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Sample records for ii post-lbv wolf-rayet

  1. Uncovering multiple Wolf-Rayet star clusters and the ionized ISM in Mrk 178: the closest metal-poor Wolf-Rayet H II galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehrig, C.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M.; Brinchmann, J.; Kunth, D.; García-Benito, R.; Crowther, P. A.; Hernández-Fernández, J.; Durret, F.; Contini, T.; Fernández-Martín, A.; James, B. L.

    2013-07-01

    New integral field spectroscopy (IFS) has been obtained for the nearby metal-poor Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxy Mrk 178 to examine the spatial correlation between its WR stars and the neighbouring ionized interstellar medium (ISM). The strength of the broad WR features and its low metallicity make Mrk 178 an intriguing object. We have detected the blue and red WR bumps in different locations across the field of view (˜300 pc × 230 pc) in Mrk 178. The study of the WR content has been extended, for the first time, beyond its brightest star-forming knot uncovering new WR star clusters. Using Large/Small Magellanic Cloud-template WR stars, we empirically estimate a minimum of ˜20 WR stars within the region sampled. Maps of the spatial distribution of the emission lines and of the physical-chemical properties of the ionized ISM have been created and analysed. Here, we refine the statistical methodology by Pérez-Montero et al. (2011) to probe the presence of variations in the ISM properties. An error-weighted mean of 12+log(O/H) = 7.72 ± 0.01 is taken as the representative oxygen abundance for Mrk 178. A localized N and He enrichment, spatially correlated with WR stars, is suggested by this analysis. Nebular He II λ4686 emission is shown to be spatially extended reaching well beyond the location of the WR stars. This spatial offset between WRs and He II emission can be explained based on the mechanical energy input into the ISM by the WR star winds, and does not rule out WR stars as the He II ionization source. We study systematic aperture effects on the detection and measurement of the WR features, using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra combined with the power of IFS. In this regard, the importance of targeting low metallicity nearby systems is discussed.

  2. Ionizing stellar population in the disc of NGC 3310 - II. The Wolf-Rayet population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles-Caballero, D.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Díaz, A. I.; Otí-Floranes, H.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    We use integral field spectroscopy to study in detail the Wolf-Rayet (WR) population in NGC 3310, spatially resolving 18 star-forming knots with typical sizes of 200-300 pc in the disc of the galaxy hosting a substantial population of WRs. The detected emission in the so-called blue bump is attributed mainly to late-type nitrogen WRs (WNL), ranging from a few dozens to several hundreds of stars per region. Our estimated WNL/(WNL+O) ratio is comparable to reported empirical relations once the extinction-corrected emission is further corrected by the presence of dust grains inside the nebula that absorb a non-negligible fraction of UV photons. Comparisons of observables with stellar population models show disagreement by factors larger than 2-3. However, if the effects of interacting binaries and/or photon leakage are taken into account, observations and predictions tend to converge. We estimate the binary fraction of the H II regions hosting WRs to be significant in order to recover the observed X-ray flux, hence proving that the binary channel can be critical when predicting observables. We also explore the connection of the environment with the current hypothesis that WRs can be progenitors to long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Galaxy interactions, which can trigger strong episodes of star formation in the central regions, may be a plausible environment where WRs may act as progenitors of GRBs. Finally, even though the chemical abundance is generally homogeneous, we also find weak evidence for rapid N pollution by WR stellar winds at scales of ˜200 pc.

  3. Wolf-Rayet nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the 1960s, it has been established that WR stars are massive stars at advanced evolutionary stages and that their surrounding nebulae result from the interactions between the stellar mass loss and the ambient interstellar medium. Surveys of WR nebulae have been made in the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds, and other nearby galaxies in the Local Group. Some WR nebulae exhibit He II λ4686 line emission, indicating stellar effective temperatures of 90 — 100 x 103 K. The shocked fast stellar winds from WR nebulae have been detected in soft X-rays, but theoretical models have not been able to reproduce the observed X-ray spectral properties. Elemental abundances of WR nebulae consisting of synthesized stellar material can constrain stellar evolution models, but high-dispersion spectra are needed to kinematically separate the expanding shell of a WR nebula and the background interstellar medium for accurate abundance analyses.

  4. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Analysis of the binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenar, T.; Hainich, R.; Todt, H.; Sander, A.; Hamann, W.-R.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eldridge, J. J.; Pablo, H.; Oskinova, L. M.; Richardson, N. D.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are evolved massive stars (Mi ≳ 20 M⊙) characterized by strong mass-loss. Hypothetically, they can form either as single stars or as mass donors in close binaries. About 40% of all known WR stars are confirmed binaries, raising the question as to the impact of binarity on the WR population. Studying WR binaries is crucial in this context, and furthermore enable one to reliably derive the elusive masses of their components, making them indispensable for the study of massive stars. Aims: By performing a spectral analysis of all multiple WR systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), we obtain the full set of stellar parameters for each individual component. Mass-luminosity relations are tested, and the importance of the binary evolution channel is assessed. Methods: The spectral analysis is performed with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code by superimposing model spectra that correspond to each component. Evolutionary channels are constrained using the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) evolution tool. Results: Significant hydrogen mass fractions (0.1

  5. Optical spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacca, William D.; Conti, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained long-slit optical spectra of 10 Wolf-Rayet galaxies and four other starburst galaxies. Using the nebular emission lines we have determined the electron temperatures, electron densities, extinctions, oxygen abundances, mass of ionized hydrogen, and numbers of ionizing photons due to hot stars in these galaxies. The various forbidden line ratios clearly indicate a stellar origin for the emission-line spectrum. From the flux of the broad He II 4686 A emission feature we have estimated the number of Wolf-Rayet stars present. We have accounted for the contribution of these stars to the total ionizing flux and have calculated the ratio of the number of these stars to the number of O stars. Wolf-Rayet galaxies are among the youngest examples of the starburst phenomenon, which we observed at a propitious moment.

  6. The Wolf-Rayet star population in the most massive giant H II regions of M33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drissen, Laurent; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.

    1990-01-01

    Narrow-band images of NGC 604, NGC 595, and NGC 592, the most massive giant H II regions (GHRs) in M33 have been obtained, in order to study their Wolf-Rayet content. These images reveal the presence of nine candidates in NGC 604 (seven WN, two WC), 10 in NGC 595 (nine WN, one WC), and two in NGC 592 (two WN). Precise positions and estimated magnitudes are given for the candidates, half of which have so far been confirmed spectroscopically as genuine W-R stars. The flux in the emission lines of all candidates is comparable to that of normal Galactic W-R stars of similar subtype. A few of the putative superluminous W-R stars are shown to be close visual double or multiple stars; their newly estimated luminosities are now more compatible with those of normal W-R stars. NGC 595 seems to be overabundant in W-R stars for its mass compared to other GHRs, while NGC 604 is normal. Factors influencing the W-R/O number ratio in GHRs are discussed: metallicity and age appear to be the most important.

  7. New Wolf-Rayet stars in Galactic open clusters - Sher 1 and the giant H II region core Westerlund 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.; Potter, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Two new Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars were found in open clusters: a WN4 star in the O9 cluster Sher 1 and a WN7 star in the O7 cluster Westerlund 2. This confirms a previous trend, namely that fainter, hotter WN stars tend to be older than brighter, cooler WN stars. This may be a consequence of evolution via extreme mass loss.

  8. X-ray emission from the Wolf-Rayet bubble NGC 6888 - II. XMM-Newton EPIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Arthur, S. J.; Tafoya, D.; Gruendl, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    We present deep XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble NGC 6888 around the star WR 136. The complete X-ray mapping of the nebula confirms the distribution of the hot gas in three maxima spatially associated with the caps and north-west blowout hinted at by previous Chandra observations. The global X-ray emission is well described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma model (T1 = 1.4 × 106 K, T2 = 8.2 × 106 K) with a luminosity of LX = 7.8 × 1033 erg s-1 in the 0.3-1.5 keV energy range. The rms electron density of the X-ray-emitting gas is estimated to be ne = 0.4 cm-3. The high-quality observations presented here reveal spectral variations within different regions in NGC 6888, which allowed us for the first time to detect temperature and/or nitrogen abundance inhomogeneities in the hot gas inside a WR nebula. One possible explanation for such spectral variations is that the mixing of material from the outer nebula into the hot bubble is less efficient around the caps than in other nebular regions.

  9. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  10. The spectrum of HM Sagittae: A planetary nebula excited by a Wolf-Rayet star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. W.; Feibelman, W. A.; Hobbs, R. W.; Mccracken, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    A total of image tube spectrograms of HM Sagittae were obtained. More than 70 emission lines, including several broad emission features, were identified. An analysis of the spectra indicates that HM Sagittae is a planetary nebula excited by a Wolf-Rayet star. The most conspicuous Wolf-Rayet feature is that attributed to a blend of C III at 4650 A and He II at 4686 A.

  11. NEAR-INFRARED COUNTERPARTS TO CHANDRA X-RAY SOURCES TOWARD THE GALACTIC CENTER. II. DISCOVERY OF WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Muno, M. P.; Morris, M. R.; Cotera, A.

    2010-02-10

    We present new identifications of infrared counterparts to the population of hard X-ray sources near the Galactic center detected by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We have spectroscopically confirmed 16 new massive stellar counterparts to the X-ray population, including nitrogen-type (WN) and carbon-type (WC) Wolf-Rayet stars, and O supergiants. These discoveries increase the total sample of massive stellar X-ray sources in the Galactic center region to 30 (possibly 31). For the majority of these sources, the X-ray photometry is consistent with thermal emission from plasma having temperatures in the range of kT = 1-8 keV or non-thermal emission having power-law indices in the range of -1 {approx}< GAMMA {approx}< 3, and X-ray luminosities in the range of L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 32}-10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} (0.5-8.0 keV). Several sources have exhibited X-ray variability of several factors between observations. These X-ray properties are not a ubiquitous feature of single massive stars but are typical of massive binaries, in which the high-energy emission is generated by the collision of supersonic winds, or by accretion onto a compact companion. However, without direct evidence for companions, the possibility of intrinsic hard X-ray generation from single stars cannot be completely ruled out. The spectral energy distributions of these sources exhibit significant infrared excess, attributable to free-free emission from ionized stellar winds, supplemented by hot dust emission in the case of the WC stars. With the exception of one object located near the outer regions of the Quintuplet cluster, most of the new stars appear isolated or in loose associations. Seven hydrogen-rich WN and O stars are concentrated near the Sagittarius B H II region, while other similar stars and more highly evolved hydrogen-poor WN and WC stars lie scattered within {approx}50 pc, in projection, of Sagitarrius A West. We discuss various mechanisms capable of generating the observed X

  12. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  13. Photoelectric spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahng, J. D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Photoelectric spectrum scans of five southern Wolf-Rayet stars in the spectral range lambda lambda 4600-4720 were analyzed to study the variability of brightness and of emission line strengths. No variations of any kind in short time scale were found. However, in WC stars night-to-night variations of three to four percent were detected in the emission line strengths.

  14. Multiple rings around Wolf-Rayet evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    We present optical narrow-band imaging of multiple rings existing around galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. The existence of multiple rings of material around Wolf-Rayet stars clearly illustrates the various phases of evolution that massive stars go through. The objects presented here show evidence of a three stage evolution. O stars produce an outer ring with the cavity being partially filled by ejecta from a red supergiant of luminous blue variable phase. A wind from the Wolf-Rayet star then passes into the ejecta materials. A simple model is presented for this three stage evolution. Using observations of the size and dynamics of the rings allows estimates of time scales for each stage of the massive star evolution. These are consistent with recent theoretical evolutionary models. Mass estimates for the ejecta, from the model presented, are consistent with previous ring nebula mass estimates from IRAS data, showing a number of ring nebulae to have large masses, most of which must in be in the form of neutral material. Finally, we illustrate how further observations will allow the determination of many of the parameters of the evolution of massive stars such as total mass loss, average mass loss rates, stellar abundances, and total time spent in each evolutionary phase.

  15. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Gerke, Jill; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent E-mail: jfaherty@amnh.org E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: gerke@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.ca

    2012-06-15

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150 Degree-Sign in Galactic longitude and reaches 1 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  16. Comments on using absolute spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    Garmany et al. (1984) have conducted a study involving spectrophotometric scans of 13 Wolf-Rayet stars. They have found that the application of a 'standard' reddening law to the observed data gives spurious results in many cases. They concluded also that previous attempts to determine the intrinsic continua and the effective temperatures of Wolf-Rayet stars are inadequate. In the present study the conclusions of Garmany et al. are evaluated. According to this evaluation, it has not been demonstrated by Garmany et al., beyond a reasonble doubt, that the interstellar extinction law varies greatly from Wolf-Rayet star to Wolf-Rayet star. The procedure followed by Garmany et al. to find the apparent shape of the ultraviolet continuum of a Wolf-Rayet star is unsatisfactory for a number of reasons.

  17. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS IN APPARENTLY SINGLE GALACTIC WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. A GLOBAL VIEW OF THE WIND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Chene, A.-N.; St-Louis, N. E-mail: stlouis@astro.umontreal.ca

    2011-08-01

    This study is the second part of a survey searching for large-scale spectroscopic variability in apparently single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. In a previous paper (Paper I), we described and characterized the spectroscopic variability level of 25 WR stars observable from the northern hemisphere and found 3 new candidates presenting large-scale wind variability, potentially originating from large-scale structures named corotating interaction regions (CIRs). In this second paper, we discuss an additional 39 stars observable from the southern hemisphere. For each star in our sample, we obtained 4-5 high-resolution spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}100 and determined its variability level using the approach described in Paper I. In total, 10 new stars are found to show large-scale spectral variability of which 7 present CIR-type changes (WR 8, WR 44, WR55, WR 58, WR 61, WR 63, WR 100). Of the remaining stars, 20 were found to show small-amplitude changes and 9 were found to show no spectral variability as far as can be concluded from the data on hand. Also, we discuss the spectroscopic variability level of all single galactic WR stars that are brighter than v {approx} 12.5, and some WR stars with 12.5 < v {<=} 13.5, i.e., all the stars presented in our two papers and four more stars for which spectra have already been published in the literature. We find that 23/68 stars (33.8%) present large-scale variability, but only 12/54 stars ({approx}22.1%) are potentially of CIR type. Also, we find that 31/68 stars (45.6%) only show small-scale variability, most likely due to clumping in the wind. Finally, no spectral variability is detected based on the data on hand for 14/68 (20.6%) stars. Interestingly, the variability with the highest amplitude also has the widest mean velocity dispersion.

  18. Decoupled sectors and Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, Willy; Jimmy; Lorshbough, Dustin

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been proposed that gamma-ray burst (GRB) events may be modified by the presence of a dark matter sector subcomponent that is charged under an unbroken U(1). This proposal depends upon there being a nontrivial density of charged dark matter in star forming regions of galaxies which host GRBs. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of dark matter gas and visible matter gas in the star forming regions. We show that the ratio of dark jet power to visible jet power depends only on the ratio of particle mass and charge when the densities are equal, allowing for these input parameters to be probed directly by future observations of GRBs.

  19. DISCOVERY OF A WOLF-RAYET STAR THROUGH DETECTION OF ITS PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Littlefield, Colin; Garnavich, Peter; McClelland, Colin; Rettig, Terrence; Marion, G. H.; Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-06-15

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a heavily reddened Wolf-Rayet star that we name WR 142b. While photometrically monitoring a cataclysmic variable, we detected weak variability in a nearby field star. Low-resolution spectroscopy revealed a strong emission line at 7100 A, suggesting an unusual object and prompting further study. A spectrum taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope confirms strong He II emission and an N IV 7112 A line consistent with a nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star of spectral class WN6. Analysis of the He II line strengths reveals no detectable hydrogen in WR 142b. A blue-sensitive spectrum obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope shows no evidence for a hot companion star. The continuum shape and emission line ratios imply a reddening of E(B - V) = 2.2-2.6 mag. We estimate that the distance to WR 142b is 1.4 {+-} 0.3 kpc.

  20. Discovery of a Wolf-Rayet Star through Detection of Its Photometric Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littlefield, Colin; Garnavich, Peter; "Howie" Marion, G. H.; Vinkó, József; McClelland, Colin; Rettig, Terrence; Wheeler, J. Craig

    2012-06-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a heavily reddened Wolf-Rayet star that we name WR 142b. While photometrically monitoring a cataclysmic variable, we detected weak variability in a nearby field star. Low-resolution spectroscopy revealed a strong emission line at 7100 Å, suggesting an unusual object and prompting further study. A spectrum taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope confirms strong He II emission and an N IV 7112 Å line consistent with a nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star of spectral class WN6. Analysis of the He II line strengths reveals no detectable hydrogen in WR 142b. A blue-sensitive spectrum obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope shows no evidence for a hot companion star. The continuum shape and emission line ratios imply a reddening of E(B - V) = 2.2-2.6 mag. We estimate that the distance to WR 142b is 1.4 ± 0.3 kpc.

  1. The Multiplicity of Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Debra J.

    2004-01-01

    The most massive stars drastically reconfigure their surroundings via their strong stellar winds and powerful ionizing radiation. With this mass fueling their large luminosities, these stars are frequently used as standard candles in distance determination, and as tracers of stellar evolution in different regions and epochs. In their dieing burst, some of the once massive stars will enter a Wolf-Rayet (WR) phase lasting approx.10% of the stellar lifetime. This phase is particularly useful for study because these stars have strong spectroscopic signatures that allow them to be easily identified at great distances. But how accurate are these identifications? Increasingly, the relatively nearby stars we once assumed to be single are revealing themselves to be binary or multiple. New techniques, such as high-resolution imaging and interferometry, are changing our knowledge of these objects. I will discuss recent results in the literature and how this affects the binary distribution of WR stars. I will also discuss the implications of binary vs. single star evolution on evolution through the WR phase. Finally, I will discuss the implications of these revised numbers on both massive stellar evolution itself, and the impact that this has on the role of WR stars as calibrators.

  2. The True origin of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, J. S.

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) phenomenon is widespread in astronomy. It involves classical WRs, very massive stars (VMS), WR central stars of planetary nebula CSPN [WRs], and supernovae (SNe). But what is the root cause for a certain type of object to turn into an emission-line star? In this contribution, I discuss the basic aspects of radiation-driven winds that might reveal the ultimate difference between WR stars and canonical O-type stars. I discuss the aspects of (i) self-enrichment via CNO elements, (ii) high effective temperatures (Tₑff), (iii) an increase in the helium abundance (Y ), and finally (iv) the Eddington factor Γₑ. Over the last couple of years, we have made a breakthrough in our understanding of Γₑ -dependent mass loss, which will have far-reaching consequences for the evolution and fate of the most massive stars in the Universe. Finally, I discuss the prospects for studies of the WR phenomenon in the highest redshift Lyα and He ii emitting galaxies.

  3. The new Wolf-Rayet binary system WR62a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, A.; Gamen, R.; Barbá, R. H.

    2013-04-01

    Context. A significant number of the Wolf-Rayet stars seem to be binary or multiple systems, but the nature of many of them is still unknown. Dedicated monitoring of WR stars favours the discovery of new systems. Aims: We explore the possibility that WR62a is a binary system. Methods: We analysed the spectra of WR62a, obtained between 2002 and 2010, to look for radial-velocity and spectral variations that would suggest there is a binary component. We searched for periodicities in the measured radial velocities and determined orbital solutions. A period search was also performed on the "All-Sky Automated Survey" photometry. Results: We find that WR62a is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a WN5 primary star and an O 5.5-6 type secondary component in orbit with a period of 9.1447 d. The minimum masses range between 21 and 23 M⊙ for the WN star and between 39 and 42 M⊙ for the O-type star, thus indicating that the WN star is less massive than the O-type component. We detect a phase shift in the radial-velocity curve of the He ii λ4686 emission line relative to the other emission line curves. The equivalent width of this emission line shows a minimum value when the WN star passes in front of the system. The analysis of the ASAS photometry confirms the spectroscopic periodicity, presenting a minimum at the same phase.

  4. Wolf-Rayet stars in nearby galaxies: facts and fancies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, P.; Armandroff, T. E.

    Surveys for Wolf-Rayet stars in nearby galaxies are briefly reviewed. The completeness and yield of these surveys are discussed in light of recent follow-up spectroscopy. A critical evaluation is made of our current knowledge of the Wolf-Rayet population in nearby galaxies, particularly the WC/WN ratio, the WR/O ratio, the WR surface density, and how these quantities vary within a galaxy and between galaxies, particularly as a function of metallicity. The authors compare the spectroscopic properties of Galactic and Magellanic Cloud WR stars with those in the more distant systems.

  5. A new ejecta shell surrounding a Wolf-Rayet star in the LMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garnett, Donald R.; Chu, You-Hua

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained CCD spectra of newly discovered shell-like nebulae around the WN4 star Breysacher 13 and the WN1 star Breysacher 2 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The shell around Br 13 shows definite signs of enrichment in both nitrogen and helium, having much stronger (N II) and He I emission lines than are seen in typical LMC H II regions. From the measured electron temperature of about 17,000 K in the shell, we derive He/H and N/O abundance ratios which are factors of 2 and more than 10 higher, respectively, than the average LMC interstellar values. The derived oxygen abundance in the Br 13 shell is down by a factor of 8 compared to the local LMC interstellar medium (ISM); however, the derived electron temperature is affected by the presence of an incomplete shock arising from the interaction of the stellar wind with photoionized material. This uncertainty does not affect the basic conclusion that the Br 13 shell is enriched by processed material from the Wolf-Rayet star. In contrast, the shell around Br 2 shows no clear evidence of enrichment. The nebular spectrum is characterized by extremely strong (O III) and He II emission and very weak (N II). We derive normal He, O, and N abundances from our spectrum. This object therefore appears to be simply a wind-blown structure associated with a relatively dense cloud near the Wolf-Rayet star, although the very high-ionization state of the gas is unusual for a nebula associated with a Wolf-Rayet star.

  6. Diagnostics of the unstable envelopes of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassitelli, L.; Chené, A.-N.; Sanyal, D.; Langer, N.; St-Louis, N.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Fossati, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The envelopes of stars near the Eddington limit are prone to various instabilities. A high Eddington factor in connection with the iron opacity peak leads to convective instability, and a corresponding envelope inflation may induce pulsational instability. Here, we investigate the occurrence and consequences of both instabilities in models of Wolf-Rayet stars. Aims: We determine the convective velocities in the sub-surface convective zones to estimate the amplitude of the turbulent velocity at the base of the wind that potentially leads to the formation of small-scale wind structures, as observed in several Wolf-Rayet stars. We also investigate the effect of stellar wind mass loss on the pulsations of our stellar models. Methods: We approximated solar metallicity Wolf-Rayet stars in the range 2-17 M⊙ by models of mass-losing helium stars, computed with the Bonn stellar evolution code. We characterized the properties of convection in the envelope of these stars adopting the standard mixing length theory. Results: Our results show the occurrence of sub-surface convective regions in all studied models. Small (≈1 km s-1) surface velocity amplitudes are predicted for models with masses below ≈10 M⊙. For models with M ≳ 10 M⊙, the surface velocity amplitudes are of the order of 10 km s-1. Moreover we find the occurrence of pulsations for stars in the mass range 9-14 M⊙, while mass loss appears to stabilize the more massive Wolf-Rayet stars. We confront our results with observationally derived line variabilities of 17 WN stars, of which we analysed eight here for the first time. The data suggest variability to occur for stars above 10 M⊙, which is increasing linearly with mass above this value, in agreement with our results. We further find our models in the mass range 9-14M⊙ to be unstable to radial pulsations, and predict local magnetic fields of the order of hundreds of gauss in Wolf-Rayet stars more massive than ≈10 M⊙. Conclusions: Our

  7. The Masses of Black Holes with Wolf-Rayet Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas; Steiner, James F.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Binder, Breanna A.; Yang, Jun; Cappallo, Rigel

    2016-04-01

    Black Holes with Wolf-Rayet companions represent a channel for forming the most massive stellar BHs. The recent, stunning LIGO detection of the gravitational wave signature from a merging stellar BH binary points to the importance of understanding the progenitor systems formation and evolution. The BH+WR binary IC 10 X-1 holds important clues to the puzzle, by helping establish the upper observed BH mass and pointing to an association between maximum possible BH mass and low metallicity environments. However, securing dynamical mass determiniations for WR+BH binaries appears to be complicated by interaction between the radiation field of the BH and the stellar wind. This causes a substantial change to our understanding of IC 10 X-1, and by extension to the mass distribution of BH binaries. A high precision ephemeris derived from a decade of Chandra/XMM X-ray timing observations, when combined with the optical RV curve, reveals a surprizing simultenaity of mid X-ray eclipse and the maximum blueshift velocity of He II emission lines. The optical emission lines appear to originate in a shielded sector of the WR star's stellar wind which escapes total X-ray ionization by the compact object. Unravelling this projection effect is necessary to obtain the system's true mass function. Complementary Chandra, XMM and NuStar datasets offer new insights into the mass and spin of the BH, and the structure of the photo-ionized wind. We will discuss possible routes toward the mass function in BH+WR binaries via multi-wavelength observations, and the additional leverage provided by further constraining the orbital period derivative.

  8. Searching for Wolf-Rayet Stars in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, M. M.; Zurek, D.; Kanarek, G.; Faherty, J.

    2012-12-01

    Tony Moffat has been inspiring the hunt for new Wolf-Rayet stars for over 40 years. These extraordinary objects offer critical tests of stellar evolution theory, and are predicted to be progenitors of type Ib and Ic supernovae. We're only going to know if that prediction is correct (in our lifetimes) by locating and spectrographically confirming of order 10 000 WR stars - a daunting but increasingly doable task. Our 2009 prediction that roughly 6 500 Wolf-Rayet stars live in our Galaxy has been followed by demonstrations in the past few years that, via narrowband infrared imaging and spectroscopy, we can find and confirm almost all Galactic WR stars. The rest of the Local Group is unlikely to contain more than 1 000 WR stars, so the Milky Way is THE place to search exhaustively for them. I briefly describe how we hunt and gather WR stars and give a current (mid-2011) Local Group census of them.

  9. Wolf-Rayet stars from Very Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Norhasliza

    2015-01-01

    Many studies focused on very massive stars (VMS) within the framework of Pop. III stars, because this is where they were thought to be abundant. In this work, we focus on the evolution of VMS in the local universe following the discovery of VMS in the R136 cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We computed grids of VMS evolutionary tracks in the range 120-500 M ⊙ with solar, LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud metallicities. All models end their lives as Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars of the WC (or WO) type. We discuss the evolution and fate of VMS around solar metallicity with particular focus on the WR phase. For example, we show that a distinctive feature that may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of Ne and Mg at the surface of WC stars.

  10. Multiple Shells Around Wolf-Rayet Stars: Space Based Astrometric Observing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Anthony P.

    1995-01-01

    The completion of a complementary optical emission-line survey of the nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet stars in the southern sky is reported, along with the completion of a survey the large-scale environments of Wolf-Rayet stars using IRAS Skyflux data. HIRES IRAS maps in the four IRAS wavebands for appoximately half of all galactic Wolf-Rayet stars are created.

  11. Carbon and nitrogen lines in the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Underhill, A. B.

    1988-01-01

    The one-representative-point radiative transfer theory of Castor and van Blerkom (1970) is used to predict the relative energies in emission lines of the ions of carbon and nitrogen in Wolf-Rayet atmospheres for a wide range of parameters. The predicted ratios are compared with observed relative energies of lines in the visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges of six Wolf-Rayet stars. It is found that the lower levels of C II, C III, N III, and N IV are strongly overpopulated relative to their populations in LTE. The differences between WC and WN spectra appear to be due chiefly to a difference in electron temperature in the line-emitting regions. The typical volume of stars studied is estimated to be in the range of 10 to the 41st to 10 to the 44th cu cm. Possible ways in which the line-emitting regions may be arranged around the star are discussed, noting that the high-temperature line-emitting plasma may lie in a thin annular disk approximately 10 to the 15th cm from the star.

  12. A spectropolarimetric survey of northern hemisphere Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, T. J.; Hillier, D. J.; Howarth, I. D.

    1998-06-01

    We present a homogeneous, high signal-to-noise spectropolarimetric survey of 16 northern hemisphere Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. A reduction in polarization at emission-line wavelengths - the `line effect' - is identified in four stars: WRs 134, 137, 139, and 141. The magnitude of the effect in WR 139 (V444 Cyg) is variable, while WR 136, previously reported to show the line effect, does not show it in our data. Assuming the line effect generally to arise from axisymmetric distortions of stellar winds, we show that a model in which all WRs have the same intrinsic (equator-on) polarization, with the observed variations solely a result of inclination effects, is inconsistent with the observations. A model in which the intrinsic polarizations are uniformly distributed is more plausible, but best-fitting results are obtained if the distribution of polarizations is biased towards small values, with only ~20 per cent of stars having intrinsic polarizations greater than ~0.3 per cent. Radiative transfer calculations indicate that the observed continuum polarizations can be matched by models with equator:pole density ratios of 2-3. The model spectra have electron-scattering wings that are significantly stronger than observed (in both intensity and polarized flux), confirming that the winds of stars showing intrinsic polarization must be clumped on small scales as well as being distorted on large scales. We combine the results of our survey with observations from the literature to give a sample of 29 stars which have both accurate spectropolarimetric observations and physical parameters derived from standard-model analyses. We find that the line-effect stars are clustered at high M, L in the luminosity-mass-loss rate plane (although they are unexceptional in the terminal velocity-subtype and the surface-mass-flux-temperature planes). The mass-loss rates derived from radio-continuum observations for these stars are in good accord with the results of optical emission-line analyses

  13. Le Phénomène Wolf-Rayet au Sein des Etoiles chaudes de Populations I et II: Histoire des Vents stellaires et Impact sur la Structure nébulaire circumstellaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosdidier, Yves

    2000-12-01

    Les spectres des étoiles Wolf-Rayet pop. I (WR) présentent de larges raies en émission dues à des vents stellaires chauds en expansion rapide (vitesse terminale de l'ordre de 1000 km/s). Le modèle standard des étoiles WR reproduit qualitativement le profil général et l'intensité des raies observées. Mais la spectroscopie intensive à moyenne résolution de ces étoiles révèle l'existence de variations stochastiques dans les raies (sous-pics mobiles en accélération échelles de temps: environ 10-100 min.). Ces variations ne sont pas comprises dans le cadre du modèle standard et suggèrent une fragmentation intrinsèque des vents. Cette thèse de doctorat présente une étude de la variabilité des raies spectrales en émission des étoiles WR pop. II; la question de l'impact d'un vent WR fragmenté sur le milieu circumstellaire est aussi étudiée: 1) à partir du suivi spectroscopique intensif des raies CIIIl5696 et CIVl5801/12, nous analysons quantitativement (via le calcul des Spectres de Variance Temporelle) les vents issus de 5 étoiles centrales de nébuleuses planétaires (NP) galactiques présentant le phénomène WR; 2) nous étudions l'impact de la fragmentation des vents issus de deux étoiles WR pop. I sur le milieu circumstellaire via: i) l'imagerie IR (NICMOS2/HST) de WR 137, et ii) l'imagerie H-alpha (WFPC2/HST) et l'interférométrie Fabry-Perot H-alpha (SIS-CFHT) de la nébuleuse M 1-67 (étoile centrale: WR 124). Les principaux résultats sont les suivants: VENTS WR POP. II: (1) Nous démontrons la variabilité spectroscopique intrinsèque des vents issus des noyaux de NP HD 826 ([WC 8]), BD +30 3639 ([WC 9]) et LSS 3169 ([WC 9]), observés durant respectivement 22, 15 et 1 nuits, et rapportons des indications de variabilité pour les noyaux [WC 9] HD 167362 et He 2-142. Les variabilités de HD 826 et BD +30 3639 apparaissent parfois plus soutenues (``bursts'' qui se maintiennent durant plusieurs nuits); (2) La cinématique des sous

  14. Colliding Winds in Massive Binaries Involving Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Marchenko, Sergey V.; Bartzakos, Peter

    1996-12-01

    Wolf-Rayet stars are notorious for their very strong, hot winds. Their presence in binary systems can therefore lead to strong wind collisions, that manifest themselves as well-defined, phase-dependent distortions of the spectral lines. Turning this around, profile variations can be used to determine properties of the wind collision, as well as the winds and even the orbit itself. We review the present situation regarding colliding winds for WR stars in WR + O, WR + WR, and WR + c systems.

  15. ELEVEN NEW HEAVILY REDDENED FIELD WOLF-RAYET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. D. T.; Cushing, Michael; Barletta, Anthony; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of a medium-narrowband 2 {mu}m line survey covering 5.8 deg{sup 2} near the Galactic plane. We confirm 11 new field Wolf-Rayet stars along three lines of sight probing the inner Galaxy, demonstrating the capability to uncover distant and highly reddened populations of Galactic wind-borne emission-line stars suffering extinction as high as A{sub V} {approx} 40 and as distant as 9 kpc down to modest magnitude limits of K{sub s} {approx} 12.5. All stars are of subtype WC7-8, with median distance d = 6 kpc and median extinction A{sub K{sub s}} = 2.5. Over the fields surveyed, the density of Wolf-Rayet stars to limiting magnitude K{sub s} {approx} 12.5 was found to be 1.9 deg{sup -2}. We compare this to models which predict their distribution within the Galaxy and find that, even neglecting survey and subtype incompleteness, they consistently underpredict the number of newly discovered stars along the surveyed lines of sight.

  16. Eleven New Heavily Reddened Field Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. D. T.; Cushing, Michael; Barletta, Anthony; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of a medium-narrowband 2 μm line survey covering 5.8 deg2 near the Galactic plane. We confirm 11 new field Wolf-Rayet stars along three lines of sight probing the inner Galaxy, demonstrating the capability to uncover distant and highly reddened populations of Galactic wind-borne emission-line stars suffering extinction as high as AV ~ 40 and as distant as 9 kpc down to modest magnitude limits of Ks ~ 12.5. All stars are of subtype WC7-8, with median distance d = 6 kpc and median extinction A_{K_s} = 2.5. Over the fields surveyed, the density of Wolf-Rayet stars to limiting magnitude Ks ~ 12.5 was found to be 1.9 deg-2. We compare this to models which predict their distribution within the Galaxy and find that, even neglecting survey and subtype incompleteness, they consistently underpredict the number of newly discovered stars along the surveyed lines of sight.

  17. Photometry, polarimetry, spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry of the enigmatic Wolf-Rayet star EZ Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, Carmelle; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Drissen, Laurent; Lamontagne, Robert; Seggewiss, Wilhelm; Niemela, Virpi S.; Cerruti, Miguel A.; Barrett, Paul; Bailey, Jeremy; Garcia, Jorge

    1992-01-01

    New observations of the peculiar Wolf-Rayet star EZ Canis Majoris collected since 1987 are presented, and photometric, polarimetric, spectroscopic, and spectropolarimetric data are discussed. Linear polarization data are well fitted with an eccentric binary model where an additional free parameter is included to allow for epoch-dependent changes of the geometrical electron distribution in the W-R envelope. This yields a set of basic parameters, including an eccentricity e = 0.39 +/- 0.02 and an orbital inclination i = 114 deg +/- 3 deg. The spectroscopic data show global profile variations for all three observed strong emission lines He II 5412 A, C IV 5807 A, and He I 5876 A. Radial velocities of the lines vary with the 3.766-day period. Radially expanding inhomogeneities are superposed on the line profiles and variable polarization in the lines is observed.

  18. The 'Baldwin Effect' in Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Patrick; Conti, Peter S.; Lamers, Henny J. G. L. M.; Koenigsberger, Gloria

    1993-01-01

    The equivalent widths of a number of emission lines in the spectra of WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars are found to inversely correlate with the luminosity of the underlying continuum. This is the well-known Baldwin Effect that has previously been observed in quasars and some Seyfert I galaxies. The Effect can be inferred from line and continuum predictions in published non-LTE model helium atmospheres and is explainable in terms of differences in wind density among WN stars. Using a simple wind model, we show that the Effect arises from the fact that both the effective radius for the local continuum and the emission measure of the layers above the continuum-forming region depend on the density in the wind. The Effect provides a new method for distance determinations of W-R stars.

  19. Variable dust emission from Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.; van der Hucht, K. A.; The, P. S.

    1987-09-01

    An infrared photometric survey of late type Wolf-Rayet stars shows little evidence for secular variation in mass loss or dust formation rates apart from the three known variables: WR 48a, WR 137 (HD 192641) and WR 140 (HD 193793, the prototype). In 1985, WR 140 again brightened sharply in the infrared owing to the formation of circumstellar dust. The relation of this to the previous dust condensation episode strongly supported suggestions that these episodes were periodic (P = 7.9 yr). This leads to confirmation that the system is a binary, and provides a framework for the interpretation of the radio and X-ray variations. Observations of WR 48a and WR 137 show steady fading since their recent dust condensation events, and comparison with earlier photometry suggests a period of about 12 yr for WR 137.

  20. On Wolf-Rayet stars with unshifted absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. F. J.; Lamontagne, R.; Shara, M. M.; McAlister, H. A.

    1986-06-01

    The authors examine a sample of 16 galactic Wolf-Rayet stars that exhibit unshifted absorption lines, but for which orbital motion involving the WR star and an O-type companion is either unknown or thought to be absent. If all of these are binaries, this would increase the estimate of the binary frequency for WR stars by about 10%. Speckle interferometry of three bright non-WNL+abs stars in Cygnus fails to reveal any astrometric companions down to a separation of 0.05arcsec. Thus, either the absorption lines are intrinsic to the WR star in these three cases or, more likely, they arise in a bound companion. The search for wide spectroscopic orbits for WR 137 and the WN3+abs star WR 3 is re-examined.

  1. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Andromeda Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Shara, M.M.

    1987-09-01

    A survey of M31 for strong-line Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars has been completed, confirming the trends found previously, that (1) M31 is at present about an order of magnitude less active in star formation than the Galaxy, as reflected in the total number of W-R stars, assumed to have evolved from massive progenitors; (2) the number ratio of late to early WC stars, WCL/WCE, varies systematically with galactocentric radius as in the Galaxy, possibly a consequence of the metallicity gradient in the disk; and (3) most W-R stars lie in the prominent ring of active star formation at R = 7-12 kpc from the center of M31. 19 references.

  2. A Dust Shell around the Early Type Wolf-Rayet Star WR:19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.; van der Hucht, K. A.; The, P. S.; Bouchet, P.

    1990-11-01

    Infrared photometry of the WC4-type Wolf-Rayet star WR 19 (LS 3) in 1988-90 shows evidence for an expanding dust shell in its wind, similar to those observed from late-type WR stars like WR 48a (WC8), WR 140 (WC7 + 04) and WR 137 (WC 7+). This demonstrates that dust formation by Wolf-Rayet stars is not restricted to later WC subtypes and is more common than hitherto supposed.

  3. A survey of nebulae around galactic wolf-rayet stars in the southern sky, 2.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, A. P.; Yocum, D. R.; Garcia-Segura, G.; Chu, Y.-H.

    1994-01-01

    We present the second half of a charge coupled device (CCD) narrow-band imaging survey of galactic Wolf-Rayet stars located in the southern hemisphere as listed by van der Hucht et al. (1981). Images of 50 Wolf-Rayet stars were taken using a wide-field CCD and narrowband interference filters centered on H alpha and (O III) 5007 A wavelengths. The first half of the survey (Marston, Chu, & Garcia-Segura 1993, hereafter Paper I) revealed six new ring nebulae residing around Wolf-Rayet stars. Here we reveal a possible 11 new rings and the existence of multiple rings associated with two previously known nebula, RCW 118 and G2.4+1.4 and around the stars WR 16 and WR 43. Combining our results with those of Miller & Chu (1993) and Paper I, 92% of the van der Hucht catalog of Wolf-Rayet stars have now been surveyed. Of the 38 possible ring nebulae found in our surveys to date, 22 reside around WN subtype Wolf-Rayet stars, 13 around WC stars, one around a triplet of Wolf-Rayet stars and one around a WO star (WR 102). One ring exists around a WN/WC star (WR 98). A bias toward rings being observed around W-R + OB binaries is noted. Such pairings are generally bright, and the detection of a ring around them may merely be a function of their combined luminosity. Several Wolf-Rayet stars are shown to be surrounded by multiple rings (two or three) which suggests that a number of ejections of stellar material have taken place during their evolution.

  4. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Qin Shengli

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  5. Synthesis of 19F in Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, G.; Arnould, M.

    2000-03-01

    Meynet & Arnould (1993) have suggested that Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars could significantly contaminate the Galaxy with \\chem{19}{F}. In their scenario, \\chem{19}{F} is synthesized at the beginning of the He-burning phase from the \\chem{14}{N} left over by the previous CNO-burning core, and is ejected in the interstellar medium when the star enters its WC phase. Recourse to CNO seeds makes the \\chem{19}{F} yields metallicity-dependent. These yields are calculated on grounds of detailed stellar evolutionary sequences for an extended range of initial masses (from 25 to 120 Msun) and metallicities (Z=0.008, 0.02 and 0.04). The adopted mass loss rate prescription enables to account for the observed variations of WR populations in different environments. The \\chem{19}{F} abundance in the WR winds of 60 M_sun model stars is found to be about 10 to 70 times higher than its initial value, depending on the metallicity. This prediction is used in conjunction with a very simple model for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy to predict that WR stars could be significant (dominant?) contributors to the solar system fluorine content. We also briefly discuss the implications of our model on the possible detection of fluorine at high redshift.

  6. Helium stars: towards an understanding of Wolf-Rayet evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, L. A. S.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are massive stars that have lost most or all of their hydrogen via powerful stellar winds. Recent observations have indicated that hydrogen-free WR stars have cooler temperatures than those predicted by current evolutionary models. To investigate how varying mass-loss rate affects WR evolution, we have created a grid of pure helium star models. We compare our results with Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud WR observations and show that the temperature ranges of observed WR stars can be reproduced by varying the mass-loss rate, which effectively determines the size of the helium envelope around the core. We also find that WN and WO stars arise from more massive stars, whereas WC stars come from lower masses. This contradicts the standard Conti scenario by which WN and WC stars evolve in an age sequence. We also predict the magnitudes of our models at core-collapse and compare with observations of nearby progenitors of Type Ib/c supernovae. We confirm the findings of previous studies that suggest WR stars are the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae; the progenitors would remain unobserved except in the cases where the progenitor is a low-mass helium giant, as is the case of iPTF13bvn.

  7. A survey of nebulae around Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars in the southern sky, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, A. P.; Chu, Y.-H.; Garcia-Segura, G.

    1994-01-01

    Images are presented from the first half of a survey of all Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars in the catalog of van der Hucht et al. (1981) residing in the southern skies. Previous surveys used only existing broad-band photographic plates. Encouraged by successes using CCD imaging with interference filters of the LMC and northern Galaxy (Miller & Chu 1993), we have expanded the survey to the southern hemisphere. In the first half of our southern survey, H alpha and (O III) narrow-band CCD images of fields centered on known Wolf-Rayet stars have indicated the existence of six new ring nebulae as well as revealing previously unobserved morphological features in the known ring nebulae. An example of this is an almost perfect ring of (O III) emission residing interior to the previously observed H alpha filaments of the Wolf-Rayet ring nebulae RCW 104. Our surveys to date indicate that 21% of all Wolf-Rayet stars have ring nebulae, with WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars having a greater likelihood for an associated ring.

  8. A rotating, expanding disk in the Wolf-Rayet star EZ Canis Majoris?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Nook, M. A.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Taylor, M.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of linear polarization changes across the extended wings of He II lines, mainly the strong 4-3 transition at 4686 A, in the WN5 star EZ CMa, is reported. When the polarization across the line profiles is plotted in the Stokes parameters plane, it traces loops clockwise from the blue wing through line center to the red, rather than straight lines. Such polarization loops are reminiscent of what is observed in the Balmer lines of Be stars. The continuum polarization in EZ CMa can be understood by an axisymmetric, electron-scattering envelope, with the decrease in polarization in He II being caused by an increase in absorptive opacity in the lines and dilution by unpolarized line emission, while the variations in position angle are due to the Doppler-shifted absorptive opacity and/or scattered line photons. As the sense of rotation in the loops is also independent of phase of this alleged Wolf-Rayet + compact binary, the polarized line profiles are the signature of a rotating, expanding wind geometry around a single star.

  9. The first transition Wolf-Rayet WN/C star in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Caldwell, Nelson; Iłkiewicz, Krystian; Drozd, Katarzyna; Zurek, David

    2016-02-01

    Three decades of searches have revealed 154 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in M31, with 62 of WC type, 92 of WN type and zero of transition-type WN/C or WC/N. In apparent contrast, about two per cent of the WR stars in the Galaxy, the LMC and M33 simultaneously display strong lines of carbon and nitrogen, i.e. they are transition-type WN/C or WC/N stars. We report here the serendipitous discovery of M31 WR 84-1, the first transition star in M31, located at RA = 00h43m43{^s.}61 Dec. = +41°45'27{^''.}95 (J2000). We present its spectrum, classify it as WN5/WC6, and compare it with other known transition stars. The star is unresolved in Hubble Space Telescope narrow-band and broad-band images, while its spectrum displays strong, narrow emission lines of hydrogen, [N II], [S II] and [O III]; this indicates a nebula surrounding the star. The radial velocity of the nebular lines is consistent with that of gas at the same position in the disc of M31. The metallicity at the 11.8 kpc galactocentric distance of M31 WR 84-1 is approximately solar, consistent with other known transition stars. We suggest that modest numbers of reddened WR stars remain to be found in M31.

  10. THE WOLF-RAYET CONTENT OF M33

    SciTech Connect

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2011-06-01

    Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are evolved massive stars, and the relative number of WC-type and WN-type WRs should vary with metallicity, providing a sensitive test of stellar evolutionary theory. The observed WC/WN ratio is much higher than that predicted by theory in some galaxies but this could be due to observational incompleteness for WN types, which have weaker lines. Previous studies of M33's WR content show a galactocentric gradient in the relative numbers of WCs and WNs, but only small regions have been surveyed with sufficient sensitivity to detect all of the WNs. Here, we present a sensitive survey for WRs covering all of M33, finding 55 new WRs, mostly of WN type. Our spectroscopy also improves the spectral types of many previously known WRs, establishing in one case that the star is actually a background quasar. The total number of spectroscopically confirmed WRs in M33 is 206, a number we argue is complete to {approx}5%, with most WRs residing in OB associations, although {approx}2% are truly isolated. The WC/WN ratio in the central regions (<2 kpc) of M33 is much higher than that predicted by the current Geneva evolutionary models, while the WC/WN ratios in the outer regions are in good accord, as are the values in the Small Magellanic Cloud and Large Magellanic Cloud. The WC/WN ratio and the WC subtype distribution both argue that the oxygen abundance gradient in M33 is significantly larger than that found by some recent studies, but are consistent with the two-component model proposed by Magrini et al.

  11. Sample of Wolf-Rayet galaxies from the SLOAN digital sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agienko, K. B.; Guseva, N. G.; Izotov, Yu. I.

    2013-05-01

    We have analyzed the spectra of blue compact dwarf galaxies from the SLOAN Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 and created a sample of 271 galaxies with Wolf-Rayet (WR) spectral features produced by high-velocity stellar winds. A blue WR feature (bump) is a blend of the N V λλ 460.5 and 462.0 nm, N III λλ 463.4 and 464.0 nm, C III λλ 465.0 nm, C IV λ 465.8 nm, and He II λ 468.6 nm emission lines. A red WR feature (bump) is the broad C IV λ 580.8 nm emission. The blue WR bump is mainly due to emissions of nitrogen WR (WN) stars, while the red bump is fully produced by emissions of carbon WR (WC) stars. All the sample spectra show the blue WR bumps, whereas the red WR bumps are only identified in 50% of sample spectra. We have derived the numbers of early-type WC stars (WCE) and late-type WN stars (WNL) in the galaxies using the luminosities of single WC and WN stars in the red and blue bumps, respectively. The number of O stars is estimated using the Hβ luminosity. The ratio of the overall number of WR stars of different types to the number of all massive stars N(WR)/N(O + WR) decreases with decreasing metallicity, corresponding to the evolution population synthesis models.

  12. Absolute spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars from 1200 to 7000 A - A cautionary tale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmany, C. D.; Conti, P. S.; Massey, P.

    1984-01-01

    It is demonstrated that absolute spectrophotometry of the continua of Wolf-Rayet stars may be obtained over the wavelength range 1200-7000 A using IUE and optical measurements. It is shown that the application of a 'standard' reddening law to the observed data gives spurious results in many cases. Additional UV extinction is apparently necessary and may well be circumstellar in origin. In such hot stars, the long-wavelength 'tail' of the emergent stellar continuum are measured. The inadequacy of previous attempts to determine intrinsic continua and effective temperatures of Wolf-Rayet stars is pointed out.

  13. The Wolf-Rayet Content of M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Georgy, Cyril

    2012-11-01

    Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are evolved massive stars, and the relative number of WC-type and WN-type WRs should vary with the metallicity of the host galaxy, providing a sensitive test of stellar evolutionary theory. However, past studies of the WR content of M31 have been biased toward detecting WC stars, as their emission-line signatures are much stronger than those of WNs. Here, we present the results of a survey covering all of M31's optical disk (2.2 deg2), with sufficient sensitivity to detect the weaker-lined WN types. We identify 107 newly found WR stars, mostly of WN type. This brings the total number of spectroscopically confirmed WRs in M31 to 154, a number we argue is complete to ~95%, except in regions of unusually high reddening. This number is consistent with what we expect from the integrated Hα luminosity compared to that of M33. The majority of these WRs formed in OB associations around the Population I ring, although 5% are truly isolated. Both the relative number of WC- to WN-type stars as well as the WC subtype distribution suggest that most WRs exist in environments with higher-than-solar metallicities, which is consistent with studies of M31's metallicity. Although the WC to WN ratio we find for M31 is much lower than that found by previous studies, it is still higher than what the Geneva evolutionary models predict. This may suggest that Roche-lobe overflow produces the excess of WC stars observed at high metallicity, or that the assumed rotational velocities in the models are too high. The spectroscopic observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. MMT telescope time was granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by the National Science Foundation. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  14. Long-term Observations of Wolf-Rayet Type Binary Systems WR 127 and WR 141

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoz, Ibrahim; Yakut, Kadri

    2016-07-01

    New UBVRI long-term photometric observations of the Wolf-Rayet systems WR 127 and WR 141 are obtained at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory with the 60cm Robotic telescope. Our new observations are combined with the earlier observations. We analyzed all the available light variation of the systems and revised the orbital parameters of the systems.

  15. Inhomogeneites dans le Vent des Etoiles Wolf-Rayet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Carmelle

    1992-01-01

    Des mesures spectroscopiques effectuees avec un haut rapport signal sur bruit et une bonne resolution ont demontre l'existence de regions perturbees en mouvement dans le vent d'etoiles Wolf-Rayet (WR). L'echantillon d'objets etudies ici comprend 9 etoiles WR couvrant differents sous-types WN et WC. De nombreuses petites structures variables superposees au profil des raies d'emission formees dans le vent stellaire signalent la presence des perturbations. L'etude des variations globales des raies et l'examen des micro-structures individuelles ont permis de decrire plusieurs caracteristiques des perturbations. Entre autres, on observe des correlations significatives entre le niveau de variabilite des raies et certains parametres des etoiles qui confirment que le phenomene de variabilite est intrinseque au vent stellaire. En comparant les changements des vitesses radiales et des largeurs equivalentes des differentes raies d'une meme etoile, on conclut que les regions perturbees ont une etendue finie par rapport a l'enveloppe des etoiles. On peut facilement suivre les structures individuelles sur une periode de temps couvrant ~eq8 heures (et peut etre meme 24 heures) avant qu'elles ne disparaissent. Durant ce temps les structures se deplacent en s'eloignant du centre de la raie. A partir des differents comportements notes lors de l'analyse des variations globales et lors de l'examen des structures individuelles, on propose de representer les perturbations par un modele d'inhomogeneites discretes en expansion dans le vent. On suppose simplement que les inhomogeneites emettent comme le vent global (et absorbent aussi si le vent global montre un profil P Cyg). La superposition du graphique de l'acceleration radiale moyenne des inhomogeneites de WR140 en fonction de leur vitesse radiale et du modele theorique d'inhomogeneites qui suivent la loi generale de vitesse donne un taux d'acceleration lent, avec beta >= 3 pour les inhomogeneites de cette etoile. On obtient, entre

  16. X ray emission from Wolf-Rayet stars with recurrent dust formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawley, Gayle L.

    1993-01-01

    We were granted a ROSAT observation of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 137 (equals HD 192641) to test a proposed mechanism for producing the infrared variability reported by Williams et al. (1987). These studies showed one clear infrared outburst preceded by what may be the dimming of a previous outburst. The recurrent dust formation model was put forward by Williams et al. (1990) to account for similar variability seen in WR 140, which varies in both the infrared and X-ray bands. The detected X-ray flux from WR 140 was observed to decrease from its normally high (for Wolf-Rayet stars) level as the infrared flux increased. Observation of two apparently-periodic infrared outbursts led to the hypothesis that WR 140 had an O star companion in an eccentric orbit, and that the increase in infrared flux came from a dust formation episode triggered by the compression of the O star and Wolf-Rayet star winds. The absorption of the X-rays by the increased material explained the decrease in flux at those wavelengths. If the infrared variability in WR 137 were caused by a similar interaction of the Wolf-Rayet star with a companion, we might expect that WR 137 would show corresponding X-ray variability and an X-ray luminosity somewhat higher than typical WC stars, as well as a phase-dependent non-thermal X-ray spectrum. Our goals in this study were to obtain luminosity estimates from our counting rates for comparison with previous observations of WR 137 and other WC class stars, especially WR 140; to compare the luminosity with the IR lightcurve; and to characterize the spectral shape of the X-ray emission, including the column density.

  17. X ray emission from Wolf-Rayet stars with recurrent dust formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawley, Gayle L.

    1993-10-01

    We were granted a ROSAT observation of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 137 (equals HD 192641) to test a proposed mechanism for producing the infrared variability reported by Williams et al. (1987). These studies showed one clear infrared outburst preceded by what may be the dimming of a previous outburst. The recurrent dust formation model was put forward by Williams et al. (1990) to account for similar variability seen in WR 140, which varies in both the infrared and X-ray bands. The detected X-ray flux from WR 140 was observed to decrease from its normally high (for Wolf-Rayet stars) level as the infrared flux increased. Observation of two apparently-periodic infrared outbursts led to the hypothesis that WR 140 had an O star companion in an eccentric orbit, and that the increase in infrared flux came from a dust formation episode triggered by the compression of the O star and Wolf-Rayet star winds. The absorption of the X-rays by the increased material explained the decrease in flux at those wavelengths. If the infrared variability in WR 137 were caused by a similar interaction of the Wolf-Rayet star with a companion, we might expect that WR 137 would show corresponding X-ray variability and an X-ray luminosity somewhat higher than typical WC stars, as well as a phase-dependent non-thermal X-ray spectrum. Our goals in this study were to obtain luminosity estimates from our counting rates for comparison with previous observations of WR 137 and other WC class stars, especially WR 140; to compare the luminosity with the IR lightcurve; and to characterize the spectral shape of the X-ray emission, including the column density.

  18. Spectrum and Light Curve of a Supernova Shock Breakout through a Thick Wolf-Rayet Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirski, Gilad; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-06-01

    Wolf-Rayet stars are known to eject winds. Thus, when a Wolf-Rayet star explodes as a supernova, a fast (gsim 40, 000 km s-1) shock is expected to be driven through a wind. We study the signal expected from a fast supernova shock propagating through an optically thick wind and find that the electrons behind the shock driven into the wind are efficiently cooled by inverse Compton over soft photons that were deposited by the radiation-mediated shock that crossed the star. Therefore, the bolometric luminosity is comparable to the kinetic energy flux through the shock, and the spectrum is found to be a power law, whose slope and frequency range depend on the number flux of soft photons available for cooling. Wolf-Rayet supernovae that explode through a thick wind have a high flux of soft photons, producing a flat spectrum, νF ν = Const, in the X-ray range of 0.1 <~ T <~ 50 keV. As the shock expands into an optically thin wind, the soft photons are no longer able to cool the shock that plows through the wind, and the bulk of the emission takes the form of a standard core-collapse supernova (without a wind). However, a small fraction of the soft photons is upscattered by the shocked wind and produces a transient unique X-ray signature.

  19. Imaging of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy He 2-10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, Michael R.; Korista, Kirk T.; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    We present B, V, and emission-line CCD images of the Wolf-Rayet galaxy He 2-10. The broad band images reveal the galaxy to consist of two starburst regions at the center of an elliptical stellar envelope about 10 times their size, with a major axis diameter of approximately 3.8 kpc. Previous imaging detected only the starburst regions, leading to the erroneous description of the object as an interacting pair. Morphologically, He 2-10 resembles the majority of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDGs), some of which also show Wolf-Rayet features in their spectra. The lack of nearby neighbors to He 2-10 suggests that its star formation is proceeding stochastically, rather than as the result of interaction, and its morphological similarity to other BCDGs suggests that all such galaxies may pass through a Wolf-Rayet phase. The similarity of the outer regions of He 2-10 and other BCDGs to normal dwarf ellipticals also supports models in which the former evolve into the latter.

