germinating pollen inhibited pollen tube elongation, accompanied by the absence of pectin RG-II and boron in the pollen tube tip. These results indicate that expression of NpGUT1 is required for the development and functions of male and female tissues. PMID:17053077

  20. Sensitization to mouse and cockroach allergens and asthma morbidity in urban minority youth: Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II).

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Anna B; Lee, Todd A; Cai, Miao; Oh, Sam S; Eng, Celeste; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Farber, Harold J; Serebrisky, Denise; Silverberg, Jonathan; Williams, L Keoki; Seibold, Max A; Sen, Saunak; Borrell, Luisa N; Avila, Pedro; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Burchard, Esteban G; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Pest allergen sensitization is associated with asthma morbidity in urban youth but minimally explored in Latino populations. Specifically, the effect of mouse sensitization on the risk of asthma exacerbation has been unexplored in Latino subgroups. To evaluate whether pest allergen sensitization is a predictor of asthma exacerbations and poor asthma control in urban minority children with asthma. Latino and African American children (8-21 years old) with asthma were recruited from 4 sites across the United States. Logistic regression models evaluated the association of mouse or cockroach sensitization with asthma-related acute care visits or hospitalizations. A total of 1,992 children with asthma in the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino American (GALA-II) and Study of African-Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE-II) cohorts were studied. Asthmatic children from New York had the highest rate of pest allergen sensitization (42% mouse, 56% cockroach), with the lowest rate in San Francisco (4% mouse, 8% cockroach). Mouse sensitization, more than cockroach, was associated with increased odds of acute care visits (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.47; 95% CI, 1.07-2.03) or hospitalizations (aOR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.81-5.18), even after controlling for self-reported race and site of recruitment. In stratified analyses, Mexican youth sensitized to mouse allergen did not have higher odds of asthma exacerbation. Other Latino and Puerto Rican youth sensitized to mouse had higher odds of hospitalization for asthma (aORs, 4.57 [95% CI, 1.86-11.22] and 10.01 [95% CI, 1.77-56.6], respectively) but not emergency department visits. Pest allergen sensitization is associated with a higher odds of asthma exacerbations in urban minority youth. Puerto Rican and Other Latino youth sensitized to mouse were more likely to have asthma-related hospitalizations than Mexican youth. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  1. Polymorphism of the MHC class II Eb gene determines the protection against collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Zanelli, E.; Krco, C.J.

    1995-05-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is an animal model of auto immune polyarthritis, sharing similarities with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Paradoxally, susceptibility to mouse CIA is controlled by the H2A loci (DQ homologous) while RA is linked to HLA.DR genes (H2E homologous). We recently showed that the E{beta}{sup d} molecule prevents CIA development in susceptible H2{sup q} mice. We addressed the question of whether H2Eb polymorphism will influence CIA incidence as HLA.DRB1 polymorphism does in RA. In F{sub 1} mice, only H2Eb{sup d} and H2Eb{sup s} molecules showed protection. Using recombinant B10.RDD (Eb{sup d/b}) mice, we found that CIA protection was mediated bymore » the first domain of the E{beta}{sup d} molecule. Using peptides covering the third hypervariable region of the E{beta} chain, we found a perfect correlation between presentation of E{beta} peptides by the H2A{sup q} molecule and protection on CIA. Therefore, the mechanism by which H2Eb protects against CIA seems to rely on the affinity of E{beta} peptides for the H2A{sup q} molecule. 35 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  2. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced.

  3. Transcriptional up-regulation of antioxidant genes by PPARδ inhibits angiotensin II-induced premature senescence in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Ham, Sun Ah; Paek, Kyung Shin; Hwang, Jung Seok; Jung, Si Young; Kim, Min Young; Jin, Hanna; Kang, Eun Sil; Woo, Im Sun; Kim, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Han, Chang Woo; Seo, Han Geuk

    2011-03-25

    This study evaluated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in Ang II-induced senescence in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). Activation of PPARδ by GW501516, a specific agonist of PPARδ, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced premature senescence of hVSMCs. Agonist-activated PPARδ suppressed the generation of Ang II-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a concomitant reduction in DNA damage. Notably, GW501516 up-regulated the expression of antioxidant genes, such as glutathione peroxidase 1, thioredoxin 1, manganese superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase 1. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of these antioxidant genes almost completely abolished the effects of GW501516 on ROS production and premature senescence in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Taken together, the enhanced transcription of antioxidant genes is responsible for the PPARδ-mediated inhibition of premature senescence through sequestration of ROS in hVSMCs treated with Ang II. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of a partially deleted gene of human type II procollagen (COL2A1) in transgenic mice produces a chondrodysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberg, P.; Khillan, J.S.; Prockop, D.J.

    A minigene version of the human gene for type II procollagen (COL2AI) was prepared that lacked a large central region containing 12 of the 52 exons and therefore 291 of the 1523 codons of the gene. The construct was modeled after sporadic in-frame deletions of collagen genes that cause synthesis of shortened pro{alpha} chains that associate with normal pro{alpha} chains and thereby cause degradation of the shortened and normal pro{alpha} chains through a process called procollagen suicide. The gene construct was used to prepare five lines of transgenic mice expressing the minigene. A large proportion of the mice expressing themore » minigene developed a phenotype of a chondrodysplasia with dwarfism, short and thick limbs, a short snout, a cranial bulge, a cleft palate, and delayed mineralization of bone. A number of mice died shortly after birth. Microscopic examination of cartilage revealed decreased density and organization of collagen fibrils. In cultured chondrocytes from the transgenic mice, the minigene was expressed as shortened pro{alpha}1(II) chains that were disulfide-linked to normal mouse pro{alpha}1(II) chains. Therefore, the phenotype is probably explained by depletion of the endogenous mouse type II procollagen through the phenomenon of procollagen suicide.« less

  5. Ketide Synthase (KS) Domain Prediction and Analysis of Iterative Type II PKS Gene in Marine Sponge-Associated Actinobacteria Producing Biosurfactants and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Selvin, Joseph; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Lipton, Anuj N.; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Kiran, George S.

    2016-01-01

    The important biological macromolecules, such as lipopeptide and glycolipid biosurfactant producing marine actinobacteria were analyzed and their potential linkage between type II polyketide synthase (PKS) genes was explored. A unique feature of type II PKS genes is their high amino acid (AA) sequence homology and conserved gene organization. These enzymes mediate the biosynthesis of polyketide natural products with enormous structural complexity and chemical nature by combinatorial use of various domains. Therefore, deciphering the order of AA sequence encoded by PKS domains tailored the chemical structure of polyketide analogs still remains a great challenge. The present work deals with an in vitro and in silico analysis of PKS type II genes from five actinobacterial species to correlate KS domain architecture and structural features. Our present analysis reveals the unique protein domain organization of iterative type II PKS and KS domain of marine actinobacteria. The findings of this study would have implications in metabolic pathway reconstruction and design of semi-synthetic genomes to achieve rational design of novel natural products. PMID:26903957

  6. Cloning and Characterization of the Lipooligosaccharide Galactosyltransferase II Gene of Haemophilus ducreyi

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuhua; Schilling, Birgit; Tarantino, Laurie; Tullius, Michael V.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Munson, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of chancroid, a genital ulcer disease. The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) is considered to be a major virulence determinant and has been implicated in the adherence of H. ducreyi to keratinocytes. Strain A77, an isolate from the Paris collection, is serum sensitive, poorly adherent to fibroblasts, and deficient in microcolony formation. Structural analysis indicates that the LOS of strain A77 lacks the galactose residue found in the N-acetyllactosamine portion of the strain 35000HP LOS as well as the sialic acid substitution. From an H. ducreyi 35000HP genomic DNA library, a clone complementing the defect in A77 was identified by immunologic screening with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3F11, a MAb which recognizes the N-acetyllactosamine portion of strain 35000HP LOS. The clone contained a 4-kb insert that was sequenced. One open reading frame which encodes a protein with a molecular weight of 33,400 was identified. This protein has homology to glycosyltransferases of Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus somnus, Neisseria species, and Pasteurella haemolytica. The putative H. ducreyi glycosyltransferase gene was insertionally inactivated, and an isogenic mutant of strain 35000HP was constructed. The most complex LOS glycoform produced by the mutant has a mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel identical to that of the LOS of strain A77 and lacks the 3F11-binding epitope. Structural studies confirm that the most complex glycoform of the LOS isolated from the mutant lacks the galactose residue found in the N-acetyllactosamine portion of the strain 35000HP LOS. Although previously published data suggested that the serum-sensitive phenotype of A77 was due to the LOS mutation, we observed that the complemented A77 strain retained its serum-sensitive phenotype and that the galactosyltransferase mutant retained its serum-resistant phenotype. Thus, the serum sensitivity of strain A77 cannot be attributed to the

  7. Identification of two novel critical mutations in PCNT gene resulting in microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Feng; Wang, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Min-Wei; Lou, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Chun-Yu; Feng, Hong-Lin; Lin, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is a highly detrimental human autosomal inherited recessive disorder. The hallmark characteristics of this disease are intrauterine and postnatal growth restrictions, with some patients also having cerebrovascular problems such as cerebral aneurysms. The genomic basis behind most clinical features of MOPD II remains largely unclear. The aim of this work was to identify the genetic defects in a Chinese family with MOPD II associated with multiple intracranial aneurysms. The patient had typical MOPD II syndrome, with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple intracranial aneurysms. We identified three novel mutations in the PCNT gene, including one single base alteration (9842A>C in exon 45) and two deletions (Del-C in exon 30 and Del-16 in exon 41). The deletions were co-segregated with the affected individual in the family and were not present in the control population. Computer modeling demonstrated that the deletions may cause drastic changes on the secondary and tertiary structures, affecting the hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of the mutant proteins. In conclusion, we identified two novel mutations in the PCNT gene associated with MOPD II and intracranial aneurysms, and the mutations were expected to alter the stability and functioning of the protein by computer modeling.

  8. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  9. Genetic polymorphism of ACE and the angiotensin II type1 receptor genes in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aim and Methods We investigated the association between polymorphisms of the angiotensin converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1) and angiotensin II type one receptor (AT1RA1166C) genes and the causation of renal disease in 76 advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) pediatric patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) or conservative treatment (CT). Serum ACE activity and creatine kinase-MB fraction (CK-MB) were measured in all groups. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated according to echocardiographic measurements. Seventy healthy controls were also genotyped. Results The differences of D allele and DI genotype of ACE were found significant between MHD group and the controls (p = 0.0001). ACE-activity and LVMI were higher in MHD, while CK-MB was higher in CT patients than in all other groups. The combined genotype DD v/s ID+II comparison validated that DD genotype was a high risk genotype for hypertension .~89% of the DD CKD patients were found hypertensive in comparison to ~ 61% of patients of non DD genotype(p = 0.02). The MHD group showed an increased frequency of the C allele and CC genotype of the AT1RA1166C polymorphism (P = 0.0001). On multiple linear regression analysis, C-allele was independently associated with hypertension (P = 0.04). Conclusion ACE DD and AT1R A/C genotypes implicated possible roles in the hypertensive state and in renal damage among children with ESRD. This result might be useful in planning therapeutic strategies for individual patients. PMID:21859496

  10. A young root-specific gene (ArMY2) from horseradish encoding a MYR II myrosinase with kinetic preference for the root-specific glucosinolate gluconasturtiin.

    PubMed

    Loebers, Andreas; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    The pungent taste of horseradish is caused by isothiocyanates which are released from glucosinolates by myrosinases. These enzymes are encoded by genes belonging to one of two subfamilies, termed MYR I and MYR II, respectively. A MYR II-type myrosinase gene was identified for the first time in horseradish. The gene termed ArMY2 was only expressed in young roots. A full-length cDNA encoding a myrosinase termed ArMy2 was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant His-tagged enzyme was characterized biochemically. Substrate affinity was 5 times higher towards gluconasturtiin than towards sinigrin. Gluconasturtiin was found to be the most abundant glucosinolate in young horseradish roots while sinigrin dominated in storage roots and leaves. This indicates that a specialized glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system might be active in young roots. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutations in the VLGR1 Gene Implicate G-Protein Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Usher Syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Michael D.; Luijendijk, Mirjam W. J.; Humphrey, Kurt D.; Möller, Claes; Kimberling, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with at least three genetic subtypes (USH2A, USH2B, and USH2C) and is classified phenotypically as congenital hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. The VLGR1 (MASS1) gene in the 5q14.3-q21.1 USH2C locus was considered a likely candidate on the basis of its protein motif structure and expressed-sequence-tag representation from both cochlear and retinal subtracted libraries. Denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing of polymerase-chain-reaction products amplified from 10 genetically independent patients with USH2C and 156 other patients with USH2 identified four isoform-specific VLGR1 mutations (Q2301X, I2906FS, M2931FS, and T6244X) from three families with USH2C, as well as two sporadic cases. All patients with VLGR1 mutations are female, a significant deviation from random expectations. The ligand(s) for the VLGR1 protein is unknown, but on the basis of its potential extracellular and intracellular protein-protein interaction domains and its wide mRNA expression profile, it is probable that VLGR1 serves diverse cellular and signaling processes. VLGR1 mutations have been previously identified in both humans and mice and are associated with a reflex-seizure phenotype in both species. The identification of additional VLGR1 mutations to test whether a phenotype/genotype correlation exists, akin to that shown for other Usher syndrome disease genes, is warranted. PMID:14740321

  12. Quantification of phase I / II metabolizing enzyme gene expression and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct levels in human prostate

    PubMed Central

    John, Kaarthik; Ragavan, Narasimhan; Pratt, M. Margaret; Singh, Paras B.; Al-Buheissi, Salah; Matanhelia, Shyam S.; Phillips, David H.; Poirier, Miriam C.; Martin, Francis L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies of migrant populations suggest that dietary and/or environmental factors play a crucial role in the aetiology of prostatic adenocarcinoma (CaP). The human prostate consists of the peripheral zone (PZ), transition zone (TZ) and central zone (CZ); CaP occurs most often in the PZ. METHODS To investigate the notion that an underlying differential expression of phase I/II genes, and/or the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts might explain the elevated PZ susceptibility, we examined prostate tissues (matched tissue sets consisting of PZ and TZ) from men undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy for CaP (n=26) or cystoprostatectomy (n=1). Quantitative gene expression analysis was employed for cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms CYP1A1, CYP1B1 and CYP1A2, as well as N-acetyltransferase 1 and 2 (NAT1 and NAT2) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). RESULTS CYP1B1, NAT1 and COMT were expressed in all tissue sets; levels of CYP1B1 and NAT1 were consistently higher in the PZ compared to TZ. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CYP1B1 (nuclear-associated and primarily in basal epithelial cells) and NAT1. Tissue sections from 23 of these aforementioned 27 matched tissue sets were analyzed for PAH-DNA adduct levels using antiserum elicited against DNA modified with r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE). PAH-DNA adduct levels were highest in glandular epithelial cells, but a comparison of PZ and TZ showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION Although expression of activating and/or detoxifying enzymes may be higher in the PZ, PAH-DNA adduct levels appear to be similar in both zones. Therefore, factors other than PAH-DNA adducts may be responsible for promotion of tumour formation in the human prostate. PMID:19143007

  13. Predicting BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers: comparison of LAMBDA, BRCAPRO, Myriad II, and modified Couch models.

    PubMed

    Lindor, Noralane M; Lindor, Rachel A; Apicella, Carmel; Dowty, James G; Ashley, Amanda; Hunt, Katherine; Mincey, Betty A; Wilson, Marcia; Smith, M Cathie; Hopper, John L

    2007-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict the probability that a person carries a detectable germline mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Their relative performance in a clinical setting is unclear. To compare the performance characteristics of four BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutation prediction models: LAMBDA, based on a checklist and scores developed from data on Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women; BRCAPRO, a Bayesian computer program; modified Couch tables based on regression analyses; and Myriad II tables collated by Myriad Genetics Laboratories. Family cancer history data were analyzed from 200 probands from the Mayo Clinic Familial Cancer Program, in a multispecialty tertiary care group practice. All probands had clinical testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations conducted in a single laboratory. For each model, performance was assessed by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (ROC) and by tests of accuracy and dispersion. Cases "missed" by one or more models (model predicted less than 10% probability of mutation when a mutation was actually found) were compared across models. All models gave similar areas under the ROC curve of 0.71 to 0.76. All models except LAMBDA substantially under-predicted the numbers of carriers. All models were too dispersed. In terms of ranking, all prediction models performed reasonably well with similar performance characteristics. Model predictions were widely discrepant for some families. Review of cancer family histories by an experienced clinician continues to be vital to ensure that critical elements are not missed and that the most appropriate risk prediction figures are provided.

  14. Generation and analysis of knock-in mice carrying pseudohypoaldosteronism type II-causing mutations in the cullin 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yuya; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Mori, Takayasu; Inoue, Yuichi; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Eriko; Ohta, Akihito; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-10-21

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary hypertensive disease caused by mutations in four different genes: with-no-lysine kinases (WNK) 1 and 4, Kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3), and cullin 3 (Cul3). Cul3 and KLHL3 form an E3 ligase complex that ubiquitinates and reduces the expression level of WNK4. PHAII-causing mutations in WNK4 and KLHL3 impair WNK4 ubiquitination. However, the molecular pathogenesis of PHAII caused by Cul3 mutations is unclear. In cultured cells and human leukocytes, PHAII-causing Cul3 mutations result in the skipping of exon 9, producing mutant Cul3 protein lacking 57 amino acids. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in the kidneys and is responsible for the pathogenesis of PHAII in vivo is unknown. We generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation in the C-terminus of intron 8 of Cul3, c.1207-1G>A, which corresponds to a PHAII-causing mutation in the human Cul3 gene. Heterozygous Cul3(G(-1)A/+) knock-in mice did not exhibit PHAII phenotypes, and the skipping of exon 9 was not evident in their kidneys. However, the level of Cul3 mRNA expression in the kidneys of heterozygous knock-in mice was approximately half that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, homozygous knock-in mice were nonviable. It suggested that the mutant allele behaved like a knockout allele and did not produce Cul3 mRNA lacking exon 9. A reduction in Cul3 expression alone was not sufficient to develop PHAII in the knock-in mice. Our findings highlighted the pathogenic role of mutant Cul3 protein and provided insight to explain why PHAII-causing mutations in Cul3 cause kidney-predominant PHAII phenotypes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Identification of InuR, a new Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator involved in the regulation of inulinolytic genes in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Lian; Roubos, Johannes A; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Ram, Arthur F J

    2008-01-01

    The expression of inulinolytic genes in Aspergillus niger is co-regulated and induced by inulin and sucrose. We have identified a positive acting transcription factor InuR, which is required for the induced expression of inulinolytic genes. InuR is a member of the fungal specific class of transcription factors of the Zn(II)2Cys6 type. Involvement of InuR in inulin and sucrose metabolism was suspected because of the clustering of inuR gene with sucB, which encodes an intracellular invertase with transfructosylation activity and a putative sugar transporter encoding gene (An15g00310). Deletion of the inuR gene resulted in a strain displaying a severe reduction in growth on inulin and sucrose medium. Northern analysis revealed that expression of inulinolytic and sucrolytic genes, e.g., inuE, inuA, sucA, as well as the putative sugar transporter gene (An15g00310) is dependent on InuR. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed, three additional putative sugar transporters encoding genes (An15g04060, An15g03940 and An17g01710), which were strongly induced by sucrose in an InuR dependent way. In silico analysis of the promoter sequences of strongly InuR regulated genes suggests that InuR might bind as dimer to two CGG triplets, which are separated by eight nucleotides.

  16. The expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Seiichi; Ashizawa, Koji; Gohma, Hiroshi

    2006-12-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and an ER antagonist on the expression of Hedgehog genes (Indian hedgehog: Ihh; Desert hedgehog: Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Patched 1: Ptc1; glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1: Gli1; chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II: Coup-TfII) in the rat uterus. Immature female rats were administered once with 17{alpha}-ethynyl estradiol (EE, an ER agonist), propyl pyrazole triole (PPT, an ER{alpha}-selective agonist), diarylpropionitrile (DPN, an ER{beta}-selective agonist), or ICI 182,780 (an ER antagonist). Expression of mRNA for Ihh, Dhh, and Ptc1 was dose-dependently downregulated by EE inmore » the uterus of immature rats, mediated by ER as confirmed by coadministration of ICI 182,780. The mRNA expression levels of Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII were simultaneously downregulated during the period in which the mRNA expression levels of Ihh and Dhh were downregulated in the uterus after administration of EE. PPT downregulated the transcription of Ihh, Dhh, Ptc1, Gli1, and Coup-TfII, indicating that expression of these genes was regulated by the ER{alpha}-dependent pathway. DPN also downregulated the transcription of Ihh and Dhh, although the effect was weaker than that of PPT, indicating that the regulation of uterine Ihh and Dhh transcription was also affected by the ER{beta}-dependent pathway. These results suggest that the expression of Hedgehog genes (Ihh, Dhh) and Hedgehog target genes (Ptc1, Gli1, Coup-TfII) is affected by estrogenic stimuli in the uterus of immature female rats.« less

  17. Detection and characterization of recombinant DNA expressing vip3A-type insecticidal gene in GMOs--standard single, multiplex and construct-specific PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Singh, Chandra K; Ojha, Abhishek; Bhatanagar, Raj K; Kachru, Devendra N

    2008-01-01

    Vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip), a unique class of insecticidal protein, is now part of transgenic plants for conferring resistance against lepidopteron pests. In order to address the imminent regulatory need for detection and labeling of vip3A carrying genetically modified (GM) products, we have developed a standard single PCR and a multiplex PCR assay. As far as we are aware, this is the first report on PCR-based detection of a vip3A-type gene (vip-s) in transgenic cotton and tobacco. Our assay involves amplification of a 284-bp region of the vip-s gene. This assay can possibly detect as many as 20 natural wild-type isolates bearing a vip3A-like gene and two synthetic genes of vip3A in transgenic plants. The limit of detection as established by our assay for GM trait (vip-s) is 0.1%. Spiking with nontarget DNA originating from diverse plant sources had no inhibitory effect on vip-s detection. Since autoclaving of vip-s bearing GM leaf samples showed no deterioration/interference in detection efficacy, the assay seems to be suitable for processed food products as well. The vip-s amplicon identity was reconfirmed by restriction endonuclease assay. The primer set for vip-s was equally effective in a multiplex PCR assay format (duplex, triplex and quadruplex), used in conjunction with the primer sets for the npt-II selectable marker gene, Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and nopaline synthetase terminator, enabling concurrent detection of the transgene, regulatory sequences and marker gene. Further, the entire transgene construct was amplified using the forward primer of the promoter and the reverse primer of the terminator. The resultant amplicon served as a template for nested PCR to confirm the construct integrity. The method is suitable for screening any vip3A-carrying GM plant and food. The availability of a reliable PCR assay method prior to commercial release of vip3A-based transgenic crops and food would facilitate rapid and efficient regulatory

  18. Angiotensin II modulates interleukin-1{beta}-induced inflammatory gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells via interfering with ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shanqin; Zhi, Hui; Hou, Xiuyun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine how angiotensin II modulates ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk and gene expression. {yields} Angiotensin II suppresses IL-1{beta}-induced prolonged ERK and NF-{kappa}B activation. {yields} ERK-RSK1 signaling is required for IL-1{beta}-induced prolonged NF-{kappa}B activation. {yields} Angiotensin II modulates NF-{kappa}B responsive genes via regulating ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk. {yields} ERK-NF-{kappa}B crosstalk is a novel mechanism regulating inflammatory gene expression. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II is implicated in cardiovascular diseases, which is associated with a role in increasing vascular inflammation. The present study investigated how angiotensin II modulates vascular inflammatory signaling and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Inmore » cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), angiotensin II suppressed interleukin-1{beta}-induced prolonged phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK)-1, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, leading to decreased iNOS but enhanced VCAM-1 expression, associated with an up-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 expression. Knock-down of RSK1 selectively down regulated interleukin-1{beta}-induced iNOS expression without influencing VCAM-1 expression. In vivo experiments showed that interleukin-1{beta}, iNOS, and VCAM-1 expression were detectable in the aortic arches of both wild-type and apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice. VCAM-1 and iNOS expression were higher in ApoE{sup -/-} than in wild type mouse aortic arches. Angiotensin II infusion (3.2 mg/kg/day, for 6 days, via subcutaneous osmotic pump) in ApoE{sup -/-} mice enhanced endothelial and adventitial VCAM-1 and iNOS expression, but reduced medial smooth muscle iNOS expression associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK and RSK-1. These results indicate that

  19. Gene silencing of myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 by adenovirus-delivered small interfering RNA suppresses cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin II in mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wenjian; He, Weiqing; Shang, Guangdong; Jiang, Jiandong; Wang, Yiguang; Kong, Weijia

    2010-11-01

    Our previous studies proved that myofibrillogenesis regulator (MR)-1 has a close relationship with cardiac hypertrophy induced by ANG II. In the present study, we developed a recombinant adenoviral vector (AdSiR-MR-1) driving small interfering (si)RNA against MR-1 to evaluate its effect on cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by chronic ANG II infusion in mice; AdSiR-MR-1 was administered via the jugular vein through one bolus injection. Thirteen days after the injection, viral DNA was still detectable in the heart, validating the efficiency of gene transfer. Expression levels of MR-1 mRNA and protein were increased by 2.5-fold in the heart after ANG II infusion; AdSiR-control, which contained a scrambled siRNA sequence, had no effect on them. AdSiR-MR-1 treatment abolished the upregulation of MR-1 induced by ANG II. The silencing effect of AdSiR-MR-1 was observed in many other tissues, such as the liver, lung, and kidney, except skeletal muscle. ANG II-induced cardiac hypertrophy was suppressed in mice treated with AdSiR-MR-1, as determined by echocardiography. Morphological and immnohistochemical examinations revealed that interstitial cardiac fibrosis as well as infiltrating inflammatory cells were increased after ANG II infusion; AdSiR-MR-1 greatly ameliorated these disorders. In ANG II-infused mice, MR-1 silencing also blocked the upregulation of other genes related to cardiac hypertrophy or metabolism of the extracellular matrix. In summary, our results demonstrate the feasibility of MR-1 silencing in vivo and suggest that MR-1 could be a potential new target to treat cardiac hypertrophy induced by ANG II.

  20. CNS-directed gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome).

    PubMed

    Motas, Sandra; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Roca, Carles; Sánchez, Xavier; Sánchez, Víctor; Molas, Maria; Bertolin, Joan; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-06-16

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by severe neurologic and somatic disease caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme that catabolizes the glycosaminoglycans heparan and dermatan sulphate. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) currently constitutes the only approved therapeutic option for MPSII. However, the inability of recombinant IDS to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits ERT efficacy in treating neurological symptoms. Here, we report a gene therapy approach for MPSII through direct delivery of vectors to the CNS. Through a minimally invasive procedure, we administered adeno-associated virus vectors encoding IDS (AAV9- Ids ) to the cerebrospinal fluid of MPSII mice with already established disease. Treated mice showed a significant increase in IDS activity throughout the encephalon, with full resolution of lysosomal storage lesions, reversal of lysosomal dysfunction, normalization of brain transcriptomic signature, and disappearance of neuroinflammation. Moreover, our vector also transduced the liver, providing a peripheral source of therapeutic protein that corrected storage pathology in visceral organs, with evidence of cross-correction of nontransduced organs by circulating enzyme. Importantly, AAV9- Ids -treated MPSII mice showed normalization of behavioral deficits and considerably prolonged survival. These results provide a strong proof of concept for the clinical translation of our approach for the treatment of Hunter syndrome patients with cognitive impairment.

  1. CNS-directed gene therapy for the treatment of neurologic and somatic mucopolysaccharidosis type II (Hunter syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Motas, Sandra; Haurigot, Virginia; Garcia, Miguel; Marcó, Sara; Ribera, Albert; Roca, Carles; Sánchez, Víctor; Molas, Maria; Bertolin, Joan; Maggioni, Luca; León, Xavier; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by severe neurologic and somatic disease caused by deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS), an enzyme that catabolizes the glycosaminoglycans heparan and dermatan sulphate. Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) currently constitutes the only approved therapeutic option for MPSII. However, the inability of recombinant IDS to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits ERT efficacy in treating neurological symptoms. Here, we report a gene therapy approach for MPSII through direct delivery of vectors to the CNS. Through a minimally invasive procedure, we administered adeno-associated virus vectors encoding IDS (AAV9-Ids) to the cerebrospinal fluid of MPSII mice with already established disease. Treated mice showed a significant increase in IDS activity throughout the encephalon, with full resolution of lysosomal storage lesions, reversal of lysosomal dysfunction, normalization of brain transcriptomic signature, and disappearance of neuroinflammation. Moreover, our vector also transduced the liver, providing a peripheral source of therapeutic protein that corrected storage pathology in visceral organs, with evidence of cross-correction of nontransduced organs by circulating enzyme. Importantly, AAV9-Ids-treated MPSII mice showed normalization of behavioral deficits and considerably prolonged survival. These results provide a strong proof of concept for the clinical translation of our approach for the treatment of Hunter syndrome patients with cognitive impairment. PMID:27699273

  2. Neurobehavioral changes and alteration of gene expression in the brains of metallothionein-I/II null mice exposed to low levels of mercury vapor during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Minoru; Honda, Masako; Watanabe, Chiho; Satoh, Masahiko; Yasutake, Akira

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the neurobehavioral changes and alteration in gene expression in the brains of metallothionein (MT)-I/II null mice exposed to low-levels of mercury vapor (Hg(0)) during postnatal development. MT-I/II null and wild-type mice were repeatedly exposed to Hg(0) at 0.030 mg/m(3) (range: 0.023-0.043 mg/m(3)), which was similar to the current threshold value (TLV), for 6 hr per day until the 20th day postpartum. The behavioral effects were evaluated with locomotor activity in the open field (OPF), learning ability in the passive avoidance response (PA) and spatial learning ability in the Morris water maze (MM) at 12 weeks of age. Hg(0)-exposed MT-I/II null mice showed a significant decrease in total locomotor activity in females, though learning ability and spatial learning ability were not affected. Immediately after Hg(0) exposure, mercury concentrations in the brain did not exceed 0.5 µg/g in any animals. Hg(0) exposure resulted in significant alterations in gene expression in the brains of both strains using DNA microarray analysis. The number of altered genes in MT-I/II null mice was higher than that in wild-type mice and calcium-calmodulin kinase II (Camk2a) involved in learning and memory in down-regulated genes was detected. These results provide useful information to elucidate the development of behavioral toxicity following low-level exposure to Hg(0).

  3. Identification of sequences in herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP22 that influence RNA polymerase II modification and viral late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Thomas W; Rice, Stephen A

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) immediate-early protein ICP22 alters the phosphorylation of the host cell RNA polymerase II (Pol II) during viral infection. In this study, we have engineered several ICP22 plasmid and virus mutants in order to map the ICP22 sequences that are involved in this function. We identify a region in the C-terminal half of ICP22 (residues 240 to 340) that is critical for Pol II modification and further show that the N-terminal half of the protein (residues 1 to 239) is not required. However, immunofluorescence analysis indicates that the N-terminal half of ICP22 is needed for its localization to nuclear body structures. These results demonstrate that ICP22's effects on Pol II do not require that it accumulate in nuclear bodies. As ICP22 is known to enhance viral late gene expression during infection of certain cultured cells, including human embryonic lung (HEL) cells, we used our engineered viral mutants to map this function of ICP22. It was found that mutations in both the N- and C-terminal halves of ICP22 result in similar defects in viral late gene expression and growth in HEL cells, despite having distinctly different effects on Pol II. Thus, our results genetically uncouple ICP22's effects on Pol II from its effects on viral late gene expression. This suggests that these two functions of ICP22 may be due to distinct activities of the protein.

  4. Three genes in the human MHC class III region near the junction with the class II: Gene for receptor of advanced glycosylation end products, PBX2 homeobox gene and a notch homolog, human counterpart of mouse mammary tumor gene int-3

    SciTech Connect

    Sugaya, K.; Fukagawa, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    Cosmid walking of about 250 kb from MHC class III gene CYP21 to class II was conducted. The gene for receptor of advanced glycosylation end products of proteins (RAGE, a member of immunoglobulin super-family molecules), the PBX2 homeobox gene designated HOX12, and the human counterpart of the mouse mammary tumor gene int-3 were found. The contiguous RAGE and HOX12 genes were completely sequenced, and the human int-3 counterpart was partially sequenced and assigned to a Notch homolog. This human Notch homolog, designated NOTCH3, showed both the intracellular portion present in the mouse int-3 sequence and the extracellular portion absent inmore » the int-3. It thus corresponds to the intact form of a Notch-type transmembrane protein. About 20 kb of dense Alu clustering was found just centromeric to the NOTCH3. 48 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  5. Down-regulation of ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channel protein through sustained stimulation of AT1 receptor by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yue; Wang, Yuhong; Xu, Jia; Zuo, Xu; Xu, Yanfang

    2014-09-26

    We investigated the effects of AT1 receptor stimulation by angiotensin II (Ang II) on human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel protein in a heterogeneous expression system with the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells which stably expressed hERG channel protein and were transiently transfected with the human AT1 receptors (HEK293/hERG). Western-blot analysis showed that Ang II significantly decreased the expression of mature hERG channel protein (155-kDa band) in a time- and dose-dependent manner without affecting the level of immature hERG channel protein (135-kDa band). The relative intensity of 155-kDa band was 64.7±6.8% of control (P<0.01) after treatment of Ang II at 100nM for 24h. To investigate the effect of Ang II on the degradation of mature hERG channel protein, we blocked forward trafficking from ER to Golgi with a Golgi transit inhibitor brefeldin A (10μM). Ang II significantly enhanced the time-dependent reduction of mature hERG channel protein. In addition, the proteasomal inhibitor lactacystin (5μM) inhibited Ang II-mediated the reduction of mature hERG channel protein, but the lysosomal inhibitor bafilomycin A1 (1μM) had no effect on the protein. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide 1 (1μM) antagonized the reduction of mature hERG channel protein induced by Ang II. The results indicate that sustained stimulation of AT1 receptors by Ang II reduces the mature hERG channel protein via accelerating channel proteasomal degradation involving the PKC pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification and characterization of the reptilian GnRH-II gene in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, and its evolutionary considerations.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Tadahiro; Park, Min Kyun

    2003-10-16

    To elucidate the molecular phylogeny and evolution of a particular peptide, one must analyze not the limited primary amino acid sequences of the low molecular weight mature polypeptide, but rather the sequences of the corresponding precursors from various species. Of all the structural variants of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH-II (chicken GnRH-II, or cGnRH-II) is remarkably conserved without any sequence substitutions among vertebrates, but its precursor sequences vary considerably. We have identified and characterized the full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the GnRH-II precursor and determined its genomic structure, consisting of four exons and three introns, in a reptilian species, the leopard gecko Eublepharis macularius. This is the first report about the GnRH-II precursor cDNA/gene from reptiles. The deduced leopard gecko prepro-GnRH-II polypeptide had the highest identities with the corresponding polypeptides of amphibians. The GnRH-II precursor mRNA was detected in more than half of the tissues and organs examined. This widespread expression is consistent with the previous findings in several species, though the roles of GnRH outside the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis remain largely unknown. Molecular phylogenetic analysis combined with sequence comparison showed that the leopard gecko is more similar to fishes and amphibians than to eutherian mammals with respect to the GnRH-II precursor sequence. These results strongly suggest that the divergence of the GnRH-II precursor sequences seen in eutherian mammals may have occurred along with amniote evolution.