  20. THE PROPAGATION OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN JETS IN WOLF-RAYET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakura, Hiroki

    2013-02-20

    We numerically investigate the jet propagation through a rotating collapsing Wolf-Rayet star with detailed central engine physics constructed based on the neutrino-driven collapsar model. The collapsing star determines the evolution of the mass accretion rate, black hole mass, and spin, all of which are important ingredients for determining the jet luminosity. We reveal that neutrino-driven jets in rapidly spinning Wolf-Rayet stars are capable of breaking out from the stellar envelope, while those propagating in slower rotating progenitors fail to break out due to insufficient kinetic power. For progenitor models with successful jet breakouts, the kinetic energy accumulated in the cocoon could be as large as {approx}10{sup 51} erg and might significantly contribute to the luminosity of the afterglow emission or to the kinetic energy of the accompanying supernova if nickel production takes place. We further analyze the post-breakout phase using a simple analytical prescription and conclude that the relativistic jet component could produce events with an isotropic luminosity L {sub p(iso)} {approx} 10{sup 52} erg s{sup -1} and isotropic energy E {sub j(iso)} {approx} 10{sup 54} erg. Our findings support the idea of rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars as plausible progenitors of GRBs, while slowly rotational ones could be responsible for low-luminosity or failed GRBs.

  1. Concerning the Wolf-Rayet and other luminous early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underhill, A. B.

    1981-01-01

    Effective temperatures, radii, and luminosities were determined from S2/68, ANS, UBV, and uvby photometry for four B0/B1 supergiants, four O4 stars, and four WN7/WN8 stars as well as for four test stars having spectral types between B1.5 V and 09 V and five stars with known angular diameters and effective temperatures. The effective temperatures of B1 Ia+ stars are found to be near 17,000 K, those of O4 stars near 45,000, and those of WN7/WN8 stars near 26,000 K. The question of modeling the atmospheres of hot luminous stars is examined, and it is noted that the photosphere can be modeled adequately using a classical plane-parallel layer model atmosphere. In addition, it is found that the Wolf-Rayet stars of types WN7/WN8 fall in the H-R diagram near the B0 Ia stars, while the others fall near B0.5 III stars. The evolutionary relationship between the Wolf-Rayet and O stars is considered; it is suggested that a Wolf-Rayet spectrum is a short-lived phase in the life of a massive star.

  2. Spectrum and light curve of a supernova shock breakout through a thick Wolf-Rayet wind

    SciTech Connect

    Svirski, Gilad; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-06-20

    Wolf-Rayet stars are known to eject winds. Thus, when a Wolf-Rayet star explodes as a supernova, a fast (≳ 40, 000 km s{sup –1}) shock is expected to be driven through a wind. We study the signal expected from a fast supernova shock propagating through an optically thick wind and find that the electrons behind the shock driven into the wind are efficiently cooled by inverse Compton over soft photons that were deposited by the radiation-mediated shock that crossed the star. Therefore, the bolometric luminosity is comparable to the kinetic energy flux through the shock, and the spectrum is found to be a power law, whose slope and frequency range depend on the number flux of soft photons available for cooling. Wolf-Rayet supernovae that explode through a thick wind have a high flux of soft photons, producing a flat spectrum, νF {sub ν} = Const, in the X-ray range of 0.1 ≲ T ≲ 50 keV. As the shock expands into an optically thin wind, the soft photons are no longer able to cool the shock that plows through the wind, and the bulk of the emission takes the form of a standard core-collapse supernova (without a wind). However, a small fraction of the soft photons is upscattered by the shocked wind and produces a transient unique X-ray signature.

  3. IC 4663: the first unambiguous [WN] Wolf-Rayet central star of a planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, B.; Crowther, P. A.; De Marco, O.; Köppen, J.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Acker, A.; Hillwig, T. C.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the serendipitous discovery of the first central star of a planetary nebula (PN) that mimics the helium- and nitrogen-rich WN sequence of massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. The central star of IC 4663 (PN G346.2-08.2) is dominated by broad He II and N V emission lines which correspond to a [WN3] spectral type. Unlike previous [WN] candidates, the surrounding nebula is unambiguously a PN. At an assumed distance of 3.5 kpc, corresponding to a stellar luminosity of 4000 L⊙, the V= 16.9 mag central star remains 4-6 mag fainter than the average luminosity of massive WN3 stars even out to an improbable d= 8 kpc. The nebula is typical of PNe with an elliptical morphology, a newly discovered asymptotic giant branch (AGB) halo, a relatively low expansion velocity (vexp= 30 km s-1) and a highly ionized spectrum with an approximately solar chemical abundance pattern. The [WN3] star is hot enough to show Ne VII emission (T*= 140 ± 20 kK) and exhibits a fast wind (v∞= 1900 km s-1), which at d= 3.5 kpc would yield a clumped mass-loss rate of ?= 1.8 × 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 with a small stellar radius (R*= 0.11 R⊙). Its atmosphere consists of helium (95 per cent), hydrogen (<2 per cent), nitrogen (0.8 per cent), neon (0.2 per cent) and oxygen (0.05 per cent) by mass. Such an unusual helium-dominated composition cannot be produced by any extant scenario used to explain the H-deficiency of post-AGB stars. The O(He) central stars share a similar composition and the discovery of IC 4663 provides the first evidence for a second He-rich/H-deficient post-AGB evolutionary sequence [WN] →O(He). This suggests that there is an alternative mechanism responsible for producing the majority of H-deficient post-AGB stars that may possibly be expanded to include other He-rich/H-deficient stars such as R Coronae Borealis stars and AM Canum Venaticorum stars. The origin of the unusual composition of [WN] and O(He) central stars remains unexplained. Based on observations made with Gemini

  4. Momentum deposition on Wolf-Rayet winds: Nonisotropic diffusion with effective gray opacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayley, Kenneth G.; Owocki, Stanley P.; Cranmer, Steven R.

    1995-01-01

    We derive the velocity and mass-loss rate of a steady state Wolf-Rayet (WR) wind, using a nonisotropic diffusion approximation applied to the transfer between strongly overlapping spectral lines. Following the approach of Friend & Castor (1983), the line list is assumed to approximate a statistically parameterized Poisson distribution in frequency, so that photon transport is controlled by an angle-dependent, effectively gray opacity. We show the nonisotropic diffusion approximation yields good agreement with more accurate numerical treatments of the radiative transfer, while providing analytic insight into wind driving by multiple scattering. We illustrate, in particular, that multiple radiative momentum deposition does not require that potons be repeatedly reflected across substantial distances within the spherical envelope, but indeed is greatest when photons undergo a nearly local diffusion, e.g., through scattering by many lines closely spaced in frequency. Our results reiterate the view that the so-called 'momentum problem' of Wolf-Rayet winds is better characterized as an 'opacity problem' of simply identfying enough lines. One way of increasing the number of thick lines in Wolf-Rayet winds is to transfer opacity from saturated to unsaturated lines, yielding a steeper opacity distribution than that found in OB winds. We discuss the implications of this perspective for extending our approach to W-R wind models that incorporate a more fundamental treatment of the ionization and excitation processes that determine the line opacity. In particular, we argue that developing statistical descriptions of the lines to allow an improved effective opacity for the line ensemble would offer several advantages for deriving such more fundamental W-R wind models.

  5. A search for rotationally-modulated wind-structure in Wolf-Rayet star WR 137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, Tim J.

    1999-08-01

    We wish to obtain high signal-to-noise, moderate dispersion time- series spectroscopy of the dust-producting Wolf-Rayet star WR 137. These data will be used to examine the frequency, life-times, and velocity distributions of density inhomogeneities within the wind, and to search for periodic modulation of the line-profile morphology indicative of large-scale azimuthal structure. Evidence for rotational modulation will provide strong support for the hypothesis that WR 137 has an equatorially-compressed wind as a result of rapid rotation, and that it is a carbon-sequence analogue of WRs 6 and 134.

  6. An archival search for UV spectroscopic variability of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Louis, N.; Willis, Alan J.; Smith, L. J.

    1988-06-01

    In order to assess the ubiquity of stellar wind variability in Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, spectroscopic variability for all galactic WR stars observed more than once at high resolution with IUE, excluding the well known spectroscopic binaries, was studied. This involved dearchiving, reducing on Starlink, and examining every HIRES WR image secured to date, embracing 15 stars and 111 spectra. A survey of the SWP spectra available is presented. Evidence of significant P Cygni profile variability is found in WR 22 (=HD 92740) and WR 137 (=HD 192641), but not in the other stars in the sample.

  7. Interactions and star-formation activity in Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Esteban, César

    2009-12-01

    We present the main results of the Ph.D. thesis carried out by López-Sánchez (Ph.D. thesis, 2006), in which a detailed morphological, photometric and spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 20 Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies was performed. The main aims are the study of the star formation and O and WR stellar populations in these galaxies, and the role that interactions between low surface brightness companion objects have in the triggering of the bursts. We analyze the morphology, stellar populations, physical conditions, chemical abundances and kinematics of the ionized gas, as well as the star-formation activity of each system.

  8. A deep survey for Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Motivation, search technique, and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Smith, Lindsey F.; Potter, Michael; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from a survey of large areas of the southern Milky Way for Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars to 17-18th magnitude, carried out using direct narrowband and broadband Schmidt plates. Thirteen new WR stars were detected in an about 40-deg-sq region in Carina, where 24 WR stars were already known; the new stars were found to be significantly redder, fainter, and farther away than the known stars. Of the new WR stars, 11 are of subtype WN, and two are WC, compared to the 17 WN and seven WC stars among the previously known WR stars in the same area.

  9. Objetos de tipo espectral temprano en la vecindad de estrellas Wolf-Rayet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, A.; Gamen, R.; Barbá, R.

    We are carrying out a spectroscopic monitoring of faint and poor-studied Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars in order to detect new binary systems. Since most of these systems are not related to known clusters or OB associations, a study of the stellar surrounding population is being done. These objects were chosen according to their IR colors in the 2MASS Catalogue and re- sulted in the discovery of several objects with early spectral types. The observations were performed in 2007 and 2008 with the 4-m telescope V. Blanco of the Inter-American Observatory of Cerro Tololo, Chile. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  10. The vast population of Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars in M101. I. Motivation and first results

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Bibby, Joanne L.; Zurek, David; Crowther, Paul A.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Drissen, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Assembling a catalog of at least 10,000 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars is an essential step in proving (or disproving) that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. To this end, we have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to carry out a deep, He II optical narrowband imaging survey of the ScI spiral galaxy M101. Almost the entire galaxy was imaged with the unprecedented depth and resolution that only the HST affords. Differenced with archival broadband images, the narrowband images allow us to detect much of the W-R star population of M101. We describe the extent of the survey and our images, as well as our data reduction procedures. A detailed broadband-narrowband imaging study of a field east of the center of M101, containing the giant star-forming region NGC 5462, demonstrates our completeness limits, how we find W-R candidates, their properties and spatial distribution, and how we rule out most contaminants. We use the broadband images to locate luminous red supergiant (RSG) candidates. The spatial distributions of the W-R and RSG stars near NGC 5462 are strikingly different. W-R stars dominate the complex core, while RSGs dominate the complex halo. Future papers in this series will describe and catalog more than a thousand W-R and RSG candidates that are detectable in our images, as well as spectra of many of those candidates.

  11. A new massive double-lined spectroscopic binary system: The Wolf-Rayet star WR 68a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, A.; Gamen, R.; Barbá, R. H.; Morrell, N.

    2015-09-01

    Double-lined spectroscopic binary systems, containing a Wolf-Rayet and a massive O-type star, are key objects for the study of massive star evolution because these kinds of systems allow the determination of fundamental astrophysical parameters of their components. We have performed spectroscopic observations of the star WR 68a as part of a dedicated monitoring program of WR stars to discover new binary systems. We identified spectral lines of the two components of the system and disentangled the spectra. We measured the radial velocities in the separated spectra and determined the orbital solution. We discovered that WR 68a is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with an orbital period of 5.2207 days, very small or null eccentricity, and inclination ranging between 75 and 85 deg. We classified the binary components as WN6 and O5.5-6. The WN star is less massive than the O-type star with minimum masses of 15 ± 5 M⊙ and 30 ± 4 M⊙, respectively. The equivalent width of the He ii λ4686 emission line shows variations with the orbital phase, presenting a minimum when the WN star is in front of the system. The light curve constructed from available photometric data presents minima in both conjunctions of the system. Table 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. The Vast Population of Wolf-Rayet and Red Supergiant Stars in M101. I. Motivation and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Bibby, Joanne L.; Zurek, David; Crowther, Paul A.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Drissen, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Assembling a catalog of at least 10,000 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars is an essential step in proving (or disproving) that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. To this end, we have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to carry out a deep, He II optical narrowband imaging survey of the ScI spiral galaxy M101. Almost the entire galaxy was imaged with the unprecedented depth and resolution that only the HST affords. Differenced with archival broadband images, the narrowband images allow us to detect much of the W-R star population of M101. We describe the extent of the survey and our images, as well as our data reduction procedures. A detailed broadband-narrowband imaging study of a field east of the center of M101, containing the giant star-forming region NGC 5462, demonstrates our completeness limits, how we find W-R candidates, their properties and spatial distribution, and how we rule out most contaminants. We use the broadband images to locate luminous red supergiant (RSG) candidates. The spatial distributions of the W-R and RSG stars near NGC 5462 are strikingly different. W-R stars dominate the complex core, while RSGs dominate the complex halo. Future papers in this series will describe and catalog more than a thousand W-R and RSG candidates that are detectable in our images, as well as spectra of many of those candidates.

  13. Lattice Structure in Astrophysics: A reconsideration of White Dwarfs, Variables, and Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Stars of the main sequence display a mass-luminosity relation which indicates that they share a common building block (hydrogen) and lattice structure (hexagonal planar) with the solar photosphere. White dwarfs however display very low luminosity in spite of their elevated color temperature. Rather than postulate that these stars represent degenerate matter, as Eddington and Chandrasekhar were forced to assume given their gaseous models, within the context of a Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model white dwarfs might simply be thought as possessing a different lattice structure (e.g. body centered cubic) and hence a lowered emissivity. They do not need to possess exceeding densities, reduced radii, and degeneracy in order to account for their lowered emissivity. Similarly, variable stars might well be oscillating between lattices types wherein the energy differences involved in the transformations are small. Other stars, such as Wolf-Rayet stars, which lack photospheric emission, might be too hot to enable a discrete lattice to form. Though condensed, the photosphere in that case would have a lattice which is so poorly organized that its emissivity is trivial. Nonetheless, the broad emission lines of Wolf-Rayet stars indicates that these objects are not breaking apart but rather, are important sites of condensation.

  14. Episodic Dust Formation by Wolf-Rayet Stars: Smoke Signals From Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.

    1996-12-01

    It is evident from infrared observations made over the last two decades that there is a group of Wolf-Rayet stars which make dust episodically in their winds. In cases where observations have continued for long enough, it is seen that dust-formation episodes occur repeatedly, at intervals of about a decade. Three such episodes by the prototype, WR 140, have been observed and linked to the interaction of the winds of the WC7 and O4-5 components of this binary. A second episode by another system containing a WC7 star, WR 137, has recently begun. New optical spectroscopy of two other WC systems, not previously known to be binaries and which have showed dust-formation episodes, indicates the presence of OB companions and suggests that they too might be binaries. Closely related to these systems is the long-period WC9+B0I binary WR 70, whose dust emission is more complex. These systems can give new insights to the structure of Wolf-Rayet winds.

  15. DISCOVERY OF TWIN WOLF-RAYET STARS POWERING DOUBLE RING NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Wachter, Stefanie; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Hoard, D. W.; Morris, Patrick W.

    2010-11-20

    We have spectroscopically discovered a pair of twin, nitrogen-type, hydrogen-rich, Wolf-Rayet stars (WN8-9h) that are both surrounded by circular, mid-infrared-bright nebulae detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope and MIPS instrument. The emission is probably dominated by a thermal continuum from cool dust, but also may contain contributions from atomic line emission. There is no counterpart at shorter Spitzer/IRAC wavelengths, indicating a lack of emission from warm dust. The two nebulae are probably wind-swept stellar ejecta released by the central stars during a prior evolutionary phase. The nebulae partially overlap on the sky and we speculate on the possibility that they are in the early stage of a collision. Two other evolved massive stars have also been identified within the area subtended by the nebulae, including a carbon-type Wolf-Rayet star (WC8) and an O7-8 III-I star, the latter of which appears to be embedded in one of the larger WN8-9h nebulae. The derived distances to these stars imply that they are coeval members of an association lying 4.9 {+-} 1.2 kpc from Earth, near the intersection of the Galaxy's Long Bar and the Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm. This new association represents an unprecedented display of complex interactions between multiple stellar winds, outflows, and the radiation fields of evolved massive stars.

  16. SN 2008D: A WOLF-RAYET EXPLOSION THROUGH A THICK WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Svirski, Gilad; Nakar, Ehud

    2014-06-10

    Supernova (SN) 2008D/XRT 080109 is considered to be the only direct detection of a shock breakout from a regular SN to date. While a breakout interpretation was favored by several papers, inconsistencies remain between the observations and current SN shock breakout theory. Most notably, the duration of the luminous X-ray pulse is considerably longer than expected for a spherical breakout through the surface of a type Ibc SN progenitor, and the X-ray radiation features, mainly its flat spectrum and its luminosity evolution, are enigmatic. We apply a recently developed theoretical model for the observed radiation from a Wolf-Rayet SN exploding through a thick wind and show that it naturally explains all of the observed features of SN 2008D X-ray emission, including the energetics, the spectrum, and the detailed luminosity evolution. We find that the inferred progenitor and SN parameters are typical for an exploding Wolf-Rayet. A comparison of the wind density found at the breakout radius and the density at much larger radii, as inferred by late radio observations, suggests an enhanced mass-loss rate taking effect about 10 days prior to the SN explosion. This finding joins accumulating evidence for a possible late phase in the stellar evolution of massive stars, involving vigorous mass loss a short time before the SN explosion.

  17. Massive star formation in Wolf-Rayet galaxies. III. Analysis of the O and WR populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Esteban, C.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: We perform a comprehensive multiwavelength analysis of a sample of 20 starburst galaxies that show a substantial population of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. In this paper, the third of the series, we present the analysis of the O and WR star populations within these galaxies. Methods: We study the spatial localization of the WR-rich clusters via the detection of the blue WR bump, mainly composed by the broad He ii λ4686 line and attributed to WN stars, and the red WR bump, composed by the broad C iv λ5808 line observed in WC stars. We perform a detailed fitting of the nebular and broad emission lines within these broad features and derive the numbers of WN, WC and O stars using (i) the standard assumption of constant WR luminosities and (ii) considering metallicity-dependent WR luminosities. We then compare our results with the predictions given by evolutionary synthesis models and with previous empirical results. Results: We report the detection of blue WR bump in 20 regions, but the red WR bump is only detected in six. Aperture effects and the exact positioning of the slit onto the WR-rich bursts play a fundamental role in their detection. The nebular He ii λ4686 line is detected in 21 regions; its intensity clearly decreases with increasing metallicity. We derive an empirical estimation of the WNL/(WNL+O) ratio using the intensity of the broad He ii line assuming metallicity-dependent WR luminosities. As expected, the total number of WR stars increases with increasing metallicity, but objects with 12 + log(O/H) < 8.2 show a rather constant WR/(WR+O) ratio. The computed WCE/WNL ratios are different than those empirically found in nearby star-forming galaxies, indicating that the observed galaxies are experiencing a strong and very short burst. Considering metallicity-dependent WR luminosities, our data agree with a Salpeter-like IMF in all regimes. Conclusions: We consider that the contribution of the WCE stars is not negligible at low metallicities, but deeper

  18. The close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of metallicity in M31 and M33

    SciTech Connect

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2014-07-01

    Massive star evolutionary models generally predict the correct ratio of WC-type and WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars at low metallicities, but underestimate the ratio at higher (solar and above) metallicities. One possible explanation for this failure is perhaps single-star models are not sufficient and Roche-lobe overflow in close binaries is necessary to produce the 'extra' WC stars at higher metallicities. However, this would require the frequency of close massive binaries to be metallicity dependent. Here we test this hypothesis by searching for close Wolf-Rayet binaries in the high metallicity environments of M31 and the center of M33 as well as in the lower metallicity environments of the middle and outer regions of M33. After identifying ∼100 Wolf-Rayet binaries based on radial velocity variations, we conclude that the close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayets is not metallicity dependent and thus other factors must be responsible for the overabundance of WC stars at high metallicities. However, our initial identifications and observations of these close binaries have already been put to good use as we are currently observing additional epochs for eventual orbit and mass determinations.

  19. First Detections of Molecular Gas Associated with the Wolf-Rayet Ring Nebula NGC 3199

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, A. P.

    2001-12-01

    This paper presents the first observations of molecular gas associated with the Wolf-Rayet ring nebula NGC 3199 around the WR star WR 18. This includes first observations of the molecules HCN, HCO+, CN, and HNC seen in any Wolf-Rayet ring nebula. Our observations immediately suggest the presence of high-density molecular gas (>104 cm-3) in the nebula with significant amounts of associated molecular gas, which is in the form of clumpy ejecta and/or interstellar material. Molecular CO gas was mapped across the optically bright portion of the nebula and out into the diffuse ionized component using the 12CO J=1-->0 line. CO gas is not seen within the optically bright rim of NGC 3199 but adjacent to it. The optical emission rim therefore appears to mark regions of photodissociation. Velocity components in the CO data are consistent with those seen in high-resolution optical spectra of the Hα line but extend beyond the visible emission. A prior suggestion of the formation of the nebula via a bow shock appears unlikely since Hipparcos measurements show the proper motion of WR 18 is almost at right angles to the direction required for the bow shock model. Instead, line splitting toward the north of the nebula suggests that a possible blowout of the Wolf-Rayet wind through surrounding ejecta may be responsible for some of the velocity features observed. Preliminary estimates of molecular abundances in the nebula seen toward the central star are significantly higher than for the interstellar medium and are similar to those in planetary nebulae, although CN is distinctly underabundant in comparison to the very high values found in many planetary nebulae. The abundances found are consistent with the idea that at least a portion of the molecular material is associated with ejecta from the central star. Based on observations collected at the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile. The Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope

  20. Discovery of a New Wolf-Rayet Star Using SAGE-LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Chené, A.-N.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Schnurr, O.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first-ever discovery of an extragalactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) star with Spitzer. A new WR star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was revealed via detection of its circumstellar shell using 24 μm images obtained in the framework of the Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC). Subsequent spectroscopic observations with the Gemini South resolved the central star in two components, one of which is a WN3b+abs star, while the second one is a B0 V star. We consider the lopsided brightness distribution over the circumstellar shell as an indication that the WR star is a runaway and use this interpretation to identify a possible parent cluster of the star.

  1. The Nature of the cm-mm Emission in Close Wolf-Rayet Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, G.; Alberdi, A.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; González, R. F.

    2015-10-01

    The centimeter spectra of Wolf-Rayet (WR) binaries often show a contribution from a wind-wind collision region (WCR) between the stars. In short period systems (≤sssim 1 yr), such a component is expected to be absorbed by the unshocked winds, losing any effect from its binarity. Recent studies suggest that the WCR in these systems may also contribute to the emission at both centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. We analyzed and compared centimeter and millimeter observations of a total sample of 17 WR stars (including nine confirmed short-period systems) to detect any possible WCR contribution. More detailed observations are required in order to distinguish between different scenarios. We highlight the importance of analyzing the spectrum from quasi-simultaneous observations in a wide range of frequencies in order to properly characterize and distinguish any possible extra contribution.

  2. The Results of the 2013 Pro-Am Wolf-Rayet Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N. D.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G. M.; World-Wide WR Pro-Am Campaign Team

    Professional and amateur astronomers around the world contributed to a 4-month long campaign in 2013, mainly in spectroscopy but also in photometry, interferometry and polarimetry, to observe the first 3 Wolf-Rayet stars discovered: WR 134 (WN6b), WR 135 (WC8) and WR 137 (WC7pd+O9). Each of these stars are interesting in their own way, showing a variety of stellar wind structures. The spectroscopic data from this campaign were reduced and analyzed for WR 134 in order to better understand its behavior and long-term periodicity in the context of CIRs in the wind. We will be presenting the results of these spectroscopic data, which include the confirmation of the CIR variability and a time-coherency of ˜ 40 days (half-life of ˜ 20 days).

  3. Estrellas Wolf-Rayet y el medio interestelar: huellas de una fuerte interacción

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichowolski, S.; Arnal, E. M.

    Se presentan resultados observacionales de un estudio de la distribución de hidrógeno neutro en los alrededores de estrellas Wolf-Rayet (WR) galácticas. Los datos de la línea de 21 cm provienen de observaciones de resolución angular intermedia (9') tomadas con el radiotelescopio de Effelsberg. La muestra está compuesta por cuatro WR de la serie del nitrógeno (WN): WR130, WR131, WR155, WR156 y tres WR de la serie del carbono (WC): WR154, WR117 y WR126. Este análisis ha permitido detectar cavidades y envolturas de HI en expansión presumiblemente vinculadas a dichas estrellas.

  4. Is NGC 3199 the Third Wolf-Rayet Nebula with Diffuse X-ray emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toala, J. a.

    2013-10-01

    X-ray emission from Wolf-Rayet (WR) nebulae is thought to be produced by the powerful winds from their central stars slamming into the circumstellar medium. Only 4 WR nebulae have been observed with the latest generation of X-ray satellites: S 308 (WR6), RCW58 (WR40), NGC6888 (WR136), and the nebula of WR16, but only S 308 and NGC6888 have been detected. ROSAT observations toward the WR nebula NGC3199 hinted at the presence of soft X-ray emission associated with this nebula, but the low angular resolution does not allow us to disentangle the different contributions to this emission. We request a 40 ks XMM-Newton EPIC-pn observation to help us study the distribution of the diffuse hot gas within the WR nebula NGC3199 around WR18.

  5. On the rarity of X-ray binaries with Wolf-Rayet donors

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, T.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V.

    2012-03-14

    The paucity of High mass X-Ray binaries (HMXB) consisting of a neutron star (NS) accretor and Wolf-Rayet (WR) donor has long been at odds with expectations from population synthesis studies indicating that these systems should survive as the evolved offspring of the observed HMXB population. This tension is particularly troubling in light of recent observations uncovering a preponderance of HMXBs containing loosely bound Be donors which would be expected to naturally evolve into WR-HMXBs. Reconciling the unexpectedly large population of Be-HMXBs with the lack of observed WR-HMXB sources thus serves to isolate the dynamics of CE physics from other binary evolution parameters. We find that binary mergers during CE events must be common in order to resolve tension between these observed populations. Furthermore, future observations which better constrain the background population of loosely bound O/B-NS binaries are likely to place significant constraints on the efficiency of CE removal.

  6. Time-Series of Linear Spectropolarimetric Observations of Wolf-Rayet Stars: Results for WR 134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Louis, N.; de la Chevrotière, A.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from a timeseries of spectropolarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 134. Our most striking observation so far is that in addition to the depolarization of spectral lines with respect to the continuum, already known to occur for this star, we find excess line polarisation in the red and blue wings at wavelengths clearly in excess of the terminal velocity of the wind. Also, contrary to expectations, we find no line depolarisation for the flat-topped He I λ5876 and C IV λ5804 lines. The excess polarization of the red wing is very likely a consequence of the well known red-shifted electron-scattering wing formed in expanding atmospheres, but the origin of the blue wing polarization still remains to be identified.

  7. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars - Intrinsic colors and absolute magnitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Dodgen, Ana V.; Massey, Philip

    1988-01-01

    Absolute spectrophotometry of about 10-A resolution in the range 3400-7300 A have been obtained for southern Wolf-Rayet stars, and line-free magnitudes and colors have been constructed. The emission-line contamination in the narrow-band ubvr systems of Westerlund (1966) and Smith (1968) is shown to be small for most WN stars, but to be quite significant for WC stars. It is suggested that the more severe differences in intrinsic color from star to star of the same spectral subtype noted at shorter wavelengths are due to differences in atmospheric extent. True continuum absolute visual magnitudes and intrinsic colors are obtained for the LMC WR stars. The most visually luminous WN6-WN7 stars are found to be located in the core of the 30 Doradus region.

  8. An IRAS-based search for new Dusty Late-Type WC Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin

    1995-01-01

    I have examined all Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data relevant to the 173 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in an updated catalog, including the 13 stars newly discovered by Shara and coworkers. Using the W-R coordinates in these lists, I have examined the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC), the Faint Source Catalog, and the Faint Source Reject Catalog, and have generated one-dimensional spatial profiles ('ADDSCANs') and two-dimensional full-resolution images ('FRESCOs'). The goal was to assemble the best set of observed IRAS color indices for different W-R types, in particular for known dusty late-type WC Wolf-Rayet (WCL) objects. I have also unsuccessfully sought differences in IRAS colors and absolute magnitudes between single and binary W-R stars. The color indices for the entire ensemble of W-R stars define zones in the IRAS color-color plane. By searching the PSC for otherwise unassociated sources that satisfy these colors, I have identified potential new W-R candidates, perhaps too faint to have been recognized in previous optical searches. I have extracted these candidates' IRAS low-resolution spectrometer (LRS) data and compared the spectra with the highly characteristic LRS shape for known dusty WCL stars. The 13 surviving candidates must now be examined by optical spectroscopy. This work represents a much more rigorous and exhaustive version of the LRS study that identified IRAS 17380 - 3031 (WR98a) as the first new W-R (WC9) star discovered by IRAS. This search should have detected dusty WCL stars to a distance of 7.0 kpc from the Sun, for the absolute value of l greater than 30 deg, and to 2.9 kpc even in the innermost Galaxy. For free-free-dominated W-R stars the corresponding distances are 2.5 and 1.0 kpc, respectively.

  9. An IRAS-Based Search for New Dusty Late-Type WC Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin

    1995-01-01

    I have examined all Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data relevant to the 173 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in an updated catalog, including the 13 stars newly discovered by Shara and coworkers. Using the W-R coordinates in these lists, I have examined the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC), the Faint Source Catalog, and the Faint Source Reject Catalog, and have generated one-dimensional spatial profiles, 'ADDSCANs', and two-dimensional full-resolution images, 'FRESCOS'. The goal was to assemble the best set of observed IRAS color indices for different W-R types, in particular for known dusty late-type WC Wolf-Rayet (WCL) objects. I have also unsuccessfully sought differences in IRAS colors and absolute magnitudes between single and binary W-R stars. The color indices for the entire ensemble of W-R stars define zones in the IRAS color-color ([12] - [25], [25] - [60])-plane. By searching the PSC for otherwise unassociated sources that satisfy these colors, I have identified potential new W-R candidates, perhaps too faint to have been recognized in previous optical searches. I have extracted these candidates' IRAS low-resolution spectrometer (LRS) data and compared the spectra with the highly characteristic LRS shape for known dusty WCL stars. The 13 surviving candidates must now be ex amined by optical spectroscopy. This work represents a much more rigorous and exhaustive version of the LRS study that identified IRAS 17380 - 3031 (WR98a) as the first new W-R (WC9) star discovered by IPAS. This search should have detected dusty WCL stars to a distance of 7.0 kpc from the Sun, for l is greater than 30 degrees, and to 2.9 kpc even in the innermost galaxy. For free-free-dominated W-R stars the corresponding distances are 2.5 and 1.0 kpc, respectively.

  10. Near-Infrared Keck Interferometer and IOTA Closure Phase Observations of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, J.; Wallace, D.; Barry, R.; Richardson, L. J.; Traub, W.; Danchi, W. C.

    We present first results from observations of a small sample of IR-bright Wolf-Rayet stars with the Keck Interferometer in the near-infrared, and with the IONIC beam three-telescope beam combiner at the Infrared and Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) observatory. The former results were obtained as part of shared-risk observations in commissioning the Keck Interferometer and form a subset of a high-resolution study of dust around Wolf-Rayet stars using multiple interferometers in progress in our group. The latter results are the first closure phase observations of these stars in the near-infrared in a separated telescope interferometer. Earlier aperture-masking observations with the Keck-I telescope provide strong evidence that dust-formation in late-type WC stars are a result of wind-wind collision in short-period binaries.Our program with the Keck interferometer seeks to further examine this paradigm at much higher resolution. We have spatially resolved the binary in the prototypical dusty WC type star WR 140. WR 137, another episodic dust-producing star, has been partially resolved for the first time, providing the first direct clue to its possible binary nature.We also include WN stars in our sample to investigate circumstellar dust in this other main sub-type of WRs. We have been unable to resolve any of these, indicating a lack of extended dust.Complementary observations using the MIDI instrument on the VLTI in the mid-infrared are presented in another contribution to this workshop.

  11. OB Associations, Wolf Rayet Stars, and the Origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, W. R.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Arnould, M.; Cummings, A. C.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Goriely, S.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Meynet, G.; Scott, L. M.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2007-06-01

    We have measured the isotopic abundances of neon and a number of other species in the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) aboard the ACE spacecraft. Our data are compared to recent results from two-component (Wolf Rayet material plus solar-like mixtures) Wolf Rayet (WR) models. The three largest deviations of galactic cosmic ray isotope ratios from solar-system ratios predicted by these models, 12C/16O, 22Ne/20Ne, and 58Fe/56Fe, are very close to those observed. All of the isotopic ratios that we have measured are consistent with a GCR source consisting of ˜20% of WR material mixed with ˜80% material with solar-system composition. Since WR stars are evolutionary products of OB stars, and most OB stars exist in OB associations that form superbubbles, the good agreement of our data with WR models suggests that OB associations within superbubbles are the likely source of at least a substantial fraction of GCRs. In previous work it has been shown that the primary 59Ni (which decays only by electron-capture) in GCRs has decayed, indicating a time interval between nucleosynthesis and acceleration of >105 y. It has been suggested that in the OB association environment, ejecta from supernovae might be accelerated by the high velocity WR winds on a time scale that is short compared to the half-life of 59Ni. Thus the 59Ni might not have time to decay and this would cast doubt upon the OB association origin of cosmic rays. In this paper we suggest a scenario that should allow much of the 59Ni to decay in the OB association environment and conclude that the hypothesis of the OB association origin of cosmic rays appears to be viable.

  12. OB Associations, Wolf-Rayet Stars, and the Origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, W. R.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Arnould, M.; Cummings, A. C.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Goriely, S.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Meynet, G.; Scott, L. M.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    We have measured the isotopic abundances of neon and a number of other species in the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) aboard the ACE spacecraft. Our data are compared to recent results from two-component (Wolf-Rayet material plus solar-like mixtures) Wolf-Rayet (WR) models. The three largest deviations of galactic cosmic ray isotope ratios from solar-system ratios predicted by these models, 12C/16O, 22Ne/20Ne, and 58Fe/56Fe, are very close to those observed. All of the isotopic ratios that we have measured are consistent with a GCR source consisting of ˜20% of WR material mixed with ˜80% material with solar-system composition. Since WR stars are evolutionary products of OB stars, and most OB stars exist in OB associations that form superbubbles, the good agreement of our data with WR models suggests that OB associations within superbubbles are the likely source of at least a substantial fraction of GCRs. In previous work it has been shown that the primary 59Ni (which decays only by electron-capture) in GCRs has decayed, indicating a time interval between nucleosynthesis and acceleration of >105 y. It has been suggested that in the OB association environment, ejecta from supernovae might be accelerated by the high velocity WR winds on a time scale that is short compared to the half-life of 59Ni. Thus the 59Ni might not have time to decay and this would cast doubt upon the OB association origin of cosmic rays. In this paper we suggest a scenario that should allow much of the 59Ni to decay in the OB association environment and conclude that the hypothesis of the OB association origin of cosmic rays appears to be viable.

  13. Searching for a magnetic field in Wolf-Rayet stars using FORS 2 spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Scholz, K.; Hamann, W.-R.; Schöller, M.; Ignace, R.; Ilyin, I.; Gayley, K. G.; Oskinova, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    To investigate if magnetic fields are present in Wolf-Rayet stars, we selected a few stars in the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We acquired low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations with the European Southern Observatory FORS 2 (FOcal Reducer low dispersion Spectrograph) instrument during two different observing runs. During the first run in visitor mode, we observed the LMC Wolf-Rayet star BAT99 7 and the stars WR 6, WR 7, WR 18, and WR 23 in our Galaxy. The second run in service mode was focused on monitoring the star WR 6. Linear polarization was recorded immediately after the observations of circular polarization. During our visitor observing run, the magnetic field for the cyclically variable star WR 6 was measured at a significance level of 3.3σ ( = 258 ± 78 G). Among the other targets, the highest value for the longitudinal magnetic field, = 327 ± 141 G, was measured in the LMC star BAT99 7. Spectropolarimetric monitoring of the star WR 6 revealed a sinusoidal nature of the variations with the known rotation period of 3.77 d, significantly adding to the confidence in the detection. The presence of the rotation-modulated magnetic variability is also indicated in our frequency periodogram. The reported field magnitude suffers from significant systematic uncertainties at the factor of 2 level, in addition to the quoted statistical uncertainties, owing to the theoretical approach used to characterize it. Linear polarization measurements showed no line effect in the stars, apart from WR 6. BAT99 7, WR 7, and WR 23 do not show variability of the linear polarization over two nights.

  14. The statistical equilibrium of hydrogen and helium in a radiation field, with an application to interpreting Wolf-Rayet spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Underhill, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    The interpretation of the intensities of the hydrogen and helium emission lines in O and Wolf-Rayet spectra in terms of the abundance of hydrogen relative to helium requires information regarding the distribution of hydrogen and helium atoms and ions over their several energy states. In addition, some estimate is needed regarding the transmission of the radiation through the stellar mantle. The present paper provides new information concerning the population of the energy levels of hydrogen and helium when statistical equilibrium occurs in the presence of a radiation field. The results are applied to an interpretation of the spectra of four Wolf-Rayet stars, taking into account the implications for interpreting the spectra of O stars, OB supergiants, and Be stars.

  15. The origin of extended interstellar shells around Wolf-Rayet stars having bright optical ring nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. S.; Fesen, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations of the interstellar environment around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars have lead to the discovery of extended shells of gas and dust 50-100 pc in diameter in the lines of sight toward three WR stars. In this paper, several origins for these extended shells are discussed. While positional coincidences cannot be excluded, the locations of the WR stars near the projected centers of the shells, the detection of only shortward-shifted, high-velocity UV absorption line components in their IUE spectra, plus commonality of some WR star properties which are rare in the general WR star population suggest some casual connections between the WR stars and formation of interstellar shells. To access whether the high-velocity UV interstellar absorption lines are a frequent phenomenon related to WR stellar winds, we present a survey of such features in all WR stars observed with IUE through 1991. Of 35 stars studied, only four are found to have components with velocity displacements greater than 45 km/s which are not attributable to previously identified OB association superbubbles. The means a surprising 82% of non-OB association WR stars show no evidence of high-velocity gas in their lines of sight at IUE's spectral resolution, suggesting that high-velocity interstellar absorption lines are not a common consequence of Wolf-Rayet star stellar winds alone. We review the properties of three WR stars (HD 50896, HD 96548, and HD 192163) which may reside inside extended interstellar shells and find that they are similar in terms of spectral class (WN5-8), presence of an optical ring nebula, and reported photometric variability. Evaluation of possible origins of the extended shells suggests these three stars are in a post X-ray binary stage of high-mass binary star evolution. If this is correct, then the large interstellar shells detected might be evidence of either supernova remnant shells generated by the explosion of the binary's primary star, or non-conservative mass transfer

  16. Ultraviolet observations of clusters of Wolf-Rayet stars in the SBm3 galaxy NGC 4214 and Ultraviolet and optical observations of LINER's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippenko, Alexei V.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the grant was to obtain and analyze IUE (UV) and ground-based (optical) spectra of the central bar of NGC 4214, which contains several bright H II regions, in order to further explore the properties of the Wolf-Rayet stars in this galaxy. Several spatially distinct regions, with widely different equivalent widths of optical Wolf-Rayet lines, could be sampled by the large IUE entrance aperture. By using newly developed extraction techniques, the spectra of these H II regions could be isolated, and differences in their stellar populations would be systematically studied. Data were obtained with IUE in late February and early March, 1992. Some of the shifts were successful, but a few were not -- apparently the blind offset from the nearby star did not work equally well in all cases. Thus, the signal-to-noise ratio is somewhat lower than we had hoped. This necessitated a more careful extraction of the spectra of individual H II regions from the two-dimensional spectra. (A program that models the point spread function in the spatial direction was used to deblend the distinct H II regions.) The IUE data are currently being analyzed in conjunction with ground-based optical spectra. There appear to be obvious variations in the stellar population over angular scales of only a few arc seconds. The second part of the research performed under this grant was a continuation of a project that uses IUE (UV) and ground-based (optical) spectra to infer the physical conditions in Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission-Line Regions (LINER's). We have obtained spectra of a few key objects that cover a representative range in LINER continuum and emission-line properties. The overall goals are to (1) separate the emission into spatially distinct components, (2) establish whether the observed nuclear ultraviolet continua indicate sufficient photoionizing fluxes to account for the emission lines, (3) determine whether the nuclear emission can be explained by hot stars alone, (4

  17. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WOLF-RAYET BUBBLE S 308

    SciTech Connect

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.

    2012-08-10

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its northwest quadrant, map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a central cavity {approx}22' in size and a shell thickness of {approx}8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at 0.43 keV and O VII at 0.57 keV, and declines toward high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T{sub 1} {approx} 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K, T{sub 2} {approx} 13 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), with a total X-ray luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at the assumed distance of 1.5 kpc.

  18. X-rays from Wolf-Rayet stars observed by the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Cassinelli, J. P.; Van Der Hucht, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of three X-ray surveys are presented. Out of a sample of 20 stars, X-rays were detected from four Wolf-Rayet stars and two O8f(+) stars. The detected stars have about the same mean value as O stars for the X-ray to total luminosity ratio, L(x)/L = 10 to the -7th, but exhibit a much larger variation about the mean. The spectral energy distributions are also found to be like that of O stars in that they do not exhibit large attenuation of X-rays softer than 1 keV. This indicates that for both the O stars and WR stars much of the X-ray emission is coming from hot wisps or shocks in the outer regions of the winds and not from a thin source at the base of the wind. The general spectral shape and flux level place severe restrictions on models that attribute the lack of hydrogen emission lines to extremely high temperatures of the gas in the wind.

  19. Project Runaway: Calibrating the Spectroscopic Distance Scale Using Runaway O and Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartkopf, William I.; Mason, B. D.

    2009-05-01

    Well-determined O star masses are notoriously difficult to obtain, due to such factors as broad spectral lines, larger and less-reliable average distances, high multiplicity rates, crowded fields, and surrounding nebulosity. Some of these difficulties are reduced for the subset of O stars known as runaways, however. They have escaped some of the nebulosity and crowding, and the event leading to their ejection virtually guarantees that these objects are either single stars or extremely hard spectroscopic binaries. The goal of this project is to increase the sample of known runaway stars, using updated proper motions from the soon-to-be-released UCAC3 catalog, as well as published radial velocities and data from recent duplicity surveys of massive stars using AO and speckle interferometry. Input files include the Galactic O Star Catalog of Maiz-Apellaniz et al. (2004 ApJSS 151, 103) as well as the Seventh Catalogue of Galactic Wolf-Rayet Stars and its more recent Annex (van der Hucht 2001 NewAR 45, 135; 2006 A&A 458, 453). The new runaway star sample will form the basis for a list of SIM targets aimed at improving the distances of Galactic O and WR stars, calibrating the spectroscopic distance scale and leading to more accurate mass estimates for these massive stars.

  20. Line profiles variations from atmospheric eclipses: Constraints on the wind structure in Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, L. H.; Koenigsberger, G.

    1994-01-01

    Binary systems in which one of the components has a stellar wind may present a phenomenon known as 'wind' or 'atmospheric eclipse', in which that wind occults the luminous disk of the companion. The enhanced absorption profile, relative to the spectrum at uneclipsed orbital phases, can be be modeled to yield constraints on the spatial structure of the eclipsing wind. A new, very efficient approach to the radiative transfer problem, which makes no requirements with respect to monotonicity of the velocity gradient or size of that gradient, is presented. The technique recovers both the comoving frame calculation and the Sobolev approximation in the appropiate limits. Sample computer simulations of the line profile variations induced by wind eclipses are presented. It is shown that the location of the wind absorption features in frequency is a diagnostic tool for identifying the size of the wind acceleration region. Comparison of the model profile variations with the observed variations in the Wolf-Rayet (W-R)+6 binary system V444 Cyg illustrate how the method can be used to derive information on the structure of the wind of the W-R star constrain the size of the W-R core radius.

  1. Disentangling the Nature of the Radio Emission in Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Gabriela; Pérez-Torres, Miguel A.; Alberdi, Antonio; González, Ricardo F.

    2009-11-01

    We present quasi-simultaneous, multi-frequency Very Large Array observations at 4.8, 8.4, and 22.5 GHz of a sample of 13 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, aimed at disentangling the nature of their radio emission and the possible detection of a non-thermal behavior in close binary systems. We detected 12 stars from our sample, for which we derived spectral information and estimated their mass-loss rates. From our data, we identified four thermal sources (WR 89, 113, 138, and 141), and three sources with a composite spectrum (similar contribution of thermal and non-thermal emission; WR 8, 98, and 156). On the other hand, from the comparison with previous observations, we confirm the non-thermal spectrum of one (WR 105), and also found evidence of a composite spectrum for WR 79a, 98a, 104, and 133. Finally, we discuss the possible scenarios to explain the nature of the emission for the observed objects.

  2. International Ultraviolet Explorer Observations of Wolf-Rayet Binaries: Wind Structures. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenigsberger, G.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of six WN + OB Wolf-Rayet systems obtained with the IUE are analyzed for phase-dependent variations. Periodic variability at emission-line frequencies is detected in V444 Cyg, HD 90657, HD 211853, HD 186943 and HD 94546 on low dispersion SWP images. No changes in the low dispersion spectra of HD 193077 are apparent. We find the variations in the UV to be similar in nature to those observed in optical spectra of various WR sources. That is, there is a strengthening of absorption components in P Cygni-type features at orbital phases in which the O-star is behind the WR wind. With the aid of a computer code which models this type of variations, and through a comparison with HD 193077, the dominant mechanism producing the variations is shown to be selective atmospheric eclipses of the O-star by the WR wind. Based on this interpretation, a straightforward technique is applied to the line of N IV 1718, by which an optical depth distribution in the WN winds of the form tau varies as r(-1) is derived for 16 r 66 solar radii. Phase-dependent variations in the width of the C IV 1550 absorption component in V444 Cyg, HD 90657 and HD 211853 are interpretated as wind-wind collision effects.

  3. Absence of hot gas within the Wolf-Rayet bubble around WR 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    We present the analysis of XMM-Newton archival observations towards the Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble around WR 16. Despite the closed bubble morphology of this WR nebula, the XMM-Newton observations show no evidence of diffuse emission in its interior as in the similar WR bubbles NGC 6888 and S 308. We use the present observations to estimate a 3-σ upper limit to the X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-1.5 keV energy band equal to 7.4 × 1032 erg s-1 for the diffuse emission from the WR nebula, assuming a distance of 2.37 kpc. The WR nebula around WR 16 is the fourth observed by the current generation of X-ray satellites and the second not detected. We also examine FUSE spectra to search for nebular O vi absorption lines in the stellar continuum of WR 16. The present far-UV data and the lack of measurements of the dynamics of the optical WR bubble do not allow us to confirm the existence of a conductive layer of gas at T ~ 3 × 105 K between the cold nebular gas and the hot gas in its interior. The present observations result in an upper limit of ne < 0.6 cm-3 on the electron density of the X-ray emitting material within the nebula.

  4. Wolf-Rayet stars, OB associations, and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, W. R.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Arnould, M.; Cummings, A. C.; George, J. S.; Goriely, S.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Meynet, G.; Scott, L. M.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2006-10-01

    We have measured the isotopic abundances of neon and several refractory species in the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using the cosmic ray isotope spectrometer (CRIS) aboard the ACE spacecraft. The 22Ne/20Ne ratio at the cosmic-ray source that we have obtained is 0.387 ± 0.007 (stat.) ± 0.022 (syst.), which corresponds to enhancement by a factor of 5.3 ± 0.3 over that in the solar wind. Our ACE-CRIS data, and data from other experiments, are compared to recent results from two-component Wolf-Rayet (WR) models. The three largest deviations of galactic cosmic ray isotope ratios from solar-system ratios predicted by these models, 12C/16O, 22Ne/20Ne, and 58Fe/56Fe, are, in fact, very close to those observed. Furthermore, all of the isotope ratios that we have measured are consistent with a GCR source consisting of ∼20% of WR material mixed with ∼80% material with solar-system composition. Since WR stars are evolutionary products of OB stars, and most OB stars exist in OB associations that form superbubbles, the good agreement of our data with WR models suggests that OB associations within superbubbles are the likely source of at least a substantial fraction of GCRs.

  5. Wolf-Rayet star nucleosynthesis and the isotopic composition of the Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynet, Georges; Arnould, Marcel; Paulus, Guy; Maeder, André

    2001-10-01

    There is now strong observational evidence that the composition of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) exhibits some significant deviations with respect to the abundances measured in the local (solar neighbourhood) interstellar medium (ISM). Two main scenarios have been proposed in order to account for these differences (`anomalies'). The first one, referred to as the `two-component scenario', invokes two distinct components to be accelerated to GCR energies by supernova blast waves. One of these components is just made of ISM material of `normal' solar composition, while the other one emerges from the wind of massive mass-losing stars of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) type. The second model, referred to as the `metallicity-gradient scenario', envisions the acceleration of ISM material whose bulk composition is different from the local one as a result of the fact that it originates from inner regions of the Galaxy, where the metallicity has not the local value. In both scenarios, massive stars, particularly of the WR type, play an important role in shaping the GCR composition. After briefly reviewing some basic observations and predictions concerning WR stars (including s-process yields), this paper revisits the two proposed scenarios in the light of recent non-rotating or rotating WR models.

  6. The thermonuclear production of 19F by Wolf-Rayet stars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Arnould, M.; Meynet, G.

    2005-11-01

    New models of rotating and non-rotating stars are computed for initial masses between 25 and 120 M_⊙ and for metallicities Z = 0.004, 0.008, 0.020, and 0.040 with the aim of reexamining the wind contribution of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars to the 19F enrichment of the interstellar medium. Models with an initial rotation velocity υi = 300 km s-1 are found to globally eject less 19F than the non-rotating models. We compare our new predictions with those of Meynet & Arnould (2000, A&A, 355, 176), and demonstrate that the 19F yields are very sensitive to the still uncertain 19F (α ,p) 22Ne rate and to the adopted mass loss rates. Using the recommended mass loss rate values that take into account the clumping of the WR wind and the NACRE reaction rates, when available, we obtain WR 19F yields that are significantly lower than predicted by Meynet & Arnould (2000, A&A, 355, 176) and that would make WR stars non-important contributors to the galactic 19F budget. In view, however, of the large nuclear and mass loss rate uncertainties, we consider that the question of the WR contribution to the galactic 19F remains quite open.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of Wolf-Rayet stars. III - The WC subclass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, A. V.; Conti, P. S.; Massey, P.

    1986-01-01

    Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, which are the descendants of massive O-type stars, can be subdivided into three groups depending on their spectral appearance. These groups include the nitrogen class (WN), the carbon class (WC), and the oxygen class (WO). The present paper is concerned with the WC stars. The assignment of WC subtypes has been based on visual inspections of photographic plates. One of the aims of this study is related to the quantification of the visual estimates. The measured ratios of equivalent widths and the FWHM of the 4650 A line for Galactic and LMC stars are presented, and the reclassification of some stars is proposed on this basis. In particular, it is shown that the majority of the LMC WC stars should logically be classified WC4 instead of WC5. Comments on individual stars are provided, and terminal velocities are discussed. It is attempted to give a complete overview of the most important spectroscopic features of the WC stars in the optical region.

  8. Circumstellar Carbonaceous Material Associated with Late-Type Dusty WC Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, J. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2001-04-01

    We have studied the 5-8.5 μm infrared spectra of the late-type Wolf-Rayet stars WR 118, WR 112, and WR 104, the WN star WR 147, the B5 hypergiant Cygnus OB2 No. 12, and the Galactic center luminous blue variable Pistol Star using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared Space Observatory. We attribute an absorption feature at 6.2 μm in the spectra of WC stars to amorphous carbon dust. This absorption feature is not detected in the diffuse interstellar medium toward the WR 147, Cyg OB2 No. 12, or the Pistol Star, and therefore we suggest that it is circumstellar in nature. In addition, we detect a broad absorption feature extending from approximately 6.5 to 8 μm. We tentatively attribute this absorption to the CC stretching modes that accompany the 6.2 μm band in aromatic materials. Our analysis of the 6.2 μm absorption profile suggests that the dust grains have to be rather large (~1 μm) and point toward dense clumps as the sites of dust formation. Based on observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  9. A Chandra grating observation of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a

    SciTech Connect

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Gagné, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L. E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu

    2014-04-10

    We present results of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 48a. These are the first high-resolution spectra of this object in X-ray. Blueshifted centroids of the spectral lines of ∼ – 360 km s{sup –1} and line widths of 1000-1500 km s{sup –1} (FWHM) were deduced from the analysis of the line profiles of strong emission lines. The forbidden line of Si XIII is strong and not suppressed, indicating that the rarified 10-30 MK plasma forms far from strong sources of far-ultraviolet emission, most likely in a wind collision zone. Global spectral modeling showed that the X-ray spectrum of WR 48a suffered higher absorption in the 2012 October Chandra observation compared with a previous 2008 January XMM-Newton observation. The emission measure of the hot plasma in WR 48a decreased by a factor ∼3 over the same period of time. The most likely physical picture that emerges from the analysis of the available X-ray data is that of colliding stellar winds in a wide binary system with an elliptical orbit. We propose that the unseen secondary star in the system is another WR star or perhaps a luminous blue variable.

  10. DISENTANGLING THE NATURE OF THE RADIO EMISSION IN WOLF-RAYET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, Gabriela; Perez-Torres, Miguel A.; Alberdi, Antonio; Gonzalez, Ricardo F. E-mail: torres@iaa.e E-mail: g.montes@astrosmo.unam.m

    2009-11-01

    We present quasi-simultaneous, multi-frequency Very Large Array observations at 4.8, 8.4, and 22.5 GHz of a sample of 13 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, aimed at disentangling the nature of their radio emission and the possible detection of a non-thermal behavior in close binary systems. We detected 12 stars from our sample, for which we derived spectral information and estimated their mass-loss rates. From our data, we identified four thermal sources (WR 89, 113, 138, and 141), and three sources with a composite spectrum (similar contribution of thermal and non-thermal emission; WR 8, 98, and 156). On the other hand, from the comparison with previous observations, we confirm the non-thermal spectrum of one (WR 105), and also found evidence of a composite spectrum for WR 79a, 98a, 104, and 133. Finally, we discuss the possible scenarios to explain the nature of the emission for the observed objects.

  11. An atlas of Copernicus ultraviolet spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    An atlas of Copernicus UV scans is presented, and line identifications are tabulated, for the Wolf-Rayet stars Gamma-2 Vel (WC 8 + O7), HD 50896 (= EZ CMa; WN 5), and HD 92740 (WN 7). The atlas covers the wavelength ranges from 946.8 to 3182 A for Gamma-2 Vel, from 1012 to 1294 A for HD 50896, and from 1051 to 1243 A for HD 92740. The wavelengths include corrections for components of satellite velocity, earth velocity, and stellar heliocentric velocity; each spectral feature is classified as interstellar, photospheric, emission, UV-displaced P Cygni line absorption, or P Cygni line emission. UV-edge velocities of the P Cygni profiles are estimated, P Cygni profile types are discussed, and the results are compared with Copernicus scans of OB stars exhibiting UV P Cygni profiles. It is noted that: (1) the line-strength ratio of molecular hydrogen to atomic species appears to be substantially greater in the scans of the WN stars than in the Gamma-2 Vel scans; (2) some of the P Cygni profiles in Gamma-2 Vel differ significantly from the corresponding profiles in OB stars; and (3) there may be a slight inverse correlation between ejection velocities and excitation potentials in Gamma-2 Vel.

  12. FUSE Observations of Neutron-Capture Elements in Wolf-Rayet Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, H.

    We propose to obtain FUSE observations of planetary nebula central stars of the WC Wolf-Rayet ([WC]) class, in order to search for the products of neutron-capture processes in these stars and provide constraints on their evolutionary status. Although the origin of the [WC]'s is controversial, their H-deficient, C-rich surface compositions indicate that they have experienced a high degree of mixing and/or mass loss. Thus one might expect the nebulae they produce to show enhanced concentrations of He-burning and other nuclear products, such as nuclei produced by slow neutron capture during the AGB phase. We have already detected an absorption line from one such element, Germanium (Sterling, Dinerstein, & Bowers 2002), while conducting a search for H2 absorption from nebular molecular material FUSE GI programs A085 and B069). Since the strongest Ge enhancements were found in PNe with [WC] central stars, we propose to enlarge the sample of such objects observed by FUSE. THIS TEMPORARY AND PARTIAL SCRIPT COVERS ONE TARGET, HE 2-99, AND REQUESTS AN EXPOSURE TIME OF 15 KSEC. PHASE 2 INFORMATION FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE PROGRAM'S TOTAL TIME ALLOCATION OF 60 KSEC WILL BE SUBMITTED AT A LATER TIME.

  13. Clumping-corrected mass-loss rates of Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugis, T.; Crowther, P. A.; Willis, A. J.