  7. Differential Regulation and Posttranslational Processing of the Class II Hydrophobin Genes from the Biocontrol Fungus Hypocrea atroviridis▿

    PubMed Central

    Mikus, Marianna; Hatvani, Lóránt; Neuhof, Torsten; Komoń-Zelazowska, Monika; Dieckmann, Ralf; Schwecke, Torsten; Druzhinina, Irina S.; von Döhren, Hans; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrophobins are small extracellular proteins, unique to and ubiquitous in filamentous fungi, which mediate interactions between the fungus and environment. The mycoparasitic fungus Hypocrea atroviridis has recently been shown to possess 10 different class II hydrophobin genes, which is a much higher number than that of any other ascomycete investigated so far. In order to learn the potential advantage of this hydrophobin multiplicity for the fungus, we have investigated their expression patterns under different physiological conditions (e.g., vegetative growth), various conditions inducing sporulation (light, carbon starvation, and mechanical injury-induced stress), and confrontation with potential hosts for mycoparasitism. The results show that the 10 hydrophobins display different patterns of response to these conditions: one hydrophobin (encoded by hfb-2b) is constitutively induced under all conditions, whereas other hydrophobins were formed only under conditions of carbon starvation (encoded by hfb-1c and hfb-6c) or light plus carbon starvation (encoded by hfb-2c, hfb-6a, and hfb-6b). The hydrophobins encoded by hfb-1b and hfb-5a were primarily formed during vegetative growth and under mechanical injury-provoked stress. hfb-22a was not expressed under any conditions and is likely a pseudogene. None of the 10 genes showed a specific expression pattern during mycoparasitic interaction. Most, but not all, of the expression patterns under the three different conditions of sporulation were dependent on one or both of the two blue-light regulator proteins BLR1 and BLR2, as shown by the use of respective loss-of-function mutants. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry of mycelial solvent extracts provided sets of molecular ions corresponding to HFB-1b, HFB-2a, HFB-2b, and HFB-5a in their oxidized and processed forms. These in silico-deduced sequences of the hydrophobins indicate cleavages at known signal peptide sites as well as

  8. A genetic marker of the ACKR1 gene is present in patients with Type II congenital smell loss who have type I hyposmia and hypogeusia

    PubMed Central

    Stateman, William A.; Knöppel, Alexandra B.; Flegel, Willy A.; Henkin, Robert I.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Our previous study of Type II congenital smell loss patients revealed a statistically significant lower prevalence of an FY (ACKR1, formerly DARC) haplotype compared to controls. The present study correlates this genetic feature with subgroups of patients defined by specific smell and taste functions. METHODS Smell and taste function measurements were performed by use of olfactometry and gustometry to define degree of abnormality of smell and taste function. Smell loss was classified as anosmia or hyposmia (types I, II or III). Taste loss was similarly classified as ageusia or hypogeusia (types I, II or III). Based upon these results patient erythrocyte antigen expression frequencies were categorized by smell and taste loss with results compared between patients within the Type II group and published controls. RESULTS Comparison of antigen expression frequencies revealed a statistically significant decrease in incidence of an Fyb haplotype only among patients with type I hyposmia and any form of taste loss (hypogeusia). In all other patient groups erythrocyte antigens were expressed at normal frequencies. CONCLUSIONS Data suggest that Type II congenital smell loss patients who exhibit both type I hyposmia and hypogeusia are genetically distinct from all other patients with Type II congenital smell loss. This distinction is based on decreased Fyb expression which correlated with abnormalities in two sensory modalities (hyposmia type I and hypogeusia). Only patients with these two specific sensory abnormalities expressed the Fyb antigen (encoded by the ACKR1 gene on the long arm of chromosome 1) at frequencies different from controls. PMID:27968956

  9. Phase II multicenter study of gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy as adjuvant to surgical resection for newly diagnosed malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lee A; Manzanera, Andrea G; Bell, Susan D; Cavaliere, Robert; McGregor, John M; Grecula, John C; Newton, Herbert B; Lo, Simon S; Badie, Behnam; Portnow, Jana; Teh, Bin S; Trask, Todd W; Baskin, David S; New, Pamela Z; Aguilar, Laura K; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Despite aggressive standard of care (SOC) treatment, survival of malignant gliomas remains very poor. This Phase II, prospective, matched controlled, multicenter trial was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of aglatimagene besadenovec (AdV-tk) plus valacyclovir (gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy [GMCI]) in combination with SOC for newly diagnosed malignant glioma patients. Treatment cohort patients received SOC + GMCI and were enrolled at 4 institutions from 2006 to 2010. The preplanned, matched-control cohort included all concurrent patients meeting protocol criteria and SOC at a fifth institution. AdV-tk was administered at surgery followed by SOC radiation and temozolomide. Subset analyses were preplanned, based on prognostic factors: pathological diagnosis (glioblastoma vs others) and extent of resection. Forty-eight patients completed SOC + GMCI, and 134 met control cohort criteria. Median overall survival (OS) was 17.1 months for GMCI + SOC versus 13.5 months for SOC alone (P = .0417). Survival at 1, 2, and 3 years was 67%, 35%, and 19% versus 57%, 22%, and 8%, respectively. The greatest benefit was observed in gross total resection patients: median OS of 25 versus 16.9 months (P = .0492); 1, 2, and 3-year survival of 90%, 53%, and 32% versus 64%, 28% and 6%, respectively. There were no dose-limiting toxicities; fever, fatigue, and headache were the most common GMCI-related symptoms. GMCI can be safely combined with SOC in newly diagnosed malignant gliomas. Survival outcomes were most notably improved in patients with minimal residual disease after gross total resection. These data should help guide future immunotherapy studies and strongly support further evaluation of GMCI for malignant gliomas. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00589875. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Keratins 8 and 18 are type II acute-phase responsive genes overexpressed in human liver disease.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, Nurdan; Usachov, Valentyn; Levada, Kateryna; Trautwein, Christian; Ziol, Marianne; Nahon, Pierre; Strnad, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    Keratins (Ks) 7, 8, 18 and 19 constitute important markers and modifiers of liver disease. In mice, K8 and K18 are stress inducible and a dysregulated K8 > K18 stoichiometry predisposes to formation of Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs), i.e. aggregates characteristic of chronic liver disorders such as alcoholic liver disease (ALD). In our study, we analyse the expression and the regulation of keratins in context of human liver disease. K7, K8, K18 and K19 mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies from patients with ALD, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), chronic hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and from control subjects. HepG2 and Hep3B cells were treated with IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Mice were injected with turpentine, an established IL-6 inducer. K7, K8 and K18 were 1.5- to 3-fold upregulated in livers of ALD and HCV patients with a more active disease, but not in HBV/NASH subjects, while K19 was significantly elevated in all analysed disorders. K8 and K18 expression displayed a strong correlation (r = 0.89), but dysregulated levels with the K8 > K18 state were seen in ALD. All keratins were overexpressed in subjects with moderate vs. minimal inflammation, while K7, K8 and K18 were upregulated in patients with advanced liver fibrosis. In HepG2/Hep3B cells, IL-6 treatment but not IL-1β or TNF-α significantly increased K8 and K18 expression and elevated K18 levels were seen after turpentine injection. Keratins represent type II acute-phase responsive genes overexpressed in specific human liver disorders. A K8 > K18 state occurs in ALD and predisposes to MDB formation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Selection system and co-cultivation medium are important determinants of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Priya; Kuwahata, Melissa; Turner, Nicole; Lakshmanan, Prakash

    2010-02-01

    A reproducible method for transformation of sugarcane using various strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (A. tumefaciens) (AGL0, AGL1, EHA105 and LBA4404) has been developed. The selection system and co-cultivation medium were the most important factors determining the success of transformation and transgenic plant regeneration. Plant regeneration at a frequency of 0.8-4.8% occurred only when callus was transformed with A. tumefaciens carrying a newly constructed superbinary plasmid containing neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) and beta-glucuronidase (gusA) genes, both driven by the maize ubiquitin (ubi-1) promoter. Regeneration was successful in plants carrying the nptII gene but not the hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) gene. NptII gene selection was imposed at a concentration of 150 mg/l paromomycin sulphate and applied either immediately or 4 days after the co-cultivation period. Co-cultivation on Murashige and Skoog (MS)-based medium for a period of 4 days produced the highest number of transgenic plants. Over 200 independent transgenic lines were created using this protocol. Regenerated plants appeared phenotypically normal and contained both gusA and nptII genes. Southern blot analysis revealed 1-3 transgene insertion events that were randomly integrated in the majority of the plants produced.

  12. Validation of the 12-gene colon cancer recurrence score as a predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Marlies S; Kuppen, Peter J K; Lee, Mark; Lopatin, Margarita; Tezcan, Haluk; Putter, Hein; Clark-Langone, Kim; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; Shak, Steve; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2014-11-01

    The 12-gene Recurrence Score assay is a validated predictor of recurrence risk in stage II and III colon cancer patients. We conducted a prospectively designed study to validate this assay for prediction of recurrence risk in stage II and III rectal cancer patients from the Dutch Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) trial. RNA was extracted from fixed paraffin-embedded primary rectal tumor tissue from stage II and III patients randomized to TME surgery alone, without (neo)adjuvant treatment. Recurrence Score was assessed by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction using previously validated colon cancer genes and algorithm. Data were analysed by Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for stage and resection margin status. All statistical tests were two-sided. Recurrence Score predicted risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 2.21, P = .01), risk of distant recurrence (HR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.04 to 2.17, P = .03), and rectal cancer-specific survival (HR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.15 to 2.34, P = .007). The effect of Recurrence Score was most prominent in stage II patients and attenuated with more advanced stage (P(interaction) ≤ .007 for each endpoint). In stage II, five-year cumulative incidence of recurrence ranged from 11.1% in the predefined low Recurrence Score group (48.5% of patients) to 43.3% in the high Recurrence Score group (23.1% of patients). The 12-gene Recurrence Score is a predictor of recurrence risk and cancer-specific survival in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery alone, suggesting a similar underlying biology in colon and rectal cancers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Angiotensin II activates collagen type I gene in the renal vasculature of transgenic mice during inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis: evidence for an endothelin-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boffa, J J; Tharaux, P L; Placier, S; Ardaillou, R; Dussaule, J C; Chatziantoniou, C

    1999-11-02

    Hypertension is frequently associated with renal vascular fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether angiotensin II (Ang II) is involved in this fibrogenic process. Experiments were performed on transgenic mice harboring the luciferase gene under the control of the collagen I-alpha(2) chain promoter [procolalpha(2)(I)]. Hypertension was induced by chronic inhibition of NO synthesis (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME). Procolalpha(2)(I) activity started to increase in the renal vasculature after 4 weeks of L-NAME treatment (P<0.01) and at 14 weeks reached 3- and 8-fold increases over control in afferent arterioles and glomeruli, respectively (P<0.001). Losartan, an AT(1) receptor antagonist, given simultaneously with L-NAME prevented the increase of procolalpha(2)(I) levels and attenuated the development of renal vascular fibrosis without normalizing systolic pressure increase. Because we found previously that endothelin mediated renal vascular fibrosis in the L-NAME model, the interaction between Ang II, endothelin, and procolalpha(2)(I) was investigated in ex vivo and short-term in vivo experiments. In both conditions, the Ang II-induced activation of procolalpha(2)(I) in renal cortex was blocked by an endothelin receptor antagonist. During chronic inhibition of NO, the collagen I gene becomes activated, leading to the development of renal vascular fibrosis. Ang II is a major player in this fibrogenic process, and its effect on collagen I gene is independent of systemic hemodynamics and is at least partly mediated by the profibrogenic action of endothelin.

  14. Evolution of the P-type II ATPase gene family in the fungi and presence of structural genomic changes among isolates of Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Nicolas; Sanders, Ian R

    2006-03-10

    The P-type II ATPase gene family encodes proteins with an important role in adaptation of the cell to variation in external K+, Ca2+ and Na2+ concentrations. The presence of P-type II gene subfamilies that are specific for certain kingdoms has been reported but was sometimes contradicted by discovery of previously unknown homologous sequences in newly sequenced genomes. Members of this gene family have been sampled in all of the fungal phyla except the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; phylum Glomeromycota), which are known to play a key-role in terrestrial ecosystems and to be genetically highly variable within populations. Here we used highly degenerate primers on AMF genomic DNA to increase the sampling of fungal P-Type II ATPases and to test previous predictions about their evolution. In parallel, homologous sequences of the P-type II ATPases have been used to determine the nature and amount of polymorphism that is present at these loci among isolates of Glomus intraradices harvested from the same field. In this study, four P-type II ATPase sub-families have been isolated from three AMF species. We show that, contrary to previous predictions, P-type IIC ATPases are present in all basal fungal taxa. Additionally, P-Type IIE ATPases should no longer be considered as exclusive to the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota, since we also demonstrate their presence in the Zygomycota. Finally, a comparison of homologous sequences encoding P-type IID ATPases showed unexpectedly that indel mutations among coding regions, as well as specific gene duplications occur among AMF individuals within the same field. On the basis of these results we suggest that the diversification of P-Type IIC and E ATPases followed the diversification of the extant fungal phyla with independent events of gene gains and losses. Consistent with recent findings on the human genome, but at a much smaller geographic scale, we provided evidence that structural genomic changes, such as exonic indel

  15. The Activation of the Rat Insulin Gene II by BETA2 and PDX-1 in Rat Insulinoma Cells Is Repressed by Pax6

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Gabriele; Hessabi, Behnam; Karkour, Anke; Henrion, Ulrike; Dahlhaus, Meike; Ostmann, Annett; Giese, Bernd; Fraunholz, Martin; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Jack, Robert; Walther, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional transactivator Pax6 binds the pancreatic islet cell-specific enhancer sequence (PISCES) of the rat insulin I gene. However the human, mouse, and rat insulin gene II promoters do not contain a PISCES element. To analyze the role of Pax6 in those PISCES-less promoters, we investigated its influence on rat insulin gene II expression and included in our studies the main activators: pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein-1 (PDX-1) and BETA2/E47. Luciferase assays, Northern blots, and RIA were used to study effects of Pax6 overexpression, gel shift and chromatin precipitation assays to study its binding to the DNA, and yeast two-hybrid assays and glutathione S transferase capture assays to investigate its interactions with PDX-1 and BETA2. Finally, glucose-dependent intracellular transport of Pax6 was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy. Overexpression of Pax6 prevents activation of the rat insulin II gene by BETA2 and PDX-1 and hence suppresses insulin synthesis and secretion. In vitro, Pax6 binds to the A-boxes, thereby blocking binding of PDX-1, and at the same time, its paired domain interacts with BETA2. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the nuclear-cytoplasmic localization of Pax6 and PDX-1 are oppositely regulated by glucose. From the results, it is suggested that at low concentrations of glucose, Pax6 is localized in the nucleus and prevents the activation of the insulin gene by occupying the PDX-1 binding site and by interacting with BETA2. PMID:20943817

  16. A second mutation in the type II procollagen gene (COL2AI) causing stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy) is also a premature termination codon.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, N N; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Zackai, E H; Knowlton, R G; LaRossa, D; DiMascio, J; Prockop, D J

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analyses suggest that mutations in type II collagen may be responsible for Stickler syndrome, or arthro-ophthalmopathy (AO), in many families. In the present study oligonucleotide primers were developed to amplify and directly sequence eight of the first nine exons of the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1). Analysis of the eight exons in 10 unrelated probands with AO revealed that one had a single-base mutation in one allele that changed the codon of -CGA- for arginine at amino acid position alpha 1-9 in exon 7 to a premature termination signal for translation. The second mutation found to cause AO was, therefore, similar to the first in that both created premature termination signals in the COL2A1 gene. Since mutations producing premature termination signals have not previously been detected in genes for fibrillar collagens, the results raise the possibility that such mutations in the COL2A1 gene are a common cause of AO. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8434604

  17. Methylation of WNT target genes AXIN2 and DKK1 as robust biomarkers for recurrence prediction in stage II colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kandimalla, R; Linnekamp, J F; van Hooff, S; Castells, A; Llor, X; Andreu, M; Jover, R; Goel, A; Medema, J P

    2017-01-01

    Stage II colon cancer (CC) still remains a clinical challenge with patient stratification for adjuvant therapy (AT) largely relying on clinical parameters. Prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed for better stratification. Previously, we have shown that WNT target genes AXIN2, DKK1, APCDD1, ASCL2 and LGR5 are silenced by DNA methylation and could serve as prognostic markers in stage II CC patients using methylation-specific PCR. Here, we have extended our discovery cohort AMC90-AJCC-II (N=65) and methylation was analyzed by quantitative pyrosequencing. Subsequently, we validated the results in an independent EPICOLON1 CC cohort (N=79). Methylation of WNT target genes is negatively correlated to mRNA expression. A combination of AXIN2 and DKK1 methylation significantly predicted recurrences in univariate (area under the curve (AUC)=0.83, confidence interval (CI): 0.72–0.94, P<0.0001) analysis in stage II microsatellite stable (MSS) CC patients. This two marker combination showed an AUC of 0.80 (CI: 0.68–0.91, P<0.0001) in the EPICOLON1 validation cohort. Multivariate analysis in the Academic Medical Center (AMC) cohort revealed that both WNT target gene methylation and consensus molecular subtype 4 (CMS4) are significantly associated with poor recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio (HR)methylation: 3.84, 95% CI: 1.14–12.43; HRCMS4: 3.73, 95% CI: 1.22–11.48). CMS4 subtype tumors with WNT target methylation showed worse prognosis. Combining WNT target gene methylation and CMS4 subtype lead to an AUC of 0.89 (0.791–0.982, P<0.0001) for recurrence prediction. Notably, we observed that methylation of DKK1 is high in BRAF mutant and CIMP (CpG island methylator phenotype)-positive cancers, whereas AXIN2 methylation appears to be associated with CMS4. Methylation of AXIN2 and DKK1 were found to be robust markers for recurrence prediction in stage II MSS CC patients. Further validation of these findings in a randomized and prospective manner could pave a way to

  18. Effects of alien and intraspecies cytoplasms on manifestation of nuclear genes for wheat resistance to brown rust: II. Specificity of cytoplasm influence on different Lr genes

    SciTech Connect

    Voluevich, E.A.; Buloichik, A.A.; Palilova, A.N.

    Specificity of expression of the major nuclear genes Lr to two brown rust clones in hybrids with the same maternal cytoplasm was analyzed. It was evaluated by a resistant: susceptible ratio in the F{sub 2}. Reciprocal hybrids were obtained from the cross between the progeny of homozygous susceptible plants of the cultivar Penjamo 62 and its alloplasmatic lines carrying cytoplasms of Triticum dicoccoides var. fulvovillosum, Aegilops squarrosa var. typical, Agropyron trichophorum, and isogenic lines of the cultivar Thatcher (Th) with the Lr1, Lr9, Lr15, and Lr19 genes. It was shown that the effect of the Lr1 gene in the cytoplasmmore » of cultivar Thatcher and in eu-, and alloplasmatic forms of Penjamo 62 was less expressed than that of other Lr genes. Cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (dicoccoides)-Penjamo 62 was the only exception: in the F{sub 2}, hybrids with Th (Lr1) had a higher yield of resistant forms than those with Th (Lr15). In the hybrid combinations studied, expression and/or transmission of the Lr19 gene was more significant than that of other genes. This gene had no advantages over Lr15 and Lr19 only in cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (squarrosa)-Penjamo 62. In certain hybrid cytoplasms, the display of the Lr1, Lr15, and Lr19 genes, in contrast to Lr9, varied with the virulence of the pathogen clones. 15 refs., 5 tabs.« less

  19. Biologic determinants of tumor recurrence in stage II colon cancer: validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score in cancer and leukemia group B (CALGB) 9581.

    PubMed

    Venook, Alan P; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lopatin, Margarita; Ye, Xing; Lee, Mark; Friedman, Paula N; Frankel, Wendy; Clark-Langone, Kim; Millward, Carl; Shak, Steven; Goldberg, Richard M; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Warren, Robert S; Schilsky, Richard L; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2013-05-10

    A greater understanding of the biology of tumor recurrence should improve adjuvant treatment decision making. We conducted a validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score (RS), a quantitative assay integrating stromal response and cell cycle gene expression, in tumor specimens from patients enrolled onto Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581. CALGB 9581 randomly assigned 1,713 patients with stage II colon cancer to treatment with edrecolomab or observation and found no survival difference. The analysis reported here included all patients with available tissue and recurrence (n = 162) and a random (approximately 1:3) selection of nonrecurring patients. RS was assessed in 690 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using prespecified genes and a previously validated algorithm. Association of RS and recurrence was analyzed by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. Continuous RS was significantly associated with risk of recurrence (P = .013) as was mismatch repair (MMR) gene deficiency (P = .044). In multivariate analyses, RS was the strongest predictor of recurrence (P = .004), independent of T stage, MMR, number of nodes examined, grade, and lymphovascular invasion. In T3 MMR-intact (MMR-I) patients, prespecified low and high RS groups had average 5-year recurrence risks of 13% (95% CI, 10% to 16%) and 21% (95% CI, 16% to 26%), respectively. The 12-gene RS predicts recurrence in stage II colon cancer in CALGB 9581. This is consistent with the importance of stromal response and cell cycle gene expression in colon tumor recurrence. RS appears to be most discerning for patients with T3 MMR-I tumors, although markers such as grade and lymphovascular invasion did not add value in this subset of patients.

  20. Biologic Determinants of Tumor Recurrence in Stage II Colon Cancer: Validation Study of the 12-Gene Recurrence Score in Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581

    PubMed Central

    Venook, Alan P.; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Lopatin, Margarita; Ye, Xing; Lee, Mark; Friedman, Paula N.; Frankel, Wendy; Clark-Langone, Kim; Millward, Carl; Shak, Steven; Goldberg, Richard M.; Mahmoud, Najjia N.; Warren, Robert S.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A greater understanding of the biology of tumor recurrence should improve adjuvant treatment decision making. We conducted a validation study of the 12-gene recurrence score (RS), a quantitative assay integrating stromal response and cell cycle gene expression, in tumor specimens from patients enrolled onto Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 9581. Patients and Methods CALGB 9581 randomly assigned 1,713 patients with stage II colon cancer to treatment with edrecolomab or observation and found no survival difference. The analysis reported here included all patients with available tissue and recurrence (n = 162) and a random (approximately 1:3) selection of nonrecurring patients. RS was assessed in 690 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples with quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction by using prespecified genes and a previously validated algorithm. Association of RS and recurrence was analyzed by weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Continuous RS was significantly associated with risk of recurrence (P = .013) as was mismatch repair (MMR) gene deficiency (P = .044). In multivariate analyses, RS was the strongest predictor of recurrence (P = .004), independent of T stage, MMR, number of nodes examined, grade, and lymphovascular invasion. In T3 MMR-intact (MMR-I) patients, prespecified low and high RS groups had average 5-year recurrence risks of 13% (95% CI, 10% to 16%) and 21% (95% CI, 16% to 26%), respectively. Conclusion The 12-gene RS predicts recurrence in stage II colon cancer in CALGB 9581. This is consistent with the importance of stromal response and cell cycle gene expression in colon tumor recurrence. RS appears to be most discerning for patients with T3 MMR-I tumors, although markers such as grade and lymphovascular invasion did not add value in this subset of patients. PMID:23530100

  1. Terminal oxidase diversity and function in "Metallosphaera yellowstonensis": gene expression and protein modeling suggest mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation in the sulfolobales.

    PubMed

    Kozubal, M A; Dlakic, M; Macur, R E; Inskeep, W P

    2011-03-01

    "Metallosphaera yellowstonensis" is a thermoacidophilic archaeon isolated from Yellowstone National Park that is capable of autotrophic growth using Fe(II), elemental S, or pyrite as electron donors. Analysis of the draft genome sequence from M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 revealed seven different copies of heme copper oxidases (subunit I) in a total of five different terminal oxidase complexes, including doxBCEF, foxABCDEFGHIJ, soxABC, and the soxM supercomplex, as well as a novel hypothetical two-protein doxB-like polyferredoxin complex. Other genes found in M. yellowstonensis with possible roles in S and or Fe cycling include a thiosulfate oxidase (tqoAB), a sulfite oxidase (som), a cbsA cytochrome b(558/566), several small blue copper proteins, and a novel gene sequence coding for a putative multicopper oxidase (Mco). Results from gene expression studies, including reverse transcriptase (RT) quantitative PCR (qPCR) of cultures grown autotrophically on either Fe(II), pyrite, or elemental S showed that the fox gene cluster and mco are highly expressed under conditions where Fe(II) is an electron donor. Metagenome sequence and gene expression studies of Fe-oxide mats confirmed the importance of fox genes (e.g., foxA and foxC) and mco under Fe(II)-oxidizing conditions. Protein modeling of FoxC suggests a novel lysine-lysine or lysine-arginine heme B binding domain, indicating that it is likely the cytochrome component of a heterodimer complex with foxG as a ferredoxin subunit. Analysis of mco shows that it encodes a novel multicopper blue protein with two plastocyanin type I copper domains that may play a role in the transfer of electrons within the Fox protein complex. An understanding of metabolic pathways involved in aerobic iron and sulfur oxidation in Sulfolobales has broad implications for understanding the evolution and niche diversification of these thermophiles as well as practical applications in fields such as bioleaching of trace metals from pyritic ores.

  2. Transcriptional Profiling of Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Genes of Helicobacter pylori under Different Environmental Conditions: Identification of HP0967-HP0968 System.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G; Ares, Miguel A; Panunzi, Leonardo G; Pacheco, Sabino; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Girón, Jorge A; Torres, Javier; De la Cruz, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is responsible for causing peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. The expression of virulence factors allows the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, which results in a chronic, sometimes uncontrolled inflammatory response. Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems have emerged as important virulence factors in many pathogenic bacteria. Three type II TA systems have previously been identified in the genome of H. pylori 26695: HP0315-HP0316, HP0892-HP0893, and HP0894-HP0895. Here we characterized a heretofore undescribed type II TA system in H. pylori , HP0967-HP0968, which is encoded by the bicistronic operon hp0968-hp0967 and belongs to the Vap family. The predicted HP0967 protein is a toxin with ribonuclease activity whereas HP0968 is an antitoxin that binds to its own regulatory region. We found that all type II TA systems were expressed in H. pylori during early stationary growth phase, and differentially expressed in the presence of urea, nickel, and iron, although, the hp0968-hp0967 pair was the most affected under these environmental conditions. Transcription of hp0968-hp0967 was strongly induced in a mature H. pylori biofilm and when the bacteria interacted with AGS epithelial cells. Kanamycin and chloramphenicol considerably boosted transcription levels of all the four type II TA systems. The hp0968-hp0967 TA system was the most frequent among 317 H. pylori strains isolated from all over the world. This study is the first report on the transcription of type II TA genes in H. pylori under different environmental conditions. Our data show that the HP0967 and HP0968 proteins constitute a bona fide type II TA system in H. pylori , whose expression is regulated by environmental cues, which are relevant in the context of infection of the human gastric mucosa.

  3. Sequences of 95 human MHC haplotypes reveal extreme coding variation in genes other than highly polymorphic HLA class I and II

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Paul J.; Norberg, Steven J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Royce, Thomas; Wroblewski, Emily E.; Dunn, Tamsen; Mann, Tobias; Alicata, Claudia; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Chang, Weihua; Shults Won, Melissa; Gunderson, Kevin L.; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The most polymorphic part of the human genome, the MHC, encodes over 160 proteins of diverse function. Half of them, including the HLA class I and II genes, are directly involved in immune responses. Consequently, the MHC region strongly associates with numerous diseases and clinical therapies. Notoriously, the MHC region has been intractable to high-throughput analysis at complete sequence resolution, and current reference haplotypes are inadequate for large-scale studies. To address these challenges, we developed a method that specifically captures and sequences the 4.8-Mbp MHC region from genomic DNA. For 95 MHC homozygous cell lines we assembled, de novo, a set of high-fidelity contigs and a sequence scaffold, representing a mean 98% of the target region. Included are six alternative MHC reference sequences of the human genome that we completed and refined. Characterization of the sequence and structural diversity of the MHC region shows the approach accurately determines the sequences of the highly polymorphic HLA class I and HLA class II genes and the complex structural diversity of complement factor C4A/C4B. It has also uncovered extensive and unexpected diversity in other MHC genes; an example is MUC22, which encodes a lung mucin and exhibits more coding sequence alleles than any HLA class I or II gene studied here. More than 60% of the coding sequence alleles analyzed were previously uncharacterized. We have created a substantial database of robust reference MHC haplotype sequences that will enable future population scale studies of this complicated and clinically important region of the human genome. PMID:28360230

  4. RNAP-II transcribes two small RNAs at the promoter and terminator regions of the RNAP-I gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mayán, Maria D

    2013-01-01

    Three RNA polymerases coexist in the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. RNAP-I transcribes the 35S rRNA, RNAP-III transcribes the 5S rRNA and RNAP-II is found in both intergenic non-coding regions. Previously, we demonstrated that RNAP-II molecules bound to the intergenic non-coding regions (IGS) of the ribosomal locus are mainly found in a stalled conformation, and the stalled polymerase mediates chromatin interactions, which isolate RNAP-I from the RNAP-III transcriptional domain. Besides, RNAP-II transcribes both IGS regions at low levels, using different cryptic promoters. This report demonstrates that RNAP-II also transcribes two sequences located in the 5'- and 3'-ends of the 35S rRNA gene that overlap with the sequences of the 35S rRNA precursor transcribed by RNAP-I. The sequence located at the promoter region of RNAP-I, called the p-RNA transcript, binds to the transcription termination-related protein, Reb1p, while the T-RNA sequence, located in the termination sites of RNAP-I gene, contains the stem-loop recognized by Rtn1p, which is necessary for proper termination of RNAP-I. Because of their location, these small RNAs may play a key role in the initiation and termination of RNAP-I transcription. To correctly synthesize proteins, eukaryotic cells may retain a mechanism that connects the three main polymerases. This report suggests that cryptic transcription by RNAP-II may be required for normal transcription by RNAP-I in the ribosomal locus of S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The effect of light quality on the pro-/antioxidant balance, activity of photosystem II, and expression of light-dependent genes in Eutrema salsugineum callus cells.

    PubMed

    Pashkovskiy, P P; Soshinkova, T N; Korolkova, D V; Kartashov, A V; Zlobin, I E; Lyubimov, V Yu; Kreslavski, V D; Kuznetsov, Vl V

    2018-05-01

    The antioxidant balance, photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII), and photosynthetic pigment content, as well as the expression of genes involved in the light signalling of callus lines of Eutrema salsugineum plants (earlier Thellungiella salsuginea) under different spectral light compositions were studied. Growth of callus in red light (RL, maximum 660 nm), in contrast to blue light (BL, maximum 450 nm), resulted in a lower H 2 O 2 content and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The BL increased the activities of key antioxidant enzymes in comparison with the white light (WL) and RL and demonstrated the minimum level of PSII photochemical activity. The activities of catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) had the highest values in BL, which, along with the increased H 2 O 2 and TBARS content, indicate a higher level of oxidative stress in the cells. The expression levels of the main chloroplast protein genes of PSII (PSBA and PSBD), the NADPH-dependent oxidase gene of the plasma membrane (RbohD), the protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase genes (POR B, C) involved in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll, and the key photoreceptor signalling genes (CIB1, CRY2, PhyB, PhyA, and PIF3) were determined. Possible mechanisms of light quality effects on the physiological parameters of callus cells are discussed.

  6. A missense mutation in the arginine-vasopressin neurophysin-II gene causes autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dan; Dong, FengQin; Lu, WeiQin; Zhang, Zhe; Lu, XunLiang; Li, ChengJiang; Liu, YanNing

    2013-06-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, an autosomal dominant disorder, is mostly caused by mutations in the genes that encode AVP or its intracellular binding protein, neurophysin-II. The mutations lead to aberrant preprohormone processing and progressive destruction of AVP-secreting cells, which gradually manifests a progressive polyuria and polydipsia during early childhood, and a disorder of water homeostasis. We characterized the clinical and biochemical features, and sequenced the AVP neurophysin-II(AVP-NPII) gene of the affected individuals with autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus(ADNDI)to determine whether this disease was genetically determined. We obtained the histories of eight affected and four unaffected family individuals. The diagnosis of ADNDI was established using a water deprivation test and exogenous AVP administration. For molecular analysis, genomic DNA was extracted and the AVP-NPII gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The eight affected individuals showed different spectra of age of onsets (7-15 years) and urine volumes (132-253 ml/kg/24 h). All affected individuals responded to vasopressin administration, with a resolution of symptoms and an increase in urine osmolality by more than 50%. The characteristic hyperintense signal in the posterior pituitary on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was absent in six family members and present in one. Sequencing analysis revealed a missense heterozygous mutation 1516G > T (Gly17Val) in exon 2 of the AVP-NPII gene among the ADNDI individuals. We identified a missense mutation in the AVP-NPII gene and the same mutation showed different spectra of age of onsets and urine volumes in a new Chinese family with ADNDI. The mutation may provide a molecular basis for understanding the characteristics of NPII and add to our knowledge of the pathogenesis of ADNDI, which would allow the presymptomatic diagnosis of asymptomatic subjects. © 2012 John Wiley

  7. Occupancy of RNA Polymerase II Phosphorylated on Serine 5 (RNAP S5P) and RNAP S2P on Varicella-Zoster Virus Genes 9, 51, and 66 Is Independent of Transcript Abundance and Polymerase Location within the Gene.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Heather H; Timberlake, Kensey B; Austin, Zoe A; Badani, Hussain; Sanford, Bridget; Tremblay, Keriann; Baird, Nicholas L; Jones, Kenneth; Rovnak, Joel; Frietze, Seth; Gilden, Don; Cohrs, Randall J

    2016-02-01

    Regulation of gene transcription in varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a ubiquitous human neurotropic alphaherpesvirus, requires coordinated binding of multiple host and virus proteins onto specific regions of the virus genome. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is widely used to determine the location of specific proteins along a genomic region. Since the size range of sheared virus DNA fragments governs the limit of accurate protein localization, particularly for compact herpesvirus genomes, we used a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based assay to determine the efficiency of VZV DNA shearing before ChIP, after which the assay was used to determine the relationship between transcript abundance and the occupancy of phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAP) on the gene promoter, body, and terminus of VZV genes 9, 51, and 66. The abundance of VZV gene 9, 51, and 66 transcripts in VZV-infected human fetal lung fibroblasts was determined by reverse transcription-linked quantitative PCR. Our results showed that the C-terminal domain of RNAP is hyperphosphorylated at serine 5 (S5(P)) on VZV genes 9, 51, and 66 independently of transcript abundance and the location within the virus gene at both 1 and 3 days postinfection (dpi). In contrast, phosphorylated serine 2 (S2(P))-modified RNAP was not detected at any virus gene location at 3 dpi and was detected at levels only slightly above background levels at 1 dpi. Regulation of herpesvirus gene transcription is an elaborate choreography between proteins and DNA that is revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). We used a quantitative PCR-based assay to determine fragment size after DNA shearing, a critical parameter in ChIP assays, and exposed a basic difference in the mechanism of transcription between mammalian cells and VZV. We found that hyperphosphorylation at serine 5 of the C-terminal domain of RNAP along the lengths of VZV genes (the promoter, body, and transcription termination site) was independent of mRNA abundance. In

  8. Atelosteogenesis type II is caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate-transporter gene (DTDST): Evidence for a phenotypic series involving three chondrodysplasias

    SciTech Connect

    Haestbacka, J.; Lander, E.S.; Superti-Furga, A.

    1996-02-01

    Atelosteogenesis type II (AO II) is a neonatally lethal chondrodysplasia whose clinical and histological characteristics resemble those of another chondrodysplasia, the much less severe diastrophic dysplasia (DTD). The similarity suggests a shared pathogenesis involving lesions in the same biochemical pathway and perhaps the same gene. DTD is caused by mutations in the recently identified diastrophic dysplasia sulfate-transporter gene (DTDST). Here, we report that AOII patients also have DTDST mutations, which lead to defective uptake of inorganic sulfate and insufficient sulfation of macromolecules by patient mesenchymal cells in vitro. Together with our recent observation that a third even more severe chondrodysplasia,more » achondrogenesis type IB, is also caused by mutations in DTDST, these results demonstrate a phenotypic series of three chondrodysplasias of increasing severity caused by lesions in a single sulfate-transporter gene. The severity of the phenotype appears to be correlated with the predicted effect of the mutations on the residual activity of the DTDST protein. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.« less

  9. Rat leucine-rich protein binds and activates the promoter of the beta isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gene.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nagahiro; Masumoto, Shuji; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Yoshiyuki; Yamauchi, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    We previously found the neuronal cell-type specific promoter and binding partner of the beta isoform of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (beta CaM kinase II) in rat brain [Donai, H., Morinaga, H., Yamauchi, T., 2001. Genomic organization and neuronal cell type specific promoter activity of beta isoform of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II of rat brain. Mol. Brain Res. 94, 35-47]. In the present study, we purified a protein that binds specifically a promoter region of beta CaM kinase II gene from a nuclear extract of the rat cerebellum using DEAE-cellulose column chromatography, ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified protein was identified as rat leucine-rich protein 157 (rLRP157) using tandem mass spectrometry. Then, we prepared its cDNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from poly(A)(+)RNA of rat cerebellum. The rLRP157 cDNA was introduced into mouse neuroblastomaxrat glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells, and cells stably expressing rLRP157 (NG/LRP cells) were isolated. Binding of rLRP157 with the promoter sequence was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay using nuclear extract of NG/LRP cells. A luciferase reporter gene containing a promoter of beta CaM kinase II was transiently expressed in NG/LRP cells. Under the conditions, the promoter activity was enhanced about 2.6-fold in NG/LRP cells as compared with wild-type cells. The expression of rLRP157 mRNA was paralleled with that of beta CaM kinase II in the adult and embryo rat brain detected by in situ hybridization. Nuclear localization of rLRP157 was confirmed using GFP-rLRP157 fusion protein investigated under a confocal microscope. These results indicate that rLRP157 is one of the proteins binding to, and regulating the activity of, the promoter of beta CaM kinase II.

  10. Loss of Resistance to Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension in the Jackson Laboratory Recombination-Activating Gene Null Mouse on the C57BL/6J Background.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Pai, Amrita V; West, Crystal A; Wu, Xie; Speth, Robert C; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-06-01

    Resistance to angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension in T-cell-deficient male mice with a targeted mutation in the recombination-activating gene-1 ( Rag1 ) on the C57BL/6J background (B6. Rag1 -/- -M), which was reported by 5 independent laboratories including ours before 2015, has been lost. In mice purchased from Jackson Laboratory in 2015 and 2016, the time course and magnitude increase in mean arterial pressure induced by 2 weeks of Ang II infusion at 490 ng/kg per minute was identical between B6. Rag1 -/- -M and male wild-type littermates. Moreover, there were no differences in the time course or magnitude increase in mean arterial pressure at the lowest dose of Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute) that increased mean arterial pressure. This loss in Ang II resistance is independent of T cells. Angiotensin type 1-receptor binding was 1.4-fold higher in glomeruli isolated from recently purchased B6. Rag1 -/- -M suggesting an increase in renal angiotensin type 1-receptor activity masks the blood pressure protection afforded by the lack of T cells. The phenotypic change in B6. Rag1 -/- -M has implications for investigators using this strain to study mechanisms of T-cell modulation of Ang II-dependent blood pressure control. These findings also serve as a reminder that the universal drive for genetic variation occurs in all animals including inbred mouse strains and that spontaneous mutations leading to phenotypic change can compromise experimental reproducibility over time and place. Finally, these observations illustrate the importance of including experimental details about the location and time period over which animals are bred in publications involving animal studies to promote rigor and reproducibility in the scientific literature. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Piper betle induces phase I & II genes through Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild type and Nrf2 knockout cells.