    1998-05-01

    Mass-loss rates of Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars have been determined from their radio emission power and spectral index (alpha = dln {f_ν} / dln ν), accounting for the clumped structure and (potential) variable ionization in their outer winds. The average spectral index between mm- and cm- wavelengths is ~ 0.77 for WN stars and ~ 0.75 for WC stars, in contrast with ~ 0.58 expected for smooth winds. The observed wavelength dependence of alpha can be explained using clumped wind models in some cases, with shocks (at 30-100 stellar radii) producing a higher ionization zone in the outer wind. We obtain an empirical formula relating mass-loss with observed optical emission line equivalent widths, with application to stars without measured radio fluxes. Clumping-corrected mass-loss rates are generally lower than those obtained by current smooth wind models. Specifically we find log \\mdot(clumpy)-log \\mdot(smooth)=-0.19 (sigma=0.28) for WN stars, and log \\mdot(clumpy)-log \\mdot(smooth)=-0.62 (sigma=0.19) for WC stars. New mass-loss rate estimates agree very well with (clumping independent) determinations of WR components in binary systems.

  14. Wolf-Rayet, Yellow and Red Supergiant in the single massive stars perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Cyril; Hirschi, R.; Ekstrom, S.; Meynet, G.

    2013-06-01

    Rotation and mass loss are the key ingredients determining the fate of single massive stars. In recent years, a large effort has been made to compute whole grids of stellar models at different metallicities, including or not the effects of rotation, with the Geneva evolution code. In this talk, I will focus on the evolved stages of massive star evolution (red and yellow supergiants, Wolf-Rayet stars), in the framework of these new grids of models. I will highlight the effects of rotation and mass loss on the post-main sequence evolution of massive stars at solar and lower metallicity. In particular, I will discuss their impact on the maximum mass for a star to end its life as a RSG (leading to a type IIP supernova), on the possibility for a star to finish as a YSG, and on the initial mass ranges leading to various WR star subtypes. I will then compare the results predicted by our code with observed populations of evolved massive stars, bringing constraints on our computations, as well as some indications on the binary star fraction needed to reproduce them.

  15. On the Launching and Structure of Radiatively Driven Winds in Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrostatic models of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars typically contain low-density outer envelopes that inflate the stellar radii by a factor of several and are capped by a denser shell of gas. Inflated envelopes and density inversions are hallmarks of envelopes that become super-Eddington as they cross the iron-group opacity peak, but these features disappear when mass loss is sufficiently rapid. We re-examine the structures of steady, spherically symmetric wind solutions that cross a sonic point at high optical depth, identifying the physical mechanism through which the outflow affects the stellar structure, and provide an improved analytical estimate for the critical mass-loss rate above which extended structures are erased. Weak-flow solutions below this limit resemble hydrostatic stars even in supersonic zones; however, we infer that these fail to successfully launch optically thick winds. WR envelopes will therefore likely correspond to the strong, compact solutions. We also find that wind solutions with negligible gas pressure are stably stratified at and below the sonic point. This implies that convection is not the source of variability in WR stars, as has been suggested; however, acoustic instabilities provide an alternative explanation. Our solutions are limited to high optical depths by our neglect of Doppler enhancements to the opacity, and do not account for acoustic instabilities at high Eddington factors; yet, they do provide useful insights into WR stellar structures.

  16. First survey of Wolf-Rayet star populations over the full extension of nearby galaxies observed with CALIFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles-Caballero, D.; Díaz, A. I.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Monreal-Ibero, A.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Kehrig, C.; García-Benito, R.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Galbany, L.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Vílchez, J. M.; González Delgado, R. M.; van de Ven, G.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Lyubenova, M.; Meidt, S.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; Mast, D.; Mendoza, M. A.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    The search of extragalactic regions with conspicuous presence of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars outside the Local Group is challenging task owing to the difficulty in detecting their faint spectral features. In this exploratory work, we develop a methodology to perform an automated search of WR signatures through a pixel-by-pixel analysis of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data belonging to the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey, CALIFA. This procedure has been applied to a sample of nearby galaxies spanning a wide range of physical, morphological, and environmental properties. This technique allowed us to build the first catalogue of regions rich in WR stars with spatially resolved information, and enabled us to study the properties of these complexes in a two-dimensional (2D) context. The detection technique is based on the identification of the blue WR bump (around He iiλ4686 Å, mainly associated with nitrogen-rich WR stars; WN) and the red WR bump (around C ivλ5808 Å, mainly associated with carbon-rich WR stars; WC) using a pixel-by-pixel analysis that maximizes the number of independent regions within a given galaxy. We identified 44 WR-rich regions with blue bumps distributed in 25 out of a total of 558 galaxies. The red WR bump was identified only in 5 of those regions. Most of the WR regions are located within one effective radius from the galaxy centre, and around one-third are located within ~1 kpc or less from the centre. We found that the majority of the galaxies hosting WR populations in our sample are involved in some kind of interaction process. Half of the host galaxies share some properties with gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts where WR stars, such as potential candidates to the progenitors of GRBs, are found. We also compared the WR properties derived from the CALIFA data with stellar population synthesis models, and confirm that simple star models are generally not able to reproduce the observations. We conclude that other effects, such as

  17. Stellar envelope inflation near the Eddington limit. Implications for the radii of Wolf-Rayet stars and luminous blue variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfener, G.; Owocki, S. P.; Vink, J. S.

    2012-02-01

    Context. It has been proposed that the envelopes of luminous stars may be subject to substantial radius inflation. The peculiar structure of such inflated envelopes, with an almost void, radiatively dominated region beneath a thin, dense shell could mean that many in reality compact stars are hidden below inflated envelopes, displaying much lower effective temperatures. The inflation effect has been discussed in relation to the radius problem of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, but has yet failed to explain the large observed radii of Galactic WR stars. Aims: We wish to obtain a physical perspective of the inflation effect, and study the consequences for the radii of WR stars, and luminous blue variables (LBVs). For WR stars the observed radii are up to an order of magnitude larger than predicted by theory, whilst S Doradus-type LBVs are subject to humongous radius variations, which remain as yet ill-explained. Methods: We use a dual approach to investigate the envelope inflation, based on numerical models for stars near the Eddington limit, and a new analytic formalism to describe the effect. An additional new aspect is that we take the effect of density inhomogeneities (clumping) within the outer stellar envelopes into account. Results: Due to the effect of clumping we are able to bring the observed WR radii in agreement with theory. Based on our new formalism, we find that the radial inflation is a function of a dimensionless parameter W, which largely depends on the topology of the Fe-opacity peak, i.e., on material properties. For W > 1, we discover an instability limit, for which the stellar envelope becomes gravitationally unbound, i.e. there no longer exists a static solution. Within this framework we are also able to explain the S Doradus-type instabilities for LBVs like AG Car, with a possible triggering due to changes in stellar rotation. Conclusions: The stellar effective temperatures in the upper Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram are potentially strongly affected

  18. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf-Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Massey, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.4 We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ˜50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  19. A modern search for Wolf-Rayet stars in the Magellanic Clouds: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, Philip; Neugent, Kathryn F.; Morrell, Nidia; Hillier, D. John E-mail: kneugent@lowell.edu E-mail: hillier@pitt.edu

    2014-06-10

    Over the years, directed surveys and incidental spectroscopy have identified 12 Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and 139 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), numbers which are often described as 'essentially complete'. Yet, new WRs are discovered in the LMC almost yearly. We have therefore initiated a new survey of both Magellanic Clouds using the same interference-filter imaging technique previously applied to M31 and M33. We report on our first observing season, in which we have successfully surveyed ∼15% of our intended area of the SMC and LMC. Spectroscopy has confirmed nine newly found WRs in the LMC (a 6% increase), including one of WO-type, only the third known in that galaxy and the second to be discovered recently. The other eight are WN3 stars that include an absorption component. In two, the absorption is likely from an O-type companion, but the other six are quite unusual. Five would be classified naively as 'WN3+O3 V', but such a pairing is unlikely given the rarity of O3 stars, the short duration of this phase (which is incommensurate with the evolution of a companion to a WN star), and because these stars are considerably fainter than O3 V stars. The sixth star may also fall into this category. CMFGEN modeling suggests these stars are hot, bolometrically luminous, and N-rich like other WN3 stars, but lack the strong winds that characterize WNs. Finally, we discuss two rare Of?p stars and four Of supergiants we found, and propose that the B[e] star HD 38489 may have a WN companion.

  20. Massive stars on the verge of exploding: the properties of oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramper, F.; Straal, S. M.; Sanyal, D.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.; Gräfener, G.; Langer, N.; Vink, J. S.; de Mink, S. E.; Kaper, L.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Oxygen sequence Wolf-Rayet (WO) stars are a very rare stage in the evolution of massive stars. Their spectra show strong emission lines of helium-burning products, in particular highly ionized carbon and oxygen. The properties of WO stars can be used to provide unique constraints on the (post-)helium burning evolution of massive stars, and their remaining lifetimes and the expected properties of their supernovae. Aims: We aim to homogeneously analyze the currently known presumed-single WO stars to obtain the key stellar and outflow properties and to constrain their evolutionary state. Methods: We use the line-blanketed non-local thermal equilibrium atmosphere code cmfgen to model the X-Shooter spectra of the WO stars and to deduce the atmospheric parameters. We calculate dedicated evolutionary models to determine the evolutionary state of the stars. Results: The WO stars have extremely high temperatures that range from 150 kK to 210 kK, and very low surface helium mass fractions that range from 44% down to 14%. Their properties can be reproduced by evolutionary models with helium zero-age main sequence masses of MHe,ini = 15-25 M⊙ that exhibit a fairly strong (a few times 10-5M⊙ yr-1), homogeneous (fc> 0.3) stellar wind. Conclusions: WO stars represent the final evolutionary stage of stars with estimated initial masses of Mini = 40-60 M⊙. They are post core-helium burning and predicted to explode as type Ic supernovae within a few thousand years. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory under program IDs 091.C-0934 and 093.D-0591.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE ECLIPSING WOLF-RAYET BINARY CQ Cep

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner E-mail: szhekov@space.bas.bg E-mail: werner.schmutz@pmodwrc.ch

    2015-02-01

    The short-period (1.64 d) near-contact eclipsing WN6+O9 binary system CQ Cep provides an ideal laboratory for testing the predictions of X-ray colliding wind shock theory at close separation where the winds may not have reached terminal speeds before colliding. We present results of a Chandra X-ray observation of CQ Cep spanning ∼1 day during which a simultaneous Chandra optical light curve was acquired. Our primary objective was to compare the observed X-ray properties with colliding wind shock theory, which predicts that the hottest shock plasma (T ≳ 20 MK) will form on or near the line-of-centers between the stars. The X-ray spectrum is strikingly similar to apparently single WN6 stars such as WR 134 and spectral lines reveal plasma over a broad range of temperatures T ∼ 4-40 MK. A deep optical eclipse was seen as the O star passed in front of the Wolf-Rayet star and we determine an orbital period P {sub orb} = 1.6412400 d. Somewhat surprisingly, no significant X-ray variability was detected. This implies that the hottest X-ray plasma is not confined to the region between the stars, at odds with the colliding wind picture and suggesting that other X-ray production mechanisms may be at work. Hydrodynamic simulations that account for such effects as radiative cooling and orbital motion will be needed to determine if the new Chandra results can be reconciled with the colliding wind picture.

  2. X-RAY EMISSION FROM NITROGEN-TYPE WOLF-RAYET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Guedel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner

    2010-03-15

    We summarize new X-ray detections of four nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars obtained in a limited survey aimed at establishing the X-ray properties of WN stars across their full range of spectral subtypes. None of the detected stars is so far known to be a close binary. We report Chandra detections of WR 2 (WN2), WR 18 (WN4), and WR 134 (WN6), and an XMM-Newton detection of WR79a (WN9ha). These observations clearly demonstrate that both WNE and WNL stars are X-ray sources. We also discuss Chandra archive detections of the WN6h stars WR 20b, WR 24, and WR 136 and ROSAT non-detections of WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). The X-ray spectra of all WN detections show prominent emission lines and an admixture of cool (kT < 1 keV) and hot (kT > 2 keV) plasma. The hotter plasma is not predicted by radiative wind shock models and other as yet unidentified mechanisms are at work. Most stars show X-ray absorption in excess of that expected from visual extinction (A {sub V}), likely due to their strong winds or cold circumstellar gas. Existing data suggest a falloff in X-ray luminosity toward later WN7-9 subtypes, which have higher L {sub bol} but slower, denser winds than WN2-6 stars. This provides a clue that wind properties may be a more crucial factor in determining emergent X-ray emission levels than bolometric luminosity.

  3. Wind Structure and Luminosity Variations in the Wolf-Rayet/Luminous Blue Variable HD 5980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Leonid; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Hillier, D. John; Morrell, Nidia; Barbá, Rodolfo; Gamen, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    Over the past 40 years, the massive luminous blue variable/Wolf-Rayet system HD 5980 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) has undergone a long-term S Doradus-type variability cycle and two brief and violent eruptions in 1993 and 1994. In this paper we analyze a collection of UV and optical spectra obtained between 1979 and 2009 and perform CMFGEN model fits to spectra of 1994, 2000, 2002, and 2009. The results are as follows: (1) the long-term S Dor-type variability is associated with changes of the hydrostatic radius; (2) the 1994 eruption involved changes in its bolometric luminosity and wind structure; (3) the emission-line strength, the wind velocity, and the continuum luminosity underwent correlated variations in the sense that a decreasing V ∞ is associated with increasing emission line and continuum levels; and (4) the spectrum of the third star in the system (Star C) is well fit by a T eff = 32 K model atmosphere with SMC chemical abundances. For all epochs, the wind of the erupting star is optically thick at the sonic point and is thus driven mainly by the continuum opacity. We speculate that the wind switches between two stable regimes driven by the "hot" (during the eruption) and the "cool" (post-eruption) iron opacity bumps as defined by Lamers & Nugis and Gräfener & Hamann, and thus the wind may undergo a bi-stability jump of a different nature from that which occurs in OB stars. Based on data obtained with HST, IUE, FUSE, and the 6.5 m Magellan telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile.

  4. Superbubbles, Wolf-Rayet stars, and the origin of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, W. R.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Arnould, M.; Cummings, A. C.; George, J. S.; Goriely, S.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Meynet, G.; Scott, L. M.; Stone, Ec; von Rosenvinge, Tt

    2006-10-01

    The abundances of neon and several other isotopic ratios in the galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) have been measured using data from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). We have derived the 22Ne/20Ne ratio at the cosmic-ray source using the measured 21Ne, 19F, and 17O abundances as ''tracers'' of secondary isotope production. Using this approach, the 22Ne/20Ne abundance ratio obtained for the cosmic-ray source is 0.387 ± 0.007 (stat.) ± 0.022 (syst.). This corresponds to an enhancement by a factor of 5.3±0.3 over the 22Ne/20Ne ratio in the solar wind. We compare our data for neon and refractory isotope ratios, and data from other experiments, with recent results from two-component Wolf- Rayet (WR) models. The three largest deviations of GCR isotope ratios from solarsystem ratios predicted by these models, 12C/16O, 22Ne/20Ne, and 58Fe/56Fe, are present in the GCRs. In fact, all of the isotope ratios that we have measured are consistent with a GCR source consisting of about 80% material with solar-system composition and about 20% of WR material. Since WR stars are evolutionary products of O and B stars, and most OB stars exist in OB associations that form superbubbles, the good agreement of these data with WR models suggests that superbubbles are the likely source of at least a substantial fraction of GCRs.

  5. Cosmic-Ray Neon, Wolf-Rayet Stars, and the Superbubble Origin of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, W. R.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Arnould, M.; Cummings, A. C.; George, J. S.; Goriely, S.; Israel, M. H.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Meynet, G.; Scott, L. M.; Stone, E. C.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2005-11-01

    We report the abundances of neon isotopes in the Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) using data from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). These abundances have been measured for seven energy intervals over the energy range of 84<=E/M<=273 MeV nucleon-1. We have derived the 22Ne/20Ne ratio at the cosmic-ray source using the measured 21Ne, 19F, and 17O abundances as ``tracers'' of secondary production of the neon isotopes. Using this approach, the 22Ne/20Ne abundance ratio that we obtain for the cosmic-ray source is 0.387+/-0.007(statistical)+/-0.022(systematic). This corresponds to an enhancement by a factor of 5.3+/-0.3 over the 22Ne/20Ne ratio in the solar wind. This cosmic-ray source 22Ne/20Ne ratio is also significantly larger than that found in anomalous cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, most meteoritic samples of matter, and interplanetary dust particles. We compare our ACE CRIS data for neon and refractory isotope ratios, and data from other experiments, with recent results from two-component Wolf-Rayet (W-R) models. The three largest deviations of GCR isotope ratios from solar system ratios predicted by these models, 12C/16O, 22Ne/20Ne, and 58Fe/56Fe, are indeed present in the GCRs. In fact, all of the isotope ratios that we have measured are consistent with a GCR source consisting of about 80% material with solar system composition and about 20% W-R material. Since W-R stars are evolutionary products of OB stars, and most OB stars exist in OB associations that form superbubbles, the good agreement of these data with W-R models suggests that superbubbles are the likely source of at least a substantial fraction of GCRs.

  6. X-Ray Emission from the Wolf-Rayet Bubble S 308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.; Snowden, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its Northwest quadrant (Chu et al. 2003), map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a 22' in size central cavity and a shell thickness of approx. 8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at approx.0.43 keV and O VII at approx.0.5 keV, and declines towards high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T1 approx.1.1 x 10(exp 6) K, T2 approx.13 x 10(exp 6) K), with a total X-ray luminosity approx.3 x 10(exp 33) erg/s at the assumed distance of 1.8 kpc. Qualitative comparison of the X-ray morphology of S 308 with the results of numerical simulations of wind-blown WR bubbles suggests a progenitor mass of 40 Stellar mass and an age in the WR phase approx.20,000 yrs. The X-ray luminosity predicted by simulatioms including the effects of heat conduction is in agreement with the observations, however, the simulated X-ray spectrum indicates generally hotter gas than is derived from the observations. We suggest that non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) may provide an explanation for this discrepancy.

  7. SEARCH FOR A MAGNETIC FIELD VIA CIRCULAR POLARIZATION IN THE WOLF-RAYET STAR EZ CMa

    SciTech Connect

    De la Chevrotiere, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Collaboration: MiMeS Collaboration

    2013-02-20

    We report on the first deep, direct search for a magnetic field via the circular polarization of Zeeman splitting in a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star. Using the highly efficient ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we observed at three different epochs one of the best W-R candidates in the sky expected to harbor a magnetic field, the bright, highly variable WN4 star EZ CMa = WR6 = HD 50896. We looked for the characteristic circular polarization (Stokes V) pattern in strong emission lines that would arise as a consequence of a global, rotating magnetic field with a split monopole configuration. We also obtained nearly simultaneous linear polarization spectra (Stokes Q and U), which are dominated by electron scattering, most likely from a flattened wind with large-scale corotating structures. As the star rotates with a period of 3.766 days, our view of the wind changes, which in turn affects the value of the linear polarization in lines versus continuum at the {approx}0.2% level. Depending on the epoch of observation, our Stokes V data were affected by significant crosstalk from Stokes Q and U to V. We removed this spurious signal from the circular polarization data and experimented with various levels of spectral binning to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our data. In the end, no magnetic field is unambiguously detected in EZ CMa. Assuming that the star is intrinsically magnetic and harbors a split monopole configuration, we find an upper limit of B {approx} 100 G for the intensity of its field in the line-forming regions of the stellar wind.

  8. Hα imaging survey of Wolf-Rayet galaxies: morphologies and star formation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Omar, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Hα and optical broad-band images of 25 nearby Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies are presented. The WR galaxies are known to have a recent (≤10 Myr) and massive star formation episode. The photometric Hα fluxes are estimated and corrected for extinction and line contamination in the filter pass-bands. The star formation rates (SFRs) are estimated using Hα images and from archival data in the far-ultraviolet (FUV), far-infrared (FIR) and 1.4-GHz radio continuum wavebands. A comparison of SFRs estimated from different wavebands is made after including similar data available in the literature for other WR galaxies. The Hα-based SFRs are found to be tightly correlated with SFRs estimated from the FUV data. The correlations also exist with SFR estimates based on the radio and FIR data. The WR galaxies also follow the radio-FIR correlation known for normal star-forming galaxies, although it is seen here that the majority of dwarf WR galaxies have a radio deficiency. An analysis using the ratio of non-thermal to thermal radio continuum and the ratio of the FUV to Hα SFRs indicates that WR galaxies have lower non-thermal radio emission compared to normal galaxies, most likely due to a lack of supernovae in the very young star formation episode in the WR galaxies. The morphologies of 16 galaxies in our sample are highly suggestive of an ongoing tidal interaction or a past merger in these galaxies. This survey strengthens the conclusions obtained from previous similar studies indicating the importance of tidal interactions in triggering star-formation in WR galaxies.

  9. WO-Type Wolf-Rayet Stars: the Last Hurrah of the Most Massive Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    2014-10-01

    WO-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are considered the final evolutionary stage of the highest mass stars, immediate precursors to Type Ic (He-poor) core-collapse supernovae. These WO stars are rare, and until recently only 6 were known. Our knowledge about their physical properties is mostly based on a single object, Sand 2 in the LMC. It was the only non-binary WO star both bright and unreddened enough that its FUV and NUV spectra could be obtained by FUSE and HST/FOS. A non-LTE analysis showed that Sand 2 is very hot and its (C+O)/He abundance ratio is higher than that found in WC-type WRs, suggesting it is indeed highly evolved. However, the O VI resonance doublet in the FUV required a considerably cooler temperature (120,000 K) model than did the optical O VI lines (170,000 K). Further, the enhanced chemical abundances did not match the predictions of stellar evolutionary models. Another non-LTE study found a 3x higher (C+O)/He abundance ratio and a cooler temperature. We have recently discovered two other bright, single, and lightly reddened WOs in the LMC, allowing us to take a fresh look at these important objects. Our newly found WOs span a range in excitation type, from WO1 (the highest) to WO4 (the lowest). Sand 2 is intermediate (WO3). We propose to use COS to obtain FUV and NUV data of all three stars for as comprehensive a study as is currently possible. These UV data will be combined with our optical Magellan spectra for a detailed analysis with CMFGEN with the latest atomic data. Knowing the degree of chemical evolution of these WO stars is crucial to determining their evolutionary status, and thus in understanding the final stages of the most massive stars.

  10. Red Eyes on Wolf-Rayet Stars: New Discoveries via Infrared Color Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Van Dyk, S.; Morris, P.

    2012-12-01

    We summarize the latest results form our infrared, color-based survey for Galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Using photometry from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE and 2MASS databases, we select WRs via a method that exploits their unique infrared colors, which is mainly the result of excess radiation generated by free-free scattering within their dense ionized winds. The selection criterion results in a WR detection rate of ≍20% in spectroscopic follow-up of candidates that comprise a broad color space defined by the color distribution of all known WRs having B > 14 mag, although there are smaller regions within this color space which yield WRs at a rate of >50%. Cross-correlation with archival X-ray catalogs increases the WR detection rate of the broad color space to ≍40%, although with significant bias toward WN types. Although the majority of the new WRs have no obvious association with stellar clusters, two WC8 stars reside in a previously unknown massive-star cluster, in which five OB supergiants were also identified. In addition, two WC and four WN stars, all but one of which are X-ray sources, were identified in association with the stellar clusters Danks 1 and 2. Our 60 latest WR discoveries (out of nearly 100 to date) include 38 WN types and 22 WC types, bringing the total number of known Galactic WRs close to 500, or ≍8% of the total empirically estimated population. An examination of their Galactic distribution reveals an approximate tracing of spiral arms and an enhanced WR surface density toward several massive-star formation sites.

  11. Characterizing Wolf-Rayet Stars in the Near- and Mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Kanarek, Graham; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2014-05-01

    We present refined color-color selection criteria for identifying Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using available mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from WISE in combination with near-infrared (NIR) photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Using a sample of spectrally classified objects, we find that WR stars are well distinguished from the field stellar population in the (W1 - W2) versus (J - Ks ) color-color diagram, and further distinguished from other emission line objects such as planetary nebulae, Be, and cataclysmic variable stars using a combination of NIR and MIR color constraints. As proof of concept we applied the color constraints to a photometric sample in the Galactic plane, located WR star candidates, and present five new spectrally confirmed and classified WC (1) and WN (4) stars. Analysis of the 0.8-5.0 μm spectral data for a subset of known, bright WC and WN stars shows that emission lines (primarily He I) extend into the 3.0-5.0 μm spectral region, although their strength is greatly diminished compared to the 0.8-2.5 μm region. The WR population stands out relative to background field stars at NIR and MIR colors due to an excess continuum contribution, likely caused by free-free scattering in dense winds. Mean photometric properties of known WRs are presented and imply that reddened late-type WN and WC sources are easier to detect than earlier-type sources at larger Galactic radii. WISE W3 and W4 images of 10 WR stars show evidence of circumstellar shells linked to mass ejections from strong stellar winds.

  12. Characterizing Wolf-Rayet stars in the near- and mid-infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Kanarek, Graham; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2014-05-01

    We present refined color-color selection criteria for identifying Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using available mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from WISE in combination with near-infrared (NIR) photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Using a sample of spectrally classified objects, we find that WR stars are well distinguished from the field stellar population in the (W1 – W2) versus (J – K{sub s} ) color-color diagram, and further distinguished from other emission line objects such as planetary nebulae, Be, and cataclysmic variable stars using a combination of NIR and MIR color constraints. As proof of concept we applied the color constraints to a photometric sample in the Galactic plane, located WR star candidates, and present five new spectrally confirmed and classified WC (1) and WN (4) stars. Analysis of the 0.8-5.0 μm spectral data for a subset of known, bright WC and WN stars shows that emission lines (primarily He I) extend into the 3.0-5.0 μm spectral region, although their strength is greatly diminished compared to the 0.8-2.5 μm region. The WR population stands out relative to background field stars at NIR and MIR colors due to an excess continuum contribution, likely caused by free-free scattering in dense winds. Mean photometric properties of known WRs are presented and imply that reddened late-type WN and WC sources are easier to detect than earlier-type sources at larger Galactic radii. WISE W3 and W4 images of 10 WR stars show evidence of circumstellar shells linked to mass ejections from strong stellar winds.

  13. A Wolf-Rayet-Like Progenitor of SN 2013cu from Spectral Observations of a Stellar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ofek, E. O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Yaron, O.; Tal, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Horesh, A.; Cia, A. De; Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Filippenko, A. V.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive fate of massive Wolf-Rayet stars (WRSs) is a key open question in stellar physics. An appealing option is that hydrogen- deficient WRSs are the progenitors of some hydrogen-poor supernova explosions of types IIb, Ib and Ic. A blue object, having luminosity and colours consistent with those of some WRSs, has recently been identified in pre-explosion images at the location of a supernova of type Ib, but has not yet been conclusively determined to have been the progenitor. Similar work has so far only resulted in non-detections. Comparison of early photometric observations of type Ic supernovae with theoretical models suggests that the progenitor stars had radii of less than 10(exp 12) centimetres, as expected for some WRSs. The signature of WRSs, their emission line spectra, cannot be probed by such studies. Here we report the detection of strong emission lines in a spectrum of type IIb supernova 2013cu (iPTF13ast) obtained approximately 15.5 hours after explosion (by 'flash spectroscopy', which captures the effects of the supernova explosion shock breakout flash on material surrounding the progenitor star).We identify Wolf-Rayet-like wind signatures, suggesting a progenitor of the WN(h) subclass (those WRSs with winds dominated by helium and nitrogen, with traces of hydrogen). The extent of this dense wind may indicate increased mass loss from the progenitor shortly before its explosion, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  14. A Wolf-Rayet-like progenitor of SN 2013cu from spectral observations of a stellar wind.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I; Ofek, E O; Ben-Ami, S; Cenko, S B; Kasliwal, M M; Cao, Y; Yaron, O; Tal, D; Silverman, J M; Horesh, A; De Cia, A; Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Perley, D; Vreeswijk, P M; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Filippenko, A V; Wheeler, J C

    2014-05-22

    The explosive fate of massive Wolf-Rayet stars (WRSs) is a key open question in stellar physics. An appealing option is that hydrogen-deficient WRSs are the progenitors of some hydrogen-poor supernova explosions of types IIb, Ib and Ic (ref. 2). A blue object, having luminosity and colours consistent with those of some WRSs, has recently been identified in pre-explosion images at the location of a supernova of type Ib (ref. 3), but has not yet been conclusively determined to have been the progenitor. Similar work has so far only resulted in non-detections. Comparison of early photometric observations of type Ic supernovae with theoretical models suggests that the progenitor stars had radii of less than 10(12) centimetres, as expected for some WRSs. The signature of WRSs, their emission line spectra, cannot be probed by such studies. Here we report the detection of strong emission lines in a spectrum of type IIb supernova 2013cu (iPTF13ast) obtained approximately 15.5 hours after explosion (by 'flash spectroscopy', which captures the effects of the supernova explosion shock breakout flash on material surrounding the progenitor star). We identify Wolf-Rayet-like wind signatures, suggesting a progenitor of the WN(h) subclass (those WRSs with winds dominated by helium and nitrogen, with traces of hydrogen). The extent of this dense wind may indicate increased mass loss from the progenitor shortly before its explosion, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  15. RED EYES ON WOLF-RAYET STARS: 60 NEW DISCOVERIES VIA INFRARED COLOR SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Morris, Patrick W.

    2011-08-15

    We have spectroscopically identified 60 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, including 38 nitrogen types (WN) and 22 carbon types (WC). Using photometry from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE and Two Micron All Sky Survey databases, the new WRs were selected via a method we have established that exploits their unique infrared colors, which is mainly the result of excess radiation generated by free-free scattering within their dense ionized winds. The selection criterion has been refined since the last report, resulting in a WR detection rate of {approx}20% in spectroscopic follow-up of candidates that comprise a broad color space defined by the color distribution of all known WRs having B > 14 mag. However, there are smaller regions within this color space that yield WRs at a rate of >50% in spectroscopic follow-up. Candidates that are not WRs are mainly Be stars, which is possibly attributable to the physical similarities between the free-free emission parameters of Be disks and WR winds. As an additional selection experiment, the list of WR candidates was cross-correlated with archival X-ray point-source catalogs, which increases the WR detection rate of the broad color space to {approx}40%; 10 new WR X-ray sources have been found in addition to a previously unrecognized X-ray counterpart to a known WR. The extinction values, distances, and Galactocentric radii of all new WRs are calculated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Although the majority of the new WRs have no obvious association with stellar clusters, two WC8 stars reside in a previously unknown massive-star cluster, in which five OB supergiants were also identified. The new system lies at an estimated distance of {approx}6.1 kpc, near the intersection of the Scutum-Centaurus Arm with the Galaxy's bar. In addition, two WC and four WN stars, all but one of which are X-ray sources, were identified in association with the stellar clusters Danks 1 and 2. A WN9 star has also been associated with the cluster [DBS2003

  16. Photometric and spectroscopic studies of star-forming regions within Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, M. Chrisphin; López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Sahu, D. K.; Sanwal, B. B.; Bisht, Shuchi

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the properties of star-forming regions within a sample of seven Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies. We analyse their morphologies, colours, star-formation rates (SFRs), metallicities and stellar populations, combining broad-band and narrow-band photometry with low-resolution optical spectroscopy. The UBVRI observations were made with the 2-m HCT (Himalayan Chandra Telescope) and 1-m ARIES telescope. The spectroscopic data were obtained using the Hanle Faint Object Spectrograph Camera (HFOSC) mounted on the 2-m HCT. The observed galaxies are NGC 1140, IRAS 07164+5301, NGC 3738, UM 311, NGC 6764, NGC 4861 and NGC 3003. The optical spectra were used to search for the faint WR features, to confirm that the ionization of the gas is caused by the massive stars, and to quantify the oxygen abundance of each galaxy using several independent empirical calibrations. We detected broad features originating in WR stars in NGC 1140 and 4861 and used them to derive the massive star populations. For these two galaxies we also derived the oxygen abundance using a direct estimation of the electron temperature of the ionized gas. The N/O ratio in NGC 4861 is ˜0.25-0.35 dex higher than expected, which may be a consequence of the chemical pollution by N-rich material released by WR stars. Using our Hα images we identified tens of star-forming regions within these galaxies, for which we derived the SFR. Our Hα-based SFR usually agrees with the SFR computed using the far-infrared and the radio-continuum flux. For all regions we found that the most recent star-formation event is 3-6 Myr old. We used the optical broad-band colours in combination with Starburst99 models to estimate the internal reddening and the age of the dominant underlying stellar population within all these regions. Knots in NGC 3738, 6764 and 3003 generally show the presence of an important old (400-1000 Myr) stellar population. However, the optical colours are not able to detect stars older than 20

  17. The onset of Wolf-Rayet wind outflow and the nature of the hot component in the symbiotic nova PU Vulpecula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sion, Edward M.; Shore, Steven N.; Ready, Christian J.; Scheible, Maureen P.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed temporal variations in the far ultraviolet He II (1640), Si IV (1393, 1402), and C IV (1548, 1550) line profiles in eight high dispersion, International Ultraviolet Explorer Short Wavelength Prime spectra of the symbiotic nova PU Vul by comparatively examining these profiles on a common velocity scale. We see clear evidence of the onset of a Wolf-Rayet-like wind outflow from the bloated, contracting white dwarf hot component with terminal velocity of approximately equals -550 to -600 km/s. We have quantitatively analyzed the complicated He II (1640) emission region for the first time and show that the discrete absorption features seen in the He II region occur at precisely the same velocites in each spectrum, thus demonstrating that the absorbing source is steady and not affected by any orbital motion. We demonstrate that there is an underlying He II wind emission feature whose true shape is hidden by superposed absorption due to the foreground red giant wind flowing in front of the white dwarf and abscuring the white dwarf's wind outflow. We present synthetic spectra of He II emission behind an absorbing slab with u = 20 km/s, T = 5000 K, and column densities in the range N = 1 x 10(exp 22) and 1 x 10(exp 23)/sq cm which explain these absorptions. Our analysis of the Si IV and C IV resonance doublets, in velocity space, reveal temporal variations in the profile between 1987 and 1991 with the emergence of clear P Cygni profiles in Si IV by 1990. A nebular emission feature in C III 1909 also appears in the most recent spectra (e.g., SW42538H) while it was absent or extremely weak in the earliest spectra (e.g., SW36332H), thus strengthening evidence that the nebular emission, as seen in permitted and semiforbidden lines, intensities in step with the onset of the hot, fast, wind outflow. We also report the first detection of narrow interstellar (circumbinary shell?) absorption lines near -1 km/s, most strongly in Al III (1854, 1862) and Si IV (1392

  18. Source-plane reconstruction of the giant gravitational arc in A2667: A candidate Wolf-Rayet galaxy at z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Shuo; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Covone, Giovanni; Jullo, Eric; Richard, Johan; Izzo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analysis of Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Very Large Telescope imaging and spectroscopic data of a bright lensed galaxy at z = 1.0334 in the lensing cluster A2667. Using this high-resolution imaging, we present an updated lens model that allows us to fully understand the lensing geometry and reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc gives a unique opportunity to view the structure of a high-redshift disk galaxy. We find that the lensed galaxy of A2667 is a typical spiral galaxy with a morphology similar to the structure of its counterparts at higher redshift, z ∼ 2. The surface brightness of the reconstructed source galaxy in the z {sub 850} band reveals the central surface brightness I(0) = 20.28 ± 0.22 mag arcsec{sup –2} and a characteristic radius r{sub s} = 2.01 ± 0.16 kpc at redshift z ∼ 1. The morphological reconstruction in different bands shows obvious negative radial color gradients for this galaxy. Moreover, the redder central bulge tends to contain a metal-rich stellar population, rather than being heavily reddened by dust due to high and patchy obscuration. We analyze the VIMOS/integral field unit spectroscopic data and find that, in the given wavelength range (∼1800-3200 Å), the combined arc spectrum of the source galaxy is characterized by a strong continuum emission with strong UV absorption lines (Fe II and Mg II) and shows the features of a typical starburst Wolf-Rayet galaxy, NGC 5253. More specifically, we have measured the equivalent widths of Fe II and Mg II lines in the A2667 spectrum, and obtained similar values for the same wavelength interval of the NGC 5253 spectrum. Marginal evidence for [C III] 1909 emission at the edge of the grism range further confirms our expectation.

  19. Source-plane Reconstruction of the Giant Gravitational Arc in A2667: A Candidate Wolf-Rayet Galaxy at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Covone, Giovanni; Jullo, Eric; Richard, Johan; Izzo, Luca; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analysis of Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Very Large Telescope imaging and spectroscopic data of a bright lensed galaxy at z = 1.0334 in the lensing cluster A2667. Using this high-resolution imaging, we present an updated lens model that allows us to fully understand the lensing geometry and reconstruct the lensed galaxy in the source plane. This giant arc gives a unique opportunity to view the structure of a high-redshift disk galaxy. We find that the lensed galaxy of A2667 is a typical spiral galaxy with a morphology similar to the structure of its counterparts at higher redshift, z ~ 2. The surface brightness of the reconstructed source galaxy in the z 850 band reveals the central surface brightness I(0) = 20.28 ± 0.22 mag arcsec-2 and a characteristic radius rs = 2.01 ± 0.16 kpc at redshift z ~ 1. The morphological reconstruction in different bands shows obvious negative radial color gradients for this galaxy. Moreover, the redder central bulge tends to contain a metal-rich stellar population, rather than being heavily reddened by dust due to high and patchy obscuration. We analyze the VIMOS/integral field unit spectroscopic data and find that, in the given wavelength range (~1800-3200 Å), the combined arc spectrum of the source galaxy is characterized by a strong continuum emission with strong UV absorption lines (Fe II and Mg II) and shows the features of a typical starburst Wolf-Rayet galaxy, NGC 5253. More specifically, we have measured the equivalent widths of Fe II and Mg II lines in the A2667 spectrum, and obtained similar values for the same wavelength interval of the NGC 5253 spectrum. Marginal evidence for [C III] 1909 emission at the edge of the grism range further confirms our expectation.

  20. Massive star formation in Wolf-Rayet galaxies. IV. Colours, chemical-composition analysis and metallicity-luminosity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Esteban, C.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We have performed a comprehensive multiwavelength analysis of a sample of 20 starburst galaxies that show a substantial population of very young massive stars, most of them classified as Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies. In this paper, the forth of the series, we present the global analysis of the derived photometric and chemical properties. Methods: We compare optical/NIR colours and the physical properties (reddening coefficient, equivalent widths of the emission and underlying absorption lines, ionization degree, electron density, and electron temperature) and chemical properties (oxygen abundances and N/O, S/O, Ne/O, Ar/O, and Fe/O ratios) with previous observations and galaxy evolution models. We compile 41 independent star-forming regions - with oxygen abundances between 12 + log(O/H) = 7.58 and 8.75 - , of which 31 have a direct estimate of the electron temperature of the ionized gas. Results: According to their absolute B-magnitude, many of them are not dwarf galaxies, but they should be during their quiescent phase. We found that both c(Hβ) and Wabs increase with increasing metallicity. The differences in the N/O ratio is explained assuming differences in the star formation histories. We detected a high N/O ratio in objects showing strong WR features (HCG 31 AC, UM 420, IRAS 0828+2816, III Zw 107, ESO 566-8 and NGC 5253). The ejecta of the WR stars may be the origin of the N enrichment in these galaxies. We compared the abundances provided by the direct method with those obtained through empirical calibrations, finding that (i) the Pilyugin method is the best suited empirical calibration for these star-forming galaxies; (ii) the relations provided by Pettini & Pagel (2004, MNRAS, 348, 59) give acceptable results for objects with 12 + log(O/H) > 8.0; and (iii) the results provided by empirical calibrations based on photoionization models are systematically 0.2-0.3 dex higher than the values derived from the direct method. The O and N abundances and the N

  1. Ionization structure and chemical abundances of the Wolf-Rayet nebula NGC 6888 with integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Martín-Gordón, D.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez Montero, E.; Riera, A.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The study of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars gives us clues about the mass-loss history of massive stars, as well as about the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM). Aims: This work aims to search for the observational footprints of the interactions between the ISM and stellar winds in the WR nebula NGC 6888 in order to understand its ionization structure, chemical composition, and kinematics. Methods: We have collected a set of integral field spectroscopy observations across NGC 6888, obtained with PPAK in the optical range performing both 2D and 1D analyses. Attending to the 2D analysis in the northeast part of NGC 6888, we have generated maps of the extinction structure and electron density. We produced statistical frequency distributions of the radial velocity and diagnostic diagrams. Furthermore, we performed a thorough study of integrated spectra in nine regions over the whole nebula. Results: The 2D study has revealed two main behaviours. We have found that the spectra of a localized region to the southwest of this pointing can be represented well by shock models assuming n = 1000 cm-3, twice solar abundances, and shock velocities from 250 to 400 km s-1. With the 1D analysis we derived electron densities ranging from <100 to 360 cm-3. The electron temperature varies from ~7700 K to ~10 200 K. A strong variation of up to a factor 10 between different regions in the nitrogen abundance has been found: N/H appears lower than the solar abundance in those positions observed at the edges and very enhanced in the observed inner parts. Oxygen appears slightly underabundant with respect to solar value, whereas the helium abundance is found to be above it. We propose a scenario for the evolution of NGC 6888 to explain the features observed. This scheme consists of a structure of multiple shells: i) an inner and broken shell with material from the interaction between the supergiant and WR shells, presenting an overabundance in N/H and a

  2. Two New Wolf-Rayet Stars and a Luminous Blue Variable Star in the Quintuplet (AFGL 2004) near the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; McLean, Ian S.; Morris, Mark

    1995-07-01

    As part of an 1800 pc2 survey of the Galactic center region in the lines of He I (2.058 mu m), Br gamma (2.166 mu m), and the He II/C IV complex (3.09 mu m), we have found two new Wolf-Rayet stars, a WN9 and a WC9, near the Galactic center. K-band spectra of both stars show broad helium emission lines, and the WC9 shows broad carbon emission lines. A third emission-line star in the region has a spectrum and luminosity similar to a luminous blue variable (LBV). The stars are within 2 pc, in projection, of the Quintuplet cluster (AFGL 2004) and are probably members of this cluster on the basis of their proximity and expected ages. All three stars are evolved descendants of massive main-sequence stars having Minitial >~ 50 M⊙ (WC9), >~ 20 M⊙ (WN9), and >~ 40 M⊙ (LBV candidate). The LBV candidate has a luminosity of L ~ 106.3 L⊙, comparable to that of eta Carinae (L = 106.5 L⊙), one of the most luminous stars in the local group of galaxies. A total of five emission-line stars are now known to reside in the Quintuplet, and they collectively produce NLyc ~ 1049 photons s-1. The new LBV candidate generates enough ionizing photons to account for the "Pistol" H II region (G0.15-0.05), while the nearby "Sickle" (G0.18-0.04) may be ionized by a population of O stars accompanying the five emission-line stars.

  3. Massive star formation in Wolf-Rayet galaxies. I. Optical and NIR photometric results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Esteban, C.

    2008-11-01

    Aims: We have performed a comprehensive multiwavelength analysis of a sample of 20 starburst galaxies that show the presence of a substantial population of massive stars. The main aims are the study of the massive star formation and stellar populations in these galaxies, and the role that interactions with or between dwarf galaxies and/or low surface companion objects have in triggering the bursts. In this series of papers, we present our new optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations, and complete with data at other wavelengths (X-ray, far-infrared, and radio) available in the literature. In this paper, the first in the series, we analyze the morphology, stellar population age, and star-formation rate of each system. Methods: We completed new deep optical and NIR broad-band images, as well as the new continuum-subtracted Hα maps, of our sample of Wolf-Rayet galaxies. We analyze the morphology of each system and its surroundings and quantify the photometric properties of all important objects. All data were corrected for both extinction and nebular emission using our spectroscopic data. The age of the most recent star-formation burst is estimated and compared with the age of the underlying older low-luminosity population. The Hα-based star-formation rate, number of O7V equivalent stars, mass of ionized gas, and mass of the ionizing star cluster are also derived. Results: We found interaction features in many (15 up to 20) of the analyzed objects, which were extremely evident in the majority. We checked that the correction for nebular emission to the broad-band filter fluxes is important in compact objects and/or with intense nebular emission to obtain realistic colors and compare with the predictions of evolutionary synthesis models. The estimate of the age of the most recent star-formation burst is derived consistently. In general, the Hα-based star formation rate agrees with the estimates given by independent multiwavelength methods

  4. THE DISCOVERY OF A RARE WO-TYPE WOLF-RAYET STAR IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip; Morrell, Nidia E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2012-12-01

    While observing OB stars within the most crowded regions of the Large Magellanic Cloud, we happened upon a new Wolf-Rayet (WR) star in Lucke-Hodge 41, the rich OB association that contains S Doradus and numerous other massive stars. At first glance the spectrum resembled that of a WC4 star, but closer examination showed strong O VI {lambda}{lambda}3811, 34 lines, leading us to classify it as a WO4. This is only the second known WO in the LMC, and the first known WO4 (the other being a WO3). This rarity is to be expected due to these stars' short lifespans as they represent the most advanced evolutionary stage in a massive star's lifetime before exploding as supernovae. This discovery shows that while the majority of WRs within the LMC have been discovered, there may be a few WRs left to be found.

  5. X-ray Observations of Binary and Single Wolf-Rayet Stars with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen; Gudel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Zhekov, Svetozar

    2006-01-01

    We present an overview of recent X-ray observations of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with XMM-Newton and Chandra. These observations are aimed at determining the differences in X-ray properties between massive WR + OB binary systems and putatively single WR stars. A new XMM spectrum of the nearby WN8 + OB binary WR 147 shows hard absorbed X-ray emission (including the Fe Ka line complex), characteristic of colliding wind shock sources. In contrast, sensitive observations of four of the closest known single WC (carbon-rich) WR stars have yielded only nondetections. These results tentatively suggest that single WC stars are X-ray quiet. The presence of a companion may thus be an essential factor in elevating the X-ray emission of WC + OB stars to detectable levels.

  6. The Wolf-Rayet stars in M 31. I. Analysis of the late-type WN stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, A.; Todt, H.; Hainich, R.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Comprehensive studies of Wolf-Rayet stars were performed in the past for the Galactic and the LMC population. The results revealed significant differences, but also unexpected similarities between the WR populations of these different galaxies. Analyzing the WR stars in M 31 will extend our understanding of these objects in different galactic environments. Aims: The present study aims at the late-type WN stars in M 31. The stellar and wind parameters will tell about the formation of WR stars in other galaxies with different metallicity and star formation histories. The obtained parameters will provide constraints to the evolution of massive stars in the environment of M 31. Methods: We used the latest version of the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code to analyze the stars via fitting optical spectra and photometric data. To account for the relatively low temperatures of the late WN10 and WN11 subtypes, our WN models have been extended into this temperature regime. Results: Stellar and atmospheric parameters are derived for all known late-type WN stars in M 31 with available spectra. All of these stars still have hydrogen in their outer envelopes, some of them up to 50% by mass. The stars are located on the cool side of the zero age main sequence in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, while their luminosities range from 105 to 106 L⊙. It is remarkable that no star exceeds 106 L⊙. Conclusions: If formed via single-star evolution, the late-type WN stars in M 31 stem from an initial mass range between 20 and 60 M⊙. From the very late-type WN9-11 stars, only one star is located in the S Doradus instability strip. We do not find any late-type WN stars with the high luminosities known in the Milky Way. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. A Wolf-Rayet-like progenitor of SN 2013cu from spectral observations of a stellar wind.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I; Ofek, E O; Ben-Ami, S; Cenko, S B; Kasliwal, M M; Cao, Y; Yaron, O; Tal, D; Silverman, J M; Horesh, A; De Cia, A; Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Perley, D; Vreeswijk, P M; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Filippenko, A V; Wheeler, J C

    2014-05-22

    The explosive fate of massive Wolf-Rayet stars (WRSs) is a key open question in stellar physics. An appealing option is that hydrogen-deficient WRSs are the progenitors of some hydrogen-poor supernova explosions of types IIb, Ib and Ic (ref. 2). A blue object, having luminosity and colours consistent with those of some WRSs, has recently been identified in pre-explosion images at the location of a supernova of type Ib (ref. 3), but has not yet been conclusively determined to have been the progenitor. Similar work has so far only resulted in non-detections. Comparison of early photometric observations of type Ic supernovae with theoretical models suggests that the progenitor stars had radii of less than 10(12) centimetres, as expected for some WRSs. The signature of WRSs, their emission line spectra, cannot be probed by such studies. Here we report the detection of strong emission lines in a spectrum of type IIb supernova 2013cu (iPTF13ast) obtained approximately 15.5 hours after explosion (by 'flash spectroscopy', which captures the effects of the supernova explosion shock breakout flash on material surrounding the progenitor star). We identify Wolf-Rayet-like wind signatures, suggesting a progenitor of the WN(h) subclass (those WRSs with winds dominated by helium and nitrogen, with traces of hydrogen). The extent of this dense wind may indicate increased mass loss from the progenitor shortly before its explosion, consistent with recent theoretical predictions. PMID:24848059

  8. Pinwheels in the sky, with dust: 3D modelling of the Wolf-Rayet 98a environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Tom; Keppens, Rony; van Marle, Allard Jan; Camps, Peter; Baes, Maarten; Meliani, Zakaria

    2016-08-01

    The Wolf-Rayet 98a (WR 98a) system is a prime target for interferometric surveys, since its identification as a `rotating pinwheel nebulae', where infrared images display a spiral dust lane revolving with a 1.4 yr periodicity. WR 98a hosts a WC9+OB star, and the presence of dust is puzzling given the extreme luminosities of Wolf-Rayet stars. We present 3D hydrodynamic models for WR 98a, where dust creation and redistribution are self-consistently incorporated. Our grid-adaptive simulations resolve details in the wind collision region at scales below one percent of the orbital separation (˜4 au), while simulating up to 1300 au. We cover several orbital periods under conditions where the gas component alone behaves adiabatic, or is subject to effective radiative cooling. In the adiabatic case, mixing between stellar winds is effective in a well-defined spiral pattern, where optimal conditions for dust creation are met. When radiative cooling is incorporated, the interaction gets dominated by thermal instabilities along the wind collision region, and dust concentrates in clumps and filaments in a volume-filling fashion, so WR 98a must obey close to adiabatic evolutions to demonstrate the rotating pinwheel structure. We mimic Keck, ALMA or future E-ELT observations and confront photometric long-term monitoring. We predict an asymmetry in the dust distribution between leading and trailing edge of the spiral, show that ALMA and E-ELT would be able to detect fine-structure in the spiral indicative of Kelvin-Helmholtz development, and confirm the variation in photometry due to the orientation. Historic Keck images are reproduced, but their resolution is insufficient to detect the details we predict.

  9. ISOLATED WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION IDENTIFIED VIA PASCHEN-{alpha} EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Cotera, A.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C.

    2010-12-10

    We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-{alpha} (P{alpha}) emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0.{sup 0}65 x 0.{sup 0}25 (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include six carbon-type (WC) and five nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, six O supergiants, and two B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts having properties consistent with solitary O stars and colliding-wind binaries. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excess, which is possibly thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the GCR to 88. All sources of strong P{alpha} excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed WR subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.

  10. RE-EXAMINING HIGH ABUNDANCE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY MASS-METALLICITY OUTLIERS: HIGH N/O, EVOLVED WOLF-RAYET GALAXIES?

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Marble, Andrew R. E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu

    2011-09-01

    We present new MMT spectroscopic observations of four dwarf galaxies representative of a larger sample observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and identified by Peeples et al. as low-mass, high oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity relation. Peeples showed that these four objects (with metallicity estimates of 8.5 {<=} 12 + log(O/H) {<=} 8.8) have oxygen abundance offsets of 0.4-0.6 dex from the M{sub B} luminosity-metallicity relation. Our new observations extend the wavelength coverage to include the [O II] {lambda}{lambda}3726, 3729 doublet, which adds leverage in oxygen abundance estimates and allows measurements of N/O ratios. All four spectra are low excitation, with relatively high N/O ratios (N/O {approx}> 0.10), each of which tend to bias estimates based on strong emission lines toward high oxygen abundances. These spectra all fall in a regime where the 'standard' strong-line methods for metallicity determinations are not well calibrated either empirically or by photoionization modeling. By comparing our spectra directly to photoionization models, we estimate oxygen abundances in the range of 7.9 {<=} 12 + log (O/H) {<=} 8.4, consistent with the scatter of the mass-metallicity relation. We discuss the physical nature of these galaxies that leads to their unusual spectra (and previous classification as outliers), finding their low excitation, elevated N/O, and strong Balmer absorption are consistent with the properties expected from galaxies evolving past the 'Wolf-Rayet galaxy' phase. We compare our results to the 'main' sample of Peeples and conclude that they are outliers primarily due to enrichment of nitrogen relative to oxygen and not due to unusually high oxygen abundances for their masses or luminosities.

  11. An extensive spectroscopic time series of three Wolf-Rayet stars - I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N. D.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G. M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, É.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Kubát, J.; Kubátová, B.; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Muñoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferrière, A.; Sablowski, D. P.; Simón-Díaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F. M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Küsters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschläger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-08-01

    During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analysed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analysing the variability of the He II λ5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 ± 0.008 (s.d.) d. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 ± 6 d, or ˜18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grey-scale difference images with theoretical grey-scales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of Δφ ≃ 90° was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV λλ5802,5812 and He I λ5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I λ5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.

  12. SN 2011hw: helium-rich circumstellar gas and the luminous blue variable to Wolf-Rayet transition in supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Kandrashoff, Michael T.

    2012-11-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the peculiar Type IIn/Ibn supernova (SN) 2011hw. Its optical light curve exhibits a slower decline rate than that of normal SNe Ibc, with a peak absolute magnitude of -19.5 (unfiltered) and a secondary rise 20-30 d later of -18.3 mag (R). Spectra of SN 2011hw are highly unusual compared to those of normal SN types, most closely resembling the spectra of SNe Ibn. We centre our analysis on comparing SN 2011hw to the well-studied Type Ibn SN 2006jc. While the two SNe have many important similarities, the differences are quite telling: compared to SN 2006jc, SN 2011hw has weaker He I and Ca II lines and relatively stronger H lines, its light curve exhibits a higher visual-wavelength luminosity and slower decline rate, and emission lines associated with the progenitor's circumstellar material (CSM) are narrower. One can reproduce the unusual continuum shape of SN 2011hw with roughly equal contributions from a 6000-K blackbody and a spectrum of SN 2006jc. We attribute this blackbody-like emission component and many other differences between the two SNe to a small amount of additional H in SN 2011hw, analogous to the small H mass that makes SNe IIb differ from SNe Ib. Slower speeds in the CSM and somewhat elevated H content suggest a connection between SN 2011hw's progenitor and Ofpe/WN9 stars, which have been associated with luminous blue variables (LBVs) in their hot quiescent phases, and are H poor - but not H free like classical Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. Comparisons between SN 2011hw and SN 2006jc can be largely understood if their progenitors exploded at different points in the transitional evolution from an LBV to a WR star.

  13. Estrellas Wolf-Rayet de tipo WN en la Vía Láctea: Campaña 2007-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, A.; Gamen, R.; Barbá, R. H.

    We are carrying out a spectroscopic monitoring of Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars, in order to detect binary systems. The sample consists of approx- imately 50 stars of the Nitrogen sequence (WN) and fainter than V =13. The observations are made from the 4-m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory (CTIO), Chile. In the following, we present the first results of the 2007-2008 campaign. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  14. The Wolf-Rayet stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. A comprehensive analysis of the WN class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainich, R.; Rühling, U.; Todt, H.; Oskinova, L. M.; Liermann, A.; Gräfener, G.; Foellmi, C.; Schnurr, O.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Massive stars, although being important building blocks of galaxies, are still not fully understood. This especially holds true for Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with their strong mass loss, whose spectral analysis requires adequate model atmospheres. Aims: Following our comprehensive studies of the WR stars in the Milky Way, we now present spectroscopic analyses of almost all known WN stars in the LMC. Methods: For the quantitative analysis of the wind-dominated emission-line spectra, we employ the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code. By fitting synthetic spectra to the observed spectral energy distribution and the available spectra (ultraviolet and optical), we obtain the physical properties of 107 stars. Results: We present the fundamental stellar and wind parameters for an almost complete sample of WN stars in the LMC. Among those stars that are putatively single, two different groups can be clearly distinguished. While 12% of our sample are more luminous than 106L⊙ and contain a significant amount of hydrogen, 88% of the WN stars, with little or no hydrogen, populate the luminosity range between log (L/L⊙) = 5.3 ... 5.8. Conclusions: While the few extremely luminous stars (log (L/L⊙) > 6), if indeed single stars, descended directly from the main sequence at very high initial masses, the bulk of WN stars have gone through the red-supergiant phase. According to their luminosities in the range of log (L/L⊙) = 5.3 ... 5.8, these stars originate from initial masses between 20 and 40 M⊙. This mass range is similar to the one found in the Galaxy, i.e. the expected metallicity dependence of the evolution is not seen. Current stellar evolution tracks, even when accounting for rotationally induced mixing, still partly fail to reproduce the observed ranges of luminosities and initial masses. Moreover, stellar radii are generally larger and effective temperatures correspondingly lower than predicted from stellar evolution models, probably due to

  15. Wolf-Rayet stars in M81: detection and characterization using GTC/OSIRIS spectra and HST/ACS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-González, V. M. A.; Mayya, Y. D.; Rosa-González, D.

    2016-08-01

    We here report the properties of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in 14 locations in the nearby spiral galaxy M81. These locations were found serendipitously while analysing the slit spectra of a sample of ˜150 star-forming complexes, taken using the long-slit and multiobject spectroscopic modes of the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias. Colours and magnitudes of the identified point sources in the Hubble Space Telescope images compare well with those of individual W-R stars in the Milky Way. Using templates of individual W-R stars, we infer that the objects responsible for the observed W-R features are single stars in 12 locations, comprising of three WNLs, three WNEs, two WCEs and four transitional WN/C types. In diagrams involving bump luminosities and the width of the bumps, the W-R stars of the same sub-class group together, with the transitional stars occupying locations intermediate between the WNE and WCE groups, as expected from the evolutionary models. However, the observed number of 4 transitional stars out of our sample of 14 is statistically high as compared to the 4 per cent expected in stellar evolutionary models.

  16. Chandra Detects the Rare Oxygen-type Wolf-Rayet Star WR 142 and OB Stars in Berkeley 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner

    2010-06-01

    We present first results of a Chandra X-ray observation of the rare oxygen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 142 (= Sand 5 = St 3) harbored in the young, heavily obscured cluster Berkeley 87. Oxygen-type WO stars are thought to be the most evolved of the WRs and progenitors of supernovae or gamma-ray bursts. As part of an X-ray survey of supposedly single WR stars, we observed WR 142 and the surrounding Berkeley 87 region with Chandra ACIS-I. We detect WR 142 as a faint yet extremely hard X-ray source. Due to weak emission, its nature as a thermal or non-thermal emitter is unclear and thus we discuss several emission mechanisms. Additionally, we report seven detections and eight non-detections by Chandra of massive OB stars in Berkeley 87, two of which are bright yet soft X-ray sources whose spectra provide a dramatic contrast to the hard emission from WR 142.

  17. Ionization structure and chemical abundances of the Wolf-Rayet nebula NGC 6888 with integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez Montero, E.

    2013-05-01

    n this work we search for the observational footprints of the interactions between the interstellar medium and stellar winds in the Wolf-Rayet nebula NGC 6888 in order to understand its ionization structure, chemical composition, and kinematics. We collected a set of integral field spectroscopy observations across NGC 6888, obtained with PPAK in the optical range performing both 2D and 1D analyses. Attending to the 2D analysis in the north-east part of the nebula, we generated maps of the extinction structure and electron density. We produced diagnostic diagrams and statistical frequency distributions of the radial velocity. Nine integrated spectra were generated over the whole nebula. We measured line intensities to obtain physical parameters and chemical abundances. We inferred that nearly all the zones present an oxygen abundance slightly below the solar values. The derived N/H appears enhanced up to a factor of 6. Helium presents an enrichment in most of the integrated zones, too. Finally, we proposed a scheme of irregular and/or broken shells for NGC 6888 to explain the features observed.

  18. Suzaku monitoring of the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 140 around periastron passage: An approach for quantifying the wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Yasuharu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Tsuboi, Yohko; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael; Pollock, Andy M. T.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Williams, Peredur M.; Dougherty, Sean; Pittard, Julian

    2015-12-01

    Suzaku observations of the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) binary WR 140 (WC7pd+O5.5fc) were made at four different times around periastron passage in 2009 January. The spectra changed in shape and flux with the phase. As periastron approached, the column density of the low-energy absorption increased, which indicates that the emission from the wind-wind collision plasma was absorbed by the dense W-R wind. The spectra can be mostly fitted with two different components: a warm component with kBT = 0.3-0.6 keV and a dominant hot component with kBT ˜ 3 keV. The emission measure of the dominant, hot component is not inversely proportional to the distance between the two stars. This can be explained by the O star wind colliding before it has reached its terminal velocity, leading to a reduction in its wind momentum flux. At phases closer to periastron, we discovered a cool plasma component in a recombining phase, which is less absorbed. This component may be a relic of the wind-wind collision plasma, which was cooled down by radiation, and may represent a transitional stage in dust formation.

  19. The CHARA Array resolves the long-period Wolf-Rayet binaries WR 137 and WR 138

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Noel D.; Shenar, Tomer; Roy-Loubier, Olivier; Schaefer, Gail; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; St-Louis, Nicole; Gies, Douglas R.; Farrington, Chris; Hill, Grant M.; Williams, Peredur M.; Gordon, Kathryn; Pablo, Herbert; Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina

    2016-10-01

    We report on interferometric observations with the CHARA Array of two classical Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in suspected binary systems, namely WR 137 and WR 138. In both cases, we resolve the component stars to be separated by a few milliarcseconds. The data were collected in the H band, and provide a measure of the fractional flux for both stars in each system. We find that the WR star is the dominant H-band light source in both systems (fWR,137 = 0.59 ± 0.04; fWR,138 = 0.67 ± 0.01), which is confirmed through both comparisons with estimated fundamental parameters for WR stars and O dwarfs, as well as through spectral modelling of each system. Our spectral modelling also provides fundamental parameters for the stars and winds in these systems. The results on WR 138 provide evidence that it is a binary system which may have gone through a previous mass-transfer episode to create the WR star. The separation and position of the stars in the WR 137 system together with previous results from the IOTA interferometer provides evidence that the binary is seen nearly edge-on. The possible edge-on orbit of WR 137 aligns well with the dust production site imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope during a previous periastron passage, showing that the dust production may be concentrated in the orbital plane.

  20. Detached dust shell around Wolf-Rayet star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036

    SciTech Connect

    Borissova, J.; Amigo, P.; Kurtev, R.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Chené, A.-N.; Minniti, D.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a detached dust shell around the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036 is reported. This shell is uncovered through the Spitzer-MIPS 24 μm image, where it appears brightest, and it is invisible at shorter wavelengths. Using new APEX observations and other data available from the literature, we have estimated some of the shell parameters: the inner and outer radii of 0.15 and 0.90 pc, respectively; the overall systemic velocity of the molecular {sup 12}CO(3 → 2) emission of –45.7 ± 2.3 km s{sup –1}; an expansion velocity of the gas of 16.3 ± 1 km s{sup –1}; the dust temperature and opacity of 122 ± 12 K and 1.04, respectively; and an age of 2.8 × 10{sup 4} yr. The WR star displays some cyclic variability. The mass computed for the WR60-6 nebula indicates that the material was probably ejected during its previous stages of evolution. In addition, we have identified a bright spot very close to the shell, which can be associated with the Midcourse Space Experiment source G312.13+00.20.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in post RSG/LBV phase (Graefener+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graefener, G.; Vink, J. S.; Harries, T. J.; Langer, N.

    2013-01-01

    Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with fast rotating cores are thought to be the direct progenitors of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). A well accepted evolutionary channel towards LGRBs is chemically-homogeneous evolution at low metallicities, which completely avoids a red supergiant (RSG), or luminous blue variable (LBV) phase. On the other hand, strong absorption features with velocities of several hundred km/s have been found in some LGRB afterglow spectra (GRB 020813 and GRB 021004), which have been attributed to dense circumstellar (CS) material that has been ejected in a previous RSG or LBV phase, and is interacting with a fast WR-type stellar wind. Here we investigate the properties of Galactic WR stars and their environment to identify similar evolutionary channels that may lead to the formation of LGRBs. We compile available information on the spectropolarimetric properties of 29 WR stars, the presence of CS ejecta for 172 WR stars, and the CS velocities in the environment of 34 WR stars in the Galaxy. We use linear line-depolarization as an indicator of rotation, nebular morphology as an indicator of stellar ejecta, and velocity patterns in UV absorption features as an indicator of increased velocities in the CS environment. (2 data files).

  2. HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY REVEALS THE SPECIAL NATURE OF WOLF-RAYET STAR WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Gayley, K. G.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Ignace, R.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    2012-03-10

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray spectrum of a putatively single Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. 400 ks observations of WR 6 by the XMM-Newton telescope resulted in a superb quality high-resolution X-ray spectrum. Spectral analysis reveals that the X-rays originate far out in the stellar wind, more than 30 stellar radii from the photosphere, and thus outside the wind acceleration zone where the line-driving instability (LDI) could create shocks. The X-ray emitting plasma reaches temperatures up to 50 MK and is embedded within the unshocked, 'cool' stellar wind as revealed by characteristic spectral signatures. We detect a fluorescent Fe line at Almost-Equal-To 6.4 keV. The presence of fluorescence is consistent with a two-component medium, where the cool wind is permeated with the hot X-ray emitting plasma. The wind must have a very porous structure to allow the observed amount of X-rays to escape. We find that neither the LDI nor any alternative binary scenario can explain the data. We suggest a scenario where X-rays are produced when the fast wind rams into slow 'sticky clumps' that resist acceleration. Our new data show that the X-rays in single WR star are generated by some special mechanism different from the one operating in the O-star winds.

  3. Herschel observations of the nebula M1-67 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvatira-Nakou, C.; Hutsemékers, D.; Royer, P.; Waelkens, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Barlow, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    Infrared Herschel imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula M1-67 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 124 have been obtained along with optical imaging observations. The infrared images reveal a clumpy dusty nebula that extends up to 1 pc. The comparison with the optical images shows that the ionized gas nebula coincides with the dust nebula, the dust and the gas being mixed together. A photodissociation region is revealed from the infrared spectroscopic analysis. The analysis of the infrared spectrum of the nebula, where forbidden emission lines of ionized elements were detected, showed that the nebula consists of mildly processed material with the calculated abundance number ratios being N/O = 1.0 ± 0.5 and C/O = 0.46 ± 0.27. Based on a radiative transfer model, the dust mass of the nebula was estimated to be 0.22 M⊙ with a population of large grains being necessary to reproduce the observations. The comparison of the mass-loss rate and the abundance ratios to theoretical models of stellar evolution led to the conclusion that the nebular ejection took place during a RSG/YSG evolutionary phase of a central star with an initial mass of 32 M⊙. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Based in part on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  4. X-ray emission from the Wolf-Rayet bubble NGC 6888. I. Chandra ACIS-S observations

    SciTech Connect

    Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.

    2014-02-01

    We analyze Chandra observations of the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) bubble NGC 6888. This W-R bubble presents similar spectral and morphological X-ray characteristics to those of S 308, the only other W-R bubble also showing X-ray emission. The observed spectrum is soft, peaking at the N VII line emission at 0.5 keV, with additional line emission at 0.7-0.9 keV and a weak tail of harder emission up to ∼1.5 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T {sub 1} ∼ 1.4 × 10{sup 6} K, T {sub 2} ∼ 7.4 × 10{sup 6} K). We confirm the results of previous X-ray observations that no noticeable temperature variations are detected in the nebula. The X-ray-emitting plasma is distributed in three apparent morphological components: two caps along the tips of the major axis and an extra contribution toward the northwest blowout not reported in previous analyses of the X-ray emission toward this W-R nebula. Using the plasma model fits of the Chandra ACIS spectra for the physical properties of the hot gas and the ROSAT PSPC image to account for the incomplete coverage of Chandra observations, we estimate a luminosity of L {sub X} = (7.7 ± 0.1) ×10{sup 33} erg s{sup –1} for NGC 6888 at a distance of 1.26 kpc. The average rms electron density of the X-ray-emitting gas is ≳ 0.4 cm{sup –3} for a total mass ≳ 1.2 M {sub ☉}.

  5. Searching for magnetic fields in 11 Wolf-Rayet stars: Analysis of circular polarization measurements from ESPaDOnS

    SciTech Connect

    De la Chevrotière, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Collaboration: MiMeS Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    With recent detections of magnetic fields in some of their progenitor O stars, combined with known strong fields in their possible descendant neutron stars, it is natural to search for magnetic fields in Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, despite the problems associated with the presence of winds enhanced by an order of magnitude over those of O stars. We continue our search among a sample of 11 bright WR stars following our introductory study in a previous paper of WR6 = EZ CMa using the spectropolarimeter ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, most of them in all four Stokes parameters. This sample includes six WN stars and five WC stars encompassing a range of spectral subclasses. Six are medium/long-period binaries and three show corotating interaction regions. We report no definite detections of a magnetic field in the winds in which the lines form (which is about the same distance from the center of the star as it is from the surface of the progenitor O star) for any of the eleven stars. Possible reasons and their implications are discussed. Nonetheless, the data show evidence supporting marginal detections for WR134, WR137, and WR138. According to the Bayesian analysis, the most probable field intensities are B {sub wind} ∼ 200, 130, and 80 G, respectively, with a 95.4% probability that the magnetic fields present in the observable parts of their stellar wind, if stronger, does not exceed B{sub wind}{sup max}∼1900 G, ∼1500 G, and ∼1500 G, respectively. In the case of non-detections, we report an average field strength upper limit of B{sub wind}{sup max}∼500 G.

  6. X-Ray Emission from the Wolf-Rayet Bubble NGC 6888. I. Chandra ACIS-S Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2014-02-01

    We analyze Chandra observations of the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) bubble NGC 6888. This W-R bubble presents similar spectral and morphological X-ray characteristics to those of S 308, the only other W-R bubble also showing X-ray emission. The observed spectrum is soft, peaking at the N VII line emission at 0.5 keV, with additional line emission at 0.7-0.9 keV and a weak tail of harder emission up to ~1.5 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T 1 ~ 1.4 × 106 K, T 2 ~ 7.4 × 106 K). We confirm the results of previous X-ray observations that no noticeable temperature variations are detected in the nebula. The X-ray-emitting plasma is distributed in three apparent morphological components: two caps along the tips of the major axis and an extra contribution toward the northwest blowout not reported in previous analyses of the X-ray emission toward this W-R nebula. Using the plasma model fits of the Chandra ACIS spectra for the physical properties of the hot gas and the ROSAT PSPC image to account for the incomplete coverage of Chandra observations, we estimate a luminosity of L X = (7.7 ± 0.1) ×1033 erg s-1 for NGC 6888 at a distance of 1.26 kpc. The average rms electron density of the X-ray-emitting gas is >~ 0.4 cm-3 for a total mass >~ 1.2 M ⊙.

  7. LARGE-SCALE PERIODIC VARIABILITY OF THE WIND OF THE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 1 (HD 4004)

    SciTech Connect

    Chene, A.-N.

    2010-06-20

    We present the results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the WN4 Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 1 = HD 4004. Our broadband V photometry covering a timespan of 91 days shows variability with a period of P = 16.9{sup +0.6}{sub -0.3} days. The same period is also found in our spectral data. The light curve is non-sinusoidal with hints of a gradual change in its shape as a function of time. The photometric variations nevertheless remain coherent over several cycles and we estimate that the coherence timescale of the light curve is of the order of 60 days. The spectroscopy shows large-scale line-profile variability which can be interpreted as excess emission peaks moving from one side of the profile to the other on a timescale of several days. Although we cannot unequivocally exclude the unlikely possibility that WR 1 is a binary, we propose that the nature of the variability we have found strongly suggests that it is due to the presence in the wind of the WR star of large-scale structures, most likely corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which are predicted to arise in inherently unstable radiatively driven winds when they are perturbed at their base. We also suggest that variability observed in WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137 is of the same nature. Finally, assuming that the period of CIRs is related to the rotational period, we estimate the rotation rate of the four stars for which sufficient monitoring has been carried out, i.e., v{sub rot} = 6.5, 40, 70, and 275 km s{sup -1} for WR 1, WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137, respectively.

  8. REVEALING THE ASYMMETRY OF THE WIND OF THE VARIABLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR1 (HD 4004) THROUGH SPECTROPOLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    St-Louis, N.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, high quality spectropolarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR1 (HD 4004) obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are presented. All major emission lines present in the spectrum show depolarization in the relative Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I. From the behavior of the amount of line depolarization as a function of line strength, the intrinsic continuum light polarization of WR1 is estimated to be P/I = 0.443% ± 0.028% with an angle of θ = –26.°2. Although such a level of polarization could in principle be caused by a wind flattened by fast rotation, the scenario in which it is a consequence of the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind is preferred. This is supported by previous photometric and spectroscopic observations showing periodic variations with a period of 16.9 days. This is now the third WR star thought to exhibit CIRs in its wind that is found to have line depolarization. Previous authors have found a strong correlation between line depolarization and the presence of an ejected nebula, which they interpret as a sign that the star has relatively recently reached the WR phase since the nebula are thought to dissipate very fast. In cases where the presence of CIRs in the wind is favored to explain the depolarization across spectral lines, the above-mentioned correlation may indicate that those massive stars have only very recently transited from the previous evolutionary phase to the WR phase.

  9. A 10-h period revealed in optical spectra of the highly variable WN8 Wolf-Rayet star WR 123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Foellmi, C.; Marchenko, S. V.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ballereau, D.; Chauville, J.; Zorec, J.; Poteet, C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: What is the origin of the large-amplitude variability in Wolf-Rayet WN8 stars in general and WR123 in particular? A dedicated spectroscopic campaign targets the ten-hour period previously found in the high-precision photometric data obtained by the MOST satellite. Methods: In June-August 2003 we obtained a series of high signal-to-noise, mid-resolution spectra from several sites in the λλ 4000-6940 Å domain. We also followed the star with occasional broadband (Johnson V) photometry. The acquired spectroscopy allowed a detailed study of spectral variability on timescales from ~5 min to months. Results: We find that all observed spectral lines of a given chemical element tend to show similar variations and that there is a good correlation between the lines of different elements, without any significant time delays, save the strong absorption components of the Hei lines, which tend to vary differently from the emission parts. We find a single sustained periodicity, P ~ 9.8 h, which is likely related to the relatively stable pulsations found in MOST photometry obtained one year later. In addition, seemingly stochastic, large-amplitude variations are also seen in all spectral lines on timescales of several hours to several days. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Concil of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based also on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory, under programme ID 271.D-5025.Photometric data presented in Fig. 1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/530/A151

  10. The X-ray light curve of the massive colliding wind Wolf-Rayet + O binary WR 21a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, Eric; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-05-01

    Our dedicated XMM-Newton monitoring, as well as archival Chandra and Swift datasets, were used to examine the behaviour of the WN5h+O3V binary WR 21a at high energies. For most of the orbit, the X-ray emission exhibits few variations. However, an increase in strength of the emission is seen before periastron, following a 1 /D relative trend, where D is the separation between both components. This increase is rapidly followed by a decline due to strong absorption as the Wolf-Rayet (WR) comes in front. The fitted local absorption value appears to be coherent with a mass-loss rate of about 1 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 for the WR component. However, absorption is not the only parameter affecting the X-ray emission at periastron as even the hard X-ray emission decreases, suggesting a possible collapse of the colliding wind region near to or onto the photosphere of the companion just before or at periastron. An eclipse may appear as another potential scenario, but it would be in apparent contradiction with several lines of evidence, notably the width of the dip in the X-ray light curve and the absence of variations in the UV light curve. Afterwards, the emission slowly recovers, with a strong hysteresis effect. The observed behaviour is compatible with predictions from general wind-wind collision models although the absorption increase is too shallow. Based on observations collected at ESO as well as with Swift, Chandra, and the ESA science mission XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  11. Sur la nature de la variabilite spectrale et photometrique periodique d'etoiles Wolf-Rayet apparemment isolees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, Thierry

    Il est depuis longtemps suspecté que les étoiles Wolf-Rayet apparemment isolées présentant des variations périodiques dans le profil de leurs raies spectrales, en photométrie ou en polarimétrie sont associées à un compagnon dégénéré (étoile à neutron ou trou noir), et constituent ainsi une phase évolutive dont l'existence, bien que prédite par les modèles évolutifs des systèmes binaires massifs rapprochés, n'a pas encore été catégoriquement confirmée observationnellement. Cependant, de récentes études ayant trait à la variabilité spectrale des étoiles OB laissent émettre quelques doutes quant à la pertinence de ce modèle, en démontrant que des vents largement asphériques peuvent se développer dans les étoiles de type précoce. Le scénario alternatif serait donc de considérer que la variabilité périodique observée n'est pas due à la présence d'un compagnon dégénéré affectant la structure à grande échelle du vent de l'étoile Wolf-Rayet, mais est au contraire induite par la modulation par rotation d'un vent nettement anisotropique. Cet ouvrage présente les résultats d'un vaste programme d'observations spectroscopiques et photométriques (généralement simultanées) se proposant de lever l'ambiguïté sur la nature précise des étoiles Wolf-Rayet apparemment isolées dont la périodicité des variations est. soit depuis longtemps établie (WR 6), soit suspectée (WR 1, WR 134, WR 136). Notre étude a permis de confirmer l'existence d'une périodicité de 2.3 jours pour l'étoile WR 134. En outre, nous présentons des arguments mettant en doute l'éventuelle association de WR 6 et WR 134 avec un compagnon dégénéré. Alternativement, nous proposons que la variabilité périodique observée serait plutôt induite, à l'instar de nombreuses étoiles OB, par la rotation de structures azimutalement étendues dans le vent. Ce modèle est plus à même d'appréhender certains aspects de la variabilité, notamment la

  12. Long-term photometry of the Wolf-Rayet stars WR 137, WR 140, WR 148, and WR 153

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, K. P.; Altmann, M.; Seggewiss, W.

    2000-03-01

    In 1991, a long term UBV-photometry campaign of four Wolf-Rayet stars was started using the 60 cm telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen, Bulgaria. Here we report on our observational results and discuss the light variations. The star WR 137 was observed during 1991 - 1998. No indications of eclipses were found, though random light variations with small amplitudes exist, which are probably due to dynamical wind instabilities. WR 140 was also monitored between 1991 and 1998. In 1993, a dip in the light curve in all passbands was observed shortly after periastron passage, with amplitude of 0.03 mag in V. This is interpreted in terms of an ``eclipse'' by dust condensation in the WR-wind. The amplitude of the eclipse increases towards shorter wavelengths; thus, electron scattering alone is not sufficient to explain the observations. An additional source of opacity is required, possibly Rayleigh scattering. After the eclipse, the light in all passbands gradually increased to reach the ``pre-eclipse'' level in 1998. The very broad shape of the light minimum suggests that a dust envelope was built up around the WR-star at periastron passage by wind-wind interaction, and was gradually dispersed after 1993. Our observations of WR 148 (WR + c?) confirm the 4.3 d period; however, they also show additional significant scatter. Another interesting finding is a long-term variation of the mean light (and, possibly, of the amplitude) on a time scale of years. There is some indication of a 4 year cycle of that long-term variation. We discuss the implications for the binary model. Our photometry of WR 153 is consistent with the quadruple model of this star by showing that both orbital periods, 6.7 d (pair A) and 3.5 d (pair B), exist in the light variations. A search in the HIPPARCOS photometric data also reveals both periods, which is an independant confirmation. No other periods in the light variability of that star are found. The longer period light curve shows

  13. Large-scale Periodic Variability of the Wind of the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 1 (HD 4004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; St-Louis, N.

    2010-06-01

    We present the results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the WN4 Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 1 = HD 4004. Our broadband V photometry covering a timespan of 91 days shows variability with a period of P = 16.9+0.6 -0.3 days. The same period is also found in our spectral data. The light curve is non-sinusoidal with hints of a gradual change in its shape as a function of time. The photometric variations nevertheless remain coherent over several cycles and we estimate that the coherence timescale of the light curve is of the order of 60 days. The spectroscopy shows large-scale line-profile variability which can be interpreted as excess emission peaks moving from one side of the profile to the other on a timescale of several days. Although we cannot unequivocally exclude the unlikely possibility that WR 1 is a binary, we propose that the nature of the variability we have found strongly suggests that it is due to the presence in the wind of the WR star of large-scale structures, most likely corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which are predicted to arise in inherently unstable radiatively driven winds when they are perturbed at their base. We also suggest that variability observed in WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137 is of the same nature. Finally, assuming that the period of CIRs is related to the rotational period, we estimate the rotation rate of the four stars for which sufficient monitoring has been carried out, i.e., v rot = 6.5, 40, 70, and 275 km s-1 for WR 1, WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137, respectively. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Also based on observations obtained at the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic with is operated by the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec and the Observatoire de

  14. Integral field spectroscopy of M1-67. A Wolf-Rayet nebula with luminous blue variable nebula appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez-Montero, E.; Candian, A.; Sánchez, S. F.; Martín-Gordón, D.; Riera, A.

    2013-06-01

    Aims: This work aims to disentangle the morphological, kinematic, and chemical components of the nebula M1-67 to shed light on its process of formation around the central Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR124. Methods: We have carried out integral field spectroscopy observations over two regions of M1-67, covering most of the nebula in the optical range. Maps of electron density, line ratios, and radial velocity were created to perform a detailed analysis of the two-dimensional structure. We studied the physical and chemical properties by means of integrated spectra selected over the whole nebula. Photoionization models were performed to confirm the empirical chemical results theoretically. In addition, we obtained and analysed infrared spectroscopic data and the MIPS 24 μm image of M1-67 from Spitzer. Results: We find that the ionized gas of M1-67 is condensed in knots aligned in a preferred axis along the NE-SW direction, like a bipolar structure. Both electron density and radial velocity decrease in this direction when moving away from the central star. From the derived electron temperature, Te ~ 8200 K, we have estimated chemical abundances, obtaining that nitrogen appears strongly enriched and oxygen depleted. From the last two results, we infer that this bipolarity is the consequence of an ejection of an evolved stage of WR124 with material processed in the CNO cycle. Furthermore, we find two regions placed outside of the bipolar structure with different spectral and chemical properties. The infrared study has revealed that the bipolar axis is composed of ionized gas with a low ionization degree that is well mixed with warm dust and of a spherical bubble surrounding the ejection at 24 μm. Taking the evolution of a 60 M⊙ star and the temporal scale of the bipolar ejection into account, we propose that the observed gas was ejected during an eruption in the luminous blue variable stage. The star has entered the WR phase recently without apparent signs of interaction

  15. Analysis of ultraviolet atmospheric eclipses in the Wolf-Rayet binary CV Serpentis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, J. A.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Khaliullin, Kh. F.

    1985-01-01

    While no eclipses deeper than 0.04 mag are noted in the present UV spectra, covering one-half of an orbital cycle of CV Ser, in the electron scattering continuum at 2400-3200 A or in fine error sensor observations, marked atmospheric eclipses of up to 0.5 mag depth are observed in individual strong lines and over large ranges of the continuum at shorter wavelengths. The flux above the continuum in the C II 1247 A, Si IV 1400 A, and Si IV 1723 lines showed similar phase dependence with emission weakening, as well as with the emission's going into absorption as phase progresses from superior to inferior conjunction of the WC star (primary eclipse). These observations show effects very similar to the behavior of WN stars in the UV.

  16. New HST Observations of the Wolf-Rayet Nebula NGC 6888

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, R. J.; Moore, B. D.; Hester, J. J.; Scowen, P. A.; Buckalew, B. A.

    2002-05-01

    HST/WFPC2 imagery and STIS spectra of the circumstellar shell NGC 6888 are presented. The nebula was formed by the collision of the stellar wind of the WN6 star HD 192163 with material shed during its preceding red supergiant phase. The resulting nebula is an 8 pc x 5 pc photoionized shell enveloped in a shock-heated skin of emission powered by the internal pressure of the wind-blown bubble. We present color-coded pictures of our new WFPC2 imagery along the shell's northern perimeter. These included three fields imaged using the F502N, F656N, and F658N filters, and a previously studied region using F487N and F658N. STIS spectra covering the ~1650-9500 Å wavelength range of four knots and surrounding medium were obtained for comprehensive studies of spatial variations in various emission lines. Collectively the new data permit a global view of the shell material at different times relative to the breakout of the hot bubble interior. The NE pointing was observed previously with WFPC2, and analyzed by comparison with photoionization models. The earlier work, presented in Moore, Hester and Scowen 2000 (MHS00) relied on ground-based observations. Our new observations show that previous estimates of [N II]/Hα were low by 20-50%. The lower gas density in the new models is in better agreement with the evolutionary scenario discussed in MHS00. The new ionizing flux is closer to that of the stellar model of Crowther & Smith 1996. The absence of the UV C II] & C III] lines in our STIS spectra allows only an upper limit on the carbon abundance in the nebula. Support for the observations came from AURA/STScI to Rice & ASU as General Observer Program GO-08568.

  17. Observations and 3D Hydrodynamical models of planetary nebulae with Wolf Rayet type central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechy-García, J. S.; Velázquez, P. F.; Peña, M.; Raga, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    We present high-resolution, long-slit spectroscopic observations of two planetary nebulae with [WC] central stars located near the galactic bulge, M 1-32 and M 3-15. The observations were obtained with the 2.1-m telescope at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, San Pedro Mártir. M 1-32 shows wide wings on the base of its emission lines and M 3-15 has two very faint high-velocity knots. In order to model both PNe we built a three-dimensional model consisting of a jet interacting with an equatorially concentrated slow wind, emulating the presence of a dense torus, using the Yguazú hydrodynamical code. From our hydrodynamical models, we obtained position-velocity (PV) diagrams in the [N II]λ6583 line for comparison with the observations. We find that the spectral characteristics of M 1-32 and M 3-15 can be explained with the same physical model -a jet moving inside an AGB wind- using different parameters (physical conditions and position angles of the jet). In agreement with our model and observations, these objects contain a dense torus seeing pole-on and a bipolar jet escaping thorough the poles. Then we propose to classify this kind of objects as spectroscopic bipolar nebulae, although they have been classified morphologically as compact, round, or elliptical nebulae or with "close collimated lobes".

  18. Rotating Wolf-Rayet stars in a post RSG/LBV phase. An evolutionary channel towards long-duration GRBs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfener, G.; Vink, J. S.; Harries, T. J.; Langer, N.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with fast rotating cores are thought to be the direct progenitors of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). A well accepted evolutionary channel towards LGRBs is chemically-homogeneous evolution at low metallicities, which completely avoids a red supergiant (RSG), or luminous blue variable (LBV) phase. On the other hand, strong absorption features with velocities of several hundred km s-1 have been found in some LGRB afterglow spectra (GRB 020813 and GRB 021004), which have been attributed to dense circumstellar (CS) material that has been ejected in a previous RSG or LBV phase, and is interacting with a fast WR-type stellar wind. Aims: Here we investigate the properties of Galactic WR stars and their environment to identify similar evolutionary channels that may lead to the formation of LGRBs. Methods: We compile available information on the spectropolarimetric properties of 29 WR stars, the presence of CS ejecta for 172 WR stars, and the CS velocities in the environment of 34 WR stars in the Galaxy. We use linear line-depolarization as an indicator of rotation, nebular morphology as an indicator of stellar ejecta, and velocity patterns in UV absorption features as an indicator of increased velocities in the CS environment. Results: Based on previous nebular classifications, we determine an incidence rate of ~23% of WR stars with "possible ejecta nebulae" in the Galaxy. We find that this group of objects dominates the population of WR stars with spectropolarimetric signatures of rotation, while WR stars without such nebulae only rarely show indications of rotation. This confirms the correlation between rotation and CS ejecta from our previous work. The corresponding objects are most likely in an early stage after a preceding RSG or LBV phase, and have not yet lost their angular momenta due to the strong mass-loss in the WR phase. From their photometric periods we estimate rotation parameters in the range ω = νrot/νcrit = 0

  19. Interstellar Lines NaI 5890 (D2), NaI 5896 (D1) in the Spectra of the Wolf-Rayet Type Star HD 192163

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustamov, J. N.; Abdulkerimova, A. F.

    2012-08-01

    Results of spectral investigations of the interstellar absorption lines NaI 5890 (D2) and NaI 5896 (D1) in a spectrum of a Wolf-Rayet type star HD 192163 are presented. Observations carried out at Cassegrain focus of 2- meter "Zeiss-2000" telescope of N.Tusi Shamakhy Astrophysical observatory (ShAO) of NAS Azerbaijan in 2005-2010. 46 eshelle-spectrograms of star HD 192163, and also 4 eshelle-spectrograms of star HD 191765 and standard star HD 18947 for the purpose of comparative research of lines of doublet NaI 5890 (D2) and NaI 5896 (D1) were investigated. The asymmetry of profiles of these interstellar absorption lines had been revealed only in the spectra of HD 192163 and this asymmetry is interpreted by the contribution of genetic associated with the star HD 192163 ring nebula NGC 6888, in formation of these lines.

  20. GRO source candidates: (A) Nearby modest-size molecular clouds; (B) Pulsar with Wolf-Rayet companion that has lost its H-envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Murphy, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Within 100 pc of the sun there are over a hundred cirrus clouds with masses of approx. 60 solar mass and dense molecular clouds with masses of approx. 4 solar mass. If the local interstellar density of cosmic rays is also present in these clouds, the flux of neutral pion from the decay of gamma rays from the core of a cloud at a distance of 20 pc is approx. 13 x 10(exp -8) photons/sq cm/s. The flux from the more extensive cirrus cloud is approx 4 x 10(exp -7) photons/sq cm/s. A relativistic beam of particles generated by a compact stellar object and incident upon a large, close companion can be a strong gamma ray line source if more of the beam energy is used in interactions with C and O and heavier nuclei and less with H and He. This would be the case if the companion has lost its hydrogen envelope and nucleosynthesized much of its He into C, O, and Ne. Such objects are Wolf-Rayet stars and it is believed that some Wolf-Rayet stars do, in fact, have compact companions. For a beam of protons of 10(exp 37) erg/s, the flux at 1 kpc of the 4.4 MeV C-12 line could be as high as 5 x 10(exp -6) photons/sq cm/s. The fluxes of the deexcitation lines from the spallation products of O-16 are also presented.

  1. XMM-Newton Detection of Hard X-Ray Emission in the Nitrogen-Type Wolf-Rayet Star WR 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner

    2002-06-01

    We have used the excellent sensitivity of XMM-Newton to obtain the first high-quality X-ray spectrum of a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star that is not known to be a member of a binary system. Our target, the nitrogen-type star WR 110 (HD 165688), was also observed and detected with the Very Large Array at four different frequencies. The radio flux density increases with frequency according to a power law Sν~ν+0.64+/-0.10, in very good agreement with the behavior expected for free-free wind emission. The radio data give an ionized mass-loss rate M=4.9×10-5 Msolar yr-1 for an assumed spherical constant-velocity wind. The undispersed CCD X-ray spectra reveal strong emission lines from He-like ions of Mg, Si, and S. The emission measure distribution shows a dominant contribution from cool plasma with a characteristic temperature kTcool~0.5 keV (~6 MK). Little or no excess absorption of this cool component above the value expected from the visual extinction is present. We conclude that the bulk of the cool plasma detected by XMM-Newton lies at hundreds of stellar radii or more if the wind is approximately spherical and homogeneous, but it could lie closer to the star if the wind is clumped. If the cool plasma is due to instability-driven wind shocks, then typical shock velocities are vs~340-550 km s-1 and the average filling factor of X-ray-emitting gas in the wind is no larger than f~10-6. A surprising result is the unambiguous detection of a hard X-ray component that is clearly seen in the hard-band images and the spectra. This hard component accounts for about half of the observed flux and can be acceptably fitted by a hot, optically thin thermal plasma or a power-law model. If the emission is thermal, then a temperature kThot>=3 keV is derived. Such high temperatures are not predicted by current instability-driven wind shock models, and a different mechanism is thus required to explain the hard X-rays. We examine several possible mechanisms and show that the hard emission

  2. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. I. METHODS AND FIRST RESULTS: 41 NEW WR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Gerke, Jill; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Villar-Sbaffi, Alfredo; Stanonik, Kathryn; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent E-mail: jgerke@amnh.org E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: alfredovs@hotmail.com E-mail: eartigau@gemini.edu

    2009-08-15

    The discovery of new Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in our Galaxy via large-scale narrowband optical surveys has been severely limited by dust extinction. Recent improvements in infrared technology have made narrowband-broadband imaging surveys viable again. We report a new J, K, and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, spanning 150 degrees in Galactic longitude and reaching 1 degree above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 173 WR star candidates we have discovered 41 new WR stars, 15 of type WN and 26 of type WC. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with K-band spectra, and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. A few of the new WR stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new WR stars is seen to follow that of previously known WR stars along the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Tentative radial velocities were also measured for most of the new WR stars.

  3. Outflow-Induced Dynamical and Radiative Instability in Stellar Envelopes with an Application to Luminous Blue Variables and Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical models of the remnants of massive stars in a very hot, post-red-supergiant phase display no obvious instability if standard assumptions are made. However, the brightest observed classical luminous blue variables (LBVs) may well belong to such a phase. A simple time-dependent theory of moving stellar envelopes is developed in order to treat deep hydrodynamical disturbances caused by surface mass loss and to test the moving envelopes for dynamical instability. In the case of steady-state outflow, the theory reduces to the equivalent of the Castor, Abbott, and Klein formulation for optically thick winds at distances well above the sonic point. The time-dependent version indicates that the brightest and hottest LBVs are both dynamically and radiatively unstable, as a result of the substantial lowering of the generalized Eddington luminosity limit by the mass-loss acceleration. It is suggested that dynamical instability, by triggering secular cycles of mass loss, is primarily what differentiates LBVs from the purely radiatively unstable Wolf-Rayet stars. Furthermore, when accurate main-sequence mass-loss rates are used to calculate the evolutionary tracks, the predicted surface hydrogen and nitrogen abundances of the blue remnants agree much better with observations of the brightest LBVs than before.

  4. A Search for X-Ray Evidence of a Compact Companion to the Unusual Wolf-Rayet Star HD 50896 (EZ CMa)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Itoh, Masayuki; Nagase, Fumiaki

    1998-01-01

    We analyze results of a approx.25 ksec ASCA X-ray observation of the unusual Wolf-Rayet star HD 50896 (= EZ CMa). This WN5 star shows optical and ultraviolet variability at a 3.766 day period, which has been interpreted as a possible signature of a compact companion. Our objective was to search for evidence of hard X-rays (greater than or equal to 5 keV) which could be present if the WN5 wind is accreting onto a compact object. The ASCA spectra are dominated by emission below 5 keV and show no significant emission in the harder 5-10 keV range. Weak emission lines are present, and the X-rays arise in an optically thin plasma which spans a range of temperatures from less than or equal to 0.4 keV up to at least approx. 2 keV. Excess X-ray absorption above the interstellar value is present, but the column density is no larger than N(sub H) approx. 10(exp 22)/sq cm. The absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity L(sub x)(0.5 - 10 keV) = 10(exp 32.85) erg/s gives L(sub x)/ L(sub bol) approx. 10(exp -6), a value that is typical of WN stars. No X-ray variability was detected. Our main conclusion is that the X-ray properties of HD 50896 are inconsistent with the behavior expected for wind accretion onto a neutron star or black hole companion. Alternative models based on wind shocks can explain most aspects of the X-ray behavior, and we argue that the hotter plasma near approx. 2 keV could be due to the WR wind shocking onto a normal (nondegenerate) companion.

  5. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS REVEAL VERY HIGH X-RAY LUMINOSITY FROM THE CARBON-RICH WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 48a

    SciTech Connect

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Gagne, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L. E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu

    2011-01-20

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the dusty Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star WR 48a. This is the first detection of this object in X-rays. The XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are heavily absorbed and the presence of numerous strong emission lines indicates a thermal origin of the WR 48a X-ray emission, with dominant temperature components at kT{sub cool} {approx} 1 keV and kT{sub hot} {approx} 3 keV, the hotter component dominating the observed flux. No significant X-ray variability was detected on timescales {<=}1 day. Although the distance to WR 48a is uncertain, if it is physically associated with Open clusters Danks 1 and 2 at d {approx}4 kpc, then the resultant X-ray luminosity L{sub X}{approx} 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} makes it the most X-ray luminous W-R star in the Galaxy detected so far, after the black hole candidate Cyg X-3. We assume the following scenarios as the most likely explanation for the X-ray properties of WR 48a: (1) colliding stellar winds in a wide WR+O binary system, or in a hierarchical triple system with non-degenerate stellar components and (2) accretion shocks from the WR 48a wind onto a close companion (possibly a neutron star). More specific information about WR 48a and its wind properties will be needed to distinguish between the above possibilities.

  6. A Clue to the Extent of Convective Mixing Inside Massive Stars: The Surface Hydrogen Abundances of Luminous Blue Variables and Hydrogen-Poor Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-wen

    1999-01-01

    Interior layers of stars that have been exposed by surface mass loss reveal aspects of their chemical and convective histories that are otherwise inaccessible to observation. It must be significant that the surface hydrogen abundances of luminous blue variables (LBVs) show a remarkable uniformity, specifically X(sub surf) = 0.3 - 0.4, while those of hydrogen-poor Wolf-Rayet (WN) stars fall, almost without exception, below these values, ranging down to X(sub surf) = 0. According to our stellar model calculations, most LBVs are post-red-supergiant objects in a late blue phase of dynamical instability, and most hydrogen-poor WN stars are their immediate descendants. If this is so, stellar models constructed with the Schwarzschild (temperature-gradient) criterion for convection account well for the observed hydrogen abundances, whereas models built with the Ledoux (density-gradient) criterion fail. At the brightest luminosities, the observed hydrogen abundances of LBVs are too large to be explained by any of our highly evolved stellar models, but these LBVs may occupy transient blue loops that exist during an earlier phase of dynamical instability when the star first becomes a yellow supergiant. Independent evidence concerning the criterion for convection, which is based mostly on traditional color distributions of less massive supergiants on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, tends to favor the Ledoux criterion. It is quite possible that the true criterion for convection changes over from something like the Ledoux criterion to something like the Schwarzschild criterion as the stellar mass increases.

  7. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF TWO HOT R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS AND A WOLF-RAYET CENTRAL STAR OF A PLANETARY NEBULA: IN SEARCH OF A POSSIBLE LINK

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Gallagher, J. S.; Freeman, W. R.; Camp, K. A. E-mail: wfreem2@lsu.edu

    2011-08-15

    We present new Spitzer/IRS spectra of two hot R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, one in the Galaxy, V348 Sgr, and one lying in the Large Magellanic Cloud, HV 2671. These two objects may constitute a link between the RCB stars and the late Wolf-Rayet ([WCL]) class of central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe), such as CPD -56{sup 0} 8032, that has little or no hydrogen in their atmospheres. HV 2671 and V348 Sgr are members of a rare subclass that has significantly higher effective temperatures than most RCB stars, but shares the traits of hydrogen deficiency and dust formation that define the cooler RCB stars. The [WC] CSPN star, CPD -56{sup 0} 8032, displays evidence of dual-dust chemistry showing both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and crystalline silicates in its mid-IR spectrum. HV 2671 shows strong PAH emission but no sign of having crystalline silicates. The spectrum of V348 Sgr is very different from that of CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 and HV 2671. The PAH emission seen strongly in the other two stars is not present. Instead, the spectrum is dominated by a broad emission centered at about 8.2 {mu}m. This feature is not identified with either PAHs or silicates. Several other cool RCB stars, novae, and post-asymptotic giant branch stars show similar features in their IR spectra. The mid-IR spectrum of CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 shows emission features that may be associated with C{sub 60}. The other two stars do not show evidence of C{sub 60}. The different nature of the dust around these stars does not help us in establishing further links that may indicate a common origin. HV 2671 has also been detected by Herschel/PACS and SPIRE. V348 Sgr and CPD -56{sup 0} 8032 have been detected by AKARI/Far-Infrared Surveyor. These data were combined with Spitzer, IRAS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and other photometry to produce their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the visible to the far-IR. Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling was used to study the circumstellar dust

  8. The Rise and Fall of the Type Ib Supernova iPTF13bvn Not a Massive Wolf-Rayet Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. We investigate iPTF13bvn, a core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5806. This object was discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) very close to the estimated explosion date and was classified as a stripped-envelope CC SN, likely of Type Ib. Furthermore, a possible progenitor detection in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images was reported, making this the only SN Ib with such an identification. Based on the luminosity and color of the progenitor candidate, as well as on early-time spectra and photometry of the SN, it was argued that the progenitor candidate is consistent with a single, massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Aims. We aim to confirm the progenitor detection, to robustly classify the SN using additional spectroscopy, and to investigate if our follow-up photometric and spectroscopic data on iPTF13bvn are consistent with a single-star WR progenitor scenario. Methods. We present a large set of observational data, consisting of multi-band light curves (UBVRI, g'r'i'z') and optical spectra. We perform standard spectral line analysis to track the evolution of the SN ejecta. We also construct a bolometric light curve and perform hydrodynamical calculations to model this light curve to constrain the synthesized radioactive nickel mass and the total ejecta mass of the SN. Late-time photometry is analyzed to constrain the amount of oxygen. Furthermore, image registration of pre- and post-explosion HST images is performed. Results. Our HST astrometry confirms the location of the progenitor candidate of iPTF13bvn, and follow-up spectra securely classify this as a SN Ib. We use our hydrodynamical model to fit the observed bolometric light curve, estimating the total ejecta mass to be 1.9 solar mass and the radioactive nickel mass to be 0.05 solar mass. The model fit requires the nickel synthesized in the explosion to be highly mixed out in the ejecta. We also find that the late-time nebular r

  9. Relación física entre el cúmulo abierto Hogg 15 y la estrella Wolf-Rayet WR 47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Bica, E.; Santos, J. F. C., Jr.; Clariá, J. J.

    We revise the fundamental parameters of the faint open cluster Hogg 15, for which two recent colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) studies have obtained significantly different ages (Sagar et al. 2001, MNRAS, 327, 23; Piatti & Clariá 2001, A&A, 370, 931). In the present study, we combine a series of methods trying to constrain age, together with other fundamental parameters. We employ spatial extractions to construct the CMDs, and the cluster integrated spectrum to compare the latter with those of templates of known age. For Hogg 15 we derive an age of (20 ± 10) Myr, a reddening of (1.10 ± 0.05) mag, and a distance of (3.1 ± 0.5) kpc. We conclude that the estimation of an older age in the study of Piatti & Clariá can be accounted for in terms of main sequence/turnoff curvature being blurred in the CMDs, an effect mainly caused by field contamination. To clarify the issue of whether the Wolf-Rayet star HDE 311884 (WR 47), known to be a WN6 + O5V binary system, is associated or not with Hogg 15, we discuss its fundamental parameters, particularly its distance. Based on the WR 47 spectrum and available photometry, we assume that the underestimated distance implied by the Hipparcos parallax (216 pc) is affected by its binary character. By comparing the WR 47 spectrum with those of WR stars of a similar type, we conclude that WR 47 is not affected by a E(B-V) colour excess much higher than that associated with Hogg 15, namely E(B-V) = 1.10. On the basis of the WR 47's resulting distance of (5.2 ± 0.9) kpc, which largely surpasses that of the cluster, we conclude that WR 47 is not related to Hogg 15 from the point of view of origin, since the cluster and the star do not belong to the same formation event.

  10. The rise and fall of the Type Ib supernova iPTF13bvn. Not a massive Wolf-Rayet star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.

    2014-05-01

    Context. We investigate iPTF13bvn, a core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5806. This object was discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) very close to the estimated explosion date and was classified as a stripped-envelope CC SN, likely of Type Ib. Furthermore, a possible progenitor detection in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images was reported, making this the only SN Ib with such an identification. Based on the luminosity and color of the progenitor candidate, as well as on early-time spectra and photometry of the SN, it was argued that the progenitor candidate is consistent with a single, massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Aims: We aim to confirm the progenitor detection, to robustly classify the SN using additional spectroscopy, and to investigate if our follow-up photometric and spectroscopic data on iPTF13bvn are consistent with a single-star WR progenitor scenario. Methods: We present a large set of observational data, consisting of multi-band light curves (UBVRI, g'r'i'z') and optical spectra. We perform standard spectral line analysis to track the evolution of the SN ejecta. We also construct a bolometric light curve and perform hydrodynamical calculations to model this light curve to constrain the synthesized radioactive nickel mass and the total ejecta mass of the SN. Late-time photometry is analyzed to constrain the amount of oxygen. Furthermore, image registration of pre- and post-explosion HST images is performed. Results: Our HST astrometry confirms the location of the progenitor candidate of iPTF13bvn, and follow-up spectra securely classify this as a SN Ib. We use our hydrodynamical model to fit the observed bolometric light curve, estimating the total ejecta mass to be 1.9 M⊙ and the radioactive nickel mass to be 0.05 M⊙. The model fit requires the nickel synthesized in the explosion to be highly mixed out in the ejecta. We also find that the late-time nebular r'-band luminosity is not

  11. Ultraviolet photometry from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory. XXXIX - The structure of the eclipsing Wolf-Rayet binary V444 Cygni as derived from light curves between 2460 A and 3. 5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Khaliullin, Kh. F.; Eaton, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The WN5 component of V444 Cyg is characterized on the basis of light curves constructed using 1971 OAO observations at 425, 332, 298, and 246 nm and the broadband data at 2.2 and 3.5 microns of Hartmann (1978). Data and calculation results are presented in tables and graphs and discussed. Parameters estimated include core radius 2.9 solar radii, surface temperature 90,000 K, surface electron density 9 x 10 to the 12th/cu cm, surface outflow velocity 400 km/s, and terminal velocity (at about 10 solar radii) 2500 km/s, suggesting that the flow is He. These results are found to agree with the model of Wolf-Rayet atmospheres proposed by Beals (1929, 1944).

  12. Copernicus observations of distant unreddened stars. II - Line of sight to HD 50896

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Copernicus UV data on interstellar lines toward HD 50896, a Wolf-Rayet star, are analyzed to study abundances and physical conditions in the line of sight. About 20% of the low-velocity neutral gas is contained in a dense cloud with 10% to 50% of its hydrogen in molecular form; the atomic abundances show typical interstellar depletions. The low-velocity H II gas may be associated with the high ionizing flux of the Wolf-Rayet star or with H II regions along the line of sight. Si III exhibits strong absorption shortward of the low-velocity H II gas, characteristic of a collisionally ionized component at 30,000 to 80,000 K; the possible connections with an unobserved supernova remnant or stellar mass loss are discussed. High-velocity features at 78 and -96 km/sec, in which Fe and Si are near their cosmic abundances, are also indicative of strong shocks.

  13. Spectroscopy and photometry campaign on three bright Wolf Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-06-01

    Dr. Noel Richardson (Universite de Montreal) and colleagues have invited AAVSO observers to participate in an international professional-amateur spectroscopy and photometry campaign on the Wof Rayet stars WR 134, WR 135, and WR 137 (HD 191765, HD 192103, and HD 192641). The campaign has begun and runs through September 17, 2013. The purpose of the campaign is to study clumping aspects of the strong winds and changes present in large structures in the stellar winds in these WR stars. Spectroscopy and UBVRI time-series observations are requested. Supplemental targets to be observed if time permits are V905 Sco (HD 160529) and V4375 Sgr (HD 316285). Finder charts with sequences may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Photometry should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Details of the campaign are given at: http://www.stsci.de/wr134/index.htm. Instructions for sending spectroscopy data to Dr. Richardson are given at http! ://www.stsci.de/wr134/pdf/data_transfer.pdf.

  14. The Unusual Wolf-Rayet Star EZ CMa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2002-01-01

    The XMM-Newton observations were obtained on 29 - 30 October 2001 during the AO-1 Guest Observer program. Our X-ray analysis focused on data from the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC). The VLA observations were obtained during a 3.5 hour interval on 1999 Oct. 19 with the array in hybrid BnA configuration. Radio continuum data were acquired at five different frequencies 1.42 GHz (21 cm), 4.86 GHz (6 cm), 8.44 GHz (3.6 cm), 14.94 GHz (2 cm), and 22.46 GHz (1.3 cm). These radio data are unique since they provide an excellent snapshot picture of the dependence of the radio flux on frequency obtained over a short time interval and are thus immune to the variability effects which can distort results obtained from non-contemporaneous observations at different frequencies.

  15. Hidden Milky Way star clusters hosting Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtev, R.; Borissova, J.; Ivanov, V. D.; Georgiev, L.

    2009-05-01

    A noticeable fraction of the hidden young star clusters contain WR and O stars providing us with unique laboratories to study the evolution of these rare objects and their maternity places. We are reporting the reddening, the distance and age of two new members of the family of massive young Galactic clusters, hosting WR stars - Glimpse 23 and Glimpse 30.

  16. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Continuum energy distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Brownsberger, Kenneth R.; Conti, Peter S.; Massey, Philip; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    All available low-resolution IUE spectra are assembled for Galactic, LMC, and SMC W-R stars and are merged with ground-based optical and NIR spectra in order to collate in a systematic fashion the shapes of these energy distributions over the wavelength range 0.1-1 micron. They can be consistently fitted by a power law of the form F(lambda) is approximately equal to lambda exp -alpha over the range 1500-9000 A to derive color excesses E(B-V) and spectral indices by removing the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature. The WN star color excesses derived are found to be in good agreement with those of Schmutz and Vacca (1991) and Koesterke et al. (1991). Significant heterogeneity in spectral index values was generally seen with any given subtype, but the groups consisting of the combined set of Galactic and LMC W-R stars, the separate WN and WC sequences, and the Galactic and LMC W-R stars all showed a striking and consistent Gaussian-like frequency distribution of values.

  17. TRIGGERING COLLAPSE OF THE PRESOLAR DENSE CLOUD CORE AND INJECTING SHORT-LIVED RADIOISOTOPES WITH A SHOCK WAVE. II. VARIED SHOCK WAVE AND CLOUD CORE PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A. E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.edu

    2013-06-10

    A variety of stellar sources have been proposed for the origin of the short-lived radioisotopes that existed at the time of the formation of the earliest solar system solids, including Type II supernovae (SNe), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and super-AGB stars, and Wolf-Rayet star winds. Our previous adaptive mesh hydrodynamics models with the FLASH2.5 code have shown which combinations of shock wave parameters are able to simultaneously trigger the gravitational collapse of a target dense cloud core and inject significant amounts of shock wave gas and dust, showing that thin SN shocks may be uniquely suited for the task. However, recent meteoritical studies have weakened the case for a direct SN injection to the presolar cloud, motivating us to re-examine a wider range of shock wave and cloud core parameters, including rotation, in order to better estimate the injection efficiencies for a variety of stellar sources. We find that SN shocks remain as the most promising stellar source, though planetary nebulae resulting from AGB star evolution cannot be conclusively ruled out. Wolf-Rayet (WR) star winds, however, are likely to lead to cloud core shredding, rather than to collapse. Injection efficiencies can be increased when the cloud is rotating about an axis aligned with the direction of the shock wave, by as much as a factor of {approx}10. The amount of gas and dust accreted from the post-shock wind can exceed that injected from the shock wave, with implications for the isotopic abundances expected for a SN source.

  18. Remarkable long-term changes in the small Magellanic Cloud Wolf-Rayet system HD 5980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenigsberger, G.; Moffat, A. F. J.; St-Louis, N.; Auer, L. H.; Drissen, L.; Seggewiss, W.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we report the remarkable changes which occured in the Small Magellanic Cloud W-R system HD5980 = AB5 between 1978 and 1991. Within this timescale, there has been a systematic enhancement (by factors of 2-10 depending on the line) in the equivalent widths of all emission lines, and a change in the relative strengths of N III, N IV, and N V lines. Currently, the W-R spectrum is more typical of a WN6 star than a WN3 or WN4, as it was originally classified. The terminal speed of the wind has diminished by approximately 600 km/s, while the system has brightened in the visual by 0.45 mag. The UV (1850 A) continuum changed by less than 0.13 mag. The change from WN3 or WN4 to WN6 is unprecedented. The system appears to be composed at least three stars: two WNs in mutual 19.266 day orbit and an O-type supergiant. We propose that the changes observed in HD 5980 are related to an increase in wind density of one (or both?) of the W-R components, where the brighter WN6 component will dominate the W-R spectrum after the change, and we speculate that this modification of the wind structure is driven by tidal interaction induced by a possible current periastron passage of the third component in the system.

  19. Stellar wind variations in HD 45166: The continuing story. [Wolf-Rayet star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Allan J.; Stickland, David J.; Heap, Sara R.

    1988-01-01

    High resolution SWP IUE spectra of HD 45166 (qWR+B8V) obtained over a 36 hr continuous run, together with earlier observations, reveal 2 distinct modes of UV variability in this object. Gross, epoch-linked changes are seen in the strengths of the qWR emission lines, accompanied by large changes in its highly ionized photospheric absorption spectrum. Rapid (hours) variability in strong, multiple, high velocity, wind discrete absorption components (DAC), in the CIV lambda 1550 resonance lines, which superpose to give the appearance of a broad P Cygni absorption profile at many epochs is also observed. These multiple DAC's (often at least 3 are seen) propagate in velocity, from 0.6 to 1.0 v inf, on a timescale of 1 day, implying an acceleration of 180 cm/s comparable to that seen in O-type stars.

  20. Dust Formation in the Wolf-Rayet Star WR137: NICMOS Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Anthony

    1997-07-01

    We propose to use NICMOS on HST to take a second image of the dust formation region in the 13-year elliptical-orbit wind-interacting binary WR 137 = HD 192641 {WC7+OB}, within a few months after periastron passage, which occured around July-September 1997. Ground-based IR photometry shows that copious amounts of carbon- rich dust are forming around current periastron passage, when wind- wind collision compression is at its peak. Recently we obtained {GO # 7369, September 1997} direct images of HD 192641 with NIC-2 through the F165M, F237M filters. We have resolved, for the first time, IR-emitting dust in the close environment of HD 192641. As expected on the basis of groundbased, spatially unresolved IR spectrosocopy, we saw the dust emission only in the K-band, not in the H-band. We found that the dust emission occured in a few strong clumps within about 0.5" from the star. In order to study the dynamics of the dust formation, we request a follow-up NICMOS orbit.

  1. The light curve of CV Serpentis, the sometimes-eclipsing Wolf-Rayet star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schild, R.; Liller, W.

    1975-01-01

    New photoelectric observations of the B-magnitude of CV Ser made in 1973 and 1974 show no clear evidence of an eclipse, but they establish night-to-night variability of several percent, a systematic brightness change of 0.035 mag during a portion of the single orbit observed in 1973, and irregular flaring in 1974. We made iris photometer measurements of Harvard patrol plates taken between 1905 June and 1953 July, and find no evidence of a very deep eclipse such as observed by Hjellming and Hiltner. We present several new light curves and discuss then in the light of the recent results of Cowley et al.