    PubMed

    Wan Hasan, Wan Nuraini; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Makpol, Suzana; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum

    2014-02-23

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a primary transcription factor, protecting cells from oxidative stress by regulating a number of antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes. Dietary components such as sulforaphane in broccoli and quercetin in onions have been shown to be inducers of Nrf2. Piper betle (PB) grows well in tropical climate and the leaves are used in a number of traditional remedies for the treatment of stomach ailments and infections among Asians. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of Piper betle (PB) leaves extract in Nrf2 signaling pathway by using 2 types of cells; mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from wild-type (WT) and Nrf2 knockout (N0) mice. WT and N0 cells were treated with 5 and 10 μg/ml of PB for 10 and 12-h for the determination of nuclear translocation of Nrf2 protein. Luciferase reporter gene activity was performed to evaluate the antioxidant response element (ARE)-induction by PB. Real-time PCR and Western blot were conducted on both WT and N0 cells after PB treatment for the determination of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and heme-oxygenase (HO-1)], phase I oxidoreductase enzymes [ quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)] and phase II detoxifying enzyme [glutathione S-transferase (GST)]. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 by PB in WT cells was better after 10 h incubation compared to 12 h. Real time PCR and Western blot analysis showed increased expressions of Nrf2, NQO1 and GSTA1 genes with corresponding increases in glutathione, NQO1 and HO-1 proteins in WT cells. Reporter gene ARE was stimulated by PB as shown by ARE/luciferase assay. Interestingly, PB induced SOD1 gene and protein expressions in N0 cells but not in WT cells. The results of this study confirmed that PB activated Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway which subsequently induced some phase I oxidoreductase, phase II detoxifying and antioxidant genes expression via ARE reporter gene involved in the Nrf2 pathway with the

  12. Piper betle induces phase I & II genes through Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild type and Nrf2 knockout cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a primary transcription factor, protecting cells from oxidative stress by regulating a number of antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes. Dietary components such as sulforaphane in broccoli and quercetin in onions have been shown to be inducers of Nrf2. Piper betle (PB) grows well in tropical climate and the leaves are used in a number of traditional remedies for the treatment of stomach ailments and infections among Asians. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of Piper betle (PB) leaves extract in Nrf2 signaling pathway by using 2 types of cells; mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from wild-type (WT) and Nrf2 knockout (N0) mice. Methods WT and N0 cells were treated with 5 and 10 μg/ml of PB for 10 and 12-h for the determination of nuclear translocation of Nrf2 protein. Luciferase reporter gene activity was performed to evaluate the antioxidant response element (ARE)-induction by PB. Real-time PCR and Western blot were conducted on both WT and N0 cells after PB treatment for the determination of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and heme-oxygenase (HO-1)], phase I oxidoreductase enzymes [NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)] and phase II detoxifying enzyme [glutathione S-transferase (GST)]. Results Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 by PB in WT cells was better after 10 h incubation compared to 12 h. Real time PCR and Western blot analysis showed increased expressions of Nrf2, NQO1 and GSTA1 genes with corresponding increases in glutathione, NQO1 and HO-1 proteins in WT cells. Reporter gene ARE was stimulated by PB as shown by ARE/luciferase assay. Interestingly, PB induced SOD1 gene and protein expressions in N0 cells but not in WT cells. Conclusion The results of this study confirmed that PB activated Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway which subsequently induced some phase I oxidoreductase, phase II detoxifying and antioxidant genes expression via ARE reporter

  13. Deletion of the transforming growth factor β receptor type II gene in articular chondrocytes leads to a progressive osteoarthritis-like phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Li, Jia; Wang, Baoli; Jin, Hongting; Wang, Meina; Zhang, Yejia; Yang, Yunzhi; Im, Hee-Jeong; O'Keefe, Regis; Chen, Di

    2013-12-01

    While transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling plays a critical role in chondrocyte metabolism, the TGFβ signaling pathways and target genes involved in cartilage homeostasis and the development of osteoarthritis (OA) remain unclear. Using an in vitro cell culture method and an in vivo mouse genetic approach, we undertook this study to investigate TGFβ signaling in chondrocytes and to determine whether Mmp13 and Adamts5 are critical downstream target genes of TGFβ signaling. TGFβ receptor type II (TGFβRII)-conditional knockout (KO) (TGFβRII(Col2ER)) mice were generated by breeding TGFβRII(flox/flox) mice with Col2-CreER-transgenic mice. Histologic, histomorphometric, and gene expression analyses were performed. In vitro TGFβ signaling studies were performed using chondrogenic rat chondrosarcoma cells. To determine whether Mmp13 and Adamts5 are critical downstream target genes of TGFβ signaling, TGFβRII/matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13)- and TGFβRII/ADAMTS-5-double-KO mice were generated and analyzed. Inhibition of TGFβ signaling (deletion of the Tgfbr2 gene in chondrocytes) resulted in up-regulation of Runx2, Mmp13, and Adamts5 expression in articular cartilage tissue and progressive OA development in TGFβRII(Col2ER) mice. Deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene significantly ameliorated the OA-like phenotype induced by the loss of TGFβ signaling. Treatment of TGFβRII(Col2ER) mice with an MMP-13 inhibitor also slowed OA progression. Mmp13 and Adamts5 are critical downstream target genes involved in the TGFβ signaling pathway during the development of OA. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. MHC II-β chain gene expression studies define the regional organization of the thymus in the developing bony fish Dicentrarchus labrax (L.).

    PubMed

    Picchietti, S; Abelli, L; Guerra, L; Randelli, E; Proietti Serafini, F; Belardinelli, M C; Buonocore, F; Bernini, C; Fausto, A M; Scapigliati, G

    2015-02-01

    MHC II-β chain gene transcripts were quantified by real-time PCR and localised by in situ hybridization in the developing thymus of the teleost Dicentrarchus labrax, regarding the specialization of the thymic compartments. MHC II-β expression significantly rose when the first lymphoid colonization of the thymus occurred, thereafter increased further when the organ progressively developed cortex and medulla regions. The evolving patterns of MHC II-β expression provided anatomical insights into some mechanisms of thymocyte selection. Among the stromal cells transcribing MHC II-β, scattered cortical epithelial cells appeared likely involved in the positive selection, while those abundant in the cortico-medullary border and medulla in the negative selection. These latter most represent dendritic cells, based on typical localization and phenotype. These findings provide further proofs that efficient mechanisms leading to maturation of naïve T cells are operative in teleosts, strongly reminiscent of the models conserved in more evolved gnathostomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic variants in IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and adiponectin genes and colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites.

    PubMed

    Keku, Temitope O; Vidal, Adriana; Oliver, Shannon; Hoyo, Catherine; Hall, Ingrid J; Omofoye, Oluwaseun; McDoom, Maya; Worley, Kendra; Galanko, Joseph; Sandler, Robert S; Millikan, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating genetic susceptibility may clarify effects of known environmental factors and also identify individuals at high risk. We evaluated the association of four insulin-related pathway gene polymorphisms in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) (CA)( n ) repeat, insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-II) (rs680), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) (rs2854744), and adiponectin (APM1 rs1501299) with colon cancer risk, as well as relationships with circulating IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and C-peptide in a population-based study. Participants were African Americans (231 cases and 306 controls) and Whites (297 cases, 530 controls). Consenting subjects provided blood specimens and lifestyle/diet information. Genotyping for all genes except IGF-I was performed by the 5'-exonuclease (Taqman) assay. The IGF-I (CA)(n) repeat was assayed by PCR and fragment analysis. Circulating proteins were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by logistic regression. The IGF-I (CA)( 19 ) repeat was higher in White controls (50 %) than African American controls (31 %). Whites homozygous for the IGF-I (CA)(19) repeat had a nearly twofold increase in risk of colon cancer (OR = 1.77; 95 % CI = 1.15-2.73), but not African Americans (OR = 0.73, 95 % CI 0.50-1.51). We observed an inverse association between the IGF-II Apa1 A-variant and colon cancer risk (OR = 0.49, 95 % CI 0.28-0.88) in Whites only. Carrying the IGFBP-3 variant alleles was associated with lower IGFBP-3 protein levels, a difference most pronounced in Whites (p-trend <0.05). These results support an association between insulin pathway-related genes and elevated colon cancer risk in Whites but not in African Americans.

  16. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

    MedlinePlus

    Sipple syndrome; MEN II; Pheochromocytoma - MEN II; Thyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma; Parathyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma ... The cause of MEN II is a defect in a gene called RET. This defect causes many tumors to appear in the same ...

  17. Localization of the human tripeptidyl peptidase II gene (TPP2) to 13q32-q33 by nonradioactive in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Martinsson, T.; Vujic, M.; Tomkinson, B.

    1993-08-01

    The authors have assigned the human tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP2) gene to chromosome region 13q32-q33 using two different methods. First, a full-length TPP2 cDNA was used as a probe on Southern blots of DNA from a panel of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids. The TPP2 sequences were found to segregate with the human chromosome 13. Second, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was performed with the same probe. This analysis supported the chromosome 13 localization and further refined it to region 13q32-q33. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Assignment of Etfdh, Etfb, and Etfa to chromosomes 3, 7, and 13: The mouse homologs of genes respondible for glutaric acidemia type II in human

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.A.; Dowler, L.L.; Angeloni, S.V.

    Electron transfer flavoprotein (composed of {alpha} and {beta} subunits) is an obligatory electron acceptor for several dehydrogenases and is located in the mitochondrial matrix. Electrons accepted by electron transfer flavo-protein (ETF) are transferred to the main mitochondrial respiratory chain by the way of ETF dehydrogenase (ETFDH). In humans, deficiency of ETF or ETFDH leads to glutaric acidemia type II, an inherited metabolic disorder that can be fatal in its neonatal form and is characterized by severe hypoketotic hypoglycemia and acidosis. We used cDNA probes for the Etfdh, Etfb, and Etfa genes to determine localization of these mouse genes to chromosomesmore » 3, 7, and 13. 18 refs., 3 figs.« less

  19. A nuclear gene for the iron-sulfur subunit of mitochondrial complex II is specifically expressed during Arabidopsis seed development and germination.

    PubMed

    Elorza, Alvaro; Roschzttardtz, Hannetz; Gómez, Isabel; Mouras, Armand; Holuigue, Loreto; Araya, Alejandro; Jordana, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Three nuclear genes, SDH2-1, SDH2-2 and SDH2-3, encode the essential iron-sulfur subunit of mitochondrial complex II in Arabidopsis thaliana. SDH2-1 and SDH2-2 probably arose via a recent duplication event and we reported that both are expressed in all organs from adult plants. In contrast, transcripts from SDH2-3 were not detected. Here we present data demonstrating that SDH2-3 is specifically expressed during seed development. SDH2-3 transcripts appear during seed maturation, persist through desiccation, are abundant in dry seeds and markedly decline during germination. Analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying the SDH2-3 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene shows that the SDH2-3 promoter is activated in the embryo during maturation, from the bent-cotyledon stage. beta-Glucuronidase expression correlates with the appearance of endogenous SDH2-3 transcripts, suggesting that control of this nuclear gene is achieved through transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, progressive deletions of this promoter identified a 159 bp region (-223 to -65) important for SDH2-3 transcriptional activation in seeds. Interestingly, the SDH2-3 promoter remains active in embryonic tissues during germination and post-germinative growth, and is turned off in vegetative tissues (true leaves). In contrast to SDH2-3 transcripts, SDH2-1 and SDH2-2 transcripts are barely detected in dry seeds and increase during germination and post-germinative growth. The opposite expression patterns of SDH2 nuclear genes strongly suggest that during germination the embryo-specific SDH2-3 is replaced by SDH2-1 or SDH2-2 in mitochondrial complex II.

  20. Immunomodulation of glioma cells after gene therapy: induction of major histocompatibility complex class I but not class II antigen in vitro.

    PubMed

    Parsa, A T; Chi, J H; Hurley, P T; Jeyapalan, S A; Bruce, J N

    2001-09-01

    Acquired immunity has been demonstrated in Fischer rats bearing syngeneic 9L tumors after herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene transfection and ganciclovir treatment. The nature of this immunity in rats and its relevance to the HSV TK/ganciclovir protocol for human subjects remain to be determined. In this study, levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I and II antigen expression were measured before and after HSV TK transfection, in an effort to document immunomodulatory changes caused by gene therapy. Tumor cells from the 9L gliosarcoma cell line, three primary human glioma cultures, and the human glioma cell line U87 MG were transduced with HSV TK vector-containing supernatant from fibroblast-producing cells (titer of 5 x 10(6) colony-forming units/ml) and selected in G418 medium for neomycin resistance. Clones were pooled or individually selected for cell-killing assays with ganciclovir, to confirm TK expression (10(3) cells/well in a 96-well dish). Northern analyses using MHC Class I and Class II complementary deoxyribonucleic acid probes were performed on blots containing total ribonucleic acid from wild-type tumor cells and HSV TK transfectants. A beta-actin complementary deoxyribonucleic acid probe served as an internal control. Cell surface expression was confirmed with flow cytometry. The induction of MHC Class I was tested for cycloheximide and genistein sensitivity. All cell cultures exhibited increases in MHC Class I but not MHC Class II expression, as determined by Northern analysis densitometry and flow cytometry. Cycloheximide treatment did not diminish the up-regulation of MHC Class I after retroviral transfection, implicating a signal transduction pathway that does not require ongoing protein synthesis. Genistein pretreatment of cell cultures did diminish the up-regulation of MHC Class I, implicating a tyrosine kinase in the signaling cascade. Induction of MHC Class I in rat and human glioma cells after HSV TK

  1. Examination of chromosome 7p22 candidate genes RBaK, PMS2 and GNA12 in familial hyperaldosteronism type II.

    PubMed

    Jeske, Y W A; So, A; Kelemen, L; Sukor, N; Willys, C; Bulmer, B; Gordon, R D; Duffy, D; Stowasser, M

    2008-04-01

    1. There are two types of familial hyperaldosteronism (FH): FH-I and FH-II. FH-I is caused by a hybrid CYP11B1/CYP11B2 gene mutation. The genetic cause of FH-II, which is more common, is unknown. Adrenal hyperplasia and adenomas are features. We previously reported linkage of FH-II to a approximately 5 Mb region on chromosome 7p22. We subsequently reported finding no causative mutations in the retinoblastoma-associated Kruppel-associated box gene (RBaK), a candidate at 7p22 involved in tumorigenesis and cell cycle control. 2. In the current study we investigated RBaK regulatory regions and two other candidate genes: postmeiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2, involved in DNA mismatch repair and tumour predisposition) and guanine nucleotide-binding protein alpha-12 (GNA12, a transforming oncogene). 3. The GNA12 and PMS2 genes were examined in two affected (A1, A2) and two unaffected (U1, U2) subjects from a large 7p22-linked FH-II family (family 1). No mutations were found. 4. The RBaK and PMS2 distal promoters were sequenced to -2150 bp from the transcription start site for RBaK and-2800 bp for PMS2. Five unreported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in subjects A1, A2 but not in U1 or U2; A(-2031 bp)T, T(-2030 bp)G, G(-834 bp)C, C(-821 bp)G in RBaK and A(-876 bp)G in PMS2. Additional affected and unaffected subjects from family 1 and from two other 7p22-linked FH-II families and 58 unrelated normotensive control subjects were genotyped for these SNPs. 5. The five novel SNPs were found to be present in a significant proportion of normotensive controls. The four RBaK promoter SNPs were found to be in linkage disequilibrium in the normal population. The RBaK promoter (-)2031T/2030G/834C/821T allele was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the causative mutation in FH-II family 1, but not in families 2 and 3. The PMS2 promoter (-)876G allele was also found to be linked to affected phenotypes in family 1. 6. The RBaK and PMS2 promoter SNPs alter the

  2. Targeted mutagenesis of the psbE and psbF genes blocks photosynthetic electron transport: evidence for a functional role of cytochrome b559 in photosystem II.

    PubMed Central

    Pakrasi, H B; Williams, J G; Arntzen, C J

    1988-01-01

    The genes encoding the two subunits (alpha and beta) of the cytochrome b559 (cyt b559) protein, psbE and psbF, were cloned from the unicellular, transformable cyanobacterium, Synechocystis 6803. Cyt b559, an intrinsic membrane protein, is a component of photosystem II, a membrane-protein complex that catalyzes photosynthetic oxygen evolution. However, the role of cyt b559 in photosynthetic electron transport is yet to be determined. A high degree of homology was found between the cyanobacterial and green plant chloroplastidic psbE and psbE genes and in the amino acid sequences of their corresponding protein products. Cartridge mutagenesis techniques were used to generate a deletion mutant of Synechocystis 6803 in which the psbE and psbF genes were replaced by a kanamycin-resistance gene cartridge. Physiological analyses indicated that the PSII complexes of the mutant were inactivated. We conclude that cyt b559 is an essential component of PSII. Images PMID:3130246

  3. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: Chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Beall, D.S.; Mejia, J.P.

    1991-04-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high levels of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selected for increased expression of alcohol dehydrogenase on aldehyde indicator plates. These mutants were functionally equivalent to the previous plasmid-based strains for the fermentation of xylose and glucose tomore » ethanol. Ethanol concentrations of 54.4 and 41.6 g/liter were obtained from 10% glucose and 8% xylose, respectively. The efficiency of conversion exceeded theoretical limits (0.51 g of ethanol/g of sugar) on the basis of added sugars because of the additional production of ethanol from the catabolism of complex nutrients. Further mutations were introduced to inactivate succinate production (frd) and to block homologous recombination (recA).« less

  4. Genetic variation of the MHC class II DRB genes in the Japanese weasel, Mustela itatsi, endemic to Japan, compared with the Siberian weasel, Mustela sibirica.

    PubMed

    Nishita, Y; Abramov, A V; Kosintsev, P A; Lin, L-K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a critical role in vertebrate immune system and are highly polymorphic. To further understand the molecular evolution of the MHC genes, we compared MHC class II DRB genes between the Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi), a species endemic to Japan, and the Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), a closely related species on the continent. We sequenced a 242-bp region of DRB exon 2, which encodes antigen-binding sites (ABS), and found 24 alleles from 31 M. itatsi individuals and 17 alleles from 21 M. sibirica individuals, including broadly distributed, species-specific and/or geographically restricted alleles. Our results suggest that pathogen-driven balancing selection have acted to maintain the diversity in the DRB genes. For predicted ABS, nonsynonymous substitutions exceeded synonymous substitutions, also indicating positive selection, which was not seen at non-ABS. In a Bayesian phylogenetic tree, two M. sibirica DRB alleles were basal to the rest of the sequences from mustelid species and may represent ancestral alleles. Trans-species polymorphism was evident between many mustelid DRB alleles, especially between M. itatsi and M. sibirica. These two Mustela species divided about 1.7 million years ago, but still share many MHC alleles, indicative of their close phylogenetic relationship. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Dilatative uropathy as a manifestation of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus due to a novel mutation in the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin-II gene.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, V; Mainberger, A; Morris-Rosendahl, D J; Löning, L; Mayer, W; Müller, H L

    2013-12-01

    Polydypsia and polyuria are frequent symptoms in patients with sellar masses caused by neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI), a disorder caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) -neurophysin II (NPII) gene, should be considered as a rare differential diagnosis. A delayed diagnosis bears the risk of life-threatening electrolyte imbalances and permanent urinary tract damage, leading to impaired quality of life.We present a Caucasian kindred of at least 4 generations with FNDI.Clinical histories, endocrine para-meters, and results of molecular analyses of the AVP gene are presented with a review of the literature on diabetes insipidus (DI) related urinary tract dilatation.Polyuria and polydipsia were only reported based on explicit and thorough interrogation after more than 4 years of clinical follow-up. A novel heterozygous mutation in the AVP gene was found in all examined symptomatic subjects (c.1-33_c.4del37nt). A literature review revealed that non-obstructive hydronephrosis (NOH) is a rare but known complication of DI.Since increased fluid intake is often a typical familial pattern in adFNDI, it is frequently missed as being pathologic in affected patients, therefore a detailed clinical history of drinking volumes is of critical importance. AVP gene testing is an important component in the confirmation of the diagnosis. Otherwise unexplainable NOH should lead to further investigations and evaluation of rare diseases like FNDI. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Early-onset central diabetes insipidus is associated with de novo arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II or Wolfram syndrome 1 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Silverio; Di Iorgi, Natascia; Ragione, Fulvio Della; Scianguetta, Saverio; Borriello, Adriana; Allegri, Anna Elsa Maria; Ferraro, Marcella; Santoro, Claudia; Napoli, Flavia; Calcagno, Annalisa; Giaccardi, Marta; Cappa, Marco; Salerno, Maria Carolina; Cozzolino, Domenico; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2015-04-01

    Idiopathic early-onset central diabetes insipidus (CDI) might be due to mutations of arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II (AVP-NPII (AVP)) or wolframin (WFS1) genes. Sequencing of AVP and WFS1 genes was performed in nine children with CDI, aged between 9 and 68 months, and negative family history for polyuria and polydipsia. Two patients carried a mutation in the AVP gene: a heterozygous G-to-T transition at nucleotide position 322 of exon 2 (c.322G>T) resulting in a stop codon at position 108 (p.Glu108X), and a novel deletion from nucleotide 52 to 54 (c.52_54delTCC) producing a deletion of a serine at position 18 (p.Ser18del) of the AVP pre-prohormone signal peptide. A third patient carried two heterozygous mutations in the WFS1 gene localized on different alleles. The first change was A-to-G transition at nucleotide 997 in exon 8 (c.997A>G), resulting in a valine residue at position 333 in place of isoleucine (p.Ile333Val). The second novel mutation was a 3 bp insertion in exon 8, c.2392_2393insACG causing the addition of an aspartate residue at position 797 and the maintenance of the correct open reading frame (p. Asp797_Val798insAsp). While similar WFS1 protein levels were detected in fibroblasts from healthy subjects and from the patient and his parents, a major sensitivity to staurosporine-induced apoptosis was observed in the patient fibroblasts as well as in patients with Wolfram syndrome. Early-onset CDI is associated with de novo mutations of the AVP gene and with hereditary WFS1 gene changes. These findings have valuable implications for management and genetic counseling. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  7. Comparison of Abbott RealTime genotype II, GeneMatrix restriction fragment mass polymorphism and Sysmex HISCL HCV Gr assays for hepatitis C virus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Han, Mi-Soon; Park, Yongjung; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2017-07-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype is a predictive marker for treatment response. We sequentially evaluated the performances of two nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) and one serology assay for HCV genotype: Abbott RealTime genotype II (RealTime II), GeneMatrix restriction fragment mass polymorphism (RFMP), and Sysmex HISCL HCV Gr (HISCL Gr). We examined 281 clinical samples with three assays. The accuracy was assessed using the HCV Genotype Performance Panel PHW204 (SeraCare Life Sciences) for two NAATs. Discrepant cases were re-genotyped by the Versant HCV v.2.0 (line probe 2.0) assay. With the RealTime II assay, clinic samples were analyzed as follows: genotypes 1b (43.1%), 2 (40.2%), 1 subtypes other than 1a and 1b (12.5%), 3 (1.8%), 4 (1.4%), 1a (0.7%), 6 (0.4%), and mixed (1.1%). The RealTime II and RFMP assays showed a type concordance rate of 97.5% (274/281) (κ=0.80) and no significant discordance (p=0.25). Both assays accurately genotyped all samples in the Performance Panel by the subtype level. The HISCL Gr assay showed concordance rates of about 91% (κ<0.40) and statistically significant discordances with two NAATs (p<0.05). In confirmation tests, the results of RFMP assay were the most consistent with those of Versant 2.0 assay. The three HCV assays provided genotyping and serotyping results with good concordance rates. The two NAATs (RealTime II and RFMP) showed comparable performance and good agreement. However, the results of the HISCL Gr assay showed statistically significant differences with those of the NAATs.

  8. Impaired growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae on potato plants overexpressing the oryzacystatin II gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant proteinase inhibitors are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. Oryzacystatins I and II (OCI and OCII) show potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate ...

  9. Gene therapy of murine teratocarcinoma: separate functions for insulin-like growth factors I and II in immunogenicity and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Trojan, J; Johnson, T R; Rudin, S D; Blossey, B K; Kelley, K M; Shevelev, A; Abdul-Karim, F W; Anthony, D D; Tykocinski, M L; Ilan, J

    1994-01-01

    Teratocarcinoma is a germ-line carcinoma giving rise to an embryoid tumor with structures derived from the three embryonic layers: mesoderm, endoderm, and ectoderm. Teratocarcinoma is widely used as an in vitro model system to study regulation of cell determination and differentiation during mammalian embryogenesis. Murine embryonic carcinoma (EC) PCC3 cells express insulin-like growth factor I(IGF-I) and its receptor, while all derivative tumor structures express IGF-I and IGF-II and their receptors. Therefore the system lends itself to dissect the role of these two growth factors during EC differentiation. With an episomal antisense strategy, we define a role for IGF-I in tumorigenicity and evasion of immune surveillance. Antisense IGF-I EC transfectants are shown to elicit a curative anti-tumor immune response with tumor regression at distal sites. In contrast, IGF-II is shown to drive determination and differentiation in EC cells. Since IGF-I and IGF-II bind to type I receptor and antisense sequence used for IGF-II cannot form duplex with endogenous IGF-I transcripts, it follows that this receptor is not involved in determination and differentiation. Images PMID:8016120

  10. Deletion of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene attenuates chronic alcohol-induced retinal ganglion cell death with preservation of VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiao; Lv, Huayi; Wang, Bo; Chen, Qiang; Miao, Lining; Su, Guanfang; Tan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    To investigate how chronic alcohol consumption affects adult visual nervous system and whether renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in this pathogenic process. Male transgenic mice with angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor gene knockout (AT1-KO) and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice were pair-fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli alcohol or isocaloric maltose dextrin control liquid diet for 2 months. At the end of the study, retinas were harvested and subjected to histopathological and immunohistochemical examination. We found that chronic alcohol consumption significantly increased retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis in the retina of WT mice, but not AT1-KO mice, detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP-nick-end labeling staining and caspase 3 activation, along with an up-regulation of AT1 expression in RGC. At the same time, the phosphorylation of P53 in RGCs was significantly increased for both WT and AT1-KO mice exposed to alcohol, which could be significantly, although partially, prevented by AT1 gene deletion. We further examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and CD31, and found that alcohol treatment significantly decreased the expression of VEGF and CD31 in RGCs of WT mice, but not AT1-KO mice. Taken together, our study demonstrates that the induction of RGC apoptosis by chronic alcohol exposure may be related to p53-activation and VEGF depression, all which are partially dependent of AT1 receptor activation.

  11. Transcriptional Profiling of Type II Toxin–Antitoxin Genes of Helicobacter pylori under Different Environmental Conditions: Identification of HP0967–HP0968 System

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G.; Ares, Miguel A.; Panunzi, Leonardo G.; Pacheco, Sabino; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Girón, Jorge A.; Torres, Javier; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is responsible for causing peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. The expression of virulence factors allows the persistence of H. pylori in the stomach, which results in a chronic, sometimes uncontrolled inflammatory response. Type II toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems have emerged as important virulence factors in many pathogenic bacteria. Three type II TA systems have previously been identified in the genome of H. pylori 26695: HP0315–HP0316, HP0892–HP0893, and HP0894–HP0895. Here we characterized a heretofore undescribed type II TA system in H. pylori, HP0967–HP0968, which is encoded by the bicistronic operon hp0968–hp0967 and belongs to the Vap family. The predicted HP0967 protein is a toxin with ribonuclease activity whereas HP0968 is an antitoxin that binds to its own regulatory region. We found that all type II TA systems were expressed in H. pylori during early stationary growth phase, and differentially expressed in the presence of urea, nickel, and iron, although, the hp0968–hp0967 pair was the most affected under these environmental conditions. Transcription of hp0968–hp0967 was strongly induced in a mature H. pylori biofilm and when the bacteria interacted with AGS epithelial cells. Kanamycin and chloramphenicol considerably boosted transcription levels of all the four type II TA systems. The hp0968–hp0967 TA system was the most frequent among 317 H. pylori strains isolated from all over the world. This study is the first report on the transcription of type II TA genes in H. pylori under different environmental conditions. Our data show that the HP0967 and HP0968 proteins constitute a bona fide type II TA system in H. pylori, whose expression is regulated by environmental cues, which are relevant in the context of infection of the human gastric mucosa. PMID:27920769

  12. Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese patient caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the SOX10 gene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Tie-Song; Lin, Ken; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Hong-Chao; Yang, Yan-Li; Low, Fan; Gao, Ying-Qin; Ruan, Biao

    2016-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder. It is the most common type of syndromic hearing impairment with highly genetic heterogeneity and proved to be related by 6 genes as follows: PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDN3, EDNRB and SOX10. This article aims to identify the genetic causes of a Chinese WS child patient. A Chinese WS child was collected for clinical data collection by questionnaire survey. DNA samples of proband and his parents were extracted from peripheral blood samples. Six candidate genes were sequenced by the Trusight One sequencing panel on the illumina NextSeq 500 platform. A novel nonsense heterozygous mutation was found in the coding region of exon 2 in the SOX10 gene of proband. The novel nonsense heterozygous mutation could cause the replacement of the 55th lysine codon by stop codon (484T > C, C142R) and further more possibly cause terminating the protein translation in advance. However, both proband's parents had no mutation of genes above mentioned. The gene mutation of SOX10 [NM_006941.3 c.163A > T] is a novel nonsense mutation. No record of this mutation has been found in dbSNP, HGMD, 1000 Genomes Project, ClinVar and ESP6500 databases. It meets the condition of PS2 of strong evidence in 2015 ACMG Standards and Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tagging SNPs in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes and response of renin activity, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations to antihypertensive treatment in Kazakans.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weili; Zhang, Yuanming; Shan, Zimei; Wang, Qian; Huang, Yongdi; Wang, Chenchen; Yan, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Polymorphisms of REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 may be associated with responses of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) activity phenotypes to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) antihypertensive treatment. A total of 400 first diagnosed Kazak hypertensives were randomly allocated to two groups and received a 3-week course of either captopril and atenolol as monotherapy under double blinding. Genotype-phenotype association analyses were performed by covariance analyses between baseline level and responses of blood pressure, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone concentrations with tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in REN, AGTR1 and AGTR2 genes. A false discovery rate method was used to adjust multiple testing. After adjustment for multiple testing, we found that the G allele of rs6676670 (T/G) in intron 1 of REN was significantly associated with higher baseline aldosterone concentrations (p < 0.0001, explained variance (EV) = 2.3%). Significant associations after adjustments were also found between the A allele of rs2887284, with higher baseline renin activity (p = 0.022, EV = 1.0%), higher responses of renin (p = 0.018 EV = 5.4%), and higher responses of angiotensin II (p = 0.0255, EV = 3.13%) to the treatment of ACEI. The carriers of the A allele of rs2887284 appeared to be more sensitive to the ACEI treatment. rs2887284 in intron 9 of REN is associated with the response of renin and angiotensin II levels to ACEI treatment.

  14. Biotechnological applications of mobile group II introns and their reverse transcriptases: gene targeting, RNA-seq, and non-coding RNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Enyeart, Peter J; Mohr, Georg; Ellington, Andrew D; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2014-01-13

    Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons that combine the activities of an autocatalytic intron RNA (a ribozyme) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase to insert site-specifically into DNA. They recognize DNA target sites largely by base pairing of sequences within the intron RNA and achieve high DNA target specificity by using the ribozyme active site to couple correct base pairing to RNA-catalyzed intron integration. Algorithms have been developed to program the DNA target site specificity of several mobile group II introns, allowing them to be made into 'targetrons.' Targetrons function for gene targeting in a wide variety of bacteria and typically integrate at efficiencies high enough to be screened easily by colony PCR, without the need for selectable markers. Targetrons have found wide application in microbiological research, enabling gene targeting and genetic engineering of bacteria that had been intractable to other methods. Recently, a thermostable targetron has been developed for use in bacterial thermophiles, and new methods have been developed for using targetrons to position recombinase recognition sites, enabling large-scale genome-editing operations, such as deletions, inversions, insertions, and 'cut-and-pastes' (that is, translocation of large DNA segments), in a wide range of bacteria at high efficiency. Using targetrons in eukaryotes presents challenges due to the difficulties of nuclear localization and sub-optimal magnesium concentrations, although supplementation with magnesium can increase integration efficiency, and directed evolution is being employed to overcome these barriers. Finally, spurred by new methods for expressing group II intron reverse transcriptases that yield large amounts of highly active protein, thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases from bacterial thermophiles are being used as research tools for a variety of applications, including qRT-PCR and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The

  15. Metabolic Phase I (CYPs) and Phase II (GSTs) Gene Polymorphisms and Their Interaction with Environmental Factors in Nasopharyngeal Cancer from the Ethnic Population of Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Seram Anil; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2017-09-26

    Multiple genetic and environmental factors and their interaction are believed to contribute in the pathogenesis of Nasopharyngeal Cancer (NPC). We investigate the role of Metabolic Phase I (CYPs) and Phase II (GSTs) gene polymorphisms, gene-gene and gene-environmental interaction in modulating the susceptibility to NPC in Northeast India. To determine the association of metabolic gene polymorphisms and environmental habits, 123 cases and 189 controls blood/swab samples were used for PCR and confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Analysis for GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphism was done by multiplex PCR. The T3801C in the 3'- flanking region of CYP1A1 gene was detected by PCR-RFLP method. The Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The GSTM1 null genotype alone (OR = 2.76) was significantly associated with NPC risk (P < 0.0001). The combinations of GSTM1 null and GSTT1 null genotypes also higher, 3.77 fold (P < 0.0001), risk of NPC, while GSTM1 null genotype along with CYP1A1 T3801C TC + CC genotype had 3.22 (P = 0.001) fold risk. The most remarkable risk was seen among individual carrying GSTM1 null, GSTT1 null genotypes and CYP1A1 T3801C TC + CC genotypes (OR = 5.71, P = 0.001). Further; analyses demonstrate an enhanced risk of NPC in smoked meat (OR = 5.56, P < 0.0001) and fermented fish consumers (OR = 5.73, P < 0.0001) carrying GSTM1 null genotype. An elevated risk of NPC was noted in smokers (OR = 12.67, P < 0.0001) and chewers (OR = 5.68, P < 0.0001) with GSTM1 null genotype. However, smokers had the highest risk of NPC among individuals carrying GSTT1 null genotype (OR = 4.46, P = 0.001) or CYP1A1 T3801C TC + CC genotype (OR = 7.13, P < 0.0001). The association of null genotypes and mutations of metabolic neutralizing genes along with the environmental habits (tobacco smokers and chewers, smoke meat, fermented fishes) can be used as a possible biomarker for

  16. A beta1-adrenergic receptor CaM kinase II-dependent pathway mediates cardiac myocyte fetal gene induction.

    PubMed

    Sucharov, Carmen C; Mariner, Peter D; Nunley, Karin R; Long, Carlin; Leinwand, Leslie; Bristow, Michael R

    2006-09-01

    Beta-adrenergic signaling plays an important role in the natural history of dilated cardiomyopathies. Chronic activation of beta-adrenergic receptors (beta1-AR and beta2-AR) during periods of cardiac stress ultimately harms the failing heart by mechanisms that include alterations in gene expression. Here, we show that stimulation of beta-ARs with isoproterenol in neonate rat ventricular myocytes causes a "fetal" response in the relative activities of the human cardiac fetal and/or adult gene promoters that includes repression of the human and rat alpha-myosin heavy chain (alpha-MyHC) promoters with simultaneous activation of the human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and rat beta-MyHC promoters. We also show that the promoter changes correlate with changes in endogenous gene expression as measured by mRNA expression. Furthermore, we show that these changes are specifically mediated by the beta1-AR, but not the beta2-AR, and are independent of alpha1-AR stimulation. We also demonstrate that the fetal gene response is independent of cAMP and protein kinase A, whereas inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) pathway blocks isoproterenol-mediated fetal gene program induction. Finally, we show that induction of the fetal program is dependent on activation of the L-type Ca2+ channel. We conclude that in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, agonist-occupied beta1-AR mobilizes Ca2+ stores to activate fetal gene induction through cAMP independent pathways that involve CaMK.

  17. Demand theory of gene regulation. II. Quantitative application to the lactose and maltose operons of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Savageau, M A

    1998-01-01

    Induction of gene expression can be accomplished either by removing a restraining element (negative mode of control) or by providing a stimulatory element (positive mode of control). According to the demand theory of gene regulation, which was first presented in qualitative form in the 1970s, the negative mode will be selected for the control of a gene whose function is in low demand in the organism's natural environment, whereas the positive mode will be selected for the control of a gene whose function is in high demand. This theory has now been further developed in a quantitative form that reveals the importance of two key parameters: cycle time C, which is the average time for a gene to complete an ON/OFF cycle, and demand D, which is the fraction of the cycle time that the gene is ON. Here we estimate nominal values for the relevant mutation rates and growth rates and apply the quantitative demand theory to the lactose and maltose operons of Escherichia coli. The results define regions of the C vs. D plot within which selection for the wild-type regulatory mechanisms is realizable, and these in turn provide the first estimates for the minimum and maximum values of demand that are required for selection of the positive and negative modes of gene control found in these systems. The ratio of mutation rate to selection coefficient is the most relevant determinant of the realizable region for selection, and the most influential parameter is the selection coefficient that reflects the reduction in growth rate when there is superfluous expression of a gene. The quantitative theory predicts the rate and extent of selection for each mode of control. It also predicts three critical values for the cycle time. The predicted maximum value for the cycle time C is consistent with the lifetime of the host. The predicted minimum value for C is consistent with the time for transit through the intestinal tract without colonization. Finally, the theory predicts an optimum value

  18. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part II. Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy have become a major field in modern biotechnology, especially in the area of human health and fascinating developments achieved in the past decades are impressive examples of an interdisciplinary interplay between medicine, biology and engineering. Among the classical products from cells one can find viral vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and interferons, as well as recombinant therapeutic proteins. Gene therapy opens up challenging new areas. In this review, a definitions of these processes are given and fields of application and products, as well as the future prospects, are discussed.

  19. Identification of two novel mutations in the SLC25A13 gene and detection of seven mutations in 102 patients with adult-onset type II citrullinemia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kobayashi, K; Nishi, I; Horinouchi, H; Jalil, M A; Li, M X; Ushikai, M; Iijima, M; Kondo, I; Saheki, T

    2000-12-01

    Adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2) is characterized by a liver-specific deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) protein. We have recently identified the gene responsible for CTLN2, viz., SLC25A13, which encodes a calcium-binding mitochondrial carrier protein, designated citrin, and found five mutations of the SLC25A13 gene in CTLN2 patients. In the present study, we have identified two novel mutations, 1800ins1 and R605X, in SLC25A13 mRNA and the SLC25A13 gene. Diagnostic analysis for the seven mutations in 103 CTLN2 patients diagnosed by biochemical and enzymatic studies has revealed that 102 patients had one or two of the seven mutations and 93 patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes. These results indicate that CTLN2 is caused by an abnormality in the SLC25A13 gene, and that our criteria for CTLN2 before DNA diagnosis are correct. Five of 22 patients from consanguineous unions have been shown to be compound heterozygotes, suggesting a high frequency of the mutated genes. The frequency of homozygotes is calculated to be more than 1 in 20,000 from carrier detection (6 in 400 individuals tested) in the Japanese population. We have detected no cross-reactive immune materials in the liver of CTLN2 patients with any of the seven mutations by Western blot analysis with anti-human citrin antibody. From these findings, we hypothesize that CTLN2 is caused by a complete deletion of citrin, although the mechanism of ASS deficiency is still unknown.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the COX1 gene in Kluyveromyces lactis mitochondrial DNA: evidence for recent horizontal transfer of a group II intron.

    PubMed

    Hardy, C M; Clark-Walker, G D

    1991-07-01

    The cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene (COX1) in K. lactis K8 mtDNA spans 8,826 bp and contains five exons (termed E1-E5) totalling 1,602 bp that show 88% nucleotide base matching and 91% amino acid homology to the equivalent gene in S. cerevisiae. The four introns (termed K1 cox1.1-1.4) contain open reading frames encoding proteins of 786, 333, 319 and 395 amino acids respectively that potentially encode maturase enzymes. The first intron belongs to group II whereas the remaining three are group I type B. Introns K1 cox1.1, 1.3, and 1.4 are found at identical locations to introns Sc cox1.2, 1.5 a, and 1.5 b respectively from S. cerevisiae. Horizontal transfer of an intron between recent progenitors of K. lactis and S. cerevisiae is suggested by the observation that K1 cox1.1 and Sc cox1.2 show 96% base matching. Sequence comparisons between K1 cox1.3/Sc cox1.5 a and K1 cox1.4/Sc cox1.5 b suggest that these introns are likely to have been present in the ancestral COX1 gene of these yeasts. Intron K1 cox1.2 is not found in S. cerevisiae and appears at an unique location in K. lactis. A feature of the DNA sequences of the group I introns K1 cox1.2, 1.3, and 1.4 is the presence of 11 GC-rich clusters inserted into both coding and noncoding regions. Immediately downstream of the COX1 gene is the ATPase subunit 8 gene (A8) that shows 82.6% base matching to its counterpart in S. cerevisiae mtDNA.

  1. Light Regulation of the Arabidopsis Respiratory Chain. Multiple Discrete Photoreceptor Responses Contribute to Induction of Type II NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase Genes1

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Matthew A.; Franklin, Keara A.; Svensson, Å. Staffan; Salter, Michael G.; Whitelam, Garry C.; Rasmusson, Allan G.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled oxidation reactions catalyzed by the large, proton-pumping complexes of the respiratory chain generate an electrochemical gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane that is harnessed for ATP production. However, several alternative respiratory pathways in plants allow the maintenance of substrate oxidation while minimizing the production of ATP. We have investigated the role of light in the regulation of these energy-dissipating pathways by transcriptional profiling of the alternative oxidase, uncoupling protein, and type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase gene families in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings. Expression of the nda1 and ndc1 NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes was rapidly up-regulated by a broad range of light intensities and qualities. For both genes, light induction appears to be a direct transcriptional effect that is independent of carbon status. Mutant analyses demonstrated the involvement of two separate photoreceptor families in nda1 and ndc1 light regulation: the phytochromes (phyA and phyB) and an undetermined blue light photoreceptor. In the case of the nda1 gene, the different photoreceptor systems generate distinct kinetic induction profiles that are integrated in white light response. Primary transcriptional control of light response was localized to a 99-bp region of the nda1 promoter, which contains an I-box flanked by two GT-1 elements, an arrangement prevalent in the promoters of photosynthesis-associated genes. Light induction was specific to nda1 and ndc1. The only other substantial light effect observed was a decrease in aox2 expression. Overall, these results suggest that light directly influences the respiratory electron transport chain via photoreceptor-mediated transcriptional control, likely for supporting photosynthetic metabolism. PMID:15333756

  2. New data from basal Australian songbird lineages show that complex structure of MHC class II β genes has early evolutionary origins within passerines.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Shandiya; Bray, Rebecca D; Mulder, Raoul A; Sunnucks, Paul; Pavlova, Alexandra; Melville, Jane

    2016-05-21

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a crucial role in the adaptive immune system and has been extensively studied across vertebrate taxa. Although the function of MHC genes appears to be conserved across taxa, there is great variation in the number and organisation of these genes. Among avian species, for instance, there are notable differences in MHC structure between passerine and non-passerine lineages: passerines typically have a high number of highly polymorphic MHC paralogs whereas non-passerines have fewer loci and lower levels of polymorphism. Although the occurrence of highly polymorphic MHC paralogs in passerines is well documented, their evolutionary origins are relatively unexplored. The majority of studies have focussed on the more derived passerine lineages and there is very little empirical information on the diversity of the MHC in basal passerine lineages. We undertook a study of MHC diversity and evolutionary relationships across seven species from four families (Climacteridae, Maluridae, Pardalotidae, Meliphagidae) that comprise a prominent component of the basal passerine lineages. We aimed to determine if highly polymorphic MHC paralogs have an early evolutionary origin within passerines or are a more derived feature of the infraorder Passerida. We identified 177 alleles of the MHC class II β exon 2 in seven basal passerine species, with variation in numbers of alleles across individuals and species. Overall, we found evidence of multiple gene loci, pseudoalleles, trans-species polymorphism and high allelic diversity in these basal lineages. Phylogenetic reconstruction of avian lineages based on MHC class II β exon 2 sequences strongly supported the monophyletic grouping of basal and derived passerine species. Our study provides evidence of a large number of highly polymorphic MHC paralogs in seven basal passerine species, with strong similarities to the MHC described in more derived passerine lineages rather than the simpler MHC

  3. CIITA promoter I CARD-deficient mice express functional MHC class II genes in myeloid and lymphoid compartments.

    PubMed

    Zinzow-Kramer, W M; Long, A B; Youngblood, B A; Rosenthal, K M; Butler, R; Mohammed, A-U-R; Skountzou, I; Ahmed, R; Evavold, B D; Boss, J M

    2012-06-01

    Three distinct promoters control the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression, class II transactivator (CIITA), in a cell type-specific manner. Promoter I (pI) CIITA, expressed primarily by dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, expresses a unique isoform that contains a caspase-recruitment domain (CARD). The activity and function of this isoform are not understood, but are believed to enhance the function of CIITA in antigen-presenting cells. To determine whether isoform I of CIITA has specific functions, CIITA mutant mice were created in which isoform I was replaced with isoform III sequences. Mice in which pI and the CARD-encoding exon were deleted were also created. No defect in the formation of CD4 T cells, the ability to respond to a model antigen or bacterial or viral challenge was observed in mice lacking CIITA isoform I. Although CIITA and MHC-II expression was decreased in splenic DCs, pI knockout animals expressed CIITA from downstream promoters, suggesting that control of pI activity is mediated by unknown distal elements that could act at pIII, the B-cell promoter. Thus, no critical function is linked to the CARD domain of CIITA isoform I with respect to basic immune system development, function and challenge.

  4. Attenuation of corneal myofibroblast development through nanoparticle-mediated soluble transforming growth factor-β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay; Rodier, Jason T; Tandon, Ashish; Klibanov, Alexander M; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2012-01-01

    To explore (i) the potential of polyethylenimine (PEI)-DNA nanoparticles as a vector for delivering genes into human corneal fibroblasts, and (ii) whether the nanoparticle-mediated soluble extracellular domain of the transforming growth factor-β type II receptor (sTGFβRII) gene therapy could be used to reduce myofibroblasts and fibrosis in the cornea using an in vitro model. PEI-DNA nanoparticles were prepared at a nitrogen-to-phosphate ratio of 30 by mixing linear PEI and a plasmid encoding sTGFβRII conjugated to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion of human immunoglobulin. The PEI-DNA polyplex formation was confirmed through gel retardation assay. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were generated from donor corneas; myofibroblasts and fibrosis were induced with TGFβ1 (1 ng/ml) stimulation employing serum-free conditions. The sTGFβRII conjugated to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin gene was introduced into HCF using either PEI-DNA nanoparticles or Lipofectamine. Suitable negative and positive controls to compare selected nanoparticle and therapeutic gene efficiency were included. Delivered gene copies and mRNA (mRNA) expression were quantified with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and protein with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The changes in fibrosis parameters were quantified by measuring fibrosis marker α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) mRNA and protein levels with qPCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting. Cytotoxicity was determined using cellular viability, proliferation, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. PEI readily bound to plasmids to form nanoparticular polyplexes and exhibited much greater transfection efficiency (p<0.01) than the commercial reagent Lipofectamine. The PEI-DNA-treated cultures showed 4.5×10(4) plasmid copies/µg DNA in real-time qPCR and 7,030±87 pg/ml sTGFβRII protein in ELISA analyses, whereas Lipofectamine-transfected cultures demonstrated 1.9×10(3) gene copies

  5. Deletion of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene or scavenge of superoxide prevents chronic alcohol-induced aortic damage and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Tan, Yi; Wang, Bo; Miao, Xiao; Chen, Qiang; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2012-10-01

    To investigate whether chronic alcohol consumption induces vascular injury via angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor-dependent superoxide generation, male transgenic mice with knockout of AT1 gene (AT1-KO) and age-matched wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice were pair-fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli alcohol or isocaloric maltose dextrin control liquid diet for 2 months. Ethanol content (%, W/V) in the diet was 4.8 (34% of total calories) at initiation, and gradually increased up to 5.4 (38% of total calories). For some WT mice with and without alcohol treatment, superoxide dismutase mimetic (MnTMPyP) was given simultaneously by intraperitoneal injection at 5 mg/kg body weight daily for 2 months. At the end of studies, aortas were harvested for histopathological and immunohistochemical examination. Significant increases in the wall thickness and structural disarrangement of aorta were found in alcohol group, along with significant increases in aortic oxidative and/or nitrosative damage, expressions of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), inflammatory response, cell death and proliferation, and remodelling (fibrosis). However, these pathological changes were completely attenuated in alcohol-treated AT1-KO mice or in alcohol-treated WT mice that were also simultaneously treated with MnTMPyP for 2 months. These results suggest that chronic alcohol consumption may activate NOX via Ang II/AT1 receptor, to generate superoxide and associated peroxynitrite that in turn causes aortic nitrosative damage, inflammation, cell death and proliferation, and remodelling. Therefore, blocking Ang II/AT1 system or scavenging superoxide may become a potential preventive and/therapeutic approach to alcoholic vascular damage. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II as a new marker gene to study assemblages of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the field.

    PubMed

    Stockinger, Herbert; Peyret-Guzzon, Marine; Koegel, Sally; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Redecker, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Due to the potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota) to improve plant growth and soil quality, the influence of agricultural practice on their diversity continues to be an important research question. Up to now studies of community diversity in AMF have exclusively been based on nuclear ribosomal gene regions, which in AMF show high intra-organism polymorphism, seriously complicating interpretation of these data. We designed specific PCR primers for 454 sequencing of a region of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II gene, and established a new reference dataset comprising all major AMF lineages. This gene is known to be monomorphic within fungal isolates but shows an excellent barcode gap between species. We designed a primer set to amplify all known lineages of AMF and demonstrated its applicability in combination with high-throughput sequencing in a long-term tillage experiment. The PCR primers showed a specificity of 99.94% for glomeromycotan sequences. We found evidence of significant shifts of the AMF communities caused by soil management and showed that tillage effects on different AMF taxa are clearly more complex than previously thought. The high resolving power of high-throughput sequencing highlights the need for quantitative measurements to efficiently detect these effects.

  7. Production of dammarane-type sapogenins in rice by expressing the dammarenediol-II synthase gene from Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Lin, Juncheng; Cheng, Zuxin; Xu, Ming; Huang, Xinying; Yang, Zhijian; Zheng, Jingui

    2015-10-01

    Ginsenosides are the main active ingredients in Chinese medicinal ginseng; 2,3-oxidosqualene is a precursor metabolite to ginsenosides that is present in rice. Because rice lacks a key rate-limiting enzyme (dammarenediol-II synthase, DS), rice cannot synthesize dammarane-type ginsenosides. In this study, the ginseng (Panax ginseng CA Mey.) DS gene (GenBank: AB265170.1) was transformed into rice using agrobacterium, and 64 rice transgenic plants were produced. The Transfer-DNA (T-DNA) insertion sites in homozygous lines of the T2 generation were determined by using high-efficiency thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (hiTAIL-PCR) and differed in all tested lines. One to two copies of the T-DNA were present in each transformant, and real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the transformed DS gene could be transcribed and highly expressed. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that the dammarane-type sapogenin 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) content was 0.35-0.59 mg/g dw and the dammarane-type sapogenin 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT) content was 0.23-0.43 mg/g dw in the transgenic rice. LC/MS analysis confirmed production of PPD and PPT. These results indicate that a new "ginseng rice" germplasm containing dammarane-type sapogenins has been successfully developed by transforming the ginseng DS gene into rice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The chloroplast tRNALys(UUU) gene from mustard (Sinapis alba) contains a class II intron potentially coding for a maturase-related polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, H; Link, G

    1987-01-01

    The trnK gene endocing the tRNALys(UUU) has been located on mustard (Sinapis alba) chloroplast DNA, 263 bp upstream of the psbA gene on the same strand. The nucleotide sequence of the trnK gene and its flanking regions as well as the putative transcription start and termination sites are shown. The 5' end of the transcript lies 121 bp upstream of the 5' tRNA coding region and is preceded by procaryotic-type "-10" and "-35" sequence elements, while the 3' end maps 2.77 kb downstream to a DNA region with possible stemloop secondary structure. The anticodon loop of the tRNALys is interrupted by a 2,574 bp intron containing a long open reading frame, which codes for 524 amino acids. Based on conserved stem and loop structures, this intron has characteristic features of a class II intron. A region near the carboxyl terminus of the derived polypeptide appears structurally related to maturases.

  9. Genetic variants in IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and adiponectin genes and colon cancer risk in African Americans and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Keku, Temitope O.; Vidal, Adriana; Oliver, Shannon; Hoyo, Catherine; Hall, Ingrid J.; Omofoye, Seun; McDoom, Maya; Worley, Kendra; Galanko, Joseph; Sandler, Robert S.; Millikan, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluating genetic susceptibility may clarify effects of known environmental factors and also identify individuals at high risk. We evaluated the association of four insulin-related pathway gene polymorphisms in insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I) (CA)n repeat, insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-II) (rs680), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) (rs2854744), and adiponectin (APM1 rs1501299) with colon cancer risk, as well as relationships with circulating IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3, and C-peptide in a population-based study. Methods Participants were African Americans (231cases, 306 controls) and Whites (297 cases, 530 controls). Consenting subjects provided blood specimens, and lifestyle/diet information. Genotyping for all genes except IGF-I was performed by the 5′-exonuclease (Taqman) assay. The IGF-I (CA)n repeat was assayed by PCR, and fragment analysis. Circulating proteins were measured by enzyme immunoassays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by logistic regression. Results The IGF-I (CA)19 repeat was higher in White controls (50%) than African American controls (31%). Whites homozygous for the IGF-I (CA)19 repeat had a nearly two fold increase in risk of colon cancer (OR=1.77; 95%CI=1.15–2.73), but not African Americans (OR= 0.73, 95%CI 0.50–1.51). We observed an inverse association between the IGF-II Apa1 A-variant and colon cancer risk (OR= 0.49, 95%CI 0.28–0.88) in Whites only. Carrying the IGFBP-3 variant alleles was associated with lower IGFBP-3 protein levels, a difference most pronounced in Whites (p- trend < 0.05). Conclusions These results support an association between insulin pathway-related genes and elevated colon cancer risk in Whites but not in African Americans. PMID:22565227

  10. Genetic variants within obesity-related genes are associated with tumor recurrence in patients with stages II/III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Sebio, Ana; Gerger, Armin; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Yang, Dongyun; Zhang, Wu; Stremitzer, Stefan; Stintzing, Sebastian; Sunakawa, Yu; Yamauchi, Shinichi; Ning, Yan; Fujimoto, Yoshiya; Ueno, Masashi; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and it is also linked to CRC recurrence and survival. Polymorphisms located in obesity-related genes are associated with an increased risk of developing several cancer types including CRC. We evaluated whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms in obesity-related genes may predict tumor recurrence in colon cancer patients. Genotypes were obtained from germline DNA from 207 patients with stage II or III colon cancer at the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Nine polymorphisms in eight obesity-related genes (PPAR, LEP, NFKB, CD36, DRG1, NGAL, REGIA, and DSCR1) were evaluated. The primary endpoint of the study was the 3-year recurrence rate. Positive associations were also tested in an independent Japanese cohort of 350 stage III CRC patients. In univariate analysis, for PPARrs1801282, patients with a CC genotype had significantly lower recurrence probability (29 ± 4% SE) compared with patients with a CG genotype (48 ± 8% SE) [hazard ratio (HR): 1.77; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-3.10; P = 0.040]. For DSCR1rs6517239, patients with an AA genotype had higher recurrence probability than patients carrying at least one allele G (37 ± 4% SE vs. 15 ± 6% SE) (HR: 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.94; P = 0.027). This association was stronger in the patients bearing a left-sided tumor (HR: 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13-0.88; P = 0.018). In the Japanese cohort, no associations were found. This hypothesis-generating study suggests a potential influence of polymorphisms within obesity-related genes in the recurrence probability of colon cancer. These interesting results should be evaluated further.

  11. HCV proteins and immunoglobulin variable gene (IgV) subfamilies in HCV-induced type II mixed cryoglobulinemia: a concurrent pathogenetic role.

    PubMed

    Sautto, Giuseppe; Mancini, Nicasio; Solforosi, Laura; Diotti, Roberta A; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII) is well established, but the role played by distinct HCV proteins and by specific components of the anti-HCV humoral immune response remains to be clearly defined. It is widely accepted that HCV drives the expansion of few B-cell clones expressing a restricted pool of selected immunoglobulin variable (IgV) gene subfamilies frequently endowed with rheumatoid factor (RF) activity. Moreover, the same IgV subfamilies are frequently observed in HCV-transformed malignant B-cell clones occasionally complicating MCII. In this paper, we analyze both the humoral and viral counterparts at the basis of cryoglobulins production in HCV-induced MCII, with particular attention reserved to the single IgV subfamilies most frequently involved.

  12. HCV Proteins and Immunoglobulin Variable Gene (IgV) Subfamilies in HCV-Induced Type II Mixed Cryoglobulinemia: A Concurrent Pathogenetic Role

    PubMed Central

    Sautto, Giuseppe; Mancini, Nicasio; Solforosi, Laura; Diotti, Roberta A.; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (MCII) is well established, but the role played by distinct HCV proteins and by specific components of the anti-HCV humoral immune response remains to be clearly defined. It is widely accepted that HCV drives the expansion of few B-cell clones expressing a restricted pool of selected immunoglobulin variable (IgV) gene subfamilies frequently endowed with rheumatoid factor (RF) activity. Moreover, the same IgV subfamilies are frequently observed in HCV-transformed malignant B-cell clones occasionally complicating MCII. In this paper, we analyze both the humoral and viral counterparts at the basis of cryoglobulins production in HCV-induced MCII, with particular attention reserved to the single IgV subfamilies most frequently involved. PMID:22690241

  13. Stat5-mediated regulation of the human type II 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta5-delta4 isomerase gene: activation by prolactin.

    PubMed

    Feltus, F A; Groner, B; Melner, M H

    1999-07-01

    Altered PRL levels are associated with infertility in women. Molecular targets at which PRL elicits these effects have yet to be determined. These studies demonstrate transcriptional regulation by PRL of the gene encoding the final enzymatic step in progesterone biosynthesis: 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta5-delta4 isomerase (3beta-HSD). A 9/9 match with the consensus Stat5 response element was identified at -110 to -118 in the human Type II 3beta-HSD promoter. 3beta-HSD chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter constructs containing either an intact or mutated Stat5 element were tested for PRL activation. Expression vectors for Stat5 and the PRL receptor were cotransfected with a -300 --> +45 3beta-HSD CAT reporter construct into HeLa cells, which resulted in a 21-fold increase in reporter activity in the presence of PRL. Promoter activity showed an increased response with a stepwise elevation of transfected Stat5 expression or by treatment with increasing concentrations of PRL (max, 250 ng/ml). This effect was dramatically reduced when the putative Stat5 response element was removed by 5'-deletion of the promoter or by the introduction of a 3-bp mutation into critical nucleotides in the element. Furthermore, 32P-labeled promoter fragments containing the Stat5 element were shifted in electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments using nuclear extracts from cells treated with PRL, and this complex was supershifted with antibodies to Stat5. These results demonstrate that PRL has the ability to regulate expression of a key human enzyme gene (type II 3beta-HSD) in the progesterone biosynthetic pathway, which is essential for maintaining pregnancy.

  14. A standardised challenge model with an enterotoxigenic F4+ Escherichia coli strain in piglets assessing clinical traits and faecal shedding of fae and est-II toxin genes.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Franz; Vahjen, Wilfried; Pieper, Robert; Martinez-Vallespin, Beatriz; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of five feed additives on post weaning diarrhoea (PWD) in piglets challenged 3 d after weaning with an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain (ETEC). In three experimental runs, a total of 84 piglets was weaned at 21 days of age and randomly assigned to seven treatments. As dietary treatment, piglets were fed a basal diet or diets with addition of bovine colostrum (0.2%), pineapple stem extract containing bromelain (0.2%), an autolysed yeast preparation (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (0.1%), a combination of organic acids (0.7%) and a phytogenic product with thyme essential oil (0.015%). A porcine ETEC, serotype O149:K91:K88ac was given twice via oral infection on day 3 after weaning at 10(10) colony forming units/animal. One group of piglets was fed the basal diet without ETEC challenge. Traits included clinical sores, body temperature, faecal scoring and determination of faecal dry matter and the shedding of fae and est-II ETEC toxin genes. After weaning, non-challenged control piglets did not show signs of diarrhoea or impaired health, while the majority of infected piglets had a drop in body temperature, signs of diarrhoea and impaired general health. Mortality, the decrease of faecal dry matter and shedding of the toxin genes fae and est-II were not affected by the different additives. In conclusion, the ETEC challenge model induced distinct clinical signs of PWD in piglets, but the tested feed additives had no preventive effect under these conditions.

  15. Inversin, the gene product mutated in nephronophthisis type II, functions as a molecular switch between Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Matias; Gloy, Joachim; Ganner, Athina; Bullerkotte, Axel; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Krönig, Corinna; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Cabello, Olga A; Jenny, Andreas; Mlodzik, Marek; Polok, Bozena; Driever, Wolfgang; Obara, Tomoko; Walz, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Cystic renal diseases are caused by mutations of proteins that share a unique subcellular localization: the primary cilium of tubular epithelial cells1. Mutations of the ciliary protein inversin cause nephronophthisis type II, an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease characterized by extensive renal cysts, situs inversus and renal failure2. Here we report that inversin acts as a molecular switch between different Wnt signaling cascades. Inversin inhibits the canonical Wnt pathway by targeting cytoplasmic dishevelled (Dsh or Dvl1) for degradation; concomitantly, it is required for convergent extension movements in gastrulating Xenopus laevis embryos and elongation of animal cap explants, both regulated by noncanonical Wnt signaling. In zebrafish, the structurally related switch molecule diversin ameliorates renal cysts caused by the depletion of inversin, implying that an inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling is required for normal renal development. Fluid flow increases inversin levels in ciliated tubular epithelial cells and seems to regulate this crucial switch between Wnt signaling pathways during renal development. PMID:15852005

  16. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Gene and Newcastle Disease Virus Titre and Body Weight in Leung Hang Khao Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Molee, A.; Kongroi, K.; Kuadsantia, P.; Poompramun, C.; Likitdecharote, B.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II gene on resistance to Newcastle disease virus and body weight of the Thai indigenous chicken, Leung Hang Khao (Gallus gallus domesticus). Blood samples were collected for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis from 485 chickens. Polymerase chain reaction sequencing was used to classify single nucleotide polymorphisms of class II MHC. Body weights were measured at the ages of 3, 4, 5, and 7 months. Titres of Newcastle disease virus at 2 weeks to 7 months were determined and the correlation between body weight and titre was analysed. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and body weight and titre were analysed by a generalized linear model. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified: C125T, A126T, C209G, C242T, A243T, C244T, and A254T. Significant correlations between log titre and body weight were found at 2 and 4 weeks. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms and titre were found for C209G and A254T, and between all single nucleotide polymorphisms (except A243T) and body weight. The results showed that class II MHC is associated with both titre of Newcastle disease virus and body weight in Leung Hang Khao chickens. This is of concern because improved growth traits are the main goal of breeding selection. Moreover, the results suggested that MHC has a pleiotropic effect on the titre and growth performance. This mechanism should be investigated in a future study. PMID:26732325

  17. Changes in protein and gene expression of angiotensin II receptors (AT1 and AT2) in aorta of diabetic and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Romero-Nava, R; Rodriguez, J E; Reséndiz-Albor, A A; Sánchez-Muñoz, F; Ruiz-Hernandéz, A; Huang, F; Hong, E; Villafaña, S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and hypertension have been associated with cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Some reports have related the coexistence of hypertension and diabetes with increase in the risk of developing vascular complications. Recently some studies have shown results suggesting that in the early stages of diabetes and hypertension exist a reduced functional response to vasopressor agents like angiotensin II (Ang II), which plays an important role in blood pressure regulation mechanism through the activation of its AT1 and AT2 receptors. For that reason, the aim of this work was to study the gene and protein expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors in aorta of diabetic SHR and WKY rats. Diabetes was induced by the administration of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg i.p.). After 4 weeks of the onset of diabetes, the protein expression was obtained by western blot and the mRNA expression by RT-PCR. Our results showed that the hypertensive rats have a higher mRNA and protein expression of AT1 receptors than normotensive rats while the AT2 expression remained unchanged. On the other hand, the combination of diabetes and hypertension increased the mRNA and protein expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors significantly. In conclusion, our results suggest that diabetes with hypertension modifies the mRNA and protein expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors. However, the overexpression of AT2 could be associated with the reduction in the response to Ang II in the early stage of diabetes.

  18. Analysis of Gln223Agr polymorphism of Leptin Receptor Gene in type II diabetic mellitus subjects among Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Pishva, Seyyed Reza; Heidari, Farzad; Aziz, Ahmad Fazli Abdul; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Mohamed; Pei, Chong Pei; Ismail, Patimah

    2013-09-18

    Leptin is known as the adipose peptide hormone. It plays an important role in the regulation of body fat and inhibits food intake by its action. Moreover, it is believed that leptin level deductions might be the cause of obesity and may play an important role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM), as well as in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The Leptin Receptor (LEPR) gene and its polymorphisms have not been extensively studied in relation to the T2DM and its complications in various populations. In this study, we have determined the association of Gln223Agr loci of LEPR gene in three ethnic groups of Malaysia, namely: Malays, Chinese and Indians. A total of 284 T2DM subjects and 281 healthy individuals were recruited based on International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. Genomic DNA was extracted from the buccal specimens of the subjects. The commercial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was carried out by proper restriction enzyme MSP I to both amplify and digest the Gln223Agr polymorphism. The p-value among the three studied races was 0.057, 0.011 and 0.095, respectively. The values such as age, WHR, FPG, HbA1C, LDL, HDL, Chol and Family History were significantly different among the subjects with Gln223Agr polymorphism of LEPR (p < 0.05).

  19. Point mutation in the MITF gene causing Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation Indian family.

    PubMed

    Lalwani, A K; Attaie, A; Randolph, F T; Deshmukh, D; Wang, C; Mhatre, A; Wilcox, E

    1998-12-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant neural crest cell disorder phenotypically characterized by hearing impairment and disturbance of pigmentation. A presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1, caused by loss of function mutation in the PAX3 gene. In contrast, type 2 WS (WS2) is characterized by normally placed medial canthi and is genetically heterogeneous; mutations in MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report on a three-generation Indian family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. This mutation, initially reported in a Northern European family, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking the HLH-Zip or Zip structure necessary for normal interaction with its target DNA motif. Comparison of the phenotype between the two families demonstrates a significant difference in pigmentary disturbance of the eye. This family, with the first documented case of two unrelated WS2 families harboring identical mutations, provides additional evidence for the importance of genetic background on the clinical phenotype.

  20. HLA class II and TNF genes in African Americans from the Southeastern United States: regional differences in allele frequencies.

    PubMed

    Kuffner, Tamara; Whitworth, William; Jairam, Maya; McNicholl, Janet

    2003-06-01

    Knowledge of population major histocompatibility complex gene frequencies is important for construction of organ donor pools and for studies of disease association. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 (HLA-DRB1), HLA-DQB1, and TNFalpha -308 (G-A) promoter genetic typing was performed in 112 healthy, unrelated African Americans (AAs) from the southeastern United States. Allele frequencies were compared with published frequency data from other AA populations. Our AA population had the highest frequency of HLA- DRB1*09 (6.7%) reported in any AA population. The frequency of the TNF alpha -308A polymorphism was also high (14.4%), when compared with published frequencies in AAs. Significant regional differences in the distribution of most HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles were observed in all AA populations examined. The AA HLA-DRB1 and -DQB1 frequencies also differed from published Caucasian frequencies. This is the first report describing the distribution of TNF alpha promoter alleles in the Southeastern United States. The high DRB1*09 and TNF alpha -308A allele frequencies of our population most resemble the frequencies of these alleles in certain West African populations. These varying major histocompatibility complex gene frequencies may reflect different regional population structures among AAs in the United States, which may be due to differences in ancestral origins, migration, and racial admixture.

  1. CO2 induced seawater acidification impacts sea urchin larval development II: gene expression patterns in pluteus larvae.

    PubMed

    Stumpp, M; Dupont, S; Thorndyke, M C; Melzner, F

    2011-11-01

    Extensive use of fossil fuels is leading to increasing CO(2) concentrations in the atmosphere and causes changes in the carbonate chemistry of the oceans which represents a major sink for anthropogenic CO(2). As a result, the oceans' surface pH is expected to decrease by ca. 0.4 units by the year 2100, a major change with potentially negative consequences for some marine species. Because of their carbonate skeleton, sea urchins and their larval stages are regarded as likely to be one of the more sensitive taxa. In order to investigate sensitivity of pre-feeding (2 days post-fertilization) and feeding (4 and 7 days post-fertilization) pluteus larvae, we raised Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos in control (pH 8.1 and pCO(2) 41 Pa e.g. 399 μatm) and CO(2) acidified seawater with pH of 7.7 (pCO(2) 134 Pa e.g. 1318 μatm) and investigated growth, calcification and survival. At three time points (day 2, day 4 and day 7 post-fertilization), we measured the expression of 26 representative genes important for metabolism, calcification and ion regulation using RT-qPCR. After one week of development, we observed a significant difference in growth. Maximum differences in size were detected at day 4 (ca. 10% reduction in body length). A comparison of gene expression patterns using PCA and ANOSIM clearly distinguished between the different age groups (two-way ANOSIM: Global R=1) while acidification effects were less pronounced (Global R=0.518). Significant differences in gene expression patterns (ANOSIM R=0.938, SIMPER: 4.3% difference) were also detected at day 4 leading to the hypothesis that differences between CO(2) treatments could reflect patterns of expression seen in control experiments of a younger larva and thus a developmental artifact rather than a direct CO(2) effect. We found an up regulation of metabolic genes (between 10%and 20% in ATP-synthase, citrate synthase, pyruvate kinase and thiolase at day 4) and down regulation of calcification related genes

  2. Molecular characterization of a gene POLR2H encoded an essential subunit for RNA polymerase II from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda Melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Du, Yu-Jie; Hou, Yi-Ling; Hou, Wan-Ru

    2013-02-01

    The Giant Panda is an endangered and valuable gene pool in genetic, its important functional gene POLR2H encodes an essential shared peptide H of RNA polymerases. The genomic DNA and cDNA sequences were cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) adopting touchdown-PCR and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. The length of the genomic sequence of the Giant Panda is 3,285 bp, including five exons and four introns. The cDNA fragment cloned is 509 bp in length, containing an open reading frame of 453 bp encoding 150 amino acids. Alignment analysis indicated that both the cDNA and its deduced amino acid sequence were highly conserved. Protein structure prediction showed that there was one protein kinase C phosphorylation site, four casein kinase II phosphorylation sites and one amidation site in the POLR2H protein, further shaping advanced protein structure. The cDNA cloned was expressed in Escherichia coli, which indicated that POLR2H fusion with the N-terminally His-tagged form brought about the accumulation of an expected 20.5 kDa polypeptide in line with the predicted protein. On the basis of what has already been achieved in this study, further deep-in research will be conducted, which has great value in theory and practical significance.

  3. ANG II receptor subtype 1a gene knockdown in the subfornical organ prevents increased drinking behavior in bile duct-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Walch, Joseph D; Nedungadi, T Prashant; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2014-09-15

    Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes congestive liver failure that initiates hemodynamic changes, resulting in dilutional hyponatremia due to increased water intake and vasopressin release. This project tested the hypothesis that angiotensin signaling at the subfornical organ (SFO) augments drinking behavior in BDL rats. A genetically modified adeno-associated virus containing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for ANG II receptor subtype 1a (AT1aR) gene was microinjected into the SFO of rats to knock down expression. Two weeks later, BDL or sham surgery was performed. Rats were housed in metabolic chambers for measurement of fluid and food intake and urine output. The rats were euthanized 28 days after BDL surgery for analysis. A group of rats was perfused for immunohistochemistry, and a second group was used for laser-capture microdissection for analysis of SFO AT1aR gene expression. BDL rats showed increased water intake that was attenuated in rats that received SFO microinjection of AT1aR shRNA. Among BDL rats treated with scrambled (control) and AT1aR shRNA, we observed an increased number of vasopressin-positive cells in the supraoptic nucleus that colocalized with ΔFosB staining, suggesting increased vasopressin release in both groups. These results indicate that angiotensin signaling through the SFO contributes to increased water intake, but not dilutional hyponatremia, during congestive liver failure. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Partial IGF-1 deficiency is sufficient to reduce heart contractibility, angiotensin II sensibility, and alter gene expression of structural and functional cardiac proteins.

    PubMed

    González-Guerra, José Luis; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; Aguirre, Gabriel A; Muñoz, Úrsula; Martín-Estal, Irene; Ávila-Gallego, Elena; Granado, Miriam; Puche, Juan E; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2017-01-01

    Circulating levels of IGF-1 may decrease under several circumstances like ageing, metabolic syndrome, and advanced cirrhosis. This reduction is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, progression to type 2 diabetes, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, underlying mechanisms between IGF-1 deficiency and cardiovascular disease remain elusive. The specific aim of the present work was to study whether the partial IGF-1 deficiency influences heart and/or coronary circulation, comparing vasoactive factors before and after of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). In addition, histology of the heart was performed together with cardiac gene expression for proteins involved in structure and function (extracellular matrix, contractile proteins, active peptides); carried out using microarrays, followed by RT-qPCR confirmation of the three experimental groups. IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated to a reduction in contractility and angiotensin II sensitivity, interstitial fibrosis as well as altered expression pattern of genes involved in extracellular matrix proteins, calcium dynamics, and cardiac structure and function. Although this work is descriptive, it provides a clear insight of the impact that partial IGF-1 deficiency on the heart and establishes this experimental model as suitable for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and exploring therapeutic options for patients under IGF-1 deficiency conditions.