  2. WR 110: A SINGLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WITH COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS IN ITS WIND?

    SciTech Connect

    Chene, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Fahed, R.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; Chevrotiere, A. De La; Cameron, C.; Matthews, J. M.; Gamen, R. C.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D. E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca

    2011-07-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 {+-} 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n {approx} 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude {approx}0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs {approx}two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods.

  3. WR 110: A Single Wolf-Rayet Star with Corotating Interaction Regions in its Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Cameron, C.; Fahed, R.; Gamen, R. C.; Lefèvre, L.; Rowe, J. F.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; De La Chevrotière, A.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2011-07-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 ± 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n ≈ 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude ~0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs ~two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  4. Gamma-ray line emission from Al-26 produced by Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prantzos, N.; Casse, M.; Gros, M.; Doom, C.; Arnould, M.

    1985-01-01

    The recent satellite observations of the 1.8 MeV line from the decay of Al-26 has given a new impetus to the study of the nucleosynthesis of Al-26. The production and ejection of Al-26 by massive mass-losing stars (Of and WR stars) is discussed in the light of recent stellar models. The longitude distribution of the Al-26 gamma ray line emission produced by the galactic collection of WR stars is derived based on various estimates of their radial distribution. This longitude profile provides: (1) a specific signature of massive stars on the background of other potential Al-26 sources, as novae, supernovae, certain red giants and possibly AGB stars; and (2) a possible tool to improve the data analysis of the HEAO 3 and SMM experiments.

  5. An atlas of optical spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet carbon and oxygen stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Ana V.; Massey, Philip

    1987-01-01

    The atlas contains a homogeneous set of optical spectrophotometric observations (3300-7300 A) at moderate resolution (about 10 A) of almost all WC and WO stars in the Galaxy, the LMC, and the SMC. The data are presented in the form of spectral tracings (in magnitude units) arranged by subtype, with no correction for interstellar reddening. A montage of prototype stars of each spectral class is also shown. Comprehensive line identifications are given for the optical lines of WC and WO spectra, with major contributions tabulated and unidentified lines noted.

  6. Luminous clusters of Wolf-Rayet stars in the SBmIII galaxy NGC 4214

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    1991-01-01

    Observations are reported of strong broad emission lines attributed to WR stars in the spectra of several bright knots in the nearby Magellanic irregular galaxy NGC 4214 (classified as type SBmIII), in addition to the emission produced by the more prevalent WN stars). Data are presented on measurements of the line fluxes, the line equivalent widths, and continuum flux densities in the four observed knots, showing that the strongest WR lines generally appear in knots having the most luminous stellar continuum. The significance of this observation is discussed.

  7. PTF11iqb: Bridging the gap between Type IIN and normal Type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Mauerhan, Jon; Ofek, Eran; Cenko, Stephen B.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2015-01-01

    The recent supernova (SN) PTF11iqb was classified as a Type IIn event caught very early after explosion. It showed narrow Wolf-Rayet (WR) spectral features on day 2, but the narrow emission weakened quickly and the spectrum morphed through several stages resembling normal Types II-P and II-L. At late times, Hα emission ex- hibited a complex, multi-peaked profile reminiscent of SN 1998S. Overall, we find that PTF11iqb was a near twin of the classic object SN 1998S, except with a factor of 2- 4 weaker interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) at early times, and stronger CSM interaction at late times. We match the main light curve with a simple model for weak CSM interaction (with a mass loss rate of roughly 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 ) added to the light curve of a normal SN II-P (the relatively weak CSM interaction allowed this plateau to be seen more clearly than in other SNe IIn). This plateau in the underlying light curve requires that the progenitor had an extended hydrogen envelope like a cool (red or yellow) supergiant at the moment that it exploded. The likely cool supergiant progenitor is significant because PTF11iqb showed WR features in its early spectrum. Overall, PTF11iqb seems to bridge SNe IIn with weaker pre-SN mass loss seen in SNe II-L and II-P, thereby implying that episodic pre-SN mass loss on a wide range of time and mass scales could be more frequent than implied by standard SNe IIn.

  8. GR 290 (Romano’s Star). II. Light History and Evolutionary State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcaro, V. F.; Maryeva, O.; Nesci, R.; Calabresi, M.; Chieffi, A.; Galleti, S.; Gualandi, R.; Haver, R.; Mills, O. F.; Osborn, W. H.; Pasquali, A.; Rossi, C.; Vasilyeva, T.; Viotti, R. F.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the past light history of the luminous variable star GR 290 (M33/V532, Romano’s Star) in the M33 galaxy, and collected new spectrophotometric observations in order to analyze links between this object, the LBV category, and the Wolf-Rayet stars of the nitrogen sequence. We have built the historical light curve of GR 290 back to 1901, from old observations of the star found in several archival plates of M33. These old recordings together with published and new data on the star allowed us to infer that for at least half a century the star was in a low luminosity state, with B ≃ 18-19, most likely without brighter luminosity phases. After 1960, five large variability cycles of visual luminosity were recorded. The amplitude of the oscillations was seen increasing toward the 1992-1994 maximum, then decreasing during the last maxima. The recent light curve indicates that the photometric variations have been quite similar in all the bands and that the B - V color index has been constant within ±0.1m despite the 1.5m change of the visual luminosity. The spectrum of GR 290 at the large maximum of 1992-94 was equivalent to late-B-type, while, during 2002-2014, it varied between WN10h-11h near the visual maxima to WN8h-9h at the luminosity minima. We have detected, during this same period, a clear anti-correlation between the visual luminosity, the strength of the He ii 4686 Å emission line, the strength of the 4600-4700 Å lines’ blend, and the spectral type. From a model analysis of the spectra collected during the whole 2002-2014 period, we find that the Rosseland radius R2/3, changed between the minimum and maximum luminosity phases by a factor of three while Teff varied between about 33,000 and 23,000 K. We confirm that the bolometric luminosity of the star has not been constant, but has increased by a factor of ˜1.5 between minimum and maximum luminosity, in phase with the apparent luminosity variations. Presently, GR 290 falls in the H

  9. High-velocity interstellar gas in the line of sight to the Wolf-Rayet star HD 50896

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols-Bohlin, J.; Fesen, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The large shell of interstellar gas (IG) discovered toward HD 50896 by Heckathorn and Fesen (1984) is characterized on the basis of high-dispersion IUE SWP and LWR spectra of 19 objects located within 4 deg of HD 50896 (but outside the optical ring nebula S308) at distances 0.6-2.9 kpc (compared to 1.5 kpc for HD 50896). The IG is found to have two components (at velocities -80 and -125 km/s), diameter 90 pc or greater, and distance 1.0 + or - 0.2 kpc, demonstrating that it is not related to HD 50896 and suggesting that it is a highly evolved supernova remnant associated with cluster Cr 121.

  10. Dust Formation in Hot Stellar Winds: Infra-Red Imaging of the Wolf-Rayet Binary WR137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, Anthony

    1997-07-01

    We propose to use NICMOS on HST to image the dust formed in the bow shock region of the 12.6-year elliptical-orbit binary WR 137 = HD 192641 {WC7+OB}, within a year after periastron passage, predicted to occur in late 1996 or early 1997. Ground -based IR photometry has shown that copious amounts of carbon- rich dust are formed just after periastron passage, when wind- wind collision compression is at its peak. WR 137 is the currently most favorable system for the direct detection of the extended dust formation region among all known WR episodic dust emitters. Imaging of the dust emitting region will directly test for the first time the concept of wind-wind collision and allow one to study how and where dust can form in such a hostile environment.

  11. The production of short-lived radionuclides by new non-rotating and rotating Wolf-Rayet model stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Meynet, G.

    2006-07-01

    Context.It has been speculated that WR winds may have contaminated the forming solar system, in particular with short-lived radionuclides (half-lives in the approximate 10^5{-}108 y range) that are responsible for a class of isotopic anomalies found in some meteoritic materials.Aims.We revisit the capability of the WR winds to eject these radionuclides using new models of single non-exploding WR stars with metallicity Z = 0.02.Methods. The earlier predictions for non-rotating WR stars are updated, and models for rotating such stars are used for the first time in this context.Results. We find that (1) rotation has no significant influence on the short-lived radionuclide production by neutron capture during the core He-burning phase, and (2) {}26{Al},{}36{Cl}, {}41{Ca}, and {}107{Pd} can be wind-ejected by a variety of WR stars at relative levels that are compatible with the meteoritic analyses for a period of free decay of around 105 y between production and incorporation into the forming solar system solid bodies.Conclusions.We confirm the previously published conclusions that the winds of WR stars have a radionuclide composition that can meet the necessary condition for them to be a possible contaminating agent of the forming solar system. Still, it remains to be demonstrated from detailed models that this is a sufficient condition for these winds to have provided a level of pollution that is compatible with the observations.

  12. MOST Finds No Coherent Oscillations in the Hot Carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet Star HD 165763 (WR 111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. F. J.; Marchenko, S. V.; Zhilyaev, B. E.; Rowe, J. F.; Muntean, V.; Chené, A.-N.; Matthews, J. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Guenther, D. B.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Weiss, W. W.

    2008-05-01

    We have photometrically monitored the V = 8 mag Galactic Population I WC5 star WR 111 for 3 weeks nonstop using the MOST microsatellite. Each of the ~27,000 data points has a precision of ~3 mmag. We find no coherent Fourier components above the 50 part per million level over the whole interval for frequencies f > 10 cd-1 (periods P < 2.4 hr). This limit is nearly 2 orders of magnitude below recent predictions for early-type WR stars based on strange-mode pulsation simulations, with expected periods in the range 10-30 minutes. Simultaneous spectroscopic observations of WR 111 reveal a normal level of stochastic clumps propagating in the wind, which possibly manifest themselves in the slow 1/f rise in the MOST power spectrum below f ~ 10 cd-1. Time-frequency analysis of the MOST data shows no obvious short-lived frequencies above the 1 mmag level, in stark contrast to the highly variable cool WR stars WR 123 (WN8) and WR 103 (WC9d), monitored previously by MOST. Radiation pressure therefore appears to be the main, if not sole, driver of WR 111's strong wind. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  13. Color excesses, intrinsic colors, and absolute magnitudes of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vacca, William D.; Torres-Dodgen, Ana V.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of determining the color excesses of WR stars in the Galaxy and the LMC has been developed and is used to determine the excesses for 44 Galactic and 32 LMC WR stars. The excesses are combined with line-free, narrow-band spectrophotometry to derive intrinsic colors of the WR stars of nearly all spectral subtypes. No correlation of UV spectral index or intrinsic colors with spectral subtype is found for the samples of single WN or WC stars. There is evidence that early WN stars in the LMC have flatter UV continua and redder intrinsic colors than early WN stars in the Galaxy. No separation is found between the values derived for Galactic WC stars and those obtained for LMC WC stars. The intrinsic colors are compared with those calculated from model atmospheres of WR stars and generally good agreement is found. Absolute magnitudes are derived for WR stars in the LMC and for those Galactic WR stars located in clusters and associations for which there are reliable distance estimates.

  14. Narrow He II emission in star-forming galaxies at low metallicity. Stellar wind emission from a population of very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfener, G.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-06-01

    Context. In a recent study, star-forming galaxies with He ii λ1640 emission at moderate redshifts between 2 and 4.6 have been found to occur in two modes that are distinguished by the width of their He ii emission lines. Broad He ii emission has been attributed to stellar emission from a population of evolved Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. The origin of narrow He ii emission is less clear but has been attributed to nebular emission excited by a population of very hot Pop III stars formed in pockets of pristine gas at moderate redshifts. Aims: We propose an alternative scenario for the origin of the narrow He ii emission, namely very massive stars (VMS) at low metallicity (Z), which form strong but slow WR-type stellar winds due to their proximity to the Eddington limit. Methods: We estimated the expected He ii line fluxes and equivalent widths based on wind models for VMS and Starburst99 population synthesis models and compared the results with recent observations of star-forming galaxies at moderate redshifts. Results: The observed He ii line strengths and equivalent widths are in line with what is expected for a population of VMS in one or more young super-clusters located within these galaxies. Conclusions: In our scenario the two observed modes of He ii emission originate from massive stellar populations in distinct evolutionary stages at low Z (~0.01 Z⊙). If this interpretation is correct, there is no need to postulate the existence of Pop III stars at moderate redshifts to explain the observed narrow He ii emission. An interesting possibility is the existence of self-enriched VMS with similar WR-type spectra at extremely low Z. Stellar He ii emission from such very early generations of VMS may be detectable in future studies of star-forming galaxies at high redshifts with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The fact that the He ii emission of VMS is largely neglected in current population synthesis models will generally affect the interpretation of the

  15. On Determining the Primordial Helium Abundance from the Spectra of H II Galaxies: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Alison

    1993-03-01

    In the paper "On Determining the primordial Helium Abundance from the Spectra of H II Galaxies" by Alison Campbell (ApJ,401,157(1992]) a correction should be made to one of the values given for (He/HN)_p_. The value (He/N)_p_ = 0.0738 +/- 0.0016 which was quoted from the work of B. E. J. Pagel, E. A. Simonson, R. J. Terlevich, & M. Edmunds (MNRAS 255,325(1992]) is their standard least-squares fit to the 19 object O/H-He/H data set (Table 16). They prefer a value (He/N)_p_ = 0.0738+/-0.0021, based on the average of O/H-He/H and N/H-He/HN regressions and obtained by a maximum-likelihood technique which B. Pagel (private communication) has informed the author correctly accounts for errors in both y and x. This value for (He/N)_p_ is 2.0 σ, rather than 2.7 σ, below the theoretical lower limit of 0.078+/-0.0004. (The uncertainty in the theoretical (He/H)_p_ reflects the 1 σ experimental uncertainty in the neutron lifetime; T. P. Walker, G. Steigman, D. N. Schramm, K. A. Olive, & H. Kang, ApJ, 376, 5I (1991), and references therein.] Further, the ~2% overestimate of the true value of (He/H)_p_ which arises from the neglect of x uncertainties (Sections III and VI of the author's paper) does not apply to Pagel et al.'s result. The presence of an intrinsic dispersion in helium abundance at a given oxygen abundance was noted by B. E. J. Pagel, R. J. Terlevich, & J. Melnick (PASP, 98,1005(1986]) and was associated by them with winds from WolfRayet (WR) stars. Pagel et al. (1992) exclude from their regression analysis all H II galaxies exhibiting WR emission features and find that the remaining objects in their sample show no physical scatter.

  16. Grids of stellar models with rotation. II. WR populations and supernovae/GRB progenitors at Z = 0.014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, C.; Ekström, S.; Meynet, G.; Massey, P.; Levesque, E. M.; Hirschi, R.; Eggenberger, P.; Maeder, A.

    2012-06-01

    Context. In recent years, many very interesting observations have appeared concerning the positions of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD), the number ratios of WR stars, the nature of Type Ibc supernova (SN) progenitors, long and soft gamma ray bursts (LGRB), and the frequency of these various types of explosive events. These observations represent key constraints on massive star evolution. Aims: We study, in the framework of the single-star evolutionary scenario, how rotation modifies the evolution of a given initial mass star towards the WR phase and how it impacts the rates of Type Ibc SNe. We also discuss the initial conditions required to obtain collapsars and LGRB. Methods: We used a recent grid of stellar models computed with and without rotation to make predictions concerning the WR populations and the frequency of different types of core-collapse SNe. Current rotating models were checked to provide good fits to the following features: solar luminosity and radius at the solar age, main-sequence width, red-giant and red-supergiant (RSG) positions in the HRD, surface abundances, and rotational velocities. Results: Rotating stellar models predict that about half of the observed WR stars and at least half of the Type Ibc SNe may be produced through the single-star evolution channel. Rotation increases the duration of the WNL and WNC phases, while reducing those of the WNE and WC phases, as was already shown in previous works. Rotation increases the frequency of Type Ic SNe. The upper mass limit for Type II-P SNe is ~19.0 M⊙ for the non rotating models and ~16.8 M⊙ for the rotating ones. Both values agree with observations. Moreover, present rotating models provide a very good fit to the progenitor of SN 2008ax. We discuss future directions of research for further improving the agreement between the models and the observations. We conclude that the mass-loss rates in the WNL and RSG phases are probably underestimated at present

  17. High-velocity interstellar gas in the lines of sight to the Wolf-Rayet stars HD 97152 and HD 96548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols-Bohlin, Joy; Fesen, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The interstellar medium was studied in the direction to the WR stars HD 96548 and HD 97152, and the results are reported. New observational data on the UV spectra of several field stars near both these WR stars are presented. The high-velocity gas seen in the spectra of these stars suggests that the detected expanding interstellar gas structure consists of two OB cluster supershells. The presence of high-velocity absorption components in one of five field star spectra in the direction of the more isolated WR star HD 96548 suggests that this expanding gas does not originate from the optical ring nebula RCW 58 surrounding HD 96548, as previously believed, but instead indicates the detection of a previously unknown expanding interstellar shell in this line of sight.

  18. The Dust Properties of Hot R Coronae Borealis Stars and a Wolf-Rayet Central Star of a Planetary Nebula: In Search of the Missing Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; De Marco, O.; Whitney, B. A.; Babler, B.; Gallagher, J. S.; Nordhaus, J.; Speck, A. K.; Wolff, M. J.; Freeman, W. R.; Camp, K. A.; Lawson, W. A.; Roman-Duval, J.; Misselt, K. A.; Meade, M.; Sonneborn, G.; Matsuura, M.; Meixner, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present new Spitzer IIRS spectra of two hot R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars, one in the Galaxy,V348 Sgr, and one lying in the Large Magellanic Cloud, HV 2671. These two objects constitute a link between the RCB stars and the [WCL] class of central stars of planetary nebula (CSPNe) that has little or no hydrogen in their atmospheres such as CPD -560 8032. HV 2671 and V348 Sgr are members of a rare subclass that has significantly higher effective temperatures than most RCB stars, but sharing the traits of hydrogen deficiency and dust formation that define the cooler RCB stars. The [WC] CSPNe star, CPD -560 8032, displays evidence for dual-dust chemistry showing both PAHs and crystalline silicates in its mid-IR spectrum. HV 2671 shows strong PAH emission but shows no sign of having crystalline silicates. The spectrum of V348 Sgr is very different from those of CPD -56deg 8032 and HV 2671. The PAH emission seen strongly in the other two stars is only weakly present. Instead, the spectrum is dominated by a broad emission centered at about 8.5 microns. This feature is not identified with either PAHs or silicates. Several other novae and post-asymptotic giant branch stars show similar features in their IR spectra. The mid-IR spectrum of CPD -56deg 8032 shows emission features associated with C60 . The other two stars do not show evidence for C60. The nature of the dust around these stars does not help us in establishing further links that may indicate a common origin.

  19. He II emitters in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Population III star formation or peculiar stellar populations in galaxies at 2 < z < 4.6?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; Maccagni, D.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to identify He II emitters at 2 < z < 4.6 and to constrain the source of the hard ionizing continuum that powers the He II emission. Methods: We assembled a sample of 277 galaxies with a highly reliable spectroscopic redshift at 2 < z < 4.6 from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) Deep and Ultra-Deep data, and we identified 39 He II λ1640 emitters. We studied their spectral properties, measuring the fluxes, equivalent widths (EW), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) for most relevant lines, including He II λ1640, Lyα line, Si II λ1527, and C IV λ1549. Results: About 10% of galaxies at z ~ 3 and iAB ≤ 24.75 show He II in emission, with rest frame equivalent widths EW0 ~ 1-7 Å, equally distributed between galaxies with Lyα in emission or in absorption. We find 11 (3.9% of the global population) reliable He II emitters with unresolved He II lines (FWHM0 < 1200 km s-1), 13 (4.6% of the global population) reliable emitters with broad He II emission (FWHM0 > 1200 km s-1), 3 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and an additional 12 possible He II emitters. The properties of the individual broad emitters are in agreement with expectations from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) model. Instead, the properties of the narrow emitters are not compatible with this model, nor with predictions of gravitational cooling radiation produced by gas accretion, unless this is severely underestimated by current models by more than two orders of magnitude. Rather, we find that the EW of the narrow He II line emitters are in agreement with expectations for a Population III (PopIII) star formation, if the episode of star formation is continuous, and we calculate that a PopIII star formation rate (SFR) of 0.1-10 M⊙ yr-1 alone is enough to sustain the observed He II flux. Conclusions: We conclude that narrow He II emitters are powered either by the ionizing flux from a stellar population rare at z ~ 0 but much more common at z ~ 3, or by PopIII star formation. As proposed by

  20. A giant outburst two years before the core-collapse of a massive star.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, A; Smartt, S J; Mattila, S; Eldridge, J J; Young, D; Itagaki, K; Yamaoka, H; Navasardyan, H; Valenti, S; Patat, F; Agnoletto, I; Augusteijn, T; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Boles, T; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Botticella, M T; Bufano, F; Cao, C; Deng, J; Dennefeld, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Harutyunyan, A; Keenan, F P; Iijima, T; Lorenzi, V; Mazzali, P A; Meng, X; Nakano, S; Nielsen, T B; Smoker, J V; Stanishev, V; Turatto, M; Xu, D; Zampieri, L

    2007-06-14

    The death of massive stars produces a variety of supernovae, which are linked to the structure of the exploding stars. The detection of several precursor stars of type II supernovae has been reported (see, for example, ref. 3), but we do not yet have direct information on the progenitors of the hydrogen-deficient type Ib and Ic supernovae. Here we report that the peculiar type Ib supernova SN 2006jc is spatially coincident with a bright optical transient that occurred in 2004. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the supernova leads us to suggest that the progenitor was a carbon-oxygen Wolf-Rayet star embedded within a helium-rich circumstellar medium. There are different possible explanations for this pre-explosion transient. It appears similar to the giant outbursts of luminous blue variable stars (LBVs) of 60-100 solar masses, but the progenitor of SN 2006jc was helium- and hydrogen-deficient (unlike LBVs). An LBV-like outburst of a Wolf-Rayet star could be invoked, but this would be the first observational evidence of such a phenomenon. Alternatively, a massive binary system composed of an LBV that erupted in 2004, and a Wolf-Rayet star exploding as SN 2006jc, could explain the observations. PMID:17568740

  1. A giant outburst two years before the core-collapse of a massive star.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, A; Smartt, S J; Mattila, S; Eldridge, J J; Young, D; Itagaki, K; Yamaoka, H; Navasardyan, H; Valenti, S; Patat, F; Agnoletto, I; Augusteijn, T; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Boles, T; Bonnet-Bidaud, J-M; Botticella, M T; Bufano, F; Cao, C; Deng, J; Dennefeld, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Harutyunyan, A; Keenan, F P; Iijima, T; Lorenzi, V; Mazzali, P A; Meng, X; Nakano, S; Nielsen, T B; Smoker, J V; Stanishev, V; Turatto, M; Xu, D; Zampieri, L

    2007-06-14

    The death of massive stars produces a variety of supernovae, which are linked to the structure of the exploding stars. The detection of several precursor stars of type II supernovae has been reported (see, for example, ref. 3), but we do not yet have direct information on the progenitors of the hydrogen-deficient type Ib and Ic supernovae. Here we report that the peculiar type Ib supernova SN 2006jc is spatially coincident with a bright optical transient that occurred in 2004. Spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the supernova leads us to suggest that the progenitor was a carbon-oxygen Wolf-Rayet star embedded within a helium-rich circumstellar medium. There are different possible explanations for this pre-explosion transient. It appears similar to the giant outbursts of luminous blue variable stars (LBVs) of 60-100 solar masses, but the progenitor of SN 2006jc was helium- and hydrogen-deficient (unlike LBVs). An LBV-like outburst of a Wolf-Rayet star could be invoked, but this would be the first observational evidence of such a phenomenon. Alternatively, a massive binary system composed of an LBV that erupted in 2004, and a Wolf-Rayet star exploding as SN 2006jc, could explain the observations.

  2. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.; Karska, A.; Messias, H.; van der Werf, P.; Hunt, L. K.; Baes, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rizzo, J. R.; Rossi, A.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Schady, P.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims: Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas in the closest galaxy hosting a GRB (980425). Methods: We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [O i] 63 μm spectroscopy, and an APEX/SHeFI CO(2-1) line detection and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. Results: The GRB 980425 host has elevated [C ii]/FIR and [O i]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rates (SFR) derived from line ([C ii], [O i], Hα) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [C ii] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy centre, whereas [O i] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [O i] flux indicates that there is high radiation field and high gas density at these positions, as derived from modelling of photo-dissociation regions. The [C ii]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Indeed, its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [C ii]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. Conclusions: The [O i] and H i concentrations and the high radiation field and density close to the GRB position are consistent with the hypothesis of a very recent (at most a few tens of Myr ago) inflow of atomic gas triggering star formation. In this scenario dust has not had time to build up (explaining high line-to-continuum ratios). Such a recent enhancement of star formation activity would indeed manifest itself in high SFRline/SFRcontinuum ratios because the line indicators are sensitive only to recent (≲10 Myr) activity, whereas the continuum indicators measure

  3. He i in the central giant H ii region of NGC 5253. A 2D observational approach to collisional and radiative transfer effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal-Ibero, A.; Walsh, J. R.; Westmoquette, M. S.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Context. NGC 5253 is a nearby peculiar blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy that, on account of its proximity, provides an ideal laboratory for detailed spatial study of starburst galaxies. An open issue not addressed so far is how the collisional and self-absorption effects on He i emission influence the determination of the He+ abundance in 2D and what is the relation to the physical and chemical properties of the ionised gas. Aims: A 2D, imaging spectroscopy, study of the spatial behaviour of collisional and radiative transfer effects in He+ and their impact on the determination of He+ abundance is presented for the first time in a starburst galaxy. Methods: The He i lines were analysed based on previously presented integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data, obtained with FLAMES at the VLT and lower resolution gratings of the Giraffe spectrograph, as well as with GMOS at Gemini and the R381 grating. Results: Collisional effects reproduce the electron density (ne) structure. They are negligible (i.e. ~0.1-0.6%) for transitions in the singlet cascade but relatively important for those in the triplet cascade. In particular, they can contribute up to 20% of the flux in the He iλ7065 line. Radiative transfer effects are important over an extended and circular area of ~30 pc in diameter centred on the super star clusters (SSCs). The singly ionised helium abundance, y+, has been mapped using extinction-corrected fluxes of six He i lines, realistic assumptions for electron temperature (Te), ne, and the stellar absorption equivalent width, as well as the most recent emissivities. We find a mean(± standard deviation) of 103y+ ~ 80.3( ± 2.7) over the mapped area. The relation between the excitation and the total helium abundance, ytot, is consistent with no abundance gradient. Uncertainties in the derivation of helium abundances are dominated by the adopted assumptions. We illustrate the difficulty of detecting a putative helium enrichment owing to the presence of Wolf-Rayet

  4. CARBON STARS WITH INFRARED SPECTRA IN GROUP P OF THE IRAS/LRS DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-10-01

    Sources with infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database all show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. They are often planetary nebulae, H II regions, reflection/dark nebulae, Wolf-Rayet stars, or external galaxies. However, we noted that some carbon stars are also included in this group. We searched for and investigated all infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database. Finally, we found 11 previously known carbon stars and identified 8 new candidate carbon stars in Group P. Infrared spectra of these stars may present the 11.2 {mu}m SiC emission features indicative of their carbon-rich properties.

  5. Luminous variables in the Quintuplet cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.; Matsumoto, S.; Carter, B. S.; Sekiguchi, K.

    1999-03-01

    We report observations of variability amongst the stars of the `Quintuplet' cluster located about 30 pc in projection from the centre of the Galaxy. Two of the five cocoon star members, which may be protostars or peculiar Wolf-Rayet stars, are seen to vary slowly with moderate amplitude (0.4-0.5 mag). The bright star within the `Pistol' H ii region, suspected of being a luminous blue variable (LBV), has in fact been found to show variability, confirming its tentative classification. A second nearby presumed LBV also varies. One of the apparent Quintuplet members is likely to be a Mira variable along the same line of sight.

  6. The number of O-type runaways, the number of O and Wolf-Rayet stars with a compact companion and the formation rate of double pulsars predicted by massive close binary evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donder, E.; Vanbeveren, D.; van Bever, J.

    1997-02-01

    Using a detailed model of massive close binary evolution and accounting properly for the effects of asymmetric supernova explosions (SN) where we use recent observations of pulsar runaway velocities, we determine the theoretically expected number of post-SN O-type stars with and without a compact companion (CC), the number of O-type runaways, the number of WR+CC systems and the formation rate of binary pulsars in our Galaxy. We conclude that o at least 50% of the O-type runaways are formed through the binary scenario, o less than 3% of all WR stars may hide a CC, o the formation rate of binary pulsars in our Galaxy =~0.003-0.01 times the formation rate of massive stars; this corresponds roughly to a binary pulsar formation rate of the order of 10^-5^/year in agreement with the observations. Our results reveal a significant fraction of single WR stars but with a binary history. We also predict the existence of 'weird' WR stars, i.e a WR star with a CC in its centre (descendants of Thorne-˙(Z)ytkow objects).

  7. Sources of High-Energy Emission in the Green Pea Galaxies: New Constraints from Magellan Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Derek Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered Green Pea galaxies display extreme starburst activity and may be some of the only possible Lyman continuum emitting galaxies at low redshift. Green Peas are characterized by their unusually high [O III]/[O II] ratios, similar to the ratios observed in high-redshift galaxies. In addition, the presence of the high-energy He II 4686 line shows that the Green Peas are highly ionized. However, the origin of the He II emission in the Green Peas, and many other starburst galaxies, is still an open question. We analyze IMACS and MagE spectra from the Magellan telescopes in order to evaluate the most probable cause of this He II emission. We also analyze other properties like dust content, temperature and density, and kinematic components. Our IMACS spectra show no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features. We set upper limits on the WR populations in our sample and conclude that Wolf-Rayet stars are not a likely candidate for the He II emission. With deeper MagE spectra we investigate energetic shocks as a possible source of the He II, and move one step closer to uncovering the origin of high-energy photons in these unique starbursts.

  8. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE CENTRAL 0.5 pc OF THE GALAXY. II. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J. R.; Do, T.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Matthews, K. E-mail: tuan.do@uci.edu E-mail: morris@astro.ucla.edu

    2013-02-20

    The supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way plays host to a massive, young cluster that may have formed in one of the most inhospitable environments in the Galaxy. We present new measurements of the global properties of this cluster, including the initial mass function (IMF), age, and cluster mass. These results are based on Keck laser-guide-star adaptive optics observations used to identify the young stars and measure their Kp-band luminosity function as presented in Do et al. A Bayesian inference methodology is developed to simultaneously fit the global properties of the cluster utilizing the observations and extensive simulations of synthetic star clusters. We find that the slope of the mass function for this cluster is {alpha} = 1.7 {+-} 0.2, which is steeper than previously reported, but still flatter than the traditional Salpeter slope of 2.35. The age of the cluster is between 2.5 and 5.8 Myr with 95% confidence, which is a younger age than typically adopted but consistent within the uncertainties of past measurements. The exact age of the cluster is difficult to determine since our results show two distinct age solutions (3.9 Myr and 2.8 Myr) due to model degeneracies in the relative number of Wolf-Rayet and OB stars. The total cluster mass is between 14,000 and 37,000 M {sub Sun} above 1 M {sub Sun} and it is necessary to include multiple star systems in order to fit the observed luminosity function and the number of observed Wolf-Rayet stars. The new IMF slope measurement is now consistent with X-ray observations indicating a factor of 10 fewer X-ray emitting pre-main-sequence stars than expected when compared with a Salpeter IMF. The young cluster at the Galactic center is one of the few definitive examples of an IMF that deviates significantly from the near-universal IMFs found in the solar neighborhood.

  9. Episodic dust formation by HD 192641 (WR 137) - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.; Kidger, M. R.; van der Hucht, K. A.; Morris, P. W.; Tapia, M.; Perinotto, M.; Morbidelli, L.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Anthony, D. M.; Caldwell, J. J.; Alonso, A.; Wild, V.

    2001-06-01

    We present new infrared photometry of the WC7-type Wolf-Rayet star HD 192641 (WR137) from 1985 to 1999. These data track the cooling of the dust cloud formed in the 1982-84 dust-formation episode from 1985 to 1991, the increase of the infrared flux from 1994.5 to a new dust-formation maximum in 1997 and its subsequent fading. From these and earlier data we derive a period of 4765+/-50d (13.05+/-0.15yr) for the dust-formation episodes. Between dust-emission episodes, the infrared spectral energy distribution has the form of a power law, λFλ~λ-1.86. The rising branch of the infrared light curve (1994-97) differs in form from that of the episodic dust-maker WR125. Time-dependent modelling shows that this difference can be attributed to a different time dependence of dust formation in WR137, which occurred approximately ~t2 until maximum, whereas that of WR125 could be described by a step function, akin to a threshold effect. For an adopted distance of 1.6kpc, the rate of dust formation was found to be 5.0×10-8Msolaryr-1 at maximum, accounting for a fraction fC~1.5×10-3 of the carbon flowing in the stellar wind. The fading branches of the light curves show evidence for secondary `mini-eruptions' in 1987, 1988 and 1990, behaviour very different from that of the prototypical episodic dust-maker HD 193793 (WR140), and suggesting the presence in the WR137 stellar wind of large-scale structures that are crossed by the wind-wind collision region.

  10. Detection of WC9 stars in NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Andrew C.; Conti, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    We report the discovery of a broad emission feature at 5696 A in a giant extragalactic H II region in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365, identified with a C III emission line seen in some Wolf-Rayet stars. The absence of comparable C IV emission in 5808 A implies the observed feature is from stars of WC9 subtype. This constitutes the first unequivocal detection of WC9 stars in a giant H II region and the first example of these stars outside our Galaxy. Their presence in the high-abundance environment of NGC 1365 supports the notion that late WC-type progenitors form only in "metal-rich" circumstances.

  11. Nebular phase observations of the Type-Ib supernova iPTF13bvn favour a binary progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncarayakti, H.; Maeda, K.; Bersten, M. C.; Folatelli, G.; Morrell, N.; Hsiao, E. Y.; González-Gaitán, S.; Anderson, J. P.; Hamuy, M.; de Jaeger, T.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kawabata, K. S.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We present and analyse late-time observations of the Type-Ib supernova with possible pre-supernova progenitor detection, iPTF13bvn, which were done ~300 days after the explosion. We discuss them in the context of constraints on the supernova's progenitor. Previous studies have proposed two possible natures for the progenitor of the supernova, i.e. a massive Wolf-Rayet star or a lower-mass star in a close binary system. Methods: Our observations show that the supernova has entered the nebular phase, with the spectrum dominated by Mg I]λλ4571, [O I]λλ6300, 6364, and [Ca II]λλ7291, 7324 emission lines. We measured the emission line fluxes to estimate the core oxygen mass and compared the [O I]/[Ca II] line ratio with other supernovae. Results.The core oxygen mass of the supernova progenitor was estimated to be ≲0.7 M⊙, which implies initial progenitor mass that does not exceed ~15-17 M⊙.Since the derived mass is too low for a single star to become a Wolf-Rayet star, this result lends more support to the binary nature of the progenitor star of iPTF13bvn. The comparison of [O I]/[Ca II] line ratio with other supernovae also shows that iPTF13bvn appears to be in close association with the lower mass progenitors of stripped-envelope and Type-II supernovae. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the US National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU); Chilean Telescope Time Allocation Committee proposal CN2014A-91.

  12. Spectropolarimetry of hot, luminous stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.

    1994-01-01

    I review polarimetric observations of presumably single, hot luminous stars. The stellar types discussed are OB stars. B(e) supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBV), Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, and type II supernovae (SN). It is shown that variable, intrinsic polarization is a common phenomenon in that part of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram which these stars occupy. However, much observational work remains to be done before we can answer the most basic, statistical questions about the polarimetric properties of different groups of hot, luminous stars. Insight into the diagnostic power of polarization observations has been gained, but cannot be exploited without detailed models. Thus, while polarimetric observations do tell us that the mass-loss processes of all types of massive stars are time-dependent and anisotropic, the significance that this might have for the accuracy of their stellar parameters and evolutionary paths remains elusive.

  13. First discoveries in the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koter, A.; Sana, H.; Evans, C.; Besthenlehner, J. M.; Taylor, W. D.

    2013-01-01

    The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey is a multi-epoch spectroscopic campaign targeting ˜800 of the most massive stars in the 30 Dor region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The dataset comprises well over 300 O-type stars, including 20 Of/WN and Wolf-Rayet stars. A survey of this type has a large potential for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss three intriguing findings in the subset of O and WNh stars obtained in the first year of data analysis: (i) VFTS 682, the first ˜150 M⊙ star that is not located in the core of a massive star cluster; (ii) VFTS 102, a near-critically spinning O9 V star, and (iii) R139, found to be the most massive binary system where both components are O supergiants.

  14. Catalog of far-ultraviolet objective-prism spectrophotometry: Skylab experiment S-019, ultraviolet steller astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Wray, J. D.; Parsons, S. B.; Benedict, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    Ultraviolet stellar spectra in the wavelength region from 1300 to 5000 A (130 to 500) were photographed during the three manned Skylab missions using a 15 cm aperture objective-prism telescope. The prismatic dispersion varied from 58 A mm/1 at 1400 A to 1600 A mm/1 at 3000 A. Approximately 1000 spectra representing 500 stars were measured and reduced to observed fluxes. About 100 stars show absorption lines of Si IV, C IV, or C II. Numerous line features are also recorded in supergiant stars, shell stars, A and F stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. Most of the stars in the catalog are of spectral class B, with a number of O and A type stars and a sampling of WC, WN, F and C type stars. Spectrophotometric results are tabulated for these 500 stars.

  15. The trace of the CNO cycle in the ring nebula NGC 6888

    SciTech Connect

    Mesa-Delgado, A.; Esteban, C.; García-Rojas, J.; Reyes-Pérez, J.; Morisset, C.; Bresolin, F.

    2014-04-20

    We present new results on the chemical composition of the Galactic ring nebula NGC 6888 surrounding the WN6(h) star WR136. The data are based on deep spectroscopical observations taken with the High Dispersion Spectrograph at the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The spectra cover the optical range from 3700 to 7400 Å. The effect of the CNO cycle is well-identified in the abundances of He, N, and O, while elements not involved in the synthesis such as Ar, S, and Fe present values consistent with the solar vicinity and the ambient gas. The major achievement of this work is the first detection of the faint C II λ4267 recombination line in a Wolf-Rayet nebula. This allows us to estimate the C abundance in NGC 6888 and therefore investigate for the first time the trace of the CNO cycle in a ring nebula around a Wolf-Rayet star. Although the detection of the C II line has a low signal-to-noise ratio, the C abundance seems to be higher than the predictions of recent stellar evolution models of massive stars. The Ne abundance also shows a puzzling pattern with an abundance of about 0.5 dex lower than the solar vicinity, which may be related to the action of the NeNa cycle. Attending to the constraints imposed by the dynamical timescale and the He/H and N/O ratios of the nebula, the comparison with stellar evolution models indicates that the initial mass of the stellar progenitor of NGC 6888 is between 25 M {sub ☉} and 40 M {sub ☉}.

  16. DISSECTION OF H{alpha} EMITTERS : LOW-z ANALOGS OF z > 4 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Hyunjin; Chary, Ranga-Ram

    2013-03-01

    Strong H{alpha} emitters (HAEs) dominate the z {approx} 4 Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) population. We have identified local analogs of these HAEs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. At z < 0.4, only 0.04% of the galaxies are classified as HAEs with H{alpha} equivalent widths ({approx}> 500 A) comparable to that of z {approx} 4 HAEs. Local HAEs have lower stellar mass and lower ultraviolet (UV) luminosity than z {approx} 4 HAEs, yet the H{alpha}-to-UV luminosity ratio, as well as their specific star formation rate, is consistent with that of z {approx} 4 HAEs, indicating that they are scaled-down versions of high-z star-forming galaxies. Compared to the previously studied local analogs of LBGs selected using rest-frame UV properties, local HAEs show similar UV luminosity surface density, weaker D{sub n} (4000) break, lower metallicity, and lower stellar mass. This implies that the local HAEs are less evolved galaxies than the traditional Lyman break analogs. In the stacked spectrum, local HAEs show a significant He II {lambda}4686 emission line suggesting a population of hot, massive stars similar to that seen in some Wolf-Rayet galaxies. Low [N II]/[O III] line flux ratios imply that local HAEs are inconsistent with being systems that host bright active galactic nuclei. Instead, it is highly likely that local HAEs are galaxies with an elevated ionization parameter, either due to a high electron density or large escape fraction of hydrogen ionizing photons as in the case of Wolf-Rayet galaxies.

  17. Tyrosinaemia II.

    PubMed

    Colditz, P B; Yu, J S; Billson, F A; Rogers, M; Molloy, H F; O'Halloran, M; Wilcken, B

    1984-08-18

    Four cases of tyrosinaemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome) are reported. This syndrome consists of corneal erosions, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, and sometimes mental retardation. Presentation with photophobia and dendritic corneal ulceration or circumscribed palmoplantar keratoderma should alert the physician to the possible diagnosis of tyrosinaemia II. Early diagnosis is important, as the clinical picture can be modified by dietary restriction.

  18. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  19. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  20. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  1. BORE II

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  2. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  3. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  4. OPTICAL SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC MONITORING OF THE EXTREME LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STAR GR 290 (ROMANO's STAR) IN M 33

    SciTech Connect

    Polcaro, V. F.; Viotti, R. F.; Rossi, C.; Galleti, S.; Gualandi, R.; Norci, L.

    2011-01-15

    We study the long-term, S Dor-type variability and the present hot phase of the luminous blue variable (LBV) star GR 290 (Romano's Star) in M 33 in order to investigate possible links between the LBV and the late, nitrogen sequence Wolf-Rayet Stars (WNL) stages of very massive stars. We use intermediate-resolution spectra, obtained with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in 2008 December, when GR 290 was at minimum (V = {approx}18.6), as well as new low-resolution spectra and BVRI photometry obtained with the Loiano and Cima Ekar telescopes during 2007-2010. We identify more than 80 emission lines in the 3100-10000 A range covered by the WHT spectra, belonging to different species: the hydrogen Balmer and Paschen series, neutral and ionized helium, C III, N II-III, S IV, Si III-IV, and many forbidden lines of [N II], [O III], [S III], [A III], [Ne III], and [Fe III]. Many lines, especially the He I triplets, show a P Cygni profile with an a-e radial velocity difference of -300 to -500 km s{sup -1}. The shape of the 4630-4713 A emission blend and of other emission lines resembles that of WN9 stars; the blend deconvolution shows that the He II 4686 A has a strong broad component with FWHM {approx_equal} 1700 km s{sup -1}. During 2003-2010 the star underwent large spectral variations, best seen in the 4630-4686 A emission feature. Using the late-WN spectral types of Crowther and Smith, GR 290 apparently varied between the WN11 and WN8-9 spectral types; the hotter the star was the fainter its visual magnitude was. This spectrum-visual luminosity anticorrelation of GR 290 is reminiscent of the behavior of the best-studied LBVs, such as S Dor and AG Car. During the 2008 minimum, we found a significant decrease in bolometric luminosity, which could be attributed to absorption by newly formed circumstellar matter. We suggest that the broad 4686 A line and the optical continuum formed in a central Wolf-Rayet region, while the narrow emission line spectrum originated in an

  5. Chemical abundances in high-redshift galaxies: a powerful new emission line diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Nicholls, David C.

    2016-02-01

    This Letter presents a new, remarkably simple diagnostic specifically designed to derive chemical abundances for high redshift galaxies. It uses only the Hα, [N ii] and [S ii] emission lines, which can usually be observed in a single grating setting, and is almost linear up to an abundance of 12+log (O/H) = 9.05. It can be used over the full abundance range encountered in high redshift galaxies. By its use of emission lines located close together in wavelength, it is also independent of reddening. Our diagnostic depends critically on the calibration of the N/O ratio. However, by using realistic stellar atmospheres combined with the N/O vs. O/H abundance calibration derived locally from stars and H ii regions, and allowing for the fact that high-redshift H ii regions have both high ionisation parameters and high gas pressures, we find that the observations of high-redshift galaxies can be simply explained by the models without having to invoke arbitrary changes in N/O ratio, or the presence of unusual quantities of Wolf-Rayet stars in these galaxies.

  6. FLUORINE ABUNDANCES OF GALACTIC LOW-METALLICITY GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. N.; Zhao, G.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Christlieb, N. E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn E-mail: ecaffau@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de

    2013-03-01

    With abundances and 2{sigma} upper limits of fluorine (F) in seven metal-poor field giants, nucleosynthesis of stellar F at low metallicity is discussed. The measurements are derived from the HF(1-0) R9 line at 23358 A using near-infrared K-band high-resolution spectra obtained with CRIRES at the Very Large Telescope. The sample reaches lower metallicities than previous studies on F of field giants, ranging from [Fe/H] = -1.56 down to -2.13. Effects of three-dimensional model atmospheres on the derived F and O abundances are quantitatively estimated and shown to be insignificant for the program stars. The observed F yield in the form of [F/O] is compared with two sets of Galactic chemical evolution models, which quantitatively demonstrate the contribution of Type II supernova (SN II) {nu}-process and asymptotic giant branch/Wolf-Rayet stars. It is found that at this low-metallicity region, models cannot well predict the observed distribution of [F/O], while the observations are better fit by models considering an SN II {nu}-process with a neutrino energy of E {sub {nu}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 53} erg. Our sample contains HD 110281, a retrograde orbiting low-{alpha} halo star, showing a similar F evolution as globular clusters. This supports the theory that such halo stars are possibly accreted from dwarf galaxy progenitors of globular clusters in the halo.

  7. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2: THE MYSTERY OF NEON

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Trump, Jonathan R.; Bridge, Joanna S.; Luo, Bin; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    We use near-infrared grism spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope to examine the strength of [Ne III] λ3869 relative to Hβ, [O II] λ3727, and [O III] λ5007 in 236 low-mass (7.5 ≲ log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ≲ 10.5) star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.90 < z < 2.35. By stacking the data by stellar mass, we show that the [Ne III]/[O II] ratios of the z ∼ 2 universe are marginally higher than those seen in a comparable set of local Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies, and that [Ne III]/[O III] is enhanced by ∼0.2 dex. We consider the possible explanations for this ∼4σ result, including higher oxygen depletion out of the gas phase, denser H II regions, higher production of {sup 22}Ne via Wolf-Rayet stars, and the existence of a larger population of X-ray obscured active galactic nuclei at z ∼ 2 compared to z ∼ 0. None of these simple scenarios, alone, are favored to explain the observed line ratios. We conclude by suggesting several avenues of future observations to further explore the mystery of enhanced [Ne III] emission.

  8. The Origin and Optical Depth of Ionizing Photons in the Green Pea Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of radiative feedback and star formation in galaxies at high redshift is hindered by the rarity of similar systems at low redshift. However, the recently identified Green Pea (GP) galaxies are similar to high-redshift galaxies in their morphologies and star formation rates and are vital tools for probing the generation and transmission of ionizing photons. The GPs contain massive star clusters that emit copious amounts of high-energy radiation, as indicated by intense [OIII] 5007 emission and HeII 4686 emission. We focus on six GP galaxies with high ratios of [O III] 5007,4959/[O II] 3727 ~10 or more. Such high ratios indicate gas with a high ionization parameter or a low optical depth. The GP line ratios and ages point to chemically homogeneous massive stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, or shock ionization as the most likely sources of the He II emission. Models including shock ionization suggest that the GPs may have low optical depths, consistent with a scenario in which ionizing photons escape along passageways created by recent supernovae. The GPs and similar galaxies can shed new light on cosmic reionization by revealing how ionizing photons propagate from massive star clusters to the intergalactic medium.

  9. Evolution and fate of very massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Norhasliza; Hirschi, Raphael; Meynet, Georges; Crowther, Paul A.; Ekström, Sylvia; Frischknecht, Urs; Georgy, Cyril; Abu Kassim, Hasan; Schnurr, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    There is observational evidence that supports the existence of very massive stars (VMS) in the local universe. First, VMS (Mini ≲ 320 M⊙) have been observed in the Large Magellanic Clouds (LMC). Secondly, there are observed supernovae (SNe) that bear the characteristics of pair creation supernovae (PCSNe, also referred to as pair instability SN) which have VMS as progenitors. The most promising candidate to date is SN 2007bi. In order to investigate the evolution and fate of nearby VMS, we calculated a new grid of models for such objects, for solar, LMC and Small Magellanic Clouds (SMC) metallicities, which covers the initial mass range from 120 to 500 M⊙. Both rotating and non-rotating models were calculated using the GENEVA stellar evolution code and evolved until at least the end of helium burning and for most models until oxygen burning. Since VMS have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All the VMS, at all the metallicities studied here, end their life as WC(WO)-type Wolf-Rayet stars. Because of very important mass losses through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 M⊙. A distinctive feature which may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses would be the enhanced abundances of Ne and Mg at the surface of WC stars. This feature is however not always apparent depending on the history of mass loss. At solar metallicity, none of our models is expected to explode as a PCSN. At the metallicity of the LMC, only stars more massive than 300 M⊙ are expected to explode as PCSNe. At the SMC metallicity, the mass range for the PCSN progenitors is much larger and

  10. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XVII. Physical and wind properties of massive stars at the top of the main sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestenlehner, J. M.; Gräfener, G.; Vink, J. S.; Najarro, F.; de Koter, A.; Sana, H.; Evans, C. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; Walborn, N. R.

    2014-10-01

    The evolution and fate of very massive stars (VMS) is tightly connected to their mass-loss properties. Their initial and final masses differ significantly as a result of mass loss. VMS have strong stellar winds and extremely high ionising fluxes, which are thought to be critical sources of both mechanical and radiative feedback in giant H ii regions. However, how VMS mass-loss properties change during stellar evolution is poorly understood. In the framework of the VLT-Flames Tarantula Survey (VFTS), we explore the mass-loss transition region from optically thin O star winds to denser WNh Wolf-Rayet star winds, thereby testing theoretical predictions. To this purpose we select 62 O, Of, Of/WN, and WNh stars, an unprecedented sample of stars with the highest masses and luminosities known. We perform a spectral analysis of optical VFTS as well as near-infrared VLT/SINFONI data using the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN to obtain both stellar and wind parameters. For the first time, we observationally resolve the transition between optically thin O star winds and optically thick hydrogen-rich WNh Wolf-Rayet winds. Our results suggest the existence of a "kink" between both mass-loss regimes, in agreement with recent Monte Carlo simulations. For the optically thick regime, we confirm the steep dependence on the classical Eddington factor Γe from previous theoretical and observational studies. The transition occurs on the main sequence near a luminosity of 106.1L⊙, or a mass of 80 ... 90 M⊙. Above this limit, we find that - even when accounting for moderate wind clumping (with fv = 0.1) - wind mass-loss rates are enhanced with respect to standard prescriptions currently adopted in stellar evolution calculations. We also show that this results in substantial helium surface enrichment. Finally, based on our spectroscopic analyses, we are able to provide the most accurate ionising fluxes for VMS known to date, confirming the pivotal role of VMS in ionising and

  11. A Rare Encounter with Very Massive Stars in NGC~3125-A1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wofford, A.; Leitherer, C.; Chandar, R.; Bouret, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    Super star cluster A1 in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC~3125 shows broad He II λ1640 emission (FWHM ~ 1200 km/s) of unprecedented strength (equivalent width, EW = 7.1+/-0.4 angstroms). Previous attempts to characterize A1's massive star content were hampered by the low resolution of the UV spectrum and the lack of co-spatial panchromatic data. We obtained far-UV to near-IR spectroscopy of the two principal emitting regions in the galaxy with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We use these data to derive the ages, reddenings, masses, and Wolf-Rayet (WR) to O star ratios of three compact clusters in the galaxy. We rule out that the extraordinary HeII lambda 1640 emission and OV lambda 1371 absorption in A1 are due to an extremely flat upper Initial Mass Function (IMF), and suggest that they originate in the winds of Very Massive Stars ( > 120 Msun, VMS). In order to reproduce the properties of peculiar clusters such as A1, the stellar evolution tracks implemented in Starburst99 need to be extended to masses >120 Msun.

  12. High-resolution CCD spectra of stars in globular clusters. III - M4, M13, and M22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, George; Leep, E. Myckky; Oke, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Spectra of 0.3 and 0.6 A resolution of stars in M4, M13 and M22 to derive abundances of various atomic species and the CN molecule. For M13, the usual Fe/H ratio and a surprisingly high aluminum abundance is found. The CN lines indicate a larger column density in the oxygen-rich star III-63 than in the oxygen-poor star II-67 by a factor of 10. It appears that II-67 is deficient in C, N, and O by about a factor 3 relative to iron for all three elements. For M4, Fe/H = -1.2 using solar f values derived via the Bell et al. (1976) model. This Fe abundance lies between earlier echelle values and photometric values. For two stars, CN data are obtained that can be understood if there was a slight excess of C/Fe and N/Fe prior to CN cycling and mixing. For M22, a large difference in CN is found between stars III-3 and IV-102. The origin of the CNO elements is discussed in terms of mass loss from an early generation of red giants and possibly Wolf-Rayet stars.

  13. FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-26

    FIRE II - Cirrus Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) II ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE II - Cirrus Home Page FIRE II - Cirrus Mission Summaries ...

  14. Type II universal spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  15. Angiotensin II receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Yee, Daniel K; Fluharty, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II plays a key role in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. To correct body fluid deficits that occur during hypovolaemia, an animal needs to ingest both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is not surprising that angiotensin II, which is synthesized in response to hypovolaemia, acts centrally to increase both water and NaCl intake. Here, we review findings relating to the properties of angiotensin II receptors that give rise to changes in behaviour. Data are described to suggest that divergent signal transduction pathways are responsible for separable behavioural responses to angiotensin II, and a hypothesis is proposed to explain how this divergence may map onto neural circuits in the brain.

  16. IPHAS and the symbiotic stars . II. New discoveries and a sample of the most common mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, R. L. M.; Valentini, M.; Munari, U.; Drew, J. E.; Rodríguez-Flores, E. R.; Viironen, K.; Greimel, R.; Santander-García, M.; Sabin, L.; Mampaso, A.; Parker, Q.; DePew, K.; Sale, S. E.; Unruh, Y. C.; Vink, J. S.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Barlow, M. J.; Lennon, D. J.; Groot, P. J.; Giammanco, C.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Walton, N. A.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Knowledge of the total population of symbiotic stars in the Galaxy is important for understanding basic aspects of stellar evolution in interacting binaries and the relevance of this class of objects in the formation of supernovae of type Ia. Aims: In a previous paper, we presented the selection criteria needed to search for symbiotic stars in IPHAS, the INT Hα survey of the Northern Galactic plane. IPHAS gives us the opportunity to make a systematic, complete search for symbiotic stars in a magnitude-limited volume. Methods: Follow-up spectroscopy at different telescopes worldwide of a sample of sixty two symbiotic star candidates is presented. Results: Seven out of nineteen S-type candidates observed spectroscopically are confirmed to be genuine symbiotic stars. The spectral type of their red giant components, as well as reddening and distance, were computed by modelling the spectra. Only one new D-type symbiotic system, out of forty-three candidates observed, was found. This was as expected (see discussion in our paper on the selection criteria). The object shows evidence for a high density outflow expanding at a speed ≥65 km s-1. Most of the other candidates are lightly reddened classical T Tauri stars and more highly reddened young stellar objects that may be either more massive young stars of HAeBe type or classical Be stars. In addition, a few notable objects have been found, such as three new Wolf-Rayet stars and two relatively high-luminosity evolved massive stars. We also found a helium-rich source, possibly a dense ejecta hiding a WR star, which is surrounded by a large ionized nebula. Conclusions: These spectroscopic data allow us to refine the selection criteria for symbiotic stars in the IPHAS survey and, more generally, to better understand the behaviour of different Hα emitters in the IPHAS and 2MASS colour-colour diagrams. Based on observations obtained at; the 2.6 m Nordic Optical Telescope operated by NOTSA; the 2.5 m INT and 4.2 m

  17. Spitzer infrared spectrograph point source classification in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffle, Paul M. E.; Kemper, F.; Jones, O. C.; Sloan, G. C.; Kraemer, K. E.; Woods, Paul M.; Boyer, M. L.; Srinivasan, S.; Antoniou, V.; Lagadec, E.; Matsuura, M.; McDonald, I.; Oliveira, J. M.; Sargent, B. A.; Sewiło, M.; Szczerba, R.; van Loon, J. Th.; Volk, K.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    The Magellanic Clouds are uniquely placed to study the stellar contribution to dust emission. Individual stars can be resolved in these systems even in the mid-infrared, and they are close enough to allow detection of infrared excess caused by dust. We have searched the Spitzer Space Telescope data archive for all Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) staring-mode observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and found that 209 Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) point sources within the footprint of the Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-SMC) Spitzer Legacy programme were targeted, within a total of 311 staring-mode observations. We classify these point sources using a decision tree method of object classification, based on infrared spectral features, continuum and spectral energy distribution shape, bolometric luminosity, cluster membership and variability information. We find 58 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, 51 young stellar objects, 4 post-AGB objects, 22 red supergiants, 27 stars (of which 23 are dusty OB stars), 24 planetary nebulae (PNe), 10 Wolf-Rayet stars, 3 H II regions, 3 R Coronae Borealis stars, 1 Blue Supergiant and 6 other objects, including 2 foreground AGB stars. We use these classifications to evaluate the success of photometric classification methods reported in the literature.

  18. Erratum: The 2.27 day period of WR-134 (HD 191765)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandliss, Stephan R.; Bohannan, Bruce; Robert, Carmelle; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The original temporal analysis of a 12 night spectral timeseries of Wolf-Rayet (WR)-134 has been found to be flawed and a re-analysis shows that the line profile variations are indeed periodic. When combined with a 4 night timeseries taken 45 days earlier, a period near 2.27 d is found in periodograms of the He II lambda 5412 line centroid, rms line width, and line skew variations. When the emission line residuals are ordered as a function of phase, a sinuous feature appears to 'snake' about the line center with an amplitude of +/-500 km/s. This is approximately equal to 20 larger than the line centroid amplitude; the calculation of which is heavily weighted by static portions of the line profile. In addition to the 'snake,' emission residuals appear that move away from line center on unbound trajectories and are thought to result from the interaction of a periodic driver with the unstable flow of the radiation driven wind.

  19. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) ultraviolet spectral atlas of selected astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chi-Chao; Reichert, Gail A.; Ake, Thomas B.; Boggess, Albert; Holm, Albert V.; Imhoff, Catherine L.; Kondo, Yoji; Mead, Jaylee M.; Shore, Steven N.

    1992-01-01

    The IUE Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas of Selected Astronomical Objects (or 'the Atlas'), is based on the data that were available in the IUE archive in 1986, and is intended to be a quick reference for the ultraviolet spectra of many categories of astronomical objects. It shows reflected sunlight from the Moon, planets, and asteroids, and also shows emission from comets. Comprehensive compilations of UV spectra for main sequence, subgiant, giant, bright giant, and supergiant stars are published elsewhere. This Atlas contains the spectra for objects occupying other areas of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: pre-main sequence stars, chemically peculiar stars, pulsating variables, subluminous stars, and Wolf-Rayet stars. This Atlas also presents phenomena such as the chromospheric and transition region emissions from late-type stars; composite spectra of stars, gas streams, accretion disks and gas envelopes of binary systems; the behavior of gas ejecta shortly after the outburst of novac and supernovac; and the H II regions, planetary nebulae, and supernova remnants. Population 2 stars, globular clusters, and luminous stars in the Magellanic Clouds, M31, and M33, are also included in this publication. Finally, the Atlas gives the ultraviolet spectra of galaxies of different Hubble types and of active galaxies.

  20. Physical conditions and element abundances in supernova and γ-ray burst host galaxies at different redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, M.

    2016-08-01

    We compare the physical parameters and the relative abundances calculated throughout supernova (SN) and γ-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies using a detailed modelling of the spectra. The coupled effect of shocks and radiation from the starburst within the host galaxy is considered. We have found the following. (i) Shock velocities are lower in long-period GRBs (LGRBs) than in SN host galaxies. (ii) O/H relative abundances in SN hosts are scattered within a range 8.0 < 12+log(O/H) < 8.85 but they are close to solar in LGRB hosts. LGRB galaxies hosting Wolf-Rayet stars have He/H = 0.13 in a few objects. (iii) The starburst temperatures within a few SN hosts are relatively high (T* > 105 K). The values of T* in LGRB hosts are ˜3-8 × 104 K. (iv) The Hα absolute flux calculated from the emitting clouds of a few SN hosts at 0.1 < z < 0.3 is sensibly higher than in the other galaxies. Hα increases sharply with the ionization parameter U. The present analysis suggests that the SN-host symbiosis is stronger than for GRBs in terms of activity. The physical and chemical conditions in the GRB host galaxies are similar to those in starburst galaxies within a large redshift range.

  1. Spectroscopy of the Pistol and Quintuplet stars in the Galactic centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moneti, A.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Najarro, F.; Figer, D.; Stolovy, S.

    1999-03-01

    We present initial results of a spectroscopic study of the Pistol and of the cocoon stars in the Quintuplet Cluster. From ISOCAM CVF 5--17 μm spectroscopy of the field of the Pistol Star, we have discovered a nearly spherical shell of hot dust surrounding this star, a probable LBV. This shell is most prominent at λ >~ 12 μm, and its morphology clearly indicates that the shell is stellar ejecta. Emission line images show that most of the ionised material is along the northern border of this shell, and its morphology is very similar to that of the Pistol H ii region (Yusef-Zadeh & Morris, 1987). We thus confirm that the ionisation comes from very hot stars in the core of the Quintuplet Cluster. An SWS spectrum of the Pistol Nebula indicates a harder ionising radiation than could be provided by the Pistol Star, but which is consistent with ionisation from Wolf-Rayet stars in the Quintuplet Cluster. The CVF 5--17 μm spectra of the cocoon stars in the Quintuplet do not show any emission feature that could help elucidate their nature.

  2. FLUORINE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD: IS IT ALL PRODUCED IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS?

    SciTech Connect

    Jönsson, H.; Ryde, N.; Harper, G. M.; Richter, M. J.; Hinkle, K. H.

    2014-07-10

    The origin of ''cosmic'' fluorine is uncertain, but there are three proposed production sites/mechanisms for the origin: asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, ν nucleosynthesis in Type II supernovae, and/or the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. The relative importance of these production sites has not been established even for the solar neighborhood, leading to uncertainties in stellar evolution models of these stars as well as uncertainties in the chemical evolution models of stellar populations. We determine the fluorine and oxygen abundances in seven bright, nearby giants with well determined stellar parameters. We use the 2.3 μm vibrational-rotational HF line and explore a pure rotational HF line at 12.2 μm. The latter has never been used before for an abundance analysis. To be able to do this, we have calculated a line list for pure rotational HF lines. We find that the abundances derived from the two diagnostics agree. Our derived abundances are well reproduced by chemical evolution models including only fluorine production in AGB stars and, therefore, we draw the conclusion that this might be the main production site of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of using the 12 μm HF lines to determine the possible contribution of the ν process to the fluorine budget at low metallicities where the difference between models including and excluding this process is dramatic.

  3. Chandra/ACIS Observations of the 30 Doradus Star-Forming Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Feigelson, Eric; Burrows, David; Chu, You-Hua; Garmire, Gordon; Griffiths, Richard; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Pavlov, George; Tsuboi, Yohko

    2002-04-01

    30 Doradus is the archetype giant extragalactic H II region, a massive star-forming complex in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We examine high-spatial-resolution X-ray images and spectra of the essential parts of 30 Doradus, obtained with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The central cluster of young high-mass stars, R136, is resolved at the arcsecond level, allowing spectral analysis of bright constituents; other OB/Wolf-Rayet binaries and multiple systems (e.g. R139, R140) are also detected. Spatially-resolved spectra are presented for N157B, the composite SNR containing a 16-msec pulsar. The spectrally soft superbubble structures seen by ROSAT are dramatically imaged by Chandra; we explore the spectral differences they exhibit. Taken together, the components of 30 Doradus give us an excellent microscopic view of high-energy phenomena seen on larger scales in more distant galaxies as starbursts and galactic winds.

  4. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Measurements of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federman, S. R.; Sheffer, Yaron; Lambert, David L.; Smith, V. V.

    2005-02-01

    The source of fluorine is not well understood, although core-collapse supernovae, Wolf-Rayet stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars have been suggested. A search for evidence of the ν-process during Type II supernovae is presented. Absorption from interstellar F I is seen in spectra of HD 208440 and HD 209339A acquired with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. In order to extract the column density for F I from the line at 954 Å, absorption from H2 has to be modeled and then removed. Our analysis indicates that for H2 column densities less than about 3×1020 cm-2, the amount of F I can be determined from λ954. For these two sight lines, there is no clear indication for enhanced F abundances resulting from the ν-process in a region shaped by past supernovae. Based on observations made with the NASA/CNES/CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), which is operated for NASA by the Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  5. Probing a GRB Progenitor at a Redshift of z=2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive optical/near-infrared follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226, including VLT spectroscopy and polarimetry, supplemented by Chandra X-ray and BOOTES-1 rapid response observations. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the burst when the afterglow was at a magnitude of R approx. 19. The multi-color light curve of the afterglow, with a break around 1 day after the burst, is achromatic within the observational uncertainties even during episodes of short-term fluctuations. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, consistent with low intrinsic polarization observed in other afterglows. VLT spectra show a foreground absorber of Mg II at a redshift z=1.042 and two absorption line systems at redshifts z=1.962+/-0.001 and at z=1.986+/-0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. The kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds is very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004, supporting the view that at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  6. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  7. World War II Homefront.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  8. Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II

    MedlinePlus

    Sipple syndrome; MEN II; Pheochromocytoma - MEN II; Thyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma; Parathyroid cancer - pheochromocytoma ... The cause of MEN II is a defect in a gene called RET. This defect causes many tumors to appear in the same ...

  9. Network II Database

    1994-11-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database.

  10. Factor II deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. It leads to problems with blood clotting (coagulation). Factor II is also known as prothrombin. ... blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or ...

  11. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  12. PEP-II Status

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.; Bertsche, K.; Browne, M.; Cai, Y.; Cheng, W.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Donald, M.; Ecklund, S.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.S.; Fox, J.; Heifets, S.; Himel, T.; Iverson, R.; Kulikov, A.; Novokhatski, A.; Pacak, V.; Pivi, M.; Rivetta, C.; Ross, M.; /SLAC /Saclay /Frascati

    2008-07-25

    PEP-II and BaBar have just finished run 7, the last run of the SLAC B-factory. PEP-II was one of the few high-current e+e- colliding accelerators and holds the present world record for stored electrons and stored positrons. It has stored 2.07 A of electrons, nearly 3 times the design current of 0.75 A and it has stored 3.21 A of positrons, 1.5 times more than the design current of 2.14 A. High-current beams require careful design of several systems. The feedback systems that control instabilities, the RF system stability loops, and especially the vacuum systems have to handle the higher power demands. We present here some of the accomplishments of the PEP-II accelerator and some of the problems we encountered while running high-current beams.

  13. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  14. About APPLE II Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180° requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  15. Mod II engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Albert E.; Huang, Shyan-Cherng

    1987-01-01

    The testing of a prototype of an automotive Stirling engine, the Mod II, is discussed. The Mod II is a one-piece cast block with a V-4 single-crankshaft configuration and an annular regenerator/cooler design. The initial testing of Mod II concentrated on the basic engine, with auxiliaries driven by power sources external to the engine. The performance of the engine was tested at 720 C set temperature and 820 C tube temperature. At 720 C, it is observed that the power deficiency is speed dependent and linear, with a weak pressure dependency, and at 820 C, the power deficiency is speed and pressure dependent. The effects of buoyancy and nozzle spray pattern on the heater temperature spread are investigated. The characterization of the oil pump and the operating cycle and temperature spread tests are proposed for further evaluation of the engine.

  16. The Eutelsat II programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, Claude; Dumesnil, Jean-Jacques

    Eutelsat II is designed to provide Europe with Ku-band communication and TV services with 16 active channels of 50 W power output. In-orbit reconfigurable antenna feed networks permit customized transmission offering either medium-gain over the whole of Europe or high-gain over tailored geographic areas, allowing TV reception on dishes as small as 60 cm. The payload design makes use of only two antennas, each comprising a dual dish reflector and two reconfigurable primary feed arrays. This paper gives an overview of the Eutelsat II mission, and presents a technical description of the satellite, the program schedule, and future prospects.

  17. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  18. College Algebra II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Carl; And Others

    Presented are student performance objectives, a student progress chart, and assignment sheets with objective and diagnostic measures for the stated performance objectives in College Algebra II. Topics covered include: differencing and complements; real numbers; factoring; fractions; linear equations; exponents and radicals; complex numbers,…

  19. Listen & Learn II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Building Resources, Spruce Grove (Alberta).

    Six community builders in Edmonton, Alberta, planned, developed, and implemented Listen and Learn II, a reflective research project in asset-based community building, over a 6-month period in 1998. They met regularly over 2 months to plan the research and design a method that was open to participation at any stage, encouraged exchange of…

  20. Instant Insanity II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Tom; Young, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    "Instant Insanity II" is a sliding mechanical puzzle whose solution requires the special alignment of 16 colored tiles. We count the number of solutions of the puzzle's classic challenge and show that the more difficult ultimate challenge has, up to row permutation, exactly two solutions, and further show that no…

  1. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  2. Periodontics II: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dordick, Bruce

    A proposal is presented for Periodontics II, a course offered at the Community College of Philadelphia to give the dental hygiene/assisting student an understanding of the disease states of the periodontium and their treatment. A standardized course proposal cover form is given, followed by a statement of purpose for the course, a list of major…

  3. WR Time Series Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablo, H.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    We take a comprehensive look at Wolf Rayet photometric variability using the MOST satellite. This sample, consisting of 6 WR stars and 6 WC stars defies all typical photometric analysis. We do, however, confirm the presence of unusual periodic signals resembling sawtooth waves which are present in 11 out of 12 stars in this sample.

  4. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  5. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  6. PTF11iqb: cool supergiant mass-loss that bridges the gap between Type IIn and normal supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan; Mauerhan, Jon C.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Graham, Melissa L.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Williams, G. Grant; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Xu, Dong; Ben-Ami, Sagi

    2015-05-01

    The supernova (SN) PTF11iqb was initially classified as a Type IIn event caught very early after explosion. It showed narrow Wolf-Rayet (WR) spectral features on day 2 (as in SN 1998S and SN 2013cu), but the narrow emission weakened quickly and the spectrum morphed to resemble Types II-L and II-P. At late times, Hα exhibited a complex, multipeaked profile reminiscent of SN 1998S. In terms of spectroscopic evolution, we find that PTF11iqb was a near twin of SN 1998S, although with somewhat weaker interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) at early times, and stronger interaction at late times. We interpret the spectral changes as caused by early interaction with asymmetric CSM that is quickly (by day 20) enveloped by the expanding SN ejecta photosphere, but then revealed again after the end of the plateau when the photosphere recedes. The light curve can be matched with a simple model for CSM interaction (with a mass-loss rate of roughly 10-4 M⊙ yr-1) added to the light curve of a normal SN II-P. The underlying plateau requires a progenitor with an extended hydrogen envelope like a red supergiant at the moment of explosion, consistent with the slow wind speed (<80 km s-1) inferred from narrow Hα emission. The cool supergiant progenitor is significant because PTF11iqb showed WR features in its early spectrum - meaning that the presence of such WR features does not necessarily indicate a WR-like progenitor. Overall, PTF11iqb bridges SNe IIn with weaker pre-SN mass-loss seen in SNe II-L and II-P, implying a continuum between these types.

  7. Radiative properties of pair-instability supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli; Hillier, D. John; Blondin, Stéphane

    2013-02-01

    We present non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer simulations of pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) stemming from red-supergiant (RSG), blue-supergiant and Wolf-Rayet star rotation-free progenitors born in the mass range 160-230 M⊙, at 10-4 Z⊙. Although subject to uncertainties in convection and stellar mass-loss rates, our initial conditions come from physically-consistent models that treat evolution from the main sequence, the onset of the pair-production instability, and the explosion phase. With our set of input models characterized by large 56Ni and ejecta masses, and large kinetic energies, we recover qualitatively the Type II-Plateau, II-peculiar and Ib/c light-curve morphologies, although they have larger peak bolometric luminosities (˜109 to 1010 L⊙) and a longer duration (˜200 d). We discuss the spectral properties for each model during the photospheric and nebular phases, including Balmer lines in II-P and II-pec at early times, the dominance of lines from intermediate-mass elements near the bolometric maximum, and the strengthening of metal line blanketing thereafter. Having similar He-core properties, all models exhibit similar post-peak spectra that are strongly blanketed by Fe ii and Fe i lines, characterized by red colours, and that arise from photospheres/ejecta with a temperature of ≲4000 K. Combined with the modest linewidths after the bolometric peak, these properties contrast with those of known superluminous SNe, suggesting that PISNe are yet to be discovered. Being reddish, PISNe will be difficult to observe at high redshift except when they stem from RSG explosions, in which case they could be used as metallicity probes and distance indicators.

  8. RESOLVING IONIZATION AND METALLICITY ON PARSEC SCALES ACROSS MRK 71 WITH HST-WFC3

    SciTech Connect

    James, Bethan L.; Auger, Matthew; Aloisi, Alessandra; Calzetti, Daniela; Kewley, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies in the nearby universe provide a means for studying feedback mechanisms and star formation processes in low-metallicity environments in great detail. Owing to their vicinity, these local analogs to primordial young galaxies are well suited for high-resolution studies that are unfeasible for high-redshift galaxies. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 observations of one such BCD, Mrk 71, one of the most powerful local starbursts known, in the light of [O ii], He ii, Hβ, [O iii], Hα, and [S ii]. At D ≃ 3.44 Mpc, this extensive suite of emission-line images enables us to explore the chemical and physical conditions of Mrk 71 on ∼2 pc scales. We use emission-line diagnostics to distinguish ionization mechanisms on a pixel-by-pixel basis and show that despite the previously reported hypersonic gas and superbubble blowout, the gas in Mrk 71 is photoionized, with no sign of shock-excited emission. He ii emission line images are used to identify up to six Wolf-Rayet stars, three of which lie on the edge of a blowout region. Using strong-line metallicity diagnostics, we present the first “metallicity image” of a galaxy, revealing chemical inhomogeneity on scales of <50 pc. We additionally demonstrate that while chemical structure can be lost at large scales, metallicity diagnostics can break down on spatial scales smaller than an H ii region. This study highlights not only the benefits of high-resolution spatially resolved observations in assessing the effects of feedback mechanisms but also the potential limitations when employing emission-line diagnostics; these results are particularly relevant as we enter the era of extremely large telescopes.

  9. Introducing CAML II

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaia II, Tom; Boyes, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Channel Access Markup Language (CAML) is a XML based markup language and implementation for displaying EPICS channel access controls within a web browser. The CAML II project expanded upon the work of CAML I adding more features and greater integration with other web technologies. The most dramatic new feature introduced in CAML II is the introduction of a namespace so CAML controls can be embedded within XHTML documents. A repetition template with macro substitution allows for rapid coding of arbitrary XHTML repetitions. Enhancements have been made to several controls including more powerful plotting options. Advanced formatting options were introduced for text controls. Virtual process variables allow for custom calculations. An EDL to CAML translator eases the transition from EDM screens to CAML pages.

  10. RADTRAN II user guide

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M M; Wilmot, E L; Taylor, J M

    1983-02-01

    RADTRAN II is a flexible analytical tool for calculating both the incident-free and accident impacts of transporting radioactive materials. The consequences from incident-free shipments are apportioned among eight population subgroups and can be calculated for several transport modes. The radiological accident risk (probability times consequence summed over all postulated accidents) is calculated in terms of early fatalities, early morbidities, latent cancer fatalities, genetic effects, and economic impacts. Groundshine, inhalation, direct exposure, resuspension, and cloudshine dose pathways are modeled to calculate the radiological health risks from accidents. Economic impacts are evaluated based on costs for emergency response, cleanup, evacuation, income loss, and land use. RADTRAN II can be applied to specific scenario evaluations (individual transport modes or specified combinations), to compare alternative modes or to evaluate generic radioactive material shipments. Unit-risk factors can easily be evaluated to aid in performing generic analyses when several options must be compared with the amount of travel as the only variable.

  11. Results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66{sub -13}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73{sub -16}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup 5} (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69{sub -11}{sup +11} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  12. TARN II project

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, T.

    1985-04-01

    On the basis of the achievement of the accelerator studies at present TARN, it is decided to construct the new ring TARN II which will be operated as an accumulator, accelerator, cooler and stretcher. It has the maximum magnetic rigidity of 7 Txm corresponding to the proton energy 1.3 GeV and the ring diameter is around 23 m. Light and heavy ions from the SF cyclotron will be injected and accelerated to the working energy where the ring will be operated as a desired mode, for example a cooler ring mode. At the cooler ring operation, the strong cooling devices such as stochastic and electron beam coolings will work together with the internal gas jet target for the precise nuclear experiments. TARN II is currently under the contruction with the schedule of completion in 1986. In this paper general features of the project are presented.

  13. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  14. RISTA II trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John R.

    1998-11-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation has developed an advanced 2nd generation IR sensor system under the guidance of the US Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) as part of an Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) called Counter Mobile Rocket Launcher (CMRL). Designed to support rapid counter fire against mobile targets from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), the sensor system, called reconnaissance IR surveillance target acquisition (RISTA II), consists of a 2nd generation FLIR/line scanner, a digital data link, a ground processing facility, and an aided target recognizer (AiTF). The concept of operation together with component details was reported at the passive sensors IRIS in March, 1996. The performance testing of the RISTA II System was reported at the National IRIS in November, 1997. The RISTA II sensor has subsequently undergone performance testing on a Royal Netherlands Air Force F-16 for a manned reconnaissance application in August and October, 1997, at Volkel Airbase, Netherlands. That testing showed performance compatible with the medium altitude IR sensor performance. The results of that testing, together with flight test imagery, will be presented.

  15. THE MAGELLAN/IMACS CATALOG OF OPTICAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT CANDIDATES IN M83

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S. E-mail: winkler@middlebury.edu

    2012-11-15

    We present a new optical imaging survey of supernova remnants (SNRs) in M83, using data obtained with the Magellan I 6.5 m telescope and IMACS instrument under conditions of excellent seeing. Using the criterion of strong [S II] emission relative to H{alpha}, we confirm all but three of the 71 SNR candidates listed in our previous survey, and expand the SNR candidate list to 225 objects, more than tripling the earlier sample. Comparing the optical survey with a new deep X-ray survey of M83 with Chandra, we find that 61 of these SNR candidates have X-ray counterparts. We also identify an additional list of 46 [O III]-selected nebulae for follow-up as potential ejecta-dominated remnants, seven of which have associated X-ray emission that makes them strong candidates. Some of the other [O III]-bright objects could also be normal interstellar medium (ISM) dominated SNRs with shocks fast enough to doubly ionize oxygen, but with H{alpha} and [S II] emission faint enough to have been missed. A few of these objects may also be H II regions with abnormally high [O III] emission compared with the majority of M83 H II regions, compact nebulae excited by young Wolf-Rayet stars, or even background active galactic nuclei. The SNR H{alpha} luminosity function in M83 is shifted by a factor of {approx}4.5 times higher than for M33 SNRs, indicative of a higher mean ISM density in M83. We describe the search technique used to identify the SNR candidates and provide basic information and finder charts for the objects.

  16. Spectropolarimetry of the Type Ib Supernova iPTF 13bvn: revealing the complex explosion geometry of a stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Emma; Maund, Justyn R.; Baade, Dietrich; Wheeler, J. Craig; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Patat, Ferdinando; Höflich, Peter; Spyromilio, Jason; Wang, Lifan; Zelaya, Paula

    2016-03-01

    We present six epochs of spectropolarimetric observations and one epoch of spectroscopy of the Type Ib SN iPTF 13bvn. The epochs of these observations correspond to -10 to +61 d with respect to the r-band light-curve maximum. The continuum is intrinsically polarized to the 0.2-0.4 per cent level throughout the observations, implying asphericities of ˜10 per cent in the shape of the photosphere. We observe significant line polarization associated with the spectral features of Ca II IR3, He I/Na I D, He I λλ6678, 7065, Fe II λ4924 and O I λ7774. We propose that an absorption feature at ˜6200 Å, usually identified as Si II λ6355, is most likely to be high-velocity H α at -16 400 km s-1. Two distinctly polarized components, separated in velocity, are detected for both He I/Na I D and Ca II IR3 , indicating the presence of two discrete line-forming regions in the ejecta in both radial velocity space and in the plane of the sky. We use the polarization of He I λ5876 as a tracer of sources of non-thermal excitation in the ejecta; finding that the bulk of the radioactive nickel was constrained to lie interior to ˜50-65 per cent of the ejecta radius. The observed polarization is also discussed in the context of the possible progenitor system of iPTF 13bvn, with our observations favouring the explosion of a star with an extended, distorted envelope rather than a compact Wolf-Rayet star.

  17. THE ORIGIN AND OPTICAL DEPTH OF IONIZING RADIATION IN THE 'GREEN PEA' GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Although Lyman-continuum (LyC) radiation from star-forming galaxies likely drove the reionization of the universe, observations of star-forming galaxies at low redshift generally indicate low LyC escape fractions. However, the extreme [O III]/[O II] ratios of the z = 0.1-0.3 Green Pea galaxies may be due to high escape fractions of ionizing radiation. To analyze the LyC optical depths and ionizing sources of these rare, compact starbursts, we compare nebular photoionization and stellar population models with observed emission lines in the Peas' Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. We focus on the six most extreme Green Peas, the galaxies with the highest [O III]/[O II] ratios and the best candidates for escaping ionizing radiation. The Balmer line equivalent widths and He I {lambda}3819 emission in the extreme Peas support young ages of 3-5 Myr, and He II {lambda}4686 emission in five extreme Peas signals the presence of hard ionizing sources. Ionization by active galactic nuclei or high-mass X-ray binaries is inconsistent with the Peas' line ratios and ages. Although stacked spectra reveal no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features, we tentatively detect WR features in the SDSS spectra of three extreme Peas. Based on the Peas' ages and line ratios, we find that WR stars, chemically homogeneous O stars, or shocks could produce the observed He II emission. If hot stars are responsible, then the Peas' optical depths are ambiguous. However, accounting for emission from shocks lowers the inferred optical depth and suggests that the Peas may be optically thin. The Peas' ages likely optimize the escape of LyC radiation; they are old enough for supernovae and stellar winds to reshape the interstellar medium, but young enough to possess large numbers of UV-luminous O or WR stars.

  18. NSLS II Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M.; Doom, L.; Hseuh, H.; Longo, C.; Settepani, P.; Wilson, K.; Hu, J.

    2009-09-13

    National Synchrotron Light Source II, being constructed at Brookhaven, is a 3-GeV, 500 mA, 3rd generation synchrotron radiation facility with ultra low emittance electron beams. The storage ring vacuum system has a circumference of 792 m and consists of over 250 vacuum chambers with a simulated average operating pressure of less than 1 x 10{sup -9} mbar. A summary of the update design of the vacuum system including girder supports of the chambers, gauges, vacuum pumps, bellows, beam position monitors and simulation of the average pressure will be shown. A brief description of the techniques and procedures for cleaning and mounting the chambers are given.

  19. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  20. Run II luminosity progress

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Collider Run II program continues at the energy and luminosity frontier of high energy particle physics. To the collider experiments CDF and D0, over 3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity has been delivered to each. Upgrades and improvements in the Antiproton Source of the production and collection of antiprotons have led to increased number of particles stored in the Recycler. Electron cooling and associated improvements have help make a brighter antiproton beam at collisions. Tevatron improvements to handle the increased number of particles and the beam lifetimes have resulted in an increase in luminosity.

  1. The Detection Rate of Early UV Emission from Supernovae: A Dedicated Galex/PTF Survey and Calibrated Theoretical Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganot, Noam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran. O.; Sagiv, Ilan; Waxman, Eli; Lapid, Ofer; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; The ULTRASAT Science Team; Chelouche, Doron; Rafter, Stephen; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Poznanski, Dovi; Nakar, Ehud; Maoz, Dan; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; WTTH Consortium, The; Neill, James D.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Martin, Christofer D.; Gezari, Suvi; the GALEX Science Team; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Nugent, Peter E.; Sullivan, Mark; Palomar Transient Factory, The

    2016-03-01

    The radius and surface composition of an exploding massive star, as well as the explosion energy per unit mass, can be measured using early UV observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We present the first results from a simultaneous GALEX/PTF search for early ultraviolet (UV) emission from SNe. Six SNe II and one Type II superluminous SN (SLSN-II) are clearly detected in the GALEX near-UV (NUV) data. We compare our detection rate with theoretical estimates based on early, shock-cooling UV light curves calculated from models that fit existing Swift and GALEX observations well, combined with volumetric SN rates. We find that our observations are in good agreement with calculated rates assuming that red supergiants (RSGs) explode with fiducial radii of 500 R ⊙, explosion energies of 1051 erg, and ejecta masses of 10 M ⊙. Exploding blue supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars are poorly constrained. We describe how such observations can be used to derive the progenitor radius, surface composition, and explosion energy per unit mass of such SN events, and we demonstrate why UV observations are critical for such measurements. We use the fiducial RSG parameters to estimate the detection rate of SNe during the shock-cooling phase (<1 day after explosion) for several ground-based surveys (PTF, ZTF, and LSST). We show that the proposed wide-field UV explorer ULTRASAT mission is expected to find >85 SNe per year (˜0.5 SN per deg2), independent of host galaxy extinction, down to an NUV detection limit of 21.5 mag AB. Our pilot GALEX/PTF project thus convincingly demonstrates that a dedicated, systematic SN survey at the NUV band is a compelling method to study how massive stars end their life.

  2. EXTENDED NARROW-LINE EMISSION IN THE BRIGHT SEYFERT 1.5 GALAXY HE 2211-3903

    SciTech Connect

    Scharwaechter, J.; Dopita, M. A.; Zuther, J.; Fischer, S.; Eckart, A.; Komossa, S.

    2011-08-15

    Extended narrow-line regions (ENLRs) and extended emission-line regions have been the focus of integral field spectroscopy aiming at the inner kiloparsecs of nearby Seyfert galaxies as well as the larger environment of high-redshift QSOs. Based on observations with the Wide Field Spectrograph at the 2.3 m telescope of the Australian National University, we present spatially resolved emission-line diagnostics of the bright Seyfert 1.5 galaxy HE 2211-3903 which is drawn from a sample of the brightest Seyfert galaxies at z < 0.06 with luminosities around the classical Seyfert/QSO demarcation. In addition to the previously known spiral arms of HE 2211-3903, the emission-line maps reveal a large-scale ring with a radius of about 6 kpc which is connected to the active galactic nucleus (AGN) through a bar-like structure. The overall gas kinematics indicates a disk rotation pattern. The emission-line ratios show Seyfert-type, H II region-type, and composite classifications, while there is no strong evidence of LINER-type ratios. Shock ionization is likely to be negligible throughout the galaxy. The composite line ratios are explained via a mixing line between AGN and H II region photoionization. Composite line ratios are predominantly found in between the H II regions in the circum-nuclear region, the bar-like structure to the east of the nucleus, and the eastern half of the ring, suggesting AGN photoionization of the low-density interstellar medium in an ENLR on galaxy scales. The line ratios in the nucleus indicate N enrichment, which is discussed in terms of chemical enrichment by Wolf-Rayet and asymptotic giant branch stars during past and ongoing nuclear starburst activity.

  3. Massive stars exploding in a He-rich circumstellar medium - VIII. PSN J07285387+3349106, a highly reddened supernova Ibn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Terreran, G.; Taubenberger, S.; Noebauer, U. M.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Ciabattari, F.; Dennefeld, M.; Dimai, A.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Harutyunyan, A.; Leonini, S.; Ochner, P.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Zaggia, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present spectroscopic and photometric observations for the Type Ibn supernova (SN) dubbed PSN J07285387+3349106. Using data provided by amateur astronomers, we monitored the photometric rise of the SN to maximum light, occurred on 2015 February 18.8 UT (JDmax(V) = 245 7072.0 ± 0.8). PSN J07285387+3349106 exploded in the inner region of an infrared luminous galaxy, and is the most reddened SN Ibn discovered so far. We apply multiple methods to derive the total reddening to the SN, and determine a total colour excess E(B - V)tot = 0.99 ± 0.48 mag. Accounting for the reddening correction, which is affected by a large uncertainty, we estimate a peak absolute magnitude of MV = -20.30 ± 1.50. The spectra are dominated by continuum emission at early phases, and He I lines with narrow P-Cygni profiles are detected. We also identify weak Fe III and N II features. All these lines show an absorption component which is blueshifted by about 900-1000 km s-1. The spectra also show relatively broad He I line wings with low contrast, which extend to above 3000 km s-1. From about two weeks past maximum, broad lines of O I, Mg II and the Ca II near-infrared triplet are identified. The composition and the expansion velocity of the circumstellar material, and the presence of He I and α-elements in the SN ejecta indicate that PSN J07285387+3349106 was produced by the core collapse of a stripped-envelope star. We suggest that the precursor was WNE-type Wolf-Rayet star in its dense, He-rich circumstellar cocoon.

  4. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  5. Mod II Stirling engine overviews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Roger A.

    1988-01-01

    The Mod II engine is a second-generation automotive Stirling engine (ASE) optimized for part-power operation. It has been designed specifically to meet the fuel economy and exhaust emissions objectives of the ASE development program. The design, test experience, performance, and comparison of data to analytical performance estimates of the Mod II engine to date are reviewed. Estimates of Mod II performance in its final configuration are also given.

  6. PEP-II Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Gaydosh, Michael

    2003-05-14

    The PEP-II Asymmetric B-factory consists of two independent storage rings, one located atop the other in the 2200m-circumference PEP tunnel. The high-energy ring, which stores a 9-GeV electron beam, is an upgrade of the existing PEP collider. It re-utilizes all of the PEP magnets and incorporates a state-of-the-art copper vacuum chamber and a new RF system capable of supporting a one-amp stored beam. The low-energy ring, which stores 3.1-GeV positrons, is new construction. Injection is achieved by extracting electrons and positrons at collision energies from the SLC and transporting them each in a dedicated bypass line. The low-emittance SLC beams will be used for the injection process.

  7. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  8. A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars. III. A Search for Luminous Blue Variables and Other Hα Emission-Line Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip; McNeill, Reagin T.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Hodge, Paul W.; Blaha, Cynthia; Jacoby, George H.; Smith, R. C.; Strong, Shay B.

    2007-12-01

    We describe a search for Hα emission-line stars in M31, M33, and seven dwarfs in or near the Local Group (IC 10, NGC 6822, WLM, Sextans B, Sextans A, Pegasus, and the Phoenix dwarf) using interference filter imaging with the KPNO and CTIO 4 m telescopes and Mosaic cameras. The survey is aimed primarily at identifying new luminous blue variables (LBVs) from their spectroscopic similarity to known LBVs, avoiding the bias toward photometric variability, which may require centuries to manifest itself if LBVs go through long quiescent periods. Follow-up spectroscopy with WIYN confirms that our survey detected a wealth of stars whose spectra are similar to the known LBVs. We "classify" the spectra of known LBVs and compare these to the spectra of the new LBV candidates. We demonstrate spectacular spectral variability for several of the new LBV candidates, such as AM2, previously classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR), which now shows Fe I, Fe II, and Balmer emission lines but neither the N III λλ4634, 4642 nor the He II λ4686 emission it did in 1982. Profound spectral changes are also noted for other suspected and known LBVs. Several of the LBV candidates also show >0.5 mag changes in V over the past 10-20 years. The number of known or suspected LBVs is now 24 in M31, 37 in M33, 1 in NGC 6822, and 3 in IC 10. We estimate that the total number of LBVs in M31 and M33 may be several hundred, in contrast to the eight known historically through large-scale photometric variability. This has significant implications for the timescale of the LBV phase. We also identify a few new WRs and peculiar emission-line objects. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  9. The physical conditions, metallicity and metal abundance ratios in a highly magnified galaxy at z = 3.6252

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Rigby, Jane R.; Sharon, Keren; Johnson, Traci; Wuyts, Eva; Florian, Michael; Gladders, Michael D.; Oguri, Masamune

    2014-08-01

    We present optical and near-IR imaging and spectroscopy of SGAS J105039.6+001730, a strongly lensed galaxy at z = 3.6252 magnified by >30×, and derive its physical properties. We measure a stellar mass of log(M{sub *}/M{sub ☉}) = 9.5 ± 0.35, star formation rates from [O II] λλ3727 and Hβ of 55 ± 25 and 84 ± 24 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, respectively, an electron density of n{sub e} ≤ 10{sup 3} cm{sup –2}, an electron temperature of T{sub e} ≤ 14,000 K, and a metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.3 ± 0.1. The strong C III] λλ1907,1909 emission and abundance ratios of C, N, O, and Si are consistent with well-studied starbursts at z ∼ 0 with similar metallicities. Strong P Cygni lines and He II λ1640 emission indicate a significant population of Wolf-Rayet stars, but synthetic spectra of individual populations of young, hot stars do not reproduce the observed integrated P Cygni absorption features. The rest-frame UV spectral features are indicative of a young starburst with high ionization, implying either (1) an ionization parameter significantly higher than suggested by rest-frame optical nebular lines, or (2) differences in one or both of the initial mass function and the properties of ionizing spectra of massive stars. We argue that the observed features are likely the result of a superposition of star forming regions with different physical properties. These results demonstrate the complexity of star formation on scales smaller than individual galaxies, and highlight the importance of systematic effects that result from smearing together the signatures of individual star forming regions within galaxies.

  10. Utilizing clouds for Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobie, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the use of cloud computing resources for the Belle II experiment. A number of different methods are used to exploit the private and opportunistic clouds. Clouds are making significant contributions to the generation of Belle II MC data samples and it is expected that their impact will continue to grow over the coming years.

  11. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  12. [Modified Class II tunnel preparation].

    PubMed

    Rimondini, L; Baroni, C

    1991-05-15

    Tunnel preparations for restoration of Class II carious lesions in primary molars preserve the marginal ridge and minimize sacrifice of healthy tooth substructure. Materials with improved bonding to tooth structure and increase potential for fluoride release allow Class II restorations without "extension for prevention". PMID:1864420

  13. Technology II: Implementation Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) are facing a number of challenges, including the explosive use of the Internet, the digital divide, the need for integrating technology into teaching and learning, the impact of Tidal Wave II, and the need to ensure that technology is accessible to persons with disabilities. The CCCs' Technology II Strategic…

  14. ACRIM II Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-12-30

    ACRIM II Data and Information Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance ... and Order:   ASDC Order Tool FTP Web Access:  Data Pool Parameters:  Total Solar Irradiance ... ACRIM II Instrument Page ACRIM III Data Sets Readme Files:  Readme File Image ...

  15. Software Development at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Thomas; Hauth, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Belle II is a next generation B-factory experiment that will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor Belle. This requires not only a major upgrade of the detector hardware, but also of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software. The challenges of the software development at Belle II and the tools and procedures to address them are reviewed in this article.

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema

    Steve Dierker

    2016-07-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Dierker

    2008-03-12

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  18. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  19. The Stark II reality.

    PubMed

    Memel, Sherwin L; Grosvenor, John C

    2003-02-01

    The long awaited final regulations in Phase I of a two-phase rulemaking process under the Stark II law were published on January 4, 2001. The Phase I final rules govern interpretation of the Stark law as it is applied to referrals by a physician for designated categories of health services to entities in which the referring physician has a financial interest. These new regulations are of particular concern to specialists, such as orthopaedic surgeons, whose practices are oriented to ancillary services that are considered designated health services, such as radiology, physical therapy and durable medical equipment, and where the availability of clear guidance is essential to ensure that medically necessary care is provided in a manner that complies with law. However, rather than the "brightline" guidance that the healthcare community sought, the new regulations create uncertainty in areas that had not existed before. The new regulations require physicians to evaluate the full range of their business and professional relationships to avoid the risk of nonpayment of claims, civil money penalties, or program exclusion after the effective date of the new regulations. PMID:12567126

  20. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  1. [Oculocutaneous type II tyrosinosis].

    PubMed

    Podglajen-Wecxsteen, O; Delaporte, E; Piette, F; le Flohic, X; Bergoend, H

    1993-01-01

    Richner-Hanhart syndrome, also called oculo-cutaneous tyrosinosis type II, is a recessive autosomal genodermatosis consecutive to a disorder of tyrosine metabolism. It presents as a varying association of palmo-plantar keratosis, bilateral keratitis and mental retardation. The authors report a new case which is atypical in that palmoplantar keratosis made a late appearance. The diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of hypertyrosinaemia, hypertyrosinuria and urinary excretion of phenolic acids, and the absence of hepato-renal lesion. Needle biopsy of the liver, which demonstrates the deficiency of soluble cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, is not indispensable to the diagnosis and was not performed in our patient. Treatment consisted of a dietary measure: a controlled phenylalanine and tyrosine intake to obtain a tyrosinaemia below 10 mg/100 ml. This resulted in a favourable and durable course of the oculo-cutaneous lesions. In case of isolated skin lesion, retinoids can be prescribed either alone of combined with a diet, making it less strict.

  2. Oscillator strength measurements in samarium(II), neodymium(II) and praseodymium(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruohong

    A knowledge of the abundances of lanthanide ions in stellar photospheres is valuable in astrophysics, especially for chemically peculiar stars. However, the determination of elemental abundances is often limited by inadequate knowledge of oscillator strengths. Combining independently measured values of radiative lifetimes and branching fractions is an effective and precise method to measure oscillator strengths. It avoids absolute intensity measurements, requiring a knowledge of the absolute number density of particles and absolute measurements of intensity, and furthermore decreases the systematic error greatly. In the previous work of our group, the lifetimes of Sm II, Nd II and Pr II were obtained. In this thesis work, we measured the corresponding branching fractions of these lanthanide ions using a fast-ion-beam laser-induced- fluorescence technique. The power of this technique is that ions are selectively excited by a laser, which ensures that every branch comes from a single upper level and gets rid of spectral blends. Besides, the low ion-beam density ensures that the systematic errors due to collisions and radiation trapping are negligible. Combining the branching fractions with our previously measured lifetimes, we obtained 608, 430 and 260 oscillator strength values for Sm II, Nd II and Pr II transitions, respectively, over the wavelength range 350-850 nm. These transitions originate from 69 upper levels in the range 21 655 cm -1 -29 388 cm -1 for Sm II, 46 upper levels in the range 22 697 cm -1 -29 955 cm -1 for Nd II, and 32 levels in the range 22 040 cm -1 -28 577 cm -1 for Pr II. Of the 260 measured oscillator strength values of Pr II, 183 have been determined accurately for the first time. The uncertainties arise principally from systematic uncertainties of the efficiency calibration of the optical detection system (7.1%), with smaller statistical contributions (1.5%). Comparisons are made to prior measurements.

  3. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  4. Biosatellite II mission.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, O E

    1969-01-01

    Biosatellite B was launched from Cape Kennedy, Florida, on a two-stage DELTA launch vehicle at 6:04 p.m. on 7 September, 1967. Approximately nine minutes later the 435 kg spacecraft biological laboratory was placed into a satisfactory 315 km near-circular earth orbit, successfully separated from the launch vehicle's second stage and was designated Biosatellite II. The scientific payload consisting of thirteen selected general biology and radiation experiments were subjected to planned, carefully controlled environmental conditions during 45 hours of earth-orbital flight. The decision was made to abbreviate the scheduled 3-day mission by approximately one day because of a threatening tropical storm in the recovery area, and a problem of communication with the spacecraft from the tracking stations. Highest priority was placed on recovery which was essential to obtain the scientific results on all the experiments. The operational phase of the mission came to a successful conclusion with the deorbit of the recovery capsule, deployment of the parachute system and air recovery by the United States Air Force. The 127 kg recovery capsule was returned to biology laboratories at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, for disassembly and immediate inspection and analysis of the biological materials by the experimenters. It was evident immediately that the quality of the biology was excellent and this fact gave promise of a high return of scientific data. The environmental conditions provided to the experimental material in the spacecraft, provisions for experimental controls, and operational considerations are presented as they relate to interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:11949687

  5. Photosystem II: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, A W; Faller, P

    2003-01-01

    Based on the current model of its structure and function, photosystem II (PSII) seems to have evolved from an ancestor that was homodimeric in terms of its protein core and contained a special pair of chlorophylls as the photo-oxidizable cofactor. It is proposed that the key event in the evolution of PSII was a mutation that resulted in the separation of the two pigments that made up the special chlorophyll pair, making them into two chlorophylls that were neither special nor paired. These ordinary chlorophylls, along with the two adjacent monomeric chlorophylls, were very oxidizing: a property proposed to be intrinsic to monomeric chlorophylls in the environment provided by reaction centre (RC) proteins. It seems likely that other (mainly electrostatic) changes in the environments of the pigments probably tuned their redox potentials further but these changes would have been minor compared with the redox jump imposed by splitting of the special pair. This sudden increase in redox potential allowed the development of oxygen evolution. The highly oxidizing homodimeric RC would probably have been not only inefficient in terms of photochemistry and charge storage but also wasteful in terms of protein or pigments undergoing damage due to the oxidative chemistry. These problems would have constituted selective pressures in favour of the lop-sided, heterodimeric system that exists as PSII today, in which the highly oxidized species are limited to only one side of the heterodimer: the sacrificial, rapidly turned-over D1 protein. It is also suggested that one reason for maintaining an oxidizable tyrosine, TyrD, on the D2 side of the RC, is that the proton associated with its tyrosyl radical, has an electrostatic role in confining P(+) to the expendable D1 side. PMID:12594932

  6. Biosatellite II mission.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, O E

    1969-01-01

    Biosatellite B was launched from Cape Kennedy, Florida, on a two-stage DELTA launch vehicle at 6:04 p.m. on 7 September, 1967. Approximately nine minutes later the 435 kg spacecraft biological laboratory was placed into a satisfactory 315 km near-circular earth orbit, successfully separated from the launch vehicle's second stage and was designated Biosatellite II. The scientific payload consisting of thirteen selected general biology and radiation experiments were subjected to planned, carefully controlled environmental conditions during 45 hours of earth-orbital flight. The decision was made to abbreviate the scheduled 3-day mission by approximately one day because of a threatening tropical storm in the recovery area, and a problem of communication with the spacecraft from the tracking stations. Highest priority was placed on recovery which was essential to obtain the scientific results on all the experiments. The operational phase of the mission came to a successful conclusion with the deorbit of the recovery capsule, deployment of the parachute system and air recovery by the United States Air Force. The 127 kg recovery capsule was returned to biology laboratories at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, for disassembly and immediate inspection and analysis of the biological materials by the experimenters. It was evident immediately that the quality of the biology was excellent and this fact gave promise of a high return of scientific data. The environmental conditions provided to the experimental material in the spacecraft, provisions for experimental controls, and operational considerations are presented as they relate to interpretation of the experimental results.

  7. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Blood Donors; Blood Transfusion; HIV Infections; HIV-1; HIV-2; HTLV-I; HTLV-II; Retroviridae Infections; Hepatitis, Viral, Human; Hepatitis B; Hepacivirus; West Nile Virus

  8. New instruments at IPNS: POSY II and SAD II

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Felcher, G.P.; Kleb, R.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1988-09-29

    Three new instruments are currently in varying degrees of development/construction at IPNS. One of these, the Glass, Liquid, and Amorphous Materials Diffractometer (GLAD) is the subject of a separate paper in these Proceedings, and so will not be discussed further here. The other two, a second neutron reflectometer (POSY II) and a second small-angle diffractometer (SAD II) are described briefly below. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Delta II commercial space transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. F.

    1988-07-01

    Delta II is an upgraded variant of the Delta family of launch vehicles that has been in use by NASA since 1960. Among the design improvements incorporated by Delta II is a cryogenic-propellant second stage, a 2.89-m diameter satellite-protecting nose fairing, graphite/epoxy solid rocket motor cases, and 12:1 main engine expansion nozzle. The manufacturer/operator offers Delta II customers a dedicated, single satellite launch capability fully tailored to the given spacecraft's unique mission requirements.

  10. The Very Massive Star Content of the Nuclear Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Calzetti, D.; Sidoli, F.

    2016-05-01

    The blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a very young starburst containing twin nuclear star clusters, separated by a projected distance of 5 pc. One cluster (#5) coincides with the peak of the Hα emission and the other (#11) with a massive ultracompact H ii region. A recent analysis of these clusters shows that they have a photometric age of 1 ± 1 Myr, in apparent contradiction with the age of 3-5 Myr inferred from the presence of Wolf-Rayet features in the cluster #5 spectrum. We examine Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of #5 and show that the stellar features arise from very massive stars (VMSs), with masses greater than 100 M ⊙, at an age of 1-2 Myr. We further show that the very high ionizing flux from the nuclear clusters can only be explained if VMSs are present. We investigate the origin of the observed nitrogen enrichment in the circumcluster ionized gas and find that the excess N can be produced by massive rotating stars within the first 1 Myr. We find similarities between the NGC 5253 cluster spectrum and those of metal-poor, high-redshift galaxies. We discuss the presence of VMSs in young, star-forming galaxies at high redshift; these should be detected in rest-frame UV spectra to be obtained with the James Webb Space Telescope. We emphasize that population synthesis models with upper mass cutoffs greater than 100 M ⊙ are crucial for future studies of young massive star clusters at all redshifts.

  11. An HST Search for the Progenitor of the Type Ib Supernova 2010O in NGC 3690/Arp 299

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Howard E.; Aloisi, A.; Garmany, C.; James, B.; Newton, J.; Puckett, T.; Sohn, S. T.; van der Marel, R. P.; Nelemans, G.; Voss, R.; Nielsen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Several progenitor stars of Type II supernovae (SNe) have been identified in archival pre-explosion HST images. All of them are consistent with being red supergiants, as had been expected but never actually confirmed until the advent of HST imaging. The hydrogen-deficient Type Ib and Ic SNe are in a less satisfactory state. They are believed to be core-collapse SNe arising from massive stars that have lost their H envelopes. Unfortunately, however, there has never been an identified progenitor of an SN Ib or Ic, so it remains uncertain whether they are massive Wolf-Rayet stars, or less-massive stars in interacting binaries. The Type Ib SN 2010O was discovered by the amateur members of our team. It appeared in the starburst interacting galaxy NGC 3690 (Arp 299). It offers a tantalizing new opportunity, because NGC 3690 has been the subject of very extensive HST observations, ranging from the UV and optical to the near-IR, obtained before the outburst. SN 2010O is also interesting because of its close proximity to a variable X-ray source discovered by our team in pre-explosion Chandra images, which may support the interacting-binary scenario. We imaged SN 2010O with the HST's Wide Field Planetary Camera 3 in June 2010. We find that it lies close to, but not within, a young compact cluster. There is no conspicuous optical progenitor star in the pre-outburst HST images. We will discuss the implications for the progenitor objects of Type Ib supernovae. Funding from STScI is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND METAL CONTENT OF THE GREEN PEAS. NEW DETAILED GTC-OSIRIS SPECTROPHOTOMETRY OF THREE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Amorin, R.; Perez-Montero, E.; Vilchez, J. M.

    2012-04-20

    We present deep broadband imaging and long-slit spectroscopy of three compact, low-mass starburst galaxies at redshift z {approx} 0.2-0.3, also referred to as Green Peas (GP). We measure physical properties of the ionized gas and derive abundances for several species with high precision. We find that the three GPs display relatively low extinction, low oxygen abundances, and remarkably high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratios. We also report on the detection of clear signatures of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in these galaxies. We carry out a pilot spectral synthesis study using a combination of both population and evolutionary synthesis models. Their outputs are in qualitative agreement, strongly suggesting a formation history dominated by starbursts. In agreement with the presence of W-R stars, these models show that these GPs currently undergo a major starburst producing between {approx}4% and {approx}20% of their stellar mass. However, as models imply, they are old galaxies that formed most of their stellar mass several Gyr ago. The presence of old stars has been spectroscopically verified in one of the galaxies by the detection of Mg I {lambda}{lambda}5167, 5173 absorption lines. Additionally, we perform a surface photometry study based on Hubble Space Telescope data, which indicates that the three galaxies possess an exponential low surface brightness envelope. If due to stellar emission, the latter is structurally compatible with the evolved hosts of luminous blue compact dwarf (BCD)/H II galaxies, suggesting that GPs are identifiable with major episodes in the assembly history of local BCDs. These conclusions highlight the importance of these objects as laboratories for studying galaxy evolution at late cosmic epochs.

  13. Kupier prize lecture: Sources of solar-system carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward; Zinner, Ernst

    1994-01-01

    We have tried to deconvolve Solar-System carbon into its sources, on the basis of C-12/C-13 ratios (equivalent to R). Interstellar SiC in meteorites, representing greater than 4.6-Ga-old stardust from carbon stars, is isotopically heavier (bar R = 38 +/- 2) than Solar-System carbon (89), implying that the latter contains an additional, light component. A likely source are massive stars, mainly Type II supernovae and Wolf-Rayet stars, which, being O-rich, eject their C largely as CO rather than carbonaceous dust. The fraction of such light C in the Solar System depends on R(sub light) in the source. For R(sub light) = 180-1025 (as in 'Group 4' meteoritic graphite spherules, which apparently came from massive stars greater than 4.6 Ga ago), the fraction of light C is 0.79-0.61. Similar results are obtained for present-day data on red giants and interstellar gas. Although both have become enriched in C-13 due to galactic evolution (to bar-R = 20 and 57), the fraction of the light component in interstellar gas again is near 0.7. (Here bar R represents the mean of a mixture calculated via atom fractions; it is not identical to the arithmetic mean R). Interstellar graphite, unlike SiC, shows a large peak at R approximately equal 90, near the solar value. Although some of the grains may be of local origin, others show anomalies in other elements and hence are exotic. Microdiamonds, with R = 93, also are exotic on the basis of their Xe and N. Apparently R approximately 90 was a fairly common composition 4.6 Ga ago, of stars as well as the ISM.

  14. UNUSUAL {sup 29,30}Si-RICH SiCs OF MASSIVE STAR ORIGIN FOUND WITHIN GRAPHITES FROM THE MURCHISON METEORITE

    SciTech Connect

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2010-06-15

    Correlated transmission electron microscopy and NanoSIMS isotopic studies have revealed two unusual SiCs with large {sup 29,30}Si enrichments within micron-sized graphites from the Murchison meteorite. Such anomalies are rare among the overall SiC population (in <<0.01% of SiCs yet measured), whereas two of the three SiCs found within graphite show {sup 29,30}Si enrichments, in one case as large as {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si = (2.28 {+-} 0.03) x solar and {sup 30}Si/{sup 28}Si = (2.03 {+-} 0.03)x solar. C-burning and Ne-burning in massive stars (>8 M{sub sun} initial mass) during their post-main-sequence development are the only processes capable of producing sufficiently large {sup 29,30}Si enrichments. This material with heavy Si isotopic enrichments from the O/Ne and O/Si layers is later incorporated into carbonaceous stardust, either in ejecta from Type II supernovae or perhaps in the colliding winds of Wolf-Rayet binaries. Although often too small for Si isotopic measurements, four other SiC-containing graphites show other signatures of a massive star origin. Abundance estimates suggest that such unusual SiCs are present within {approx}1% of high-density graphites. This abundance can be reconciled with the much lower abundance in the overall SiC population if these unusual SiCs are naturally smaller ({approx}200 nm or less) than SiCs from other isotopic subgroups and if differential destruction of small unusual SiCs occurs in massive star outflows unless these SiCs are encapsulated in graphite.

  15. The Super-Star Cluster NGC 1569-A Resolved on Subparsec Scales with Hubble Space Telescope Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maoz, Dan; Ho, Luis C.; Sternberg, Amiel

    2001-06-01

    We present 3000-10000 Å Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph long-slit spectroscopy of the bright super-star cluster A (SSC-A) in the dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 1569. The 0.05" HST angular resolution allows us, for the first time, to probe for spatial variations in the stellar population of an ~106 Msolar SSC. Integrated ground-based spectra of SSC-A have previously revealed young Wolf-Rayet (W-R) signatures that coexist with features from supposedly older, red supergiant (RSG) populations. We find that the W-R emission complexes come solely from the subcluster A2, identified in previous HST imaging, and are absent from the main cluster A1, thus resolving the question of whether the W-R and RSG features arise in a single or distinct clusters. The equivalent widths of the W-R features in A2-including the C IV λ5808 complex that we detect in this object for the first time-are larger than previously observed in other W-R galaxies. Models with subsolar metallicity, as inferred from the nebular emission lines of this galaxy, predict much lower equivalent widths. On the ``clean'' side of A1, opposite to A2, we find no evidence for radial gradients in the observed stellar population at 0.05"II triplet. Based on observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  16. Medium-resolution spectroscopy of FORJ0332-3557: probing the interstellar medium and stellar populations of a lensed Lyman-break galaxy at z = 3.77

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanac, Rémi A.; Valls-Gabaud, David; Lidman, Chris

    2008-06-01

    We recently reported the discovery of FORJ0332-3557, a lensed Lyman-break galaxy at z = 3.77 in a remarkable example of strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lensing. We present here a medium-resolution rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectrum of the source, which appears to be similar to the well-known Lyman-break galaxy MS1512-cB58 at z = 2.73. The spectral energy distribution is consistent with a stellar population of less than 30Ma, with an extinction of Av = 0.5 mag and an extinction-corrected star formation rate SFRUV of 200-300h-170Msolara-1. The Lyα line exhibits a damped profile in absorption produced by a column density of about NHI = (2.5 +/- 1.0) × 1021cm-2, superimposed on an emission line shifted both spatially (0.5 arcsec with respect to the UV continuum source) and in velocity space (+830kms-1 with respect to the low-ionization absorption lines from its interstellar medium), a clear signature of outflows with an expansion velocity of about 270kms-1. A strong emission line from HeII λ164.04 nm indicates the presence of Wolf-Rayet stars and reinforces the interpretation of a very young starburst. The metallic lines indicate subsolar abundances of elements Si, Al and C in the ionized gas phase. Based on observations made at the ESO VLT under programmes 74.A-0536 and 78.A-0240. E-mail: remi.cabanac@ast.obs-mip.fr (RAC); david.valls-gabaud@obspm.fr (DV-G); clidman@eso.org (CL)

  17. Planetary nebulae and their mimics: The MASH-MEN Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissay, Rozenn; Parker, Quentin A.; Frew, David J.; Bojicic, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The total number of true, likely and possible planetary nebulae (PN) now known in the Milky Way is about 3000, approximately twice the number known a decade ago. The new discoveries are a legacy of the recent availability of wide-field, narrowband imaging surveys, primarily in the light of Hα. The two most important are the AAO/UKST SuperCOSMOS Hα survey SHS and the Isaac Newton photometric Hα survey IPHAS, which are responsible for most of the new discoveries. A serious problem with previous PN catalogs is that several different kinds of astrophysical objects are able to mimic PN in some of their observed properties leading to significant contamination. These objects include H~II regions and Strömgren zones around young O/B stars, reflection nebulae, Wolf-Rayet ejecta, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro objects, young stellar objects, B[e] stars, symbiotic stars and outflows, late-type stars, cataclysmic variables, low redshift emission-line galaxies, and even image/detector flaws. PN catalogs such as the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg Hα Planetary Nebula catalog (MASH) have been carefully vetted to remove these mimics using the wealth of new wide-field multi-wavelength data and our 100% follow-up spectroscopy to produce a compilation of new PN discoveries of high purity. During this process significant numbers of PN mimics have been identified. The aim of this project is to compile these MASH rejects into a catalog of Miscellaneous Emission Nebulae (MEN) and to highlight the most unusual and interesting examples. A new global analysis of these MEN objects is underway before publishing the MEN catalog online categorizing objects by type together with their spectra and multi-wavelength images.

  18. Recent results on the connection between massive stars and supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John

    2015-08-01

    With the dramatic increase in observational data on supernovae (SNe), SN studies are undergoing a renaissance. It is known that Type II SN IIP arise from the explosion of a red supergiant (RSG). In several cases the RSG is seen in pre-explosion images, but it is absent in post-SN images — unambiguous proof that the RSG has exploded. Surprisingly, all RSG progenitors identified have a mass less than approximately 20 M⊙. To date, there has been no direct detection of the progenitor of a Type Ib or Ic SN. Because their ejecta masses are generally low (3 to 5 M⊙), these SNe are believed to arise from a relatively low mass star in a binary system. Such systems dominate the statistics due to the initial mass function. The broad-lined Ic SNe tend to have higher mass, and some of these may be associated with classic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Type IIn SNe are a heterogeneous class of SN — they arise when the SN ejecta interacts with preexisting circumstellar material. Their spectra often exhibit narrow emission lines, and they can be particularly luminous due to the efficient conversion of kinetic energy into radiation. The origin of Type IIn SN and their connection to stellar evolution is the subject of fierce debate and controversy. The final class to be discussed are the pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) which arise from a nuclear detonation. PISNe have a distinct chemical signature, and the observational evidence for the existence of this class of SN is ambiguous and controversial. While much progress has been made, it is still difficult to get models of core-collapse SNe to explode from first principles. The problem is inherently 3D and numerous questions remain unanswered. How much material falls back onto the core? What is the nature and extent of mixing in the ejecta? What are the chemical yields? Do all massive stars end their life as a luminous SN?

  19. PROBING SHOCK BREAKOUT AND PROGENITORS OF STRIPPED-ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE THROUGH THEIR EARLY RADIO EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    We study properties of early radio emission from stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe; those of Type IIb/Ib/Ic). We suggest there is a sub-class of stripped-envelope SNe based on their radio properties, including the optically well-studied Type Ic SNe (SNe Ic) 2002ap and 2007gr, showing a rapid rise to a radio peak within {approx}10 days and reaching a low luminosity (at least an order of magnitude fainter than a majority of SNe IIb/Ib/Ic). They show a decline after the peak that is shallower than that of other stripped-envelope SNe while their spectral index is similar. We show that all these properties are naturally explained if the circumstellar material (CSM) density is low and therefore the forward shock is expanding into the CSM without deceleration. Since the forward shock velocity in this situation, as estimated from the radio properties, still records the maximum velocity of the SN ejecta following the shock breakout, observing these SNe in radio wavelengths provides new diagnostics on the nature of both the breakout and the progenitor which otherwise require a quite rapid follow-up in other wavelengths. The inferred post-shock breakout velocities of SNe Ic 2002ap and 2007gr are sub-relativistic, {approx}0.3c. These are higher than that inferred for SN II 1987A, in line with suggested compact progenitors. However, these are lower than expected for a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) progenitor. It may reflect an as yet unresolved nature of the progenitors just before the explosion, and we suggest that the W-R progenitor envelopes might have been inflated which could quickly reduce the maximum ejecta velocity from the initial shock breakout velocity.

  20. Are Superluminous Supernovae and Long GRBs the Products of Dynamical Processes in Young Dense Star Clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed "metal aversion" of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  1. HOST GALAXIES OF LUMINOUS TYPE 2 QUASARS AT z {approx} 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xin; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Krolik, Julian H.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2009-09-10

    We present deep Gemini GMOS optical spectroscopy of nine luminous quasars at redshifts z {approx} 0.5, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey type 2 quasar sample. Our targets were selected to have high intrinsic luminosities (M{sub V} < -26 mag) as indicated by the [O III] {lambda}5007 A emission-line luminosity (L[{sub OIII}]). Our sample has a median black hole mass of {approx}10{sup 8.8} M{sub sun} inferred assuming the local M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation and a median Eddington ratio of {approx}0.7, using stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} measured from the G band. We estimate the contamination of the stellar continuum from scattered quasar light based on the strength of broad H{beta}, and provide an empirical calibration of the contamination as a function of L {sub [OIII]}; the scattered-light fraction is {approx}30% of L{sub 5100} for objects with L {sub [OIII]} = 10{sup 9.5} L{sub sun}. Population synthesis indicates that young poststarburst populations (<0.1 Gyr) are prevalent in luminous type 2 quasars, in addition to a relatively old population (>1 Gyr) which dominates the stellar mass. Broad emission complexes around He II {lambda}4686 A with luminosities up to 10{sup 8.3} L{sub sun} are unambiguously detected in three out of the nine targets, indicative of Wolf-Rayet (WR) populations. Population synthesis shows that {approx}5 Myr poststarburst populations contribute substantially to the luminosities (>50% of L{sub 5100}) of all three objects with WR detections. We find two objects with double cores and four with close companions. Our results may suggest that luminous type 2 quasars trace an early stage of galaxy interaction, perhaps responsible for both the quasar and the starburst activity.

  2. The Very Massive Star Content of the Nuclear Star Clusters in NGC 5253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J.; Crowther, P. A.; Calzetti, D.; Sidoli, F.

    2016-05-01

    The blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 hosts a very young starburst containing twin nuclear star clusters, separated by a projected distance of 5 pc. One cluster (#5) coincides with the peak of the Hα emission and the other (#11) with a massive ultracompact H ii region. A recent analysis of these clusters shows that they have a photometric age of 1 ± 1 Myr, in apparent contradiction with the age of 3–5 Myr inferred from the presence of Wolf-Rayet features in the cluster #5 spectrum. We examine Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet and Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of #5 and show that the stellar features arise from very massive stars (VMSs), with masses greater than 100 M ⊙, at an age of 1–2 Myr. We further show that the very high ionizing flux from the nuclear clusters can only be explained if VMSs are present. We investigate the origin of the observed nitrogen enrichment in the circumcluster ionized gas and find that the excess N can be produced by massive rotating stars within the first 1 Myr. We find similarities between the NGC 5253 cluster spectrum and those of metal-poor, high-redshift galaxies. We discuss the presence of VMSs in young, star-forming galaxies at high redshift; these should be detected in rest-frame UV spectra to be obtained with the James Webb Space Telescope. We emphasize that population synthesis models with upper mass cutoffs greater than 100 M ⊙ are crucial for future studies of young massive star clusters at all redshifts.

  3. Are superluminous supernovae and long GRBs the products of dynamical processes in young dense star clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-20

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed 'metal aversion' of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  4. Discovery of a [WO] central star in the planetary nebula Th 2-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Gamen, R.; Díaz, R. J.; Niemela, V. S.

    2008-09-01

    Context: About 2500 planetary nebulae are known in our Galaxy but only 224 have central stars with reported spectral types in the Strasbourg-ESO Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (Acker et al. 1992; Acker et al. 1996). Aims: We have started an observational program aiming to increase the number of PN central stars with spectral classification. Methods: By means of spectroscopy and high resolution imaging, we identify the position and true nature of the central star. We carried out low resolution spectroscopic observations at CASLEO telescope, complemented with medium resolution spectroscopy performed at Gemini South and Magellan telescopes. Results: As a first outcome of this survey, we present for the first time the spectra of the central star of the PN Th 2-A. These spectra show emission lines of ionized C and O, typical in Wolf-Rayet stars. Conclusions: We identify the position of that central star, which is not the brightest one of the visual central pair. We classify it as of type [WO 3]pec, which is consistent with the high excitation and dynamical age of the nebula. Based on data collected at (i) the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina y Universidades Nacionales de La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan, Argentina; (ii) the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; (iii) the 8 m Gemini South Telescope, Chile.

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Candidate O Star Bubbles in N44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazé, Yaël; Chu, You-Hua; Guerrero, Martín A.; Oey, M. S.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Smith, R. Chris

    2002-12-01

    Dynamical studies of superbubbles and Wolf-Rayet ring nebulae show discrepancies from the standard adiabatic model for windblown bubbles. We therefore study the physical properties and kinematics of three candidate bubbles blown by single O stars to evaluate whether these discrepancies are also found in these simpler objects. Our sample candidates are N44 F, N44 J, and N44 M, in the outskirts of the H II complex N44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We have obtained ground-based and Hubble Space Telescope emission-line images and high-dispersion echelle spectra for these objects. From the Hα luminosities and the [O III]/Hα ratios of these nebulae, we estimate the spectral types of the ionizing stars to be O7 V, O9.5 V, and O9.5 V for N44 F, N44 J, and N44 M, respectively. We find that the observed expansion velocity of 12 km s-1 for N44 F is consistent with the stellar wind luminosity expected from the central ionizing star, as predicted by the standard bubble model. The observed upper limits for the expansion velocities of N44 J and N44 M are also compatible with the expected values, within the uncertainties. We also report the discovery in N44 F of strongly defined dust columns, similar to those seen in the Eagle Nebula. The photoevaporation of these dense dust features may be kinematically important and may actually govern the evolution of the shell. The inclusion of photoevaporation processes may thus undermine the apparent agreement between the observed bubble dynamics and the simple adiabatic models.

  6. Detecting a Hot Companion to the Progenitor of the Type Ic Supernova 1994I in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler

    2013-10-01

    Core-collapse supernovae {SNe} are the endpoints of the lives of massive stars {with initial mass > 8 solar masses}. We are reasonably confident that the progenitor stars for most hydrogen-rich Type II SNe are red supergiants, based in part on direct identifications with HST. However, the progenitors of the stripped-envelope He-rich Type Ib and He-poor Type Ic SNe have yet to be directly identified. These SNe are thought to arise from either single, high-mass stars in the Wolf-Rayet phase or, alternatively, from lower-mass stars in interacting binary systems. Both models can account for the required extensive envelope stripping. Until a progenitor is identified for these SN types, our best hope of testing these progenitor models is to detect the companion star to the progenitor, if the binary model holds. This star is predicted to be a hot supergiant. Therefore, it is best detected in the ultraviolet. The only SN which is sufficiently nearby and experienced low enough reddening to be a viable target for this detection is the SN Ic 1994I in M51. Furthermore, the SN was imaged by HST when it was still bright, so we can pinpoint its location. We therefore propose, as part of the UV Initiative in Cycle 21, to image the site in F275W and F336W to levels deep enough to significantly detect a putative progenitor companion, if it exists. The proposed observations will provide an important test of the binary progenitor hypothesis.

  7. The chemical composition of Galactic ring nebulae around massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Morisset, C.; García-Rojas, J.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep spectra of ring nebulae associated with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and O-type stars: NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58, S 308, NGC 7635 and RCW 52. The data have been taken with the 10m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6.5m Clay Telescope. We extract spectra of several apertures in some of the objects. We derive C2+ and O2+ abundances from faint recombination lines in NGC 6888 and NGC 7635, permitting to derive their C/H and C/O ratios and estimate the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF) of O2+. The ADFs are larger than the typical ones of normal H II regions but similar to those found in the ionized gas of star-forming dwarf galaxies. We find that chemical abundances are rather homogeneous in the nebulae where we have spectra of several apertures: NGC 6888, NGC 7635 and G2.4+1.4. We obtain very high values of electron temperature in a peripheral zone of NGC 6888, finding that shock excitation can reproduce its spectral properties. We find that all the objects associated with WR stars show N enrichment. Some of them also show He enrichment and O deficiency as well as a lower Ne/O than expected, this may indicate the strong action of the ON and NeNa cycles. We have compared the chemical composition of NGC 6888, G2.4+1.4, RCW 58 and S 308 with the nucleosynthesis predicted by stellar evolution models of massive stars. We find that non-rotational models of stars of initial masses between 25 and 40 M⊙ seem to reproduce the observed abundance ratios of most of the nebulae.

  8. THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND FEEDBACK IN THE PROGENITORS OF THE COMPACT PASSIVE GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christina C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lee, Bomee; Tundo, Elena; Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman; Trump, Jonathan R.; Cassata, Paolo; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Pentericci, Laura; Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Bell, Eric F.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; and others

    2015-02-10

    Quenched galaxies at z > 2 are nearly all very compact relative to z ∼ 0, suggesting a physical connection between high stellar density and efficient, rapid cessation of star-formation. We present rest-frame UV spectra of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at z ∼ 3 selected to be candidate progenitors of the quenched galaxies at z ∼ 2 based on their compact rest-frame-optical sizes and high Σ{sub SFR}. We compare their UV properties to those of more extended LBGs of similar mass and star-formation rate (non-candidates). We find that candidate progenitors have faster bulk interstellar medium (ISM) gas velocities and higher equivalent widths of interstellar absorption lines, implying larger velocity spread among absorbing clouds. Candidates deviate from the relationship between equivalent widths of Lyα and interstellar absorption lines in that their Lyα emission remains strong despite high interstellar absorption, possibly indicating that the neutral H I fraction is patchy, such that Lyα photons can escape. We detect stronger C IV P-Cygni features (emission and absorption) and He II emission in candidates, indicative of larger populations of metal-rich Wolf-Rayet stars compared to non-candidates. The faster bulk motions, broader spread of gas velocity, and Lyα properties of candidates are consistent with their ISM being subject to more energetic feedback than non-candidates. Together with their larger metallicity (implying more evolved star-formation activity) this leads us to propose, if speculatively, that they are likely to quench sooner than non-candidates, supporting the validity of selection criteria used to identify them as progenitors of z ∼ 2 passive galaxies. We propose that massive, compact galaxies undergo more rapid growth of their stellar mass content, perhaps because the gas accretion mechanisms are different, and quench sooner than normally sized LBGs at these (early) epochs.

  9. SAM II Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-06

    ... Data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument, which flew on board the Nimbus-7 ... Spatial Resolution:  The altitude profiles of aerosol extinction have a 1 km vertical resolution. Temporal ...

  10. The Monomeric Pentacyanocobaltate (II) Anion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosha, Donnati M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory procedures, background information, and discussion of experimental results are provided for the preparation of Thallium (I) Pentacyanocobaltate (II). The preparation of this pale green salt is carried out in an aqueous medium. (Author/JN)

  11. Pregnancy and tyrosinaemia type II.

    PubMed

    Cerone, R; Fantasia, A R; Castellano, E; Moresco, L; Schiaffino, M C; Gatti, R

    2002-08-01

    A female patient with tyrosinaemia type II is reported having undergone two untreated pregnancies. During pregnancies, plasma tyrosine was raised. The outcomes of both offspring show that maternal tyrosinaemia may have an adverse effect on the developing fetus.

  12. Annex II technical documentation assessed.

    PubMed

    van Drongelen, A W; Roszek, B; van Tienhoven, E A E; Geertsma, R E; Boumans, R T; Kraus, J J A M

    2005-12-01

    Annex II of the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is used frequently by manufacturers to obtain CE-marking. This procedure relies on a full quality assurance system and does not require an assessment of the individual medical device by a Notified Body. An investigation into the availability and the quality of technical documentation for Annex II devices revealed severe shortcomings, which are reported here. PMID:16419921

  13. The global structure of hot star winds: Constraints from spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eversberg, Thomas

    2000-11-01

    Chapter 1. We present time-series of ultra-high S/N, high resolution spectra of the He II λ 4686 Å emission line in the O4I(n)f supergiant ζ Puppis, the brightest early-type O-star in the sky. These reveal stochastic, variable substructures in the line, which tend to move away from the line-center with time. Similar scaled-up features are well established in the strong winds of Wolf-Rayet stars (the presumed descendants of O stars), where they are explained by outward moving inhomogeneities (e.g., blobs, clumps, shocks) in the winds. If all hot-star winds are clumped like that of ζ Pup, as is plausible, then mass-low rates based on recombination-line intensities will have to be revised downwards. Using a standard `β' velocity law we deduce a value of β = 1.0-1.2 to account for the kinematics of these structures in the wind of ζ Pup. In addition to the small-scale stochastic variations we also find a slow systematic variation of the mean central absorption reversal. Chapter 2. We introduce a new polarimeter unit which, mounted at the Cassegrain focus of any telescope and fiber-connected to a fixed CCD spectrograph, is able to measure all Stokes parameters I, Q, U and V across spectral lines of bright stellar targets and other point sources in a quasi-simultaneous manner. Applying standard reduction techniques for linearly and circularly polarized light we are able to obtain photon-noise limited line polarization. We briefly outline the technical design of the polarimeter unit and the linear algebraic Mueller calculus for obtaining polarization parameters of any point source. In addition, practical limitations of the optical elements are outlined. We present first results obtained with our spectropolarimeter for four bright, hot-star targets: We confirm previous results for Hα in the bright Be star γ Cas and find linear depolarization features across the emission line complex C III/C IV (λ 5696/λ 5808 Å) of the WR+O binary γ2 Vel. We also find circular

  14. Symbiotic stars and other Hα emission-line stars towards the Galactic bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miszalski, Brent; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Udalski, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    identified. These include central stars of planetary nebulae (PNe) [one (WC10-11) Wolf-Rayet and five with high-density cores], two novae, two WN6 Wolf-Rayet stars, two possible Be stars, a B[e] star with a bipolar outflow, an ultracompact H II region and a dMe flare star. Dust obscuration events were found in two central stars of PNe, increasing the known cases to five, as well as one WN6 star. There is considerable scope to uncover several more symbiotic stars towards the bulge, many of which are currently misclassified as PNe, provided that deep spectroscopy is combined with optical and near-infrared light curves.

  15. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of novel Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes with saccharin and nicotinamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, S.; Bulut, İ.; Naumov, P.; Biçer, E.; Çakır, O.

    2001-01-01

    Four novel mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) with saccharin and nicotinamide were synthesised and characterised on the basis of elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopic study, UV-Vis spectrometric and magnetic susceptibility data. The structure of the Cu (II) complex is completely different from those of the Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes. From the frequencies of the saccharinato CO and SO 2 modes, it has been proven that the saccharinato ligands in the structure of the Cu complex are coordinated to the metal ion ([Cu(NA) 2(Sac) 2(H 2O)], where NA — nicotinamide, Sac — saccharinato ligand or ion), whilst in the Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes are uncoordinated and exist as ions ([M(NA) 2(H 2O) 4](Sac) 2).

  16. Adsorption of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) on modified jute fibres.

    PubMed

    Shukla, S R; Pai, Roshan S

    2005-09-01

    The potential of a lignocellulosic fibre, jute, was assessed for adsorption of heavy metal ions like Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) from their aqueous solutions. The fibre was also used as adsorbent after chemically modifying it by two different techniques viz, loading of a dye with specific structure, C.I. Reactive Orange 13, and oxidising with hydrogen peroxide. Both the modified jute fibres gave higher metal ion adsorption. Thus, the dye loaded jute fibres showed metal ion uptake values of 8.4, 5.26 and 5.95 mg/g for Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II), respectively, while the corresponding values for oxidised jute fibres were 7.73, 5.57 and 8.02 mg/g, as against 4.23, 3.37 and 3.55 mg/g for unmodified jute fibres. Adsorption isotherm models indicated best fit for Langmuir model for the modified jute fibres. The adsorption values decreased with lowering of pH. The desorption efficiency, regenerative and reuse capacity of these adsorbents were also assessed for three successive adsorption-desorption cycles. The adsorptive capacity was retained only when the caustic soda regeneration is carried out as an intermediate step after desorption. Possible mechanism has been given.

  17. 24 CFR 202.12 - Title II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Title II. 202.12 Section 202.12... INSTITUTIONS AND MORTGAGEES Title I and Title II Specific Requirements § 202.12 Title II. (a) Tiered pricing—(1... mortgagee approved for participation in Title II programs is notified by the Secretary that it had a rate...

  18. EBR-II Data Digitization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Su-Jong; Rabiti, Cristian; Sackett, John

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  19. Heavy Stars Thrive among Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    VLT Observes Wolf-Rayet Stars in Virgo Cluster Galaxies [1] Summary Do very massive stars form in metal-rich regions of the Universe and in the nuclei of galaxies ? Or does "heavy element poisoning" stop stellar growth at an early stage, before young stars reach the "heavyweight class"? What may at the first glance appear as a question for specialists actually has profound implications for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies, those systems of billions of stars - the main building blocks of the Universe. With an enormous output of electromagnetic radiation and energetic elementary particles, massive stars exert a decisive influence on the surrounding (interstellar) gas and dust clouds . They also eject large amounts of processed elements, thereby participating in the gradual build-up of the many elements we see today. Thus the presence or absence of such stars at the centres of galaxies can significantly change the overall development of those regions and hence, presumably, that of the entire galaxy. A team of European astronomers [2] has now directly observed the presence of so-called Wolf-Rayet stars (born with masses of 60 - 90 times that of the Sun or more) within metal-rich regions in some galaxies in the Virgo cluster, some 50 million light-years away. This is the first unambiguous detection of such massive stellar objects in metal-rich regions . PR Photo 20a/02 : H II regions in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4254 . PR Photo 20b/02 : Multi-object-slit observation of galaxy NGC 4303 . PR Photo 20c/02 : Spectrum of H II region in NGC 4254 with Wolf-Rayet signatures. Production of heavy elements in the Universe Most scientists agree that the Universe in which we live underwent a dramatic event, known as the Big Bang , approximately 15,000 million years ago. During the early moments, elementary particles were formed which after some time united into more complex nuclei and in turn resulted in the production of hydrogen and helium atoms and their isotopes

  20. Proposed MIDAS II processing array

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.

    1982-03-01

    MIDAS (Modular Interactive Data Analysis System) is a ganged processor scheme used to interactively process large data bases occurring as a finite sequence of similar events. The existing device uses a system of eight ganged minicomputer central processor boards servicing a rotating group of 16 memory blocks. A proposal for MIDAS II, the successor to MIDAS, is to use a much larger number of ganged processors, one per memory block, avoiding the necessity of switching memories from processor to processor. To be economic, MIDAS II must use a small, relatively fast and inexpensive microprocessor, such as the TMS 9995. This paper analyzes the use of the TMS 9995 applied to the MIDAS II processing array, emphasizing computational, architectural and physical characteristics which make the use of the TMS 9995 attractive for this application.

  1. NSLS-II INJECTION CONCEPT.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN, T.; PINAYEV, I.; ROSE, J.; WANG, X.J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Currently the facility upgrade project is in progress at the NSLS (at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The goal of the NSLS-II is a 3 GeV ultra-low-emittance storage ring that will increase radiation brightness by three orders of magnitude over that of the present NSLS X-ray ring. The low emittance of the high brightness ring's lattice results in a short lifetime, so that a top-off injection mode becomes an operational necessity. Therefore, the NSLS-II injection system must provide, and efficiently inject, an electron beam at a high repetition rate. In this paper, we present our concept of the NSLS-II injection system and discuss the conditions for, and constraints on, its design.

  2. RTNS-II: present status

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, D.W.; Logan, C.M.

    1980-10-01

    The present status of the RTNS-II facility is described and typical operating parameters are given. A brief discussion is given of the methods used in production of the TiT/sub 2/ targets as well as their performance and tritium handling at RTNS-II. The various types of non-interactive beam diagnostics presently in use at the neutron sources are outlined. The on-line computer system which provides a time history of an irradiation and records target performance is described. Examples are listed of several representative experimental programs which have been carried out thus far at RTNS-II. These include both active and passive experiments. Finally, several of the major improvements to the facility made since the beginning of the experimental program are given.

  3. Charm physics at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    I. Furic

    2003-10-28

    The CDF II detector has the capability of triggering on displaced tracks. Because of this ability, CDF II has accrued large samples of charged meson decays to fully hadronic final states in 64 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data gathered at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Using initial Run II data samples, the production cross sections for J/{psi}, D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, D*{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} mesons have been measured. Ratios of branching ratios for Cabibbo suppressed final states and CP asymmetries in D{sup 0} meson decays have been studied. A measurement of the mass difference m(D{sub s}{sup +}) -m(D{sup +}) has been done, and a limit for the branching fraction of the FCNC D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays has been set.

  4. Propulsion Systems for Aircraft. Aerospace Education II. Instructional Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmer, James D.

    This curriculum guide accompanies another publication in the Aerospace Education II series entitled "Propulsion Systems for Aircraft." The guide includes specific guidelines for teachers on each chapter in the textbook. Suggestions are included for objectives (traditional and behavioral), suggested outline, orientation, suggested key points,…

  5. The PEP-II design

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.K.

    1995-05-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Positron Electron Project-II (PEP-II) is a design for a high-luminosity, asymmetric energy, electron-positron colliding beam accelerator that will operate at the center-of-mass energy of the {Upsilon}4S (10.58 GeV). The goal of the design is to achieve a large enough integrated luminosity with a moving center-of-mass reference frame to he able to observe the predicted rare decay modes of the {Upsilon}4S that do not conserve charge parity (CP).

  6. Case 22:Type II diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. It is composed of two types depending on the pathogenesis. Type I diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency and usually has its onset during childhood or teenage years. This is also called ketosis-prone diabetes. Type II diab...

  7. RARE II: The Administration's View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, M. Rupert

    1977-01-01

    RARE II is a new Roadless Area Review and Evaluation of the National Forest system. Administrators are attempting to inventory existing wilderness areas and to determine criteria for setting aside additional ones. This information will be used for the required 1980 update of the national assessment of forests and rangelands. (MA)

  8. Type-II Weyl semimetals.

    PubMed

    Soluyanov, Alexey A; Gresch, Dominik; Wang, Zhijun; Wu, QuanSheng; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi; Bernevig, B Andrei

    2015-11-26

    Fermions--elementary particles such as electrons--are classified as Dirac, Majorana or Weyl. Majorana and Weyl fermions had not been observed experimentally until the recent discovery of condensed matter systems such as topological superconductors and semimetals, in which they arise as low-energy excitations. Here we propose the existence of a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion that emerges at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter. This particle was missed by Weyl because it breaks the stringent Lorentz symmetry in high-energy physics. Lorentz invariance, however, is not present in condensed matter physics, and by generalizing the Dirac equation, we find the new type of Weyl fermion. In particular, whereas Weyl semimetals--materials hosting Weyl fermions--were previously thought to have standard Weyl points with a point-like Fermi surface (which we refer to as type-I), we discover a type-II Weyl point, which is still a protected crossing, but appears at the contact of electron and hole pockets in type-II Weyl semimetals. We predict that WTe2 is an example of a topological semimetal hosting the new particle as a low-energy excitation around such a type-II Weyl point. The existence of type-II Weyl points in WTe2 means that many of its physical properties are very different to those of standard Weyl semimetals with point-like Fermi surfaces.

  9. Recent results from DORIS II

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Solar Ca II K Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  11. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, R.

    1998-07-01

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  12. TREC Initiative with Cheshire II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Ray R.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the University of California at Berkeley's participation in the TREC (Text Retrieval Conference) interactive track experiments. Highlights include results of searches on two systems, Cheshire II and ZPRISE; system design goals and implementation; precision and recall results; search questions by topic and system; and results of…

  13. 40 K Fastrac II Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A 40 K Fastrac II duration test performed at Marshall Test Stand 116. The purpose of this test was to gauge the length of time between contact of TEA (Triethylenealuminum) and LOX (liquid oxygen) as an ignitor for the Fastrac engine.

  14. Achondrogenesis type II with polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Rittler, M; Orioli, I M

    1995-11-01

    We report on a newborn male infant who presented the typical findings of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino), and who also showed postaxial polydactyly on both feet and bilateral microtia. Polydactyly is frequently part of the short-rib syndromes, but has not been reported in achondrogenesis. The hypothesis of polydactyly as part of a contiguous gene syndrome is discussed. PMID:8588578

  15. Military Aerospace. Aerospace Education II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. C.

    This book is a revised publication in the series on Aerospace Education II. It describes the employment of aerospace forces, their methods of operation, and some of the weapons and equipment used in combat and combat support activities. The first chapter describes some of the national objectives and policies served by the Air Force in peace and…

  16. Outcome in tyrosinaemia type II.

    PubMed

    Barr, D G; Kirk, J M; Laing, S C

    1991-10-01

    Tyrosinaemia type II was diagnosed in a boy with failure to thrive and in his sister on neonatal screening. On diet the outcome, at 12 and 10 years respectively, has been excellent in respect of oculocutaneous sequelae, growth, and psychomotor development, contrasting with the generally unfavourable outcome in most reported cases.

  17. Application Programming in AWIPS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, Matt; McGrath, Kevin; Burks, Jason; Carcione, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Since its inception almost 8 years ago, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has integrated NASA data into the National Weather Service's decision support system (DSS) the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). SPoRT has, in some instances, had to shape and transform data sets into various formats and manipulate configurations to visualize them in AWIPS. With the advent of the next generation of DSS, AWIPS II, developers will be able to develop their own plugins to handle any type of data. Raytheon is developing AWIPS II to be a more extensible package written mainly in Java, and built around a Service Oriented Architecture. A plugin architecture will allow users to install their own code modules, and (if all the rules have been properly followed) they will work hand-in-hand with AWIPS II as if it were originally built in. Users can bring in new datasets with existing plugins, tweak plugins to handle a nuance or desired new functionality, or create an entirely new visualization layout for a new dataset. SPoRT is developing plugins to ensure its existing NASA data will be ready for AWIPS II when it is delivered, and to prepare for the future of new instruments on upcoming satellites.

  18. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  19. Diversity of parasite complex II.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shigeharu; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Ohmori, Junko; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Parasites have developed a variety of physiological functions necessary for completing at least part of their life cycles in the specialized environments of surrounding the parasites in the host. Regarding energy metabolism, which is essential for survival, parasites adapt to the low oxygen environment in mammalian hosts by using metabolic systems that are very different from those of the hosts. In many cases, the parasite employs aerobic metabolism during the free-living stage outside the host but undergoes major changes in developmental control and environmental adaptation to switch to anaerobic energy metabolism. Parasite mitochondria play diverse roles in their energy metabolism, and in recent studies of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, the mitochondrial complex II plays an important role in anaerobic energy metabolism of parasites inhabiting hosts by acting as a quinol-fumarate reductase. In Trypanosomes, parasite complex II has been found to have a novel function and structure. Complex II of Trypanosoma cruzi is an unusual supramolecular complex with a heterodimeric iron-sulfur subunit and seven additional non-catalytic subunits. The enzyme shows reduced binding affinities for both substrates and inhibitors. Interestingly, this structural organization is conserved in all trypanosomatids. Since the properties of complex II differ across a wide range of parasites, this complex is a potential target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In this regard, structural information on the target enzyme is essential for the molecular design of drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory complex II: Role in cellular physiology and disease. PMID:23333273

  20. Comparative studies of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE II satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared for measurement locations which are coincident in time and space. At 1.0 micron, the SAM II and SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles are similar within their measurement errors. In addition, sunrise and sunset aerosol extinction data at four different wavelengths are compared for occasions when the SAGE II and SAM II measurements are nearly coincident in space and about 12 hours apart.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic, antimicrobial and DNA cleavage studies of new Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Hg(II) complexes with naphthofuran-2-carbohydrazide Schiff base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halli, Madappa B.; Sumathi, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    A series of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Hg(II) complexes have been synthesized with newly synthesized Schiff base derived from naphthofuran-2-carbohydrazide and cinnamaldehyde. The elemental analyses of the complexes are confined to the stoichiometry of the type MLCl2 [M = Co(II) and Cu(II)], ML2Cl2 [M = Ni(II), Cd(II), Zn(II) and Hg(II)] respectively, where L is Schiff base ligand. Structures have been proposed from elemental analyses, IR, electronic, mass, 1H NMR, ESR spectral data, magnetic, and thermal studies. The measured low molar conductance values in DMF indicate that the complexes are non-electrolytes. Spectroscopic studies suggest coordination occurs through azomethine nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of the ligand with the metal ions. The Schiff base and its complexes have been screened for their antibacterial (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi) and antifungal (Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Cladosporium and Candida albicans) activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The DNA cleavage studies by agarose gel electrophoresis method was studied for all the complexes.

  2. Adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), and As(V) on bacterially produced metal sulfides.

    PubMed

    Jong, Tony; Parry, David L

    2004-07-01

    The adsorption of Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Ni(II), Fe(II) and As(V) onto bacterially produced metal sulfide (BPMS) material was investigated using a batch equilibrium method. It was found that the sulfide material had adsorptive properties comparable with those of other adsorbents with respect to the specific uptake of a range of metals and, the levels to which dissolved metal concentrations in solution can be reduced. The percentage of adsorption increased with increasing pH and adsorbent dose, but decreased with increasing initial dissolved metal concentration. The pH of the solution was the most important parameter controlling adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and As(V) by BPMS. The adsorption data were successfully modeled using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Desorption experiments showed that the reversibility of adsorption was low, suggesting high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. The mechanism of adsorption for the divalent metals was thought to be the formation of strong, inner-sphere complexes involving surface hydroxyl groups. However, the mechanism for the adsorption of As(V) by BPMS appears to be distinct from that of surface hydroxyl exchange. These results have important implications to the management of metal sulfide sludge produced by bacterial sulfate reduction.

  3. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  4. Solid phase extraction of lead (II), copper (II), cadmium (II) and nickel (II) using gallic acid-modified silica gel prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fazhi; Lin, Xucong; Wu, Xiaoping; Xie, Zenghong

    2008-01-15

    The immobilization of gallic acid on the surface of amino group-containing silica gel phases for the formation of a newly chelating matrix (GASG) is described. The newly synthesized extractant, characterized by the diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transformation spectroscopy and elemental analysis, was used to preconcentrate Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II). The pH ranges for quantitative sorption and the concentrations of HCl for eluting Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were opimized, respectively. The sorption capacity of the matrix has been found to be 12.63, 6.09, 15.38, 4.62mg/g for Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II), respectively, with the preconcentration factor of approximately 200 ( approximately 100 for Cd(II)). The effects of flow rates, the eluants, the electrolytes and cations on the metal ions extraction, as well as the chelating matrix stability and reusability, were also studied. The extraction behavior of the matrix was conformed with Langmuir's equation. The present preconcentration and determination method was successfully applied to the analysis of synthetic metal mixture solution and river water samples. The 3sigma detection limit and 10sigma quantification limit for Pb(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Ni(II) were found to be 0.58, 0.86, 0.65, 0.92microg/L and 1.08, 1.23, 0.87, 1.26microg/L, respectively. PMID:18371717

  5. SAM II Data and Information (ASCII)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-01

    SAM II (ASCII) Data and Information Data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument, ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Set Guide Readme Files:  Data Set (Text file) ...

  6. Type-II Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yepez, Jeffrey

    This paper discusses a computing architecture that uses both classical parallelism and quantum parallelism. We consider a large parallel array of small quantum computers, connected together by classical communication channels. This kind of computer is called a type-II quantum computer, to differentiate it from a globally phase-coherent quantum computer, which is the first type of quantum computer that has received nearly exclusive attention in the literature. Although a hybrid, a type-II quantum computer retains the crucial advantage allowed by quantum mechanical superposition that its computational power grows exponentially in the number of phase-coherent qubits per node, only short-range and short time phase-coherence is needed, which significantly reduces the level of engineering facility required to achieve its construction. Therefore, the primary factor limiting its computational power is an economic one and not a technological one, since the volume of its computational medium can in principle scale indefinitely.

  7. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W.; Elliott, S.R.; Cherry, M.L.

    1995-07-10

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sup +21}{sub {minus}18}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sup +13}{sub {minus}12}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  9. [Tyrosinemia type II. Case report].

    PubMed

    Benatiya, A I; Bouayed, M A; Touiza, E; Daoudi, K; Bhalil, S; Elmesbahi, I; Tahri, H

    2005-01-01

    Tyrosinemia type II or Richner-Hanhart syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by the association of pseudoherpetiform corneal ulcerations and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. We report the case of a 12 year-old young man presenting a superficial punctate keratitis and a corneal dystrophy in both eyes, associated with a palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. The dosage of the serum level of tyrosine is meaningfully raised to 1236 micromol/l. A dietary treatment restraining tyrosine and phenylalanine is started with favorable results after an evolution of 6 months. Tyrosinemia type II is an autosomal recessive disease, due to an enzymatic deficit in tyrosine aminotransferase. The diagnosis is based on the clinic and high level of serum and urinary tyrosine as well as of its urinary metabolites. This disease must be suspected in all cases of dentritic keratitis not reacting on the antiviral treatment, and more especially if it is associated with cutaneous lesions such as palmo-plantar keratosis.

  10. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  11. Blebbistatin and blebbistatin-inactivated myosin II inhibit myosin II-independent processes in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shi; Liu, Xiong; Korn, Edward D.

    2005-01-01

    Blebbistatin, a cell-permeable inhibitor of class-II myosins, was developed to provide a tool for studying the biologic roles of myosin II. Consistent with this use, we find that blebbistatin inhibits three myosin II-dependent processes in Dictyostelium (growth in suspension culture, capping of Con A receptors, and development to fruiting bodies) and does not inhibit growth on plates, which does not require myosin II. As expected, macropinocytosis (myosin I-dependent), contractile vacuole activity (myosin V-dependent), and phagocytosis (myosin VII-dependent), none of which requires myosin II, are not inhibited by blebbistatin in myosin II-null cells, but, unexpectedly, blebbistatin does inhibit macropinocytosis and phagocytosis by cells expressing myosin II. Expression of catalytically inactive myosin II in myosin II-null cells also inhibits macropinocytosis and phagocytosis. Both blebbistatin-inhibited myosin II and catalytically inactive myosin II form cytoplasmic aggregates, which may be why they inhibit myosin II-independent processes, but neither affects the distribution of actin filaments in vegetative cells or actin and myosin distribution in dividing or polarized cells. Blebbistatin also inhibits cell streaming and plaque expansion in myosin II-null cells. Our results are consistent with myosin II being the only Dictyostelium myosin that is inhibited by blebbistatin but also show that blebbistatin-inactivated myosin II inhibits some myosin II-independent processes and that blebbistatin inhibits other activities in the absence of myosin II. PMID:15671182

  12. MPS II drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  13. Heavy Stars Thrive among Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    VLT Observes Wolf-Rayet Stars in Virgo Cluster Galaxies [1] Summary Do very massive stars form in metal-rich regions of the Universe and in the nuclei of galaxies ? Or does "heavy element poisoning" stop stellar growth at an early stage, before young stars reach the "heavyweight class"? What may at the first glance appear as a question for specialists actually has profound implications for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies, those systems of billions of stars - the main building blocks of the Universe. With an enormous output of electromagnetic radiation and energetic elementary particles, massive stars exert a decisive influence on the surrounding (interstellar) gas and dust clouds . They also eject large amounts of processed elements, thereby participating in the gradual build-up of the many elements we see today. Thus the presence or absence of such stars at the centres of galaxies can significantly change the overall development of those regions and hence, presumably, that of the entire galaxy. A team of European astronomers [2] has now directly observed the presence of so-called Wolf-Rayet stars (born with masses of 60 - 90 times that of the Sun or more) within metal-rich regions in some galaxies in the Virgo cluster, some 50 million light-years away. This is the first unambiguous detection of such massive stellar objects in metal-rich regions . PR Photo 20a/02 : H II regions in the Virgo cluster galaxy NGC 4254 . PR Photo 20b/02 : Multi-object-slit observation of galaxy NGC 4303 . PR Photo 20c/02 : Spectrum of H II region in NGC 4254 with Wolf-Rayet signatures. Production of heavy elements in the Universe Most scientists agree that the Universe in which we live underwent a dramatic event, known as the Big Bang , approximately 15,000 million years ago. During the early moments, elementary particles were formed which after some time united into more complex nuclei and in turn resulted in the production of hydrogen and helium atoms and their isotopes

  14. Light echoes - Type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1987-01-01

    Type II supernovae (SNs) light curves show a remarkable range of shapes. Data have been collected for the 12 Type II SNs that have light curve information for more than four months past maximum. Contrary to previous reports, it is found that (1) the decay rate after 100 days past maximum varies by almost an order of magnitude and (2) the light curve shapes are not bimodally distributed, but actually form a continuum. In addition, it is found that the extinctions to the SNs are related to the light curve shapes. This implies that the absorbing dust is local to the SNs. The dust is likely to be part of a circumstellar shell emitted by the SN progenitor that Dwek (1983) has used to explain infrared echoes. The optical depth of the shell can get quite large. In such cases, it is found that the photons scattered and delayed by reflection off dust grains will dominate the light curve several months after peak brightness. This 'light echo' offers a straightforward explanation of the diversity of Type II SN light curves.

  15. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C. ); Standley, V. ); Voss, S.S. ); Haskin, E. )

    1993-01-10

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  16. PEP-II Operations Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2000-11-01

    PEP-II is a two-ring asymmetric B factory operating at the Upsilon(4S) resonance. It was constructed by a SLAC-LBNL-LLNL collaboration. The collider comprises two rings, a High-Energy Ring (HER) storing 9 GeV electrons, and a Low-Energy Ring (LER) storing 3.1 GeV positrons. Commissioning of the HER began in mid-1997 and commissioning of the LER began in mid-1998. First evidence for collisions was obtained on July 23, 1998. The BaBar detector was installed in early 1999, and commissioning with the detector commenced in May 1999. By September 1999, PEP-II had reached a peak luminosity of 1.35 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. In the present run, which began in October 1999, the peak luminosity has reached 3.1 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} and the integrated luminosity delivered is 25 fb{sup {minus}1}. At present, PEP-II is the world's highest luminosity collider. In this paper we describe the startup experience and summarize the operational experience during fiscal year 2000 (from October 1999 through September 2000). Plan s for luminosity upgrades are briefly described.

  17. Argus II retinal prosthesis system: An update.

    PubMed

    Rachitskaya, Aleksandra V; Yuan, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This review focuses on a description of the Argus II retinal prosthesis system (Argus II; Second Sight Medical Products, Sylmar, CA) that was approved for humanitarian use by the FDA in 2013 in patients with retinitis pigmentosa with bare or no light perception vision. The article describes the components of Argus II, the studies on the implant, and future directions. PMID:26855177

  18. Spectroscopic and mycological studies of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes with 4-aminoantipyrine derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Chandra, Sulekh

    2011-10-01

    Complexes of the type [M(L)X 2], where M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II), have been synthesized with novel NO-donor Schiff's base ligand, 1,4-diformylpiperazine bis(4-imino-2,3-dimethyl-1-phenyl-3-pyrazolin-5-one) which is obtained by the acid catalyzed condensation of 1,4-diformylpiperazine with 4-aminoantipyrine. The elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, UV, NMR, mass and EPR studies of the compounds led to the conclusion that the ligand acts as tetradentate chelate. The Schiff's base ligand forms hexacoordinated complexes having octahedral geometry for Ni(II) and tetragonal geometry for Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes. The mycological studies of the compounds were examined against the several opportunistic pathogens, i.e., Alternaria brassicae, Aspergillus niger and Fusarium oxysporum. The Cu(II) complexes were found to have most fungicidal behavior.

  19. 40 CFR Table II-1 to Subpart II of... - Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission Factors II Table II-1 to Subpart II of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98, Subpt. II, Table...

  20. 40 CFR Table II-1 to Subpart II of... - Emission Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission Factors II Table II-1 to Subpart II of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98, Subpt. II, Table...

  1. The Stars Surrounding WR 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, David G.; Forbes, Douglas

    2005-09-01

    Photoelectric UBV photometry is presented for stars in a field closely adjacent to the Wolf-Rayet star WR 55 (WN7) in a search for a possible parent cluster. There is a group of at least eight stars ~7' south-southeast of the WR star forming a newly discovered, sparsely populated open cluster (designated C1331-622), but the stars are only 819+/-26 pc distant, less than a quarter of the predicted distance to WR 55.

  2. Spectroscopic Monitoring of Southern Galactic O and WN Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamen, R.; Barbá, R. H.; Morrell, N. I.; Arias, J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2008-08-01

    We are conducting a spectroscopic monitoring of O- and WN-type stars for which there is no indication of multiplicity in the Galactic O-Stars Catalog (Maíz-Apellániz et al. 2004) or in the VIIth Catalog of Galactic Wolf-Rayet Stars (van der Hucht 2001). We search for radial-velocity (RV) variations indicative of orbital motion.

  3. Massive stars in the galaxies of the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    2013-07-01

    The star-forming galaxies of the Local Group act as our laboratories for testing massive star evolutionary models. In this review, I briefly summarize what we believe we know about massive star evolution, and the connection between OB stars, Luminous Blue Variables, yellow supergiants, red supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars. The difficulties and recent successes in identifying these various types of massive stars in the neighboring galaxies of the Local Group will be discussed.

  4. 3D numerical model for NGC 6888 Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Velázquez, P. F.; Rosado, M.

    We present 3D numerical simulations of the NGC6888 nebula considering the proper motion and the evolution of the star, from the red supergiant (RSG) to the Wolf-Rayet (WR) phase. Our simulations reproduce the limb-brightened morphology observed in [OIII] and X-ray emission maps. The synthetic maps computed by the numerical simulations show filamentary and clumpy structures produced by instabilities triggered in the interaction between the WR wind and the RSG shell.

  5. Synthesis, spectral characterization and biological evaluation of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with thiosemicarbazone ending by pyrazole and pyridyl rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; Al-Jahdali, M.; El-Rakhawy, El-Bastawesy R.

    2014-08-01

    Here we present the synthesis of the new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes with chelating ligand (Z)-(2-((1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylene) hydrazinyl)(pyridin-2-ylamino)methanethiol. All the complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, UV-vis, magnetic susceptibility measurements and EPR spectral studies. IR spectra of complexes showed that the ligand behaves as NN neutral bidentate, NSN mononegative tridentate and NSNN mononegative tetradentate. The electronic spectra and the magnetic measurements suggested the octahedral geometry for all complexes as well as the EPR confirmed the tetragonal distorted octahedral for Cu(II) complex. Cd(II) complex showed the highest inhibitory antioxidant activity either using ABTS method. The SOD-like activity exhibited those Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes have strong antioxidative properties. We tested the synthesized compounds for antitumor activity and showed that the ability to kill liver (HePG2) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells definitely.

  6. Zeeman effect of As II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Andrew, K. L.

    1972-01-01

    Spectrograms of As electrodeless-discharge tubes operated in a field of 24,025 G have given Zeeman patterns for 232 As II spectral lines from 2361 to 10,556 A and yielded 80 Lande g factors, of which more than half are new. There is agreement between these and the g values calculated by least-squares fitting for single configurations or for multiconfigurations, where configuration interaction is noticeable. All of the measured g values as well as the energy levels are used in the fitting process.

  7. Commissioning of NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Willeke, F.

    2015-05-03

    NSLS-II, the new 3rd generation light source at BNL was designed for a brightness of 1022 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 (0.1%BW)-1. It was constructed between 2009 and 2014. The storage ring was commissioned in April 2014 which was followed by insertion device and beamline commissioning in the fall of 2014. All ambitious design parameters of the facility have already been achieved except for commissioning the full beam intensity of 500mA which requires more RF installation. This paper reports on the results of commissioning.

  8. Shuttle II - The next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative evaluation is conducted for next-generation Space Shuttle-type system configurations, in light of mission and design goals, performance and operational requirements, and technology development needs and opportunities. Cargo vehicle options presently entertained are an unmanned Shuttle Derivative Vehicle and a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. Two high priority manned vehicle options are small (35,000-lb payload) and large (150,000-lb payload) fully reusable vehicles. Attention is given to single stage vs. two-stage 'Shuttle II' system performance and economic projections.

  9. Mass spectrometry and potentiometry studies of Pb(II)-, Cd(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes.

    PubMed

    Furia, Emilia; Aiello, Donatella; Di Donna, Leonardo; Mazzotti, Fabio; Tagarelli, Antonio; Thangavel, Hariprasad; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2014-01-21

    Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes were investigated by potentiometric and different mass spectrometric (MS) methodologies. Laser desorption mass spectrometry has provided both the composition and structure of metal-cystine complexes according to the speciation models proposed on the basis of the potentiometric data. Detection of neutral complexes was achieved by protonation or electrochemical reduction during mass spectrometric experiments. The redox activity of metal-cystine complexes was confirmed by laser desorption and charge transfer matrix assisted laser assisted MS experiments, which allowed us to observe the formation of complexes with a reduction of cystine. The stoichiometry of Cd(II)-, Pb(II)- and Zn(II)-cystine complexes was defined by observing the isotopic pattern of the investigated compound. The results suggest that interaction occurs through the carboxylate group of the ligand.

  10. Spectral studies on cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes of naphthaldehyde substituted aroylhydrazones.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Deo Nandan

    2006-07-01

    A series of new coordination complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) with two new aroylhydrazones, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone (H(2)L(1)) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-2-thenoyl-hydrazone (H(2)L(2)) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy and thermal analysis. IR spectra suggests ligands acts as a tridentate dibasic donor coordinating through the deprotonated naphtholic oxygen atom, azomethine nitrogen atom and enolic oxygen atom. EPR and ligand field spectra suggests octahedral geometry for Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and a square planar geometry for Cu(II) complexes. PMID:16529995

  11. Spectral studies on cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes of naphthaldehyde substituted aroylhydrazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Deo Nandan

    2006-07-01

    A series of new coordination complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II) with two new aroylhydrazones, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone (H 2L 1) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-2-thenoyl-hydrazone (H 2L 2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, 1H NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, electronic spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy and thermal analysis. IR spectra suggests ligands acts as a tridentate dibasic donor coordinating through the deprotonated naphtholic oxygen atom, azomethine nitrogen atom and enolic oxygen atom. EPR and ligand field spectra suggests octahedral geometry for Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and a square planar geometry for Cu(II) complexes.

  12. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C. ); Standley, V. ); Voss, S.S. ); Haskin, E. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz 11 space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safely assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the US with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  13. The SRC-II process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, B. K.; Jackson, D. M.

    1981-03-01

    The Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-II) process which produces low-sulfur distillate fuel oil from coal is discussed. The process dissolves coal in a process-derived solvent at elevated temperature and pressure in the presence of hydrogen, separates the undissolved mineral residue, then recovers the original solvent by vacuum distillation. The distillate fuel oil produced is for use largely as a nonpolluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam and is expected to be competitive with petroleum fuels during the 1980s. During this period, the SRC-II fuel oil is expected to be attractive compared with combustion of coal with flue gas desulfurization in U.S. East Coast oil-burning power plants, as well as in small and medium-sized industrial boilers. The substantial quantities of methane, light hydrocarbons and naphtha produced by the process have value as feedstocks for preparation of pipeline gas, ethylene and high-octane unleaded gasoline, and can replace petroleum fractions in many applications. The liquid and gas products from a future large-scale plant, such as the 6000 t/day plant planned for Morgantown, West Virginia, are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.25 to $4.75/GJ.

  14. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  15. THE SPECTRUM OF Fe II

    SciTech Connect

    Nave, Gillian; Johansson, Sveneric

    2013-01-15

    The spectrum of singly ionized iron (Fe II) has been recorded using high-resolution Fourier transform (FT) and grating spectroscopy over the wavelength range 900 A to 5.5 {mu}m. The spectra were observed in high-current continuous and pulsed hollow cathode discharges using FT spectrometers at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, AZ and Imperial College, London and with the 10.7 m Normal Incidence Spectrograph at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Roughly 12,900 lines were classified using 1027 energy levels of Fe II that were optimized to measured wavenumbers. The wavenumber uncertainties of lines in the FT spectra range from 10{sup -4} cm{sup -1} for strong lines around 4 {mu}m to 0.05 cm{sup -1} for weaker lines around 1500 A. The wavelength uncertainty of lines in the grating spectra is 0.005 A. The ionization energy of (130,655.4 {+-} 0.4) cm{sup -1} was estimated from the 3d{sup 6}({sup 5}D)5g and 3d{sup 6}({sup 5}D)6h levels.

  16. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal analysis and electrical conductivity studies of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) vitamin B2 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Moussa, Mohamed A. A.; Mohamed, Soha F.

    2011-05-01

    Riboflavin (RF) complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) were successfully synthesized. Structures of metal complexes obtained were confirmed and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, and infrared spectra. DC electrical conductivity measurements indicated that the alkaline earth metal (II) complexes of RF ligand are non-electrolytes. Elemental analysis of chelates suggest that the metal(II) ligand ratio is 1:2 with structure formula as [M(RF) 2( X) 2]· nH 2O. Infrared assignments clearly show that RF ligand coordinated as a bidentate feature through azomethine nitrogen of pyrazine ring and C dbnd O of pyrimidine-2,4-dione. Thermal analyses of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) complexes were investigated using (TG/DSC) under atmospheric nitrogen between 30 and 800 °C. The surface morphology of the complexes was studied by SEM. The electrical conductivities of RF and its metal complexes were also measured with DC electrical conductivity in the temperature range from room to 483 K.

  17. Use of anodic stripping voltammetry to determine zinc(II), lead(II), and copper(II) in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimkina, L.M.; Gus'kova, V.P.

    1988-01-20

    The existing standard procedure for the polarographic determination of Zn, Pb, and Cu, based on the cathodic polarization of a dropping mercury electrode, is laborious and time-consuming and allows one to determine the above-mentioned trace elements only when they are separated beforehand. We consider the possibility of using anodic stripping voltammetry with a mercury film electrode for the simultaneous determination of Zn(II), Pb(II), and Cu(II) in foods.

  18. Quiet High Speed Fan II (QHSF II): Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontos, Karen; Weir, Don; Ross, Dave

    2012-01-01

    This report details the aerodynamic, mechanical, structural design and fabrication of a Honey Engines Quiet High Speed Fan II (lower hub/tip ratio and higher specific flow than the Baseline I fan). This fan/nacelle system incorporates features such as advanced forward sweep and an advanced integrated fan/fan exit guide vane design that provides for the following characteristics: (1) Reduced noise at supersonic tip speeds, in comparison to current state-of-the-art fan technology; (2) Improved aeroelastic stability within the anticipated operating envelope; and (3) Aerodynamic performance consistent with current state-of-the-art fan technology. This fan was fabricated by Honeywell and tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel for aerodynamic, aeromechanical, and acoustic performance.

  19. EDTA functionalized silica for removal of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Barakat, M A; Daza, Y A; Woodcock, H L; Kuhn, J N

    2013-10-15

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) functionalized silica adsorbent has been synthesized using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxylsilane (APTES) as a bridging link between silanol groups (SiOH) of silica and carboxylic group of EDTA. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) analysis confirmed the grafting of EDTA onto the silica. The synthesized EDTA-silica was investigated as an adsorbent for removal of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of solution pH, initial solution concentration, and contact time were studied. The removal of metal ions increased with the increase in solution pH, contact time and concentration. The maximum equilibrium time was found to be 45min for all three metal ions. Kinetics studies revealed that the adsorption of Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) onto EDTA-silica followed the pseudo-second order kinetics and film diffusion and intra-particle diffusion mechanism were involved. Adsorption equilibrium data were well fitted to Langmuir isotherm model and maximum monolayer adsorption capacity for Cu(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) was 79.36, 74.07 and 67.56mg g(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic results reveal that the removal of metals onto EDTA-silica was endothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  20. Solid phase extraction of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol loaded Amberlite XAD-1180.

    PubMed

    Tokalioğlu, Serife; Yilmaz, Vedat; Kartal, Senol

    2009-05-01

    A new method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) ions in various matrices was proposed. The method is based on the adsorption and chelation of the metal ions on a column containing Amberlite XAD-1180 resin impregnated with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) reagent prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The effect of pH, type, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume, flow rates of sample and elution solutions, and interfering ions have been investigated. The optimum pH for simultaneous retention of all the metal ions was 9. Eluent for quantitative elution was 20 ml of 2 mol l(-1) HNO(3). The optimum sample and eluent flow rates were found as 4 ml min(-1), and also sample volume was 500 ml, except for Mn (87% recovery). The sorption capacity of the resin was found to be 0.77, 0.41, 0.57, and 0.30 mg g(-1) for Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), and Mn(II), respectively. The preconcentration factor of the method was 200 for Cu(II), 150 for Pb(II), 100 for Cd(II) and Ni(II), and 50 for Mn(II). The recovery values for all of the metal ions were > or = 95% and relative standard deviations (RSDs) were < or = 5.1%. The detection limit values were in the range of 0.03 and 1.19 microg l(-1). The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysing the certified reference materials (TMDA 54.4 fortified lake water and GBW 07605 tea samples) and the recovery studies. This procedure was applied to the determination of Cu(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Mn(II) in waste water and lake water samples.

  1. Double quantum coherence electron spin resonance on coupled Cu(II)-Cu(II) electron spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, James S.; Saxena, Sunil

    2005-10-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the ability to generate double quantum coherences (DQCs) for the case of Cu(II). We show that small splittings (˜7 MHz) from the Cu(II)-Cu(II) electron-electron magnetic dipolar interaction can be reliably resolved even though the inhomogeneously broadened Cu(II) linewidth is ˜2 GHz. A Cu(II)-Cu(II) distance of 2.0 nm was measured on a model peptide system, thus, demonstrating that distances on the nanometer scale may be measured using DQC electron spin resonance (ESR).

  2. Start II, red ink, and Boris Yeltsin

    SciTech Connect

    Arbatov, A.

    1993-04-01

    Apart from the vulnerability implied by the START II treaty, it will bear the burden of the general political opposition to the Yeltsin administration. START II will be seen as part of an overall Yeltsin-Andrei Kozyrev foreign policy that is under fire for selling out Russian national interests in Yugoslavia, the Persian Gulf, and elsewhere. This article discusses public opinion concerning START II, the cost of its implementation, and the general purpose of the treaty.

  3. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  4. [Study on hemolytic mechanism of polyphyllin II].

    PubMed

    Ning, Li-hua; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yao-xiang; Li, Xin-ping

    2015-09-01

    To study the hemolytic effect of polyphyllin II (PP II) mediated by anion channel protein and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), in order to initially reveal its hemolytic mechanism in vitro. In the experiment, the spectrophotometric method was adopted to detect the hemolysis of PP II in vitro and the effect of anion channel-related solution and blocker, glucose channel-related inhibitor and multi-target drugs dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and diazepam on the hemolysis of PP II. The scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were used to observe the effect of PP II on erythrocyte (RBC) morphology. The results showed that PP II -processed blood cells were severely deformed into spherocytes, acanthocyturia and vesicae. According to the results of the PP II hemolysis experiment in vitro, the anion hypertonic solution LiCl, NaHCO3, Na2SO4 and PBS significantly inhibited the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05), while blockers NPPB and DIDS remarkably promoted it (P < 0.01). Hyperosmotic sodium chloride, fructose and glucose at specific concentrations notably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05). The glucose channel inhibitor Cytochalasin B and verapamil remarkably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.01). The hemolysis induced by PP II could also be antagonized by 1 gmol x L(1) diazepam and 100 μmol x L(-1) DHEA pretreated for 1 min (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the hemolytic mechanism of PP II in vitro may be related to the increase in intracellular osmotic pressure and rupture of erythrocytes by changing the anion channel transport activity, with GLUT1 as the major competitive interaction site. PMID:26983211

  5. AGEX II: Technical quarterly, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C.

    1995-03-01

    The AGEX II Technical Quarterly publishes short technical contributions on above ground experiments that use pulsed power and laser drivers. The Quarterly is intended to provide rapid exposure of timely technical ideas and results as well as a means for documenting AGEX II progress and scientific quality for the AGEX II community. Suitable topics include experimental results, diagnostic apparatus, theoretical design, and scaling, among others.

  6. Telemetry Tests Of The Advanced Receiver II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Bevan, Roland P.; Marina, Miguel

    1993-01-01

    Report describes telemetry tests of Advanced Receiver II (ARX-II): digital radio receiving subsystem operating on intermediate-frequency output of another receiving subsystem called "multimission receiver" (MMR), detecting carrier, subcarrier, and data-symbol signals transmitted by spacecraft, and extracts Doppler information from signals. Analysis of data shows performance of MMR/ARX-II system comparable and sometimes superior to performances of Blk-III/BPA and Blk-III/SDA/SSA systems.

  7. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  8. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  9. Probing outflows in z = 1 ∼ 2 galaxies through Fe II/Fe II* multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuping; Giavalisco, Mauro; Guo, Yicheng

    2014-10-01

    We report on a study of the 2300-2600 Å Fe II/Fe II* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.0 < z < 2.6 as probes of galactic-scale outflows. We extracted a mass-limited sample of 97 galaxies at z ∼ 1.0-2.6 from ultra-deep spectra obtained during the GMASS spectroscopic survey in the GOODS South field with the Very Large Telescope and FORS2. We obtain robust measures of the rest equivalent width of the Fe II absorption lines down to a limit of W{sub r} > 1.5 Å and of the Fe II* emission lines to W{sub r} > 0.5 Å. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [O II] emission line, we find that both the Fe II and Mg II absorption lines are blueshifted, indicating that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the Fe II gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of Mg II. We investigate the variation of Fe II line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that Fe II lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the Fe II lines relative to the Mg II doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended Fe II* emission in two-dimensional stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for Fe II absorption lie close (3 ∼ 4 kpc) to the disks of galaxies. We show that the Fe II/Fe II* multiplets offer unique probes of the kinematic structure of galactic outflows.

  10. Neurosurgical notes: World War II.

    PubMed

    Pool, J L

    2000-03-01

    This concerns my activities as a neurosurgeon in the European Theater of Operations and the North African, Tunisian campaign, during World War II. Action during the Battle of the Bulge came later. Our mobile tent hospital, the 9th Evacuation Hospital, was similar to that depicted in the television show M*A*S*H. To lend flavor to these comments, I have referred to medical and surgical matters in other units as well as our own, mentioned global aspects of the war, and included vignettes of life off-duty. The story begins after induction into the Army Medical Corps as a volunteer in July 1942 and ends with honorable discharge in April 1946. PMID:10719869

  11. EPACT II: project and methods.

    PubMed

    Juillerat, Pascal; Froehlich, Florian; Felley, Christian; Pittet, Valérie; Mottet, Christian; Gonvers, Jean-Jacques; Michetti, Pierre; Vader, John-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Building on the first European Panel on the Appropriateness of Crohn's Disease Treatment (EPACT I) which was held in Lausanne at the beginning of March 2004, a new panel will be convened in Switzerland (EPACT II, November to December 2007) to update this work. A combined evidence- and panel-based method (RAND) will be applied to assess the appropriateness of therapy for Crohn's disease (CD). In preparation for the meeting of experts, reviews of evidence-based literature were prepared for major clinical presentations of CD. During the meeting, an international multidis- ciplinary panel that includes gastroenterologists, surgeons and general practitioners weigh the strength of evidence and apply their clinical experience when assessing the appropriateness of therapy for 569 specific indications (clinical scenarios). This chapter describes in detail the process of updating the literature review and the systematic approach of the RAND Appropriateness Method used during the expert panel meeting. PMID:18239398

  12. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  13. Optimization of simultaneous electrochemical determination of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cu(II) and Hg(II) at carbon nanotube-modified graphite electrodes.

    PubMed

    Pikna, L'ubomír; Heželová, Mária; Kováčová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The health of the environment is worsening every day. Monitoring of potentially toxic elements and remediation of environmental pollution are necessary. Therefore, the research and development of simple, inexpensive, portable and effective sensors is important. Electrochemistry is a useful component of the field of environment monitoring. The present study focuses on evaluating and comparing three types of electrodes (PIGE, PIGE/MWCNT/HNO3 and PIGE/MWCNT/EDTA/HNO3) employed for the simultaneous electrochemical determination of four potentially toxic elements: Cd(II), Pb(II), Cu(II) and Hg(II). Cyclic voltammograms were measured in an acetate buffer. The LOD, LOQ, the standard and relative precisions of the method and a prediction intervals were calculated (according to the technical procedure DIN 32 645) for the three electrodes and for each measured element. The LOD for PIGE/CNT/HNO3 (the electrode with narrowest calculated prediction intervals) was 2.98 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for Cd(II), 4.83 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for Pb(II), 3.81 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for Cu(II), 6.79 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for Hg(II). One of the benefits of this study was the determination of the amount of Hg(II) in the mixture of other elements.

  14. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  15. Phase II metabolism of benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Schrenk, D; Orzechowski, A; Schwarz, L R; Snyder, R; Burchell, B; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Bock, K W

    1996-01-01

    The hepatic metabolism of benzene is thought to be a prerequisite for its bony marrow toxicity. However, the complete pattern of benzene metabolites formed in the liver and their role in bone marrow toxicity are not fully understood. Therefore, benzene metabolism was studied in isolated rodent hepatocytes. Rat hepatocytes released benzene-1,2-dihydrodiol, hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CT), phenol (PH), trans-trans-muconic acid, and a number of phase II metabolites such as PH sulfate and PH glucuronide. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholantrene (3-MC) markedly increased PH glucuronide formation while PH sulfate formation was decreased. Likewise, V79 cells transfected with the 3-MC-inducible rat UGT1.6 cDNA showed a considerable rate of PH and HQ glucuronidation. In addition to inducing glucuronidation of phenols, 3-MC treatment (reported to protect rats from the myelotoxicity of benzene) resulted in a decrease of hepatic CYP2E1. In contrast, pretreatment of rats with the CYP2E1-inducer isopropanol strongly enhanced benzene metabolism and the formation of phenolic metabolites. Mouse hepatocytes formed much higher amounts of HQ than rat hepatocytes and considerable amounts of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene (THB) sulfate and HQ sulfate. In conclusion, the protective effect of 3-MC in rats is probably due to a shift from the labile PH sulfate to the more stable PH glucuronide, and to a decrease in hepatic CYP2E1. The higher susceptibility of mice toward benzene may be related to the high rate of formation of the myelotoxic metabolite HQ and the semistable phase II metabolites HQ sulfate and THB sulfate. Images Figure 4. PMID:9118891

  16. Accurate Ritz Wavelengths of Parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] Lines of Astrophysical Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffoni, M. P.; Pickering, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    We report a comprehensive list of accurate Ritz wavelengths for parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] lines obtained from the analysis of energy levels measured in the laboratory with Fourier transform emission spectroscopy. Such lines, particularly those in the infrared, are in demand for the analysis of low-density astrophysical plasmas in and around objects such as planetary nebulae, star-forming regions, and active galactic nuclei. Transitions between all known metastable levels of Co II and V II are included in our analysis, producing wavelengths for 1477 [V II] lines and 782 [Co II] lines. Of these, 170 [V II] lines and 171 [Co II] lines arise from transitions with calculated transition probabilities greater than 1 × 10-2 s-1 and upper level excitations of less than 5 eV, and thus are likely to be observed in astrophysical spectra.

  17. ACCURATE RITZ WAVELENGTHS OF PARITY-FORBIDDEN [Co II] AND [V II] LINES OF ASTROPHYSICAL INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffoni, M. P.; Pickering, J. C.

    2013-08-15

    We report a comprehensive list of accurate Ritz wavelengths for parity-forbidden [Co II] and [V II] lines obtained from the analysis of energy levels measured in the laboratory with Fourier transform emission spectroscopy. Such lines, particularly those in the infrared, are in demand for the analysis of low-density astrophysical plasmas in and around objects such as planetary nebulae, star-forming regions, and active galactic nuclei. Transitions between all known metastable levels of Co II and V II are included in our analysis, producing wavelengths for 1477 [V II] lines and 782 [Co II] lines. Of these, 170 [V II] lines and 171 [Co II] lines arise from transitions with calculated transition probabilities greater than 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} and upper level excitations of less than 5 eV, and thus are likely to be observed in astrophysical spectra.

  18. Kinetics of Formation of Cobalt(II)- and Nickel(II) Carbonic Anhydrase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuate, Robert S.; Reardon, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the kinetic behavior associated with the interaction of metal ions with apocarbonic anhydrase, focusing on the formation of two metallocarbonic anhydrase--the biochemically active Co(II) and the inactive Ni(II)derivatives. (GA)

  19. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression analysis of cDNA encoding metalloprotein II (MP II) induced by single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) in polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazuo; Zhou, Yibing; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Na; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-11-01

    We amplified and analyzed the complete cDNA of metalloprotein II (MP II) from the somatic muscle of the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, the full length cDNA is 904 bp encoding 119 amino acids. The MP II cDNA sequence was subjected to BLAST searching in NCBI and was found to share high homology with hemerythrin of other worms. MP II expression of P. aibuhitensis exposed to single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) was analyzed using real time-PCR. MP II mRNA expression increased at the start of Cu(II) exposure, then decreased and finally return to the normal level. Expression pattern of MP II under Cd(II) exposure was time- and dose-dependent. MP II expression induced by a combination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) was similar to that induced by Cd(II) alone.

  20. Competitive adsorption of copper(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and zinc(II) onto basic oxygen furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yongjie; Hou, Haobo; Zhu, Shujing

    2009-02-15

    Polluted and contaminated water can often contain more than one heavy metal species. It is possible that the behavior of a particular metal species in a solution system will be affected by the presence of other metals. In this study, we have investigated the adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) onto basic oxygen furnace slag (BOF slag) in single- and multi-element solution systems as a function of pH and concentration, in a background solution of 0.01M NaNO(3). In adsorption edge experiments, the pH was varied from 2.0 to 13.0 with total metal concentration 0.84mM in the single element system and 0.21mM each of Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) in the multi-element system. The value of pH(50) (the pH at which 50% adsorption occurs) was found to follow the sequence Zn>Cu>Pb>Cd in single-element systems, but Pb>Cu>Zn>Cd in the multi-element system. Adsorption isotherms at pH 6.0 in the multi-element systems showed that there is competition among various metals for adsorption sites on BOF slag. The adsorption and potentiometric titrations data for various slag-metal systems were modeled using an extended constant-capacitance surface complexation model that assumed an ion-exchange process below pH 6.5 and the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes at higher pH. Inner-sphere complexation was more dominant for the Cu(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) systems.

  1. Cohesin regulates MHC class II genes through interactions with MHC class II insulators.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M

    2011-10-15

    Cohesin is a multiprotein, ringed complex that is most well-known for its role in stabilizing the association of sister chromatids between S phase and M. More recently, cohesin was found to be associated with transcriptional insulators, elements that are associated with the organization of chromatin into regulatory domains. The human MHC class II (MHC-II) locus contains 10 intergenic elements, termed MHC-II insulators, which bind the transcriptional insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor. MHC-II insulators interact with each other, forming a base architecture of discrete loops and potential regulatory domains. When MHC-II genes are expressed, their proximal promoter regulatory regions reorganize to the foci established by the interacting MHC-II insulators. MHC-II insulators also bind cohesin, but the functional role of cohesin in regulating this system is not known. In this article, we show that the binding of cohesin to MHC-II insulators occurred irrespective of MHC-II expression but was required for optimal expression of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes. In a DNA-dependent manner, cohesin subunits interacted with CCCTC-binding factor and the MHC-II-specific transcription factors regulatory factor X and CIITA. Intriguingly, cohesin subunits were important for DNA looping interactions between the HLA-DRA promoter region and a 5' MHC-II insulator but were not required for interactions between the MHC-II insulators themselves. This latter observation introduces cohesin as a regulator of MHC-II expression by initiating or stabilizing MHC-II promoter regulatory element interactions with the MHC-II insulator elements, events that are required for maximal MHC-II transcription.

  2. Competitive Fe(II)-Zn(II) uptake on a synthetic montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Soltermann, Daniela; Marques Fernandes, Maria; Baeyens, Bart; Miehé-Brendlé, Jocelyne; Dähn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of Fe(II) with clay minerals is of particular relevance in global geochemical processes controlling metal and nutrient cycles and the fate of contaminants. In this context, the influence of competitive sorption effects between Fe(II) and other relevant transition metals on their uptake characteristics and mobility remains an important issue. Macroscopic sorption experiments combined with surface complexation modeling and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to elucidate competitive sorption processes between divalent Fe and Zn at the clay mineral-water interface. Sorption isotherms were measured on a synthetic iron-free montmorillonite (IFM) under anoxic conditions (O2 <0.1 ppm) for the combinations of Zn(II)/Fe(II) and Fe(II)/Zn(II), where the former metal in each pair represents the trace metal (<10(-7) M) and the latter the competing metal at higher concentrations (10(-7) to 10(-3) M). Results of the batch sorption and EXAFS measurements indicated that Fe(II) is competing with trace Zn(II) for the same type of strong sites if Fe(II) is present in excess, whereas no competition between trace Fe(II) and Zn(II) was observed if Zn(II) is present at high concentrations. The noncompetitive behavior suggests the existence of sorption sites which have a higher affinity for Fe(III), where surface-induced oxidation of the sorbed Fe(II) to Fe(III) occurred, and which are not accessible for Zn(II). The understanding of this competitive uptake mechanism between Fe(II) and Zn(II) is of great importance to assess the bioavailability and mobility of transition metals in the natural environment. PMID:24289476

  3. The Magellan/IMACS Catalog of Optical Supernova Remnant Candidates in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.

    2012-11-01

    We present a new optical imaging survey of supernova remnants (SNRs) in M83, using data obtained with the Magellan I 6.5 m telescope and IMACS instrument under conditions of excellent seeing. Using the criterion of strong [S II] emission relative to Hα, we confirm all but three of the 71 SNR candidates listed in our previous survey, and expand the SNR candidate list to 225 objects, more than tripling the earlier sample. Comparing the optical survey with a new deep X-ray survey of M83 with Chandra, we find that 61 of these SNR candidates have X-ray counterparts. We also identify an additional list of 46 [O III]-selected nebulae for follow-up as potential ejecta-dominated remnants, seven of which have associated X-ray emission that makes them strong candidates. Some of the other [O III]-bright objects could also be normal interstellar medium (ISM) dominated SNRs with shocks fast enough to doubly ionize oxygen, but with Hα and [S II] emission faint enough to have been missed. A few of these objects may also be H II regions with abnormally high [O III] emission compared with the majority of M83 H II regions, compact nebulae excited by young Wolf-Rayet stars, or even background active galactic nuclei. The SNR Hα luminosity function in M83 is shifted by a factor of ~4.5 times higher than for M33 SNRs, indicative of a higher mean ISM density in M83. We describe the search technique used to identify the SNR candidates and provide basic information and finder charts for the objects. Based on observations made with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, and NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The ground-based observations were obtained through NOAO, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. for the National Science Foundation. NASA's Chandra Observatory is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory under contract No. NAS83060 and the data were obtained through program GO1-12115.

  4. On the properties of the interstellar medium in extremely metal-poor blue compact dwarf galaxies. GMOS-IFU spectroscopy and SDSS photometry of the double-knot galaxy HS 2236+1344

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, P.; Papaderos, P.; Gomes, J. M.; Smith Castelli, A. V.; Vega, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    the central part of HS 2236+1344. Similar to many BCDs with He ii λ4686 emission, HS 2236+1344 shows no Wolf-Rayet (WR) bump. The reduced and calibrated data cube are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/569/A110

  5. A N-heterocyclic tetracarbene Pd(ii) moiety containing a Pd(ii)-Pb(ii) bimetallic MOF for three-component cyclotrimerization via benzyne.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Li, Yue; Wei, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Cheng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Ji, Jun; Yao, Bing-Jian; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2016-08-18

    A novel Pd(ii)-Pb(ii) bimetallic metal-organic framework Pd(ii)-Pb(ii)-MOF (B) which contains an N-heterocyclic tetracarbene Pd(ii) moiety was synthesized based on a chelating N-heterocyclic dicarbene Pd(ii)-NHDC ligand (A) under solvothermal conditions. It can be a highly active heterogeneous catalyst for three-component cyclotrimerization via benzyne species.

  6. Preschool Racial Attitude Measure II (PRAM II): Technical Report #1: 1970-71 Standardization Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John E.

    This report provides detailed technical information concerning the Preschool Racial Attitude Measure II (PRAM II) a method for assessing the attitudes of pre-literate children toward light- and dark-skinned individuals. Several major changes were involved in the PRAM II revision: (1) the length was doubled, (2) the general artistic quality of the…

  7. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes II Table II-2 to Subpart II Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt....

  8. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes II Table II-2 to Subpart II Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt....

  9. Diet History Questionnaire II & Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Web-based DHQ

    Cancer.gov

    The Web-based versions of DHQ II and C-DHQ II are identical in content to the paper forms. By automating the DHQ II and providing versions on the Web for public use, researchers have another tool to collect and analyze food frequency questionnaire data.

  10. FOREWORD: HELAS II International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizon, Laurent; Roth, Markus

    2008-07-01

    Volume 118 (2008) of Journal of Physics: Conference Series provides a written record of the talks and posters presented at the HELAS II International Conference `Helioseismology, Asteroseismology and MHD Connections'. The conference was held during the week 20-24 August 2007 in Göttingen, Germany, jointly hosted by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research and the Faculty of Physics of the University of Göttingen. A total of 140 scientists from all over the world attended. The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of Conny Aerts, Annie Baglin, Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, Thierry Corbard, Jadwiga Daszyńska-Daszkiewicz, Stefan Dreizler, Yvonne Elsworth, Laurent Gizon (Chairman), Wolfgang Glatzel, Frank Hill, Donald Kurtz, Oskar von der Lühe, Maria Pia Di Mauro, Mário Monteiro, Pere Pallé, Markus Roth, Philip Scherrer, Manfred Schüssler, and Michael Thompson. HELAS stands for the European Helio- and Asteroseismology Network, a Coordination Action supported by the sixth Framework Programme of the European Union. It aims to bring together researchers in the fields of solar and stellar oscillations. This volume consists of 91 articles organized into sections that reflect the scientific programme of the conference: 012001-07 Wave diagnostics in physics, geophysics and astrophysics 012008-09 Perspectives on helio- and asteroseismology 012010-17 Asteroseismology: Observations 012018-25 Asteroseismology: Theory 012026-32 Global helioseismology and solar models 012033-38 Local helioseismology and magnetic activity 012039-44 Future observational projects in helio- and asteroseismology 012045-91 Poster papers. The overwhelming majority of papers discuss the seismology of the Sun and stars. Papers in the first section provide a broader perspective on wave phenomena and techniques for probing other physical systems, from living beings to the universe as a whole. We were extremely fortunate to have particularly distinguished experts to cover these topics

  11. Adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions by cross-linking chitosan/rectorite nano-hybrid composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixuan; Chen, Yufei; Zhang, Qiuyun; Guo, Xingmei; Peng, Yanni; Xiao, Huijuan; Chen, Xiaocheng; Luo, Jiwen

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan/rectorie (CTS/REC) nano-hybrid composite microsphere was prepared by changing the proportion of CTS/REC with 2:1, 3:1 and 4:1. Compared with the pure cross-linking chitosan microsphere, the nano-hybrid composite microsphere was proved to have better sorption capacity of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II), especially 2:1(CTS/REC-1). The adsorption behavior of the microsphere of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) was investigated in single and binary metal systems. In single system, the equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) followed the Langmuir model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative values of (ΔG) suggested that the adsorption process was spontaneous. In binary system, the combined action of the metals was found to be antagonistic and the metal sorption followed the order of Cu(II)>Cd(II)>Ni(II). The regeneration studies indicated that EDTA desorbed Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) from cross-linking microspheres better than HCl. The FT-IR and XPS spectra showed that coordination bonds were formed between Cd(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) and the nitrogen atoms of cross-linking CTS/REC nano-hybrid composite microspheres. PMID:26076634

  12. Synthesis, DFT Calculation, and Antimicrobial Studies of Novel Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) Heteroleptic Complexes Containing Benzoylacetone and Dithiocarbamate

    PubMed Central

    Ekennia, Anthony C.; Onwudiwe, Damian C.; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Osowole, Aderoju A.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2015-01-01

    Heteroleptic complexes of zinc(II), copper(II), manganese(II), and cobalt(II) of the types [MLL′(H2O)2]·nH2O and [MLL′]·nH2O have been synthesized using sodium N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate (L) and benzoylacetone (L′). The metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility, infrared (IR), and UV-visible spectroscopic studies. The electrical conductance measurements revealed the nonelectrolytic nature of the synthesized complexes. The results of the elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and electronic spectra inferred that the Zn(II) complex adopted a four-coordinate geometry while the Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) complexes assumed octahedral geometries. The IR spectra showed that the metal ions coordinated with the ligands via the S- and O-donor atoms. The geometry, electronic, and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spin density distributions, relative strength of H–bonds, and thermodynamic parameters revealed that the order of stability of the metal complexes is Mn < Co < Cu > Zn. The agar diffusion methods were used to study the antimicrobial activity of the complexes against two Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. pneumoniae), one Gram negative bacterium (E. coli), and two fungi organisms (A. niger and A. candida) and the complexes showed a broad spectrum of activities against the microbes. PMID:26681931

  13. Arkansas HEA Title II. State Report, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In October 1998, Congress enacted Title II, Sections 207 and 208 (as amendments to the Higher Education Act) which support the efforts of States, Institutions of Higher Education, and their School District partners to improve the recruitment, preparation, and support of new teachers. The Title II report includes specifications, conditions and…

  14. Micro Channel/Multibus-II Interface Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Ambrose, John J.; Jaworski, Richard C.; Heise, Nyles N.; Thornton, David N.

    1991-01-01

    Micro Channel/Multibus-II interface circuit provides electrical interconnections enabling communications between Micro Channels of IBM Personal System/2 computers and IEEE 1296 standard Multibus-II parallel system bus (iPSB). Made mostly of commercially available parts, interface enables independent Micro Channels to communicate over iPSB without modification.

  15. Run II data analysis on the grid

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Mandrichenko, Igor Terekhov and Frank Wurthwein

    2002-12-02

    In this document, we begin the technical design for the distributed RunII computing for CDF and D0. The present paper defines the three components of the data handling area of Run II computing, namely the Data Handling System, the Storage System and the Application. We outline their functionality and interaction between them. We identify necessary and desirable elements of the interfaces.

  16. The CDF SVX II detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    The proposed CDF SVX II detector upgrade for secondary vertex detection during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II collider run is described. The general design and important features of this silicon vertex detector are presented. The CDF physics goals which are addressed by this detector are also given.

  17. World War II: A Technology Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, Suzy

    1990-01-01

    Presents a class activity on the history, causes, and consequences of World War II. Focuses on the development and deployment of the atomic bomb. Utilizes a Video Encyclopedia Program for historical background. Divides the class into groups that are responsible for researching and preparing a videotape on a World War II topic. (RW)

  18. Geology of the Phase II System

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A. William

    1980-11-19

    This is a report on the analysis of EE-2 cuttings and thin sections, geologic characterization of the Phase II system, comparison with Phase 1, and geologic speculations and recommendations concerning Phase II. The EE-2 litholog has been included in the pocket.

  19. Syntheses of Arnottin I and Arnottin II

    PubMed Central

    Moschitto, Matthew J.; Anthony, David R.; Lewis, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Short total syntheses of arnottin I and II were accomplished in 5 and 6 steps, respectively. A sesamol-benzyne cycloaddition with a 3-furyl-benzoate followed by regiospecific lactonization provided rapid, large-scale access to the core of arnottin I. Saponification of arnottin I and hypervalent iodide mediated spirocyclization provided an efficient and direct preparation of racemic arnottin II. PMID:25748275

  20. The CNET Automated Budget System (CABS) II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Morris G.; And Others

    The Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET) Automated Budget System II (CABS II) is an improved and expanded version of an earlier system which was developed by the Training Analysis and Evaluation Group (TAEG) to provide an efficient, easy means of handling the large volume of data necessary to produce budget documents. Intended as a guide…

  1. Biology II Curriculum Guide. Bulletin 1820.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Academic Programs.

    In 1986, the Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education requested that an advanced course in Biology II be developed. The resulting curriculum guide contains grade appropriate goals, skills, and competencies; suggested activities; suggested materials of instruction; and minimum time allotments for instruction. Biology II is a…

  2. TRUPACT-II procedures and maintenance instructions

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-14

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for operation, inspection and maintenance of a TRUPACT-II Shipping Package and directly related components. This document shall supply the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP (NRC Certificate of Compliance No. 9218), the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. This document details the operations, maintenance, repair, replacement of components, as well as the documentation required and the procedures to be followed to maintain the integrity of the TRUPACT-II container. These procedures may be modified for site use, but as a minimum all parameters and format listed herein must be included in any site modified version. For convenience and where applicable steps may be performed out of sequence. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the minimum required procedures for use of the adjustable center of gravity lift fixture and the TRUPACT-II transport trailer in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging.

  3. World War II Memorial Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    These learning activities can help students get the most out of a visit to the Tennessee World War II Memorial, a group of ten pylons located in Nashville (Tennessee). Each pylon contains informational text about the events of World War II. The ten pylons are listed as: (1) "Pylon E-1--Terror: America Enters the War against Fascism, June 1940";…

  4. First Run II results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. Donati

    2002-06-04

    In this paper we report on the first run II results from the CDF experiment. A brief description of the Tevatron collider and CDF detector upgrades and performance achieved in the first part of run II is followed by the CDF expectations in the fields of beauty, top, electroweak and Higgs physics.

  5. Hearing Restoration in Neurofibromatosis Type II Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeon Mi; Chang, Jin Woo; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type II will eventually succumb to bilateral deafness. For patients with hearing loss, modern medical science technology can provide efficient hearing restoration through a number of various methods. In this article, several hearing restoration methods for patients with neurofibromatosis type II are introduced. PMID:27189272

  6. World War II Homefront: A Historiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, Allan M.

    2002-01-01

    Highlights the scholarship that exists on the World War II homefront covering topics such as World War II as a good war, Franklin D. Roosevelt, economic policy, propaganda, status of women and women's employment, the role of African Americans, racial violence, and the Japanese American experience. (CMK)

  7. Synthesis, DFT Calculation, and Antimicrobial Studies of Novel Zn(II), Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) Heteroleptic Complexes Containing Benzoylacetone and Dithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Ekennia, Anthony C; Onwudiwe, Damian C; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Osowole, Aderoju A; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-01-01

    Heteroleptic complexes of zinc(II), copper(II), manganese(II), and cobalt(II) of the types [MLL'(H2O)2]·nH2O and [MLL']·nH2O have been synthesized using sodium N-methyl-N-phenyldithiocarbamate (L) and benzoylacetone (L'). The metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility, infrared (IR), and UV-visible spectroscopic studies. The electrical conductance measurements revealed the nonelectrolytic nature of the synthesized complexes. The results of the elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and electronic spectra inferred that the Zn(II) complex adopted a four-coordinate geometry while the Co(II), Cu(II), and Mn(II) complexes assumed octahedral geometries. The IR spectra showed that the metal ions coordinated with the ligands via the S- and O-donor atoms. The geometry, electronic, and thermodynamic parameters of the complexes were obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The spin density distributions, relative strength of H-bonds, and thermodynamic parameters revealed that the order of stability of the metal complexes is Mn < Co < Cu > Zn. The agar diffusion methods were used to study the antimicrobial activity of the complexes against two Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus and S. pneumoniae), one Gram negative bacterium (E. coli), and two fungi organisms (A. niger and A. candida) and the complexes showed a broad spectrum of activities against the microbes. PMID:26681931

  8. Inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine.

    PubMed

    Woo, S H; Reynolds, M C; Sun, N J; Cassady, J M; Snapka, R M

    1997-08-15

    The cytotoxic oxoaporphine alkaloid liriodenine, isolated from Cananga odorata, was found to be a potent inhibitor of topoisomerase II (EC 5.99.1.3) both in vivo and in vitro. Liriodenine treatment of SV40 (simian virus 40)-infected CV-1 cells caused highly catenated SV40 daughter chromosomes, a signature of topoisomerase II inhibition. Strong catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by liriodenine was confirmed by in vitro assays with purified human topoisomerase II and kinetoplast DNA. Liriodenine also caused low-level protein-DNA cross-links to pulse-labeled SV40 chromosomes in vivo, suggesting that it may be a weak topoisomerase II poison. This was supported by the finding that liriodenine caused topoisomerase II-DNA cross-links in an in vitro assay for topoisomerase II poisons. Verapamil did not increase either liriodenine-induced protein-DNA cross-links or catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II in SV40-infected cells. This indicates that liriodenine is not a substrate for the verapamil-sensitive drug efflux pump in CV-1 cells. PMID:9313773

  9. Angiotensin II disrupts inhibitory avoidance memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Juliana S; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Zinn, Carolina G; Kerr, Daniel S; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2006-08-01

    The brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in learning and memory, but the actual role of angiotensin II (A(II)) and its metabolites in this process has been difficult to comprehend. This has been so mainly due to procedural issues, especially the use of multi-trial learning paradigms and the utilization of pre-training intracerebroventricular infusion of RAS-acting compounds. Here, we specifically analyzed the action of A(II) in aversive memory retrieval using a hippocampal-dependent, one-trial, step-down inhibitory avoidance task (IA) in combination with stereotaxically localized intrahippocampal infusion of drugs. Rats bilaterally implanted with infusion cannulae aimed to the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus were trained in IA and tested for memory retention 24 h later. We found that when given into CA1 15 min before IA memory retention test, A(II), but not angiotensin IV or angiotensin(1-7) induced a dose-dependent and reversible amnesia without altering locomotor activity, exploratory behavior or anxiety state. The effect of A(II) was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by the A(II)-type 2 receptor (AT(2)) antagonist PD123319 but not by the A(II)-type 1 receptor (AT(1)) antagonist losartan. By themselves, neither PD123319 nor losartan had any effect on memory expression. Our data indicate that intra-CA1 A(II) hinders retrieval of avoidance memory through a process that involves activation of AT(2) receptors.

  10. Multi-dimensional models of circumstellar shells around evolved massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, A. J.; Keppens, R.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Massive stars shape their surrounding medium through the force of their stellar winds, which collide with the circumstellar medium. Because the characteristics of these stellar winds vary over the course of the evolution of the star, the circumstellar matter becomes a reflection of the stellar evolution and can be used to determine the characteristics of the progenitor star. In particular, whenever a fast wind phase follows a slow wind phase, the fast wind sweeps up its predecessor in a shell, which is observed as a circumstellar nebula. Aims: We make 2D and 3D numerical simulations of fast stellar winds sweeping up their slow predecessors to investigate whether numerical models of these shells have to be 3D, or whether 2D models are sufficient to reproduce the shells correctly. Methods: We use the MPI-AMRVAC code, using hydrodynamics with optically thin radiative losses included, to make numerical models of circumstellar shells around massive stars in 2D and 3D and compare the results. We focus on those situations where a fast Wolf-Rayet star wind sweeps up the slower wind emitted by its predecessor, being either a red supergiant or a luminous blue variable. Results: As the fast Wolf-Rayet wind expands, it creates a dense shell of swept up material that expands outward, driven by the high pressure of the shocked Wolf-Rayet wind. These shells are subject to a fair variety of hydrodynamic-radiative instabilities. If the Wolf-Rayet wind is expanding into the wind of a luminous blue variable phase, the instabilities will tend to form a fairly small-scale, regular filamentary lattice with thin filaments connecting knotty features. If the Wolf-Rayet wind is sweeping up a red supergiant wind, the instabilities will form larger interconnected structures with less regularity. The numerical resolution must be high enough to resolve the compressed, swept-up shell and the evolving instabilities, which otherwise may not even form. Conclusions: Our results show that 3D

  11. Special issue "International CAWSES-II Symposium"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nakamura, Takuji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-02-01

    This special issue gathered papers from the International CAWSES-II Symposium (November 18-22, 2013 at Nagoya University, Japan). Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System II (CAWSES-II) is an international scientific program sponsored by Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP) that continued from 2009 to 2013. The program was established with the aim of significantly enhancing our understanding of the space environment and its impacts on life and society. The International CAWSES-II Symposium was successful with 388 presentations; and from that, 38 papers were published in this special issue. In this preface, we briefly discuss the contents of the special issue as well as the CAWSES-II review papers published in Progress in Earth and Planetary Science (PEPS) in 2014-2015.

  12. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2

  13. TRUPACT-II, a regulatory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, P.C.; Spooner, O.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Transuranic Package Transporter II (TRUPACT-II) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certified Type B packaging for the shipment of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) material by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The NRC approved the TRUPACT-II design as meeting the requirements of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71) and issued Certificate of Compliance (CofC) Number 9218 to the DOE. There are currently 15 certified TRUPACT-IIs. Additional TRUPACT-IIs will be required to make more than 15,000 shipments of CH-TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The TRUPACT-II may also be used for the DOE inter-site and intra-site shipments of CH-TRU waste. The Land Withdrawal Act (Public Law 102-579), enacted by the US Congress, October 30, 1992, and an agreement between the DOE and the State of New Mexico, signed August 4, 1987, both stipulate that only NRC approved packaging may be used for shipments of TRU waste to the WIPP. Early in the TRUPACT-II development phase it was decided that the transportation system (tractor, trailer, and TRUPACT-II) should be highway legal on all routes without the need for oversize and/or overweight permits. In large measure, public acceptance of the DOE`s efforts to safely transport CH-TRU waste depends on the public`s perception that the TRUPACT-II is in compliance with all applicable regulations, standards, and quality assurance requirements. This paper addresses some of the numerous regulations applicable to Type B packaging, and it describes how the TRUPACT-II complies with these regulations.

  14. Intracellular angiotensin II activates rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Deliu, Elena; Tica, Andrei A; Motoc, Dana; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2011-09-01

    Angiotensin II is a modulator of myometrial activity; both AT(1) and AT(2) receptors are expressed in myometrium. Since in other tissues angiotensin II has been reported to activate intracellular receptors, we assessed the effects of intracellular administration of angiotensin II via microinjection on myometrium, using calcium imaging. Intracellular injection of angiotensin II increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in myometrial cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was abolished by the AT(1) receptor antagonist losartan but not by the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD-123319. Disruption of the endo-lysosomal system, but not that of Golgi apparatus, prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Blockade of AT(1) receptor internalization had no effect, whereas blockade of microautophagy abolished the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) produced by intracellular injection of angiotensin II; this indicates that microautophagy is a critical step in transporting the peptide into the endo-lysosomes lumenum. The response to angiotensin II was slightly reduced in Ca(2+)-free saline, indicating a major involvement of Ca(2+) release from internal stores. Blockade of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors with heparin and xestospongin C or inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) with U-73122 abolished the response to angiotensin II, supporting the involvement of PLC-IP(3) pathway. Angiotensin II-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was slightly reduced by antagonism of ryanodine receptors. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that in myometrial cells, intracellular angiotensin II activates AT(1)-like receptors on lysosomes and activates PLC-IP(3)-dependent Ca(2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum; the response is further augmented by a Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release mechanism via ryanodine receptors activation.

  15. Standards in neurosonology. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27104002

  16. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  17. Standards in neurosonology. Part II.

    PubMed

    Wojczal, Joanna; Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity).

  18. Early failure of Class II resin composite versus Class II amalgam restorations placed by dental students.

    PubMed

    Overton, J D; Sullivan, Diane J

    2012-03-01

    Using the information from remake request slips in a dental school's predoctoral clinic, we examined the short-term survival of Class II resin composite restorations versus Class II dental amalgam restorations. In the student clinic, resin composite is used in approximately 58 percent of Class II restorations placed, and dental amalgam is used in the remaining 42 percent. In the period examined, Class II resin composite restorations were ten times more likely to be replaced at no cost to the patient than Class II dental amalgam restorations. A total of eighty-four resin composite restorations and six amalgam restorations were replaced due to an identified failure.

  19. Adsorption of Cu(II), Hg(II), and Ni(II) ions by modified natural wool chelating fibers.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Ayad, D M; Sarhan, A A

    2010-04-15

    The graft copolymerization of ethyl acrylate (EA) onto natural wool fibers initiated by potassium persulphate and Mohr's salt redox initiator system in limited aqueous medium was carried out in heterogeneous media. Ester groups of the grafted copolymers were partially converted into hydrazide function groups followed by hydrazone formation through reaction with isatin. Also the application of the modified fibers for metal ion uptake was studied using Cu(II), Hg(II) and Ni(II). The modified chelating fibers were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction. PMID:19962235

  20. Effects of Mg II and Ca II ionization on ab-initio solar chromosphere models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammacher, W.; Cuntz, M.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustically heated solar chromosphere models are computed considering radiation damping by (non-LTE) emission from H(-) and by Mg II and Ca II emission lines. The radiative transfer equations for the Mg II k and Ca II K emission lines are solved using the core-saturation method with complete redistribution. The Mg II k and Ca II K cooling rates are compared with the VAL model C. Several substantial improvements over the work of Ulmschneider et al. (1987) are included. It is found that the rapid temperature rises caused by the ionization of Mg II are not formed in the middle chromosphere, but occur at larger atmospheric heights. These models represent the temperature structure of the 'real' solar chromosphere much better. This result is a major precondition for the study of ab-initio models for solar flux tubes based on MHD wave propagation and also for ab-initio models for the solar transition layer.

  1. Physical Properties of Emission-line Galaxies at z ~ 2 from Near-infrared Spectroscopy with Magellan FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Daniel; McCarthy, Patrick; Siana, Brian; Malkan, Mathew; Mobasher, Bahram; Atek, Hakim; Henry, Alaina; Martin, Crystal L.; Rafelski, Marc; Hathi, Nimish P.; Scarlata, Claudia; Ross, Nathaniel R.; Bunker, Andrew J.; Blanc, Guillermo; Bedregal, Alejandro G.; Domínguez, Alberto; Colbert, James; Teplitz, Harry; Dressler, Alan

    2014-04-01

    -forming sequence in the [O III]/Hβ versus [N II]/Hα diagram. We speculate that the elevated nitrogen abundance could result from substantial numbers of Wolf-Rayet stars in starbursting galaxies at z ~ 2.

  2. First detections of FS Canis Majoris stars in clusters. Evolutionary state as constrained by coeval massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Trombley, C.; Davies, B.; Figer, D. F.

    2015-03-01

    Context. FS CMa stars are low-luminosity objects showing the B[e] phenomenon whose evolutionary state remains a puzzle. These stars are surrounded by compact disks of warm dust of unknown origin. Hitherto, membership of FS CMa stars to coeval populations has never been confirmed. Aims: The discovery of low-luminosity line emitters in the young massive clusters Mercer 20 and Mercer 70 prompts us to investigate the nature of such objects. We intend to confirm membership to coeval populations in order to characterize these emission-line stars through the cluster properties. Methods: Based on ISAAC/VLT medium-resolution spectroscopy and NICMOS/HST photometry of massive cluster members, new characterizations of Mercer 20 and Mercer 70 are performed. Coevality of each cluster and membership of the newly-discovered B[e] objects are investigated using our observations as well as literature data of the surroundings. Infrared excess and narrow-band photometric properties of the B[e] stars are also studied. Results: We confirm and classify 22 new cluster members, including Wolf-Rayet stars and blue hypergiants. Spectral types (O9-B1.5 V) and radial velocities of B[e] objects are compatible with the remaining cluster members, while emission features of Mg ii, Fe ii], and [Fe ii] are identified in their spectra. The ages of these stars are 4.5 and 6 Myr, and they show mild infrared excesses. Conclusions: We confirm the presence of FS CMa stars in the coeval populations of Mercer 20 and Mercer 70. We discuss the nature and evolutionary state of FS CMa stars, discarding a post-AGB nature and introducing a new hypothesis about mergers. A new search method for FS CMa candidates in young massive clusters based on narrow-band Paschen-α photometry is proposed and tested in photometric data of other clusters, yielding three new candidates. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under program IDs 083.D

  3. Use of APACHE II and SAPS II to predict mortality for hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byeong Hoo; Park, Sang Kyu; Jang, Dong Kyu; Jang, Kyoung Sool; Kim, Jong Tae; Han, Yong Min

    2015-01-01

    We studied the applicability of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute stroke and compared the results with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). We also conducted a comparative study of accuracy for predicting hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke mortality. Between January 2011 and December 2012, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to the ICU were included in the study. APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were compared using a calibration curve, the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and the results were compared with the GCS and NIHSS. Overall 498 patients were included in this study. The observed mortality was 26.3%, whereas APACHE II and SAPS II-predicted mortalities were 35.12% and 35.34%, respectively. The mean GCS and NIHSS scores were 9.43 and 21.63, respectively. The calibration curve was close to the line of perfect prediction. The ROC curve showed a slightly better prediction of mortality for APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients. The GCS and NIHSS were inferior in predicting mortality in both patient groups. Although both the APACHE II and SAPS II systems can be used to measure performance in the neurosurgical ICU setting, the accuracy of APACHE II in hemorrhagic stroke patients and SAPS II in ischemic stroke patients was superior.

  4. [C II] and [N II] from dense ionized regions in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Pineda, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The interstellar medium (ISM) consists of highly ionized and neutral atomic, as well as molecular, components. Knowledge of their distribution is important for tracing the structure and lifecycle of the ISM. Aims: To determine the properties of the highly ionized gas and neutral weakly ionized gas in the Galaxy traced by the fine-structure lines of ionized nitrogen, [N ii], and ionized carbon, [C ii]. Methods: We utilize observations of the [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm fine-structure lines taken with the high spectral resolution Heterodyne Instrument in the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Observatory along ten lines of sight towards the inner Galaxy to analyze the ionized ISM. The [N ii] emission can be used to estimate the contribution of the highly ionized gas to the [C ii] emission and separate the contributions from highly ionized and weakly ionized neutral gas. Results: We find that [N ii] has strong emission in distinct spectral features along all lines of sight associated with strong [C ii] emission. The [N ii] arises from moderate density extended H ii regions or ionized boundary layers of clouds. Comparison of the [N ii] and [C ii] spectra in 31 separate kinematic features shows that many of the [C ii] spectra are affected by absorption from low excitation gas associated with molecular clouds, sometimes strongly so. The apparent fraction of the [C ii] associated with the [N ii] gas is unrealistically large in many cases, most likely due to the reduction of [C ii] by absorption. In a few cases the foreground absorption can be modeled to determine the true source intensity. In these sources we find that the foreground absorbing gas layer has C+ column densities of order 1018 cm-2. Conclusions: [C ii] emission arising from strong sources of [N ii] emission is frequently absorbed by low excitation foreground gas complicating the interpretation of the properties of the ionized and neutral gas components that give rise to [C ii] emission.

  5. New Rh2(II,II) Architecture for the Catalytic Reduction of H⁺.

    PubMed

    White, Travis A; Witt, Suzanne E; Li, Zhanyong; Dunbar, Kim R; Turro, Claudia

    2015-10-19

    Formamidinate-bridged Rh2(II,II) complexes containing diimine ligands of the formula cis-[Rh2(II,II)(μ-DTolF)2(NN)2](2+) (Rh2-NN2), where DTolF = p-ditolylformamidinate and NN = dppn (benzo[i]dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-h]quinoxaline), dppz (dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine), and phen (1,10-phenanthroline), electrocatalytically reduce H(+) to H2 in DMF solutions containing CH3COOH at a glassy carbon electrode. Cathodic scans in the absence of acid display a Rh(III,II/II,II) reduction at -0.90 V vs Fc(+)/Fc followed by NN(0/-) reduction at -1.13, -1.36, and -1.65 V for Rh2-dppn2, Rh2-dppz2, and Rh2-phen2, respectively. Upon the addition of acid, Rh2-dppn2 and Rh2-dppz2 undergo reduction-protonation-reduction at each pyrazine-containing NN ligand prior to the Rh2(II,II/II,I) reduction. The Rh2(II,I) species is then protonated at one of the metal centers, resulting in the formation of the corresponding Rh2(II,III)-hydride. In the case of Rh2-phen2, the reduction of the phen ligand is followed by intramolecular electron transfer to the Rh2(II,II) core in the presence of protons to form a Rh2(II,III)-hydride species. Further reduction and protonation at the Rh2 core for all three complexes rapidly catalyzes H2 formation with varied calculated turnover frequencies (TOF) and overpotential values (η): 2.6 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.56 V for Rh2-dppn, 2.8 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.50 V for Rh2-dppz2, and 5.9 × 10(4) s(-1) and 0.64 V for Rh2-phen2. Bulk electrolysis confirmed H2 formation, and further CH3COOH addition regenerates H2 production, attesting to the robust nature of the architecture. The cis-[Rh2(II,II)(μ-DTolF)2(NN)2](2+) architecture benefits by combining electron-rich formamidinate bridges, a redox-active Rh2(II,II) core, and electron-accepting NN diimine ligands to allow for the electrocatalysis of H(+) substrate to H2 fuel.

  6. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters.

  7. SEARCHING FOR NEW HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Pandian, Jagadheep D.; Kurtz, Stan

    2011-09-20

    Hypercompact (HC) H II regions are, by nature, very young H II regions, associated with the earliest stages of massive star formation. They may represent the transition phase as an early B-type star grows into an O-type star. Unfortunately, so few HC H II regions are presently known that their general attributes and defining characteristics are based on small number statistics. A larger sample is needed for detailed studies and good statistics. Class II methanol masers are one of the best indicators of the early stages of massive star formation. Using the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey-the most sensitive blind survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers to date-we selected 24 HC H II region candidates. We made Expanded Very Large Array continuum observations at 3.6 and 1.3 cm to search for HC H II regions associated with these masers. We identified six potential HC H II regions in our sample based on the presence of optically thick free-free emission. Overall, we find that 30% of the methanol masers have an associated centimeter radio continuum source (separation less than 0.1 pc), which is in general agreement with previous studies.

  8. Angiotensin II: Immunohistochemical Study in Sardinian Pterygium

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, P.; Corrias, M.; Zucca, I.; Piras, F.; Sirigu, P.; Perra, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    The Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the principal effector peptide of the RAS system. It has a pleiotropic effect and, beside its physiological role, it has the property to stimulate angiogenesis and activate multiple signalling pathways related to cell proliferation. The purpose of the study was to determinate the Ang II expression and localization in Sardinian pterygium and normal conjunctiva by immunohistochemistry, and its possible involvement in the development and progression of the disease. Twenty-three pterygiums and eleven normal conjunctiva specimens obtained from Sardinian patients, were processed for paraffin embedding and assessed for the immunohistochemi-cal revelation of Ang II. Significant Ang II expression was identified in pterygium and conjunctiva. Particularly, thirteen pterygium specimens (n=13) displayed exclusively moderate to strong nuclear staining; some specimens (n=5) showed exclusively a moderate cytoplasmic immunoreactivity, and few specimens (n=2) displayed moderate to strong immunoreactivity in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Only 3 specimens were negative. Statistical significance difference in respect of nuclear and cytoplasmic localization was observed between normal conjunctiva and pterygium (P=0.020). The results showed a predominant intranuclear localization of Ang II in pterygium epithelial cells, in spite of conjunctiva that mainly showed cytoplasmic localization. These findings suggest a possible role for Ang II in the development and/or progression of pterygium mediated by the activation of local RAS system. PMID:25308851

  9. 20 CFR 404.1342 - Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits. 404.1342 Section 404.1342 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... II and post-World War II wage credits. (a) You get wage credits for World War II or post-World......

  10. 20 CFR 404.1342 - Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits. 404.1342 Section 404.1342 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... II and post-World War II wage credits. (a) You get wage credits for World War II or post-World......

  11. 20 CFR 404.1342 - Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits. 404.1342 Section 404.1342 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... II and post-World War II wage credits. (a) You get wage credits for World War II or post-World......

  12. 20 CFR 404.1342 - Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits. 404.1342 Section 404.1342 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... II and post-World War II wage credits. (a) You get wage credits for World War II or post-World......

  13. 20 CFR 404.1342 - Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limits on granting World War II and post-World War II wage credits. 404.1342 Section 404.1342 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... II and post-World War II wage credits. (a) You get wage credits for World War II or post-World......

  14. Probing Our Heliospheric History II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Katherine; Redfield, S.

    2012-05-01

    A physical relationship between our local interstellar medium (ISM), galactic cosmic rays (GCR), and our planetary environment has long been a subject of interest to the astronomical community. Clouds of sufficient density to compress the heliosphere to within 1 AU are commonly seen throughout the galactic environment, including within the Local Bubble (LB). Such a compression would lead to an increase in the GCR flux at 1 AU and would have drastic consequences for many planetary processes such as atmospheric chemistry, lightning production, cloud cover, and DNA mutation rates for surface organisms. Prior to this work, we derived a column density profile of the ISM toward 49 bright stars along a narrow cone centered on the historical solar path. High resolution spectra were taken of NaI and CaII absorption out to a distance of 610 pc, with a median separation distance of 11 pc between adjacent stars. No absorption is seen out to a distance of 120 pc (consistent with the LB), but a complex number of absorbers is seen beyond. We now present the detection of several distinct clouds, their associated column densities, radial velocities, inferred distances, and size constraints. This combination of cloud properties allows us to derive a volume density profile of the ISM in the Sun's “rear-view mirror,” which represents one plausible record of actual ISM encounters for the Sun. We also make use of empirical relations to determine the effect these clouds would have on the historical heliosphere. Our analysis suggests that within the last 10 million years, if the Sun encountered a cloud with the same properties as we have detected along the solar historical trajectory, the Sun's termination shock would have resided inside the orbit of Uranus, with a GCR flux at Earth an order of magnitude greater than it is currently.

  15. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  16. Light harvesting in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2013-10-01

    Water oxidation in photosynthesis takes place in photosystem II (PSII). This photosystem is built around a reaction center (RC) where sunlight-induced charge separation occurs. This RC consists of various polypeptides that bind only a few chromophores or pigments, next to several other cofactors. It can handle far more photons than the ones absorbed by its own pigments and therefore, additional excitations are provided by the surrounding light-harvesting complexes or antennae. The RC is located in the PSII core that also contains the inner light-harvesting complexes CP43 and CP47, harboring 13 and 16 chlorophyll pigments, respectively. The core is surrounded by outer light-harvesting complexes (Lhcs), together forming the so-called supercomplexes, at least in plants. These PSII supercomplexes are complemented by some "extra" Lhcs, but their exact location in the thylakoid membrane is unknown. The whole system consists of many subunits and appears to be modular, i.e., both its composition and organization depend on environmental conditions, especially on the quality and intensity of the light. In this review, we will provide a short overview of the relation between the structure and organization of pigment-protein complexes in PSII, ranging from individual complexes to entire membranes and experimental and theoretical results on excitation energy transfer and charge separation. It will become clear that time-resolved fluorescence data can provide invaluable information about the organization and functioning of thylakoid membranes. At the end, an overview will be given of unanswered questions that should be addressed in the near future.

  17. Participation of angiotensin II in learning and memory. II. Interactions of angiotensin II with dopaminergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Yonkov, D I; Georgiev, V P; Opitz, M J

    1986-04-01

    The effect of angiotensin II (ATII) and of its interactions with dopaminergic drugs injected post-trial on retention in active avoidance tasks in shuttle-box-trained rats were studied. ATII at doses of 0.10 and 0.50 micrograms administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) immediately after training improved retention. The dopaminergic receptor agonist apomorphine at a dose of 0.10 mg/kg injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) facilitated retention whereas elymoclavine (a dopaminergic agonist) at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg i.p. had no effect. ATII at a dose of 0.10 micrograms i.c.v. administered after apomorphine 0.10 mg/kg or elymoclavine 2.5 mg/kg exerted a stronger retention-facilitating effect. The dopaminergic receptor antagonist haloperidol at a dose of 1 mg/kg i.p. markedly impaired retention. ATII at a dose of 0.50 micrograms administered after haloperidol (1 mg/kg) did not exercise its retention-facilitating effect. It is concluded that the retention facilitating effects of ATII are realized through interactions with brain dopaminergic transmission.

  18. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  19. Angiotensin II and renal tubular ion transport.

    PubMed

    Valles, Patricia; Wysocki, Jan; Batlle, Daniel

    2005-08-29

    Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, also participates in the regulation of renal sodium and water excretion, not only via a myriad of effects on renal hemodynamics, glomerular filtration rate, and regulation of aldosterone secretion, but also via direct effects on renal tubule transport. In addition, angiotensin II stimulates H+ secretion and HCO3- reabsorption in both proximal and distal tubules and regulates H+-ATPase activity in intercalated cells of the collecting tubule. Different results regarding the effect of angiotensin II on bicarbonate reabsorption and proton secretion have been reported at the functional level, depending on the angiotensin II concentration and tubule segment studied. It is likely that interstitial angiotensin II is more important in regulating hemodynamic and transport functions than circulating angiotensin II. In proximal tubules, stimulation of bicarbonate reabsorption, Na+/H+-exchange, and Na+/HCO3- cotransport has been found using low concentrations (<10(-9) M), while inhibition of bicarbonate reabsorption has been documented using concentrations higher than 10(-8) M. Evidence for the regulation of H+-ATPase activity in vivo and in vitro by trafficking/exocytosis has been provided. An additional level of H+-ATPase regulation via protein synthesis may be important as well. Recently, we have shown that both aldosterone and angiotensin II provide such a mechanism of regulation in vivo at the level of the medullary collecting tubule. Interestingly, in this part of the nephron, the effects of aldosterone and angiotensin II are not sodium dependent, whereas in the cortical collecting duct, both aldosterone and angiotensin II, by contrast, affect H+ secretion by sodium-dependent mechanisms.

  20. Angiotensin II reduces calcium uptake into bone.

    PubMed

    Schurman, Scott J; Bergstrom, William H; Shoemaker, Lawrence R; Welch, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Children with neonatal Bartter syndrome (NBS) have hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, and osteopenia. A complex of basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) and a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan has been identified in the serum and urine of NBS patients. This complex increases bone resorption in a bone disc bioassay system. Angiotensin II (AT II), which is increased in Bartter syndrome, increases the synthesis of b-FGF by cultured endothelial cells. Addition of 10(-8) M AT II to the bioassay, a concentration reported in Bartter syndrome patients, significantly decreased calcium uptake into bone discs [E/C 0.60 (0.04), P < 0.001 compared with buffer, normal E/C >0.90]. Adding b-FGF monoclonal antibody at 10 microg/ml [E/C 0.90 (0.06), P=NS] or indomethacin [E/C 1.00 (0.03), P=NS] to 10(-8 )M AT II neutralized this effect. In separate experiments, newborn rats were given intraperitoneal injections of AT II. Bone discs from these animals were used in the bioassay system and calcium uptake was markedly reduced compared with discs from rats injected with phosphate-buffered saline [AT II 6.6 x 10(-9), E/C 0.10 (0.04), P<0.001, AT II 3.3 x 10(-8), E/C 0.10 (0.05), P<0.001]. AT II decreases calcium uptake in the bone disc bioassay system. This effect can be abrogated by antibody to b-FGF or prostaglandin synthetase inhibition. These results support the hypothesis that in children with NBS, elevated levels of AT II stimulate local skeletal b-FGF synthesis, with a resultant increase in bone resorption via a prostaglandin-dependent pathway. PMID:14648327