  5. Partial IGF-1 deficiency is sufficient to reduce heart contractibility, angiotensin II sensibility, and alter gene expression of structural and functional cardiac proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Gabriel A.; Muñoz, Úrsula; Martín-Estal, Irene; Ávila-Gallego, Elena; Granado, Miriam; Puche, Juan E.; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2017-01-01

    Circulating levels of IGF-1 may decrease under several circumstances like ageing, metabolic syndrome, and advanced cirrhosis. This reduction is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, progression to type 2 diabetes, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, underlying mechanisms between IGF-1 deficiency and cardiovascular disease remain elusive. The specific aim of the present work was to study whether the partial IGF-1 deficiency influences heart and/or coronary circulation, comparing vasoactive factors before and after of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). In addition, histology of the heart was performed together with cardiac gene expression for proteins involved in structure and function (extracellular matrix, contractile proteins, active peptides); carried out using microarrays, followed by RT-qPCR confirmation of the three experimental groups. IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated to a reduction in contractility and angiotensin II sensitivity, interstitial fibrosis as well as altered expression pattern of genes involved in extracellular matrix proteins, calcium dynamics, and cardiac structure and function. Although this work is descriptive, it provides a clear insight of the impact that partial IGF-1 deficiency on the heart and establishes this experimental model as suitable for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and exploring therapeutic options for patients under IGF-1 deficiency conditions. PMID:28806738

  6. Polymorphisms in the Wilms Tumor Gene Are Associated With Interindividual Variations in Rubella Virus-Specific Cellular Immunity After Measles-Mumps-Rubella II Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Emily A; Haralambieva, Iana H; Larrabee, Beth L; Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Schaid, Daniel J; Poland, Gregory A

    2018-01-30

    Rubella vaccination induces widely variable immune responses in vaccine recipients. While rubella vaccination is effective at inducing immunity to rubella infection in most subjects, up to 5% of individuals do not achieve or maintain long-term protective immunity. To expand upon our previous work identifying genetic polymorphisms that are associated with these interindividual differences in humoral immunity to rubella virus, we performed a genome-wide association study in a large cohort of 1843 subjects to discover single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with rubella virus-specific cellular immune responses. We identified SNPs in the Wilms tumor protein gene (WT1) that were significantly associated (P < 5 × 10-8) with interindividual variations in rubella-specific interleukin 6 secretion from subjects' peripheral blood mononuclear cells postvaccination. No SNPs were found to be significantly associated with variations in rubella-specific interferon-γ secretion. Our findings demonstrate that genetic polymorphisms in the WT1 gene in subjects of European ancestry are associated with interindividual differences in rubella virus-specific cellular immunity after measles-mumps-rubella II vaccination. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Evaluation of gene expression in pigs selected for enhanced reproduction using differential display PCR: II. Anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Bertani, G R; Gladney, C D; Johnson, R K; Pomp, D

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify differentially expressed genes in the anterior pituitary (AP) of sows selected for enhanced reproductive phenotypes. Selection in the Index (I) line was based on an index of ovulation rate and embryo survival, whereas random selection was used in the Control (C) line. Average numbers of fully formed piglets at birth were 12.5 +/- 1.5 and 9.9 +/- 2.0 for Line I and C sows used in this study, respectively. In order to induce luteolysis and synchronize follicle development, sows were injected (i.m.) with 2 mL of prostaglandin F2alpha analog between d 12 and 14 of the estrous cycle. Tissue was harvested 2 d (d2) or 4 d (d4) after injection, resulting in four experimental groups: Cd2 (n = 6), Cd4 (n = 4), Id2 (n = 6), and Id4 (n = 7). Differential display PCR (ddPCR) was used to search for transcriptional changes between selection lines in the AP, using samples within line but pooled across days. Northern hybridization was used to confirm ddPCR results. For ddPCR, two pools were used from each line (C and I). Three genes were confirmed to be differentially expressed between Lines I and C: G-beta like protein, ferritin heavy-chain, and follicle stimulating hormone beta subunit, whereas many other expressed sequence tags were observed to be differentially expressed but still require confirmation. Our findings indicate that long-term selection to increase ovulation rate and decrease embryo mortality has altered transcriptional patterns in the anterior pituitary, most likely as correlated responses.

  8. Mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes activate aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR and induce CYP1A genes expression in human hepatocytes and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kubešová, Kateřina; Dořičáková, Aneta; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2016-07-25

    The effects of four copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui1)(L)]NO3·H2O (1-3) and [Cu(qui2)(phen)]NO3 (4), where qui1=2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, Hqui2=2-(4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-propyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone-7-carboxamide, L=1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (1), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (2), bathophenanthroline (bphen) (3), on transcriptional activities of steroid receptors, nuclear receptors and xenoreceptors have been studied. The complexes (1-4) did not influence basal or ligand-inducible activities of glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor, thyroid receptor, pregnane X receptor and vitamin D receptor, as revealed by gene reporter assays. The complexes 1 and 2 dose-dependently induced luciferase activity in stable gene reporter AZ-AhR cell line, and this induction was reverted by resveratrol, indicating involvement of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in the process. The complexes 1, 2 and 3 induced CYP1A1 mRNA in LS180 cells and CYP1A1/CYP1A2 in human hepatocytes through AhR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay EMSA showed that the complexes 1 and 2 transformed AhR in its DNA-binding form. Collectively, we demonstrate that the complexes 1 and 2 activate AhR and induce AhR-dependent genes in human hepatocytes and cancer cell lines. In conclusion, the data presented here might be of toxicological importance, regarding the multiple roles of AhR in human physiology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Topoisomerase II alpha gene copy loss has adverse prognostic significance in ERBB2-amplified breast cancer: a retrospective study of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens and medical charts

    PubMed Central

    Usha, Lydia; Tabesh, Bita; Morrison, Larry E; Rao, Ruta D; Jacobson, Kris; Zhu, April; Basu, Sanjib; Coon, John S

    2008-01-01

    Background Amplification of the ERBB2 (Her-2/neu) oncogene, which occurs in approximately 25% of breast carcinomas, is a known negative prognostic factor. Available data indicate that a variable number of nearby genes on chromosome 17q may be co-amplified or deleted, forming a continuous amplicon of variable size. In approximately 25% of these patients, the amplicon extends to the gene for topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A), a target for anthracyclines. We sought to understand the significance of these associated genomic changes for breast cancer prognosis and predicting response to therapy. Methods and patients Archival tissue samples from 63 breast cancer patients with ERBB2 amplification, stages 0–IV, were previously analyzed with FISH probes for genes located near ERBB2. In the present study, the clinical outcome data were determined for all patients presenting at stages I–III for whom adequate clinical follow up was available. Results Four amplicon patterns (Classes) were identified. These were significantly associated with the clinical outcome, specifically, recurrence of breast cancer. The Amplicon class IV with deleted TOP2A had 67% (6/9) cases with recurrence, whereas the other three classes combined had only 12% (3/25) cases (p-value = 0.004) at the time of last follow-up. TOP2A deletion was also significantly associated with time to recurrence (p-value = 0.0002). After adjusting for age in Cox regression analysis, the association between TOP2A deletion and time to recurrence remains strongly significant (p-value = 0.002) whereas the association with survival is marginally significant (p-value = 0.06). Conclusion TOP2A deletion is associated with poor prognosis in ERBB2-amplified breast carcinomas. Clarification of the mechanism of this association will require additional study. PMID:18702822

  10. Gene signatures and expression of miRNAs associated with efficacy of panitumumab in a head and neck cancer phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Siano, Marco; Espeli, Vittoria; Mach, Nicolas; Bossi, Paolo; Licitra, Lisa; Ghielmini, Michele; Frattini, Milo; Canevari, Silvana; De Cecco, Loris

    2018-07-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy plus the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) cetuximab is used to treat recurrent/metastatic (RM) head-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Recently, we defined Cluster3 gene-expression signature as a potential predictor of favorable progression-free survival (PFS) in cetuximab-treated RM-HNSCC patients and predictor of partial metabolic FDG-PET response in an afatinib window-of-opportunity trial. Another anti-EGFR-mAb (panitumumab) was used as the treatment agent in RM-HNSCC patients in the phase II PANI01trial. PANI01 tumor samples were analyzed using functional genomics to explore response predictors to anti-EGFR therapy. Whole-gene expression and real-time PCR analyses were applied to pre-treatment samples from 25 PANI01 patients. Three gene signatures (Cluster3 score, RAS onco-signature, microenvironment score) and seven selected miRNAs were separately analyzed for association with panitumumab efficacy. Cluster3 expression levels had a profile with a significant bimodal separation of samples (P =  3.08 E-13). Higher RAS activation, microenvironment score, and miRNA expression were associated with low-Cluster3 patients. The same biomarkers were separately associated with PFS. Patients with high-Cluster3 had significantly longer PFS than patients with low-Cluster3 (median PFS: 174 versus 51 days; log-rank P = 0.0021). ROC analysis demonstrated accuracy in predicting PFS (AUC = 0.877). Despite differences in clinical settings and anti-EGFR inhibitors used for treatment, response prediction by the Cluster3 signature and selected miRNAs was essentially the same. Translation into a useful clinical assay requires validation in a broader setting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Purifying Selection and Birth-and-Death Evolution in the Class II Hydrophobin Gene Families of the Ascomycete Trichoderma/Hypocrea

    SciTech Connect

    kubicek, Christian P.; Baker, Scott E.; Gamauf, Christian

    2008-01-10

    Hydrophobins are proteins containing eight conserved cysteine residues that occur uniquely in mycelial fungi, where their main function is to confer hydrophobicity to fungal surfaces in contact with air and during attachment of hyphae to hydrophobic surfaces of hosts, symbiotic partners or of themselves resulting in morphogenetic signals. Based on their hydropathy patterns and their solubility characteristics, they are classified in class I and class II hydrophobins, the latter being found only in ascomycetes. Here we have investigated the mechanisms driving the evolution of the class II hydrophobins in nine species of the mycoparasitic ascomycetous genus Trichoderma/Hypocrea, using three fullymore » sequenced genomes (H. jecorina=T. reesei, H. atroviridis=T. atroviride; H. virens=T. virens) and a total of 14.000 ESTs of six others (T. asperellum, H. lixii=T. harzianum, T. aggressivum var. europeae, T. longibrachiatum, T. cf. viride). The former three contained six, ten and nine members, which is the highest number found in any other ascomycete so far. They all showed the conserved four beta-strands/one helix structure, which is stabilized by four disulfide bonds. In addition, a small number of these HFBs contained an extended N-terminus rich in either praline and aspartate, or glycine-asparagine. Phylogenetic analysis reveals a mosaic of terminal clades contain duplicated genes and shows only three reasonably supported clades. Calculation of the ratio of differences in synonymous vs. non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions provides evidence for strong purifying selection (KS/Ka >> 1). A genome database search for class II HFBs from other ascomycetes retrieved a much smaller number of hydrophobins (2-4) from each species, and most of them were from Pyrenomycetes. A combined phylogeny of these sequences with those of Trichoderma showed that the Trichoderma HFBs mostly formed their own clades, whereas those of other pyrenomycetes occured in shared clades. Our study

  12. The Arabidopsis Mediator Complex Subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 Regulate Mediator and RNA Polymerase II Recruitment to CBF-Responsive Cold-Regulated Genes[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Piers A.; Hurst, Charlotte H.; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R.; De Cothi, Elizabeth A.; Steele, John F.; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation–induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature–induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  13. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein Beta-2 is involved in growth hormone-regulated insulin-like growth factor-II gene expression in the liver of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously, we showed that levels of different CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) mRNAs in the liver of rainbow trout were modulated by GH and suggested that C/EBPs might be involved in GH induced IGF-II gene expression. As a step toward further investigation, we have developed monospecific poly...

  14. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD genemore » region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.« less

  15. Effects of aerobic exercise training on ACE and ADRB2 gene expression, plasma angiotensin II level, and flow-mediated dilation: a study on obese postmenopausal women with prehypertension.

    PubMed

    Azadpour, Noushin; Tartibian, Bakhtyar; Koşar, Şükran Nazan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of 10 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise training (MIET) on blood pressure (BP), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and β2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) gene expression in leukocytes, plasma angiotensin II (Ang II), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in obese postmenopausal women (PMW) with prehypertension. Twenty-four obese prehypertensive PMW (aged 50-70 y; body mass index ≥30 kg/m) randomly assigned to control (n = 12) and exercise (n = 12) groups. Exercise group performed MIET (25-40 min/d, 3 d/wk at 50%-70% of heart rate reserve) for 10 weeks. Control group maintained their normal daily physical activity level. Body composition, VO2max, BP, ACE and ADRB2 gene expression, plasma Ang II, and FMD were measured before and after the training program. After MIET, systolic and diastolic BPs decreased by 4.6% and 2.4%, respectively (P < 0.001). Plasma Ang II level decreased by 45.7%, whereas FMD increased by 86% in the exercise group (P < 0.001). Exercise training resulted in a threefold increase in ADRB2 and a fourfold decrease in ACE gene expressions (P < 0.05). Training-induced changes in BP inversely associated with the changes in FMD and ADRB2 (r values range -0.55 to -0.78), and positively associated with Ang II and ACE (r values range 0.68-0.86) (P < 0.001). Ten weeks of MIET modulates ACE and ADRB2 gene expression, decreases Ang II plasma levels, and improves endothelial function in obese PMW, and these alterations are associated with reduction in BP.

  16. Building and validating a prediction model for paediatric type 1 diabetes risk using next generation targeted sequencing of class II HLA genes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lue Ping; Carlsson, Annelie; Larsson, Helena Elding; Forsander, Gun; Ivarsson, Sten A; Kockum, Ingrid; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Marcus, Claude; Persson, Martina; Samuelsson, Ulf; Örtqvist, Eva; Pyo, Chul-Woo; Bolouri, Hamid; Zhao, Michael; Nelson, Wyatt C; Geraghty, Daniel E; Lernmark, Åke

    2017-11-01

    It is of interest to predict possible lifetime risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in young children for recruiting high-risk subjects into longitudinal studies of effective prevention strategies. Utilizing a case-control study in Sweden, we applied a recently developed next generation targeted sequencing technology to genotype class II genes and applied an object-oriented regression to build and validate a prediction model for T1D. In the training set, estimated risk scores were significantly different between patients and controls (P = 8.12 × 10 -92 ), and the area under the curve (AUC) from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was 0.917. Using the validation data set, we validated the result with AUC of 0.886. Combining both training and validation data resulted in a predictive model with AUC of 0.903. Further, we performed a "biological validation" by correlating risk scores with 6 islet autoantibodies, and found that the risk score was significantly correlated with IA-2A (Z-score = 3.628, P < 0.001). When applying this prediction model to the Swedish population, where the lifetime T1D risk ranges from 0.5% to 2%, we anticipate identifying approximately 20 000 high-risk subjects after testing all newborns, and this calculation would identify approximately 80% of all patients expected to develop T1D in their lifetime. Through both empirical and biological validation, we have established a prediction model for estimating lifetime T1D risk, using class II HLA. This prediction model should prove useful for future investigations to identify high-risk subjects for prevention research in high-risk populations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Cre/lox system to develop selectable marker free transgenic tobacco plants conferring resistance against sap sucking homopteran insect.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Dipankar; Sarkar, Anindya; Mondal, Hossain A; Schuermann, David; Hohn, Barbara; Sarmah, Bidyut K; Das, Sampa

    2008-10-01

    A binary expression vector was constructed containing the insecticidal gene Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL), and a selectable nptII marker gene cassette, flanked by lox sites. Similarly, another binary vector was developed with the chimeric cre gene construct. Transformed tobacco plants were generated with these two independent vectors. Each of the T(0) lox plants was crossed with T(0) Cre plants. PCR analyses followed by the sequencing of the target T-DNA part of the hybrid T(1) plants demonstrated the excision of the nptII gene in highly precised manner in certain percentage of the T(1) hybrid lines. The frequency of such marker gene excision was calculated to be 19.2% in the hybrids. Marker free plants were able to express ASAL efficiently and reduce the survivability of Myzus persiceae, the deadly pest of tobacco significantly, compared to the control tobacco plants. Results of PCR and Southern blot analyses of some of the T(2) plants detected the absence of cre as well as nptII genes. Thus, the crossing strategy involving Cre/lox system for the excision of marker genes appears to be very effective and easy to execute. Documentation of such marker excision phenomenon in the transgenic plants expressing the important insecticidal protein for the first time has a great significance from agricultural and biotechnological points of view.

  18. Non-coding RNA derived from the region adjacent to the human HO-1 E2 enhancer selectively regulates HO-1 gene induction by modulating Pol II binding

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Mimura, Junsei; Itoh, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have disclosed the function of enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), which are long non-coding RNAs transcribed from gene enhancer regions, in transcriptional regulation. However, it remains unclear whether eRNAs are involved in the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) induction. Here, we report that multiple nuclear-enriched eRNAs are transcribed from the regions adjacent to two human HO-1 enhancers (i.e. the distal E2 and proximal E1 enhancers), and some of these eRNAs are induced by the oxidative stress-causing reagent diethyl maleate (DEM). We demonstrated that the expression of one forward direction (5′ to 3′) eRNA transcribed from the human HO-1 E2 enhancer region (named human HO-1enhancer RNA E2-3; hereafter called eRNA E2-3) was induced by DEM in an NRF2-dependent manner in HeLa cells. Conversely, knockdown of BACH1, a repressor of HO-1 transcription, further increased DEM-inducible eRNA E2-3 transcription as well as HO-1 expression. In addition, we showed that knockdown of eRNA E2-3 selectively down-regulated DEM-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, eRNA E2-3 knockdown attenuated DEM-induced Pol II binding to the promoter and E2 enhancer regions of HO-1 without affecting NRF2 recruitment to the E2 enhancer. These findings indicate that eRNAE2-3 is functional and is required for HO-1 induction. PMID:25404134

  19. Tobacco streak virus (strain dahlia) suppresses post-transcriptional gene silencing of flavone synthase II in black dahlia cultivars and causes a drastic flower color change.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Ayumi; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Doi, Motoaki; Ohno, Sho

    2015-09-01

    Tobacco streak virus suppressed post-transcriptional gene silencing and caused a flower color change in black dahlias, which supported the role of cyanidin-based anthocyanins for black flower appearance. Black flower color of dahlia (Dahlia variabilis) has been attributed, in part, to the high accumulation of cyanidin-based anthocyanins that occurs when flavone synthesis is reduced because of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of flavone synthase II (DvFNS). There are also purple-flowering plants that have emerged from a black cultivar 'Kokucho'. We report that the purple color is not caused by a mutation, as previously thought, but by infection with tobacco streak virus (TSVdahlia), which suppresses the PTGS of DvFNS. When TSVdahlia was eliminated from the purple-flowering 'Kokucho' by leaf primordia-free shoot apical meristem culture, the resulting flowers were black. TSVdahlia-infected purple flowers had lower numbers of siRNAs to DvFNS than black flowers, suggesting that TSVdahlia has a silencing suppressor. The graft inoculation of other black cultivars with TSVdahlia altered their flower color drastically except for 'Fidalgo Blacky', a very deep black cultivar with the highest amount of cyanidin-based anthocyanins. The flowers of all six TSVdahlia-infected cultivars accumulated increased amounts of flavones and reduced amounts of cyanidin-based anthocyanins. 'Fidalgo Blacky' remained black despite the change in pigment accumulation, and the amounts of cyanidin-based anthocyanins in its TSVdahlia-infected plants were still higher than those of other cultivars. We propose that black flower color in dahlia is controlled by two different mechanisms that increase the amount of cyanidin-based anthocyanins: DvFNS PTGS-dependent and -independent mechanisms. If both mechanisms occur simultaneously, the flower color will be blacker than if only a single mechanism is active.

  20. Cardiac CaM Kinase II genes δ and γ contribute to adverse remodeling but redundantly inhibit calcineurin-induced myocardial hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kreusser, Michael M; Lehmann, Lorenz H; Keranov, Stanislav; Hoting, Marc-Oscar; Oehl, Ulrike; Kohlhaas, Michael; Reil, Jan-Christian; Neumann, Kay; Schneider, Michael D; Hill, Joseph A; Dobrev, Dobromir; Maack, Christoph; Maier, Lars S; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Katus, Hugo A; Olson, Eric N; Backs, Johannes

    2014-10-07

    Ca(2+)-dependent signaling through CaM Kinase II (CaMKII) and calcineurin was suggested to contribute to adverse cardiac remodeling. However, the relative importance of CaMKII versus calcineurin for adverse cardiac remodeling remained unclear. We generated double-knockout mice (DKO) lacking the 2 cardiac CaMKII genes δ and γ specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that both CaMKII isoforms contribute redundantly to phosphorylation not only of phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2, and histone deacetylase 4, but also calcineurin. Under baseline conditions, DKO mice are viable and display neither abnormal Ca(2+) handling nor functional and structural changes. On pathological pressure overload and β-adrenergic stimulation, DKO mice are protected against cardiac dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis. But surprisingly and paradoxically, DKO mice develop cardiac hypertrophy driven by excessive activation of endogenous calcineurin, which is associated with a lack of phosphorylation at the auto-inhibitory calcineurin A site Ser411. Likewise, calcineurin inhibition prevents cardiac hypertrophy in DKO. On exercise performance, DKO mice show an exaggeration of cardiac hypertrophy with increased expression of the calcineurin target gene RCAN1-4 but no signs of adverse cardiac remodeling. We established a mouse model in which CaMKII's activity is specifically and completely abolished. By the use of this model we show that CaMKII induces maladaptive cardiac remodeling while it inhibits calcineurin-dependent hypertrophy. These data suggest inhibition of CaMKII but not calcineurin as a promising approach to attenuate the progression of heart failure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Identification of five novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanjun; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Xin; Deng, Ting; Dong, Bing; Wang, Jingzhao; Li, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is the most common form of Usher syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by moderate to severe hearing loss, postpuberal onset of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and normal vestibular function. Mutations in the USH2A gene have been shown to be responsible for most cases of USH2. To further elucidate the role of USH2A in USH2, mutation screening was undertaken in three Chinese families with USH2. Three unrelated Chinese families, consisting of six patients and 10 unaffected relatives, were examined clinically, and 100 normal Chinese individuals served as controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from the venous blood of all participants. The coding region (exons 2-72), including the intron-exon boundary of USH2A, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products amplified from the three probands were analyzed using direct sequencing to screen sequence variants. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, or single strand conformation polymorphism analysis was performed on all available family members and the control group. Fundus examination revealed typical fundus features of RP, including narrowing of the vessels, bone-speckle pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The ERG wave amplitudes of three probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests indicated moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment. Vestibular function was normal. Five novel mutations (one small insertion, one small deletion, one nonsense, one missense, and one splice site) were detected in three families after sequence analysis of USH2A. Of the five mutations, four were located in exons 22-72, specific to the long isoform of USH2A. The mutations found in our study broaden the spectrum of USH2A mutations. Our results further indicate that the long isoform of USH2A may harbor even more mutations of the USH2A gene.

  2. Novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome type II or non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Terri L.; Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Sweeney, Meredith O.; Dryja, Thaddeus P.; Berson, Eliot L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in the USH2A gene are the most common cause of USH2 and are also a cause of some forms of RP without hearing loss (ie non-syndromic RP). The USH2A gene was initially identified as a transcript comprised of 21 exons but subsequently a longer isoform containing 72 exons was identified. Methods The 51 exons unique to the long isoform of USH2A were screened for mutations among a core set of 108 patients diagnosed with USH2 and 80 patients with non-syndromic RP who were all included in a previously reported screen of the short isoform of USH2A. For several exons, additional patients were screened. Results In total, 35 deleterious mutations were identified including 17 nonsense mutations, 9 frameshift mutations, 5 splice-site mutations, and 4 small in-frame deletions or insertions. Twenty-seven mutations were novel. In addition, 65 rare missense changes were identified. A method of classifying the deleterious effect of the missense changes was developed using the summed results of 4 different mutation assessment algorithms, SIFT, pMUT, PolyPhen, and AGVGD. This system classified 8 of the 65 changes as “likely deleterious” and 9 as “possibly deleterious”. Conclusion At least one mutation was identified in 57–63% of USH2 cases and 19–23% of cases of non-syndromic recessive RP (calculated without and including probable/possible deleterious changes) thus supporting that USH2A is the most common known cause of RP in the United States. PMID:20507924

  3. Novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome type II or non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    McGee, Terri L; Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Sweeney, Meredith O; Dryja, Thaddeus P; Berson, Eliot L

    2010-07-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in the USH2A gene are the most common cause of USH2 and are also a cause of some forms of RP without hearing loss (ie, non-syndromic RP). The USH2A gene was initially identified as a transcript comprised of 21 exons but subsequently a longer isoform containing 72 exons was identified. The 51 exons unique to the long isoform of USH2A were screened for mutations among a core set of 108 patients diagnosed with USH2 and 80 patients with non-syndromic RP who were all included in a previously reported screen of the short isoform of USH2A. For several exons, additional patients were screened. In total, 35 deleterious mutations were identified including 17 nonsense mutations, 9 frameshift mutations, 5 splice-site mutations, and 4 small in-frame deletions or insertions. Twenty-seven mutations were novel. In addition, 65 rare missense changes were identified. A method of classifying the deleterious effect of the missense changes was developed using the summed results of four different mutation assessment algorithms, SIFT, pMUT, PolyPhen, and AGVGD. This system classified 8 of the 65 changes as 'likely deleterious' and 9 as 'possibly deleterious'. At least one mutation was identified in 57-63% of USH2 cases and 19-23% of cases of non-syndromic recessive RP (calculated without and including probable/possible deleterious changes) thus supporting that USH2A is the most common known cause of RP in the USA.

  4. Polymorphisms in the promoter region of the human class II alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4) gene affect both transcriptional activity and ethanol metabolism in Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukiko; Nishimura, Fusae T; Abe, Shuntaro; Fukunaga, Tatsushige; Tanii, Hideji; Saijoh, Kiyofumi

    2009-02-01

    Class II alcohol dehydrogenase (pi-ADH), encoded by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4), is considered to contribute to ethanol (EtOH) oxidation in the liver at high concentration. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were found in the promoter region of this gene. Analysis of genotype distribution in 102 unrelated Japanese subjects revealed that four loci were in strong linkage disequilibrium and could be classified into three haplotypes. The effects of these polymorphisms on transcriptional activity were investigated in HepG2 cells. Transcriptional activity was significantly higher in cells with the -136A allele than in those with the -136C allele. To investigate whether this difference in transcriptional activity caused a difference in EtOH elimination, previous data on blood EtOH changes after 0.4 g/kg body weight alcohol ingestion were analyzed. When analyzed based on aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 gene (ALDH2) (487)Glu/Lys genotype, the significantly lower level of EtOH at peak in subjects with -136C/A and -136A/A genotype compared with subjects with -136C/C genotype indicated that -136 bp was a suggestive locus for differences in EtOH oxidation. This effect was observed only in subjects with ALDH2 (487)Glu/Glu. These results suggested that the SNP at -136bp in the ADH4 promoter had an effect on transcriptional regulation, and that the higher activity of the -136A allele compared with the -136C allele caused a lower level of blood EtOH after alcohol ingestion; that is, individuals with the -136A allele may consume more EtOH and might have a higher risk for development of alcohol dependence than those without the -136A allele.

  5. RNA polymerase II components and Rrn7 form a preinitiation complex on the HomolD box to promote ribosomal protein gene expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Montes, Matías; Moreira-Ramos, Sandra; Rojas, Diego A; Urbina, Fabiola; Käufer, Norbert F; Maldonado, Edio

    2017-02-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ribosomal protein gene (RPG) promoters contain a TATA box analog, the HomolD box, which is bound by the Rrn7 protein. Despite the importance of ribosome biogenesis for cell survival, the mechanisms underlying RPG transcription remain unknown. In this study, we found that components of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) system, consisting of the initiation or general transcription factors (GTFs) TFIIA, IIB, IIE, TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the RNAPII holoenzyme, interacted directly with Rrn7 in vitro, and were able to form a preinitiation complex (PIC) on the HomolD box. PIC complex formation follows an ordered pathway on these promoters. The GTFs and RNAPII can also be cross-linked to HomolD-containing promoters in vivo. In an in vitro reconstituted transcription system, RNAPII components and Rrn7 were necessary for HomolD-directed transcription. The Mediator complex was required for basal transcription from those promoters in whole cell extract (WCE). The Med17 subunit of Mediator also can be cross-linked to the promoter region of HomolD-containing promoters in vivo, suggesting the presence of the Mediator complex on HomolD box-containing promoters. Together, these data show that components of the RNAPII machinery and Rrn7 participate in the PIC assembly on the HomolD box, thereby directing RPG transcription. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Low genetic variation in the MHC class II DRB gene and MHC-linked microsatellites in endangered island populations of the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Saka, Toshinori; Nishita, Yoshinori; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2018-02-01

    Isolated populations of the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) on Tsushima and Iriomote islands in Japan are classified as subspecies P. b. euptilurus and P. b. iriomotensis, respectively. Because both populations have decreased to roughly 100, an understanding of their genetic diversity is essential for conservation. We genotyped MHC class II DRB exon 2 and MHC-linked microsatellite loci to evaluate the diversity of MHC genes in the Tsushima and Iriomote cat populations. We detected ten and four DRB alleles in these populations, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis showed DRB alleles from both populations to be closely related to those in other felid DRB lineages, indicating trans-species polymorphism. The MHC-linked microsatellites were more polymorphic in the Tsushima than in the Iriomote population. The MHC diversity of both leopard cat populations is much lower than in the domestic cat populations on these islands, probably due to inbreeding associated with founder effects, geographical isolation, or genetic drift. Our results predict low resistance of the two endangered populations to new pathogens introduced to the islands.

  7. A new mutation of the PCNT gene in a Colombian patient with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pachajoa, Harry; Ruiz-Botero, Felipe; Isaza, Carolina

    2014-06-13

    Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism is a syndrome characterized by the presence of intrauterine growth restriction, post-natal growth deficiency and microcephaly. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II is the most distinctive syndrome in this group of entities. Individuals affected by this disease present at an adult height of less than 100 cm, a post-pubertal head circumference of 40 cm or less, mild mental retardation, an outgoing personality and bone dysplasia. We report the first case of a five-year-old Colombian boy of mixed race ancestry (mestizo), with clinical features of microcephaly, prominent and narrow nose, arched palate, amelogenesis imperfecta, short stature, tall and narrow pelvis, disproportionate shortening of fore-arms and legs, and mild coxa vara. Analysis of the PCNT gene by sequencing showed the presence of a nucleotide change in exon 10, c. 1468C>T, evidencing a new mutation not reported in the literature for microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism. The new mutation identified in this case could be associated with the severity of the phenotypic expression of the disease, resulting in the extreme short stature of the patient. Further studies are required to reach an explanation that can justify such findings, and it is vital to emphasize the importance of detection and follow-up by the epidemiological surveillance groups in birth defects and rare diseases.

  8. Clock genes and salt-sensitive hypertension: a new type of aldosterone-synthesizing enzyme controlled by the circadian clock and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hitoshi; Doi, Masao; Goto, Kaoru; Kojima, Rika

    2016-10-01

    With the current societal norm of shiftwork and long working hours, maintaining a stable daily life is becoming very difficult. An irregular lifestyle disrupts circadian rhythms, resulting in the malfunction of body physiology and ultimately leading to lifestyle-related diseases, including hypertension. By analyzing completely arrhythmic Cry1/Cry2 double-knockout (Cry-null) mice, we found salt-sensitive hypertension accompanied by hyperaldosteronism. On the basis of a DNA microarray analysis of the adrenal gland and subsequent biochemical analyses, we discovered that Hsd3b6/HSD3B1, a subtype of 3β-HSD, is markedly overexpressed in aldosterone-producing cells in the Cry-null adrenal cortex. In addition, we found that Hsd3b6/HSD3B1, which converts pregnenolone to progesterone, is a clock-controlled gene and might also be a key enzyme for the regulation of aldosterone biosynthesis, in addition to the previously established CYP11B2, which synthesizes aldosterone from deoxycorticosterone. Importantly, angiotensin II induces HSD3B1 via the transcription factor NGFIB in human adrenocortical H295R cells, similarly to CYP11B2. As HSD3B1 levels are abnormally high in the adrenal aldosterone-producing cells of idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA), the temporal component of this system in the pathophysiology of IHA is a promising area for future research.

  9. A new mutation of the PCNT gene in a Colombian patient with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism is a syndrome characterized by the presence of intrauterine growth restriction, post-natal growth deficiency and microcephaly. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II is the most distinctive syndrome in this group of entities. Individuals affected by this disease present at an adult height of less than 100cm, a post-pubertal head circumference of 40cm or less, mild mental retardation, an outgoing personality and bone dysplasia. Case presentation We report the first case of a five-year-old Colombian boy of mixed race ancestry (mestizo), with clinical features of microcephaly, prominent and narrow nose, arched palate, amelogenesis imperfecta, short stature, tall and narrow pelvis, disproportionate shortening of fore-arms and legs, and mild coxa vara. Analysis of the PCNT gene by sequencing showed the presence of a nucleotide change in exon 10, c. 1468C>T, evidencing a new mutation not reported in the literature for microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism. Conclusion The new mutation identified in this case could be associated with the severity of the phenotypic expression of the disease, resulting in the extreme short stature of the patient. Further studies are required to reach an explanation that can justify such findings, and it is vital to emphasize the importance of detection and follow-up by the epidemiological surveillance groups in birth defects and rare diseases. PMID:24928221

  10. Relationship Between Tumor Gene Expression and Recurrence in Four Independent Studies of Patients With Stage II/III Colon Cancer Treated With Surgery Alone or Surgery Plus Adjuvant Fluorouracil Plus Leucovorin

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Michael J.; Lavery, Ian; Yothers, Greg; Paik, Soonmyung; Clark-Langone, Kim M.; Lopatin, Margarita; Watson, Drew; Baehner, Frederick L.; Shak, Steven; Baker, Joffre; Cowens, J. Wayne; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose These studies were conducted to determine the relationship between quantitative tumor gene expression and risk of cancer recurrence in patients with stage II or III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV) to develop multigene algorithms to quantify the risk of recurrence as well as the likelihood of differential treatment benefit of FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy for individual patients. Patients and Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on RNA extracted from fixed, paraffin-embedded (FPE) tumor blocks from patients with stage II or III colon cancer who were treated with surgery alone (n = 270 from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP] C-01/C-02 and n = 765 from Cleveland Clinic [CC]) or surgery plus FU/LV (n = 308 from NSABP C-04 and n = 508 from NSABP C-06). Overall, 761 candidate genes were studied in C-01/C-02 and C-04, and a subset of 375 genes was studied in CC/C-06. Results A combined analysis of the four studies identified 48 genes significantly associated with risk of recurrence and 66 genes significantly associated with FU/LV benefit (with four genes in common). Seven recurrence-risk genes, six FU/LV-benefit genes, and five reference genes were selected, and algorithms were developed to identify groups of patients with low, intermediate, and high likelihood of recurrence and benefit from FU/LV. Conclusion RT-qPCR of FPE colon cancer tissue applied to four large independent populations has been used to develop multigene algorithms for estimating recurrence risk and benefit from FU/LV. These algorithms are being independently validated, and their clinical utility is being evaluated in the Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) study. PMID:20679606

  11. Relationship between tumor gene expression and recurrence in four independent studies of patients with stage II/III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus adjuvant fluorouracil plus leucovorin.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Michael J; Lavery, Ian; Yothers, Greg; Paik, Soonmyung; Clark-Langone, Kim M; Lopatin, Margarita; Watson, Drew; Baehner, Frederick L; Shak, Steven; Baker, Joffre; Cowens, J Wayne; Wolmark, Norman

    2010-09-01

    These studies were conducted to determine the relationship between quantitative tumor gene expression and risk of cancer recurrence in patients with stage II or III colon cancer treated with surgery alone or surgery plus fluorouracil (FU) and leucovorin (LV) to develop multigene algorithms to quantify the risk of recurrence as well as the likelihood of differential treatment benefit of FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy for individual patients. We performed quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) on RNA extracted from fixed, paraffin-embedded (FPE) tumor blocks from patients with stage II or III colon cancer who were treated with surgery alone (n = 270 from National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project [NSABP] C-01/C-02 and n = 765 from Cleveland Clinic [CC]) or surgery plus FU/LV (n = 308 from NSABP C-04 and n = 508 from NSABP C-06). Overall, 761 candidate genes were studied in C-01/C-02 and C-04, and a subset of 375 genes was studied in CC/C-06. A combined analysis of the four studies identified 48 genes significantly associated with risk of recurrence and 66 genes significantly associated with FU/LV benefit (with four genes in common). Seven recurrence-risk genes, six FU/LV-benefit genes, and five reference genes were selected, and algorithms were developed to identify groups of patients with low, intermediate, and high likelihood of recurrence and benefit from FU/LV. RT-qPCR of FPE colon cancer tissue applied to four large independent populations has been used to develop multigene algorithms for estimating recurrence risk and benefit from FU/LV. These algorithms are being independently validated, and their clinical utility is being evaluated in the Quick and Simple and Reliable (QUASAR) study.

  12. The gene for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type II is located in a 5-cM region in 3p12-p13: genetic and physical mapping of the SCA7 locus.

    PubMed

    David, G; Giunti, P; Abbas, N; Coullin, P; Stevanin, G; Horta, W; Gemmill, R; Weissenbach, J; Wood, N; Cunha, S; Drabkin, H; Harding, A E; Agid, Y; Brice, A

    1996-12-01

    Two families with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with pigmentary macular dystrophy (ADCA type II) were investigated. Analysis of 23 parent-child couples demonstrated the existence of marked anticipation, greater in paternal than in maternal transmissions, with earlier age at onset and a more rapid clinical course in successive generations. Clinical analysis revealed the presence of a great variability in age at onset, initial symptom, and associated signs, confirming the characteristic clinical heterogeneity of ADCA type II. The gene for ADCA type II previously was mapped to the spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7) locus on chromosome 3p12-p21.1. Linkage analysis of the two new families of different geographic origin confirmed the characteristic genetic homogeneity of ADCA type II, distinguishing it from ADCA type I. Haplotype analysis permitted refinement of the SCA7 region to the 5-cM interval between markers D3S1312 and D3S1600 on chromosome 3p12-p13. Eighteen sequence-tagged sites were used for the construction of an integrated map of the candidate region, based on a YACs contig. The entire candidate region is contained in a single nonchimeric YAC of 660 kb. The probable involvement of a CAG trinucleotide expansion, suggested by previous studies, should greatly facilitate the identification of the gene for ADCA type II.

  13. The gene for autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia type II is located in a 5-cM region in 3p12-p13: genetic and physical mapping of the SCA7 locus.

    PubMed Central

    David, G.; Giunti, P.; Abbas, N.; Coullin, P.; Stevanin, G.; Horta, W.; Gemmill, R.; Weissenbach, J.; Wood, N.; Cunha, S.; Drabkin, H.; Harding, A. E.; Agid, Y.; Brice, A.

    1996-01-01

    Two families with autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia with pigmentary macular dystrophy (ADCA type II) were investigated. Analysis of 23 parent-child couples demonstrated the existence of marked anticipation, greater in paternal than in maternal transmissions, with earlier age at onset and a more rapid clinical course in successive generations. Clinical analysis revealed the presence of a great variability in age at onset, initial symptom, and associated signs, confirming the characteristic clinical heterogeneity of ADCA type II. The gene for ADCA type II previously was mapped to the spinocerebellar ataxia 7 (SCA7) locus on chromosome 3p12-p21.1. Linkage analysis of the two new families of different geographic origin confirmed the characteristic genetic homogeneity of ADCA type II, distinguishing it from ADCA type I. Haplotype analysis permitted refinement of the SCA7 region to the 5-cM interval between markers D3S1312 and D3S1600 on chromosome 3p12-p13. Eighteen sequence-tagged sites were used for the construction of an integrated map of the candidate region, based on a YACs contig. The entire candidate region is contained in a single nonchimeric YAC of 660 kb. The probable involvement of a CAG trinucleotide expansion, suggested by previous studies, should greatly facilitate the identification of the gene for ADCA type II. PMID:8940279

  14. Generation of Trichoderma atroviride mutants with constitutively activated G protein signaling by using geneticin resistance as selection marker.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Sabine; Omann, Markus; Rodrìguez, Carolina Escobar; Radebner, Theresa; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2012-11-17

    Species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are important industrial producers of cellulases and hemicellulases, but also widely used as biocontrol agents (BCAs) in agriculture. In the latter function Trichoderma species stimulate plant growth, induce plant defense and directly antagonize plant pathogenic fungi through their mycoparasitic capabilities. The recent release of the genome sequences of four mycoparasitic Trichoderma species now forms the basis for large-scale genetic manipulations of these important BCAs. Thus far, only a limited number of dominant selection markers, including Hygromycin B resistance (hph) and the acetamidase-encoding amdS gene, have been available for transformation of Trichoderma spp. For more extensive functional genomics studies the utilization of additional dominant markers will be essential. We established the Escherichia coli neomycin phosphotransferase II-encoding nptII gene as a novel selectable marker for the transformation of Trichoderma atroviride conferring geneticin resistance. The nptII marker cassette was stably integrated into the fungal genome and transformants exhibited unaltered phenotypes compared to the wild-type. Co-transformation of T. atroviride with nptII and a constitutively activated version of the Gα subunit-encoding tga3 gene (tga3Q207L) resulted in a high number of mitotically stable, geneticin-resistant transformants. Further analyses revealed a co-transformation frequency of 68% with 15 transformants having additionally integrated tga3Q207L into their genome. Constitutive activation of the Tga3-mediated signaling pathway resulted in increased vegetative growth and an enhanced ability to antagonize plant pathogenic host fungi. The neomycin phosphotransferase II-encoding nptII gene from Escherichia coli proved to be a valuable tool for conferring geneticin resistance to the filamentous fungus T. atroviride thereby contributing to an enhanced genetic tractability of these important BCAs.

  15. Contribution of deletion in angiotensin-converting enzyme but not A1166C angiotensin II type-1 receptor gene polymorphisms to clinical outcomes in atherothrombotic disease.

    PubMed

    Le Hello, Claire; Fradin, Sabine; Morello, Rémy; Coffin, Olivier; Maïza, Dominique; Hamon, Martial

    2011-04-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (rs4340) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C (rs5186) gene polymorphisms may be involved in coronary heart disease (CHD). This study was designed to evaluate potential relationships between these polymorphisms and the risk of long-term all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients requiring revascularization for atherothrombotic disease (ATD) lesions. This prospective observational study concerned patients referred for supra-aortic vessel disease (SVD), CHD, peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) or visceral artery disease (VAD). Collected data included ATD referral site, ATD symptoms, personal and familial medical histories, ATD extent, vascular risk factors, biological values, medication use and rs4340 and rs5186 polymorphisms. The primary end point was all-cause mortality. The secondary end point, MACE, included cardiovascular death, clinical ischemic event related to SVD, CHD, PAOD or VAD. The cohort comprised 956 patients of whom 872 (91.2%) were genotyped and followed for 21.1 ± 9.9 months. Patients were referred for SVD (25.9%), CHD (42.3%), PAOD (35.2%) or VAD (1.6%). All-cause mortality and MACE rates were 7.6 and 27.2%, respectively. When comparing I/D + D/D vs. I/I genotypes, rs4340 polymorphism was associated with higher all-cause mortality rates according to uni- and multivariate analyses (p=0.008 and 0.011, respectively). Other differences were not significant (rs4340 polymorphism and MACE, rs5186 polymorphism and all-cause mortality and MACE). No interaction was found between the polymorphisms. Other independent predictors of all-cause mortality included PAOD history, SVD history, body mass index <25 kg/m(2), HbA(1c) ≥6.5%, absence of dyslipidemia and no use of aspirin. rs4340 polymorphism is associated with long-term all-cause mortality in advanced ATD patients requiring revascularization, whereas rs5186 polymorphism does not. Copyright © 2011 IMSS

  16. A survey of crop-derived transgenes in activated and digester sludges in wastewater treatment plants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Courtney M; Gwin, Carley A; Gunsch, Claudia K

    2018-04-01

    The use of transgenic crops has become increasingly common in the United States over the last several decades. Increasing evidence suggests that DNA may be protected from enzymatic digestion and acid hydrolysis in the digestive tract, suggesting that crop-derived transgenes may enter into wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) intact. Given the historical use of antibiotic resistance genes as selection markers in transgenic crop development, it is important to consider the fate of these transgenes. Herein we detected and quantified crop-derived transgenes in WWTPs. All viable US WWTP samples were found to contain multiple gene targets (p35, nos, bla and nptII) at significantly higher levels than control samples. Control wastewater samples obtained from France, where transgenic crops are not cultivated, contained significantly fewer copies of the nptII gene than US activated and digester sludges. No significant differences were measured for the bla antibiotic resistance gene (ARG). In addition, a nested PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assay was developed that targeted the bla ARG located in regions flanked by the p35 promoter and nos terminator. Overall this work suggests that transgenic crops may have provided an environmental source of nptII; however, follow-up studies are needed to ascertain the viability of these genes as they exit WWTPs.

  17. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  18. Seven novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa and Usher syndrome Type II.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenjun; Dai, Hanjun; Lu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaohui; Dong, Bing; Li, Yang

    2011-01-01

    To describe the clinical and genetic findings in one Chinese family with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and in three unrelated Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II (USH2). One family (FR1) with arRP and three unrelated families (F6, F7, and F8) with Usher syndrome (USH), including eight affected members and seven unaffected family individuals were examined clinically. The study included 100 normal Chinese individuals as normal controls. After obtaining informed consent, peripheral blood samples from all participants were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Genotyping and haplotyping analyses were performed on the known genetic loci for arRP with a panel of polymorphic markers in family FR1. In all four families, the coding region (exons 2-72), including the intron-exon boundary of the USH2A (Usher syndrome type -2A protein) gene, was screened by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, or high resolution melt curve analysis (HRM) was performed on all available family members and on the 100 normal controls. The affected individuals presented with typical fundus features of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), including narrowing of the vessels, bone-spicule pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The electroretinogram (ERG) wave amplitudes of the available probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests in the affected individuals in family FR1 were normal, while indicating moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment in the affected individuals in families F6, F7, and F8. Vestibular function was normal in all patients from all four families. The disease-causing gene in family FR1 was mapped to the USH2A locus on chromosome 1q41. Seven novel mutations (two missenses, one 7-bp deletion, two small deletions, and two nonsenses) were detected in the four families after sequencing analysis of

  19. Seven novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in Chinese families with nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa and Usher syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjun; Dai, Hanjun; Lu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaohui; Dong, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the clinical and genetic findings in one Chinese family with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) and in three unrelated Chinese families with Usher syndrome type II (USH2). Methods One family (FR1) with arRP and three unrelated families (F6, F7, and F8) with Usher syndrome (USH), including eight affected members and seven unaffected family individuals were examined clinically. The study included 100 normal Chinese individuals as normal controls. After obtaining informed consent, peripheral blood samples from all participants were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Genotyping and haplotyping analyses were performed on the known genetic loci for arRP with a panel of polymorphic markers in family FR1. In all four families, the coding region (exons 2–72), including the intron-exon boundary of the USH2A (Usher syndrome type −2A protein) gene, was screened by PCR and direct DNA sequencing. Whenever substitutions were identified in a patient, a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, or high resolution melt curve analysis (HRM) was performed on all available family members and on the 100 normal controls. Results The affected individuals presented with typical fundus features of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), including narrowing of the vessels, bone-spicule pigmentation, and waxy optic discs. The electroretinogram (ERG) wave amplitudes of the available probands were undetectable. Audiometric tests in the affected individuals in family FR1 were normal, while indicating moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment in the affected individuals in families F6, F7, and F8. Vestibular function was normal in all patients from all four families. The disease-causing gene in family FR1 was mapped to the USH2A locus on chromosome 1q41. Seven novel mutations (two missenses, one 7-bp deletion, two small deletions, and two nonsenses) were detected in the four families

  20. Do Biochemical Markers and Apa I Polymorphism in IGF-II Gene Play a Role in the Association of Birth Weight and Later BMI?

    PubMed

    Wu, Junqing; Ren, Jingchao; Li, Yuyan; Wu, Yinjie; Gao, Ersheng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the mechanisms underlying the association of birth weight with later body mass index (BMI) from the biochemical markers related to metabolism and the Apa I polymorphism in IGF-II gene. A total of 300 children were selected randomly from the Macrosomia Birth Cohort in Wuxi, China. The height and weight were measured and blood samples were collected. Plasma concentrations of 8 biochemical markers were detected. Apa I polymorphism was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Biochemical markers were detected for 296 subjects and 271 subjects were genotyped for the Apa I polymorphism. No association was found between birth weight and 8 biochemical markers. In boys, the BMIs of AA, AG and GG genotypes were 16.10 ± 2.24 kg/m(2), 17.40 ± 3.20 kg/m(2), 17.65 ± 2.66 kg/m(2). And there was statistical difference among the three genotypes. But in girls, there was no statistical difference. The birth weights of AA, AG and GG genotypes were 3751.13 ± 492.43 g, 3734.00 ± 456.88 g, 3782.00 ± 461.78 g. And there was no statistical difference among the three genotypes. Biochemical markers are not associated with birth weight. Apa I polymorphism may be related to childhood BMI, but it may be not associated with birth weight. Therefore, biochemical markers and Apa I polymorphism might not play a role in the association of birth weight and BMI.

  1. Layer-specific gene expression in epileptogenic type II focal cortical dysplasia: normal-looking neurons reveal the presence of a hidden laminar organization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type II focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are malformations of cortical development characterised by the disorganisation of the normal neocortical structure and the presence of dysmorphic neurons (DNs) and balloon cells (BCs). The pathogenesis of FCDs has not yet been clearly established, although a number of histopathological patterns and molecular findings suggest that they may be due to abnormal neuronal and glial proliferation and migration processes. In order to gain further insights into cortical layering disruption and investigate the origin of DNs and BCs, we used in situ RNA hybridisation of human surgical specimens with a neuropathologically definite diagnosis of Type IIa/b FCD and a panel of layer-specific genes (LSGs) whose expression covers all cortical layers. We also used anti-phospho-S6 ribosomal protein antibody to investigate mTOR pathway hyperactivation. Results LSGs were expressed in both normal and abnormal cells (BCs and DNs) but their distribution was different. Normal-looking neurons, which were visibly reduced in the core of the lesion, were apparently located in the appropriate cortical laminae thus indicating a partial laminar organisation. On the contrary, DNs and BCs, labelled with anti-phospho-S6 ribosomal protein antibody, were spread throughout the cortex without any apparent rule and showed a highly variable LSG expression pattern. Moreover, LSGs did not reveal any differences between Type IIa and IIb FCD. Conclusion These findings suggest the existence of hidden cortical lamination involving normal-looking neurons, which retain their ability to migrate correctly in the cortex, unlike DNs which, in addition to their morphological abnormalities and mTOR hyperactivation, show an altered migratory pattern. Taken together these data suggest that an external or environmental hit affecting selected precursor cells during the very early stages of cortical development may disrupt normal cortical development. PMID:24735483

  2. Nuclear IGF-1R interacts with regulatory regions of chromatin to promote RNA polymerase II recruitment and gene expression associated with advanced tumor stage.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Tamara; Gray, Nicki E; Wu, Xiaoning; Rieunier, Guillaume; Osher, Eliot; Mills, Jack; Verrill, Clare; Bryant, Richard J; Han, Cheng; Hutchinson, Kathryn; Lambert, Adam; Kumar, Rajeev; Hamdy, Freddie C; Weyer-Czernilofsky, Ulrike; Sanderson, Michael; Bogenrieder, Thomas; Taylor, Stephen; Macaulay, Valentine M

    2018-05-07

    Internalization of ligand-activated type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) is followed by recycling to the plasma membrane, degradation or nuclear translocation. Nuclear IGF-1R reportedly associates with clinical response to IGF-1R inhibitory drugs, yet its role in the nucleus is poorly characterized. Here we investigated the significance of nuclear IGF-1R in clinical cancers and cell line models. In prostate cancers, IGF-1R was predominantly membrane-localized in benign glands, while malignant epithelium contained prominent internalized (nuclear/cytoplasmic) IGF-1R, and nuclear IGF-1R associated significantly with advanced tumor stage. Using ChIP-seq to assess global chromatin occupancy, we identified IGF-1R binding sites at or near transcription start sites of genes including JUN and FAM21, most sites coinciding with occupancy by RNA polymerase II (RNAPol2) and histone marks of active enhancers/promoters. IGF-1R was inducibly recruited to chromatin, directly binding DNA and interacting with RNAPol2 to upregulate expression of JUN and FAM21, shown to mediate tumor cell survival and IGF-induced migration. IGF-1 also enriched RNAPol2 on promoters containing IGF-1R binding sites. These functions were inhibited by IGF-1/2 neutralizing antibody xentuzumab (BI 836845), or by blocking receptor internalization. We detected nuclear IGF-1R on JUN and FAM21 promoters in fresh prostate cancers that contained abundant nuclear IGF-1R, with evidence of correlation between nuclear IGF-1R content and JUN expression in malignant prostatic epithelium. Taken together, these data reveal previously unrecognized molecular mechanisms through which IGFs promote tumorigenesis, with implications for therapeutic evaluation of anti-IGF drugs. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Faithful transcription initiation from a mitochondrial promoter in transgenic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Bohne, Alexandra-Viola; Ruf, Stephanie; Börner, Thomas; Bock, Ralph

    2007-01-01

    The transcriptional machineries of plastids and mitochondria in higher plants exhibit striking similarities. All mitochondrial genes and part of the plastid genes are transcribed by related phage-type RNA polymerases. Furthermore, the majority of mitochondrial promoters and a subset of plastid promoters show a similar structural organization. We show here that the plant mitochondrial atpA promoter is recognized by plastid RNA polymerases in vitro and in vivo. The Arabidopsis phage-type RNA polymerase RpoTp, an enzyme localized exclusively to plastids, was found to recognize the mitochondrial atpA promoter in in vitro assays suggesting the possibility that mitochondrial promoters might function as well in plastids. We have, therefore, generated transplastomic tobacco plants harboring in their chloroplast genome the atpA promoter fused to the coding region of the bacterial nptII gene. The chimeric nptII gene was found to be efficiently transcribed in chloroplasts. Mapping of the 5′ ends of the nptII transcripts revealed accurate recognition of the atpA promoter by the chloroplast transcription machinery. We show further that the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the mitochondrial atpA transcript is capable of mediating translation in chloroplasts. The functional and evolutionary implications of these findings as well as possible applications in chloroplast genome engineering are discussed. PMID:17959651

  4. Association between estrogen receptora gene (ESR1) PvuII (T/C) and XbaI (A/G) polymorphisms and premature ovarian failure risk: evidence from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Meirong; Shu, Jingcheng; Huang, Xing; Tang, Hui

    2015-02-01

    Genetic factors are important in the pathogenesis of Premature ovarian failure (POF). Notably, estrogen receptor-a (ESR1) has been suggested as a possible candidate gene for POF; however, published studies of ESR1 gene polymorphisms have been hampered by small sample sizes and inconclusive or ambiguous results. The aim of this meta analysis is to investigate the associations between two novel common ESR1 polymorphisms (intron 1 polymorphisms PvuII-rs2234693: T.C and XbaI-rs9340799: A.G) and POF. A comprehensive search was conducted to identify all studies on the association of ESR1 gene polymorphisms with POF up to August 2014. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed-or random-effects model in the meta-analysis. Three studies covering 1396 subjects were identified. Pooled data showed significant association between ESR1 gene PvuII polymorphism and risk of POF: [allele model: Cvs. T, OR = 0.735, 95%CI: 0.624 ~ 0.865, p = 0.001; co-dominant models: CCvs.TT, OR = 0.540, 95%CI: 0.382 ~ 0.764, p = 0.001, CTvs.TT, OR = 0.735, 95%CI: 0.555 ~ 0.972, p = 0.031; dominant model: CT + CCvs.TT, OR = 0.618, 95%CI: 0.396 ~ 0.966, p = 0.035; recessive model: CCvs.TT + CT, OR = 0.659, 95%CI: 0.502 ~ 0.864, p = 0.003]. Subgroup analyses showed a significant association in all models in Asian population, but no significant association in any model in European population. For the XbaI polymorphism, overall, no significant association was observed under any genetic models. However, under dominant model, ESR1 gene XbaI polymorphism is significantly association with risk of POF in Asian population. The present meta-analysis suggests that ESR1gene PvuII polymorphism is significantly associated with an increased risk of POF. And ESR1gene XbaI polymorphism is not association with risk of POF overall. However, under dominant model, ESR1gene XbaI polymorphism is

  5. Intratumoral gene expression of 5-fluorouracil pharmacokinetics-related enzymes in stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with uracil-tegafur after surgery: a prospective multi-institutional study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Keisuke; Oyama, Takahiko; Tajima, Atsushi; Abiko, Tomohiro; Sawafuji, Makoto; Horio, Hirotoshi; Hashizume, Toshinori; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kato, Ryoichi; Nakayama, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to assess the use of the intratumoral mRNA expression levels of nucleic acid-metabolizing enzymes as biomarkers of adjuvant chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using uracil-tegafur in a multi-institutional prospective study. 236 patients with a completely resected NSCLC (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) of pathological stage IA (maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or greater), IB, and II tumors were given a dose of 250 mg of uracil-tegafur per square meter of body surface area per day orally for two years after surgery. Intratumoral mRNA levels of thymidylate synthase (TS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT), and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) genes relative to an internal standard, β-actin, were determined using laser-capture microdissection and fluorescence-based real time PCR detection systems. Among 5-FU target enzymes, TS was the only one that showed a significant difference in the level of gene expression between the high and low gene expression groups, for both disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), when patients were divided according to median values; 5-year DFS rates in high/low TS gene expression were 60.4% and 72.6%, respectively (p=0.050), 5-year OS rates were 78.1% and 88.6%, respectively (p=0.011). Cox's proportional hazard model indicated that the pathological stage and TS gene expression level were independent values for predicting DFS. The TS gene expression level was shown to be an independent predictive factor for DFS in stage I and II NSCLC patients who were treated with uracil-tegafur following surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY; Wu, Wei

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitormore » has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in

  7. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism could influence renoprotective response to losartan treatment in type 1 diabetic patients with high urinary albumin excretion rate.

    PubMed

    Dragović, Tamara; Ajdinović, Boris; Hrvacević, Rajko; Ilić, Vesna; Magić, Zvonko; Andelković, Zoran; Kocev, Nikola

    2010-04-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria, increasing arterial blood pressure and progressive decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). When persistent albuminuria is established, antihypertensive treatment becomes most important factor in slowing the progression of diabetic glomerulopathy. The aim of this study was to examine if renoprotective response to a short-term losartan therapy depends on 1166 A/C gene polymorphism for its target receptor. The study included 35 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and persistently high urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE: > 30 mg/24 h), genotyped for the 1166 A/C gene polymorphism for the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). The participants were segregated into 3 genotype groups according to combinations of A or C allele: AA (16%), AC (15%) and CC (11%). The patients received losartan 50 mg daily for 4 weeks, following 100 mg daily for another 8 weeks. At baseline and after 12 weeks of the treatment period UAE, blood pressure, GFR and filtration fraction (FF) were determined. After 12 weeks of the treatment with losartan, albuminuria was reduced from baseline by 9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 1-17, p = 0.039] in the AA genotype, and by 11% (95% CI: 6-17, p = 0.0001) in the AC genotype. Losartan treatment reduced albuminuria in the CC group by 5% (95% CI: -13-22, p = 0.47). Glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged in all genotype groups. Filtration fraction was significantly reduced from baseline by 0.018 +/- 0.024 (p = 0.012) only in the AC genotype. In the AA genotype, FF was reduced from baseline by 0.017 +/- 0.03 (p = 0.052), and in the CC genotype by 0.01 +/- 0.008 (p = 0.092). In the AA group, systolic blood pressure declined from 136 +/- 24 mmHg at baseline, to an average of 121 +/- 18 mmHg at the end of the study (p = 0.001). The AC group achived reduction from 131 +/- 10 mmHg at baseline to 115 +/- 7 mmHg (p = 0.001) during the investigation period. In

  8. Establishment of a genetic transformation system for the marine pennate diatom Fistulifera sp. strain JPCC DA0580--a high triglyceride producer.

    PubMed

    Muto, Masaki; Fukuda, Yorikane; Nemoto, Michiko; Yoshino, Tomoko; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    A genetic transformation system for the marine pennate diatom, Fistulifera sp. JPCC DA0580, was established using microparticle bombardment methods. Strain JPCC DA0580 has been recently identified as the highest triglyceride (60 % w/w) producer from a culture collection of 1,393 strains of marine microalgae, and it is expected to be a feasible source of biodiesel fuel. The transformation conditions for strain JPCC DA0580 were optimised using the green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) and the gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII). The most efficient rate of transformation was attained when tungsten particles (0.6 μm in diameter) were used for microparticle bombardment. The effect of endogenous and exogenous promoters on the expression of nptII was examined. Endogenous promoters were more efficient for obtaining transformants compared with exogenous promoters. Southern hybridisation analysis suggested that nptII integrated into the nuclear genome. This genetic manipulation technique should allow us to understand the mechanisms of high triglyceride accumulation in this strain, thereby contributing to improving BDF production.

  9. Stable transformation and expression of GhEXPA8 fiber expansin gene to improve fiber length and micronaire value in cotton

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Kamran S.; Shahid, Ahmad A.; Rao, Abdul Q.; Bashir, Aftab; Aftab, Asia; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Cotton fiber is multigenic trait controlled by number of genes. Previous studies suggest that one of these genes may be responsible for switching cotton fiber growth on and off to influence the fiber quality produced from a cotton seed. In the present study, the Gossypium hirsutum GhEXPA8 fiber expansin gene was introduced into local cotton variety NIAB 846 by using an Agrobacterium-mediated gene transformation. The neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) gene was used as a selection marker for screening of putative transgenic cotton plants. Integration and expression of the fiber expansin gene in cotton plants was confirmed with molecular techniques including Southern blot analyses, real-time PCR. Cellulose assay was used for measurement of cellulose contents of transgenic cotton fiber. The data collected from 3 years of field performance of the transgenic cotton plants expressing GhEXPA8 showed that significant improvement has been made in fiber lengths and micronaire values as compared to control G. hirsutum variety NIAB 846 cotton plants. Statistical techniques were also used for analysis of fiber and agronomic characteristics. The results of this study support improvement of cotton fiber through genetic modification. PMID:26583018

  10. Expression pattern of the pre-prothaumatin II gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) flower buds and fruits.

    PubMed

    Szwacka, M; Siedlecka, E; Zawirska-Wojtasiak, R; Wiśniewski, Ł; Malepszy, S

    2009-01-01

    Thaumatin II is an extremely sweet-tasting protein produced by fruits of the West African shrub Thaumatococcus daniellii Benth, so it can be used in biotechnology to improve the tastes of various plant products. This study is concerned with the spatial and temporal aspects of expression of the 35S-pre-prothaumatin II chimeric gene in flower buds and fruits of transgenic cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) line 225. The activity of the 35S promoter in organs of line 225 was compared with its activity in 2 other transgenic lines. The accumulation of recombinant thaumatin varied spatially in flower bud tissues of transgenic lines. We found that these differences in the spatial accumulation of transgenic protein concerned the ovary of female buds and the perianth of male buds. In contrast to flower parts, recombinant thaumatin was found in nearly all parts of the young fruit from the transgenic plants. The pre-prothaumatin II gene expression was detected at a very early developmental stage in male buds, and its pattern was rather conserved as the buds aged. The expression of the transgene was also detected in vascular tissues of examined organs but was undetectable in pollen grains, in agreement with the generally held view that the CaMV 35S promoter is virtually silent in pollen. Immunocytochemical analyses of sections of control organs revealed endogenous homolog(s) of thaumatin when using polyclonal antisera, but not when using monoclonal antibodies for recombinant thaumatin detection in transgenic cucumber.

  11. COL5A1: Fine genetic mapping, intron/exon organization, and exclusion as candidate gene in families with tuberous sclerosis complex 1, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, D.S.; Papenberg, K.A.; Marchuk, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Type V collagen is the only fibrillar collagen which has yet to be implicated in the pathogenesis of genetic diseases in humans or mice. To begin examining the possible role of type V collagen in genetic disease, we have previously mapped COL5A1, the gene for the {alpha}1 chain of type V collagen, to 9q23.2{r_arrow}q34.3 and described two restriction site polymorphisms which allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for nail-patella syndrome. We have now used these polymorphisms to exclude COL5A1 as candidate gene for tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II. In addition, we describe a CAmore » repeat, with observed heterozygosity of about 0.5, in a COL5A1 intron, which has allowed us to exclude COL5A1 as a candidate gene in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and to place COL5A1 on the CEPH family genetic map between markers D9S66 and D9S67. We have also determined the entire intron/exon organization of COL5A1, which will facilitate characterization of mutations in genetic diseases with which COL5A1 may be linked in future studies.« less

  12. Starch phosphorylation in potato tubers is influenced by allelic variation in the genes encoding glucan water dikinase, starch branching enzymes I and II, and starch synthase III

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Margaret A.; Joyce, Nigel I.; Genet, Russell A.; Cooper, Rebecca D.; Murray, Sarah R.; Noble, Alasdair D.; Butler, Ruth C.; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Starch phosphorylation is an important aspect of plant metabolism due to its role in starch degradation. Moreover, the degree of phosphorylation of starch determines its physicochemical properties and is therefore relevant for industrial uses of starch. Currently, starch is chemically phosphorylated to increase viscosity and paste stability. Potato cultivars with elevated starch phosphorylation would make this process unnecessary, thereby bestowing economic and environmental benefits. Starch phosphorylation is a complex trait which has been previously shown by antisense gene repression to be influenced by a number of genes including those involved in starch synthesis and degradation. We have used an association mapping approach to discover genetic markers associated with the degree of starch phosphorylation. A diverse collection of 193 potato lines was grown in replicated field trials, and the levels of starch phosphorylation at the C6 and C3 positions of the glucosyl residues were determined by mass spectrometry of hydrolyzed starch from tubers. In addition, the potato lines were genotyped by amplicon sequencing and microsatellite analysis, focusing on candidate genes known to be involved in starch synthesis. As potato is an autotetraploid, genotyping included determination of allele dosage. Significant associations (p < 0.001) were found with SNPs in the glucan water dikinase (GWD), starch branching enzyme I (SBEI) and the starch synthase III (SSIII) genes, and with a SSR allele in the SBEII gene. SNPs in the GWD gene were associated with C6 phosphorylation, whereas polymorphisms in the SBEI and SBEII genes were associated with both C6 and C3 phosphorylation and the SNP in the SSIII gene was associated with C3 phosphorylation. These allelic variants have potential as genetic markers for starch phosphorylation in potato. PMID:25806042

  13. Darwin's legacy II: why biology is not physics, or why it has taken a century to see the dependence of genes on the environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rama S

    2015-01-01

    Genes and environment make the organism. Darwin stood firm in his denial of any direct role of environment in the modification of heredity. His theory of evolution heralded two debates: one about the importance and adequacy of natural selection as the main mechanism of evolution, and the other about the role of genes versus environment in the modification of phenotype and evolution. Here, I provide an overview of the second debate and show that the reasons for the gene versus environment battle were twofold: first, there was confusion about the role of environment in modifying the inheritance of a trait versus the evolution of that trait, and second, there was misunderstanding about the meaning of environment and its interaction with genes in the production of phenotypes. It took nearly a century to see that environment does not directly affect the inheritance of a phenotype (i.e., its heredity), but it is nevertheless the primary mover of phenotypic evolution. Effects of genes and environment are not separate but interdependent. One cannot separate the effect of genes from that of environment, or nature from nurture. To answer the question posed in the title, it is partly because the 20th century has been a century of unending progress in genetics. But also because unlike physics, biology is not colorblind; progress in biology has often been delayed beyond the Kuhnian paradigm change due to built-in interest in negating the influence of environment. Those who are against evolution, of course, cannot be expected to understand the role of environment in evolution. Those for it, many biologists included, believing in the supremacy of genes empowers them by giving adaptation a solely gene-directed (self-driven) "teleological" interpretation.

  14. Global analysis of gene expression in maize leaves treated with low temperature. II. Combined effect of severe cold (8 °C) and circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Jończyk, M; Sobkowiak, A; Trzcinska-Danielewicz, J; Skoneczny, M; Solecka, D; Fronk, J; Sowiński, P

    2017-10-01

    In maize seedlings, severe cold results in dysregulation of circadian pattern of gene expression causing profound modulation of transcription of genes related to photosynthesis and other key biological processes. Plants live highly cyclic life and their response to environmental stresses must allow for underlying biological rhythms. To study the interplay of a stress and a rhythmic cue we investigated transcriptomic response of maize seedlings to low temperature in the context of diurnal gene expression. Severe cold stress had pronounced effect on the circadian rhythm of a substantial proportion of genes. Their response was strikingly dual, comprising either flattening (partial or complete) of the diel amplitude or delay of expression maximum/minimum by several hours. Genes encoding central oscillator components behaved in the same dual manner, unlike their Arabidopsis counterparts reported earlier to cease cycling altogether upon cold treatment. Also numerous genes lacking circadian rhythm responded to the cold by undergoing up- or down-regulation. Notably, the transcriptome changes preceded major physiological manifestations of cold stress. In silico analysis of metabolic processes likely affected by observed gene expression changes indicated major down-regulation of photosynthesis, profound and multifarious modulation of plant hormone levels, and of chromatin structure, transcription, and translation. A role of trehalose and stachyose in cold stress signaling was also suggested. Meta-analysis of published transcriptomic data allowed discrimination between general stress response of maize and that unique to severe cold. Several cis- and trans-factors likely involved in the latter were predicted, albeit none of them seemed to have a major role. These results underscore a key role of modulation of diel gene expression in maize response to severe cold and the unique character of the cold-response of the maize circadian clock.

  15. Gene transfer as a strategy to achieve permanent cardioprotection II: rAAV-mediated gene therapy with heme oxygenase-1 limits infarct size 1 year later without adverse functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianhong; Guo, Yiru; Ou, Qinghui; Wu, Wen-Jian; Chen, Ning; Zhu, Xiaoping; Tan, Wei; Yuan, Fangping; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Luo, Li; Hunt, Gregory N; Bolli, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts potent cytoprotective effects in response to stress. Previous studies have shown that gene therapy with HO-1 protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury for up to 8 weeks after gene transfer. However, the long-term effects of HO-1 gene therapy on myocardial ischemic injury and function are unknown. To address this issue, we created a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector carrying the HO-1 gene (rAAV/HO-1) that enables long-lasting transgene expression. Mice received injections in the anterior LV wall of rAAV/LacZ (LacZ group) or rAAV/HO-1 (HO-1 group); 1 year later, they were subjected to a 30-min coronary occlusion (O) and 4 h of reperfusion (R). Cardiac HO-1 gene expression was confirmed at 1 month and 1 year after gene transfer by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. In the HO-1 group, infarct size (% of risk region) was dramatically reduced at 1 year after gene transfer (11.2 ± 2.1%, n = 12, vs. 44.7 ± 3.6%, n = 8, in the LacZ group; P < 0.05). The infarct-sparing effects of HO-1 gene therapy at 1 year were as powerful as those observed 24 h after ischemic PC (six 4-min O/4-min R cycles) (15.0 ± 1.7%, n = 10). There were no appreciable changes in LV fractional shortening, LV ejection fraction, or LV end-diastolic or end-systolic diameter at 1 year after HO-1 gene transfer as compared to the age-matched controls or with the LacZ group. Histology showed no inflammation in the myocardium 1 year after rAAV/HO-1-mediated gene transfer. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that rAAV-mediated HO-1 gene transfer confers long-term (1 year), possibly permanent, cardioprotection without adverse functional consequences, providing proof of principle for the concept of achieving prophylactic cardioprotection (i.e., "immunization against infarction").

  16. An RNA-splicing mutation (G{sup +51VS20}) in the Type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in a family with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Weis, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    Defects in type II collagen have been demonstrated in a phenotypic continuum of chondrodysplasias that includes achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC), Kniest dysplasia, and Stickler syndrome. We have determined that cartilage from a terminated fetus with an inherited form of SEDC contained both normal {alpha}1(II) collagen chains and chains that lacked amino acids 256-273 of the triple-helical domain. PCR amplification of this region of COL2A1, from genomic DNA, yielded products of normal size, while amplification of cDNA yielded a normal sized species and a shorter fragment missing exon 20. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from the fetus revealedmore » a G{yields}T transversion at position +5 of intron 20; the affected father was also heterozygous for the mutation. Allele-specific PCR and heteroduplex analysis of a VNTR in COL2A1 independently confirmed the unaffected status of a fetus in a subsequent pregnancy. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the mutation prevents normal splicing of exon 20 by interfering with binding of U{sub 1} small-nuclear RNA to pre-mRNA, thus leading to skipping of exon 20 in transcripts from the mutant allele. Electron micrographs of diseased cartilage showed intracellular inclusion bodies, which were stained by an antibody to {alpha}1(II) procollagen. Our findings support the hypothesis that {alpha}-chain length alterations that preserve the Gly-X-Y repeat motif of the triple helix result in partial intracellular retention of {alpha}1(II) procollagen and produce mild to moderate chondrodysplasia phenotypes. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.« less

  17. Testicular gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown constitutively impairs diurnal testosterone secretion in the boar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its specific receptor (GnRHR-II) are highly expressed in the testis, suggesting an important role in testis biology. Gene coding errors prevent the production of GnRH-II and GnRHR-II in many species, but both genes are functional in swine. We have demo...

  18. Association of PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms on estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene to changes into serum lipid profile of post-menopausal women: Effects of aging, body mass index and breast cancer incidence

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Rochette, Neuza Felix; Souza, Letícia Soncini; Tommasi, Bruno Otoni; Pedrosa, Diego França; Fin, Irani do Carmo Francischetto; Vieira, Fernando Luiz Herkenhoff; Graceli, Jones Bernardes; Rangel, Letícia Batista Azevedo; Silva, Ian Victor

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroidal hormone involved in several physiological functions in the female body including regulation of serum lipid metabolism and breast cancer (BC). Estrogen actions on serum lipids mostly occur through its binding to intracellular Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERalpha) isoform, expressed in most of tissues. This gene (ESR1) exhibit many polymorphic sites (SNPs) located either on translated and non-translated regions that regulate ERalpha protein expression and function. This paper aimed to investigate the association of two intronic SNPs of ESR1 gene, namely c454-397T>C (PvuII) and c454-351A>G (XbaI) to alterations in serum levels of total cholesterol (T-chol), total lipid (TL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides (TG) in a cohort of post-menopausal women. In addition, we aimed to associate presence of these SNPs to development of BC along 5 years period. To do so, a group of healthy 499, highly miscigenated, post-menopausal Brazilian women, were carried using PCR-FRLP technique and further confirmed by automatic sequence analysis as well followed through 5 years for BC incidence. Measurements of serum lipid profile by standard commercial methods were carried individually whereas Dual Energy X-ray Absorciometry (DXA) measured Body Mass Indexes (BMI), Fat Mass (FM), Lean Body Mass (LBM), and Body Water Content (BWC). No effects of PvuII SNP on ESR1 gene were observed on patient´s serum T-chol, TL, LDL, HDL, and TG. However, c454-397T>C PvuII SNP is associated to lower body fat and higher levels of lean mass and body water and lower incidence of BC. On the other hand, statistically significant effect of XbaI c454-351A>G SNP on serum TG and TL levels. Patients homozygous for X allele were followed up from 2010–2015. They showed higher incidence of breast cancer (BC) when compared to either heterozygous and any P allele combination. Moreover, the increasing of TG and TL serum concentrations

  19. Association of PvuII and XbaI polymorphisms on estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) gene to changes into serum lipid profile of post-menopausal women: Effects of aging, body mass index and breast cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Rochette, Neuza Felix; Souza, Letícia Soncini; Tommasi, Bruno Otoni; Pedrosa, Diego França; Eis, Sérgio Ragi; Fin, Irani do Carmo Francischetto; Vieira, Fernando Luiz Herkenhoff; Graceli, Jones Bernardes; Rangel, Letícia Batista Azevedo; Silva, Ian Victor

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroidal hormone involved in several physiological functions in the female body including regulation of serum lipid metabolism and breast cancer (BC). Estrogen actions on serum lipids mostly occur through its binding to intracellular Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERalpha) isoform, expressed in most of tissues. This gene (ESR1) exhibit many polymorphic sites (SNPs) located either on translated and non-translated regions that regulate ERalpha protein expression and function. This paper aimed to investigate the association of two intronic SNPs of ESR1 gene, namely c454-397T>C (PvuII) and c454-351A>G (XbaI) to alterations in serum levels of total cholesterol (T-chol), total lipid (TL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides (TG) in a cohort of post-menopausal women. In addition, we aimed to associate presence of these SNPs to development of BC along 5 years period. To do so, a group of healthy 499, highly miscigenated, post-menopausal Brazilian women, were carried using PCR-FRLP technique and further confirmed by automatic sequence analysis as well followed through 5 years for BC incidence. Measurements of serum lipid profile by standard commercial methods were carried individually whereas Dual Energy X-ray Absorciometry (DXA) measured Body Mass Indexes (BMI), Fat Mass (FM), Lean Body Mass (LBM), and Body Water Content (BWC). No effects of PvuII SNP on ESR1 gene were observed on patient´s serum T-chol, TL, LDL, HDL, and TG. However, c454-397T>C PvuII SNP is associated to lower body fat and higher levels of lean mass and body water and lower incidence of BC. On the other hand, statistically significant effect of XbaI c454-351A>G SNP on serum TG and TL levels. Patients homozygous for X allele were followed up from 2010-2015. They showed higher incidence of breast cancer (BC) when compared to either heterozygous and any P allele combination. Moreover, the increasing of TG and TL serum concentrations

  20. Balancing selection and genetic drift at major histocompatibility complex class II genes in isolated populations of golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small, isolated populations often experience loss of genetic variation due to random genetic drift. Unlike neutral or nearly neutral markers (such as mitochondrial genes or microsatellites), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in these populations may retain high levels of polymorphism due to balancing selection. The relative roles of balancing selection and genetic drift in either small isolated or bottlenecked populations remain controversial. In this study, we examined the mechanisms maintaining polymorphisms of MHC genes in small isolated populations of the endangered golden snub-nosed monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana) by comparing genetic variation found in MHC and microsatellite loci. There are few studies of this kind conducted on highly endangered primate species. Results Two MHC genes were sequenced and sixteen microsatellite loci were genotyped from samples representing three isolated populations. We isolated nine DQA1 alleles and sixteen DQB1 alleles and validated expression of the alleles. Lowest genetic variation for both MHC and microsatellites was found in the Shennongjia (SNJ) population. Historical balancing selection was revealed at both the DQA1 and DQB1 loci, as revealed by excess non-synonymous substitutions at antigen binding sites (ABS) and maximum-likelihood-based random-site models. Patterns of microsatellite variation revealed population structure. FST outlier analysis showed that population differentiation at the two MHC loci was similar to the microsatellite loci. Conclusions MHC genes and microsatellite loci showed the same allelic richness pattern with the lowest genetic variation occurring in SNJ, suggesting that genetic drift played a prominent role in these isolated populations. As MHC genes are subject to selective pressures, the maintenance of genetic variation is of particular interest in small, long-isolated populations. The results of this study may contribute to captive breeding and translocation programs

  1. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)2Cys6 zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteins with a Zn(II)2Cys6 domain, Cys-X2-Cys-X6-Cys-X5-12-Cys-X2-Cys-X6-9-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overvie...

  2. rtfA, a putative RNA-Pol II transcription elongation factor gene, is necessary for normal morphological and chemical development in Aspergillus flavus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus is an agriculturally important opportunistic plant pathogen that produces potent carcinogenic compounds called aflatoxins. We identified the A. flavus rtfA gene, the ortholog of rtf1 in S. cerevisiae and rtfA in A. nidulans. Interestingly, rtfA has multiple ...

  3. Identification of a Novel De Novo Heterozygous Deletion in the SOX10 Gene in Waardenburg Syndrome Type II Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Haonan; Jin, Peng; Hao, Qian; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Xia; Wang, Ping

    2017-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associated with pigmentation abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of WSII in a patient and evaluated the reliability of the targeted next-generation exome sequencing method for the genetic diagnosis of WS. Clinical evaluations were conducted on the patient and targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify the candidate genes responsible for WSII. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed to confirm the targeted NGS results. Targeted NGS detected the entire deletion of the coding sequence (CDS) of the SOX10 gene in the WSII patient. MLPA results indicated that all exons of the SOX10 heterozygous deletion were detected; no aberrant copy number in the PAX3 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) genes was found. Real-time qPCR results identified the mutation as a de novo heterozygous deletion. This is the first report of using a targeted NGS method for WS candidate gene sequencing; its accuracy was verified by using the MLPA and qPCR methods. Our research provides a valuable method for the genetic diagnosis of WS.

  4. Characterisation of the nicotianamine aminotransferase and deoxymugineic acid synthase genes essential to Strategy II iron uptake in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alexander A. T.

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) uptake in graminaceous plant species occurs via the release and uptake of Fe-chelating compounds known as mugineic acid family phytosiderophores (MAs). In the MAs biosynthetic pathway, nicotianamine aminotransferase (NAAT) and deoxymugineic acid synthase (DMAS) enzymes catalyse the formation of 2’-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) from nicotianamine (NA). Here we describe the identification and characterisation of six TaNAAT and three TaDMAS1 genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The coding sequences of all six TaNAAT homeologs consist of seven exons with ≥88.0% nucleotide sequence identity and most sequence variation present in the first exon. The coding sequences of the three TaDMAS1 homeologs consist of three exons with ≥97.8% nucleotide sequence identity. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the TaNAAT and TaDMAS1 proteins are most closely related to the HvNAAT and HvDMAS1 proteins of barley and that there are two distinct groups of TaNAAT proteins—TaNAAT1 and TaNAAT2 –that correspond to the HvNAATA and HvNAATB proteins, respectively. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the TaNAAT2 genes are expressed at highest levels in anther tissues whilst the TaNAAT1 and TaDMAS1 genes are expressed at highest levels in root tissues of bread wheat. Furthermore, the TaNAAT1, TaNAAT2 and TaDMAS1 genes were differentially regulated by plant Fe status and their expression was significantly upregulated in root tissues from day five onwards during a seven-day Fe deficiency treatment. The identification and characterization of the TaNAAT1, TaNAAT2 and TaDMAS1 genes provides a valuable genetic resource for improving bread wheat growth on Fe deficient soils and enhancing grain Fe nutrition. PMID:28475636

  5. Orphan nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) protein negatively regulates bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced osteoblast differentiation through suppressing runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kkot-Nim; Jang, Won-Gu; Kim, Eun-Jung; Oh, Sin-Hye; Son, Hye-Ju; Kim, Sun-Hun; Franceschi, Renny; Zhang, Xiao-Kun; Lee, Shee-Eun; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2012-06-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) is an orphan nuclear receptor of the steroid-thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. COUP-TFII is widely expressed in multiple tissues and organs throughout embryonic development and has been shown to regulate cellular growth, differentiation, and organ development. However, the role of COUP-TFII in osteoblast differentiation has not been systematically evaluated. In the present study, COUP-TFII was strongly expressed in multipotential mesenchymal cells, and the endogenous expression level decreased during osteoblast differentiation. Overexpression of COUP-TFII inhibited bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)-induced osteoblastic gene expression. The results of alkaline phosphatase, Alizarin Red staining, and osteocalcin production assay showed that COUP-TFII overexpression blocks BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation. In contrast, the down-regulation of COUP-TFII synergistically induced the expression of BMP2-induced osteoblastic genes and osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, the immunoprecipitation assay showed that COUP-TFII and Runx2 physically interacted and COUP-TFII significantly impaired the Runx2-dependent activation of the osteocalcin promoter. From the ChIP assay, we found that COUP-TFII repressed DNA binding of Runx2 to the osteocalcin gene, whereas Runx2 inhibited COUP-TFII expression via direct binding to the COUP-TFII promoter. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII negatively regulates osteoblast differentiation via interaction with Runx2, and during the differentiation state, BMP2-induced Runx2 represses COUP-TFII expression and promotes osteoblast differentiation.

  6. Exposure to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine affects histone and RNA polymerase II modifications, but not DNA methylation status, in the regulatory region of the Xenopus laevis thyroid hormone receptor βΑ gene.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Kentaro; Nishiyama, Norihito; Izumi, Yushi; Otsuka, Shunsuke; Ishihara, Akinori; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2015-11-06

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play a critical role in amphibian metamorphosis, during which the TH receptor (TR) gene, thrb, is upregulated in a tissue-specific manner. The Xenopus laevis thrb gene has 3 TH response elements (TREs) in the 5' flanking regulatory region and 1 TRE in the exon b region, around which CpG sites are highly distributed. To clarify whether exposure to 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) affects histone and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) modifications and the level of DNA methylation in the 5' regulatory region, we conducted reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using X. laevis cultured cells and premetamorphic tadpoles treated with or without 2 nM T3. Exposure to T3 increased the amount of the thrb transcript, in parallel with enhanced histone H4 acetylation and RNAPII recruitment, and probably phosphorylation of RNAPII at serine 5, in the 5' regulatory and exon b regions. However, the 5' regulatory region remained hypermethylated even with exposure to T3, and there was no significant difference in the methylation status between DNAs from T3-untreated and -treated cultured cells or tadpole tissues. Our results demonstrate that exposure to T3 induced euchromatin-associated epigenetic marks by enhancing histone acetylation and RNAPII recruitment, but not by decreasing the level of DNA methylation, in the 5' regulatory region of the X. laevis thrb gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  8. Matrilin-3 induction of IL-1 receptor antagonist is required for up-regulating collagen II and aggrecan and down-regulating ADAMTS-5 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jayasuriya, Chathuraka T; Goldring, Mary B; Terek, Richard; Chen, Qian

    2012-09-11

    Deletion or mutation of the gene encoding the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein matrilin-3 (MATN3) results in the early onset of osteoarthritis (OA), suggesting chondroprotective properties of MATN3. To understand the mechanisms underlying these properties, we determined the effects of MATN3 protein on the expression of several key anabolic and catabolic genes involved in chondrocyte homeostasis, and the dependence of such regulation on the anti-inflammatory cytokine: IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). The effects of recombinant human (rh) MATN3 protein were examined in C28/I2 immortalized human chondrocytes, primary human chondrocytes (PHCs), and primary mouse chondrocytes (PMCs). Messenger RNA levels of IL-1Ra, COL2A1, ACAN, MMP-13, and ADAMTS-4 and -5 were determined using real-time RT-PCR. Knocking down IL-1Ra was achieved by siRNA gene silencing. IL-1Ra protein levels were quantified by ELISA and the Bio-Plex Suspension Array System. COL2A1 protein level was quantified using Western blot analysis. Statistic analysis was done using the two-tailed t-test or one-way ANOVA. rhMATN3 protein induced gene expression of IL-1Ra in C28/I2 cells, PHCs, and PMCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of C28/I2 cells and PHCs with MATN3 protein stimulated gene expression of COL2A1 and ACAN. Conversely, mRNA levels of COL2A1 and ACAN were decreased in MATN3 KO mice. MATN3 protein treatment inhibited IL-1β-induced MMP-13, ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5 in C28/I2 cells and PHCs. Knocking down IL-1Ra abolished the MATN3-mediated stimulation of COL2A1 and ACAN and inhibition of ADAMTS-5, but had no effect on MATN3 inhibition of MMP-13 mRNA. Our findings point to a novel regulatory role of MATN3 in cartilage homeostasis due to its capacity to induce IL-1Ra, to upregulate gene expression of the major cartilage matrix components, and to downregulate the expression of OA-associated matrix-degrading proteinases in chondrocytes. The chondroprotective properties of

  9. Linkage analysis of candidate genes in autoimmune thyroid disease. II. Selected gender-related genes and the X-chromosome. International Consortium for the Genetics of Autoimmune Thyroid Disease.

    PubMed

    Barbesino, G; Tomer, Y; Concepcion, E S; Davies, T F; Greenberg, D A

    1998-09-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and Graves' disease (GD) are autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) in which multiple genetic factors are suspected to play an important role. Until now, only a few minor risk factors for these diseases have been identified. Susceptibility seems to be stronger in women, pointing toward a possible role for genes related to sex steroid action or mechanisms related to genes on the X-chromosome. We have studied a total of 45 multiplex families, each containing at least 2 members affected with either GD (55 patients) or HT (72 patients), and used linkage analysis to target as candidate susceptibility loci genes involved in estrogen activity, such as the estrogen receptor alpha and beta and the aromatase genes. We then screened the entire X-chromosome using a set of polymorphic microsatellite markers spanning the whole chromosome. We found a region of the X-chromosome (Xq21.33-22) giving positive logarithm of odds (LOD) scores and then reanalyzed this area with dense markers in a multipoint analysis. Our results excluded linkage to the estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase genes when either the patients with GD only, those with HT only, or those with any AITD were considered as affected. Linkage to the estrogen receptor beta could not be totally ruled out, partly due to incomplete mapping information for the gene itself at this time. The X-chromosome data revealed consistently positive LOD scores (maximum of 1.88 for marker DXS8020 and GD patients) when either definition of affectedness was considered. Analysis of the family data using a multipoint analysis with eight closely linked markers generated LOD scores suggestive of linkage to GD in a chromosomal area (Xq21.33-22) extending for about 6 cM and encompassing four markers. The maximum LOD score (2.5) occurred at DXS8020. In conclusion, we ruled out a major role for estrogen receptor alpha and the aromatase genes in the genetic predisposition to AITD. Estrogen receptor beta remains a

  10. Interactions of trans-acting factor(s) with the estradiol response element and nuclear factor 1 of the vitellogenin II gene of Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Upadhayay, R; Kanungo, M S

    1996-08-01

    This study was directed at achieving an understanding of the mechanisms by which steroid hormones control the synthesis of vitellogenin (VTG) protein in the liver of the Japanese quail. Northern hybridization shows that administration of estradiol alone or with progesterone stimulates the synthesis of VTG mRNA. Gel mobility shift assay of DNA fragments containing the ERE and NF 1 shows that estradiol alone or with progesterone increases the levels of nuclear proteins that bind to these cis-acting elements of the promoter of the VTG gene. The cooperative effect of the two hormones seen at the level of expression of the VTG gene may be due to protein-protein interactions of trans-acting factors that bind to ERE and NF 1.

  11. [Expression in Escherichia coli of the gspd(l) gene of the type II secretion system in Leptospira borgpetersenii serovariety hardjo].

    PubMed

    Reyes, Ernesto Armando Rodríguez; Cullen, Paul; Bulach, Dieter; Adler, Ben; Haake, David; de la Peña-Moctezuma, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    A fragment of 1.539 pb of the gene homologous to gspD of Hardjobovis was clonated in the pET28a vector and it was transformed into E. coli C43 and Rosetta strains. The sequence of GspD(L) showed 46 % of similitude with E. coli GspD secretin. The expression of recombinant GspD(L) was obtained in Rosetta strain.

  12. Regulation of galactokinase gene expression in Tetrahymena thermophila. II. Identification of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine as a primary effector of adrenergic control of galactokinase expression.

    PubMed

    Ness, J C; Morse, D E

    1985-08-25

    Intracellular concentrations of catecholamines were determined in wild-type and mutant Tetrahymena thermophila, using the highly sensitive techniques of high-performance liquid chromatography and electro-chemical detection. Catecholamines were determined in these cell strains grown under various steady-state conditions, including those which initiate and maintain repression of galactokinase gene expression. Wild-type cells grown in defined minimal medium supplemented with 1% glycerol, exhibiting derepressed galactokinase synthesis, were found to contain considerable quantities of dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and dopamine, but no detectable levels of either norepinephrine or epinephrine. Analyses of wild-type cells revealed a strong positive correlation between the internal concentration of dopa and expression of the galactokinase gene, both of which are regulated by exogenous carbohydrates, catecholamine agonists, or dibutyryl-cAMP; an analogous relationship between intracellular dopamine concentrations and galactokinase activity was not found. In addition, a correlation between intracellular dopa content and the phenotypic expression of galactokinase in various mutants deficient in the catecholamine biosynthetic pathway or in glucokinase further confirms the role of dopa as a primary effector in the regulation of galactokinase gene expression.

  13. The mapping of the human 52-kD Ro/SSA autoantigen gene to human chromosome II, and its polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.B.; Itoh, Kazuko; Fujisaku, Atsushi

    1993-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the ribonucleoprotein Ro/SSA occur in nearly half of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and are associated with lymphopenia, photosensitive dermatitis, and pulmonary and renal disease, which suggests that they have an immunopathologic role. The majority of Ro/SSA precipitin-positive patients produce serum antibodies that bind to the 60-kD and 52-kD Ro/SSA proteins. The authors previously isolated and determined the nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone that encodes the 52-kD form of the human Ro/SSA protein. In the present study, they have determined the chromosomal location of the gene by in situ hybridization to the end of the shortmore » arm of chromosome 11. Hybridization of portions of the cDNA probe to restriction enzyme-digested DNA indicated the gene is composed of at least three exons. The exon encoding the putative zinc fingers of this protein was found to be distinct from that which encodes the leucine zipper. An RFLP of this gene was identified and is associated with the presence of lupus, primarily in black Americans. 60 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.« less

  14. Distribución Espacial de Ancho Equivalente del Triplete del CaII a partir de Imágenes GMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, R. J.; Mast, D.

    Using Gemini+GMOS imagery obtained through the filters i, z and CaT, we developed a technique for estimating the value of the Ca II triplet (CaT) equivalent width (EW). The map generated through arithmetic operations with the near infrared images was calibrated with long slit spectra obtained with REOSC spectrograph at CASLEO. We apply this technique to the study of M 83 central region and present the preliminary results on the spatial distribution of the EW(CaT) within an area of 40 per 40 square arcsec around the double nucleus of M 83, with a spatial resolution of 0.8 arcsec. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH.

  15. Low density lipoprotein receptor gene Ava II polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several common genetic polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene have associated with modifications of serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, but the results are not consistent in different populations. Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism and serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 1024 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 792 participants of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our previous stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotyping of the LDL-R gene Ava Ⅱ polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of serum TC, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C, apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 and the ratio of ApoA1 to ApoB were lower in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.01 for all). The frequency of A- and A+ alleles was 65.5% and 34.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 80.7% and 19.3% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. The frequency of A-A-, A-A+ and A+A+ genotypes was 42.6%, 45.9% and 11.5% in Bai Ku Yao, and 64.9%, 31.6% and 3.5% in Han (P < 0.001); respectively. There was also significant difference in the genotypic frequencies between males and females in Bai Ku Yao (P <0.05), and in the genotypic and allelic frequencies between normal LDL-C (≤ 3.20 mmol/L) and high LDL-C (>3.20 mmol/L) subgroups in Bai Ku Yao (P < 0.05 for each) and between males and females in Han (P < 0.05 for each). The levels of LDL-C in males and TC and HDL-C in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05 for all) in Bai Ku Yao, whereas the levels of HDL-C in males and HDL-C and ApoA1 in females were different among the three genotypes (P < 0.05-0.001) in Han. The subjects with A+A+ genotype had

  16. Overexpression of PDX-II gene in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leads to the enhanced accumulation of vitamin B6 in tuber tissues and tolerance to abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Bagri, Deepak Singh; Upadhyaya, Devanshi Chandel; Kumar, Ashwani; Upadhyaya, Chandrama Prakash

    2018-07-01

    Vitamin B6 is a vital metabolite required for living organisms as a cofactor in several metabolic biochemical reactions and recognized as a potent antioxidant molecule which modulates the expression of the proteins responsible for the scavenging of cellular reactive oxygen species. It is well established that the microorganisms and plants can synthesize the B6 de novo, therefore, all the animals including humans must acquire it from the plant dietary resources. However, the bioavailability of the vitamin in the edible portions of the commonly consumed plants is insufficient to meet the daily recommended doses. Genetic engineering techniques have proven successful in increasing the vitamin B6 content in the model plants. Present study describe the development of transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Kufri chipsona) overexpressing key vitamin B6 pathway gene, the PDXII (NCBI database Ref. ID- NM_125447.2) isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana under the control of CaMV 35S constitutive promoter. The stable integration and expression of transgene in the transgenic lines were confirmed by PCR, Southern blot and RT-PCR analysis. Transgenic tubers exhibited considerably improved vitamin B6 accumulation (up to 107-150%) in comparison to the untransformed controls potato. This increase in vitamin B6 was also correlated with the increased mRNA expression of PDXII gene. The prominent increase in the B6 content of transgenic potato was also associated with the capability to survive under abiotic stresses, therefore, the transgenic lines were able to withstand various abiotic stresses imposed by salinity (NaCl) or methyl viologen (MV). We thus demonstrated that overexpression of PDXII gene under the control of a constitutive promoter enhanced the accumulation of the vitamin B6 which also augmented the tolerance under various abiotic stresses in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Endogenous estrogen status, but not genistein supplementation, modulates 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mutation in the liver cII gene of transgenic big blue rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Hutts, Robert C; Mei, Nan; Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Michelle E; Shelton, Sharon; Manjanatha, Mugimane G; Aidoo, Anane

    2005-06-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that isoflavones found in soybeans have estrogenic activity and may safely alleviate the symptoms of menopause. One of these isoflavones, genistein, is commonly used by postmenopausal women as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy. Although sex hormones have been implicated as an important risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, there are limited data on the potential effects of the estrogens, including phytoestrogens, on chemical mutagenesis in liver. Because of the association between mutation induction and the carcinogenesis process, we investigated whether endogenous estrogen and supplemental genistein affect 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mutagenesis in rat liver. Intact and ovariectomized female Big Blue rats were treated with 80 mg DMBA/kg body weight. Some of the rats also received a supplement of 1,000 ppm genistein. Sixteen weeks after the carcinogen treatment, the rats were sacrificed, their livers were removed, and mutant frequencies (MFs) and types of mutations were determined in the liver cII gene. DMBA significantly increased the MFs in liver for both the intact and ovariectomized rats. While there was no significant difference in MF between the ovariectomized and intact control animals, the mutation induction by DMBA in the ovariectomized groups was significantly higher than that in the intact groups. Dietary genistein did not alter these responses. Molecular analysis of the mutants showed that DMBA induced chemical-specific types of mutations in the liver cII gene. These results suggest that endogenous ovarian hormones have an inhibitory effect on liver mutagenesis by DMBA, whereas dietary genistein does not modulate spontaneous or DMBA-induced mutagenesis in either intact or ovariectomized rats.

  18. Phylogenetic relationship of psychoactive fungi based on rRNA gene for a large subunit and their identification using the TaqMan assay (II).

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takuro; Kawahara, Nobuo; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Makino, Yukiko; Fukiharu, Toshimitsu; Goda, Yukihiro

    2006-11-10

    "Magic mushroom (MM)" is the name most commonly given to psychoactive fungi containing the hallucinogenic components: psilocin (1) and psilocybin (2). We investigated the rRNA gene (internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and large subunit (LSU)) of two Panaeolus species and four Psilocybe species fungi (of these, two are non-psilocybin species). On the basis of sequence alignment, we improved the identification system developed in our previous study. In this paper, we describe the new system capable of distinguishing MMs from non-psilocybin Psilocybe species, its application data and the phylogeny of MM species.

  19. Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), an osteoarthritis-associated gene, enhances proliferation and type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Tsuji, Kunikazu, E-mail: ktsuji.gcoe@tmd.ac.jp; Yamaga, Mika

    Highlights: ► hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes. ► To examine the molecular functions of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in chondrocytic ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 enhanced proliferation and colony formation in ATDC5 cells. ► hYKL-39 increased type II collagen expression in ATDC5 cells treated with chondrogenic medium. -- Abstract: Human YKL39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2/CHI3L2) is a secreted 39 kDa protein produced by articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Recent studies showed that hYKL-39 expression is increased in osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes suggesting the involvement of hYKL-39 in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However little is known regarding themore » molecular function of hYKL-39 in joint homeostasis. Sequence analyses indicated that hYKL-39 has significant identity with the human chitotorisidase family molecules, although it is considered that hYKL-39 has no enzymatic activity since it lacks putative chitinase catalytic motif. In this study, to examine the molecular function of hYKL-39 in chondrocytes, we overexpressed hYKL-39 in ATDC5 cells. Here we report that hYKL-39 enhances colony forming activity, cell proliferation, and type II collagen expression in these cells. These data suggest that hYKL-39 is a novel growth and differentiation factor involved in cartilage homeostasis.« less

  20. Determinants of orofacial clefting II: Effects of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine on gene methylation during development of the first branchial arch.

    PubMed

    Seelan, Ratnam S; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Warner, Dennis R; Smolenkova, Irina A; Pisano, M Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Defects in development of the secondary palate, which arise from the embryonic first branchial arch (1-BA), can cause cleft palate (CP). Administration of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (AzaD), a demethylating agent, to pregnant mice on gestational day 9.5 resulted in complete penetrance of CP in fetuses. Several genes critical for normal palatogenesis were found to be upregulated in 1-BA, 12h after AzaD exposure. MethylCap-Seq (MCS) analysis identified several differentially methylated regions (DMRs) in DNA extracted from AzaD-exposed 1-BAs. Hypomethylated DMRs did not correlate with the upregulation of genes in AzaD-exposed 1-BAs. However, most DMRs were associated with endogenous retroviral elements. Expression analyses suggested that interferon signaling was activated in AzaD-exposed 1-BAs. Our data, thus, suggest that a 12-h in utero AzaD exposure demethylates and activates endogenous retroviral elements in the 1-BA, thereby triggering an interferon-mediated response. This may result in the dysregulation of key signaling pathways during palatogenesis, causing CP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B.

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation wasmore » unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. 63 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.« less

  2. Part II: Functional delivery of a neurotherapeutic gene to neural stem cells using minicircle DNA and nanoparticles: Translational advantages for regenerative neurology.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Both neurotrophin-based therapy and neural stem cell (NSC)-based strategies have progressed to clinical trials for treatment of neurological diseases and injuries. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in particular can confer neuroprotective and neuro-regenerative effects in preclinical studies, complementing the cell replacement benefits of NSCs. Therefore, combining both approaches by genetically-engineering NSCs to express BDNF is an attractive approach to achieve combinatorial therapy for complex neural injuries. Current genetic engineering approaches almost exclusively employ viral vectors for gene delivery to NSCs though safety and scalability pose major concerns for clinical translation and applicability. Magnetofection, a non-viral gene transfer approach deploying magnetic nanoparticles and DNA with magnetic fields offers a safe alternative but significant improvements are required to enhance its clinical application for delivery of large sized therapeutic plasmids. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of using minicircles with magnetofection technology to safely engineer NSCs to overexpress BDNF. Primary mouse NSCs overexpressing BDNF generated increased daughter neuronal cell numbers post-differentiation, with accelerated maturation over a four-week period. Based on our findings we highlight the clinical potential of minicircle/magnetofection technology for therapeutic delivery of key neurotrophic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of 13 new mutations in the vasopressin-neurophysin II gene in 17 kindreds with familial autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Rittig, S.; Robertson, G. L.; Siggaard, C.; Kovács, L.; Gregersen, N.; Nyborg, J.; Pedersen, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive postnatal deficiency of arginine vasopressin as a result of mutation in the gene that encodes the hormone. To determine the extent of mutations in the coding region that produce the phenotype, we studied members of 17 unrelated kindreds with the disorder. We sequenced all 3 exons of the gene by using a rapid, direct dye-terminator method and found the causative mutation in each kindred. In four kindreds, the mutations were each identical to mutations described in other affected families. In the other 13 kindreds each mutation was unique. There were two missense mutations that altered the cleavage region of the signal peptide, seven missense mutations in exon 2, which codes for the conserved portion of the protein, one nonsense mutation in exon 2, and three nonsense mutations in exon 3. These findings, together with the clinical features of FNDI, suggest that each of the mutations exerts an effect by directing the production of a pre-prohormone that cannot be folded, processed, or degraded properly and eventually destroys vasopressinergic neurons. Images Figure 3 PMID:8554046

  4. Novel mutations of PAX3, MITF, and SOX10 genes in Chinese patients with type I or type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Lu; Xie, Zhiguo; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Feng, Yong

    2010-06-18

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, pigment disturbances, and sensorineural deafness. There are four WS subtypes. WS1 is mostly caused by PAX3 mutations, while MITF, SNAI2, and SOX10 mutations are associated with WS2. More than 100 different disease-causing mutations have been reported in many ethnic groups, but the data from Chinese patients with WS remains poor. Herein we report 18 patients from 15 Chinese WS families, in which five cases were diagnosed as WS1 and the remaining as WS2. Clinical evaluation revealed intense phenotypic variability in Chinese WS patients. Heterochromia iridis and sensorineural hearing loss were the most frequent features (100% and 88.9%, respectively) of the two subtypes. Many brown freckles on normal skin could be a special subtype of cutaneous pigment disturbances in Chinese WS patients. PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, and SOX10 genes mutations were screened for in all the patients. A total of nine mutations in 11 families were identified and seven of them were novel. The SOX10 mutations in WS2 were first discovered in the Chinese population, with an estimated frequency similar to that of MITF mutations, implying SOX10 is an important pathogenic gene in Chinese WS2 cases and should be considered for first-step analysis in WS2, as well as MITF. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A new double right border binary vector for producing marker-free transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Once a transgenic plant is developed, the selectable marker gene (SMG) becomes unnecessary in the plant. In fact, the continued presence of the SMG in the transgenic plant may cause unexpected pleiotropic effects as well as environmental or biosafety issues. Several methods for removal of SMGs that have been reported remain inaccessible due to protection by patents, while development of new ones is expensive and cost prohibitive. Here, we describe the development of a new vector for producing marker-free plants by simply adapting an ordinary binary vector to the double right border (DRB) vector design using conventional cloning procedures. Findings We developed the DRB vector pMarkfree5.0 by placing the bar gene (representing genes of interest) between two copies of T-DNA right border sequences. The β-glucuronidase (gus) and nptII genes (representing the selectable marker gene) were cloned next followed by one copy of the left border sequence. When tested in a model species (tobacco), this vector system enabled the generation of 55.6% kanamycin-resistant plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The frequency of cotransformation of the nptII and bar transgenes using the vector was 66.7%. Using the leaf bleach and Basta assays, we confirmed that the nptII and bar transgenes were coexpressed and segregated independently in the transgenic plants. This enable separation of the transgenes in plants cotransformed using pMarkfree5.0. Conclusions The results suggest that the DRB system developed here is a practical and effective approach for separation of gene(s) of interest from a SMG and production of SMG-free plants. Therefore this system could be instrumental in production of “clean” plants containing genes of agronomic importance. PMID:24207020

  6. Loss of the flagellum happened only once in the fungal lineage: phylogenetic structure of kingdom Fungi inferred from RNA polymerase II subunit genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajuan J; Hodson, Matthew C; Hall, Benjamin D

    2006-09-29

    At present, there is not a widely accepted consensus view regarding the phylogenetic structure of kingdom Fungi although two major phyla, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are clearly delineated. Regarding the lower fungi, Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota, a variety of proposals have been advanced. Microsporidia may or may not be fungi; the Glomales (vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) may or may not constitute a fifth fungal phylum, and the loss of the flagellum may have occurred either once or multiple times during fungal evolution. All of these issues are capable of being resolved by a molecular phylogenetic analysis which achieves strong statistical support for major branches. To date, no fungal phylogeny based upon molecular characters has satisfied this criterion. Using the translated amino acid sequences of the RPB1 and RPB2 genes, we have inferred a fungal phylogeny that consists largely of well-supported monophyletic phyla. Our major results, each with significant statistical support, are: (1) Microsporidia are sister to kingdom Fungi and are not members of Zygomycota; that is, Microsporidia and fungi originated from a common ancestor. (2) Chytridiomycota, the only fungal phylum having a developmental stage with a flagellum, is paraphyletic and is the basal lineage. (3) Zygomycota is monophyletic based upon sampling of Trichomycetes, Zygomycetes, and Glomales. (4) Zygomycota, Basidiomycota, and Ascomycota form a monophyletic group separate from Chytridiomycota. (5) Basidiomycota and Ascomycota are monophyletic sister groups. In general, this paper highlights the evolutionary position and significance of the lower fungi (Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota). Our results suggest that loss of the flagellum happened only once during early stages of fungal evolution; consequently, the majority of fungi, unlike plants and animals, are nonflagellated. The phylogeny we infer from gene sequences is the first one that is congruent with the widely accepted morphology

  7. The Missing Link in Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion: the BDLF3 Gene Induces Ubiquitination and Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Laura L.; Williams, Luke R.; White, Claire; Forrest, Calum; Rowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to spread and persist in human populations relies on a balance between host immune responses and EBV immune evasion. CD8+ cells specific for EBV late lytic cycle antigens show poor recognition of target cells compared to immediate early and early antigen-specific CD8+ cells. This phenomenon is due in part to the early EBV protein BILF1, whose immunosuppressive activity increases with lytic cycle progression. However, published data suggest the existence of a hitherto unidentified immune evasion protein further enhancing protection against late EBV antigen-specific CD8+ cells. We have now identified the late lytic BDLF3 gene as the missing link accounting for efficient evasion during the late lytic cycle. Interestingly, BDLF3 also contributes to evasion of CD4+ cell responses to EBV. We report that BDLF3 downregulates expression of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules in the absence of any effect upon other surface molecules screened, including CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD71 (transferrin receptor). BDLF3 both enhanced internalization of surface MHC molecules and reduced the rate of their appearance at the cell surface. The reduced expression of surface MHC molecules correlated with functional protection against CD8+ and CD4+ T cell recognition. The molecular mechanism was identified as BDLF3-induced ubiquitination of MHC molecules and their subsequent downregulation in a proteasome-dependent manner. IMPORTANCE Immune evasion is a necessary feature of viruses that establish lifelong persistent infections in the face of strong immune responses. EBV is an important human pathogen whose immune evasion mechanisms are only partly understood. Of the EBV immune evasion mechanisms identified to date, none could explain why CD8+ T cell responses to late lytic cycle genes are so infrequent and, when present, recognize lytically infected target cells so poorly relative to CD8+ T cells specific for

  8. The Missing Link in Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion: the BDLF3 Gene Induces Ubiquitination and Downregulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I (MHC-I) and MHC-II.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Laura L; Williams, Luke R; White, Claire; Forrest, Calum; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to spread and persist in human populations relies on a balance between host immune responses and EBV immune evasion. CD8(+) cells specific for EBV late lytic cycle antigens show poor recognition of target cells compared to immediate early and early antigen-specific CD8(+) cells. This phenomenon is due in part to the early EBV protein BILF1, whose immunosuppressive activity increases with lytic cycle progression. However, published data suggest the existence of a hitherto unidentified immune evasion protein further enhancing protection against late EBV antigen-specific CD8(+) cells. We have now identified the late lytic BDLF3 gene as the missing link accounting for efficient evasion during the late lytic cycle. Interestingly, BDLF3 also contributes to evasion of CD4(+) cell responses to EBV. We report that BDLF3 downregulates expression of surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules in the absence of any effect upon other surface molecules screened, including CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD71 (transferrin receptor). BDLF3 both enhanced internalization of surface MHC molecules and reduced the rate of their appearance at the cell surface. The reduced expression of surface MHC molecules correlated with functional protection against CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell recognition. The molecular mechanism was identified as BDLF3-induced ubiquitination of MHC molecules and their subsequent downregulation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Immune evasion is a necessary feature of viruses that establish lifelong persistent infections in the face of strong immune responses. EBV is an important human pathogen whose immune evasion mechanisms are only partly understood. Of the EBV immune evasion mechanisms identified to date, none could explain why CD8(+) T cell responses to late lytic cycle genes are so infrequent and, when present, recognize lytically infected target cells so poorly relative to CD8(+) T cells specific for

  9. Allelic diversity of the MHC class II DRB genes in brown bears (Ursus arctos) and a comparison of DRB sequences within the family Ursidae.

    PubMed

    Goda, N; Mano, T; Kosintsev, P; Vorobiev, A; Masuda, R

    2010-11-01

    The allelic diversity of the DRB locus in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes was analyzed in the brown bear (Ursus arctos) from the Hokkaido Island of Japan, Siberia, and Kodiak of Alaska. Nineteen alleles of the DRB exon 2 were identified from a total of 38 individuals of U. arctos and were highly polymorphic. Comparisons of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions in the antigen-binding sites of deduced amino acid sequences indicated evidence for balancing selection on the bear DRB locus. The phylogenetic analysis of the DRB alleles among three genera (Ursus, Tremarctos, and Ailuropoda) in the family Ursidae revealed that DRB allelic lineages were not separated according to species. This strongly shows trans-species persistence of DRB alleles within the Ursidae. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II represses cardiac transcription of the L-type calcium channel α1C-subunit gene (Cacna1c) by DREAM translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ronkainen, Jarkko J; Hänninen, Sandra L; Korhonen, Topi; Koivumäki, Jussi T; Skoumal, Reka; Rautio, Sini; Ronkainen, Veli-Pekka; Tavi, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have demonstrated that changes in the activity of calcium–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) induce a unique cardiomyocyte phenotype through the regulation of specific genes involved in excitation–contraction (E–C)-coupling. To explain the transcriptional effects of CaMKII we identified a novel CaMKII-dependent pathway for controlling the expression of the pore-forming α-subunit (Cav1.2) of the L-type calcium channel (LTCC) in cardiac myocytes. We show that overexpression of either cytosolic (δC) or nuclear (δB) CaMKII isoforms selectively downregulate the expression of the Cav1.2. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII activity induced measurable changes in LTCC current density and subsequent changes in cardiomyocyte calcium signalling in less than 24 h. The effect of CaMKII on the α1C-subunit gene (Cacna1c) promoter was abolished by deletion of the downstream regulatory element (DRE), which binds transcriptional repressor DREAM/calsenilin/KChIP3. Imaging DREAM–GFP (green fluorescent protein)-expressing cardiomyocytes showed that CaMKII potentiates the calcium-induced nuclear translocation of DREAM. Thereby CaMKII increases DREAM binding to the DRE consensus sequence of the endogenous Cacna1c gene. By mathematical modelling we demonstrate that the LTCC downregulation through the Ca2+–CaMKII–DREAM cascade constitutes a physiological feedback mechanism enabling cardiomyocytes to adjust the calcium intrusion through LTCCs to the amount of intracellular calcium detected by CaMKII. PMID:21486818

  11. Phase I/II Trial of Adeno-Associated Virus–Mediated Alpha-Glucosidase Gene Therapy to the Diaphragm for Chronic Respiratory Failure in Pompe Disease: Initial Safety and Ventilatory Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barbara K.; Collins, Shelley W.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Lawson, Lee Ann; Martin, Anatole D.; Fuller, David D.; Cleaver, Brian D.; Clément, Nathalie; Phillips, Dawn; Islam, Saleem; Dobjia, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Pompe disease is an inherited neuromuscular disease caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) leading to glycogen accumulation in muscle and motoneurons. Cardiopulmonary failure in infancy leads to early mortality, and GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) results in improved survival, reduction of cardiac hypertrophy, and developmental gains. However, many children have progressive ventilatory insufficiency and need additional support. Preclinical work shows that gene transfer restores phrenic neural activity and corrects ventilatory deficits. Here we present 180-day safety and ventilatory outcomes for five ventilator-dependent children in a phase I/II clinical trial of AAV-mediated GAA gene therapy (rAAV1-hGAA) following intradiaphragmatic delivery. We assessed whether rAAV1-hGAA results in acceptable safety outcomes and detectable functional changes, using general safety measures, immunological studies, and pulmonary functional testing. All subjects required chronic, full-time mechanical ventilation because of respiratory failure that was unresponsive to both ERT and preoperative muscle-conditioning exercises. After receiving a dose of either 1×1012 vg (n=3) or 5×1012 vg (n=2) of rAAV1-hGAA, the subjects' unassisted tidal volume was significantly larger (median [interquartile range] 28.8% increase [15.2–35.2], p<0.05). Further, most patients tolerated appreciably longer periods of unassisted breathing (425% increase [103–851], p=0.08). Gene transfer did not improve maximal inspiratory pressure. Expected levels of circulating antibodies and no T-cell-mediated immune responses to the vector (capsids) were observed. One subject demonstrated a slight increase in anti-GAA antibody that was not considered clinically significant. These results indicate that rAAV1-hGAA was safe and may lead to modest improvements in volitional ventilatory performance measures. Evaluation of the next five patients will determine whether earlier

  12. Human mtDNA hypervariable regions, HVR I and II, hint at deep common maternal founder and subsequent maternal gene flow in Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swarkar; Saha, Anjana; Rai, Ekta; Bhat, Audesh; Bamezai, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    We have analysed the hypervariable regions (HVR I and II) of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in individuals from Uttar Pradesh (UP), Bihar (BI) and Punjab (PUNJ), belonging to the Indo-European linguistic group, and from South India (SI), that have their linguistic roots in Dravidian language. Our analysis revealed the presence of known and novel mutations in both hypervariable regions in the studied population groups. Median joining network analyses based on mtDNA showed extensive overlap in mtDNA lineages despite the extensive cultural and linguistic diversity. MDS plot analysis based on Fst distances suggested increased maternal genetic proximity for the studied population groups compared with other world populations. Mismatch distribution curves, respective neighbour joining trees and other statistical analyses showed that there were significant expansions. The study revealed an ancient common ancestry for the studied population groups, most probably through common founder female lineage(s), and also indicated that human migrations occurred (maybe across and within the Indian subcontinent) even after the initial phase of female migration to India.

  13. Polymorphisms in phase I and phase II genes and breast cancer risk and relations to persistent organic pollutant exposure: a case-control study in Inuit women.

    PubMed

    Ghisari, Mandana; Eiberg, Hans; Long, Manhai; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2014-03-16

    We have previously reported that chemicals belonging to the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as perfluorinated compounds (PFAS) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are risk factors in Breast Cancer (BC) development in Greenlandic Inuit women. The present case-control study aimed to investigate the main effect of polymorphisms in genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and estrogen biosynthesis, CYP1A1, CYP1B1, COMT and CYP17, CYP19 and the BRCA1 founder mutation in relation to BC risk and to explore possible interactions between the gene polymorphisms and serum POP levels on BC risk in Greenlandic Inuit women. The study population consisted of 31 BC cases and 115 matched controls, with information on serum levels of POPs. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1A1 (Ile462Val; rs1048943), CYP1B1 (Leu432Val; rs1056836), COMT (Val158Met; rs4680), CYP17A1 (A1> A2; rs743572); CYP19A1 (C> T; rs10046) and CYP19A1 ((TTTA)n repeats) polymorphisms and BRCA1 founder mutation using TaqMan allelic discrimination method and polymerase chain reaction based restriction fragment length polymorphism. The χ2 -test was used to compare categorical variables between cases and controls and the odds ratios were estimated by unconditional logistic regression models. We found an independent association of CYP1A1 (Val) and CYP17 (A1) with BC risk.Furthermore, an increased BC risk was observed for women with high serum levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and carriers of at least: one CYP1A1 variant Val allele; one variant COMT Met allele; or the common CYP17 A1 allele. No combined effects were seen between PFAS exposure and CYP1B1 and CYP19 polymorphisms. The risk of BC was not found significantly associated with exposure to PCBs and OCPs, regardless of genotype for all investigated SNPs. The frequency of the Greenlandic founder mutation in BRCA1 was as expected higher in cases than in controls. The BRCA1 founder mutation and polymorphisms in

  14. [Molecular aspects of allergy to plant products. Part II. Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs), apple allergenicity governed by Mal d 1 gene].

    PubMed

    Bokszczanin, Kamila Ł; Przybyła, Andrzej A

    2012-03-01

    Of the plant allergens listed in the Official Allergen Database of the International Union of Immunological Societies, approximately 25% belong to the group of pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs). They have been classified into 17 PR families based on similarities in their amino acid sequence, enzymatic activities, or other functional properties. Plant-derived allergens have been identified with sequence similarities to PR families 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, and 14. The main birch allergen in northern Europe is a class 10 (PR-10) protein from the European white birch (Betula pendula) termed Bet v 1. Pollen of other Fagales species contains PR-10 homologues that share epitopes with Bet v 1, as do several fruits, nuts and vegetables. Among the plant food fruits of the Rosaceae family are the most frequently responsible for allergenic reactions. It is documented, that approximately 2% of European population is allergic to apples. The article presents molecular characterization of PR-10 proteins with regard to their structure and function as well as apple Mal d 1 gene-determined allergenicity.

  15. BASS II

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-14

    ISS038-E-047576 (14 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  16. BASS II

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-14

    ISS038-E-047582 (14 Feb. 2014) --- NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio, Expedition 38 flight engineer, works with the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS-II) experiment in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) located in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. BASS-II explores how different substances burn in microgravity with benefits for combustion on Earth and fire safety in space.

  17. Supplemental vitamin D3 and zilpaterol hydrochloride. II. Effect on calcium concentration, muscle fiber type, and calpain gene expression of feedlot steers.

    PubMed

    Korn, K T; Lemenager, R P; Claeys, M C; Waddell, J N; Engstrom, M; Schoonmaker, J P

    2013-07-01

    Two hundred and ten Angus × Simmental steers (initial BW 314 ± 11 kg) were separated into heavy and light BW blocks and allotted evenly by BW to 6 treatments (3 heavy and 2 light pens per treatment) to determine the effect of supplemental vitamin D3: 0 IU (no D), 250,000 IU for 165 d (long-term D), or 5 × 10(6) IU for 10 d (short-term D) on plasma and muscle calcium concentrations and gene expression in steers fed either 0 (NZ) or 8.38 mg/kg (ZH) zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) daily for 21 d. Placebo or ZH was added to the diet 24 d, and short-term D was added 13 d before slaughter. Treatments were removed from all diets 3 d before slaughter. Plasma total calcium (Ca(2+)) was determined at study initiation, start of ZH and short-term D feedings, and at vitamin D3 and ZH withdrawal. Both plasma total and ionic Ca(2+) were determined when animals were sent to harvest. Longissimus muscle total and ionic Ca(2+) were determined in meat aged 7 and 4 d postmortem, respectively. When ZH was fed, long-term D decreased plasma total Ca(2+) at slaughter (P < 0.04). Short-term D increased (P < 0.01) plasma total and ionic Ca(2+) at slaughter regardless of ZH inclusion in the diet. Long- and short-term D, with or without ZH, did not affect (P > 0.28) LM total Ca(2+); however, both long- and short-term D increased LM ionic Ca(2+) when ZH was not fed (P < 0.01). Long-term D reduced LM ionic Ca(2+) when ZH was fed (P < 0.02). Neither long- nor short-term D affected PPARα or δ gene expression (P = 0.19) whether or not ZH was fed. Expression of MYH1 and 2A (P < 0.05) but not 2X (P = 0.21) was decreased in steers fed ZH. Long-term D had no effect on MYH2A expression (P = 0.21). Short-term D increased MYH2A expression when ZH was not fed (P < 0.03). Calpain mRNA tended to be lower in steers fed ZH (P = 0.09), but was not affected by long- or short-term D regardless of whether or not ZH was fed (P = 0.39). Expression of calpastatin did not differ with vitamin D supplementation (P

  18. Plasticity of the reproductive axis caused by social status change in an african cichlid fish: II. testicular gene expression and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maruska, Karen P; Fernald, Russell D

    2011-01-01

    Reproduction in all vertebrates is controlled by the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis, which is regulated socially in males of the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni. Although social information influences GnRH1 neurons at the apex of the BPG axis, little is known about how the social environment and dominance affects the cellular and molecular composition of the testes to regulate reproductive capacity. We created an opportunity for reproductively suppressed males to ascend in status and then measured changes in gene expression and tissue morphology to discover how quickly the perception of this opportunity can influence the testes. Our results show rapid up-regulation of mRNA levels of FSH receptor and several steroid receptor subtypes in the testes during social ascent. In contrast, LH receptor was not elevated until 72 h after ascent, but this increase was coincident with elevated circulating androgens and early stages of spermatogenesis, suggesting a role in steroidogenesis. The spermatogenic potential of the testes, as measured by cellular composition, was also elevated before the overall increase in testes size. The presence of cysts at all stages of spermatogenesis, coupled with lower levels of gonadotropin and steroid receptors in subordinate males, suggests that the BPG axis and spermatogenesis are maintained at a subthreshold level in anticipation of the chance to gain a territory and become reproductively active. Our results show that the testis is stimulated extremely quickly after perception of social opportunity, presumably to allow suppressed males to rapidly achieve high reproductive success in a dynamic social environment.

  19. Shark class II invariant chain reveals ancient conserved relationships with cathepsins and MHC class II.

    PubMed

    Criscitiello, Michael F; Ohta, Yuko; Graham, Matthew D; Eubanks, Jeannine O; Chen, Patricia L; Flajnik, Martin F

    2012-03-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) is the critical third chain required for the MHC class II heterodimer to be properly guided through the cell, loaded with peptide, and expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells. Here, we report the isolation of the nurse shark Ii gene, and the comparative analysis of Ii splice variants, expression, genomic organization, predicted structure, and function throughout vertebrate evolution. Alternative splicing to yield Ii with and without the putative protease-protective, thyroglobulin-like domain is as ancient as the MHC-based adaptive immune system, as our analyses in shark and lizard further show conservation of this mechanism in all vertebrate classes except bony fish. Remarkable coordinate expression of Ii and class II was found in shark tissues. Conserved Ii residues and cathepsin L orthologs suggest their long co-evolution in the antigen presentation pathway, and genomic analyses suggest 450 million years of conserved Ii exon/intron structure. Other than an extended linker preceding the thyroglobulin-like domain in cartilaginous fish, the Ii gene and protein are predicted to have largely similar physiology from shark to man. Duplicated Ii genes found only in teleosts appear to have become sub-functionalized, as one form is predicted to play the same role as that mediated by Ii mRNA alternative splicing in all other vertebrate classes. No Ii homologs or potential ancestors of any of the functional Ii domains were found in the jawless fish or lower chordates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of the Bacillus methanolicus citrate synthase II gene, citY, in regulating the secretion of glutamate in L-lysine-secreting mutants.

    PubMed

    Brautaset, Trygve; Williams, Mark D; Dillingham, Richard D; Kaufmann, Christine; Bennaars, Assumpta; Crabbe, Edward; Flickinger, Michael C

    2003-07-01

    The thermotolerant, restrictive methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus MGA3 (ATCC 53907) can secrete 55 g of glutamate per liter (maximum yield, 0.36 g/g) at 50 degrees C with methanol as a carbon source and a source of ammonia in fed-batch bioreactors. A homoserine dehydrogenase mutant, 13A52-8A66, secreting up to 35 g of L-lysine per liter in fed-batch fermentations had minimal 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity [7.3 nmol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1)], threefold-increased pyruvate carboxylase activity [535 nmol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1)], and elevated citrate synthase (CS) activity [292 nmol min(-1) (mg of protein)(-1)] and simultaneously secreted glutamate (20 to 30 g per liter) and L-lysine. The flow of carbon from oxaloacetate is split between transamination to aspartate and formation of citrate. To investigate the regulation of this branch point, the B. methanolicus gene citY encoding a CSII protein with activity at 50 degrees C was cloned from 13A52-8A66 into a CS-deficient Escherichia coli K2-1-4 strain. A citY-deficient B. methanolicus mutant, NCS-L-7, was also isolated from the parent strain of 13A52-8A66 by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, followed by selection with monofluoroacetate disks on glutamate plates. Characterization of these strains confirmed that citY in strain 13A52-8A66 was not altered and that B. methanolicus possessed several forms of CS. Analysis of citY cloned from NCS-L-7 showed that the reduced CS activity resulted from a frameshift mutation. The level of glutamate secreted by NCS-L-7 was reduced sevenfold and the ratio of L-lysine to glutamate secreted was increased 4.5-fold compared to the wild type in fed-batch cultures with glutamate feeding. This indicates that glutamate secretion in L-lysine-overproducing mutants can be altered in favor of increased L-lysine secretion by regulating in vivo CS activity.

  1. Role of the Bacillus methanolicus Citrate Synthase II Gene, citY, in Regulating the Secretion of Glutamate in l-Lysine-Secreting Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Brautaset, Trygve; Williams, Mark D.; Dillingham, Richard D.; Kaufmann, Christine; Bennaars, Assumpta; Crabbe, Edward; Flickinger, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    The thermotolerant, restrictive methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus MGA3 (ATCC 53907) can secrete 55 g of glutamate per liter (maximum yield, 0.36 g/g) at 50°C with methanol as a carbon source and a source of ammonia in fed-batch bioreactors. A homoserine dehydrogenase mutant, 13A52-8A66, secreting up to 35 g of l-lysine per liter in fed-batch fermentations had minimal 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity [7.3 nmol min−1 (mg of protein)−1], threefold-increased pyruvate carboxylase activity [535 nmol min−1 (mg of protein)−1], and elevated citrate synthase (CS) activity [292 nmol min−1 (mg of protein)−1] and simultaneously secreted glutamate (20 to 30 g per liter) and l-lysine. The flow of carbon from oxaloacetate is split between transamination to aspartate and formation of citrate. To investigate the regulation of this branch point, the B. methanolicus gene citY encoding a CSII protein with activity at 50°C was cloned from 13A52-8A66 into a CS-deficient Escherichia coli K2-1-4 strain. A citY-deficient B. methanolicus mutant, NCS-L-7, was also isolated from the parent strain of 13A52-8A66 by N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, followed by selection with monofluoroacetate disks on glutamate plates. Characterization of these strains confirmed that citY in strain 13A52-8A66 was not altered and that B. methanolicus possessed several forms of CS. Analysis of citY cloned from NCS-L-7 showed that the reduced CS activity resulted from a frameshift mutation. The level of glutamate secreted by NCS-L-7 was reduced sevenfold and the ratio of l-lysine to glutamate secreted was increased 4.5-fold compared to the wild type in fed-batch cultures with glutamate feeding. This indicates that glutamate secretion in l-lysine-overproducing mutants can be altered in favor of increased l-lysine secretion by regulating in vivo CS activity. PMID:12839772

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of MAGE-A3 cancer immunotherapeutic with dacarbazine in patients with MAGE-A3-positive metastatic cutaneous melanoma: an open phase I/II study with a first assessment of a predictive gene signature

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Jean-Jacques; Mortier, Laurent; D’Hondt, Lionel; Grange, Florent; Baurain, Jean Francois; Dréno, Brigitte; Lebbe, Céleste; Robert, Caroline; Dompmartin, Anne; Neyns, Bart; Gillet, Marc; Louahed, Jamila; Jarnjak, Silvija; Lehmann, Frédéric F

    2017-01-01

    Background We assessed safety, immunogenicity and clinical activity of recombinant MAGE-A3 antigen combined with AS15 immunostimulant (MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic) in association with dacarbazine in patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods In this open-label, phase I/II, uncontrolled multicentre trial conducted in Belgium and France, patients with MAGE-A3-positive melanoma received up to 24 doses of MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic (four cycles) coadministered with eight doses of dacarbazine. Adverse events (AE) were recorded until 31 days postvaccination, and serious AEs (SAE), until 30 days following the last dose. MAGE-A3-specific antibodies were measured by ELISA. Clinical activity of MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic was assessed in patients positive/negative for previously identified gene signature (GS) associated with clinical outcome. Results Forty-eight patients were enrolled and treated (32 GS+, 15 GS−, 1 unknown GS status); two patients completed the study. All patients reported AEs, the most common were ‘general disorders and administration site conditions’ (94%). Treatment-related AEs were reported by 85% of patients; the most common was pain at injection site (38%). Sixteen SAEs were reported by 21% of patients; two were considered as treatment related (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia; grade 4). Postdose 4, all patients were seropositive for MAGE-A3-specific antibodies, with a geometric mean titre of 2778.7 ELISA units (EU)/mL (95% CI 1638.3 to 4712.8). One complete and three partial responses were reported (only in GS+ patients). Median overall survival was 11.4 months for GS+ and 5.3 months for GS− patients. Conclusion Although this trial shows poor results compared with the new results with checkpoint inhibitors, it gives an interesting insight in rapidly developing fields like combinations of immunotherapy and chemotherapy, new generation vaccines and the use of gene profile as a predictive marker. Trial registration number NCT00849875. PMID:29177094

  3. Safety and immunogenicity of MAGE-A3 cancer immunotherapeutic with dacarbazine in patients with MAGE-A3-positive metastatic cutaneous melanoma: an open phase I/II study with a first assessment of a predictive gene signature.

    PubMed

    Grob, Jean-Jacques; Mortier, Laurent; D'Hondt, Lionel; Grange, Florent; Baurain, Jean Francois; Dréno, Brigitte; Lebbe, Céleste; Robert, Caroline; Dompmartin, Anne; Neyns, Bart; Gillet, Marc; Louahed, Jamila; Jarnjak, Silvija; Lehmann, Frédéric F

    2017-01-01

    We assessed safety, immunogenicity and clinical activity of recombinant MAGE-A3 antigen combined with AS15 immunostimulant (MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic) in association with dacarbazine in patients with metastatic melanoma. In this open-label, phase I/II, uncontrolled multicentre trial conducted in Belgium and France, patients with MAGE-A3-positive melanoma received up to 24 doses of MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic (four cycles) coadministered with eight doses of dacarbazine. Adverse events (AE) were recorded until 31 days postvaccination, and serious AEs (SAE), until 30 days following the last dose. MAGE-A3-specific antibodies were measured by ELISA. Clinical activity of MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic was assessed in patients positive/negative for previously identified gene signature (GS) associated with clinical outcome. Forty-eight patients were enrolled and treated (32 GS+, 15 GS-, 1 unknown GS status); two patients completed the study. All patients reported AEs, the most common were 'general disorders and administration site conditions' (94%). Treatment-related AEs were reported by 85% of patients; the most common was pain at injection site (38%). Sixteen SAEs were reported by 21% of patients; two were considered as treatment related (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia; grade 4). Postdose 4, all patients were seropositive for MAGE-A3-specific antibodies, with a geometric mean titre of 2778.7 ELISA units (EU)/mL (95% CI 1638.3 to 4712.8). One complete and three partial responses were reported (only in GS+ patients). Median overall survival was 11.4 months for GS+ and 5.3 months for GS- patients. Although this trial shows poor results compared with the new results with checkpoint inhibitors, it gives an interesting insight in rapidly developing fields like combinations of immunotherapy and chemotherapy, new generation vaccines and the use of gene profile as a predictive marker. NCT00849875.

  4. TAF(II)250: a transcription toolbox.

    PubMed

    Wassarman, D A; Sauer, F

    2001-08-01

    Activation of RNA-polymerase-II-dependent transcription involves conversion of signals provided by gene-specific activator proteins into the synthesis of messenger RNA. This conversion requires dynamic structural changes in chromatin and assembly of general transcription factors (GTFs) and RNA polymerase II at core promoter sequence elements surrounding the transcription start site of genes. One hallmark of transcriptional activation is the interaction of DNA-bound activators with coactivators such as the TATA-box binding protein (TBP)-associated factors (TAF(II)s) within the GTF TFIID. TAF(II)250 possesses a variety of activities that are likely to contribute to the initial steps of RNA polymerase II transcription. TAF(II)250 is a scaffold for assembly of other TAF(II)s and TBP into TFIID, TAF(II)250 binds activators to recruit TFIID to particular promoters, TAF(II)250 regulates binding of TBP to DNA, TAF(II)250 binds core promoter initiator elements, TAF(II)250 binds acetylated lysine residues in core histones, and TAF(II)250 possesses protein kinase, ubiquitin-activating/conjugating and acetylase activities that modify histones and GTFs. We speculate that these activities achieve two goals--(1) they aid in positioning and stabilizing TFIID at particular promoters, and (2) they alter chromatin structure at the promoter to allow assembly of GTFs--and we propose a model for how TAF(II)250 converts activation signals into active transcription.

  5. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2017-12-09

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  6. Catching the waves: Following the leading edge of elongating RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Telmo; Adelman, Karen

    2013-01-01

    By precisely tracking the waves of elongating RNA polymerase II (Pol II) during gene activation, Danko et al. (2013) discovered a surprising diversity of elongation rates among and along human genes. PMID:23622514

  7. Genetic variation in candidate obesity genes ADRB2, ADRB3, GHRL, HSD11B1, IRS1, IRS2, and SHC1 and risk for breast cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II.

    PubMed

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Teras, Lauren R; Diver, W Ryan; Tang, Weining; Patel, Alpa V; Stevens, Victoria L; Calle, Eugenia E; Thun, Michael J; Bouzyk, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has consistently been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Proteins that are secreted by adipose tissue or are involved in regulating body mass may play a role in breast tumor development. We conducted a nested case-control study among postmenopausal women from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to determine whether genes associated with obesity increase risk for breast cancer. Tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected to capture common variation across seven candidate genes that encode adipose-related proteins: ADRB2, ADRB3, GHRL, HSD11B1, IRS1, IRS2, and SHC1. Thirty-nine SNPs were genotyped in 648 cases and 659 controls. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association between each tagging SNP and risk for breast cancer while adjusting for matching factors and potential confounders. We also examined whether these SNPs were associated with measures of adult adiposity. Two out of five tagging SNPs in HSD11B1 were associated with breast cancer (rs11807619, P = 0.006; rs932335, P = 0.0001). rs11807619 and rs932335 were highly correlated (r2 = 0.74) and, when modeled as a haplotype, only haplotypes containing the rs932335 C allele were associated with breast cancer. The rs932335 C allele was associated with a nearly twofold increased risk for breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.83, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-3.33 for C/C versus G/G). Three of the 11 SNPs for IRS2 were associated with breast cancer (rs4773082, P = 0.007; rs2289046, P = 0.016; rs754204, P = 0.03). When these three SNPs were examined as a haplotype, only the haplotype that included the G allele of rs2289046 was associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 0.76, 95% confidence interval = 0.63-0.92 for TGC versus CAT). IRS2 rs2289046, rs754204, and rs12584136 were also associated with adult weight gain but only among cases. None of the other SNPs in any gene investigated were associated with breast cancer or

  8. Genetic variation in candidate obesity genes ADRB2, ADRB3, GHRL, HSD11B1, IRS1, IRS2, and SHC1 and risk for breast cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II

    PubMed Central

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Teras, Lauren R; Diver, W Ryan; Tang, Weining; Patel, Alpa V; Stevens, Victoria L; Calle, Eugenia E; Thun, Michael J; Bouzyk, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Obesity has consistently been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Proteins that are secreted by adipose tissue or are involved in regulating body mass may play a role in breast tumor development. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study among postmenopausal women from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to determine whether genes associated with obesity increase risk for breast cancer. Tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected to capture common variation across seven candidate genes that encode adipose-related proteins: ADRB2, ADRB3, GHRL, HSD11B1, IRS1, IRS2, and SHC1. Thirty-nine SNPs were genotyped in 648 cases and 659 controls. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association between each tagging SNP and risk for breast cancer while adjusting for matching factors and potential confounders. We also examined whether these SNPs were associated with measures of adult adiposity. Results Two out of five tagging SNPs in HSD11B1 were associated with breast cancer (rs11807619, P = 0.006; rs932335, P = 0.0001). rs11807619 and rs932335 were highly correlated (r2 = 0.74) and, when modeled as a haplotype, only haplotypes containing the rs932335 C allele were associated with breast cancer. The rs932335 C allele was associated with a nearly twofold increased risk for breast cancer (odds ratio = 1.83, 95% confidence interval = 1.01–3.33 for C/C versus G/G). Three of the 11 SNPs for IRS2 were associated with breast cancer (rs4773082, P = 0.007; rs2289046, P = 0.016; rs754204, P = 0.03). When these three SNPs were examined as a haplotype, only the haplotype that included the G allele of rs2289046 was associated with breast cancer (odds ratio = 0.76, 95% confidence interval = 0.63–0.92 for TGC versus CAT). IRS2 rs2289046, rs754204, and rs12584136 were also associated with adult weight gain but only among cases. None of the other SNPs in any gene investigated were

  9. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    PubMed

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interstitial deletion of chromosome 1q [del(1)(q24q25.3)] identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization and gene dosage analysis of apolipoprotein A-II, coagulation factor V, and antithrombin III

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Takako; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Mori, Yosuke

    We report on a 12-month-old Japanese boy with an interstitial deletion of the long-arm of chromosome 1 and meningomyelocele, hydrocephalus, anal atresia, atrial septal defect, left renal agenesis, bilateral cryptorchidism, talipes equinovarus, low birth weight, growth/developmental retardation, and many minor anomalies. By conventional GTG-banding, his karyotype was first interpreted as 46,XY,de1(1)(q23q24), but it was corrected as 46,XY.ish del(1)(q24q25.3) by fluorescence in situ hybridization using 11 known cosmid clones as probes. His serum levels of apolipoprotein A-II (gene symbol: APOA2, previously assigned to 1q21-q23) and coagulation factor V (F5, 1q21-q25) were normal, while serum concentration and activity of antithrombin III (AT3,more » 1q23-q25.1) was low. The results indicated that localization of APOA2 and F5 are proximal to the deleted region and AT3 is located within the deletion extent in the patient. 16 refs., 4 figs.« less

  11. Cardiac transcriptional response to acute and chronic angiotensin II treatments.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Jennie E; Frank, Bryan C; Gaspard, Renee M; Duka, Irena; Gavras, Haralambos; Quackenbush, John

    2004-07-08

    Exposure of experimental animals to increased angiotensin II (ANG II) induces hypertension associated with cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, and myocardial necrosis and fibrosis. Some of the most effective antihypertensive treatments are those that antagonize ANG II. We investigated cardiac gene expression in response to acute (24 h) and chronic (14 day) infusion of ANG II in mice; 24-h treatment induces hypertension, and 14-day treatment induces hypertension and extensive cardiac hypertrophy and necrosis. For genes differentially expressed in response to ANG II treatment, we tested for significant regulation of pathways, based on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Microarray Pathway Profiler (GenMAPP) databases, as well as functional classes based on Gene Ontology (GO) terms. Both acute and chronic ANG II treatments resulted in decreased expression of mitochondrial metabolic genes, notably those for the electron transport chain and Krebs-TCA cycle; chronic ANG II treatment also resulted in decreased expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. In contrast, genes involved in protein translation and ribosomal activity increased expression following both acute and chronic ANG II treatments. Some classes of genes showed differential response between acute and chronic ANG II treatments. Acute treatment increased expression of genes involved in oxidative stress and amino acid metabolism, whereas chronic treatments increased cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix genes, second messenger cascades responsive to ANG II, and amyloidosis genes. Although a functional linkage between Alzheimer disease, hypertension, and high cholesterol has been previously documented in studies of brain tissue, this is the first demonstration of induction of Alzheimer disease pathways by hypertension in heart tissue. This study provides the most comprehensive available survey of gene expression changes in response to acute and chronic ANG II treatment, verifying

  12. Bacterial group II introns: not just splicing.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José Ignacio; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel

    2007-04-01

    Group II introns are both catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) and mobile retroelements that were discovered almost 14 years ago. It has been suggested that eukaryotic mRNA introns might have originated from the group II introns present in the alphaproteobacterial progenitor of the mitochondria. Bacterial group II introns are of considerable interest not only because of their evolutionary significance, but also because they could potentially be used as tools for genetic manipulation in biotechnology and for gene therapy. This review summarizes what is known about the splicing mechanisms and mobility of bacterial group II introns, and describes the recent development of group II intron-based gene-targetting methods. Bacterial group II intron diversity, evolutionary relationships, and behaviour in bacteria are also discussed.

  13. Chronic low dose ovine corticotropin releasing factor or urocortin II into the rostral dorsal raphe alters exploratory behavior and serotonergic gene expression in specific subregions of the dorsal raphe

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Michael S.; McDevitt, Ross A.; Hoplight, Blair J.; Neumaier, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) family peptides play key roles in integrating neural responses to stress. Both major CRF receptors have been pharmacologically identified in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), a stress sensitive and internally heterogeneous nucleus supplying many forebrain regions with serotonergic input. Despite the involvement of chronic stress and serotonergic dysfunction in human mood and anxiety disorders, little is known about the effects of chronic CRF receptor activation on the DRN. We infused ovine CRF (1ng/hr), urocortin II (UCNII, 1ng/hr), or vehicle alone into rat DRN over 6 days. During infusion, animals were allowed to freely explore an open field for 15 minutes on each of two days, with the addition of a novel object on the second day. Following behavioral testing, 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, serotonin transporter (SERT), and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2) expression were examined through the DRN by in situ hybridization. Ovine CRF infusion resulted in significantly decreased novel object touches, climbs, as well as increased latency to first novel object contact. UCNII had a similar but less dramatic effect, decreasing only climbing behavior. Both ovine CRF and UCNII blunted the decrease in corner time expected on re-exposure to the open field. Both peptides also produced regionally specific changes in gene expression: 5-HT1A expression was increased 30% in the mid-rostral ventromedial DRN, while SERT was decreased by 30% in the mid-caudal shell dorsomedial DRN. There also appeared to be a shift in the relative level of Tph2 expression between the ventromedial and core dorsomedial DRN at the mid-rostral level. Changes in 5-HT1A, SERT, and relative Tph2 mRNA abundance were correlated with novel object exploration. These findings suggest chronic intra-DRN administration of CRF agonists decreases exploratory behavior, while producing subregionally limited changes in serotonergic gene expression. These studies may be relevant to mechanisms

  14. Cell cycle, apoptosis, cellular uptake and whole-transcriptome microarray gene expression analysis of HeLa cells treated with a ruthenium(II)-arene complex with an isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid ligand.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Katarina K; Tanić, Miljana; Ivanović, Ivanka; Gligorijević, Nevenka; Dojčinović, Biljana P; Radulović, Siniša

    2016-10-01

    Ruthenium(II)-arene complexes are promising drug candidates for the therapy of solid tumors. In previous work, seven new compounds of the general formula [Ru(η 6 -p-cymene)(L 1-7 )Cl] were synthesized and characterized, of which the complex with L=isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid (RuT 7 ) was two times as active on HeLa cells compared to normal cell line MRC-5, as indicated by IC 50 values determined after 48h of incubation (45.4±3.0 vs. 84.2±5.7μM, respectively). In the present study, cell cycle analysis of HeLa cells treated with RuT 7 showed S phase arrest and an increase in sub-G1 population. The apoptotic potential of the title compound was confirmed with the Annexin V-FITC/PI assay together with a morphological evaluation of cells using fluorescent microscopy. Analysis of the intracellular accumulation of ruthenium showed 8.9ng Ru/10 6 cells after 6h of incubation. To gain further insight in the molecular mechanism of action of RuT 7 on HeLa cells, a whole-transcriptome microarray gene expression analysis was performed. Analysis of functional categories and signaling and biochemical pathways associated with the response of HeLa cells to treatment with RuT 7 showed that it leads the cells through the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway, via indirect DNA damage due to the action of reactive oxygen species, and through direct DNA binding of RuT 7 . Statistical analysis for enrichment of gene sets associated with known drug-induced toxicities identified fewer associated toxicity profiles in RuT 7 -treated cells compared to cisplatin treatment. Altogether these results provide the basis for further development of RuT 7 in animal and pre-clinical studies as a potential drug candidate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. FAQs II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Frank, Vikki; Lester, Jaime; Yang, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    In their paper entitled "Why should postsecondary institutions consider partnering to offer (Individual Development Accounts (IDAs)?" the authors reviewed frequently asked questions they encountered from higher education professionals about IDAs, but as their research continued so did the questions. FAQ II has more in-depth questions and…

  16. Specific immune response genes of the guinea pig. II. Relationship between the poly-L-lysine gene and the genes controlling immune responsiveness to copolymers of L-glutamic acid and L-alanine and L-glutamic acid and L-tyrosine in random-bred Hartley guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bluestein, H G; Green, I; Benacerraf, B

    1971-08-01

    The ability of guinea pigs to make immune responses to GA, a linear random copolymer of L-glutamic acid and L-alanine, GT, a random linear copolymer of L-glutamic acid and L-tyrosine, and PLL, a linear homopolymer of L-lysine, is controlled by different autosomal dominant genes specific for each of those polymers. We have investigated the relationship between the PLL gene and the GA and GT immune response genes by simultaneously immunizing random-bred Hartley strain guinea pigs with GA and PLL, GT and PLL, or GA and GT. In most Hartley guinea pigs the ability to respond immunologically to GA and to PLL is inherited together; that is, most animals responding to GA respond to PLL and vice versa. However, a few animals respond to either GA or to PLL but not both, demonstrating that the GA and PLL immune response genes are not identical but linked in most Hartley animals. Conversely, when simultaneously immunized with GT and PLL, most Hartley guinea pigs respond to either PLL or GT but not both, indicating that GT and PLL responsiveness tends to segregate away from each other. Thus, the GT and PLL immune response genes also are not inherited independently but, rather, behave as alleles or pseudoalleles. Similar results are observed when Hartley guinea pigs are simultaneously immunized with GA and GT. The ability to respond to GA segregates away from the ability to respond to GT. Our studies demonstrated that the specific immune response genes thus far identified in guinea pigs controlling the ability to respond to GA, GT, and PLL, respectively, are found on the same chromosome. In most Hartley animals, the GA and PLL immune response genes are often linked, i.e. occur on the same chromosome strand, and tend to behave as alleles or pseudoalleles to the GT immune response gene.

  17. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  18. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolutionmore » than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  19. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.

    1988-11-01

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  20. Highly efficient expression of interleukin-2 under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene enhances protective immune responses of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) DNA vaccine in pigs.

    PubMed

    Du, Yijun; Lu, Yu; Wang, Xinglong; Qi, Jing; Liu, Jiyu; Hu, Yue; Li, Feng; Wu, Jiaqiang; Guo, Lihui; Liu, Junzhen; Tao, Haiying; Sun, Wenbo; Chen, Lei; Cong, Xiaoyan; Ren, Sufang; Shi, Jianli; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinbao; Huang, Baohua; Wan, Renzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) had caused catastrophic losses in swine industry in China. The current inactivated vaccine provided only limited protection, and the attenuated live vaccine could protect piglets against the HP-PRRSV but there was a possibility that the attenuated virus returned to high virulence. In this study, the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1© was modified under the control of rabbit β-globin intron II gene and the modified vector pMVAX1© was constructed. Porcine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and GP3-GP5 fusion protein of HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN were highly expressed by pMVAX1©. Mice inoculated with pMVAX1©-GP35 developed significantly higher PRRSV-specific antibody responses and T cell proliferation than those vaccinated with pVAX1©-GP35. pMVAX1©-GP35 was selected as PRRS DNA vaccine candidate and co-administrated with pVAX1©-IL-2 or pMVAX1©-IL-2 in pigs. pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 could provide enhanced PRRSV-specific antibody responses, T cell proliferation, Th1-type and Th2-type cytokine responses and CTL responses than pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35. Following homologous challenge with HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN, similar with attenuated PRRS vaccine group, pigs inoculated with pMVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 showed no clinical signs, almost no lung lesions and no viremia, as compared to those in pMVAX1©-GP35 and pVAX1©-IL-2+pMVAX1©-GP35 groups. It indicated that pMVAX1©-IL-2 effectively increases humoral and cell mediated immune responses of pMVAX1©-GP35. Co-administration of pMVAX1©-IL-2 and pMVAX1©-GP35 might be attractive candidate vaccines for preventing HP-PRRSV infections.

  1. High-efficiency induction of soybean hairy roots and propagation of the soybean cyst nematode.

    PubMed

    Cho, H J; Farrand, S K; Noel, G R; Widholm, J M

    2000-01-01

    Cotyledon explants of 10 soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars were inoculated with Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain K599 with and without binary vectors pBI121 or pBINm-gfp5-ER possessing both neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) and beta-glucuronidase (gus) or nptII and green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes, respectively. Hairy roots were produced from the wounded surface of 54-95% of the cotyledon explants on MXB selective medium containing 200 microg ml(-1) kanamycin and 500 microg ml(-1) carbenicillin. Putative individual transformed hairy roots were identified by cucumopine analysis and were screened for transgene incorporation using polymerase chain reaction. All of the roots tested were found to be co-transformed with T-DNA from the Ri-plasmid and the transgene from the binary vectors. Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence of the 35S-gfp5 gene in the plant genomes. Transgene expression was also confirmed by histochemical GUS assay and Western blot analysis for the GFP. Attempts to induce shoot formation from the hairy roots failed. Infection of hairy roots of the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe)-susceptible cultivar, Williams 82, with eggs of H. glycines race 1, resulted in the development of mature cysts about 4-5 weeks after inoculation. Thus the soybean cyst nematode could complete its entire life cycle in transformed soybean hairy-root cultures expressing GFP. This system should be ideal for testing genes that might impart resistance to soybean cyst nematode.

  2. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  3. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes