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Sample records for ii randomized controlled

  1. Randomized phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sin-Ho; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, Phase II trials have been conducted as single-arm trials to compare the response probabilities between an experimental therapy and a historical control. Historical control data, however, often have a small sample size, are collected from a different patient population, or use a different response assessment method, so that a direct comparison between a historical control and an experimental therapy may be severely biased. Randomized Phase II trials entering patients prospectively to both experimental and control arms have been proposed to avoid any bias in such cases. The small sample sizes for typical Phase II clinical trials imply that the use of exact statistical methods for their design and analysis is appropriate. In this article, we propose two-stage randomized Phase II trials based on Fisher's exact test, which does not require specification of the response probability of the control arm for testing. Through numerical studies, we observe that the proposed method controls the type I error accurately and maintains a high power. If we specify the response probabilities of the two arms under the alternative hypothesis, we can identify good randomized Phase II trial designs by adopting the Simon's minimax and optimal design concepts that were developed for single-arm Phase II trials.

  2. Improving the quality of randomized controlled trials in Chinese herbal medicine, part II: control group design.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Moher, David; Dagenais, Simon; Li, You-Ping; Liu, Liang; Wu, Tai-Xiang; Miao, Jiang-Xia

    2006-03-01

    To discuss the types of control groups in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM), and to provide suggestions for improving the design of control group in future clinical studies in this therapeutic area. A search of the Cochrane Library was conducted in July 2005 to identify RCTs of CHM, and 66 RCTs with CHM for type 2 diabetes mellitus were obtained as the basis for further analysis. Of 66 RCTs with CHM for type 2 diabetes mellitus, 61 (92.4%) trials had both a treatment group and a control group. Twenty-seven (40.9%) RCTs compared CHM plus conventional drug vs conventional drug, 24 (36.4%) compared CHM vs conventional drug, 5 (7.6%) compared CHM vs placebo, 3 (4.5%) compared CHM plus conventional drug vs conventional drug plus placebo, 3 (4.5%) compared CHM plus conventional drug vs other CHM, 1 (1.5%) compared CHM vs no treatment, 1 (1.5%) compared CHM plus placebo vs conventional drug plus placebo, 1 (1.5%) compared CHM vs CHM plus conventional drug vs conventional drug vs placebo, and 1 (1.5%) compared CHM vs conventional drug vs CHM plus conventional drug. A variety of control groups were used in RCTs of CHM for type 2 diabetes mellitus, including placebo, active, and no treatment control groups. Justification for selecting particular types of control groups were not provided in the trials reviewed in this study. Different control groups may be appropriate according to the study objectives, and several factors should be considered prior to selecting control groups in future RCTs of CHM. (1) Investigators of CHM who design clinical trials should understand the rationale for selecting different types of control groups; (2) Control groups for RCTs should be selected according to study objectives; (3) Active control groups should select interventions for comparisons that have the strongest evidence of efficacy and prescribe them as recommended; (4) Placebo control groups should select a placebo that mimics the physical

  3. Effects of Native Type II Collagen Treatment on Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakilan, Fulya; Armagan, Onur; Ozgen, Merih; Tascioglu, Funda; Bolluk, Ozge; Alatas, Ozkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the efficacy of oral native type II collagen treatment on the symptoms and biological markers of cartilage degradation, when given concomitantly with acetaminophen in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included and randomly distributed into two groups: one treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen (group AC; n=19) and the other treated with 1500 mg/day of acetaminophen plus 10 mg/day of native type II collagen (group AC+CII; n=20) for 3 months. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) at rest and during walking, Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) pain, WOMAC function, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scores, were recorded. Coll2-1, Coll2-1NO2 and Fibulin-3 levels were quantified in urine as biomarkers of disease progression. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02237989. Results: After 3 months of treatment, significant improvements compared to baseline were reported in joint pain (VAS walking), function (WOMAC) and quality of life (SF-36) in the AC+CII group, while only improvements in some subscales of the SF-36 survey and VAS walking were detected in the AC group. Comparisons between the groups revealed a significant difference in VAS walking score in favour of the AC+CII group as compared to AC group. Biochemical markers of cartilage degradation in urine did not significantly improve in any of the groups. Conclusion: All in all, these results suggest that native type II collagen treatment combined with acetaminophen is superior to only acetaminophen for symptomatic treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27551171

  4. Hypothermia for Traumatic Brain Injury in Children-A Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Beca, John; McSharry, Brent; Erickson, Simon; Yung, Michael; Schibler, Andreas; Slater, Anthony; Wilkins, Barry; Singhal, Ash; Williams, Gary; Sherring, Claire; Butt, Warwick

    2015-07-01

    To perform a pilot study to assess the feasibility of performing a phase III trial of therapeutic hypothermia started early and continued for at least 72 hours in children with severe traumatic brain injury. Multicenter prospective randomized controlled phase II trial. All eight of the PICUs in Australia and New Zealand and one in Canada. Children 1-15 years old with severe traumatic brain injury and who could be randomized within 6 hours of injury. The control group had strict normothermia to a temperature of 36-37°C for 72 hours. The intervention group had therapeutic hypothermia to a temperature of 32-33°C for 72 hours followed by slow rewarming at a rate compatible with maintaining intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure. Of 764 children admitted to PICU with traumatic brain injury, 92 (12%) were eligible and 55 (7.2%) were recruited. There were five major protocol violations (9%): three related to recruitment and consent processes and two to incorrect temperature management. Rewarming took a median of 21.5 hours (16-35 hr) and was performed without compromise in the cerebral perfusion pressure. There was no increase in any complications, including infections, bleeding, and arrhythmias. There was no difference in outcomes 12 months after injury; in the therapeutic hypothermia group, four (17%) had a bad outcome (pediatric cerebral performance category, 4-6) and three (13%) died, whereas in the normothermia group, three (12%) had a bad outcome and one (4%) died. Early therapeutic hypothermia in children with severe traumatic brain injury does not improve outcome and should not be used outside a clinical trial. Recruitment rates were lower and outcomes were better than expected. Conventional randomized controlled trials in children with severe traumatic brain injury are unlikely to be feasible. A large international trials group and alternative approaches to trial design will be required to further inform practice.

  5. Randomized placebo-controlled phase II trial of autologous mesenchymal stem cells in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Llufriu, Sara; Sepúlveda, María; Blanco, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Moreno, Beatriz; Berenguer, Joan; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Arnaiz, Joan-Albert; Andreu, Enrique J; Fernández, Begoña; Bullich, Santi; Sánchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Graus, Francesc; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled studies of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiple sclerosis suggested some beneficial effect. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phase II study we investigated their safety and efficacy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Efficacy was evaluated in terms of cumulative number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (GEL) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 6 months and at the end of the study. Patients unresponsive to conventional therapy, defined by at least 1 relapse and/or GEL on MRI scan in past 12 months, disease duration 2 to 10 years and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 3.0-6.5 were randomized to receive IV 1-2×10(6) bone-marrow-derived-MSCs/Kg or placebo. After 6 months, the treatment was reversed and patients were followed-up for another 6 months. Secondary endpoints were clinical outcomes (relapses and disability by EDSS and MS Functional Composite), and several brain MRI and optical coherence tomography measures. Immunological tests were explored to assess the immunomodulatory effects. At baseline 9 patients were randomized to receive MSCs (n = 5) or placebo (n = 4). One patient on placebo withdrew after having 3 relapses in the first 5 months. We did not identify any serious adverse events. At 6 months, patients treated with MSCs had a trend to lower mean cumulative number of GEL (3.1, 95% CI = 1.1-8.8 vs 12.3, 95% CI = 4.4-34.5, p = 0.064), and at the end of study to reduced mean GEL (-2.8±5.9 vs 3±5.4, p = 0.075). No significant treatment differences were detected in the secondary endpoints. We observed a non-significant decrease of the frequency of Th1 (CD4+ IFN-γ+) cells in blood of MSCs treated patients. Bone-marrow-MSCs are safe and may reduce inflammatory MRI parameters supporting their immunomodulatory properties. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01228266.

  6. Randomized Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Moreno, Beatriz; Berenguer, Joan; Gabilondo, Iñigo; Martínez-Heras, Eloy; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Arnaiz, Joan-Albert; Andreu, Enrique J.; Fernández, Begoña; Bullich, Santi; Sánchez-Dalmau, Bernardo; Graus, Francesc; Villoslada, Pablo; Saiz, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Uncontrolled studies of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in multiple sclerosis suggested some beneficial effect. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover phase II study we investigated their safety and efficacy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Efficacy was evaluated in terms of cumulative number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions (GEL) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 6 months and at the end of the study. Methods Patients unresponsive to conventional therapy, defined by at least 1 relapse and/or GEL on MRI scan in past 12 months, disease duration 2 to 10 years and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 3.0–6.5 were randomized to receive IV 1–2×106 bone-marrow-derived-MSCs/Kg or placebo. After 6 months, the treatment was reversed and patients were followed-up for another 6 months. Secondary endpoints were clinical outcomes (relapses and disability by EDSS and MS Functional Composite), and several brain MRI and optical coherence tomography measures. Immunological tests were explored to assess the immunomodulatory effects. Results At baseline 9 patients were randomized to receive MSCs (n = 5) or placebo (n = 4). One patient on placebo withdrew after having 3 relapses in the first 5 months. We did not identify any serious adverse events. At 6 months, patients treated with MSCs had a trend to lower mean cumulative number of GEL (3.1, 95% CI = 1.1–8.8 vs 12.3, 95% CI = 4.4–34.5, p = 0.064), and at the end of study to reduced mean GEL (−2.8±5.9 vs 3±5.4, p = 0.075). No significant treatment differences were detected in the secondary endpoints. We observed a non-significant decrease of the frequency of Th1 (CD4+ IFN-γ+) cells in blood of MSCs treated patients. Conclusion Bone-marrow-MSCs are safe and may reduce inflammatory MRI parameters supporting their immunomodulatory properties. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01228266 PMID:25436769

  7. Sino-implant (II) - a levonorgestrel-releasing two-rod implant: systematic review of the randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Markus J.; Lopez, Laureen M.; Grimes, David A.; Cheng, Linan; Shelton, Jim; Trussell, James; Farley, Timothy M.M.; Dorflinger, Laneta

    2013-01-01

    Background Sino-implant (II) is a subdermal contraceptive implant manufactured in China. This two-rod levonorgestrel-releasing implant has the same amount of active ingredient (150 mg levonorgestrel) and mechanism of action as the widely available contraceptive implant Jadelle. We examined randomized controlled trials of Sino-implant (II) for effectiveness and side effects. Study design We searched electronic databases for studies of Sino-implant (II), and then restricted our review to randomized controlled trials. The primary outcome of this review was pregnancy. Results Four randomized trials with a total of 15,943 women assigned to Sino-implant (II) had first-year probabilities of pregnancy ranging from 0.0% to 0.1%. Cumulative probabilities of pregnancy during the four years of the product's approved duration of use were 0.9% and 1.06% in the two trials that presented date for four-year use. Five-year cumulative probabilities of pregnancy ranged from 0.7% to 2.1%. In one trial, the cumulative probability of pregnancy more than doubled during the fifth year (from 0.9% to 2.1%), which may be why the implant is approved for four years of use in China. Five-year cumulative probabilities of discontinuation due to menstrual problems ranged from 12.5% to 15.5% for Sino-implant (II). Conclusions Sino-implant (II) is one of the most effective contraceptives available today. These available clinical data, combined with independent laboratory testing, and the knowledge that 7 million women have used this method since 1994, support the safety and effectiveness of Sino-implant (II). The lower cost of Sino-implant (II) compared with other subdermal implants could improve access to implants in resource-constrained settings. PMID:20159174

  8. Promoting Regular Mammography Screening II. Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial in US Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Sally W.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Coan, Sharon P.; Perz, Catherine A.; Bastian, Lori A.; Rakowski, William; Chan, Wen; Lairson, David R.; McQueen, Amy; Fernandez, Maria E.; Warrick, Cynthia; Halder, Arada; DiClemente, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Background Few health promotion trials have evaluated strategies to increase regular mammography screening. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of two theory-based interventions in a population-based, nationally representative sample of women veterans. Methods Study candidates 52 years and older were randomly sampled from the National Registry of Women Veterans and randomly assigned to three groups. Groups 1 and 2 received interventions that varied in the extent of personalization (tailored and targeted vs targeted-only, respectively); group 3 was a survey-only control group. Postintervention follow-up surveys were mailed to all women after 1 and 2 years. Outcome measures were self-reported mammography coverage (completion of one postintervention mammogram) and compliance (completion of two postintervention mammograms). In decreasingly conservative analyses (intention-to-treat [ITT], modified intention-to-treat [MITT], and per-protocol [PP]), we examined crude coverage and compliance estimates and adjusted for covariates and variable follow-up time across study groups using Cox proportional hazards regression. For the PP analyses, we also used logistic regression. Results None of the among-group differences in the crude incidence estimates for mammography coverage was statistically significant in ITT, MITT, or PP analyses. Crude estimates of compliance differed at statistically significant levels in the PP analyses and at levels approaching statistical significance in the ITT and MITT analyses. Absolute differences favoring the intervention over the control groups were 1%–3% for ITT analysis, 1%–5% for MITT analysis, and 2%–6% for the PP analysis. Results from Cox modeling showed no statistically significant effect of the interventions on coverage or compliance in the ITT, MITT, or PP analyses, although hazard rate ratios (HRRs) for coverage were consistently slightly higher in the intervention groups than the control group (range for HRRs = 1.05–1

  9. Promoting regular mammography screening II. Results from a randomized controlled trial in US women veterans.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Sally W; del Junco, Deborah J; Tiro, Jasmin A; Coan, Sharon P; Perz, Catherine A; Bastian, Lori A; Rakowski, William; Chan, Wen; Lairson, David R; McQueen, Amy; Fernandez, Maria E; Warrick, Cynthia; Halder, Arada; DiClemente, Carlo

    2008-03-05

    Few health promotion trials have evaluated strategies to increase regular mammography screening. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of two theory-based interventions in a population-based, nationally representative sample of women veterans. Study candidates 52 years and older were randomly sampled from the National Registry of Women Veterans and randomly assigned to three groups. Groups 1 and 2 received interventions that varied in the extent of personalization (tailored and targeted vs targeted-only, respectively); group 3 was a survey-only control group. Postintervention follow-up surveys were mailed to all women after 1 and 2 years. Outcome measures were self-reported mammography coverage (completion of one postintervention mammogram) and compliance (completion of two postintervention mammograms). In decreasingly conservative analyses (intention-to-treat [ITT], modified intention-to-treat [MITT], and per-protocol [PP]), we examined crude coverage and compliance estimates and adjusted for covariates and variable follow-up time across study groups using Cox proportional hazards regression. For the PP analyses, we also used logistic regression. None of the among-group differences in the crude incidence estimates for mammography coverage was statistically significant in ITT, MITT, or PP analyses. Crude estimates of compliance differed at statistically significant levels in the PP analyses and at levels approaching statistical significance in the ITT and MITT analyses. Absolute differences favoring the intervention over the control groups were 1%-3% for ITT analysis, 1%-5% for MITT analysis, and 2%-6% for the PP analysis. Results from Cox modeling showed no statistically significant effect of the interventions on coverage or compliance in the ITT, MITT, or PP analyses, although hazard rate ratios (HRRs) for coverage were consistently slightly higher in the intervention groups than the control group (range for HRRs = 1.05-1.09). A PP analysis using logistic

  10. Roux-en-Y or Billroth II Reconstruction After Radical Distal Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    So, Jimmy Bok-Yan; Rao, Jaideepraj; Wong, Andrew Siang-Yih; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Pang, Ning Qi; Tay, Amy Yuh Ling; Yung, Man Yee; Su, Zheng; Phua, Janelle Niam Sin; Shabbir, Asim; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai

    2017-04-05

    The aim of the study was to compare the clinical symptoms between Billroth II (B-II) and Roux-en-Y (R-Y) reconstruction after distal subtotal gastrectomy (DG) for gastric cancer. Surgery is the mainstay of curative treatment for gastric cancer. The technique for reconstruction after DG remains controversial. Both B-II and R-Y are popular methods. This is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial. From October 2008 to October 2014, 162 patients who underwent DG were randomly allocated to B-II (n = 81) and R-Y (n = 81) groups. The primary endpoint is Gastrointestinal (GI) Symptoms Score 1 year after surgery. We also compared the nutritional status, extent of gastritis on endoscopy, and quality of life after surgery between the 2 procedures at 1 year. Operative time was significantly shorter for B-II than for R-Y [mean difference 21.5 minutes, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.8-39.3, P = 0.019]. The B-II and R-Y groups had a peri-operative morbidity of 28.4% and 33.8%, respectively (P = 0.500) and a 30-day mortality of 2.5% and 1.2%, respectively (P = 0.500). GI symptoms score did not differ between R-Y versus B-II reconstruction (mean difference -0.45, 95% CI -1.21 to 0.31, P = 0.232). R-Y resulted in a lower median endoscopic grade for gastritis versus B-II (mean difference -1.32, 95% CI -1.67 to -0.98, P < 0.001). We noted no difference in nutritional status (R-Y versus B-II mean difference -0.31, 95% CI -3.27 to 2.65, P = 0.837) and quality of life at 1 year between the 2 groups too. Although BII is associated with a higher incidence of heartburn symptom and higher median endoscopic grade for gastritis, BII and RY are similar in terms of overall GI symptom score and nutritional status at 1 year after distal gastrectomy.

  11. Reducing Sitting Time After Stroke: A Phase II Safety and Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    English, Coralie; Healy, Genevieve N; Olds, Tim; Parfitt, Gaynor; Borkoles, Erika; Coates, Alison; Kramer, Sharon; Bernhardt, Julie

    2016-02-01

    To test the safety, feasibility, and effectiveness of reducing sitting time in stroke survivors. Randomized controlled trial with attention-matched controls and blinded assessments. Community. Stroke survivors (N=35; 22 men; mean age, 66.9±12.7y). Four counseling sessions over 7 weeks with a message of sit less and move more (intervention group) or calcium for bone health (attention-matched control group). Measures included safety (adverse events, increases in pain, spasticity, or fatigue) and feasibility (adherence to trial protocol). Secondary measures included time spent sitting (including in prolonged bouts ≥30min), standing, and stepping as measured by the thigh-worn inclinometer (7d, 24h/d protocol) and time spent in physical activity of at least moderate intensity as measured by a triaxial accelerometer. The Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults was used to describe changes in use of time. Thirty-three participants completed the full protocol. Four participants reported falls during the intervention period with no other adverse events. From a baseline average of 640.7±99.6min/d, daily sitting time reduced on average by 30±50.6min/d (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8-54.6) in the intervention group and 40.4±92.5min/d in the control group (95% CI, 13.0-93.8). Participants in both groups also reduced their time spent in prolonged sitting bouts (≥30min) and increased time spent standing and stepping. Our protocol was both safe and feasible. Participants in both groups spent less time sitting and more time standing and stepping postintervention, but outcomes were not superior for intervention participants. Attention matching is desirable in clinical trials and may have contributed to the positive outcomes for control participants. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Project ENABLE II Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Palliative Care for Patients with Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Balan, Stefan; Brokaw, Frances C.; Seville, Janette; Hull, Jay G.; Li, Zhongze; Tosteson, Tor; Byock, Ira R.; Ahles, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Context There are few randomized controlled trials of the effectiveness of palliative care. Objective To determine the effect of a palliative care intervention on quality of life (QOL), symptom intensity, mood, and resource utilization. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled trial (November 2003-May 2008) of 322 patients with advanced cancer and an identified caregiver in a rural, NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center (the Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH) and affiliated outreach clinics and Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center (White River Junction, VT). Intervention A multi-component, psycho-educational, palliative care intervention (Project ENABLE) conducted by an advanced practice nurse consisting of 4 weekly educational sessions and monthly follow-up until death or study completion. Main Outcome Measures (1) The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative (range: 0 to 184; higher scores indicate better QOL), (2) Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (range: 0 to 900; higher scores indicate greater symptom intensity), (3) Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (range: 0 to 60; higher scores indicate more depressive symptoms), completed at baseline, 1 month and every 3 months until death or study completion, (4) days in hospital, intensive care unit (ICU), and emergency department visits recorded in the medical record. Results 322 participants with gastrointestinal (41%), lung (36%), genitourinary (12%), and breast (10%) cancer were randomized. Estimated treatment effects (intervention minus usual care) for all subjects were 4.6 (P = .02) for QOL, −27.8 (P = .06) for symptom intensity, and −1.8 (P = .02) for depressed mood. Estimated average treatment effects in the sample of participants who died during the study were 8.6 (P = .02) for QOL, −24.2 (P = .24) for symptom intensity, and −2.7 (P = .03) for depressed mood. Days in hospital, intensive care unit, and emergency department visits were not different

  13. Treadmill training to improve mobility for people with sub-acute stroke: a phase II feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baer, Gillian D; Salisbury, Lisa G; Smith, Mark T; Pitman, Jane; Dennis, Martin

    2017-07-01

    This phase II study investigated the feasibility and potential effectiveness of treadmill training versus normal gait re-education for ambulant and non-ambulant people with sub-acute stroke delivered as part of normal clinical practice. A single-blind, feasibility randomized controlled trial. Four hospital-based stroke units. Participants within three months of stroke onset. Participants were randomized to treadmill training (minimum twice weekly) plus normal gait re-education or normal gait re-education only (control) for up to eight weeks. Measures were taken at baseline, after eight weeks of intervention and at six-month follow-up. The primary outcome was the Rivermead Mobility Index. Other measures included the Functional Ambulation Category, 10-metre walk, 6-minute walk, Barthel Index, Motor Assessment Scale, Stroke Impact Scale and a measure of confidence in walking. In all, 77 patients were randomized, 39 to treadmill and 38 to control. It was feasible to deliver treadmill training to people with sub-acute stroke. Only two adverse events occurred. No statistically significant differences were found between groups. For example, Rivermead Mobility Index, median (interquartile range (IQR)): after eight weeks treadmill 5 (4-9), control 6 (4-11) p = 0.33; or six-month follow-up treadmill 8.5 (3-12), control 8 (6-12.5) p = 0.42. The frequency and intensity of intervention was low. Treadmill training in sub-acute stroke patients was feasible but showed no significant difference in outcomes when compared to normal gait re-education. A large definitive randomized trial is now required to explore treadmill training in normal clinical practice.

  14. Periodontal Tissue Regeneration Using Fibroblast Growth Factor -2: Randomized Controlled Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Masahiro; Nakashima, Keisuke; Kowashi, Yusuke; Fujii, Takeo; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Sasano, Takashi; Furuuchi, Toshi; Fukuda, Mitsuo; Noguchi, Toshihide; Shibutani, Toshiaki; Iwayama, Yukio; Takashiba, Shogo; Kurihara, Hidemi; Ninomiya, Masami; Kido, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Toshihiko; Hamachi, Takafumi; Maeda, Katsumasa; Hara, Yoshitaka; Izumi, Yuichi; Hirofuji, Takao; Imai, Enyu; Omae, Masatoshi; Watanuki, Mitsuru; Murakami, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    Background The options for medical use of signaling molecules as stimulators of tissue regeneration are currently limited. Preclinical evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 can promote periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to clarify the activity of FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of periodontal tissue lost by periodontitis and to evaluate the safety of such stimulation. Methodology/Principal Findings We used recombinant human FGF-2 with 3% hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as vehicle and conducted a randomized double-blinded controlled trial involving 13 facilities. Subjects comprised 74 patients displaying a 2- or 3-walled vertical bone defect as measured ≥3 mm apical to the bone crest. Patients were randomly assigned to 4 groups: Group P, given HPC with no FGF-2; Group L, given HPC containing 0.03% FGF-2; Group M, given HPC containing 0.1% FGF-2; and Group H, given HPC containing 0.3% FGF-2. Each patient underwent flap operation during which we administered 200 µL of the appropriate investigational drug to the bone defect. Before and for 36 weeks following administration, patients underwent periodontal tissue inspections and standardized radiography of the region under investigation. As a result, a significant difference (p = 0.021) in rate of increase in alveolar bone height was identified between Group P (23.92%) and Group H (58.62%) at 36 weeks. The linear increase in alveolar bone height at 36 weeks in Group P and H was 0.95 mm and 1.85 mm, respectively (p = 0.132). No serious adverse events attributable to the investigational drug were identified. Conclusions Although no statistically significant differences were noted for gains in clinical attachment level and alveolar bone gain for FGF-2 groups versus Group P, the significant difference in rate of increase in alveolar bone height (p = 0.021) between Groups P and H at 36 weeks suggests that some efficacy could be expected from FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of

  15. Effects of pinitol isolated from soybeans on glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in Korean patients with type II diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-I; Kim, J C; Kang, M-J; Lee, M-S; Kim, J-J; Cha, I-J

    2005-03-01

    To assess the effects of soybean-derived pinitol on glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in Korean patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan, Republic of Korea. A total of 30 patients with type II diabetes received an oral dose of 600 mg soybean-derived pinitol or placebo twice daily for 13 weeks. Pinitol significantly decreased mean fasting plasma glucose, insulin, fructosamine, HbA1c, and the homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR, P<0.001). Pinitol significantly decreased total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, the LDL/HDL-cholesterol ratio, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure and increased HDL-cholesterol (P<0.05). These data suggest that soybean-derived pinitol may be beneficial in reducing cardiovascular risk in Korean type II diabetes.

  16. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in severe traumatic brain injury: a phase II randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri L H; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the commonest cause of death and disability in those aged under 40 years. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous competitive antagonist at the interleukin-1 type-1 receptor (IL-1R). Antagonism at the IL-1R confers neuroprotection in several rodent models of neuronal injury (i.e., trauma, stroke and excitotoxicity). We describe a single center, phase II, open label, randomized-control study of recombinant human IL1ra (rhIL1ra, anakinra) in severe TBI, at a dose of 100 mg subcutaneously once a day for 5 days in 20 patients randomized 1:1. We provide safety data (primary outcome) in this pathology, utilize cerebral microdialysis to directly determine brain extracellular concentrations of IL1ra and 41 cytokines and chemokines, and use principal component analysis (PCA) to explore the resultant cerebral cytokine profile. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was safe, penetrated into plasma and the brain extracellular fluid. The PCA showed a separation in cytokine profiles after IL1ra administration. A candidate cytokine from this analysis, macrophage-derived chemoattractant, was significantly lower in the rhIL1ra-treated group. Our results provide promising data for rhIL1ra as a therapeutic candidate by showing safety, brain penetration and a modification of the neuroinflammatory response to TBI by a putative neuroprotective agent in humans for the first time.

  17. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in severe traumatic brain injury: a phase II randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri LH; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the commonest cause of death and disability in those aged under 40 years. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) is an endogenous competitive antagonist at the interleukin-1 type-1 receptor (IL-1R). Antagonism at the IL-1R confers neuroprotection in several rodent models of neuronal injury (i.e., trauma, stroke and excitotoxicity). We describe a single center, phase II, open label, randomized-control study of recombinant human IL1ra (rhIL1ra, anakinra) in severe TBI, at a dose of 100 mg subcutaneously once a day for 5 days in 20 patients randomized 1:1. We provide safety data (primary outcome) in this pathology, utilize cerebral microdialysis to directly determine brain extracellular concentrations of IL1ra and 41 cytokines and chemokines, and use principal component analysis (PCA) to explore the resultant cerebral cytokine profile. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist was safe, penetrated into plasma and the brain extracellular fluid. The PCA showed a separation in cytokine profiles after IL1ra administration. A candidate cytokine from this analysis, macrophage-derived chemoattractant, was significantly lower in the rhIL1ra-treated group. Our results provide promising data for rhIL1ra as a therapeutic candidate by showing safety, brain penetration and a modification of the neuroinflammatory response to TBI by a putative neuroprotective agent in humans for the first time. PMID:24569690

  18. Robot-assisted Versus Laparoscopic Surgery for Rectal Cancer: A Phase II Open Label Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Park, Sung Chan; Park, Ji Won; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Byung-Ho; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2017-05-25

    The phase II randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the outcomes of robot-assisted surgery with those of laparoscopic surgery in the patients with rectal cancer. The feasibility of robot-assisted surgery over laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer has not been established yet. Between February 21, 2012 and March 11, 2015, patients with rectal cancer (cT1-3NxM0) were enrolled. Patients were randomized 1:1 to either robot-assisted or laparoscopic surgery, and stratified per sex and administration of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The primary outcome was the quality of total mesorectal excision (TME) specimen. Secondary outcomes were the circumferential and distal resection margins, the number of harvested lymph nodes, morbidity, bowel function recovery, and quality of life. A total of 163 patients were randomly assigned to the robot-assisted (n = 81) and laparoscopic (n = 82) surgery groups, and 139 patients were eligible for the analyses (73 vs 66, respectively). One patient (1.2%) in the robot-assisted group was converted to open surgery. The TME quality did not differ between the robot-assisted and laparoscopic groups (80.3% vs 78.1% complete TME, respectively; 18.2% vs 21.9% nearly complete TME, respectively; P = 0.599). The resection margins, number of harvested lymph nodes, morbidity, and bowel function recovery also were not significantly different. On analyzing quality of life, scores of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life (EORTC QLQ C30) and EORTC QLQ CR38 were similar in the 2 groups, but in the EORTC QLQ CR 38 questionnaire, sexual function 12 months postoperatively was better in the robot-assisted group than in the laparoscopic group (P = 0.03). Robot-assisted surgery in rectal cancer showed TME quality comparable with that of laparoscopic surgery, and it demonstrated similar postoperative morbidity, bowel function recovery, and quality of life.

  19. Family Integrated Care (FICare) in Level II Neonatal Intensive Care Units: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Benzies, Karen M; Shah, Vibhuti; Aziz, Khalid; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Palacio-Derflingher, Luz; Scotland, Jeanne; Larocque, Jill; Mrklas, Kelly; Suter, Esther; Naugler, Christopher; Stelfox, Henry T; Chari, Radha; Lodha, Abhay

    2017-10-10

    Every year, about 15 million of the world's infants are born preterm (before 37 weeks gestation). In Alberta, the preterm birth rate was 8.7% in 2015, the second highest among Canadian provinces. Approximately 20% of preterm infants are born before 32 weeks gestation (early preterm), and require care in a Level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU); 80% are born moderate (32 weeks and zero days [32(0/7)] to 33(6/7) weeks) and late preterm (34(0/7) to 36(6/7) weeks), and require care in a Level II NICU. Preterm birth and experiences in the NICU disrupt early parent-infant relationships and induce parental psychosocial distress. Family Integrated Care (FICare) shows promise as a model of care in Level III NICUs. The purpose of this study is to evaluate length of stay, infant and maternal clinical outcomes, and costs following adaptation and implementation of FICare in Level II NICUs. We will conduct a pragmatic, cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT) in ten Alberta Level II NICUs allocated to one of two groups: FICare or standard care. The FICare Alberta model involves three theoretically-based, standardized components: information sharing, parenting education, and family support. Our sample size of 181 mother-infant dyads per group is based on the primary outcome of NICU length of stay, 80% participation, and 80% retention at follow-up. Secondary outcomes (e.g., infant clinical outcomes and maternal psychosocial distress) will be assessed shortly after admission to NICU, at discharge and 2 months corrected age. We will conduct economic analysis from two perspectives: the public healthcare payer and society. To understand the utility, acceptability, and impact of FICare, qualitative interviews will be conducted with a subset of mothers at the 2-month follow-up, and with hospital administrators and healthcare providers near the end of the study. Results of this pragmatic cRCT of FICare in Alberta Level II NICUs will inform policy decisions by

  20. Phase II double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study of armodafinil for brain radiation-induced fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Page, Brandi R.; Shaw, Edward G.; Lu, Lingyi; Bryant, David; Grisell, David; Lesser, Glenn J.; Monitto, Drew C.; Naughton, Michelle J.; Rapp, Stephen R.; Savona, Steven R.; Shah, Sunjay; Case, Doug; Chan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Common acute-term side effects of brain radiotherapy (RT) include fatigue, drowsiness, decreased physical functioning, and decreased quality of life (QOL). We hypothesized that armodafinil (a wakefulness-promoting drug known to reduce fatigue and increase cognitive function in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy) would result in reduced fatigue and sleepiness for patients receiving brain RT. Methods A phase II, multi-institutional, placebo-controlled randomized trial assessed feasibility of armodafinil 150 mg/day in participants receiving brain RT, from whom we obtained estimates of variability for fatigue, sleepiness, QOL, cognitive function, and treatment effect. Results From September 20, 2010, to October 20, 2012, 54 participants enrolled with 80% retention and 94% self-reported compliance. There were no grade 4–5 toxicities, and the incidence of grade 2–3 toxicities was similar between treatment arms, the most common of which were anxiety and nausea (15%), headaches (19%), and insomnia (20%). There were no statistically significant differences in end-RT or 4 week post-RT outcomes between armodafinil and placebo in any outcomes (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy [FACIT]-Fatigue, Brief Fatigue Inventory, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, FACT-Brain, and FACIT-cognitive function). However, in participants with more baseline fatigue, those treated with armodafinil did better than those who received the placebo on the end-RT assessments for several outcomes. Conclusion Armodafinil 150 mg/day was well tolerated in primary brain tumor patients undergoing RT with good compliance. While there was no overall significant effect on fatigue, those with greater baseline fatigue experienced improved QOL and reduced fatigue when using armodafinil. These data suggest that a prospective, phase III randomized trial is warranted for patients with greater baseline fatigue. PMID:25972454

  1. Motor recovery and cortical reorganization after mirror therapy in chronic stroke patients: a phase II randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Michielsen, Marian E; Selles, Ruud W; van der Geest, Jos N; Eckhardt, Martine; Yavuzer, Gunes; Stam, Henk J; Smits, Marion; Ribbers, Gerard M; Bussmann, Johannes B J

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate for any clinical effects of home-based mirror therapy and subsequent cortical reorganization in patients with chronic stroke with moderate upper extremity paresis. A total of 40 chronic stroke patients (mean time post .onset, 3.9 years) were randomly assigned to the mirror group (n = 20) or the control group (n = 20) and then joined a 6-week training program. Both groups trained once a week under supervision of a physiotherapist at the rehabilitation center and practiced at home 1 hour daily, 5 times a week. The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer motor assessment (FMA). The grip force, spasticity, pain, dexterity, hand-use in daily life, and quality of life at baseline-posttreatment and at 6 months-were all measured by a blinded assessor. Changes in neural activation patterns were assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at baseline and posttreatment in an available subgroup (mirror, 12; control, 9). Posttreatment, the FMA improved more in the mirror than in the control group (3.6 ± 1.5, P < .05), but this improvement did not persist at follow-up. No changes were found on the other outcome measures (all Ps >.05). fMRI results showed a shift in activation balance within the primary motor cortex toward the affected hemisphere in the mirror group only (weighted laterality index difference 0.40 ± 0.39, P < .05). This phase II trial showed some effectiveness for mirror therapy in chronic stroke patients and is the first to associate mirror therapy with cortical reorganization. Future research has to determine the optimum practice intensity and duration for improvements to persist and generalize to other functional domains.

  2. Oral type II collagen treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sieper, J; Kary, S; Sörensen, H; Alten, R; Eggens, U; Hüge, W; Hiepe, F; Kühne, A; Listing, J; Ulbrich, N; Braun, J; Zink, A; Mitchison, N A

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of oral type II collagen in the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ninety patients with RA (disease duration < or = 3 years) were treated for 12 weeks with oral bovine type II collagen at 1 mg/day (n = 30) or 10 mg/day (n = 30) or with placebo (n = 30), in a double-blind randomized study. There were no significant difference between the 3 groups in terms of response to treatment. However, we observed a higher prevalence of responders in the type II collagen-treated groups: 7 responders in the 10-mg type II collagen group and 6 in the 1-mg group, versus 4 in the placebo group. Furthermore, 3 patients in the 10-mg type II collagen group and 1 patient in the 1-mg type II group, but no patients in the placebo group, had very good response. A total of 14 patients had to be withdrawn from the study: 2 because of side effects (nausea) and 12 because of lack of efficacy. Only a minority of patients responded to treatment with oral type II collagen. These results justify further efforts to identify which patients will have good response to such therapy.

  3. Phase II study of metformin for reduction of obesity-associated breast cancer risk: a randomized controlled trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jessica A; Chalasani, Pavani; Thomson, Cynthia A; Roe, Denise; Altbach, Maria; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Stopeck, Alison; Thompson, Patricia A; Villa-Guillen, Diana Evelyn; Chow, H-H Sherry

    2016-07-19

    Two-thirds of U.S. adult women are overweight or obese. High body mass index (BMI) and adult weight gain are risk factors for a number of chronic diseases, including postmenopausal breast cancer. The higher postmenopausal breast cancer risk in women with elevated BMI is likely to be attributable to related metabolic disturbances including altered circulating sex steroid hormones and adipokines, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines, and insulin resistance. Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug that has demonstrated favorable effects on metabolic disturbances and as such may lead to lower breast cancer risk in obese women. Further, the anti-proliferative effects of metformin suggest it may decrease breast density, an accepted biomarker of breast cancer risk. This is a Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of metformin in overweight/obese premenopausal women who have elements of metabolic syndrome. Eligible participants will be randomized to receive metformin 850 mg BID (n = 75) or placebo (n = 75) for 12 months. The primary endpoint is change in breast density, based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquired fat-water features. Secondary outcomes include changes in serum insulin levels, serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 to insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 ratio, serum IGF-2 levels, serum testosterone levels, serum leptin to adiponectin ratio, body weight, and waist circumference. Exploratory outcomes include changes in metabolomic profiles in plasma and nipple aspirate fluid. Changes in tissue architecture as well as cellular and molecular targets in breast tissue collected in a subgroup of participants will also be explored. The study will evaluate whether metformin can result in favorable changes in breast density, select proteins and hormones, products of body metabolism, and body weight and composition. The study should help determine the potential breast cancer preventive activity of metformin

  4. Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Orthosis Augmented by Either Stretching or Stretching and Strengthening for Stage II Tibialis Posterior Tendon Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Houck, Jeff; Neville, Christopher; Tome, Josh; Flemister, Adolph

    2015-09-01

    The value of strengthening and stretching exercises combined with orthosis treatment in a home-based program has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of augmenting orthosis treatment with either stretching or a combination of stretching and strengthening in participants with stage II tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction (TPTD). Participants included 39 patients with stage II TPTD who were recruited from a medical center and then randomly assigned to a strengthening or stretching treatment group. Excluding 3 dropouts, there were 19 participants in the strengthening group and 17 in the stretching group. The stretching treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with stretching exercises. The strengthening treatment consisted of a prefabricated orthosis used in conjunction with the stretching and strengthening exercises. The main outcome measures were self-report (ie, Foot Function Index and Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment) and isometric deep posterior compartment strength. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test for differences between groups at 6 and 12 weeks after starting the exercise programs. Both groups significantly improved in pain and function over the 12-week trial period. The self-report measures showed minimal differences between the treatment groups. There were no differences in isometric deep posterior compartment strength. A moderate-intensity, home-based exercise program was minimally effective in augmenting orthosis wear alone in participants with stage II TPTD. Level I, prospective randomized study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with quetiapine in treating bipolar II depression: a randomized, double-blinded, control study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shao-hua; Lai, Jian-bo; Xu, Dong-rong; Qi, Hong-li; Peterson, Bradley S.; Bao, Ai-min; Hu, Chan-chan; Huang, Man-li; Chen, Jing-kai; Wei, Ning; Hu, Jian-bo; Li, Shu-lan; Zhou, Wei-hua; Xu, Wei-juan; Xu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The clinical and cognitive responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in bipolar II depressed patients remain unclear. In this study, thirty-eight bipolar II depressed patients were randomly assigned into three groups: (i) left high-frequency (n = 12), (ii) right low-frequency (n = 13), (iii) sham stimulation (n = 13), and underwent four-week rTMS with quetiapine concomitantly. Clinical efficacy was evaluated at baseline and weekly intervals using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive functioning was assessed before and after the study with the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Word-Color Interference Test (Stroop), and Trail Making Test (TMT). Thirty-five patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the mean scores of both the HDRS-17 and the MADRS significantly decreased over the 4-week trial, which did not differ among the three groups. Exploratory analyses revealed no differences in factor scores of HDRS-17s, or in response or remission rates. Scores of WCST, Stroop, or TMT did not differ across the three groups. These findings indicated active rTMS combined with quetiapine was not superior to quetiapine monotherapy in improving depressive symptoms or cognitive performance in patients with bipolar II depression. PMID:27460201

  6. Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Men: The Physicians' Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sesso, Howard D.; Christen, William G.; Bubes, Vadim; Smith, Joanne P.; MacFadyen, Jean; Schvartz, Miriam; Manson, JoAnn E.; Glynn, Robert J.; Buring, Julie E.; Gaziano, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Context Though multivitamins aim to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiency, there is a perception that multivitamins may prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD). Observational studies examining regular multivitamin use have been inconsistently associated with CVD, with no long-term clinical trials of multivitamin use. Objective To determine whether long-term multivitamin supplementation decreases the risk of major cardiovascular events among men. Design The Physicians' Health Study II is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a common daily multivitamin, that began in 1997 with continued treatment and follow-up through June 1, 2011. Setting and Participants A total of 14,641 male U.S. physicians initially aged ≥50 years (mean [± SD] age; 64.3 [± 9.2] years), including 754 men with a history of CVD at randomization, were enrolled. Intervention Daily multivitamin, as Centrum Silver. Main Outcome Measures The primary cardiovascular outcome was a composite endpoint of major cardiovascular events, including nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), nonfatal stroke, and fatal CVD. Secondary outcomes included MI and stroke individually. Results During a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 11.2 (10.7 to 13.3) years, there were 1,732 confirmed major cardiovascular events. Compared with placebo, there was no significant effect of a daily multivitamin on major cardiovascular events (active and placebo multivitamin groups, 11.0 and 10.8 events per 1,000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91–1.10; P=0.91). Further, a daily multivitamin had no effect on total MI (active and placebo multivitamin groups, 3.9 and 4.2 events per 1,000 person-years; HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.80–1.09; P=0.39), total stroke (active and placebo multivitamin groups, 4.1 and 3.9 events per 1,000 person-years; HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.91–1.23; P=0.48), or cardiovascular mortality (active and placebo multivitamin groups, 5.0 and 5.1 events per 1,000 person

  7. 1% alendronate gel as local drug delivery in the treatment of Class II furcation defects: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Kumari, Minal; Rao, Nishanth S; Naik, Savitha B

    2013-03-01

    Alendronate (ALN), an aminobisphosphonate, is known to stimulate the formation of osteoblast precursors to promote osteoblastogenesis. The present study aims to explore the efficacy of 1% ALN gel as a local drug delivery system in adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for the treatment of Class II furcation defects in comparison with placebo gel. A total of 69 mandibular Class II furcation defects were randomized and treated with either 1% ALN gel or placebo gel. Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months, and radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Defect fill at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months was calculated on standardized radiographs using image analysis software. Mean probing depth (PD) reduction and mean relative vertical (RVCAL) and horizontal (RHCAL) clinical attachment level gain were shown to be greater in the ALN group than the placebo group at 3, 6, and 12 months. Furthermore, a significantly greater mean percentage of bone fill was found in the ALN group (32.11% ± 6.18%, 32.66% ± 5.86%), compared with the placebo group (2.71% ± 0.61%, 1.83% ± 1.51%), at 6 and 12 months, respectively. The results of the present study show that local delivery of 1% ALN into a Class II furcation defect stimulates a significant PD reduction, RVCAL and RHCAL gains, and improved bone fill compared with placebo gel as an adjunct to SRP. ALN can provide a new direction in management of furcation defects.

  8. Efficacy and safety of alirocumab in high cardiovascular risk patients with inadequately controlled hypercholesterolaemia on maximally tolerated doses of statins: the ODYSSEY COMBO II randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Christopher P; Cariou, Bertrand; Blom, Dirk; McKenney, James M; Lorenzato, Christelle; Pordy, Robert; Chaudhari, Umesh; Colhoun, Helen M

    2015-05-14

    To compare the efficacy [low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering] and safety of alirocumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9, compared with ezetimibe, as add-on therapy to maximally tolerated statin therapy in high cardiovascular risk patients with inadequately controlled hypercholesterolaemia. COMBO II is a double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, parallel-group, 104-week study of alirocumab vs. ezetimibe. Patients (n = 720) with high cardiovascular risk and elevated LDL-C despite maximal doses of statins were enrolled (August 2012-May 2013). This pre-specified analysis was conducted after the last patient completed 52 weeks. Patients were randomized to subcutaneous alirocumab 75 mg every 2 weeks (plus oral placebo) or oral ezetimibe 10 mg daily (plus subcutaneous placebo) on a background of statin therapy. At Week 24, mean ± SE reductions in LDL-C from baseline were 50.6 ± 1.4% for alirocumab vs. 20.7 ± 1.9% for ezetimibe (difference 29.8 ± 2.3%; P < 0.0001); 77.0% of alirocumab and 45.6% of ezetimibe patients achieved LDL-C <1.8 mmol/L (P < 0.0001). Mean achieved LDL-C at Week 24 was 1.3 ± 0.04 mmol/L with alirocumab and 2.1 ± 0.05 mmol/L with ezetimibe, and were maintained to Week 52. Alirocumab was generally well tolerated, with no evidence of an excess of treatment-emergent adverse events. In patients at high cardiovascular risk with inadequately controlled LDL-C, alirocumab achieved significantly greater reductions in LDL-C compared with ezetimibe, with a similar safety profile. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01644188. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  9. A randomized control study of treating secondary stage II breast cancer-related lymphoedema with free lymph node transfer.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiou, Dimitrios; Demiri, Efterpi; Tsimponis, Antonis; Sarafis, Alexandros; Mpalaris, Vasillios; Tatsidou, Georgia; Arsos, Georgios

    2016-02-01

    Microsurgical techniques are increasingly used for treating severe lymphoedema cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free vascularized lymph node transfer (LNT) in stage II breast cancer-related lymphoedema patients in comparison with non-surgical management. During the last 3 years, 83 female patients were examined at our lymphoedema clinic. Finally, 36 cases were included in this study and randomly divided in two groups: group A patients (n = 18, mean age 47 years) underwent microsurgical LNT; followed by 6 months of physiotherapy and compression, while group B patients (n = 18, mean age 49 years) were managed by physiotherapy and compression alone for 6 months. Patients of both groups removed their elastic garments after 6 months and were re-examined 1 year later. All the 36 patients had detailed evaluation of the affected extremity including limb volume measurement, infection episodes and scale scoring of pain, feeling of heaviness and functional status both at baseline and 18 month. Limb volume reduction was observed in both groups; mean reduction was greater in group A (57 %) than in group B (18 %). Infection episodes in group A were significantly reduced compared to those in group B patients. All group A patients reported painless and feeling of heaviness-free extremities with overall functional improvement, while the corresponding changes in group B patients were no more than marginal. Moreover, the LNT procedure was estimated as cost effective compared to conservative treatment alone. LNT represents an effective therapeutic approach for stage II lymphoedema patients; it significantly reduces limb volume, decreases recurrent infections and improves the overall function.

  10. Acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet compares favorably to a step II diet in a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Scialli, Anthony R; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Lanou, Amy J

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet, as compared with a more typical fat-modified diet, among overweight and obese adults. Through newspaper advertisements, 64 overweight, postmenopausal women were recruited, 59 of whom completed the study. The participants were assigned randomly to a low-fat vegan diet or, for comparison, to a National Cholesterol Education Program Step II (NCEP) diet. At baseline and 14 weeks later, dietary intake, dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger, as well as the acceptability and perceived benefits and adverse effects of each diet were assessed. Dietary restraint increased in the NCEP group (P <.001), indicating a greater subjective sense of constraint with regard to diet requirements, but was unchanged in the vegan group. Disinhibition and hunger scores fell in each group (P <.001 and P <.01, respectively). The acceptability of both diets was high, although the vegan group participants rated their diet as less easy to prepare than their usual diets (P <.05) and the NCEP participants foresaw continuation of their assigned diet to be more difficult than continuation of their baseline diets (P <.05). There were no between-group differences on any acceptability measures. The acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet is high and not demonstrably different from that of a more moderate low-fat diet among well-educated, postmenopausal women in a research environment.

  11. Vertical versus horizontal suture configuration for the repair of isolated type II SLAP lesion through a single anterior portal: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Jose María; Moya-Angeler, Joaquín; Martín, Eulogio; Leyes, Manuel; Forriol, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    To compare the clinical and functional outcomes of the repair of an isolated type II SLAP lesion by 2 different configuration techniques (vertical v horizontal suture) through a single anterior portal. We designed a prospective, double-blinded, randomized clinical trial. A junior orthopaedic surgeon, who made the initial diagnosis, used a 10-point visual analog scale for pain and subjective instability and the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scoring system and evaluated the range of motion. After a diagnostic arthroscopy that ascertained the presence of an isolated type II SLAP lesion, patients were randomized to receive either vertical suture configuration (group 1) or horizontal suture configuration (group 2), both through a single anterior portal. Thirty-two patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up time was 37 months. The mean postoperative ASES score was 91.9 in group 1 versus 95.8 in group 2 (P > .05). The differences observed from preoperative ASES score for both groups to postoperative ASES score were statistically significant. The differences observed in preoperative range of motion from the contralateral healthy shoulder and the affected shoulder in both groups were all clinically and statistically significant. Comparing the overall range of motion of the affected limb postoperatively with the range of motion of the contralateral healthy shoulder and between both groups, we found no statistically significant differences in forward flexion (P = .067), external rotation (P = .101), or internal rotation (P = .343). The results of this study suggest that the repair of an isolated type II SLAP lesion through a single anterior portal is clinically and functionally beneficial to patients regardless of the suture configuration performed (vertical or horizontal suture) because no differences were observed between these configurations after repair of an isolated type II SLAP lesion. Level I, randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2011

  12. Imatinib mesylate in scleroderma-associated diffuse skin fibrosis: a phase II multicentre randomized double-blinded controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Prey, S; Ezzedine, K; Doussau, A; Grandoulier, A-S; Barcat, D; Chatelus, E; Diot, E; Durant, C; Hachulla, E; de Korwin-Krokowski, J-D; Kostrzewa, E; Quemeneur, T; Paul, C; Schaeverbeke, T; Seneschal, J; Solanilla, A; Sparsa, A; Bouchet, S; Lepreux, S; Mahon, F-X; Chene, G; Taïeb, A

    2012-11-01

    Imatinib mesylate is a potent inhibitor of platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-β signalling pathways which may play a role in systemic sclerosis (SSc)-associated skin changes. We aimed primarily at assessing the efficacy of imatinib mesylate in scleroderma skin fibrosis. We performed a phase II double-blinded trial on patients with scleroderma with either morphoea involving > 20% of body surface area or SSc with extensive skin involvement: modified Rodnan Skin Score (mRSS) ≥ 20/51. Each patient was randomized to receive either imatinib mesylate 400 mg or placebo daily for a total of 6 months, and then was followed up 6 months after therapy discontinuation. Skin fibrosis was assessed by mRSS and measurement of the dermal thickness using skin biopsies performed at inclusion and at 6 months of treatment. In addition, quality of life (Dermatology Life Quality Index and modified Health Assessment Questionnaire for Scleroderma) was recorded at each visit, and pulmonary function before and after intervention. Twenty-eight patients were included in the study with a mean age of 48·9 years (range 30-71): 25 had a diagnosis of a SSc and three of diffuse cutaneous scleroderma. Demographic data, frequency of organ involvement of SSc and mRSS were comparable between groups. At 6 months, the proportion of variation of mRSS from inclusion was not statistically significantly different between the two groups (median +0·10 in imatinib group vs. -0·16 in placebo group, P = 0·098). Similarly, changes in dermal thickness, quality of life and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide were not significantly different between groups. This study failed to demonstrate the efficacy of imatinib 400 mg daily to improve skin fibrosis of diffuse scleroderma after 6 months of treatment based on validated outcome measurements. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Netmums: a phase II randomized controlled trial of a guided Internet behavioural activation treatment for postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    O'Mahen, H A; Richards, D A; Woodford, J; Wilkinson, E; McGinley, J; Taylor, R S; Warren, F C

    2014-06-01

    Despite the high prevalence of postnatal depression (PND), few women seek help. Internet interventions may overcome many of the barriers to PND treatment use. We report a phase II evaluation of a 12-session, modular, guided Internet behavioural activation (BA) treatment modified to address postnatal-specific concerns [Netmums Helping With Depression (NetmumsHWD)]. To assess feasibility, we measured recruitment and attrition to the trial and examined telephone session support and treatment adherence. We investigated sociodemographic and psychological predictors of treatment adherence. Effectiveness outcomes were estimated with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, Postnatal Bonding Questionnaire, and Social Provisions Scale. A total of 249 women were recruited via a UK parenting site, Netmums.com. A total of 83 women meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder were randomized to NetmumsHWD (n = 41) or treatment-as-usual (TAU; n = 42). Of the 83 women, 71 (86%) completed the EPDS at post-treatment, and 71% (59/83) at the 6-month follow-up. Women completed an average of eight out of 12 telephone support sessions and five out of 12 modules. Working women and those with less support completed fewer modules. There was a large effect size favouring women who received NetmumsHWD on depression, work and social impairment, and anxiety scores at post-treatment compared with women in the TAU group, and a large effect size on depression at 6 months post-treatment. There were small effect sizes for postnatal bonding and perceived social support. A supported, modular, Internet BA programme can be feasibly delivered to postpartum women, offering promise to improve depression, anxiety and functioning.

  14. Randomized controlled trial of intravenous antivenom versus placebo for latrodectism: the second Redback Antivenom Evaluation (RAVE-II) study.

    PubMed

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Page, Colin B; Buckley, Nicholas A; Fatovich, Daniel M; Pascu, Ovidiu; MacDonald, Stephen P J; Calver, Leonie A; Brown, Simon G A

    2014-12-01

    Latrodectism is the most important spider envenomation syndrome worldwide. There remains considerable controversy over antivenom treatment. We aimed to investigate whether antivenom resulted in resolution of pain and systemic effects in patients with latrodectism who received standardized analgesia. In a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial of redback spider antivenom for latrodectism, 224 patients (>7 years) with a redback spider bite and severe pain, with or without systemic effects, were randomized to receive normal saline solution (placebo) or antivenom after receiving standardized analgesia. The primary outcome was a clinically significant reduction in pain 2 hours after trial medication compared with baseline. A second primary outcome for the subgroup with systemic features of envenomation was resolution of systemic features at 2 hours. Secondary outcomes were improved pain at 4 and 24 hours, resolution of systemic features at 4 hours, administration of opioid analgesics or unblinded antivenom after 2 hours, and adverse reactions. Two hours after treatment, 26 of 112 patients (23%) from the placebo arm had a clinically significant improvement in pain versus 38 of 112 (34%) from the antivenom arm (difference in favor of antivenom 10.7%; 95% confidence interval -1.1% to 22.6%; P=.10). Systemic effects resolved after 2 hours in 9 of 41 patients (22%) in the placebo arm and 9 of 35 (26%) in the antivenom arm (difference 3.8%; 95% confidence interval -15% to 23%; P=.79). There was no significant difference in any secondary outcome between antivenom and placebo. Acute systemic hypersensitivity reactions occurred in 4 of 112 patients (3.6%) receiving antivenom. The addition of antivenom to standardized analgesia in patients with latrodectism did not significantly improve pain or systemic effects. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study of eculizumab in patients with refractory generalized myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Howard, James F; Barohn, Richard J; Cutter, Gary R; Freimer, Miriam; Juel, Vern C; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Mellion, Michelle L; Benatar, Michael G; Farrugia, Maria Elena; Wang, Jing Jing; Malhotra, Suneil S; Kissel, John T

    2013-07-01

    Complement activation at the neuromuscular junction is a primary cause of acetylcholine receptor loss and failure of neuromuscular transmission in myasthenia gravis (MG). Eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, blocks the formation of terminal complement complex by specifically preventing the enzymatic cleavage of complement 5 (C5). This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial involving 14 patients with severe, refractory generalized MG (gMG). Six of 7 patients treated with eculizumab for 16 weeks (86%) achieved the primary endpoint of a 3-point reduction in the quantitative myasthenia gravis (QMG) score. Examining both treatment periods, the overall change in mean QMG total score was significantly different between eculizumab and placebo (P = 0.0144). After assessing data obtained from all visits, the overall change in mean QMG total score from baseline was found to be significantly different between eculizumab and placebo (P < 0.0001). Eculizumab was well tolerated. The data suggest that eculizumab may have a role in treating severe, refractory MG. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. RECAST (Remote Ischemic Conditioning After Stroke Trial): A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Phase II Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    England, Timothy J; Hedstrom, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Saoirse; Donnelly, Richard; Barrett, David A; Sarmad, Sarir; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Repeated episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning [RIC]) may improve outcome after acute stroke. We performed a pilot blinded placebo-controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke, randomized 1:1 to receive 4 cycles of RIC within 24 hours of ictus. The primary outcome was tolerability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes included safety, clinical efficacy (day 90), putative biomarkers (pre- and post-intervention, day 4), and exploratory hemodynamic measures. Twenty-six patients (13 RIC and 13 sham) were recruited 15.8 hours (SD 6.2) post-onset, age 76.2 years (SD 10.5), blood pressure 159/83 mm Hg (SD 25/11), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 (interquartile range, 3.75-9.25). RIC was well tolerated with 49 out of 52 cycles completed in full. Three patients experienced vascular events in the sham group: 2 ischemic strokes and 2 myocardial infarcts versus none in the RIC group (P=0.076, log-rank test). Compared with sham, there was a significant decrease in day 90 NIHSS score in the RIC group, median NIHSS score 1 (interquartile range, 0.5-5) versus 3 (interquartile range, 2-9.5; P=0.04); RIC augmented plasma HSP27 (heat shock protein 27; P<0.05, repeated 2-way ANOVA) and phosphorylated HSP27 (P<0.001) but not plasma S100-β, matrix metalloproteinase-9, endocannabinoids, or arterial compliance. RIC after acute stroke is well tolerated and appears safe and feasible. RIC may improve neurological outcome, and protective mechanisms may be mediated through HSP27. A larger trial is warranted. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN86672015. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Undenatured type II collagen (UC-II®) for joint support: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background UC-II contains a patented form of undenatured type II collagen derived from chicken sternum. Previous preclinical and clinical studies support the safety and efficacy of UC-II in modulating joint discomfort in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of UC-II in moderating joint function and joint pain due to strenuous exercise in healthy subjects. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in healthy subjects who had no prior history of arthritic disease or joint pain at rest but experienced joint discomfort with physical activity. Fifty-five subjects who reported knee pain after participating in a standardized stepmill performance test were randomized to receive placebo (n = 28) or the UC-II (40 mg daily, n = 27) product for 120 days. Joint function was assessed by changes in degree of knee flexion and knee extension as well as measuring the time to experiencing and recovering from joint pain following strenuous stepmill exertion. Results After 120 days of supplementation, subjects in the UC-II group exhibited a statistically significant improvement in average knee extension compared to placebo (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 74.0 ± 2.2º; p = 0.011) and to baseline (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.002). The UC-II cohort also demonstrated a statistically significant change in average knee extension at day 90 (78.8 ± 1.9º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.045) versus baseline. No significant change in knee extension was observed in the placebo group at any time. It was also noted that the UC-II group exercised longer before experiencing any initial joint discomfort at day 120 (2.8 ± 0.5 min, p = 0.019), compared to baseline (1.4 ± 0.2 min). By contrast, no significant changes were seen in the placebo group. No product related adverse events were observed during the study. At study conclusion, five

  18. Undenatured type II collagen (UC-II®) for joint support: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lugo, James P; Saiyed, Zainulabedin M; Lau, Francis C; Molina, Jhanna Pamela L; Pakdaman, Michael N; Shamie, Arya Nick; Udani, Jay K

    2013-10-24

    UC-II contains a patented form of undenatured type II collagen derived from chicken sternum. Previous preclinical and clinical studies support the safety and efficacy of UC-II in modulating joint discomfort in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of UC-II in moderating joint function and joint pain due to strenuous exercise in healthy subjects. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in healthy subjects who had no prior history of arthritic disease or joint pain at rest but experienced joint discomfort with physical activity. Fifty-five subjects who reported knee pain after participating in a standardized stepmill performance test were randomized to receive placebo (n = 28) or the UC-II (40 mg daily, n = 27) product for 120 days. Joint function was assessed by changes in degree of knee flexion and knee extension as well as measuring the time to experiencing and recovering from joint pain following strenuous stepmill exertion. After 120 days of supplementation, subjects in the UC-II group exhibited a statistically significant improvement in average knee extension compared to placebo (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 74.0 ± 2.2º; p = 0.011) and to baseline (81.0 ± 1.3º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.002). The UC-II cohort also demonstrated a statistically significant change in average knee extension at day 90 (78.8 ± 1.9º vs 73.2 ± 1.9º; p = 0.045) versus baseline. No significant change in knee extension was observed in the placebo group at any time. It was also noted that the UC-II group exercised longer before experiencing any initial joint discomfort at day 120 (2.8 ± 0.5 min, p = 0.019), compared to baseline (1.4 ± 0.2 min). By contrast, no significant changes were seen in the placebo group. No product related adverse events were observed during the study. At study conclusion, five individuals in the UC-II cohort

  19. Experimental pain ratings and reactivity of cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II following a trial of hypnosis: results of a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Burel R; Quinn, Noel B; Kronfli, Tarek; King, Christopher D; Page, Gayle G; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert R; Stapleton, Laura M; McGuire, Lynanne

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence supports the efficacy of hypnosis for reducing the pain associated with experimental stimulation and various acute and chronic conditions; however, the mechanisms explaining how hypnosis exerts its effects remain less clear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines represent potential targets for investigation given their purported roles in the perpetuation of painful conditions; yet, no clinical trials have thus far examined the influence of hypnosis on these mechanisms. Healthy participants, highly susceptible to the effects of hypnosis, were randomized to either a hypnosis intervention or a no-intervention control. Using a cold pressor task, assessments of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were collected prior to the intervention (Pre) and following the intervention (Post) along with pain-provoked changes in salivary cortisol and the soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II (sTNFαRII). Compared with the no-intervention control, data analyses revealed that hypnosis significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Hypnosis was not significantly associated with suppression of cortisol or sTNFαRII reactivity to acute pain from Pre to Post; however, the effect sizes for these associations were medium-sized. Overall, the findings from this randomized controlled pilot study support the importance of a future large-scale study on the effects of hypnosis for modulating pain-related changes of the HPA axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The project ENABLE II randomized controlled trial to improve palliative care for rural patients with advanced cancer: baseline findings, methodological challenges, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Balan, Stefan; Barnett, Kathleen N; Brokaw, Frances C; Byock, Ira R; Hull, Jay G; Li, Zhongze; McKinstry, Elizabeth; Seville, Janette L; Ahles, Tim A

    2009-03-01

    There is a paucity of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate models of palliative care. Although interventions vary, all have faced a variety of methodological challenges including adequate recruitment, missing data, and contamination of the control group. We describe the ENABLE II intervention, methods, and sample baseline characteristics to increase intervention and methodological transparency, and to describe our solutions to selected methodological issues. Half of the participants recruited from our rural U.S. comprehensive cancer center and affiliated clinics were randomly assigned to a phone-based, nurse-led educational, care coordination palliative care intervention model. Intervention services were provided to half of the participants weekly for the first month and then monthly until death, including bereavement follow-up call to the caregiver. The other half of the participants were assigned to care as usual. Symptoms, quality of life, mood, and functional status were assessed every 3 months until death. Baseline data of 279 participants were similar to normative samples. Solutions to methodological challenges of recruitment, missing data, and "usual care" control group contamination are described. It is feasible to overcome many of the methodological challenges to conducting a rigorous palliative care RCT.

  1. The Project ENABLE II Randomized Controlled Trial to Improve Palliative Care for Rural Patients with Advanced Cancer: Baseline Findings, Methodological Challenges, and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T.; Balan, Stefan; Barnett, Kathleen N.; Brokaw, Frances C.; Byock, Ira R.; Hull, Jay G.; Li, Zhongze; McKinstry, Elizabeth; Seville, Janette L.; Ahles, Tim A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate models of palliative care. Although interventions vary, all have faced a variety of methodological challenges including: adequate recruitment, missing data, and contamination of the control group. We describe the ENABLE II intervention, methods, and sample baseline characteristics to increase intervention and methodological transparency, and to describe our solutions to selected methodological issues. Methods Half of the participants recruited from our rural, US comprehensive cancer center and affiliated clinics were randomly assigned to a phone-based, nurse-led educational, care coordination palliative care intervention model. Intervention services were provided to half of the participants weekly for the first month and then monthly until death, including a bereavement follow-up call to the caregiver. The other half of the participants were assigned to care as usual. Symptoms, QOL, mood, and functional status were assessed every 3 months until death. Results Baseline data of 279 participants were similar to normative samples. Solutions to methodological challenges of recruitment, missing data, and "usual care" control group contamination are described. Conclusions It is feasible to overcome many of the methodological challenges to conducting a rigorous palliative care RCT. PMID:19619377

  2. Feasibility of a home-based exercise intervention with remote guidance for patients with stable grade II and III gliomas: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Karin; Kloek, Corelien Jj; Aaronson, Neil K; Janssen, Kasper W; Jones, Lee W; Sitskoorn, Margriet M; Stuiver, Martijn M

    2017-09-01

    In this pilot study, we investigated the feasibility of a home-based, remotely guided exercise intervention for patients with gliomas. Pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomization (2:1) to exercise or control group. Patients with stable grade II and III gliomas. The six-month intervention included three home-based exercise sessions per week at 60%-85% of maximum heart rate. Participants wore heart rate monitors connected to an online platform to record activities that were monitored weekly by the physiotherapist. Accrual, attrition, adherence, safety, satisfaction, patient-reported physical activity, VO2 peak (by maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing) and body mass index (BMI) at baseline and at six-month follow-up. In all, 34 of 136 eligible patients (25%) were randomized to exercise training ( N = 23) or the control group ( N = 11), of whom 19 and 9, respectively, underwent follow-up. Mean adherence to prescribed sessions was 79%. Patients' experiences were positive. There were no adverse events. Compared to the control group, the exercise group showed larger improvements in absolute VO2 peak (+158.9 mL/min; 95% CI: -44.8 to 362.5) and BMI (-0.3 kg/m²; 95% CI: -0.9 to 0.2). The median increase in physical activity was 1489 metabolic equivalent of task (MET) minutes higher in the exercise group. The most reported reasons for non-participation were lack of motivation or time. This innovative and intensive home-based exercise intervention was feasible in a small subset of patients with stable gliomas who were interested in exercising. The observed effects suggest that the programme may improve cardiorespiratory fitness. These results support the need for large-scale trials of exercise interventions in brain tumour patients.

  3. Cognitive behavior therapy augmentation of pharmacotherapy in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: the Pediatric OCD Treatment Study II (POTS II) randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Martin E; Sapyta, Jeffrey; Freeman, Jennifer B; Khanna, Muniya; Compton, Scott; Almirall, Daniel; Moore, Phoebe; Choate-Summers, Molly; Garcia, Abbe; Edson, Aubrey L; Foa, Edna B; March, John S

    2011-09-21

    The extant literature on the treatment of pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) indicates that partial response to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) is the norm and that augmentation with short-term OCD-specific cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) may provide additional benefit. To examine the effects of augmenting SRIs with CBT or a brief form of CBT, instructions in CBT delivered in the context of medication management. A 12-week randomized controlled trial conducted at 3 academic medical centers between 2004 and 2009, involving 124 pediatric outpatients between the ages of 7 and 17 years with OCD as a primary diagnosis and a Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score of 16 or higher despite an adequate SRI trial. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment strategies that included 7 sessions over 12 weeks: 42 in the medication management only, 42 in the medication management plus instructions in CBT, and 42 in the medication management plus CBT; the last included 14 concurrent CBT sessions. Whether patients responded positively to treatment by improving their baseline obsessive-compulsive scale score by 30% or more and demonstrating a change in their continuous scores over 12 weeks. The medication management plus CBT strategy was superior to the other 2 strategies on all outcome measures. In the primary intention-to-treat analysis, 68.6% (95% CI, 53.9%-83.3%) in the plus CBT group were considered responders, which was significantly better than the 34.0% (95% CI, 18.0%-50.0%) in the plus instructions in CBT group, and 30.0% (95% CI, 14.9%-45.1%) in the medication management only group. The results were similar in pairwise comparisons with the plus CBT strategy being superior to the other 2 strategies (P < .01 for both). The plus instructions in CBT strategy was not statistically superior to medication management only (P = .72). The number needed-to-treat analysis with the plus CBT vs medication management only in order to see 1

  4. Treatment of Sarcopenia with Bimagrumab: Results from a Phase II, Randomized, Controlled, Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Daniel; Praestgaard, Jens; Hariry, Sam; Laurent, Didier; Petricoul, Olivier; Perry, Robert G; Lach-Trifilieff, Estelle; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2017-09-01

    To assess the effects of bimagrumab on skeletal muscle mass and function in older adults with sarcopenia and mobility limitations. A 24-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, proof-of-concept study. Five centers in the United States. Community-dwelling adults (N = 40) aged 65 and older with gait speed between 0.4 and 1.0 m/s over 4 m and an appendicular skeletal muscle index of 7.25 kg/m(2) or less for men and 5.67 kg/m(2) or less for women. Intravenous bimagrumab 30 mg/kg (n = 19) or placebo (n = 21). Change from baseline in thigh muscle volume (TMV), subcutaneous and intermuscular fat, appendicular and total lean body mass, grip strength, gait speed, and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Thirty-two (80%) participants completed the study. TMV increased by Week 2, was sustained throughout the treatment period, and remained above baseline at the end of study in bimagrumab-treated participants, whereas there was no change with placebo treatment (Week 2: 5.15 ± 2.19% vs -0.34 ± 2.59%, P < .001; Week 4: 6.12 ± 2.56% vs 0.16 ± 3.42%, P < .001; Week 8: 8.01 ± 3.70% vs 0.35 ± 3.32%, P < .001; Week 16: 7.72 ± 5.31% vs 0.42 ± 5.14%, P < .001; Week 24: 4.80 ± 5.81% vs -1.01 ± 4.43%, P = .002). Participants with slower walking speed at baseline receiving bimagrumab had clinically meaningful and statistically significantly greater improvements in gait speed (mean 0.15 m/s, P = .009) and 6MWD (mean 82 m, P = .022) than those receiving placebo at Week 16. Adverse events in the bimagrumab group included muscle-related symptoms, acne, and diarrhea, most of which were mild in severity and resolved by the end of study. Treatment with bimagrumab over 16 weeks increased muscle mass and strength in older adults with sarcopenia and improved mobility in those with slow walking speed. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase II extended safety study of two Invisible Condom formulations in Cameroonian women.

    PubMed

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Trottier, Sylvie; Omar, Rabeea F; Nkele, Ngoh N; Fokoua, Séraphin; Mbu, Enow R; Domingo, Marc-Christian; Giguère, Jean-Francois; Piret, Jocelyne; Mwatha, Anthony; Mâsse, Benoît; Bergeron, Michel G

    2010-01-01

    Invisible Condom gel formulations being developed as microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV are advancing through the phases of clinical trials. The objectives of this study were to evaluate, after 8 weeks of vaginal application, the extended safety and acceptability of two Invisible Condom vaginal gel formulations: (i) the polymer alone and (ii) the polymer containing sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) compared to placebo. This study is a randomized, doubled-blind, placebo-controlled Phase II extended safety study in healthy sexually active women from Yaoundé, Cameroon. Women were randomized into three gel arms: (i) placebo, (ii) polymer alone and (iii) polymer/SLS. Women applied gel intravaginally twice daily for 8 weeks. A total of 194 sexually active women applied placebo (n=41), polymer alone (n=76) and polymer/SLS (n=77). Invisible Condom gel formulations were well tolerated with no reported serious adverse events. The majority of reported adverse events were mild or moderate and mostly similar in all three arms, except for pelvic pain that was 10% higher in the polymer and polymer/SLS arms compared to placebo. Colposcopy showed neither genital ulceration nor mucosal lesions. Nugent score, H(2)O(2)-producing lactobacilli and vaginal pH were not affected by the study products. The gel formulations and applicator were generally acceptable and comfortable. This extended safety study showed that the Invisible Condom gel formulations and applicator were well tolerated and acceptable when applied intravaginally twice daily for 8 weeks. Thus, further phases of clinical development of Invisible Condom as a potential microbicide to prevent sexual transmission of HIV are warranted.

  6. Patient perspectives on participation in the ENABLE II randomized controlled trial of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention: benefits and burdens.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Cristine; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Li, Zhongze; Hegel, Mark; Ahles, Tim A; Bakitas, Marie

    2013-04-01

    ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise Before Life Ends) II was one of the first randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention on quality of life, mood, and symptom control for advanced cancer patients and their caregivers. However, little is known about how participants experience early palliative care and the benefits and burdens of participating in a palliative care clinical trial. To gain a deeper understanding of participants' perspectives of the intervention and palliative care trial participation. A qualitative descriptive study using thematic analysis to determine benefits and burdens of a new palliative care intervention and trial participation. Of the 72 participants who were alive when the study commenced, 53 agreed to complete an in-depth, semi-structured interview regarding the ENABLE II intervention and clinical trial participation. Participants' perceptions of intervention benefits were represented by four themes: enhanced problem-solving skills, better coping, feeling empowered, and feeling supported or reassured. Three themes related to trial participation: helping future patients and contributing to science, gaining insight through completion of questionnaires, and trial/intervention aspects to improve. The benefits of the intervention and the positive aspects of trial participation outweighed trial "burdens". This study raises additional important questions relevant to future trial design and intervention development: when should a palliative care intervention be initiated and what aspects of self-care and healthy living should be offered in addition to palliative content for advanced cancer patients when they are feeling well?

  7. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation for Intensive Care Unit–Acquired Weakness: Protocol and Methodological Implications for a Randomized, Sham-Controlled, Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Alexander D.; Brower, Roy G.; Palmer, Jeffrey B.; Fan, Eddy; Zanni, Jennifer M.; Ciesla, Nancy D.; Feldman, Dorianne R.; Korupolu, Radha; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Background As the population ages and critical care advances, a growing number of survivors of critical illness will be at risk for intensive care unit (ICU)–acquired weakness. Bed rest, which is common in the ICU, causes adverse effects, including muscle weakness. Consequently, patients need ICU-based interventions focused on the muscular system. Although emerging evidence supports the benefits of early rehabilitation during mechanical ventilation, additional therapies may be beneficial. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), which can provide some muscular activity even very early during critical illness, is a promising modality for patients in the ICU. Objective The objectives of this article are to discuss the implications of bed rest for patients with critical illness, summarize recent studies of early rehabilitation and NMES in the ICU, and describe a protocol for a randomized, phase II pilot study of NMES in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Design The study was a randomized, sham-controlled, concealed, phase II pilot study with caregivers and outcome assessors blinded to the treatment allocation. Setting The study setting will be a medical ICU. Participants The study participants will be patients who are receiving mechanical ventilation for 1 day or more, who are expected to stay in the ICU for an additional 2 days or more, and who meet no exclusion criteria. Intervention The intervention will be NMES (versus a sham [control] intervention) applied to the quadriceps, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles for 60 minutes per day. Measurements Lower-extremity muscle strength at hospital discharge will be the primary outcome measure. Limitations Muscle strength is a surrogate measure, not a patient-centered outcome. The assessments will not include laboratory, genetic, or histological measures aimed at a mechanistic understanding of NMES. The optimal duration or dose of NMES is unclear. Conclusions If NMES is beneficial, the results of

  8. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II clinical trial of lovastatin for various endpoints of melanoma pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Linden, Kenneth G; Leachman, Sancy A; Zager, Jonathan S; Jakowatz, James G; Viner, Jaye L; McLaren, Christine E; Barr, Ronald J; Carpenter, Philip M; Chen, Wen-Pin; Elmets, Craig A; Tangrea, Joseph A; Lim, Sung-Jig; Cochran, Alistair J; Meyskens, Frank L

    2014-05-01

    On the basis of large cardiovascular clinical trials of lipid-lowering agents that showed a considerable decrease in the incidence of primary melanomas in the active agent arm, we have carried out a randomized, double-blind clinical trial examining the impact of lovastatin on various biomarkers of melanoma pathogenesis. Subjects with at least two clinically atypical nevi were randomized to receive oral lovastatin or placebo for a 6-month period. Clinical, histopathologic, and molecular biomarkers were evaluated for change in the two groups. Eighty subjects were randomized, evaluable, and included in the analyses. Lovastatin showed no benefit in comparison with placebo in the primary endpoint of decreasing the level of histopathologic atypia, nor in any of the secondary endpoints of decreasing clinical atypia, impact on nevus number, nor in showing significant changes in any of the molecular biomarkers. There were no significant differences in adverse event profiles for lovastatin compared with placebo. The lovastatin arm did show a significant and considerable decrease in total serum cholesterol and serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels compared with placebo, an expected result. This finding bolsters confidence in subject compliance. Given the results of this trial, it is concluded that if lovastatin were to lower the incidence of melanoma, it would appear not to be doing so by reversing atypia of precursor atypical nevi over the 6-month time frame studied. Further research into the pathogenesis of melanoma and in other potential chemopreventive agents is needed.

  9. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter phase II trial of Allisartan Isoproxil in essential hypertensive population at low-medium risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Xiao-hui; Huang, Zhi-jun; Yang, Guo-ping; Zhang, Guo-gang; Zhao, Shui-ping; Guo, Ying; Lu, Shi-juan; Ma, Jian-lin; Meng, Fan-bo; Chen, Ping; Yuan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) is a well-tolerated class of antihypertensive agents, exhibiting effective antihypertensive and cardiovascular protective function. The objective of the study was to examine the efficacy and safety of Allisartan Isoproxil, a newly developed, selective, nonpeptide blocker of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), in essential hypertensive patients at low-medium risk. A Phase II prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial comparing Allisartan Isoproxil 240mg versus placebo was conducted in essential hypertensive patients at low-medium risk at 8 sites in China. After a 2-week placebo baseline period, 275 patients received once-daily treatment with Allisartan Isoproxil 240mg or placebo randomly for 8 weeks. Systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) was measured at week 2, 4 and 8. By the end of treatment, mean reductions from baseline of SBP and DBP in Allisartan Isoproxil and placebo groups were 14.5/10.4 and 8.3/7.7 mmHg, respectively (P<0.01). The rate of effective blood pressure control in Allisartan Isoproxil group was significantly higher than in placebo group at week 4 (61.3% vs 50.0%, P<0.05) and week 8 (67.2% vs 48.6%, P<0.01). In terms of safety and tolerability, there were no report of death and serious adverse event (SAE) in all subjects. There was no difference of frequency between two groups in adverse event (AE) and adverse drug reaction (ADR) (P>0.05). No one withdraw because of an ADR in two groups. 124 patients received additional 56 weeks treatment with Allisartan Isoproxil and 84 of them completed the study. The rate of effective BP control kept up to 80% since week 24. No significant clinical change was observed and ADRs were generally mild or moderate during the long-term study. Allisartan Isoproxil 240mg was effective and safe for essential hypertension patients at low-medium risk. http://www.chictr.org/cn/ ChiCTR-TRC-10000886.

  10. Study protocol of REGOSARC trial: activity and safety of regorafenib in advanced soft tissue sarcoma: a multinational, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Brodowicz, Thomas; Liegl-Atzwager, Bernadette; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Taieb, Sophie; Kramar, Andrew; Gruenwald, Viktor; Vanseymortier, Marie; Clisant, Stéphanie; Blay, Jean-Yves; Le Cesne, Axel; Penel, Nicolas

    2015-03-14

    Angiogenesis, among other signaling pathways, plays a key-role in sarcoma biology. Regorafenib (RE) has recently been shown to be effective in imatinib and sunitinib-refractory GIST in a phase III trial. We are conducting an international trial (France, Austria and Germany) consisting in 4 parallel double-blind placebo-controlled randomized (1/1) phase II trials to assess the activity and safety of RE in doxorubicin-refractory STS (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01900743). Each phase II trial is dedicated to one of the 4 following histological subgroups: liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, synovial sarcoma and other sarcoma. Within each randomized trial the following stratification factors will be applied: countries and prior exposure to pazopanib. Key-eligibility criteria are: measurable disease, age ≥18, not > 3 previous systemic treatment lines for metastatic disease, metastatic disease not amenable to surgical resection. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival (PFS) according to central radiological review. Secondary endpoints are: Toxicity (NCI-CTC AE V4.0); time to progression; Growth modulation index in pts receiving RE after randomization; 3 and 6 months PFS-Rates, best response rate and overall survival. Each phase II trial will be separately analyzed. In 3 trials, statistical assumptions are: PFS0 = 1.6 & PFS1 = 4.6 months; 1-sided α = 0.1; β = 0.05 with a total sample size of 192 pts. To take into account the rarity of synovial sarcoma, the statistical assumptions are: PFS0 = 1.6 & PFS1 = 4.6 months; 1-sided α = 0.1; β = 0.2 Tumor assessment is done monthly during the 4 first months, and every 3 months thereafter. After central radiological confirmation of tumor progression, an optional open-label option is offered to eligible patients. The design of this trial allows an assessment of regorafenib activity over placebo in four sarcoma strata and might provide evidence for launching a phase III trial. This study

  11. Randomized controlled clinical trial of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Su, Yong; Su, Ya-Li; Lv, Li-Fang; Wang, Li-Min; Li, Quan-Zhong; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor for patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Type II diabetic patients exhibiting poor glycemic control following α-glucosidase inhibitor treatment for at least two months were selected and randomly distributed into vildagliptin and placebo groups. The body weight, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HBA1c) and blood lipid levels and hepatorenal functions of the patients were determined before and 12 weeks after the trial. Following the trial, the FBG, PPG, HbA1c, cholesterol (CHOL) and triglyceride (TG) levels in the vildagliptin group were significantly decreased compared with the pretreatment levels (P<0.05), whereas only the PPG level in the placebo group decreased (P<0.05). The FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in the vildagliptin group were markedly lower than those in the placebo group 12 weeks after the trial. A comparison of the body weights and hepatorenal functions before and after the trial or between groups did not show statistically significant differences. The combination therapy of vildagliptin plus an α-glucosidase inhibitor effectively reduced the FBG, PPG and HbA1c levels in patients without inducing weight gain or hepatorenal dysfunction. However, the therapy may have caused a reduction in the blood lipid levels.

  12. A randomized, placebo-controlled phase ii study evaluating the reduction of neutropenia and febrile neutropenia in patients with colorectal cancer receiving pegfilgrastim with every-2-week chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hecht, J Randolph; Pillai, Madhavan; Gollard, Russell; Heim, William; Swan, Forrest; Patel, Ravi; Dreiling, Lyndah; Mo, May; Malik, Imtiaz

    2010-04-01

    Adding irinotecan and/or oxaliplatin to every-2-week 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/leucovorin (LV) prolongs survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) but increases neutropenia frequency. Pegfilgrastim is indicated to decrease infection as manifested by febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients receiving chemotherapy at > 14-day intervals. This randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study examined pegfilgrastim efficacy and safety in patients with CRC receiving every-2-week chemotherapy. Patients with CRC were randomized 1:1 to pegfilgrastim 6 mg or placebo administered per-cycle on day 4. Randomization was stratified by chemotherapy regimen (patients received every-2-week FOLFOX4 [5-FU/LV/oxaliplatin], FOLFIRI [5-FU/LV/irinotecan], or FOIL [5-FU/LV/oxaliplatin/irinotecan] at physician discretion). The primary endpoint was incidence of grade 3/4 neutropenia. Secondary endpoints included incidence of grade 3/4 FN and adverse events. After 4 cycles of study treatment, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were followed for

  13. Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Study to Investigate the Immunogenicity and Safety of a West Nile Virus Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbender, Rex; Bevilacqua, Joan; Gregg, Anne M.; Watson, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Background. ChimeriVax-WN02 is a live, attenuated chimeric vaccine for protection against West Nile virus. This Phase II, randomized, double-blind, placebo–controlled, multicenter study assessed the immunogenicity, viremia, and safety of the ChimeriVax-WN02 vaccine. Methods. The 2-part study included adults in general good health. In part 1, subjects aged 18–40 years were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment groups: ChimeriVax–WN02 3.7- × -105 plaque-forming units (PFU), 3.7 × 104 PFU, 3.7 × 103 PFU, or placebo. In part 2, subjects aged 41–64 and ≥65 years were randomized to receive ChimeriVax-WN02 3.7 × 105 PFU or placebo. Results. In both part 1 and part 2, seroconversion was achieved at day 28 by >96% of subjects in active treatment groups. In part 1, neutralizing antibody titers at day 28 were higher and viremia levels lower with the highest dose, whereas the adverse event profile was similar between the dose groups. In part 2, antibody titers and viremia levels were higher in subjects aged ≥65 years, and more subjects in the 41–64 years cohort experienced adverse events. Conclusions. The ChimeriVax-WN02 vaccine was highly immunogenic in younger adults and the elderly, and it was well tolerated at all dose levels and in all age groups investigated. Clinical Trials.gov identifier: NCT00442169. PMID:21148499

  14. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study to assess the efficacy and safety of mapatumumab with sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ciuleanu, T; Bazin, I; Lungulescu, D; Miron, L; Bondarenko, I; Deptala, A; Rodriguez-Torres, M; Giantonio, B; Fox, N L; Wissel, P; Egger, J; Ding, M; Kalyani, R N; Humphreys, R; Gribbin, M; Sun, W

    2016-04-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of mapatumumab (a human agonistic monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1) in combination with sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with advanced HCC (stratified by Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status) were randomized 1:1 to receive sorafenib (400 mg, twice daily per 21-day cycle) and either placebo (placebo-sorafenib arm) or mapatumumab (30 mg/kg on day 1 per 21-day cycle; mapatumumab-sorafenib arm). The primary end point was time to (radiologic) progression (TTP), assessed by blinded independent central review. Key secondary end points included progression-free survival, overall survival, and objective response. In total, 101 patients were randomized (placebo-sorafenib arm: N = 51; mapatumumab-sorafenib arm: N = 50). There was no significant difference in median TTP between both arms [5.6 versus 4.1 months, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio (one-sided 90% confidence interval) 1.192 (0-1.737)]. No mapatumumab-related benefit was identified when TTP was evaluated in the stratified subgroups. The addition of mapatumumab to sorafenib did not demonstrate improvement in the secondary efficacy end points. The reported frequency of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs was comparable in both treatment arms. The addition of mapatumumab to sorafenib did not improve TTP or other efficacy end points, nor did it substantially change the toxicity profile of sorafenib in patients with advanced HCC. Based on these results, further development of the combination of mapatumumab and sorafenib in HCC is not planned. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Patient Perspectives on Participation in the ENABLE II Randomized Controlled Trial of a Concurrent Oncology Palliative Care Intervention: Benefits and Burdens

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, Cristine; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Li, Zhongze; Hegel, Mark; Ahles, Tim A.; Bakitas, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background ENABLE (Educate, Nurture, Advise Before Life Ends) II was one of the first randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the effects of a concurrent oncology palliative care intervention on quality of life, mood, and symptom control for advanced cancer patients and their caregivers. However, little is known about how participants experience early palliative care and the benefits and burdens of participating in a palliative care clinical trial. Aim To gain a deeper understanding of participants’ perspectives about the intervention and palliative care trial participation. Design A qualitative descriptive study using thematic analysis to determine benefits and burdens of a new palliative care intervention and trial participation. Setting/Participants Of the 72 participants who were alive when the study commenced, 53 agreed to complete an in-depth, semi-structured interview regarding the ENABLE II intervention and clinical trial participation. Results Participants’ perceptions of intervention benefits were represented by four themes: enhanced problem-solving skills, better coping, feeling empowered, and feeling supported or reassured. Three themes related to trial participation: helping future patients and contributing to science, gaining insight through completion of questionnaires, and trial/intervention aspects to improve. Conclusions The benefits of the intervention and the positive aspects of trial participation outweighed trial “burdens”. This study raises additional important questions relevant to future trial design and intervention development: when should a palliative care intervention be initiated and what aspects of self-care and healthy living should be offered in addition to palliative content for advanced cancer patients when they are feeling well? PMID:22573470

  16. Clinical Effectiveness of Intravenous Exenatide Infusion in Perioperative Glycemic Control after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A Phase II/III Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Besch, Guillaume; Perrotti, Andrea; Mauny, Frederic; Puyraveau, Marc; Baltres, Maude; Flicoteaux, Guillaume; Salomon du Mont, Lucie; Barrucand, Benoit; Samain, Emmanuel; Chocron, Sidney; Pili-Floury, Sebastien

    2017-08-18

    We aimed to assess the clinical effectiveness of intravenous exenatide compared to insulin in perioperative blood glucose control in coronary artery bypass grafting surgery patients. Patients more than 18 yr old admitted for elective coronary artery bypass grafting were included in a phase II/III nonblinded randomized superiority trial. Current insulin use and creatinine clearance of less than 60 ml/min were exclusion criteria. Two groups were compared: the exenatide group, receiving exenatide (1-h bolus of 0.05 µg/min followed by a constant infusion of 0.025 µg/min), and the control group, receiving insulin therapy. The blood glucose target range was 100 to 139 mg/dl. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who spent at least 50% of the study period within the target range. The consumption of insulin (Cinsulin) and the time to start insulin (Tinsulin) were compared between the two groups. In total, 53 and 51 patients were included and analyzed in the exenatide and control groups, respectively (age: 70 ± 9 vs. 68 ± 11 yr; diabetes mellitus: 12 [23%] vs. 10 [20%]). The primary outcome was observed in 38 (72%) patients in the exenatide group and in 41 (80%) patients in the control group (odds ratio [95% CI] = 0.85 [0.34 to 2.11]; P = 0.30). Cinsulin was significantly lower (60 [40 to 80] vs. 92 [63 to 121] U, P < 0.001), and Tinsulin was significantly longer (12 [7 to 16] vs. 7 [5 to 10] h, P = 0.02) in the exenatide group. Exenatide alone at the dose used was not enough to achieve adequate blood glucose control in coronary artery bypass grafting patients, but it reduces overall consumption of insulin and increases the time to initiation of insulin.

  17. Valproic Acid, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Combination with Paclitaxel for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Phase II/III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Mariateresa; Gallo, Marco; Brignardello, Enrico; Milla, Paola; Orlandi, Fabio; Limone, Paolo Piero; Arvat, Emanuela; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe; Piovesan, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) has a median survival less than 5 months and, to date, no effective therapy exists. Taxanes have recently been stated as the main drug treatment for ATC, and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid efficiently potentiates the effects of paclitaxel in vitro. Based on these data, this trial assessed the efficacy and safety of the combination of paclitaxel and valproic acid for the treatment of ATC. This was a randomized, controlled phase II/III trial, performed on 25 ATC patients across 5 centers in northwest Italy. The experimental arm received the combination of paclitaxel (80 mg/m2/weekly) and valproic acid (1,000 mg/day); the control arm received paclitaxel alone. Overall survival and disease progression, evaluated in terms of progression-free survival, were the primary outcomes. The secondary outcome was the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. The coadministration of valproic acid did not influence the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. Neither median survival nor median time to progression was statistically different in the two arms. Median survival of operated-on patients was significantly better than that of patients who were not operated on. The present trial demonstrates that the addition of valproic acid to paclitaxel has no effect on overall survival and disease progression of ATC patients. This trial is registered with EudraCT 2008-005221-11. PMID:27766105

  18. Randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial of heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae (Longcom batch) formulated as an oral pill (V7)

    PubMed Central

    Efremenko, Yuri V; Butov, Dmytro A; Prihoda, Natalia D; Zaitzeva, Svetlana I; Yurchenko, Larisa V; Sokolenko, Nina I; Butova, Tetyana S; Stepanenko, Anna L; Kutsyna, Galyna A; Jirathitikal, Vichai; Bourinbaiar, Aldar S

    2013-01-01

    One-month Phase II trial was conducted in 43 sputum smear-positive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis randomized into treatment (n = 22) and placebo (n = 21) arms to investigate the safety and efficacy of an orally-administered therapeutic TB vaccine (V7) containing 10 μg of heat-killed Mycobacterium vaccae provided by Longcom company. Immunotherapy and control groups comprised 8 newly diagnosed (1stDx TB; 18.6%), 6 re-treated (RTB; 14%), and 29 multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB; 67.4%) cases distributed at 5:4:13 and 3:2:16 ratios, respectively. Both arms received conventional TB drugs administered under directly observed therapy. The average weight gain in V7 arm was modest, but statistically significant (0.6 kg; p = 0.004), while placebo patients lost 0.1 kg (p = 0.77). Except defervescence and increased lymphocyte percentage, other secondary endpoints such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), leukocyte counts and hemoglobin content were not significantly affected. In control patients only one secondary endpoint, ESR, has improved. After one month mycobacterial clearance in sputum smears was observed in 31.8% (p = 0.03) and 9.5% (p = 0.83) of patients on V7 and placebo. However, the difference between outcomes in two arms was below significance threshold (p = 0.07). Thus, larger population of patients with prolonged follow-up is required to support these preliminary findings. PMID:23782489

  19. Therapeutic vaccination with TNF-Kinoid in TNF antagonist-resistant rheumatoid arthritis: a phase II randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Durez, Patrick; Vandepapeliere, Pierre; Miranda, Pedro; Toncheva, Antoaneta; Berman, Alberto; Kehler, Tatjana; Mociran, Eugenia; Fautrel, Bruno; Mariette, Xavier; Dhellin, Olivier; Fanget, Bernard; Ouary, Stephane; Grouard-Vogel, Géraldine; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Active immunization, or vaccination, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-Kinoid (TNF-K) is a novel approach to induce polyclonal anti-TNF antibodies in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. This study was performed to transfer the proof of concept obtained in mice model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) into human. We designed a pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic vaccination in RA. This was a phase IIa, placebo-controlled, multicenter study in adults with RA who previously experienced secondary failure of TNF antagonists. Patients were immunized intramuscularly with 2 or 3 doses of placebo (n = 10) or 90 (n = 6), 180 (n = 12), or 360 µg TNF-K (n = 12). The primary objective was to identify the best dose and schedule based on anti-TNF antibody titers. Clinical symptoms and safety were assessed during 12 months and solicited reactions for 7 days after each injection. The highest anti-TNF antibody response was detected in patients immunized with 360 µg TNF-K and with 3 injections, although this difference was not significant with all other groups. Similar proportions of patients receiving TNF-K and placebo reported adverse events up to month 12. Serious adverse events were reported by 4 patients treated with TNF-K (13.3%) and 3 treated with placebo (30.0%), all unrelated to treatment. At month 12, DAS28-CRP, tender and swollen joint counts, and HAQ scores decreased significantly more in patients who exhibited anti-TNF antibody response than in patients who did not. TNF-K therapeutic vaccination induced dose- and schedule-dependent anti-TNF antibodies in RA patients and was well tolerated. Patients who developed anti-TNF antibodies showed a trend toward clinical improvement. Although the most aggressive dose and schedule, i.e. 360 mg dose administered 3 times, did show a strong trend of higher antibody response, further studies are warranted to examine even higher and more frequent doses in order to establish the best conditions for

  20. Therapeutic Vaccination with TNF-Kinoid in TNF Antagonist-Resistant Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Phase II Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Durez, Patrick; Vandepapeliere, Pierre; Miranda, Pedro; Toncheva, Antoaneta; Berman, Alberto; Kehler, Tatjana; Mociran, Eugenia; Fautrel, Bruno; Mariette, Xavier; Dhellin, Olivier; Fanget, Bernard; Ouary, Stephane; Grouard-Vogel, Géraldine; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Active immunization, or vaccination, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-Kinoid (TNF-K) is a novel approach to induce polyclonal anti-TNF antibodies in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. This study was performed to transfer the proof of concept obtained in mice model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) into human. We designed a pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of therapeutic vaccination in RA. Methods This was a phase IIa, placebo-controlled, multicenter study in adults with RA who previously experienced secondary failure of TNF antagonists. Patients were immunized intramuscularly with 2 or 3 doses of placebo (n = 10) or 90 (n = 6), 180 (n = 12), or 360 µg TNF-K (n = 12). The primary objective was to identify the best dose and schedule based on anti-TNF antibody titers. Clinical symptoms and safety were assessed during 12 months and solicited reactions for 7 days after each injection. Results The highest anti-TNF antibody response was detected in patients immunized with 360 µg TNF-K and with 3 injections, although this difference was not significant with all other groups. Similar proportions of patients receiving TNF-K and placebo reported adverse events up to month 12. Serious adverse events were reported by 4 patients treated with TNF-K (13.3%) and 3 treated with placebo (30.0%), all unrelated to treatment. At month 12, DAS28-CRP, tender and swollen joint counts, and HAQ scores decreased significantly more in patients who exhibited anti-TNF antibody response than in patients who did not. Conclusions TNF-K therapeutic vaccination induced dose- and schedule-dependent anti-TNF antibodies in RA patients and was well tolerated. Patients who developed anti-TNF antibodies showed a trend toward clinical improvement. Although the most aggressive dose and schedule, i.e. 360 mg dose administered 3 times, did show a strong trend of higher antibody response, further studies are warranted to examine even higher and more frequent doses in order

  1. Glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with a disease-specific enteral formula: stage II of a randomized, controlled multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Marcus; Mayr, Peter; Mertl-Roetzer, Marion; Lauster, Frank; Haslbeck, Manfred; Hipper, Beate; Steube, Diethard; Tietjen, Monika; Eriksen, Jan; Rahlfs, Volker W

    2009-01-01

    Stage I of a preplanned 2-stage study has provided good evidence for improved glycemic control with a disease-specific enteral formula low in carbohydrates and high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), fish oil, chromium, and antioxidants in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. The study was continued with stage II to give confirmatory proof of these beneficial effects. 105 patients with HbA1C>or=7.0% and/or fasting blood glucose (FG)>6.7 mmol/L (>120 mg/dL) requiring enteral tube feeding due to neurological dysphagia received 113 kJ (27 kcal)/kg body weight of either test formula (Diben) or an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous standard formula (control) for up to 84 days. Total insulin (TI) requirements, FG, and afternoon blood glucose (AG) were assessed daily. HbA1C and safety criteria were evaluated on days 1, 28, 56, and 84. 55 patients completed the study; on day 84, median changes from baseline (data as available, test vs control) were the following: TI, -8.0 vs +2.0 IU; FG, -2.17 vs -0.67 mmol/L (-39.0 vs -12.1 mg/dL); HbA(1C), -1.30% vs -1.20%; AG, -2.36 vs -0.49 mmol/L (-42.5 vs -8.9 mg/dL). The number of relevant hypoglycemic episodes (FG<3.33 mmol/L<60 mg/dL) was 1 vs 5. Feeding tolerance was comparable in both groups. Long-term tube feeding with a disease-specific enteral formula was safe and well tolerated in type 2 diabetic patients with neurological disorders. When compared with a standard diet, TI requirement decreased significantly with less hypoglycemia whereas FG and AG were significantly lowered, resulting in improved glycemic control.

  2. Immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent dengue vaccine in healthy adults in India: A randomized, observer-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Anand Prakash; Agarkhedkar, Sharad; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Narayan, Arun; Ganguly, Satyabrata; Wartel, T Anh; Bouckenooghe, Alain; Menezes, Josemund

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease that is endemic in India. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) in Indian adults. In this observer-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase II study, adults aged 18-45 years were randomized 2:1 to receive CYD-TDV or placebo at 0, 6 and 12 months in sub-cutaneous administration. Immunogenicity was assessed using a 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50) at baseline and 28 days after each study injection. 189 participants were enrolled (CYD-TDV [n = 128]; placebo, [n = 61]). At baseline, seropositivity rates for dengue serotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 ranged from 77.0% to 86.9%. Seropositivity rates for each serotype increased after each CYD-TDV injection with a more pronounced increase after the first injection. In the CYD-TDV group, geometric mean titres (GMTs) were 2.38 to 6.11-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline but remained similar to baseline in the placebo group. In the CYD-TDV group, the GMTs were 1.66 to 4.95-fold higher and 9.23 to 24.6-fold higher after the third injection compared with baseline in those who were dengue seropositive and dengue seronegative, respectively. Pain was the most commonly reported solicited injection site reaction after the first injection in both the CYD-TDV (6.3%) and placebo groups (4.9%), but occurred less frequently after subsequent injections. No serious adverse events were vaccine-related, no immediate unsolicited adverse events, and no virologically-confirmed cases of dengue, were reported during the study. The immunogenicity and safety of CYD-TDV was satisfactory in both dengue seropositive and seronegative Indian adults.

  3. A comparison between two lingual orthodontic brackets in terms of speech performance and patients' acceptance in correcting Class II, Division 1 malocclusion: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Haj-Younis, Samiha; Khattab, Tarek Z.; Hajeer, Mohammad Y.; Farah, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare speech performance and levels of oral impairment between two types of lingual brackets. Methods: A parallel-group randomized controlled trial was carried out on patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion treated at the University of Hama School of Dentistry in Hama, Syria. A total of 46 participants (mean age: 22.3 ± 2.3 years) with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion were randomly distributed into two groups with 23 patients each (1:1 allocation ratio). Either STb (Ormco) or 7th Generation (Ormco) lingual brackets were applied. Fricative sound/s/ spectrograms were analyzed directly before intervention (T0), one week following premolar extraction prior to bracket placement (T1), within 24 hours of bracket bonding (T2), one month after (T3), and three months after (T4) bracket placement. Patients′ acceptance was assessed by means of standardized questionnaires. Results: After bracket placement, significant deterioration in articulation was recorded at all assessment times in the 7th Generation group, and up to T3 in the STb group. Significant intergroup differences were detected at T2 and T3. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in reported tongue irritation levels, whereas chewing difficulty was significantly higher in the 7th Generation group one month after bracket placement. Conclusions: 7th Generation brackets have more interaction with sound production than STb ones. Although patients in both groups complained of some degree of oral impairment, STb appliances appeared to be more comfortable than the 7th Generation ones, particularly within the first month of treatment. PMID:27653268

  4. Polyphenon E, Non-futile at Neuroprotection in Multiple Sclerosis but Unpredictably Hepatotoxic: Phase I Single Group and Phase II Randomized Placebo-Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lovera, Jesus; Ramos, Alexander; Devier, Deidre; Garrison, Virginia; Kovner, Blake; Reza, Tara; Koop, Dennis; Rooney, William; Foundas, Anne; Bourdette, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phase I (PhI): assess the safety of Polyphenon E in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and determine the futility of Polyphenon E as a neuroprotective agent. Correlate plasma levels of EGCG with neuroprotective effects. Phase II (PhII): Further assess safety and confirm the neuroprotective effects of Polyphenon E. Design PhI: single group futility study. PhII: parallel group randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Participants Recruitment area (both studies) LSU MS Center, New Orleans, LA and general public from surrounding areas. Inclusion criteria (both studies) 1) MS per 2005 McDonald criteria; 2) relapsing remitting or secondary progressive MS; 3) stable for six months prior to enrollment on either no therapy or glatiramer acetate (GA) for the PhI study and on either on GA or Interferon β for the PhII study. Exclusion criteria (both studies) 1) complete bone marrow ablation or alentuzumab use at any time; 2) mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, natalizumab or fingolimod use in the prior nine months; 3) liver problems or significant medical problems. Interventions PhI: Polyphenon E, a green tea extract containing 50% of the antioxidant Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG), two capsules twice daily (200 mg of EGCG per capsule; total daily dose 800mg) for six months. PhII: Polyphenon E or matching placebo capsules, same dose for one year. Only the research pharmacist knew treatment assignment and she randomized participants (one-to-one, stratified by GA or Interferon β, blocks of 4 or 6). Outcome evaluators did not discuss side effects with participants. Outcome measures PhI: 1) adverse events (AE); 2) futility: decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) from baseline to six months of 10% or more; 3) association between EGCG plasma levels and change in NAA. PhII: 1) AEs; 2) difference in the rate of change of NAA-levels over twelve months. We measured NAA using a point resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging sequence (TE30/TR2000) on a 10cm × 10

  5. Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) Pad Abort Test Vehicle (PATV) II Attitude Control System (ACS) Integration and Pressurization Subsystem Dynamic Random Vibration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekrami, Yasamin; Cook, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate catastrophic failures on future generation space vehicles, engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have begun to integrate a novel crew abort systems that could pull a crew module away in case of an emergency at the launch pad or during ascent. The Max Launch Abort System (MLAS) is a recent test vehicle that was designed as an alternative to the baseline Orion Launch Abort System (LAS) to demonstrate the performance of a "tower-less" LAS configuration under abort conditions. The MLAS II test vehicle will execute a propulsive coast stabilization maneuver during abort to control the vehicles trajectory and thrust. To accomplish this, the spacecraft will integrate an Attitude Control System (ACS) with eight hypergolic monomethyl hydrazine liquid propulsion engines that are capable of operating in a quick pulsing mode. Two main elements of the ACS include a propellant distribution subsystem and a pressurization subsystem to regulate the flow of pressurized gas to the propellant tanks and the engines. The CAD assembly of the Attitude Control System (ACS) was configured and integrated into the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) design. A dynamic random vibration analysis was conducted on the Main Propulsion System (MPS) helium pressurization panels to assess the response of the panel and its components under increased gravitational acceleration loads during flight. The results indicated that the panels fundamental and natural frequencies were farther from the maximum Acceleration Spectral Density (ASD) vibrations which were in the range of 150-300 Hz. These values will direct how the components will be packaged in the vehicle to reduce the effects high gravitational loads.

  6. Polyphenon E, non-futile at neuroprotection in multiple sclerosis but unpredictably hepatotoxic: Phase I single group and phase II randomized placebo-controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Lovera, Jesus; Ramos, Alexander; Devier, Deidre; Garrison, Virginia; Kovner, Blake; Reza, Tara; Koop, Dennis; Rooney, William; Foundas, Anne; Bourdette, Dennis

    2015-11-15

    Phase I (PhI): assess the safety of Polyphenon E in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and determine the futility of Polyphenon E as a neuroprotective agent. Correlate plasma levels of EGCG with neuroprotective effects. Phase II (PhII): Further assess safety and confirm the neuroprotective effects of Polyphenon E. PhI: single group futility study. PhII: parallel group randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Recruitment area (both studies): LSU MS Center, New Orleans, LA and general public from surrounding areas. Inclusion criteria (both studies): 1) MS per 2005 McDonald criteria; 2) relapsing remitting or secondary progressive MS; 3) stable for six months prior to enrollment on either no therapy or glatiramer acetate (GA) for the PhI study and on either on GA or Interferon β for the PhII study. Exclusion criteria (both studies): 1) complete bone marrow ablation or alentuzumab use at any time; 2) mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, natalizumab or fingolimod use in the prior nine months; 3) liver problems or significant medical problems. PhI: Polyphenon E, a green tea extract containing 50% of the antioxidant Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG), two capsules twice daily (200mg of EGCG per capsule; total daily dose 800mg) for six months. PhII: Polyphenon E or matching placebo capsules, same dose for one year. Only the research pharmacist knew treatment assignment and she randomized participants (one-to-one, stratified by GA or Interferon β, blocks of 4 or 6). Outcome evaluators did not discuss side effects with participants. PhI: 1) adverse events (AE); 2) futility: decrease in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) from baseline to six months of 10% or more; 3) association between EGCG plasma levels and change in NAA. PhII: 1) AEs; 2) difference in the rate of change of NAA-levels over twelve months.We measured NAA using a point resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging sequence (TE30/TR2000) on a 10cm×10cm×1cm volume of interest (VOI) located just superior to the

  7. Phase II, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a polyclonal anti-Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin in treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Mark E; Holley, H Preston; Lutz, Jon; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Woods, Christopher W; Levine, Donald P; Veney, Naomi; Fowler, Vance G

    2007-12-01

    New treatment modalities are needed for the treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin (Altastaph) is a polyclonal immune globulin preparation that is being developed as adjunctive therapy for persons with S. aureus infections complicated by bacteremia. In a phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 40 subjects with documented S. aureus bacteremia received standard therapy plus either Altastaph at 200 mg/kg of body weight in each of two infusions 24 h apart or placebo. During the 42-day observation period, antibody pharmacokinetics and safety were the primary characteristics studied. Information regarding the resolution of bacteremia and fever was also analyzed. Anti-type-5 and anti-type-8 capsular antibody levels peaked after the second infusion at 550 mug/ml and 419 mug/ml, respectively, and remained above 100 mug/ml at day 28. A total of 316 adverse events were noted in 39 of 40 subjects. Infusion-related adverse events in Altastaph recipients were infrequent and similar to those among recipients of commercial intravenously administered immunoglobulin G products. Five of 21 (23%) subjects in the Altastaph group died, whereas 2 of 18 (11%) subjects in the placebo group died (P = 0.42). Compared to the control patients, the Altastaph recipients had a shorter median time to the resolution of fever (2 days and 7 days, respectively; P = 0.09) and a shorter length of hospital stay (9 days and 14 days, respectively; P = 0.03). However, these findings are exploratory, and there were few differences in the other variables measured. High levels of opsonizing antibodies were maintained for the initial 4 weeks. Although the study was not powered to show efficacy, these preliminary findings and safety profile suggest that Altastaph may be an effective adjunct to antibiotics and warrants further investigation (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00063089).

  8. The fitness for the Ageing Brain Study II (FABS II): protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating the effect of physical activity on cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Observational studies have documented a potential protective effect of physical exercise in older adults who are at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. The Fitness for the Ageing Brain II (FABS II) study is a multicentre randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) aiming to determine whether physical activity reduces the rate of cognitive decline among individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This paper describes the background, objectives of the study, and an overview of the protocol including design, organization and data collection methods. Methods/Design The study will recruit 230 community-dwelling participants diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Participants will be randomly allocated to two treatment groups: usual care group or 24-week home-based program consisting of 150 minutes per week of tailored moderate physical activity. The primary outcome measure of the study is cognitive decline as measured by the change from baseline in the total score on the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive section. Secondary outcomes of interest include behavioral and psychological symptoms, quality of life, functional level, carer burden and physical function (strength, balance, endurance, physical activity). Primary endpoints will be measured at six and twelve months following the baseline assessment. Discussion This RCT will contribute evidence regarding the potential benefits of a systematic program of physical activity as an affordable and safe intervention for people with Alzheimer's disease. Further, if successful, physical activity in combination with usual care has the potential to alleviate the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and improve its management and the quality of life of patients and their carers. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000755235 PMID:21143943

  9. Randomized controlled phase I/II study to investigate immune stimulatory effects by low dose radiotherapy in primarily operable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficiencies of T cell based immunotherapies are affected by insufficient migration and activation of tumor specific effector T cells in the tumor. Accumulating evidence exists on the ability of ionizing radiation to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. The aim of this phase I/II clinical trial is to evaluate whether low dose single fraction radiotherapy can improve T cell associated antitumor immune response in patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods/Design This trial has been designed as an investigator initiated; prospective randomised, 4-armed, controlled Phase I/II trial. Patients who are candidates for resection of pancreatic cancer will be randomized into 4 arms. A total of 40 patients will be enrolled. The patients receive 0 Gy, 0.5 Gy, 2 Gy or 5 Gy radiation precisely targeted to their pancreatic carcinoma. Radiation will be delivered by external beam radiotherapy using a 6 MV Linac with IMRT technique 48 h prior to the surgical resection. The primary objective is the determination of an active local external beam radiation dose, leading to tumor infiltrating T cells as a surrogate parameter for antitumor activity. Secondary objectives include local tumor control and recurrence patterns, survival, radiogenic treatment toxicity and postoperative morbidity and mortality, as well as quality of life. Further, frequencies of tumor reactive T cells in blood and bone marrow as well as whole blood cell transcriptomics and plasma-proteomics will be correlated with clinical outcome. An interim analysis will be performed after the enrolment of 20 patients for safety reasons. The evaluation of the primary endpoint will start four weeks after the last patient's enrolment. Discussion This trial will answer the question whether a low dose radiotherapy localized to the pancreatic tumor only can increase the number of tumor infiltrating T cells and thus potentially enhance the antitumor immune response. The study will also

  10. Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of whole-brain irradiation with concomitant chloroquine for brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Chloroquine (CLQ), an antimalarial drug, has a lysosomotropic effect associated with increased radiationsensibility, which is mediated by the leakage of hydrolytic enzymes, increased apoptosis, autophagy and increased oxidative stress in vitro. In this phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of radiosensibilization using CLQ concomitant with 30 Gray (Gy) of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) to treat patients with brain metastases (BM) from solid tumors. Methods Seventy-three eligible patients were randomized. Thirty-nine patients received WBI (30 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks) concomitant with 150 mg of CLQ for 4 weeks (the CLQ arm). Thirty-four patients received the same schedule of WBI concomitant with a placebo for 4 weeks (the control arm). All the patients were evaluated for quality of life (QoL) using the EORTC Quality of Life (QoL) Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) (Mexican version) before beginning radiotherapy and one month later. Results The overall response rate (ORR) was 54% for the CLQ arm and 55% for the control arm (p=0.92). The progression-free survival of brain metastases (BMPFS) rates at one year were 83.9% (95% CI 69.4-98.4) for the CLQ arm and 55.1% (95% CI 33.6-77.6) for the control arm. Treatment with CLQ was independently associated with increased BMPFS (RR 0.31,95% CI [0.1-0.9], p=0.046).The only factor that was independently associated with increased overall survival (OS) was the presence of< 4 brain metastases (RR 1.9, 95% CI [1.12-3.3], p=0.017). WBI was associated with improvements in cognitive and emotional function but also with worsened nausea in both patients groups. No differences in QoL or toxicity were found between the study arms. Conclusion Treatment with CLQ plus WBI improved the control of BM (compared with the control arm) with no increase in toxicity; however, CLQ did not improve the RR or OS. A phase III clinical trial is warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:24010771

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of an undenatured type II collagen supplement in modulating knee osteoarthritis symptoms: a multicenter randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Lugo, James P; Saiyed, Zainulabedin M; Lane, Nancy E

    2016-01-29

    Undenatured type II collagen (UC-II) is a nutritional supplement derived from chicken sternum cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of UC-II for knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain and associated symptoms compared to placebo and to glucosamine hydrochloride plus chondroitin sulfate (GC). One hundred ninety one volunteers were randomized into three groups receiving a daily dose of UC-II (40 mg), GC (1500 mg G & 1200 mg C), or placebo for a 180-day period. The primary endpoint was the change in total Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) from baseline through day 180 for the UC-II group versus placebo and GC. Secondary endpoints included the Lequesne Functional Index (LFI), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and the WOMAC subscales. Modified intent-to-treat analysis were performed for all endpoints using analysis of covariance and mixed model repeated measures, while incremental area under the curve was calculated by the intent-to-treat method. At day 180, the UC-II group demonstrated a significant reduction in overall WOMAC score compared to placebo (p = 0.002) and GC (p = 0.04). Supplementation with UC-II also resulted in significant changes for all three WOMAC subscales: pain (p = 0.0003 vs. placebo; p = 0.016 vs. GC); stiffness (p = 0.004 vs. placebo; p = 0.044 vs. GC); physical function (p = 0.007 vs. placebo). Safety outcomes did not differ among the groups. UC-II improved knee joint symptoms in knee OA subjects and was well-tolerated. Additional studies that elucidate the mechanism for this supplement's actions are warranted. CTRI/2013/05/003663 ; CTRI/2013/02/003348 .

  12. Neuroplastic Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Painful Symptoms Reduction in Chronic Hepatitis C: A Phase II Randomized, Double Blind, Sham Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brietzke, Aline P.; Rozisky, Joanna R.; Dussan-Sarria, Jairo A.; Deitos, Alicia; Laste, Gabriela; Hoppe, Priscila F. T.; Muller, Suzana; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Alvares-da-Silva, Mário R.; de Amorim, Rivadavio F. B.; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pegylated Interferon Alpha (Peg-IFN) in combination with other drugs is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C infection (HCV) and is related to severe painful symptoms. The aim of this study was access the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in controlling the painful symptoms related to Peg-IFN side effects. Materials and Methods: In this phase II double-blind trial, twenty eight (n = 28) HCV subjects were randomized to receive either 5 consecutive days of active tDCS (n = 14) or sham (n = 14) during 5 consecutive days with anodal stimulation over the primary motor cortex region using 2 mA for 20 min. The primary outcomes were visual analogue scale (VAS) pain and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum levels. Secondary outcomes were the pressure-pain threshold (PPT), the Brazilian Profile of Chronic Pain: Screen (B-PCP:S), and drug analgesics use. Results: tDCS reduced the VAS scores (P < 0.003), with a mean pain drop of 56% (p < 0.001). Furthermore, tDCS was able to enhance BDNF levels (p < 0.01). The mean increase was 37.48% in the active group. Finally, tDCS raised PPT (p < 0.001) and reduced the B-PCP:S scores and analgesic use (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Five sessions of tDCS were effective in reducing the painful symptoms in HCV patients undergoing Peg-IFN treatment. These findings support the efficacy of tDCS as a promising therapeutic tool to improve the tolerance of the side effects related to the use of Peg-IFN. Future larger studies (phase III and IV trials) are needed to confirm the clinical use of the therapeutic effects of tDCS in such condition. Trial registration: Brazilian Human Health Regulator for Research with the approval number CAAE 07802012.0.0000.5327. PMID:26793047

  13. Rebamipide (OPC-12759) in the treatment of dry eye: a randomized, double-masked, multicenter, placebo-controlled phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shigeru; Awamura, Saki; Oshiden, Kazuhide; Nakamichi, Norihiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yokoi, Norihiko

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the dose response for efficacy of 1% and 2% rebamipide ophthalmic suspension compared with placebo in patients with dry eye. A randomized, double-masked, multicenter, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-response phase II study. A total of 308 patients with dry eye. After a 2-week screening period, patients were randomized to receive placebo or 1% rebamipide or 2% rebamipide administered as 1 drop in each eye 4 times daily for 4 weeks. The primary objective end point was change in fluorescein corneal staining (FCS) score from baseline to last observation carried forward (LOCF). Secondary objective end points were lissamine green conjunctival staining (LGCS) score, tear film break-up time (TBUT), and the Schirmer's test. Secondary subjective end points included dry eye-related ocular symptoms (foreign body sensation, dryness, photophobia, eye pain, and blurred vision) score and patients' overall treatment impression score. Rebamipide dose response was observed in FCS, LGCS, and TBUT scores. Both 1% and 2% rebamipide were significantly more effective than the placebo in terms of the change from baseline to LOCF for FCS, LGCS, and TBUT scores. There was no significant difference between the rebamipide and placebo groups from baseline to LOCF in Schirmer's test values, and dose response was not observed. In the predefined dry eye subpopulation with a baseline FCS score of 10 to 15, the mean change from baseline in the 2% rebamipide group was larger than that in the 1% rebamipide group. Change from baseline to LOCF for all 5 dry eye-related ocular symptom scores and patients' overall treatment impression showed significant improvements in the 1% and 2% rebamipide groups compared with the placebo group, except for photophobia in the 1% rebamipide group. No deaths or drug-related serious adverse events occurred in any treatment group. The incidence of ocular abnormalities was similar across the rebamipide and placebo groups. Rebamipide was effective in

  14. Prediction and prevention of thromboembolic events with enoxaparin in cancer patients with elevated tissue factor-bearing microparticles: a randomized-controlled phase II trial (the Microtec study).

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Jeffrey I; Liebman, Howard A; Bauer, Kenneth A; Caughey, Thomas; Campigotto, Federico; Rosovsky, Rachel; Mantha, Simon; Kessler, Craig M; Eneman, Jonathan; Raghavan, Vidya; Lenz, Heinz-Joseph; Bullock, Andrea; Buchbinder, Elizabeth; Neuberg, Donna; Furie, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    Elevated levels of circulating tissue factor-bearing microparticles (TFMP) have been associated with an increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients. We performed a randomized phase II study to evaluate the cumulative incidence of VTE in advanced cancer patients with lower levels of TFMP not receiving thromboprophylaxis and those with higher levels of circulating TFMP randomized to enoxaparin or observation. The cumulative incidence of VTE at 2 months in the higher TFMP group randomized to enoxaparin (N = 23) was 5·6% while the higher TFMP group observation arm (N = 11) was 27·3% (Gray test P = 0·06). The cumulative incidence of VTE in the low TFMP was 7·2% (N = 32). No major haemorrhages were observed in the enoxaparin arm. The median survival for patients with higher levels of TFMP followed by observation was 11·8 months compared with 17·8 months on enoxaparin (P = 0·58). In a prospective randomized trial, increased numbers of circulating TFMP detected by impedance flow cytometry identified cancer patients with a high incidence of VTE. Enoxaparin demonstrated a clear trend towards reducing the rate of VTE in patients with elevated levels of TFMP, with an overall rate of VTE similar in magnitude to the lower TFMP group. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. PREDICTION AND PREVENTION OF THROMBOEMBOLIC EVENTS WITH ENOXAPARIN IN CANCER PATIENTS WITH ELEVATED TISSUE FACTOR-BEARING MICROPARTICLES: A RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED PHASE II TRIAL (THE MICROTEC STUDY)

    PubMed Central

    Zwicker, JI; Liebman, HA; Bauer, KA; Caughey, T; Campigotto, F; Rosovsky, R; Mantha, S; Kessler, CM; Eneman, J; Raghavan, V; Lenz, HJ; Bullock, A; Buchbinder, B; Neuberg, D; Furie, B

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Elevated levels of circulating tissue factor-bearing microparticles (TFMP) have been associated with an increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients. We performed a randomized phase II study to evaluate the cumulative incidence of VTE in advanced cancer patients with lower levels of TFMP not receiving thromboprophylaxis and those with higher levels of circulating TFMP randomized to enoxaparin or observation. The cumulative incidence of VTE at 2 months in the higher TFMP group randomized to enoxaparin (N=23) was 5.6% while the higher TFMP group observation arm (N=11) was 27.3% (Gray test P=0.06). The cumulative incidence of VTE in the low TFMP was 7.2% (N=32). No major haemorrhages were observed in the enoxaparin arm. The median survival for patients with higher levels of TFMP followed by observation was 11.8 months compared with 17.8 months on enoxaparin (P=0.58). In a prospective randomized trial, increased numbers of circulating TFMP detected by impedance flow cytometry identified cancer patients with a high incidence of VTE. Enoxaparin demonstrated a clear trend towards reducing the rate of VTE in patients with elevated levels of TFMP, with an overall rate of VTE similar in magnitude to the lower TFMP group. PMID:23240761

  16. A multicenter randomized controlled evaluation of automated home monitoring and telephonic disease management in patients recently hospitalized for congestive heart failure: the SPAN-CHF II trial.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Andrew; Gregory, Douglas; Patel, Ayan R; Levine, Daniel; Venesy, David; Perry, Kathleen; Delano, Christine; Konstam, Marvin A

    2010-04-01

    We performed a prospective, randomized investigation assessing the incremental effect of automated health monitoring (AHM) technology over and above that of a previously described nurse directed heart failure (HF) disease management program. The AHM system measured and transmitted body weight, blood pressure, and heart rate data as well as subjective patient self-assessments via a standard telephone line to a central server. A total of 188 consented and eligible patients were randomized between intervention and control groups in 1:1 ratio. Subjects randomized to the control arm received the Specialized Primary and Networked Care in Heart Failure (SPAN-CHF) heart failure disease management program. Subjects randomized to the intervention arm received the SPAN-CHF disease management program in conjunction with the AHM system. The primary end point was prespecified as the relative event rate of HF hospitalization between intervention and control groups at 90 days. The relative event rate of HF hospitalization for the intervention group compared with controls was 0.50 (95%CI [0.25-0.99], P = .05). Short-term reductions in the heart failure hospitalization rate were associated with the use of automated home monitoring equipment. Long-term benefits in this model remain to be studied. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A double blind randomized placebo controlled phase I/II study assessing the safety and efficacy of allogeneic bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell in critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities comprises a clinical spectrum that extends from no symptoms to presentation with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Bone marrow derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM- MSCs) may ameliorate the consequences of CLI due to their combinatorial potential for inducing angiogenesis and immunomodulatory environment in situ. The primary objective was to determine the safety of BM- MSCs in patients with CLI. Methods Prospective, double blind randomized placebo controlled multi-center study was conducted in patients with established CLI as per Rutherford classification in category II-4, III-5, or III-6 with infra-inguinal arterial occlusive disease and were not suitable for or had failed revascularization treatment. The primary end point was incidence of treatment – related adverse events (AE). Exploratory efficacy end points were improvement in rest pain, increase in Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI), ankle pressure, healing of ulcers, and amputation rates. Twenty patients (BM-MSC: Placebo = 1:1) were administered with allogeneic BM-MSCs at a dose of 2 million cells/kg or placebo (PlasmaLyte A) at the gastrocnemius muscle of the ischemic limb. Results Improvement was observed in the rest pain scores in both the arms. Significant increase in ABPI and ankle pressure was seen in BM-MSC arm compared to the placebo group. Incidence of AEs in the BM-MSC arm was 13 vs. 45 in the placebo arm where as serious adverse events (SAE) were similar in both the arms (5 in BM-MSC and 4 in the placebo group). SAEs resulted in death, infected gangrene, amputations in these patients. It was observed that the SAEs were related to disease progression and not related to stem cells. Conclusion BM-MSCs are safe when injected IM at a dose of 2 million cells/kg body weight. Few efficacy parameters such as ABPI and ankle pressure showed positive trend warranting further studies. Trial registration NIH website (http

  18. Immunogenicity and safety of Fluzone(®) intradermal and high-dose influenza vaccines in older adults ≥65 years of age: a randomized, controlled, phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Peter; Gorse, Geoffrey J; Strout, Cynthia B; Sperling, Malcolm; Greenberg, David P; Ozol-Godfrey, Ayca; DiazGranados, Carlos; Landolfi, Victoria

    2014-05-01

    We conducted a randomized, controlled, multicenter, phase II study to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of an investigational intradermal (ID) trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) and a high-dose (HD) intramuscular (IM) TIV in older adults (≥65 years of age). Older adult subjects were immunized with ID vaccine containing either 15μg hemagglutinin (HA)/strain (n=636) or 21μg HA/strain (n=634), with HD IM vaccine containing 60μg HA/strain (n=320), or with standard-dose (SD) IM vaccine (Fluzone(®); 15μg HA/strain; n=319). For comparison, younger adults (18-49 years of age) were immunized with SD IM vaccine. In older adults, post-vaccination geometric mean titers induced by the ID vaccines were superior to those induced by the SD IM vaccine for the A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains and non-inferior for the B strain. Seroconversion rates induced by the ID vaccines were superior to those induced by the SD IM vaccine in older adults for the A/H1N1 and B strains and non-inferior for the A/H3N2 strain. Results did not differ significantly for the two ID vaccine dosages. Post-vaccination geometric mean titers, seroconversion rates, and most seroprotection rates were significantly higher in HD vaccine recipients than in older adult recipients of the SD IM or ID vaccines and, for most measures, were comparable to those of younger adult SD IM vaccine recipients. Injection-site reactions, but not systemic reactions or unsolicited adverse events, were more common with the ID vaccines than with the IM vaccines. No treatment-related serious adverse events were reported. This study demonstrated that: (1) the ID and HD vaccines were well-tolerated and more immunogenic than the SD IM vaccine in older adults; (2) the HD vaccine was more immunogenic than the ID vaccines in older adults; and (3) the HD vaccine in older adults and the SD IM vaccine in younger adults elicited comparable antibody responses (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier no.: NCT00551031).

  19. Boric acid gel as local drug delivery in the treatment of class II furcation defects in chronic periodontitis: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sandeep; Pradeep, Avani Raju; Kanoriya, Dharmendra; Garg, Shruti; Garg, Vibhuti

    2017-06-20

    Boric acid (BA) exhibits antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, as well as osteoblastic, activity. The aim of the present study was to explore the efficacy of 0.75% BA gel as a local drug-delivery system in adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for the treatment of class II furcation defects in comparison with placebo gel. A total of 48 mandibular class II furcation defects were randomized and treated with either 0.75% BA gel or placebo gel. Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months, while radiographic parameters were recorded at baseline and 6 months. Greater mean probing depth reduction and mean relative vertical and horizontal clinical attachment level gain were shown to be greater in group 1 than in group 2 at 3 and 6 months. Furthermore, a significantly greater mean percentage of bone fill was found in group 1 (16.98%±1.03%) than in the placebo (2.86%±0.92%) at 6 months. The .75% BA group showed significant improvement in clinical parameters compared to placebo gel as an adjunct to SRP. This implies an alternative for treatment of class II furcation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of the antipruritic effects of topical pimecrolimus in non-atopic prurigo nodularis: results of a randomized, hydrocortisone-controlled, double-blind phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, Dorothee; Lotts, Tobias; Blome, Christine; Braeutigam, Matthias; Phan, Ngoc Quan; Butterfass-Bahloul, Trude; Augustin, Matthias; Luger, Thomas A; Ständer, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    In the treatment of atopic dermatitis, pimecrolimus has high antipruritic effects. To investigate the efficacy of 1% pimecrolimus cream in comparison to 1% hydrocortisone cream in non-atopic prurigo nodularis (PN). A randomized, controlled, double-blind study with intraindividual randomization was done in 30 patients (17 females, 13 males; mean age 58.5 years) with PN. Pruritus intensity decreased significantly (p < 0.001) on both treated sides as early as after 10 days of treatment; scratch lesions improved (p < 0.001). Quality of life as assessed by the Dermatology Life Quality Index improved significantly. However, a significant advantage of pimecrolimus over hydrocortisone was not found. The results suggest that the non-steroid pimecrolimus is an effective alternative for PN treatment.

  1. Happy Family Kitchen II: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of a Community-Based Family Intervention for Enhancing Family Communication and Well-being in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Henry C. Y.; Mui, Moses; Wan, Alice; Ng, Yin-Lam; Stewart, Sunita M.; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S.

    2016-01-01

    Long working hours and stressful urban lifestyles pose major challenges to family communication and well-being in Hong Kong. A community-based family intervention derived from a positive psychology framework, by using cooking and dining as a platform, was developed for improving family communication and well-being. Social workers and teachers from 31 social service units and schools in collaboration with an academic partner organized and conducted the intervention programs for 2,070 individuals from 973 families in a deprived district in Hong Kong. The participants were randomly assigned into the intervention or control group in a cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT). The core intervention covered one of five positive psychology themes: joy, gratitude, flow, savoring, and listening. Assessments at pre-intervention, immediate post-intervention, and 4 and 12 weeks post-intervention showed improved family communication and well-being with sustainable effects up to 12 weeks. Positive changes in family happiness and family health were greater in the intervention group than in the control group. The savoring intervention had the most improved outcomes among the five themes. We concluded that this large-scale brief cRCT developed and conducted in real-world settings provided evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-based family intervention. This study was registered under ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01796275). PMID:27199864

  2. Experimental pain ratings and reactivity of cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II following a trial of hypnosis: Results of a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Quinn, Noel B.; Kronfli, Tarek; King, Christopher D.; Page, Gayle G.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.; Stapleton, Laura M.; McGuire, Lynanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective Current evidence supports the efficacy of hypnosis for reducing the pain associated with experimental stimulation and various acute and chronic conditions; however, the mechanisms explaining how hypnosis exerts its effects remain less clear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines represent potential targets for investigation given their purported roles in the perpetuation of painful conditions; yet, no clinical trials have thus far examined the influence of hypnosis on these mechanisms. Design Healthy participants, highly susceptible to the effects of hypnosis, were randomized to either a hypnosis intervention or a no-intervention control. Using a cold pressor task, assessments of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were collected prior to the intervention (Pre) and following the intervention (Post) along with pain-provoked changes in salivary cortisol and the soluble receptor of tumor necrosis factor-α (sTNFαRII). Results Compared to the no-intervention control, data analyses revealed that hypnosis significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Hypnosis was not significantly associated with suppression of cortisol or sTNFαRII reactivity to acute pain from Pre to Post; however, the effect sizes for these associations were medium-sized. Conclusions Overall, the findings from this randomized controlled pilot study support the importance of a future large-scale study on the effects of hypnosis for modulating pain-related changes of the HPA axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:22233394

  3. An analysis of deep vein thrombosis in burn patients (part II): A randomized and controlled study of thrombo-prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Rajeev B; Bansal, Priya; Pradhan, Gaurav S; Subberwal, Manju

    2016-12-01

    Morbidity and mortality from venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) remains a significant problem for trauma and medical patients and there are established guidelines for prophylaxis in these patients. However, the efficacy and safety of VTE prophylaxis in thermally injured patients continue to be elusive as it has never been studied in a prospective, randomized fashion. Selective use of VTE prophylaxis, for high risk patients, is practiced by some burn units even if objective evidence is lacking for majority of risk factors enunciated in burn patients. Differing demographics and wound management techniques are other confounding factors mandating more prospective studies to evaluate the need and role of chemoprophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prevention in burn patients. Ours is the first prospective, randomized, controlled study which seeks to identify risk factors for DVT in our patients, and evaluate the role of routine chemoprophylaxis and its complications. The study design (sample size, inclusion/exclusion criteria, randomization, methodology and statistical methods) is detailed in part-1 of this two part manuscript. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) identified DVT in four out of 50 patients (8% incidence) forming the control group. DVT was not detected in any of the patients on prophylaxis (0% incidence). This difference was found to be statistically significant (p value-0.021). Patients with DVT had significantly higher %TBSA, prolonged immobility and a longer duration of stay as compared to patients without DVT in the control group. Only one patient on enoxaparin prophylaxis developed mild epistaxis which resolved spontaneously. Fifteen patients died during the study out of which two had DVT but none showed autopsy evidence of pulmonary embolism. With a moderate risk of developing DVT (8%) and a complication rate of only 2% with chemoprophylaxis, we feel that routine prophylaxis has the potential to decrease the incidence of VTE, without associated complications, in

  4. Clinical efficacy of subgingivally delivered 1.2-mg simvastatin in the treatment of individuals with Class II furcation defects: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Priyanka, N; Kalra, Nitish; Naik, Savitha B; Singh, Sonender P; Martande, Santosh

    2012-12-01

    Simvastatin (SMV) assists in bone regeneration and has an anti-inflammatory effect when delivered or applied locally. The present clinical trial is designed to investigate the effectiveness of 1.2-mg SMV as a local drug delivery system as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) for the treatment of Class II furcation defects. Seventy-two patients with mandibular buccal Class II furcation defects were randomized and categorized into two treatment groups: SRP plus placebo (group 1) and SRP plus 1.2-mg SMV (group 2). Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline before SRP and at 3 and 6 months; they included modified sulcus bleeding index (mSBI), probing depth (PD), and relative vertical (RVAL) and horizontal (RHAL) attachment levels. At baseline and after 6 months, radiologic assessment of bone defect fill was performed. Both therapies resulted in significant improvements. The decrease in mSBI score at 6 months was greater in group 2 (2.02 ± 0.23) compared with group 1 (1.80 ± 0.22). The mean decrease in PD at 6 months was 1.30 ± 1.0 and 4.05 ± 1.31 mm in groups 1 and 2, respectively. A significantly greater gain in mean RVAL and RHAL was found in group 2 than in group 1 (P <0.05). Furthermore, significantly greater mean percentage of bone fill was found in group 2 (25.16%) compared with group 1 (1.54%). Locally delivered SMV provides a comfortable and flexible method to improve clinical parameters and also to enhance bone formation.

  5. Phase II, Randomized, Placebo-controlled, 90-day Study of Emixustat HCL in Geographic Atrophy Associated with Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dugel, Pravin U.; Novack, Roger L.; Csaky, Karl G.; Richmond, Preston P.; Birch, David G.; Kubota, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the safety, tolerability, and pharmacodynamics of emixustat hydrochloride (ACU-4429), a novel visual cycle modulator, in subjects with geographic atrophy (GA) associated with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to oral emixustat (2, 5, 7, or 10 mg once daily) or placebo (3:1 ratio) for 90 days. Recovery of rod photoreceptor sensitivity following a photobleach was measured by electroretinography. Safety evaluations included analysis of adverse events (AEs) and ophthalmic examinations. Results Seventy-two subjects (54 emixustat, 18 placebo) were evaluated. Emixustat suppressed rod photoreceptor sensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. Suppression plateaued by Day 14, and was reversible within 7-14 days after drug cessation. No systemic AEs of concern were noted. Dose-related ocular AEs (chromatopsia, 57% emixustat vs. 17% placebo; and delayed dark adaptation, 48% emixustat vs. 6% placebo) were mild to moderate, and the majority resolved on study or within 7-14 days after study drug cessation. Conclusions In this phase II study, emixustat produced a dose-dependent, reversible effect on rod function, and an ocular AE profile that is consistent with the proposed mechanism of action. These results support further testing of emixustat for the treatment of GA associated with dry AMD. PMID:25932553

  6. Stimulus control: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Dinsmoor, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The second part of my tutorial stresses the systematic importance of two parameters of discrimination training: (a) the magnitude of the physical difference between the positive and the negative stimulus (disparity) and (b) the magnitude of the difference between the positive stimulus, in particular, and the background stimulation (salience). It then examines the role these variables play in such complex phenomena as blocking and overshadowing, progressive discrimination training, and the transfer of control by fading. It concludes by considering concept formation and imitation, which are important forms of application, and recent work on equivalence relations. PMID:22478222

  7. Treatment of large overjet in Angle Class II: division 1 malocclusion with Andresen activators versus prefabricated functional appliances-a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Čirgić, Emina; Kjellberg, Heidrun; Hansen, Ken

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness in reducing large overjet between a prefabricated functional appliance (PFA) and a slightly modified Andresen activator (AA). Public Dental Service, Gothenburg, Sweden. A multicentre, prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted with patients from 12 general dental practices. One hundred and five patients with an Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion and an overjet of ≥6mm were eligible for the study. Eight patients were excluded due to various reasons and the sample consisted thus of 97 subjects (44 girls, 53 boys) with a mean age of 10.3 years. The study was designed as intention to treat and the patients were randomly allocated by lottery to treatment with either a PFA or an AA. The PFA and AA group consisted of 57 subjects (28 girls, 29 boys) and 40 subjects (16 girls, 24 boys), respectively. Overjet, overbite, lip seal, and sagittal molar relationship were recorded before, at the end of treatment and 1-year post-treatment. Blinding was not performed. The endpoint of treatment was set to overjet ≤3mm and after this a 6 months retention period followed. No significant difference was found in overjet, overbite, sagittal relation, and lip seal between the two groups for the total observation period. The treatment of 40 (70 per cent) patients with PFA and 21 (53 per cent) with AA were considered unsuccessful mainly due to poor compliance. No cephalometric records were taken as only patient-centred clinical outcome were used as an indicator for treatment success. The criteria of reduction of overjet to as low as 3mm could have affected the success rate. No difference in effectiveness could be shown between PFAs and AAs in correcting overjet, overbite, sagittal molar relation, and lip seal. The success rate in treatment with both appliances is, however, low. This trial was registered in "FoU i Sverige" (http://www.fou.nu/is/sverige), registration number: 97131. The protocol was not

  8. Effects of a palliative care intervention on clinical outcomes in patients with advanced cancer: the Project ENABLE II randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Balan, Stefan; Brokaw, Frances C; Seville, Janette; Hull, Jay G; Li, Zhongze; Tosteson, Tor D; Byock, Ira R; Ahles, Tim A

    2009-08-19

    There are few randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of palliative care interventions to improve the care of patients with advanced cancer. To determine the effect of a nursing-led intervention on quality of life, symptom intensity, mood, and resource use in patients with advanced cancer. Randomized controlled trial conducted from November 2003 through May 2008 of 322 patients with advanced cancer in a rural, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center in New Hampshire and affiliated outreach clinics and a VA medical center in Vermont. A multicomponent, psychoeducational intervention (Project ENABLE [Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends]) conducted by advanced practice nurses consisting of 4 weekly educational sessions and monthly follow-up sessions until death or study completion (n = 161) vs usual care (n = 161). Quality of life was measured by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy for Palliative Care (score range, 0-184). Symptom intensity was measured by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (score range, 0-900). Mood was measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (range, 0-60). These measures were assessed at baseline, 1 month, and every 3 months until death or study completion. Intensity of service was measured as the number of days in the hospital and in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the number of emergency department visits recorded in the electronic medical record. A total of 322 participants with cancer of the gastrointestinal tract (41%; 67 in the usual care group vs 66 in the intervention group), lung (36%; 58 vs 59), genitourinary tract (12%; 20 vs 19), and breast (10%; 16 vs 17) were randomized. The estimated treatment effects (intervention minus usual care) for all participants were a mean (SE) of 4.6 (2) for quality of life (P = .02), -27.8 (15) for symptom intensity (P = .06), and -1.8 (0.81) for depressed mood (P = .02). The estimated treatment effects in

  9. Mandibular Degree II Furcation Defects Treatment With Platelet-Rich Fibrin and 1% Alendronate Gel Combination: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kanoriya, Dharmendra; Pradeep, A R; Garg, Vibhuti; Singhal, Sandeep

    2017-03-01

    Different materials have been investigated for renewal of lost supporting periodontal structures and tested for furcation defect treatment. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a pool of growth-promoting factors and cytokines that promote bone regeneration and maturation of soft tissue. Alendronate (ALN), an influential member of the bisphosphonate group, is known to enhance osteoblastogenesis and inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption, thus promoting tissue regeneration. This randomized trial was done to assess effectiveness of PRF and 1% ALN gel combination in mandibular degree II furcation defect treatment in comparison with PRF and access therapy alone. Seventy-two mandibular molar furcation defects were treated with either access therapy alone (group 1), access therapy with PRF (group 2), or access therapy with PRF and 1% ALN (group 3). Plaque index, modified sulcus bleeding index, probing depth (PD), relative vertical attachment level (RVAL) and relative horizontal attachment level (RHAL), and intrabony defect depth were recorded at baseline and 9 months postoperatively. Radiographically, defect fill, assessed in percentage, was evaluated at baseline, before surgery, and 9 months post-therapy. Group 3 showed greater PD reduction and RVAL and RHAL gain when compared with groups 1 and 2 postoperatively. Moreover, group 3 sites showed a significantly greater percentage of radiographic defect fill (56.01% ± 2.64%) when compared with group 2 (49.43% ± 3.70%) and group 1 (10.25% ± 3.66%) at 9 months. Furcation defect treatment with autologous PRF combined with 1% ALN gel results in significant therapeutic outcomes when compared with PRF and access therapy alone. Combining ALN with PRF has potential for regeneration of furcation defects without any adverse effect on healing process.

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of tetravalent dengue vaccine in 2-11 year-olds previously vaccinated against yellow fever: randomized, controlled, phase II study in Piura, Peru.

    PubMed

    Lanata, Claudio F; Andrade, Teresa; Gil, Ana I; Terrones, Cynthia; Valladolid, Omar; Zambrano, Betzana; Saville, Melanie; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-07

    In a randomized, placebo-controlled, monocenter, observer blinded study conducted in an area where dengue is endemic, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) in 2-11 year-olds with varying levels of pre-existing yellow-fever immunity due to vaccination 1-7 years previously. 199 children received 3 injections of CYD-TDV (months 0, 6 and 12) and 99 received placebo (months 0 and 6) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (month 12). One month after the third dengue vaccination, serotype specific neutralizing antibody GMTs were in the range of 178-190 (1/dil) (versus 16.7-38.1 in the control group), a 10-20 fold-increase from baseline, and 94% of vaccines were seropositive to all four serotypes (versus 39% in the control group). There were no vaccine-related SAEs. The observed reactogenicity profile was consistent with phase I studies, with severity grade 1-2 injection site pain, headache, malaise and fever most frequently reported and no increase after subsequent vaccinations. Virologically confirmed dengue cases were seen after completion of the 3 doses: 1 in the CYD-TDV group (N=199), and 3 in the control group (N=99). A 3-dose regimen of CYD-TDV had a good safety profile in 2-11 year olds with a history of YF vaccination and elicited robust antibody responses that were balanced against the four serotypes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The implementation of a community-based aerobic walking program for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis: A knowledge translation randomized controlled trial: Part II: Clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disorder in the world, as it is appears to be prevalent among 80% of individuals over the age of 75. Although physical activities such as walking have been scientifically proven to improve physical function and arthritic symptoms, individuals with OA tend to adopt a sedentary lifestyle. There is therefore a need to improve knowledge translation in order to influence individuals to adopt effective self-management interventions, such as an adapted walking program. Methods A single-blind, randomized control trial was conducted. Subjects (n = 222) were randomized to one of three knowledge translation groups: 1) Walking and Behavioural intervention (WB) (18 males, 57 females) which included the supervised community-based aerobic walking program combined with a behavioural intervention and an educational pamphlet on the benefits of walking; 2) Walking intervention (W) (24 males, 57 females) wherein participants only received the supervised community-based aerobic walking program intervention and the educational pamphlet; 3) Self-directed control (C) (32 males, 52 females) wherein participants only received the educational pamphlet. One-way analyses of variance were used to test for differences in quality of life, adherence, confidence, and clinical outcomes among the study groups at each 3 month assessment during the 12-month intervention period and 6-month follow-up period. Results The clinical and quality of life outcomes improved among participants in each of the three comparative groups. However, there were few statistically significant differences observed for quality of life and clinical outcomes at long-term measurements at 12-months end of intervention and at 6- months post intervention (18-month follow-up). Outcome results varied among the three groups. Conclusion The three groups were equivalent when determining the effectiveness of knowledge uptake and improvements in quality of life and other

  12. Guided self-help concreteness training as an intervention for major depression in primary care: a Phase II randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Watkins, E R; Taylor, R S; Byng, R; Baeyens, C; Read, R; Pearson, K; Watson, L

    2012-07-01

    The development of widely accessible, effective psychological interventions for depression is a priority. This randomized trial provides the first controlled data on an innovative cognitive bias modification (CBM) training guided self-help intervention for depression. One hundred and twenty-one consecutively recruited participants meeting criteria for current major depression were randomly allocated to treatment as usual (TAU) or to TAU plus concreteness training (CNT) guided self-help or to TAU plus relaxation training (RT) guided self-help. CNT involved repeated practice at mental exercises designed to switch patients from an unhelpful abstract thinking habit to a helpful concrete thinking habit, thereby targeting depressogenic cognitive processes (rumination, overgeneralization). The addition of CNT to TAU significantly improved depressive symptoms at post-treatment [mean difference on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) 4.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-7.26], 3- and 6-month follow-ups, and for rumination and overgeneralization post-treatment. There was no difference in the reduction of symptoms between CNT and RT (mean difference on the HAMD 1.98, 95% CI -1.14 to 5.11), although CNT significantly reduced rumination and overgeneralization relative to RT post-treatment, suggesting a specific benefit on these cognitive processes. This study provides preliminary evidence that CNT guided self-help may be a useful addition to TAU in treating major depression in primary care, although the effect was not significantly different from an existing active treatment (RT) matched for structural and common factors. Because of its relative brevity and distinct format, it may have value as an additional innovative approach to increase the accessibility of treatment choices for depression.

  13. A Phase II Randomized, Controlled Trial of S-Adenosylmethionine in Reducing Serum α-Fetoprotein in Patients with Hepatitis C Cirrhosis and Elevated AFP.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Timothy R; Osann, Kathryn; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Pimstone, Neville; Hoefs, John C; Hu, Ke-Qin; Hassanein, Tarek; Boyer, Thomas D; Kong, Lorene; Chen, Wen-Pin; Richmond, Ellen; Gonzalez, Rachel; Rodriguez, Luz M; Meyskens, Frank L

    2015-09-01

    In animal models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), deficiency of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) increased the risk of HCC whereas administration of SAMe reduced HCC. The aim of this trial was to determine whether oral SAMe administration to patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis would decrease serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) level, a biomarker of HCC risk in hepatitis C. This was a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of SAMe, up to 2.4 g/d, for 24 weeks as compared with placebo among subjects with hepatitis C cirrhosis and a mildly elevated serum AFP. Primary outcome was change in AFP between baseline and week 24. Secondary outcomes included changes in routine tests of liver function and injury, other biomarkers of HCC risk, SAMe metabolites, markers of oxidative stress, and quality of life. One hundred ten subjects were randomized and 87 (44 SAMe and 43 placebo) completed treatment. There was no difference in the change in AFP during 24 weeks among subjects receiving SAMe as compared with placebo. Changes in markers of liver function, liver injury, and hepatitis C viral level were not significantly different between groups. Similarly, SAMe did not change markers of oxidative stress or serum glutathione level. SAMe blood level increased significantly among subjects receiving SAMe. Changes in quality of life did not differ between groups. Overall, this trial did not find that SAMe treatment improved serum AFP in subjects with advanced hepatitis C cirrhosis and a mildly elevated AFP. SAMe did not improve tests of liver function or injury or markers of oxidative stress or antioxidant potential.

  14. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part II, Cancer Pain Populations.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Courtney; Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-08-01

    Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life in cancer populations. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were subsequently included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy is effective for treating pain compared to no treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD)  = -.20] and active (SMD = -0.55) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also found to be beneficial for treating fatigue (SMD = -1.06) and anxiety (SMD = -1.24). Based on the evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to an active comparator, for the treatment of pain, fatigue, and anxiety. No recommendations were suggested for massage therapy compared to no treatment or sham control based on the available literature to date. This review addresses massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option for cancer pain populations. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  15. The Impact of Massage Therapy on Function in Pain Populations—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials: Part II, Cancer Pain Populations

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cindy; Paat, Charmagne F.; Price, Ashley; Xenakis, Lea; Zhang, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Pain is multi-dimensional and may be better addressed through a holistic, biopsychosocial approach. Massage therapy is commonly practiced among patients seeking pain management; however, its efficacy is unclear. This systematic review and meta-analysis is the first to rigorously assess the quality of massage therapy research and evidence for its efficacy in treating pain, function-related and health-related quality of life in cancer populations. Methods. Key databases were searched from inception through February 2014. Eligible randomized controlled trials were assessed for methodological quality using the SIGN 50 Checklist. Meta-analysis was applied at the outcome level. A diverse steering committee interpreted the results to develop recommendations. Results. Twelve high quality and four low quality studies were subsequently included in the review. Results demonstrate massage therapy is effective for treating pain compared to no treatment [standardized mean difference (SMD)  = −.20] and active (SMD = −0.55) comparators. Compared to active comparators, massage therapy was also found to be beneficial for treating fatigue (SMD = −1.06) and anxiety (SMD = −1.24). Conclusion. Based on the evidence, weak recommendations are suggested for massage therapy, compared to an active comparator, for the treatment of pain, fatigue, and anxiety. No recommendations were suggested for massage therapy compared to no treatment or sham control based on the available literature to date. This review addresses massage therapy safety, research challenges, how to address identified research gaps, and necessary next steps for implementing massage therapy as a viable pain management option for cancer pain populations. PMID:27165967

  16. Phase II Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of Patient-Led Therapies (Mirror Therapy and Lower-Limb Exercises) During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Sarah; Wilkinson, Jack; Thomas, Nessa; Selles, Ruud; McCabe, Candy; Tyrrell, Pippa; Vail, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Patient-led therapy has the potential to increase the amount of therapy patients undertake during stroke rehabilitation and to enhance recovery. Our objective was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of 2 patient-led therapies during the acute stages of stroke care: mirror therapy for the upper limb and lower-limb exercises for the lower limb. This was a blind assessed, multicenter, pragmatic randomized controlled trial of patient-led upper-limb mirror therapy and patient-led lower leg exercises. Stroke survivors with upper and lower limb limitations, undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and able to consent were recruited at least 1 week poststroke. Both interventions proved feasible, with >90% retention. No serious adverse events were reported. Both groups did less therapy than recommended; typically 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days or less. Participants receiving mirror therapy (n = 63) tended to do less practice than those doing lower-limb exercises (n = 31). Those with neglect did 69% less mirror therapy than those without (P = .02), which was not observed in the exercise group. Observed between-group differences were modest but neglect, upper-limb strength, and dexterity showed some improvement in the mirror therapy group. No changes were seen in the lower-limb group. Both patient-led mirror therapy and lower-limb exercises during inpatient stroke care are safe, feasible, and acceptable and warrant further investigation. Practice for 5 to 15 minutes for 7 days is a realistic prescription unless strategies to enhance adherence are included. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Short-term effect of plyometrics and strength training with and without superimposed electrical stimulation on muscle strength and anaerobic performance: A randomized controlled trial. Part II.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Azael J; Martín, Juan; Martín, Teresa; Abadía, Olaia; Fernández, Beatriz; García-López, David

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of combined strength and plyometric training with or without superimposed electromyostimulation (EMS) on muscle strength and anaerobic power. Twenty-nine subjects were randomly assigned to weight+plyometrics+EMS (EP), weight+plyometrics (VP), and control group (CG). Weight+plyometrics+EMS and VP performed 2 plyometric sessions and 2 weight training sessions per week throughout 4 weeks on a knee extension machine. Weight+plyometrics+EMS received EMS throughout the concentric phase of each action (120 Hz, 400 microseconds). Before, after training, and 2 weeks after the end of the training (detraining), maximal voluntary contraction, squat jump, countermovement jump, countermovement jump with free arms, and 20-minute sprint time were analyzed. After the training period, EP and VP increased their muscle strength (28.6 and 22.3%, respectively; p<0.001). After the detraining period, this gain remained above baseline values (28.1 and 18.0%, respectively; p<0.001 and p<0.01). After training and detraining, muscle strength was higher in EP than in VP (p<0.05). Vertical jump height was not modified for whichever group or test, except for the countermovement jump height with free arms, where a decrease for EP was observed after training (-6.3%; p<0.001) and detraining (-5.5%; p<0.001). Sprint performance improved in all groups in the detraining test (-0.8%; p<0.05). If a low number of training sessions are carried out, superimposed EMS leads to a higher strength gain than voluntary training alone. However, if anaerobic power is an important aim of the training, EMS should be applied isometrically instead of superimposed EMS and combined with plyometrics.

  18. No evidence of benefit from class-II compression stockings in the prevention of lower-limb lymphedema after inguinal lymph node dissection: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stuiver, M M; de Rooij, J D; Lucas, C; Nieweg, O E; Horenblas, S; van Geel, A N; van Beurden, M; Aaronson, N K

    2013-09-01

    Graduated compression stockings have been advocated for prevention of lymphedema after inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND) although scientific evidence of their efficacy in preventing lymphedema is lacking. The primary objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of class II compression stockings for the prevention of lymphedema in cancer patients following ILND. Secondary objectives were to investigate the influence of stockings on the occurrence of wound complications and genital edema, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and body image. Eighty patients (45 with melanoma, 35 with urogenital tumors) who underwent ILND at two specialized cancer centers were randomly allocated to class II compression stocking use for six months or to a usual care control group. Lymphedema of the leg and genital area, wound complications, HRQoL, and body image were assessed at regular intervals prior to and up to 12 months after ILND. No significant differences were observed between groups in the incidence of edema, median time to the occurrence of edema, incidence of genital edema, frequency of complications, HRQoL, or body image. Based on the results of the current study, routine prescription of class II graduated compression stockings after ILND should be questioned and alternative prevention strategies should be considered.

  19. Two cilengitide regimens in combination with standard treatment for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and unmethylated MGMT gene promoter: results of the open-label, controlled, randomized phase II CORE study

    PubMed Central

    Nabors, L. Burt; Fink, Karen L.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Grujicic, Danica; Tarnawski, Rafal; Nam, Do Hyun; Mazurkiewicz, Maria; Salacz, Michael; Ashby, Lynn; Zagonel, Vittorina; Depenni, Roberta; Perry, James R.; Hicking, Christine; Picard, Martin; Hegi, Monika E.; Lhermitte, Benoit; Reardon, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Survival outcomes for patients with glioblastoma remain poor, particularly for patients with unmethylated O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter. This phase II, randomized, open-label, multicenter trial investigated the efficacy and safety of 2 dose regimens of the selective integrin inhibitor cilengitide combined with standard chemoradiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and an unmethylated MGMT promoter. Methods Overall, 265 patients were randomized (1:1:1) to standard cilengitide (2000 mg 2×/wk; n = 88), intensive cilengitide (2000 mg 5×/wk during wk 1−6, thereafter 2×/wk; n = 88), or a control arm (chemoradiotherapy alone; n = 89). Cilengitide was administered intravenously in combination with daily temozolomide (TMZ) and concomitant radiotherapy (RT; wk 1−6), followed by TMZ maintenance therapy (TMZ/RT→TMZ). The primary endpoint was overall survival; secondary endpoints included progression-free survival, pharmacokinetics, and safety and tolerability. Results Median overall survival was 16.3 months in the standard cilengitide arm (hazard ratio [HR], 0.686; 95% CI: 0.484, 0.972; P = .032) and 14.5 months in the intensive cilengitide arm (HR, 0.858; 95% CI: 0.612, 1.204; P = .3771) versus 13.4 months in the control arm. Median progression-free survival assessed per independent review committee was 5.6 months (HR, 0.822; 95% CI: 0.595, 1.134) and 5.9 months (HR, 0.794; 95% CI: 0.575, 1.096) in the standard and intensive cilengitide arms, respectively, versus 4.1 months in the control arm. Cilengitide was well tolerated. Conclusions Standard and intensive cilengitide dose regimens were well tolerated in combination with TMZ/RT→TMZ. Inconsistent overall survival and progression-free survival outcomes and a limited sample size did not allow firm conclusions regarding clinical efficacy in this exploratory phase II study. PMID:25762461

  20. Melatonin analgesia is associated with improvement of the descending endogenous pain-modulating system in fibromyalgia: a phase II, randomized, double-dummy, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Central disinhibition is a mechanism involved in the physiopathology of fibromyalgia. Melatonin can improve sleep quality, pain and pain threshold. We hypothesized that treatment with melatonin alone or in combination with amitriptyline would be superior to amitriptyline alone in modifying the endogenous pain-modulating system (PMS) as quantified by conditional pain modulation (CPM), and this change in CPM could be associated with serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We also tested whether melatonin improves the clinical symptoms of pain, pain threshold and sleep quality. Methods Sixty-three females, aged 18 to 65, were randomized to receive bedtime amitriptyline (25 mg) (n = 21), melatonin (10 mg) (n = 21) or melatonin (10 mg) + amitriptyline (25 mg) (n = 21) for a period of six weeks. The descending PMS was assessed with the CPM-TASK. It was assessed the pain score on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS 0-100 mm), the score on Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), heat pain threshold (HPT), sleep quality and BDNF serum. Delta values (post- minus pre-treatment) were used to compare the treatment effect. The outcomes variables were collected before, one and six weeks after initiating treatment. Results Melatonin alone or in combination with amitriptyline reduced significantly pain on the VAS compared with amitriptyline alone (P < 0.01). The delta values on the VAS scores were-12.85 (19.93),-17.37 (18.69) and-20.93 (12.23) in the amitriptyline, melatonin and melatonin+amitriptyline groups, respectively. Melatonin alone and in combination increased the inhibitory PMS as assessed by the Numerical Pain Scale [NPS(0-10)] reduction during the CPM-TASK:-2.4 (2.04) melatonin + amitriptyline,-2.65 (1.68) melatonin, and-1.04 (2.06) amitriptyline, (P < 0.05). Melatonin + amitriptyline treated displayed better results than melatonin and amitriptyline alone in terms of FIQ and PPT improvement (P < 0.05, fort both

  1. Treatment of Plaque-Type Psoriasis With Oral CF101: Data from a Phase II/III Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    David, Michael; Gospodinov, Dimitar Konstantinov; Gheorghe, Nicola; Mateev, Grisha Stefanov; Rusinova, Mariyana Venelinova; Hristakieva, Evgeniya; Solovastru, Laura Gheuca; Patel, Rita V; Giurcaneanu, Calin; Hitova, Mariela Chepileva; Purcaru, Anca Ioana; Horia, Beti; Tsingov, Iliya Iliev; Yankova, Rumyana Kaloferova; Kadurina, Miroslava Ilieva; Ramon, Michael; Rotaru, Maria; Simionescu, Olga; Benea, Vasile; Demerdjieva, Zdravka Velichkova; Cosgarea, Maria Rodica; Morariu, Horia Silviu; Michael, Ziv; Cristodor, Patricia; Nica, Carmen; Silverman, Michael H; Bristol, David R; Harpaz, Zivit; Farbstein, Motti; Cohen, Shira; Fishman, Pnina

    2016-08-01

    CF101, an adenosine A3 receptor agonist, is an orally bioavailable small molecule drug presenting an anti-psoriatic effect demonstrated in a Phase 2 clinical trial in psoriasis patients.
    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CF101 treatment in a Phase 2/3 study in patients with moderate to severe plaque-type psoriasis.
    This multicenter, double-blind, 2-segment, placebo-controlled study randomized subjects with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis to CF101 1 or 2 mg, or placebo twice daily. At either week 12 (Segment 1) or 16 (Segment 2), the placebo group crossed over to CF101 BID through week 32 in an open-label fashion. At week 12, following an interim analysis, the CF101 1mg group was discontinued due to futility. The primary endpoint was proportion of patients achieving ≥75% improvement in Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI 75). Efficacy testing was performed using the Cochran-Mantel Haenszel test, the primary analysis of PASI 75 was performed at the 0.035 significance level.
    CF101 had an excellent safety profile at all tested dosages with a profile similar to the placebo group. The most common adverse events were infections and gastrointestinal events, and there was no cumulative intolerance over the 32-week dosing period. The study did not meet the primary endpoint of PASI 75 at week 12 (2 mg: 8.5% vs. placebo: 6.9%, P=0.621). However, at week 32, PASI mean percent improvement with CF101 2 mg was 57% (P<0.001) compared to baseline, with linear improvement in PASI 50 (63.5%), 75 (35.5%), 90 (24.7%), and 100 (10.6%).
    Oral CF101 was found to be safe and very well tolerated, demonstrating evidence of efficacy in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis through 32 weeks of treatment.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(8):931-938.

  2. Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) protocol: a prospective, randomized controlled phase II/III clinical trial of rivaroxaban versus warfarin in patients with thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome, with or without SLE.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H; Doré, C J; Clawson, S; Hunt, B J; Isenberg, D; Khamashta, M; Muirhead, N

    2015-09-01

    The current mainstay of the treatment of thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is long-term anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include rivaroxaban, have been shown to be effective and safe compared with warfarin for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in major phase III prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but the results may not be directly generalizable to patients with APS. The primary aim is to demonstrate, in patients with APS and previous VTE, with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), that the intensity of anticoagulation achieved with rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin. Secondary aims are to compare rates of recurrent thrombosis, bleeding and the quality of life in patients on rivaroxaban with those on warfarin. Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) is a phase II/III prospective non-inferiority RCT in which eligible patients with APS, with or without SLE, who are on warfarin, target international normalized ratio (INR) 2.5 for previous VTE, will be randomized either to continue warfarin (standard of care) or to switch to rivaroxaban. Intensity of anticoagulation will be assessed using thrombin generation (TG) testing, with the primary outcome the percentage change in endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) from randomization to day 42. Other TG parameters, markers of in vivo coagulation activation, prothrombin fragment 1.2, thrombin antithrombin complex and D-dimer, will also be assessed. If RAPS demonstrates i) that the anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin and ii) the absence of any adverse effects that cause concern with regard to the use of rivaroxaban, this would provide sufficient supporting evidence to make rivaroxaban a standard of care for the treatment of APS patients with previous VTE, requiring a target INR of 2.5. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Scar-improving efficacy of avotermin administered into the wound margins of skin incisions as evaluated by a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bush, James; Duncan, Jonathan A L; Bond, Jeremy S; Durani, Piyush; So, Karen; Mason, Tracey; O'Kane, Sharon; Ferguson, Mark W J

    2010-11-01

    The authors report on a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial to investigate avotermin (transforming growth factor beta-3) for reducing scarring resulting from acute incised skin wounds. Seventy-one healthy male subjects (18 to 45 years) received avotermin at 50 or 200 ng/100 μl/linear centimeter of wound margin. Subjects received three standardized 1-cm incisional wounds on the inner aspect of each upper arm. Wounds were randomized to receive (into each margin): no injection (standard wound care only), one intradermal injection of avotermin or placebo (immediately before surgery), or two injections of avotermin or placebo (immediately before surgery and 24 hours later). The primary efficacy variable was a 10-cm visual analog scale score, which assessed how closely scars resembled normal skin, administered at month 12 by an independent external scar assessment panel (a panel of lay public individuals). Avotermin at 200 ng/100 μl/linear centimeter, administered once or twice, achieved significant improvements in scar appearance compared with controls (p<0.02 for all comparisons). The 50-ng dose, administered twice, achieved significant improvements in scar appearance versus placebo (p=0.043). Treatment was well tolerated. These results confirm that avotermin is the first of a new class of regenerative medicines that reduce scarring when administered once or twice to the approximated margins of acute skin incisions.

  4. Intra-articular injection of two different doses of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells versus hyaluronic acid in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial (phase I/II).

    PubMed

    Lamo-Espinosa, José M; Mora, Gonzalo; Blanco, Juan F; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Nuñez-Córdoba, Jorge M; Sánchez-Echenique, Carmen; Bondía, José M; Aquerreta, Jesús Dámaso; Andreu, Enrique J; Ornilla, Enrique; Villarón, Eva M; Valentí-Azcárate, Andrés; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, María Consuelo; Valentí-Nin, Juan Ramón; Prósper, Felipe

    2016-08-26

    Mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising option to treat knee osteoarthritis. Their safety and usefulness must be confirmed and the optimal dose established. We tested increasing doses of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in combination with hyaluronic acid in a randomized clinical trial. A phase I/II multicenter randomized clinical trial with active control was conducted. Thirty patients diagnosed with knee OA were randomly assigned to intraarticularly administered hyaluronic acid alone (control), or together with 10 × 10(6) or 100 × 10(6) cultured autologous BM-MSCs, and followed up for 12 months. Pain and function were assessed using VAS and WOMAC and by measuring the knee motion range. X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging analyses were performed to analyze joint damage. No adverse effects were reported after BM-MSC administration or during follow-up. BM-MSC-administered patients improved according to VAS during all follow-up evaluations and median value (IQR) for control, low-dose and high-dose groups change from 5 (3, 7), 7 (5, 8) and 6 (4, 8) to 4 (3, 5), 2 (1, 3) and 2 (0,4) respectively at 12 months (low-dose vs control group p = 0.005 and high-dose vs control group p < 0.009). BM-MSC-administered patients were also superior according to WOMAC, although improvement in control and low-dose patients could not be significantly sustained beyond 6 months. On the other hand, the BM-MSC high-dose group exhibited an improvement of 16.5 (12, 19) points at 12 months (p < 0.01). Consistent with WOMAC and VAS values, motion ranges remained unaltered in the control group but improved at 12 months with BM-MSCs. X-ray revealed a reduction of the knee joint space width in the control group that was not seen in BM-MSCs high-dose group. MRI (WORMS protocol) showed that joint damage decreased only in the BM-MSC high-dose group, albeit slightly. The single intraarticular injection of in vitro expanded autologous BM-MSCs together with HA is a

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial on probiotic soy milk and soy milk: effects on epigenetics and oxidative stress in patients with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Mitra; Salehi, Rasoul; Feizi, Awat; Mirlohi, Maryam; Ghiasvand, Reza; Habibi, Nahal

    2015-11-01

    This clinical trial aimed to discover the effects of probiotic soy milk and soy milk on MLH1 and MSH2 promoter methylation, and oxidative stress among type II diabetic patients. Forty patients with type II diabetes mellitus aged 35-68 years were assigned to two groups in this randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial. Patients in the intervention group consumed 200 ml/day of probiotic soy milk containing Lactobacillus plantarum A7, while those in the control group consumed 200 ml/d of conventional soy milk for 8 weeks. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric measurements, and 24-h dietary recalls were collected at the baseline and at the end of the study, respectively. Probiotic soy milk significantly decreased promoter methylation in proximal and distal MLH1 promoter region (P < 0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively) compared with the baseline values, while plasma concentration of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) decreased significantly compared with soy milk (P < 0.05). In addition, a significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was observed in probiotic soy milk group compared with baseline value (P < 0.01). There were no significant changes from baseline in the promoter methylation of MSH2 within either group (P > 0.05). The consumption of probiotic soy milk improved antioxidant status in type II diabetic patients and may decrease promoter methylation among these patients, indicating that probiotic soy milk is a promising agent for diabetes management.

  6. Steady state He II heat transfer through random packed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlaan, M. H.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2013-10-01

    Heat flow through superfluid helium (He II) contained in porous media is examined. In particular, heat transfer experiments were performed on He II contained in a bed of polyethylene spheres of uniform size arranged in random packs. Measured results include the steady state temperature drops across the three random packs of spheres (35, 49, and 98 μm diameter) and the associated steady heat inputs. Bath temperatures range from 1.7 to 2.1 K to help grasp the superfluid effects. Two pure flow regimes (laminar and turbulent) are decipherable from the heat flux dependence of the temperature gradient. Turbulent results are fitted to an empirically derived turbulent He II heat equation for large channels with an added tortuosity (extra length traveled) term that accounts for the porous media. An average tortuosity of 1.33 was obtained, which is comparable with values of 1.36-1.41 concluded from published work on classical fluid pressure drop across random packed spheres. Laminar permeability and shape factor results are compared to past studies of He II in porous media and in channel flows. The onset of turbulence is determined through a critical heat flux from which a critical Reynolds number is formulated but, does not describe He II turbulence in the normal fluid component. The addition of the laminar and turbulent heat flow equations into a unifying prediction fits the transition regime data within 25%.

  7. Phase II, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Neoadjuvant Celecoxib in Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: Evaluation of Drug-Specific Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Walczak, Janet R.; Nelson, William G.; Fedor, Helen; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Piantadosi, Steven; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Gurganus, Robin T.; Baker, Sharyn D.; Parnes, Howard L.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Partin, Alan W.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potential pharmacologic target for the prevention of various malignancies, including prostate cancer. We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial to examine the effect of celecoxib on drug-specific biomarkers from prostate tissue obtained at prostatectomy. Patients and Methods Patients with localized prostate cancer and Gleason sum ≥ 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥ 15 ng/mL, clinical stage T2b or greater, or any combination with greater than 45% risk of capsular penetration were randomly assigned to celecoxib 400 mg by mouth twice daily or placebo for 4 to 6 weeks before prostatectomy. The primary end point was the difference in prostatic prostaglandin levels between the two groups. Secondary end points were differences in COX-1 and -2 expressions; oxidized DNA bases; and markers of proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Tissue celecoxib concentrations also were measured. Tertiary end points were drug safety and compliance. Results Seventy-three patients consented, and 64 were randomly assigned and included in the intention-to-treat analysis. There were no treatment differences in any of the primary or secondary outcomes. Multivariable regression revealed that tumor tissue had significantly lower COX-2 expression than benign prostatic tissue (P = .01) and significantly higher levels of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (P < .0001). Celecoxib was measurable in prostate tissue of patients on treatment, demonstrating that celecoxib reached its target. Celecoxib was safe and resulted in only grade 1 toxicities. Conclusion Treatment with 4 to 6 weeks of celecoxib had no effect on intermediate biomarkers of prostate carcinogenesis, despite the achievement of measurable tissue levels. We caution against using celecoxib 400 mg twice daily as a preventive agent for prostate cancer in additional studies. PMID:19720908

  8. Effect of paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprofen on body temperature in acute ischemic stroke PISA, a phase II double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial [ISRCTN98608690

    PubMed Central

    Dippel, Diederik WJ; van Breda, Eric J; van der Worp, H Bart; van Gemert, H Maarten A; Meijer, Ron J; Kappelle, L Jaap; Koudstaal, Peter J

    2003-01-01

    Background Body temperature is a strong predictor of outcome in acute stroke. In a previous randomized trial we observed that treatment with high-dose acetaminophen (paracetamol) led to a reduction of body temperature in patients with acute ischemic stroke, even when they had no fever. The purpose of the present trial was to study whether this effect of acetaminophen could be reproduced, and whether ibuprofen would have a similar, or even stronger effect. Methods Seventy-five patients with acute ischemic stroke confined to the anterior circulation were randomized to treatment with either 1000 mg acetaminophen, 400 mg ibuprofen, or placebo, given 6 times daily during 5 days. Treatment was started within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms. Body temperatures were measured at 2-hour intervals during the first 24 hours, and at 6-hour intervals thereafter. Results No difference in body temperature at 24 hours was observed between the three treatment groups. However, treatment with high-dose acetaminophen resulted in a 0.3°C larger reduction in body temperature from baseline than placebo treatment (95% CI: 0.0 to 0.6 °C). Acetaminophen had no significant effect on body temperature during the subsequent four days compared to placebo, and ibuprofen had no statistically significant effect on body temperature during the entire study period. Conclusions Treatment with a daily dose of 6000 mg acetaminophen results in a small, but potentially worthwhile decrease in body temperature after acute ischemic stroke, even in normothermic and subfebrile patients. Further large randomized clinical trials are needed to study whether early reduction of body temperature leads to improved outcome. PMID:12657165

  9. Randomized Control Trial of Composite Cuspal Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Fennis, W.M.; Kuijs, R.H.; Roeters, F.J.; Creugers, N.H.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this randomized control trial was to compare the five-year clinical performance of direct and indirect resin composite restorations replacing cusps. In 157 patients, 176 restorations were made to restore maxillary premolars with Class II cavities and one missing cusp. Ninety-two direct and 84 indirect resin composite restorations were placed by two operators, following a strict protocol. Treatment technique and operator were assigned randomly. Follow-up period was at least 4.5 yrs. Survival rates were determined with time to reparable failure and complete failure as endpoints. Kaplan-Meier five-year survival rates were 86.6% (SE 0.27%) for reparable failure and 87.2% (SE 0.27%) for complete failure. Differences between survival rates of direct and indirect restorations [89.9% (SE 0.34%) vs. 83.2% (SE 0.42%) for reparable failure and 91.2% (SE 0.32%) vs. 83.2% (SE 0.42%) for complete failure] were not statistically significant (p = .23 for reparable failure; p = .15 for complete failure). Mode of failure was predominantly adhesive. The results suggest that direct and indirect techniques provide comparable results over the long term (trial registration number: ISRCTN29200848). PMID:24155264

  10. The clinical investigation of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) schrad fruit in treatment of Type II diabetic patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Huseini, H Fallah; Darvishzadeh, F; Heshmat, R; Jafariazar, Z; Raza, Mohsin; Larijani, B

    2009-08-01

    Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad fruit is an herbal medicine used by traditional herbalists for the treatment of diabetes in Iran. To determine its efficacy and toxicity, a 2 month clinical trial was conducted in 50 type II diabetic patients. Two groups of 25 each under standard antidiabetic therapy, received 100 mg C. colocynthis fruit capsules or placebos three times a day, respectively. The patients were visited monthly and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglyceride, aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine levels were determined at the beginning and after 2 months. The results showed a significant decrease in HbA1c and fasting blood glucose levels in C. colocynthis treated patients. Other serological parameters levels in both the groups did not change significantly. No notable gastrointestinal side effect was observed in either group. In conclusion, C. colocynthis fruit treatment had a beneficial effect on improving the glycemic profile without severe adverse effects in type II diabetic patients. Further clinical studies are recommended to evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of C. colocynthis in diabetic patients. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Chemotherapy With or Without Maintenance Sunitinib for Untreated Extensive-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Study—CALGB 30504 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Ready, Neal E.; Pang, Herbert H.; Gu, Lin; Otterson, Gregory A.; Thomas, Sachdev P.; Miller, Antonius A.; Baggstrom, Maria; Masters, Gregory A.; Graziano, Stephen L.; Crawford, Jeffrey; Bogart, Jeffrey; Vokes, Everett E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of maintenance sunitinib after chemotherapy for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients and Methods The Cancer and Leukemia Group B 30504 trial was a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II study that enrolled patients before chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m2 or carboplatin area under the curve of 5 on day 1 plus etoposide 100 mg/m2 per day on days 1 to 3 every 21 days for four to six cycles). Patients without progression were randomly assigned 1:1 to placebo or sunitinib 37.5 mg per day until progression. Cross-over after progression was allowed. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) from random assignment for maintenance placebo versus sunitinib using a one-sided log-rank test with α = .15; 80 randomly assigned patients provided 89% power to detect a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.67. Results One hundred forty-four patients were enrolled; 138 patients received chemotherapy. Ninety-five patients were randomly assigned; 10 patients did not receive maintenance therapy (five on each arm). Eighty-five patients received maintenance therapy (placebo, n = 41; sunitinib, n = 44). Grade 3 adverse events with more than 5% incidence were fatigue (19%), decreased neutrophils (14%), decreased leukocytes (7%), and decreased platelets (7%) for sunitinib and fatigue (10%) for placebo; grade 4 adverse events were GI hemorrhage (n = 1) and pancreatitis, hypocalcemia, and elevated lipase (n = 1; all in same patient) for sunitinib and thrombocytopenia (n = 1) and hypernatremia (n = 1) for placebo. Median PFS on maintenance was 2.1 months for placebo and 3.7 months for sunitinib (HR, 1.62; 70% CI, 1.27 to 2.08; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.60; one-sided P = .02). Median overall survival from random assignment was 6.9 months for placebo and 9.0 months for sunitinib (HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.79 to 2.10; one-sided P = .16). Three sunitinib and no placebo patients achieved complete response during maintenance. Ten (77%) of 13 patients evaluable after cross

  12. Treatment rationale and study design for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study evaluating onartuzumab (MetMAb) in combination with bevacizumab plus mFOLFOX-6 in patients with previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bendell, Johanna C; Ervin, Thomas J; Gallinson, David; Singh, Jaswinder; Wallace, James A; Saleh, Mansoor N; Vallone, Marcy; Phan, See-Chun; Hack, Stephen P

    2013-09-01

    Dysregulation of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MET pathway is associated with poor prognosis, more aggressive biological characteristics of the tumor, and shortened survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Onartuzumab (MetMAb) is a recombinant humanized monovalent monoclonal antibody directed against MET. We present the treatment rationale and protocol for an ongoing randomized multicenter placebo-controlled phase II study designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of MetMAb combined with bevacizumab and mFOLFOX-6 (5-fluoruracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin). Eligible patients with previously untreated mCRC are randomized 1:1 to either mFOLFOX-6 combined with bevacizumab and placebo followed by 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin plus bevacizumab and placebo or mFOLFOX6, bevacizumab plus MetMAb followed by 5 FU/LV, bevacizumab, and MetMAb. The primary end point of this study is progression-free survival (PFS) in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Secondary end points include overall survival (OS), objective response rate, and safety. Subanalyses will be performed to evaluate the effect of MET receptor expression on study primary and secondary end points. Correlative studies will be performed on tissue- and blood-derived biomarkers related to both HGF/MET signaling and other associated pathway markers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Feasibility and Efficacy of the Nintendo Wii Gaming System to Improve Balance Performance Post-Stroke: Protocol of a Phase II Randomized Controlled Trial in an Inpatient Rehabilitation Setting.

    PubMed

    Bower, Kelly J; Clark, Ross A; McGinley, Jennifer L; Martin, Clarissa L; Miller, Kimberly J

    2013-04-01

    Balance deficits following stroke are common and debilitating. Commercially available gaming systems, such as the Nintendo(®) (Kyoto, Japan) Wii™, have been widely adopted clinically; however, there is limited evidence supporting their feasibility and efficacy for improving balance performance following stroke. The aim of this trial is to investigate the clinical feasibility and efficacy of using the Nintendo Wii gaming system as an adjunct to standard care to improve balance performance following stroke in an inpatient rehabilitation setting. Thirty participants undergoing inpatient stroke rehabilitation will be recruited into this Phase II, single-blind, randomized controlled trial. Participants will be allocated into a Balance or Upper Limb Group, and both groups will perform activities using the Nintendo Wii in addition to their standard care. Participants will attend three 45-minute sessions per week, for a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 4 weeks. The main focus of the study is to investigate the feasibility of the intervention protocol. This will be evaluated through recruitment, retention, adherence, acceptability, and safety. The Step Test and Functional Reach Test will be the primary efficacy outcomes. Secondary outcomes will include force platform, mobility, and upper limb measures. Assessments will occur at baseline, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after study entry. To the authors' knowledge, this will be the largest randomized clinical trial to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of the Nintendo Wii gaming system for improving balance performance in a stroke population. The results will inform the design of a Phase III multicenter trial.

  14. A Phase II Randomized, Double‐Blind, Placebo‐Controlled Study of Simtuzumab or Placebo in Combination with Gemcitabine for the First‐Line Treatment of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Zev A.; Hecht, J. Randolph; Vyushkov, Dmitry; Dong, Hua; Bendell, Johanna; Kudrik, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lessons Learned. The safety profile in the gemcitabine/simtuzumab group was similar to that in the gemcitabine/placebo group.The addition of simtuzumab to gemcitabine does not improve clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma Background. The humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody simtuzumab inhibits the extracellular matrix‐remodeling enzyme lysyl oxidase‐like 2 maintaining pathological stroma in tumors. Methods. Adult patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPaCa) were randomly assigned to receive intravenous gemcitabine, 1,000 mg/m2, in combination with 200 or 700 mg simtuzumab or placebo. Primary endpoint was progression‐free survival (PFS), secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and safety. Results. Of 240 patients, 80 were randomly assigned to gemcitabine/simtuzumab 700 mg, 79 to gemcitabine/simtuzumab 200 mg, and 81 to gemcitabine/placebo. After a median follow‐up of 3.0, 1.9, and 3.4 months for gemcitabine/simtuzumab 700 mg, gemcitabine/simtuzumab 200 mg, and gemcitabine/placebo, respectively, the median PFS was 3.7 months (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 95% confidence interval [CI], p value vs placebo: 1.09 [0.74–1.61]; p = .73), 3.5 months (1.13 [0.76–1.66], p = .61]), and 3.7 months, respectively. Median OS was 7.6 months (0.83 [0.57–1.22]; p = .28), 5.9 months (1.07 [0.73–1.55]; p = .69), and 5.7 months, respectively. ORRs were 13.9%, 14.5%, and 23.5%, respectively. Simtuzumab was well tolerated. Conclusion. The addition of simtuzumab to gemcitabine did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with mPaCa. PMID:28246206

  15. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled multicenter trial of adenosine as an adjunct to reperfusion in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMISTAD-II).

    PubMed

    Ross, Allan M; Gibbons, Raymond J; Stone, Gregg W; Kloner, Robert A; Alexander, R Wayne

    2005-06-07

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of intravenous adenosine on clinical outcomes and infarct size in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients undergoing reperfusion therapy. Previous small studies suggest that adenosine may reduce the size of an evolving infarction. Patients (n = 2,118) with evolving anterior STEMI receiving thrombolysis or primary angioplasty were randomized to a 3-h infusion of either adenosine 50 or 70 microg/kg/min or of placebo. The primary end point was new congestive heart failure (CHF) beginning >24 h after randomization, or the first re-hospitalization for CHF, or death from any cause within six months. Infarct size was measured in a subset of 243 patients by technetium-99m sestamibi tomography. There was no difference in the primary end point between placebo (17.9%) and either the pooled adenosine dose groups (16.3%) or, separately, the 50-microg/kg/min dose and 70-microg/kg/min groups (16.5% vs. 16.1%, respectively, p = 0.43). The pooled adenosine group trended toward a smaller median infarct size compared with the placebo group, 17% versus 27% (p = 0.074). A dose-response relationship with final median infarct size was seen: 11% at the high dose (p = 0.023 vs. placebo) and 23% at the low dose (p = NS vs. placebo). Infarct size and occurrence of a primary end point were significantly related (p < 0.001). Clinical outcomes in patients with STEMI undergoing reperfusion therapy were not significantly improved with adenosine, although infarct size was reduced with the 70-microg/kg/min adenosine infusion, a finding that correlated with fewer adverse clinical events. A larger study limited to the 70-microg/kg/min dose is, therefore, warranted.

  16. Efficacy and safety of bilastine in Japanese patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase II/III study.

    PubMed

    Hide, Michihiro; Yagami, Akiko; Togawa, Michinori; Saito, Akihiro; Furue, Masutaka

    2017-04-01

    Bilastine, a novel non-sedating second-generation H1-antihistamine, has been widely used in the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria with a recommended dose of 20 mg once daily in most European countries since 2010. We evaluated its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II/III study (trial registration No. JapicCTI-142574). Patients (age, 18-74 years) were randomly assigned to receive bilastine 20 mg, 10 mg or placebo once daily for 2 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change from baseline (Day -3 to 0) in total symptom score (TSS) at 2 weeks (Day 8-14), consisting of the itch and rash scores. A total of 304 patients were randomly allocated to bilastine 20 mg (101 patients), bilastine 10 mg (100 patients), and placebo (103 patients). The changes in TSS at 2 weeks were significantly decreased by bilastine 20 mg than did placebo (p < 0.001), demonstrating the superiority of bilastine 20 mg. Bilastine 10 mg also showed a significant difference from placebo (p < 0.001). The TSS changes for the bilastine showed significant improvement from Day 1, and were maintained during the treatment period. The Dermatology Life Quality Index scores were also improved in bilastine than in placebo. The bilastine treatments were safe and well tolerated. Two-week treatment with bilastine (20 or 10 mg) once daily was effective and tolerable in Japanese patients with CSU, demonstrating an early onset of action. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Daily electronic monitoring of subjective and objective measures of illness activity in bipolar disorder using smartphones--the MONARCA II trial protocol: a randomized controlled single-blind parallel-group trial.

    PubMed

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Vinberg, Maj; Frost, Mads; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe; Bardram, Jakob; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-11-25

    Patients with bipolar disorder often show decreased adherence with mood stabilizers and frequently interventions on prodromal depressive and manic symptoms are delayed. Recently, the MONARCA I randomized controlled trial investigated the effect of electronic self-monitoring using smartphones on depressive and manic symptoms. The findings suggested that patients using the MONARCA system had more sustained depressive symptoms than patients using a smartphone for normal communicative purposes, but had fewer manic symptoms during the trial. It is likely that the ability of these self-monitored measures to detect prodromal symptoms of depression and mania may be insufficient compared to automatically generated objective data on measures of illness activity such as phone usage, social activity, physical activity, and mobility. The Monsenso system, for smartphones integrating subjective and objective measures of illness activity was developed and will be tested in the present trial. The MONARCA II trial uses a randomized controlled single-blind parallel-group design. Patients with bipolar disorder according to ICD-10 who previously have been treated at the Copenhagen Clinic for Affective Disorder, Denmark are included and randomized to either daily use of the Monsenso system including an feedback loop between patients and clinicians (the intervention group) or to the use of a smartphone for normal communicative purposes (the control group) for a 9-month trial period. The trial was started in September 2014 and recruitment is ongoing. The outcomes are: differences in depressive and manic symptoms; rate of depressive and manic episodes (primary); automatically generated objective data on measures of illness activity; number of days hospitalized; psychosocial functioning (secondary); perceived stress; quality of life; self-rated depressive symptoms; self-rated manic symptoms; recovery; empowerment and adherence to medication (tertiary) between the intervention group and the

  18. Multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II controlled trial of an investigational recombinant Meningococcal serogroup B vaccine with and without outer membrane vesicles, administered in infancy.

    PubMed

    Findlow, Jamie; Borrow, Ray; Snape, Matthew D; Dawson, Tom; Holland, Ann; John, Tessa M; Evans, Anita; Telford, Karen L; Ypma, Ellen; Toneatto, Daniela; Oster, Philipp; Miller, Elizabeth; Pollard, Andrew J

    2010-11-15

    In the absence of an efficacious broadly protective vaccine, serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and septicemia in many industrialized countries. An investigational recombinant vaccine that contains 3 central proteins; Neisserial adhesin A (NadA), factor H binding protein (fHBP) and Neisserial heparin binding antigen (NHBA) has been developed. These antigens have been formulated with and without outer membrane vesicles (rMenB+OMV and rMenB, respectively) from the New Zealand epidemic strain (B:4:P1.7-2,4). In this trial, we assessed the immunogenicity of these formulations in infants, who are at greatest risk of contracting MenB disease. A total of 147 infants from the United Kingdom were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive rMenB or rMenB+OMV at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age or a single dose at 12 months of age. Serum samples taken before and after vaccination were assayed in a standardized serum bactericidal antibody assay against 7 MenB strains. Local and systemic reactogenicity were recorded for 7 days after each vaccination. Analysis was according to protocol. After 3 doses, both vaccines were immunogenic against strains expressing homologous or related NadA and fHBP. rMenB+OMV demonstrated greater immunogenicity than did rMenB and was immunogenic against strains expressing homologous PorA. Both vaccines elicited anamnestic responses after the fourth dose. For both vaccines, responses were lower against strains expressing heterologous fHBP variants and after a single dose at 12 months. The rMenB+OMV vaccine has the potential to protect infants from MenB disease, although the breadth of protection afforded to heterologous antigens requires additional investigation.

  19. A Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Ranging Study of Belimumab in Patients With Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel J.; Stohl, William; Furie, Richard A.; Lisse, Jeffrey R.; McKay, James D.; Merrill, Joan T.; Petri, Michelle A.; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Chatham, W. Winn; McCune, W. Joseph; Fernandez, Vivian; Chevrier, Marc R.; Zhong, John; Freimuth, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety, tolerability, biological activity, and efficacy of belimumab in combination with standard of care therapy (SOC) in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients with SELENA-SLEDAI score≥4 (N=449) were randomly assigned to belimumab (1, 4, 10 mg/kg) or placebo in a 52-week study. Co-primary endpoints were: 1) percentage change in the SELENA-SLEDAI score at week 24; 2) time to the first SLE flare. Results Significant differences between the treatment and placebo groups were not attained for either primary endpoint and no dose response was observed. Reduction in SELENA-SLEDAI score from baseline was 19.5% in the combined belimumab group versus 17.2% in the placebo group. The median time to first SLE flare was 67 days in the combined belimumab group versus 83 days in the placebo group. However, the median time to first SLE flare during weeks 24–52 was significantly longer with belimumab treatment (154 versus 108 days; P=0.0361). In the subgroup (71.5%) of serologically active patients (ANA ≥1:80 and/or anti-dsDNA ≥30 IU/mL), belimumab treatment resulted in significantly better responses at week 52 than placebo for SELENA-SLEDAI (−28.8% versus −14.2%; P=0.0435); PGA (−32.7% versus −10.7%; P=0.0011); and SF-36 PCS (+3.0 versus +1.2 points; P=0.0410). Treatment with belimumab resulted in 63–71% depletion of naive, activated, and plasmacytoid CD20+ B cells and a 29.4% reduction in anti-dsDNA titers (P ≤0.0017) by week 52. The rates of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs were similar in the belimumab and placebo groups. Conclusion Belimumab was biologically active and well tolerated. Belimumab effect on the reduction of SLE disease activity or flares was not significant. However, serologically active SLE patients responded significantly better to belimumab therapy plus SOC than SOC alone. PMID:19714604

  20. A Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Dose-Response Trial of the Melatonin Effect on the Pain Threshold of Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Luciana Cadore; Muller, Suzana; Torres, Iraci L. S.; Razzolini, Bruna; Rozisky, Joanna R.; Fregni, Felipe; Markus, Regina; Caumo, Wolnei

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that melatonin may produce antinociception through peripheral and central mechanisms. Based on the preliminary encouraging results of studies of the effects of melatonin on pain modulation, the important question has been raised of whether there is a dose relationship in humans of melatonin on pain modulation. Objective The objective was to evaluate the analgesic dose response of the effects of melatonin on pressure and heat pain threshold and tolerance and the sedative effects. Methods Sixty-one healthy subjects aged 19 to 47 y were randomized into one of four groups: placebo, 0.05 mg/kg sublingual melatonin, 0.15 mg/kg sublingual melatonin or 0.25 mg/kg sublingual melatonin. We determine the pressure pain threshold (PPT) and the pressure pain tolerance (PPTo). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) was used to measure the heat pain threshold (HPT) and the heat pain tolerance (HPTo). Sedation was assessed with a visual analogue scale and bispectral analysis. Results Serum plasma melatonin levels were directly proportional to the melatonin doses given to each subject. We observed a significant effect associated with dose group. Post hoc analysis indicated significant differences between the placebo vs. the intermediate (0.15 mg/kg) and the highest (0.25 mg/kg) melatonin doses for all pain threshold and sedation level tests. A linear regression model indicated a significant association between the serum melatonin concentrations and changes in pain threshold and pain tolerance (R2 = 0.492 for HPT, R2 = 0.538 for PPT, R2 = 0.558 for HPTo and R2 = 0.584 for PPTo). Conclusions The present data indicate that sublingual melatonin exerts well-defined dose-dependent antinociceptive activity. There is a correlation between the plasma melatonin drug concentration and acute changes in the pain threshold. These results provide additional support for the investigation of melatonin as an analgesic agent. Brazilian Clinical

  1. Randomized, phase II, placebo-controlled trial of onartuzumab and/or bevacizumab in combination with weekly paclitaxel in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Diéras, V; Campone, M; Yardley, D A; Romieu, G; Valero, V; Isakoff, S J; Koeppen, H; Wilson, T R; Xiao, Y; Shames, D S; Mocci, S; Chen, M; Schmid, P

    2015-09-01

    Increased hepatocyte growth factor/MET signaling is associated with an aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We evaluated the benefit of adding onartuzumab, a monoclonal anti-MET antibody, to paclitaxel with/without bevacizumab in patients with TNBC. Women with metastatic TNBC were randomized to receive onartuzumab plus placebo plus weekly paclitaxel (OP; n = 60) or onartuzumab plus bevacizumab plus paclitaxel (OBP; n = 63) or placebo plus bevacizumab plus paclitaxel (BP; n = 62). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS); additional end points included overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and safety. This trial was hypothesis generating and did not have power to detect minimum clinically meaningful differences between treatment arms. There was no improvement in PFS with the addition of onartuzumab to BP [hazard ratio (HR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.70]; the risk of a PFS event was higher with OP than with BP (HR, 1.74; 95% CI 1.13-2.68). Most patients had MET-negative tumors (88%); PAM50 subtype analysis showed basal-like tumors in 68% of samples. ORR was higher in the bevacizumab arms (OBP: 42.2%; 95% CI 28.6-57.1; BP: 54.7%; 95% CI 41.0-68.4) compared with OP (27.5%; 95% CI 15.9-40.6). Median OS was shorter with OBP (HR, 1.36; 95% CI 0.75-2.46) and OP (HR, 1.92; 95% CI 1.03-3.59), than with BP. Peripheral edema was more frequent in the onartuzumab arms (OBP, 51.8%; OP, 58.6%) versus BP (17.7%). This study did not show a clinical benefit of the addition of onartuzumab to paclitaxel with/without bevacizumab in patients with predominantly MET-negative TNBC. NCT01186991. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of an anti- oncostatin M monoclonal antibody in rheumatoid arthritis: results from phase II randomized, placebo-controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Oncostatin M (OSM) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through its effect on inflammation and joint damage. GSK315234 is a humanised anti-OSM Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). This 3-part study examines the safety, tolerability and efficacy of GSK315234 in patients with active RA. Method This was a 3-part (Parts A, B and C), multicenter study. Part A and Part B were randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Bayesian adaptive dose finding studies to investigate the safety, tolerability, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of single (Part A) and 3 repeat (Part B) intravenous infusions of GSK315234 in patients with active RA on a background of methotrexate (MTX). Part C was a single dose, randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess subcutaneously administered GSK315234 to patients with active RA on a background of MTX. Result The primary endpoint of the study was mean change in DAS28 at Day 28 in Part A and Day 56 in Part B and C. All patients receiving at least one dose of GSK315234 were included in safety analysis. In Part A, there were statistically significant differences in DAS28 between 3 mg/kg and placebo at Day 56, 84 and 91. There was also a statistically significant difference in DAS28 between 0.3 mg/kg, 3 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, as compared to placebo, at Day 84. Although these changes were small and occurred late, they supported progression to Part B and C to determine the therapeutic potential of GSK315234. For Part B, no significant difference was observed between 6 mg/kg and placebo. For Part C, a statistically significant difference in DAS28 was observed at Day 40, Day 84 and Day 100 between the 500 mg subcutaneous group, as compared to placebo. No significant findings were observed at any of the time points for EULAR response criteria, ACR20, ACR50 or ACR70. An exploratory analysis of clinical, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics data suggests the lack of

  3. Happy Family Kitchen II: a cluster randomized controlled trial of a community-based positive psychology family intervention for subjective happiness and health-related quality of life in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Ho, Henry C Y; Mui, Moses; Wan, Alice; Ng, Yin-Lam; Stewart, Sunita M; Yew, Carol; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2016-07-29

    Most positive psychology interventions conducted in the West have been focused on the individual. Family relationships are highly valued in the Chinese collectivist culture, and it is of interest to know whether family-focused interventions can improve the well-being of Chinese people. We have previously reported the effectiveness of a positive psychology family intervention in terms of family well-being. Based on the data derived from the Happy Family Kitchen II project, this paper examines the effectiveness of a community-based positive psychology family intervention on subjective happiness and health-related quality of life. Thirty-one social service units and schools organized intervention programs for 2070 participants in Hong Kong. In a cluster randomized controlled trial, participants were randomly assigned on the basis of computer-generated numbers into the intervention group or the control group. The intervention programs emphasized one of five positive psychology themes: joy, gratitude, flow, savoring, and listening. The control group engaged in activities unrelated to the intervention, such as arts and crafts workshops. Subjective happiness and mental and physical quality of life were assessed at baseline and at 4 weeks and 12 weeks postintervention. Data of 1261 participants were analyzed. The results showed that the intervention was more effective than the control condition in improving subjective happiness, with a small effect size, at 12 weeks postintervention (β = .15, p = .020, Cohen's d = .16). However, there were no improvements in mental and physical quality of life in the intervention group compared with the control group at 4 weeks (β = .39, p = .494, d = .05; β = -.10, p = 1.000, d = -.01, respectively) and 12 weeks postintervention (β = .71, p = .233, d = .08; β = -.05, p = 1.000, d = -.01, respectively). Furthermore, the booster session was no more effective than the tea

  4. Diffusion MRI quality control and functional diffusion map results in ACRIN 6677/RTOG 0625: A multicenter, randomized, phase II trial of bevacizumab and chemotherapy in recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    ELLINGSON, BENJAMIN M.; KIM, EUNHEE; WOODWORTH, DAVIS C.; MARQUES, HELGA; BOXERMAN, JERROLD L.; SAFRIEL, YAIR; McKINSTRY, ROBERT C.; BOKSTEIN, FELIX; JAIN, RAJAN; CHI, T. LINDA; SORENSEN, A. GREGORY; GILBERT, MARK R.; BARBORIAK, DANIEL P.

    2015-01-01

    Functional diffusion mapping (fDM) is a cancer imaging technique that quantifies voxelwise changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Previous studies have shown value of fDMs in bevacizumab therapy for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The aim of the present study was to implement explicit criteria for diffusion MRI quality control and independently evaluate fDM performance in a multicenter clinical trial (RTOG 0625/ACRIN 6677). A total of 123 patients were enrolled in the current multicenter trial and signed institutional review board-approved informed consent at their respective institutions. MRI was acquired prior to and 8 weeks following therapy. A 5-point QC scoring system was used to evaluate DWI quality. fDM performance was evaluated according to the correlation of these metrics with PFS and OS at the first follow-up time-point. Results showed ADC variability of 7.3% in NAWM and 10.5% in CSF. A total of 68% of patients had usable DWI data and 47% of patients had high quality DWI data when also excluding patients that progressed before the first follow-up. fDM performance was improved by using only the highest quality DWI. High pre-treatment contrast enhancing tumor volume was associated with shorter PFS and OS. A high volume fraction of increasing ADC after therapy was associated with shorter PFS, while a high volume fraction of decreasing ADC was associated with shorter OS. In summary, DWI in multicenter trials are currently of limited value due to image quality. Improvements in consistency of image quality in multicenter trials are necessary for further advancement of DWI biomarkers. PMID:25672376

  5. Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling (HLXL)-Dan, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, for Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee: A Multi-site, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Phase II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Lixing; Hochberg, Marc; Lee, David Y.W.; Gilpin, Adele M.K.; Fong, Harry H.S.; Langenberg, Patrica; Chen, Kevin; Li, Edmund K.; Tam, Lai Shan; Berman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the efficacy and safety of Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling (HLXL)-Dan, a traditional Chinese medicine, in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design A multi-site, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II dose-escalation clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients who fulfilled American College of Rheumatology criteria were randomized to receive either HLXL or placebo. Clinical assessments included measurement of knee pain and function with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), patient global assessment (PGA), and knee pain scores every 2 weeks. A Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) was established to review the data for ensuring the quality of the trial. Results In the first stage, 28 participants were randomized to receive either low-dose HLXL-Dan (2,400mg/day) or placebo for 6 weeks. The results showed no statistical difference between the two groups. The study was then re-designed following the recommendation of DSMB. Ninety-two patients were enrolled in the second stage and were randomized to receive either high-dose HLXL-Dan (4,000mg/day for week 1–2, and 5,600mg/day for week 3–8) or placebo for 8 weeks. All outcome assessments showed significant improvements for both groups after 8 weeks but no significant between-group differences. The change (mean ± SD) of WOMAC pain and WOMAC function scores of HLXL and placebo group after 8 weeks were −1.2±1.7 VS −1.4±1.5, and −1.1±1.6 VS −1.3±1.5 respectively. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Although safe to use, an 8-week treatment of HLXL-Dan was not superior to placebo for reduction in pain or functional improvement in patients with knee OA. Clinical trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00755326) PMID:26099553

  6. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Linda C.; Gies, Donna; Thompson, Emmanuel; Thomas, Bejoy

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using

  7. Randomized control trial: evaluating aluminum-based antiperspirant use, axilla skin toxicity, and reported quality of life in women receiving external beam radiotherapy for treatment of Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Watson, Linda C; Gies, Donna; Thompson, Emmanuel; Thomas, Bejoy

    2012-05-01

    Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using antiperspirants during their treatment

  8. Incidence of urinary retention during treatment with single tablet combinations of solifenacin+tamsulosin OCAS™ for up to 1 year in adult men with both storage and voiding LUTS: A subanalysis of the NEPTUNE/NEPTUNE II randomized controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Drake, Marcus J; Oelke, Matthias; Snijder, Robert; Klaver, Monique; Traudtner, Klaudia; van Charldorp, Karin; Bongaerts, Dominique; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of urinary retention (UR), specifically acute urinary retention (AUR), has been a concern when treating men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) with antimuscarinic drugs. In NEPTUNE (12-week, double-blind), men (≥45 years) with LUTS were randomized to receive tamsulosin oral-controlled absorption system (TOCAS) 0.4 mg, fixed-dose combination (FDC) of solifenacin (Soli) 6 mg + TOCAS 0.4 mg, FDC Soli 9 mg + TOCAS 0.4 mg, or placebo. In NEPTUNE II (40-week, open-label extension of NEPTUNE), continuing patients received 4-week FDC Soli 6 mg + TOCAS, then FDC Soli 6 mg or 9 mg + TOCAS for the remainder of the study, switchable every 3 months. Across both studies, 1208 men received ≥1 dose of FDC Soli 6 mg or 9 mg + TOCAS for up to 52 weeks; 1199 men completed NEPTUNE and 1066 received ≥1 dose in NEPTUNE II. In total, 13 men (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.8%) reported a UR event while receiving FDC, eight of which were AUR (0.7%; 95% CI, 0.3%-1.3%, incidence 7/1000 man-years). Six men reported UR events while taking Soli 6 mg + TOCAS (three AUR), and seven men reported a UR event while taking Soli 9 mg + TOCAS (five AUR). One man developed AUR while taking TOCAS alone and four reported UR (three AUR) during placebo run-in. Most AUR/UR events occurred within 4 months of treatment initiation. FDC Soli and TOCAS was associated with a low rate of UR and AUR in men with LUTS.

  9. Incidence of urinary retention during treatment with single tablet combinations of solifenacin+tamsulosin OCAS™ for up to 1 year in adult men with both storage and voiding LUTS: A subanalysis of the NEPTUNE/NEPTUNE II randomized controlled studies

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Marcus J.; Oelke, Matthias; Snijder, Robert; Klaver, Monique; Traudtner, Klaudia; van Charldorp, Karin; Bongaerts, Dominique; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The emergence of urinary retention (UR), specifically acute urinary retention (AUR), has been a concern when treating men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) with antimuscarinic drugs. Materials and methods In NEPTUNE (12-week, double-blind), men (≥45 years) with LUTS were randomized to receive tamsulosin oral-controlled absorption system (TOCAS) 0.4 mg, fixed-dose combination (FDC) of solifenacin (Soli) 6 mg + TOCAS 0.4 mg, FDC Soli 9 mg + TOCAS 0.4 mg, or placebo. In NEPTUNE II (40-week, open-label extension of NEPTUNE), continuing patients received 4-week FDC Soli 6 mg + TOCAS, then FDC Soli 6 mg or 9 mg + TOCAS for the remainder of the study, switchable every 3 months. Results Across both studies, 1208 men received ≥1 dose of FDC Soli 6 mg or 9 mg + TOCAS for up to 52 weeks; 1199 men completed NEPTUNE and 1066 received ≥1 dose in NEPTUNE II. In total, 13 men (1.1%; 95% CI, 0.6%–1.8%) reported a UR event while receiving FDC, eight of which were AUR (0.7%; 95% CI, 0.3%–1.3%, incidence 7/1000 man-years). Six men reported UR events while taking Soli 6 mg + TOCAS (three AUR), and seven men reported a UR event while taking Soli 9 mg + TOCAS (five AUR). One man developed AUR while taking TOCAS alone and four reported UR (three AUR) during placebo run-in. Most AUR/UR events occurred within 4 months of treatment initiation. Conclusions FDC Soli and TOCAS was associated with a low rate of UR and AUR in men with LUTS. PMID:28166296

  10. Reparative therapy for acute ischemic stroke with allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue: a safety assessment: a phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center, pilot clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Díez-Tejedor, Exuperio; Gutiérrez-Fernández, María; Martínez-Sánchez, Patricia; Rodríguez-Frutos, Berta; Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Lara, Manuel Lara; Gimeno, Blanca Fuentes

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the possible beneficial effect of the administration of stem cells in the early stages of stroke. Intravenous administration of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue in patients with acute stroke could be a safe therapy for promoting neurovascular unit repair, consequently supporting better functional recovery. We aim to assess the safety and efficacy of MSC administration and evaluate its potential as a treatment for cerebral protection and repair. A Phase IIa, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-center, pilot clinical trial. Twenty patients presenting acute ischemic stroke will be randomized in a 1:1 proportion to treatment with allogeneic MSCs from adipose tissue or to placebo (or vehicle) administered as a single intravenous dose within the first 2 weeks after the onset of stroke symptoms. The patients will be followed up for 2 years. Primary outcomes for safety analysis: adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs; neurologic and systemic complications, and tumor development. Secondary outcomes for efficacy analysis: modified Rankin Scale; NIHSS; infarct size; and biochemical markers of brain repair (vascular endothelial growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and matrix metalloproteinases 9). To our knowledge, this is the first, phase II, pilot clinical trial to investigate the safety and efficacy of intravenous administration of allogeneic MSCs from adipose tissue within the first 2 weeks of stroke. In addition, its results will help us define the best criteria for a future phase III study. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Two-year survival follow-up of the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study of radium-223 chloride in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Sten; Franzén, Lars; Parker, Christopher; Tyrrell, Christopher; Blom, René; Tennvall, Jan; Lennernäs, Bo; Petersson, Ulf; Johannessen, Dag C; Sokal, Michael; Pigott, Katharine; O'Bryan-Tear, Charles Gillies; Thuresson, Marcus; Bolstad, Bjørg; Bruland, Øyvind S

    2013-03-01

    This phase II randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of radium-223 in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and painful bone metastases. Twelve- and 18-month survival results were reported previously. Here we report 24-month overall survival (OS) and safety data from the period 12 to 24 months after the first injection of study medication. Patients with CRPC and bone pain were randomized 1:1 to receive 4 injections of radium-223 (50 kBq/kg [n = 33]) or placebo (n = 31) after external-beam radiotherapy; each injection was given every 4 weeks. Endpoints for this report were 24-month OS, long-term safety, and treatment-related adverse events (AEs) occurring in the 12- to 24-month period. After 24 months, 10 (30%) patients were alive in the radium-223 group compared with 4 patients (13%) in the placebo group. Patients who received at least 1 dose of study medication had a median OS of 65 weeks in the radium-223 group vs. 46 weeks in the placebo group (log-rank P = .056). The hazard ratio (HR) for OS, adjusted for baseline covariates, was 0.476 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.258-0.877; Cox regression P = .017). The most frequent cause of death for both arms was disease progression. There were no reports of treatment-related AEs or long-term hematologic toxicity during the 12- to 24-month follow-up. Radium-223 had a highly favorable safety profile, with no evidence of second malignancies at 24-month follow-up. The significant improvement in OS observed in patients receiving radium-223 vs. placebo suggests that treatment of bone disease with radium-223 has survival benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and safety of rebamipide liquid for chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase II study.

    PubMed

    Yokota, T; Ogawa, T; Takahashi, S; Okami, K; Fujii, T; Tanaka, K; Iwae, S; Ota, I; Ueda, T; Monden, N; Matsuura, K; Kojima, H; Ueda, S; Sasaki, K; Fujimoto, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Beppu, T; Nishimori, H; Hirano, S; Naka, Y; Matsushima, Y; Fujii, M; Tahara, M

    2017-05-05

    Recent preclinical and phase I studies have reported that rebamipide decreased the severity of chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with oral cancer. This placebo-controlled randomized phase II study assessed the clinical benefit of rebamipide in reducing the incidence of severe chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Patients aged 20-75 years with HNC who were scheduled to receive chemoradiotherapy were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive rebamipide 2% liquid, rebamipide 4% liquid, or placebo. The primary endpoint was the incidence of grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis determined by clinical examination and assessed by central review according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 3.0. Secondary endpoints were the time to onset of grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis and the incidence of functional impairment (grade ≥ 3) based on the evaluation by the Oral Mucositis Evaluation Committee. From April 2014 to August 2015, 97 patients with HNC were enrolled, of whom 94 received treatment. The incidence of grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis was 29% and 25% in the rebamipide 2% and 4% groups, respectively, compared with 39% in the placebo group. The proportion of patients who did not develop grade ≥ 3 oral mucositis by day 50 of treatment was 57.9% in the placebo group, whereas the proportion was 68.0% in the rebamipide 2% group and 71.3% in the rebamipide 4% group. The incidences of adverse events potentially related to the study drug were 16%, 26%, and 13% in the placebo, rebamipide 2%, and rebamipide 4% groups, respectively. There was no significant difference in treatment compliance among the groups. The present phase II study suggests that mouth washing with rebamipide may be effective and safe for patients with HNC receiving chemoradiotherapy, and 4% liquid is the optimal dose of rebamipide. ClinicalTrials.gov under the identifier NCT02085460 (the date of trial registration: March

  13. The interplay of epigenetic therapy and immunity in locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer: Correlative analysis of ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Yusuke; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Sunmin; Tomita, Saori; Chumsri, Saranya; Cruickshank, Scott; Ordentlich, Peter; Trepel, Jane B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entinostat, a class I-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, has shown promising activity in ENCORE 301, a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of exemestane with or without entinostat in women with locally recurrent or metastatic estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer progressing on a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor. ENCORE 301 showed an 8.3-mo improvement in median overall survival among patients who received entinostat. We investigated the impact of entinostat on immune subsets with CD40, HLA-DR, and immune checkpoint receptor expression analyses in 34 patient blood samples from ENCORE 301. We found that entinostat significantly decreased granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs at cycle 1 day 15. MDSC CD40 was significantly downregulated by entinostat. A significant increase in HLA-DR expression on CD14+ monocytes by entinostat was observed. Entinostat did not impact T-cell subsets or T-cell immune checkpoint receptor expression. Our findings suggest that a significant interplay between this epigenetic regimen and host immune homeostatic mechanisms may impact therapeutic outcome. PMID:27999738

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Autologous CD34+ Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Transduced with an Anti-Tat Ribozyme in a Multi-Center, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase II Gene Therapy Trial for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Merigan, Thomas C; Carr, Andrew; Zack, Jerome A; Winters, Mark A; Workman, Cassy; Bloch, Mark; Lalezari, Jacob; Becker, Stephen; Thornton, Lorna; Akil, Bisher; Khanlou, Homayoon; Finlayson, Robert; McFarlane, Robert; Smith, Don E; Garsia, Roger; Ma, David; Law, Matthew; Murray, John M.; von Kalle, Christof; Ely, Julie A; Patino, Sharon M; Knop, Alison E; Wong, Philip; Todd, Alison V; Haughton, Margaret; Fuery, Caroline; Macpherson, Janet L; Symonds, Geoff P; Evans, Louise A; Pond, Susan M; Cooper, David A

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene transfer has potential as a once-only treatment that reduces viral load, preserves the immune system, and avoids lifetime highly active antiretroviral therapy. This study, the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II cell-delivered gene transfer clinical trial, was conducted in 74 HIV-1 infected adults who received a tat/vpr specific anti-HIV ribozyme (OZ1) or placebo delivered in autologous CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. There were no OZ1-related adverse events. There was no statistical difference in viral load between the OZ1 and placebo group at the primary end-point (average at weeks 47 and 48) but time weighted areas under the curve from weeks 40-48 and 40-100 were significantly lower in the OZ1 group. Throughout the 100 weeks, CD4+ lymphocyte counts were higher in the OZ1 group. This study provides the first indication that cell-delivered gene transfer is safe and biologically active in HIV patients and can be developed as a conventional therapeutic product. PMID:19219022

  15. He II heat transfer through random packed spheres: Pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlaan, M. H.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2014-09-01

    Heat flow induced pressure drop through superfluid helium (He II) contained in porous media is examined. In this experiment, heat was applied to one side of a He II column containing a random pack of uniform size polyethylene spheres. Measured results include steady state pressure drops across the random packs of spheres (nominally 35 μm, 49 μm, and 98 μm diameter) for different heat inputs. Laminar, turbulent, and transition fluid flow regimes are examined. The laminar permeability and equivalent channel shape factor are compared to our past studies of the temperature drop through He II in the same porous media of packed spheres. Results from the pressure drop experiments are more accurate than temperature drop experiments due to reduced measurement errors achieved with the pressure transducer. Turbulent results are fitted to models with empirically derived friction factors. A turbulent model considering only dynamic pressure losses in the normal fluid yields the most consistent friction factors. The addition of the laminar and turbulent heat flow equations into a unifying prediction fits all regimes to within 10%.

  16. Transient helium II heat transfer through random packed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlaan, Mark H.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study time dependant heat flow through superfluid helium (He II) contained in porous media is examined. Using a porous insulation instead of fully epoxy-impregnated insulation could potentially increase cooling efficiency by allowing an intimate contact of He II with the conductor. The present work focuses on understanding heat transfer in He II contained in a bed of polyethylene spheres of uniform size arranged in a random pack. Measured results include the transient temperature decay across the bed of packed spheres (diameters of 35, 49 and 98 microns) when heat addition is removed on one side of the porous media while the other is held at bath temperature. Bath temperatures range from 1.7 to 2.1 K. Two flow regimes (transitional and turbulent) are decipherable from the dependence of the temperature gradient on the heat flux. Past steady state, turbulent He II heat transfer experiments in the same media have concluded that the Gorter-Mellink exponent varies from 3.3 to 3.4 in this temperature range. Transient results compare favorably to a one-dimensional numerical solution that considers a variable Gorter-Mellink exponent and a piece-wise determination of the heat flux.

  17. Randomized Phase II Trial of Sulindac for Lung Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, Paul J.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L. Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E.; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E.; Edell, Eric S.; Rickman, Otis B.; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F.; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥ 30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). Methods At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150 mg bid or an identical placebo bid for six months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Results Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n = 31 and n = 30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p = 0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p = 0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p = 0.92). Conclusions Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150 mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention

  18. Randomized phase II trial of sulindac for lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Paul J; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Aubry, Marie Christine; Ziegler, Katie L Allen; Zhang, Jun; Yi, Joanne E; Henry, Michael; Tazelaar, Henry D; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Midthun, David E; Edell, Eric S; Rickman, Otis B; Mazzone, Peter; Tockman, Melvyn; Beamis, John F; Lamb, Carla; Simoff, Michael; Loprinzi, Charles; Szabo, Eva; Jett, James

    2013-03-01

    Sulindac represents a promising candidate agent for lung cancer chemoprevention, but clinical trial data have not been previously reported. We conducted a randomized, phase II chemoprevention trial involving current or former cigarette smokers (≥30 pack-years) utilizing the multi-center, inter-disciplinary infrastructure of the Cancer Prevention Network (CPN). At least 1 bronchial dysplastic lesion identified by fluorescence bronchoscopy was required for randomization. Intervention assignments were sulindac 150mg bid or an identical placebo bid for 6 months. Trial endpoints included changes in histologic grade of dysplasia (per-participant as primary endpoint and per lesion as secondary endpoint), number of dysplastic lesions (per-participant), and Ki67 labeling index. Slower than anticipated recruitment led to trial closure after randomizing participants (n=31 and n=30 in the sulindac and placebo arms, respectively). Pre- and post-intervention fluorescence bronchoscopy data were available for 53/61 (87%) randomized, eligible participants. The median (range) of dysplastic lesions at baseline was 2 (1-12) in the sulindac arm and 2 (1-7) in the placebo arm. Change in dysplasia was categorized as regression:stable:progression for 15:3:8 (58%:12%:31%) subjects in the sulindac arm and 15:2:10 (56%:7%:37%) subjects in the placebo arm; these distributions were not statistically different (p=0.85). Median Ki67 expression (% cells stained positive) was significantly reduced in both the placebo (30 versus 5; p=0.0005) and sulindac (30 versus 10; p=0.0003) arms, but the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p=0.92). Data from this multi-center, phase II squamous cell lung cancer chemoprevention trial do not demonstrate sufficient benefits from sulindac 150mg bid for 6 months to warrant additional phase III testing. Investigation of pathway-focused agents is necessary for lung cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  19. He II heat transfer through random packed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlaan, Mark

    Superfluid helium (He II) contained in porous media is examined. In particular, heat transfer experiments were performed on He II contained in random packs of uniform size polyethylene spheres. Measured results include the steady state temperature and pressure drops across packs of spheres (35 micron, 49 micron, and 98 micron diameter) and the associated steady, step, and pulse heat inputs. Bath temperatures range from 1.6 K to 2.1 K to help grasp the superfluid effects. Laminar, turbulent, and transitional fluid flow regimes are examined. Turbulent results are fitted to an empirically derived turbulent He II heat flow in a channel equation with an added tortuosity (extra length traveled) term that accounts for the porous media. An average tortuosity of 1.33 +/- 0.07 was obtained, which is in good agreement with the values of 1.36 - 1.41 concluded from published work on classical fluid pressure drop across random packed spheres. Laminar permeability and shape factor results are compared to past studies of He II in porous media and in channel flows. The average critical heat flux, which describes the onset of turbulence, is predicted to be 0.19 W cm-2. The onset of turbulence is determined through a critical heat flux from which a critical Reynolds number is formulated, but does not describe He II turbulence in the normal fluid component. Other proposed He II "Reynolds numbers" are examined. The addition of the laminar and turbulent heat flow equations into a unifying prediction fits the transition regime data within 25 %. Transient temperatures compare favorably to a one-dimensional numerical solution that considers a variable Gorter-Mellink exponent and a piece-wise determination of the heat flux. Turbulent pressure drop results are fitted with empirically derived friction factors. The laminar permeability and equivalent channel shape factor derived from the pressure drop are compared the permeability and shape factor obtained from the temperature drop. Results

  20. Clobetasol propionate emulsion formulation foam 0.05%: review of phase II open-label and phase III randomized controlled trials in steroid-responsive dermatoses in adults and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Alexa Boer; Gold, Michael H; Zib, Beth; Davis, Mark W

    2008-09-01

    Clobetasol propionate 0.05% emulsion foam was recently developed for use on multiple body sites. We sought to evaluate safety and efficacy of clobetasol emulsion foam 0.05% to treat steroid-responsive dermatoses in multiple age groups. A phase II open-label study evaluated the effect of clobetasol foam on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in 52 participants aged 6 years or older with mild-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD). Cosyntropin stimulation test was used to determine the effect of clobetasol foam on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with a normal response considered to be a postinjection serum cortisol level greater than 18 mug/dL. Another phase II open-label pharmacokinetic safety study was conducted in 32 participants aged 12 years or older with mild-to-moderate plaque-type psoriasis. Pharmacokinetic parameters evaluated included maximal plasma concentration of clobetasol propionate, time to achieve maximum concentration, and area under the curve. Two phase III, randomized controlled studies assessed treatment success in participants aged 12 years or older with moderate-to-severe AD (N = 377) or mild-to-moderate plaque-type psoriasis (N = 497). In all studies, participants received study drug for 2 weeks. In the AD study, treatment success was determined using a composite end point requiring an Investigator's Static Global Assessment (ISGA) score of 0 or 1, erythema score of 0 or 1, induration/papulation score of 0 or 1, and improvement in the ISGA score of at least two grades from baseline. Likewise, the study in plaque-type psoriasis used a composite end point requiring an ISGA score of 0 or 1, erythema score of 0 or 1, scaling score of 0 or 1, plaque thickness score of 0, and improvement in the ISGA score of at least two grades from baseline. Significantly more participants achieved treatment success on clobetasol foam than vehicle foam (P < .0001 and P = .0005 for each study). Reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression was

  1. Combined, concurrent, and sequential administration of seasonal influenza and MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 vaccines: a phase II randomized, controlled trial of immunogenicity and safety in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Pio; Caicedo, Yolanda; Sierra, Alexandra; Tilman, Sandrine; Banzhoff, Angelika; Clemens, Ralf

    2011-06-15

    We performed a phase II randomized, controlled, open-label, single-center study (Centros de Estudios de Infectología Pediátrica, Colombia) to examine the feasibility of combined administration of seasonal and MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 influenza vaccines using extemporaneous mixing or simultaneous administration. The primary objective of the study was to assess the immunogenicity of seasonal influenza and A/H5N1 vaccines using European licensure criteria (Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use [CHMP]); the secondary objective was to assess vaccine reactogenicity and safety. In 401 healthy 18-40-year-old subjects, both vaccines were immunogenic in all settings; the vaccine for seasonal influenza met all CHMP criteria, unaffected by coadministration of A/H5N1 vaccine in separate or mixed injections. Likewise, the immunogenicity of A/H5N1 vaccine was unaffected by seasonal influenza vaccination, with hemagglutination inhibition seroprotection rates of 28%-40% after 1 dose and 67%-80% after 2 doses, sufficient to meet CHMP criteria. Solicited local and systemic adverse events were mainly mild to moderate. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the study period. These data demonstrate that seasonal and MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 influenza vaccines can be given as a mixed injection or by simultaneous separate injections without affecting immunogenicity or safety, supporting the feasibility of incorporating prepandemic MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 vaccines into seasonal influenza vaccination programs and the development of tetravalent influenza vaccines, including pandemic strains. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00481065.

  2. Phase II, randomized, open, controlled study of AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 pre-pandemic influenza vaccine in children aged 3 to 9 years: follow-up of safety and immunogenicity persistence at 24 months post-vaccination.

    PubMed

    Díez-Domingo, Javier; Baldó, José-María; Planelles-Catarino, Maria Victoria; Garcés-Sánchez, María; Ubeda, Isabel; Jubert-Rosich, Angels; Marès, Josep; Garcia-Corbeira, Pilar; Moris, Philippe; Teko, Maurice; Vanden Abeele, Carline; Gillard, Paul

    2015-03-01

    An AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 influenza vaccine elicited broad and persistent immune responses with an acceptable safety profile up to 6 months following the first vaccination in children aged 3-9 years. In this follow-up of the Phase II study, we report immunogenicity persistence and safety at 24 months post-vaccination in children aged 3-9 years. The randomized, open-label study assessed two doses of H5N1 A/Vietnam/1194/2004 influenza vaccine (1·9 μg or 3·75 μg hemagglutinin antigen) formulated with AS03A or AS03B (11·89 mg or 5·93 mg tocopherol, respectively). Control groups received seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine. Safety was assessed prospectively and included potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs). Immunogenicity was assessed by hemagglutination-inhibition assay 12 and 24 months after vaccination; cross-reactivity and cell-mediated responses were also assessed. (NCT00502593). The safety population included 405 children. Over 24 months, five events fulfilled the criteria for pIMDs, of which four occurred in H5N1 vaccine recipients, including uveitis (n = 1) and autoimmune hepatitis (n = 1), which were considered to be vaccine-related. Overall, safety profiles of the vaccines were clinically acceptable. Humoral immune responses at 12 and 24 months were reduced versus those observed after the second dose of vaccine, although still within the range of those observed after the first dose. Persistence of cell-mediated immunity was strong, and CD4(+) T cells with a TH 1 profile were observed. Two doses of an AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 influenza vaccine in children showed low but persistent humoral immune responses and a strong persistence of cell-mediated immunity, with clinically acceptable safety profiles up to 24 months following first vaccination. © 2014 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Optimal Quantum Control Using Randomized Benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method for optimizing quantum control in experimental systems, using a subset of randomized benchmarking measurements to rapidly infer error. This is demonstrated to improve single- and two-qubit gates, minimize gate bleedthrough, where a gate mechanism can cause errors on subsequent gates, and identify control crosstalk in superconducting qubits. This method is able to correct parameters so that control errors no longer dominate and is suitable for automated and closed-loop optimization of experimental systems.

  4. Immunogenicity and Safety of H5N1 A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (Clade 1) AS03-adjuvanted prepandemic candidate influenza vaccines in children aged 3 to 9 years: a phase ii, randomized, open, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Díez-Domingo, Javier; Garcés-Sanchez, Maria; Baldó, José-María; Planelles, María Victoria; Ubeda, Isabel; JuBert, Angels; Marés, Josep; Moris, Philippe; Garcia-Corbeira, Pilar; Dramé, Mamadou; Gillard, Paul

    2010-06-01

    The development of vaccines against pandemic influenza viruses for use in children is a public health priority. In this phase II, randomized, open study, the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of H5N1 A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (NIBRG-14) (clade 1) prepandemic influenza vaccine were assessed in children aged 3 to 5 and 6 to 9 years. Children were randomized to receive 2 doses, given 21 days apart, of A/Vietnam/1194/2004 vaccine containing 1.9 microg or 3.75 microg hemagglutinin antigen (HA), adjuvanted with a tocopherol-based oil-in-water emulsion (AS03) containing 11.86 mg (AS03(A)) or 5.93 mg (AS03(B)) tocopherol. Control groups received 2 doses of trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). Humoral immune responses, reactogenicity, and safety were the primary outcome measures; cross-reactivity and cell-mediated responses were also assessed (NCT00502593). Between 49 and 51 children in each age stratum (aged 3-5 and 6-9 years) received H5N1 vaccine, and between 17 and 18 children in each age stratum received TIV. After the second dose, recipients of H5N1 vaccine (1.9 microg HA/AS03(B), 3.75 microg HA/AS03(B), and 3.75 microg HA/AS03(A)) achieved humoral antibody titers against the vaccine-homologous strain, which fulfilled the United States influenza vaccines licensure criteria for immunogenicity. With the exception of 1 child, there were no H5N1 immune responses in children who received TIV. The most frequent injection-site event was pain in all groups, and the H5N1 vaccine had a clinically acceptable reactogenicity and safety profile. Exploratory analyses in children aged 3 to 5 years indicated that the induction of CD4 T-cell responses polarized in favor of a T-helper 1 profile. The results showed that 2 doses of AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 influenza vaccine at antigen-sparing doses of 1.9 microg or 3.75 microg HA elicited broad and persistent immune responses with acceptable reactogenicity, and without safety concerns, in children aged 3 to 9 years.

  5. Networked Dynamic Systems: Identification, Controllability, and Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi-Abdolyousefi, Marzieh

    The presented dissertation aims to develop a graph-centric framework for the analysis and synthesis of networked dynamic systems (NDS) consisting of multiple dynamic units that interact via an interconnection topology. We examined three categories of network problems, namely, identification, controllability, and randomness. In network identification, as a subclass of inverse problems, we made an explicit relation between the input-output behavior of an NDS and the underlying interacting network. In network controllability, we provided structural and algebraic insights into features of the network that enable external signal(s) to control the state of the nodes in the network for certain classes of interconnections, namely, path, circulant, and Cartesian networks. We also examined the relation between network controllability and the symmetry structure of the graph. Motivated by the analysis results for the controllability and observability of deterministic networks, a natural question is whether randomness in the network layer or in the layer of inputs and outputs generically leads to favorable system theoretic properties. In this direction, we examined system theoretic properties of random networks including controllability, observability, and performance of optimal feedback controllers and estimators. We explored some of the ramifications of such an analysis framework in opinion dynamics over social networks and sensor networks in estimating the real-time position of a Seaglider from experimental data.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral DA-1229 in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have inadequate glycaemic control with diet and exercise.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hee; Park, Cheol-Young; Ahn, Kyu-Joeng; Kim, Nan-Hee; Jang, Hak-Chul; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Park, Joong-Yeol; Chung, Choon-Hee; Min, Kyung-Wan; Sung, Yeon-Ah; Park, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Hyo Jung; Park, Sung-Woo

    2015-03-01

    DA-1229 is a novel, potent and selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-IV) inhibitor that is orally bioavailable. We aimed to evaluate the optimal dose, efficacy and safety of DA-1229, in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus suboptimally controlled with diet and exercise. We enrolled 158 patients (mean age, 53 years and a mean BMI, 25.6 kg/m(2) ). The mean baseline fasting plasma glucose level, HbA1c and duration of diabetes were 8.28 mmol/L, 7.6% (60 mmol/mol) and 3.9 years, respectively. After 2 or 6 weeks of an exercise and diet program followed by 2 weeks of a placebo period, the subjects were randomized into one of four groups for a 12-week active treatment period: placebo, 2.5, 5 or 10 mg of DA-1229. All three doses of DA-1229 significantly reduced HbA1c from baseline compared to the placebo group (-0.09 in the placebo group vs. -0.56, -0.66 and -0.61% in 2.5, 5 and 10-mg groups, respectively) but without any significant differences between the doses. Insulin secretory function, as assessed by homeostasis model assessment β-cell, the insulinogenic index, 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) C-peptide and post-OGTT C-peptide area under the curve (AUC)0-2h, significantly improved with DA-1229 treatment. The incidence of adverse events was similar between the treatment groups and DA-1229 did not affect body weight or induce hypoglycaemic events. DA-1229 monotherapy (5 mg for 12 weeks) improved HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose level, OGTT results and β-cell function. This drug was well tolerated in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A phase II randomized clinical trial on cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy plus a treatment guideline versus treatment as usual for extremely preterm infants during the first three days of life (SafeBoosC): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Every year in Europe about 25,000 infants are born extremely preterm. These infants have a 20% mortality rate, and 25% of survivors have severe long-term cerebral impairment. Preventative measures are key to reduce mortality and morbidity in an extremely preterm population. The primary objective of the SafeBoosC phase II trial is to examine if it is possible to stabilize the cerebral oxygenation of extremely preterm infants during the first 72 hours of life through the application of cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximetry and implementation of an clinical treatment guideline based on intervention thresholds of cerebral regional tissue saturation rStO2. Methods/Design SafeBoosC is a randomized, blinded, multinational, phase II clinical trial. The inclusion criteria are: neonates born more than 12 weeks preterm; decision to conduct full life support; parental informed consent; and possibility to place the cerebral NIRS oximeter within 3 hours after birth. The infants will be randomized into one of two groups. Both groups will have a cerebral oximeter monitoring device placed within three hours of birth. In the experimental group, the cerebral oxygenation reading will supplement the standard treatment using a predefined treatment guideline. In the control group, the cerebral oxygenation reading will not be visible and the infant will be treated according to the local standards. The primary outcome is the multiplication of the duration and magnitude of rStO2 values outside the target ranges of 55% to 85%, that is, the ‘burden of hypoxia and hyperoxia’ expressed in ‘%hours’. To detect a 50% difference between the experimental and control group in %hours, 166 infants in total must be randomized. Secondary outcomes are mortality at term date, cerebral ultrasound score, and interburst intervals on an amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram at 64 hours of life and explorative outcomes include neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years corrected

  8. ASSISTments Dataset from Multiple Randomized Controlled Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selent, Douglas; Patikorn, Thanaporn; Heffernan, Neil

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dataset consisting of data generated from 22 previously and currently running randomized controlled experiments inside the ASSISTments online learning platform. This dataset provides data mining opportunities for researchers to analyze ASSISTments data in a convenient format across multiple experiments at the same time.…

  9. ASSISTments Dataset from Multiple Randomized Controlled Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selent, Douglas; Patikorn, Thanaporn; Heffernan, Neil

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dataset consisting of data generated from 22 previously and currently running randomized controlled experiments inside the ASSISTments online learning platform. This dataset provides data mining opportunities for researchers to analyze ASSISTments data in a convenient format across multiple experiments at the same time.…

  10. Recruiting Participants for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, H. Alix; Roschelle, Jeremy; Feng, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to look across strategies used in a wide range of studies to build a framework for researchers to use in conceptualizing the recruitment process. This paper harvests lessons learned across 19 randomized controlled trials in K-12 school settings conducted by a leading research organization to identify strategies that…

  11. Reporting Randomized Controlled Trials in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean; Montgomery, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are increasingly used to evaluate programs and interventions in order to inform education policy and practice. High quality reports of these RCTs are needed for interested readers to understand the rigor of the study, the interventions tested, and the context in which the evaluation took place (Mayo-Wilson et…

  12. Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Fulranumab as an Adjunctive Therapy in Patients With Inadequately Controlled, Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled, Dose-ranging, Dose-loading Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Sanga, Panna; Polverejan, Elena; Wang, Steven; Kelly, Kathleen M; Thipphawong, John

    2016-06-01

    Fulranumab is an investigational, fully human recombinant monoclonal antibody (IgG2) that neutralizes the biological actions of human nerve growth factor. Low back pain is a common cause of noncancer chronic pain and represents one of the most significant socioeconomic health-related problems in developed countries. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic effect of fulranumab in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. Patients (aged 18-80 years) were randomized to receive subcutaneous injections every 4 weeks in 1 of 5 parallel treatment groups: placebo or fulranumab 1mg (1mgQ4wk), 3mg (3mgQ4wk), 3mg after a 6mg loading dose (6mgLD+3mgQ4wk), or 10mg (10mgQ4wk) every 4 weeks. A total of 385 patients (median age, 53 years; women, 54%) received at least 1 injection of study medication. No statistically significant differences were observed in improvement of pain intensity scores between the fulranumab treatment regimens and the placebo group at week 12 (primary end point; mean [SD], placebo: -2.0 [2.17], 1mgQ4wk: -1.9 [2.14], 3mgQ4wk: -2.2 [1.89], 6mgLD+3mgQ4wk: -2.0 [1.72] and 10mgQ4wk: -2.1 [2.18]). Results for secondary efficacy parameters (change in the Oswestry Disability Index, Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, and Patient Global Assessment scales) were consistent with the primary outcome. A placebo effect was observed; the overall percentage of patients with treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) was similar between the placebo (76%) and fulranumab treatment groups (77%-90%). Across all phases, the most common TEAEs in at least 10% of patients (combined fulranumab group vs placebo) were arthralgia (15% vs 12%), back pain (15% vs 18%), upper respiratory tract infection (15% vs 8%), paresthesia (14% vs 8%), diarrhea (12% vs 4%), headache (12% vs 8%), hypoesthesia (11% vs 5%), pain in extremity (11% vs 8%), sinusitis (10% vs 5%), and nasopharyngitis (10% vs 9%). Across all phases, neurologic

  13. Alternatives to the Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    West, Stephen G.; Duan, Naihua; Pequegnat, Willo; Gaist, Paul; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Holtgrave, David; Szapocznik, José; Fishbein, Martin; Rapkin, Bruce; Clatts, Michael; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2008-01-01

    Public health researchers are addressing new research questions (e.g., effects of environmental tobacco smoke, Hurricane Katrina) for which the randomized controlled trial (RCT) may not be a feasible option. Drawing on the potential outcomes framework (Rubin Causal Model) and Campbellian perspectives, we consider alternative research designs that permit relatively strong causal inferences. In randomized encouragement designs, participants are randomly invited to participate in one of the treatment conditions, but are allowed to decide whether to receive treatment. In quantitative assignment designs, treatment is assigned on the basis of a quantitative measure (e.g., need, merit, risk). In observational studies, treatment assignment is unknown and presumed to be nonrandom. Major threats to the validity of each design and statistical strategies for mitigating those threats are presented. PMID:18556609

  14. Air Pollution Control, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Werner, Ed.

    This book contains five major articles in areas of current importance in air pollution control. They are written by authors who are actively participating in the areas on which they report. It is the aim of each article to completely cover theory, experimentation, and practice in the field discussed. The contents are as follows: Emissions,…

  15. Air Pollution Control, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Werner, Ed.

    This book contains five major articles in areas of current importance in air pollution control. They are written by authors who are actively participating in the areas on which they report. It is the aim of each article to completely cover theory, experimentation, and practice in the field discussed. The contents are as follows: Emissions,…

  16. Short and Long-Term Effects of the Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Irbesartan on Intradialytic Central Hemodynamics: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled One-Year Intervention Trial (the SAFIR Study)

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjaergaard, Krista Dybtved; Jensen, Jens Dam; Christensen, Kent Lodberg; Strandhave, Charlotte; Tietze, Ida Noerager; Novosel, Marija Kristina; Bibby, Bo Martin; Jespersen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Little is known about the tolerability of antihypertensive drugs during hemodialysis treatment. The present study evaluated the use of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) irbesartan. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, one-year intervention trial. Setting and Participants Eighty-two hemodialysis patients with urine output >300 mL/day and dialysis vintage <1 year. Intervention Irbesartan/placebo 300 mg/day for 12 months administered as add-on to antihypertensive treatment using a predialytic systolic blood pressure target of 140 mmHg in all patients. Outcomes and Measurements Cardiac output, stroke volume, central blood volume, total peripheral resistance, mean arterial blood pressure, and frequency of intradialytic hypotension. Results At baseline, the groups were similar regarding age, comorbidity, blood pressure, antihypertensive medication, ultrafiltration volume, and dialysis parameters. Over the one-year period, predialytic systolic blood pressure decreased significantly, but similarly in both groups. Mean start and mean end cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure were stable and similar in the two groups, whereas central blood volume increased slightly but similarly over time. The mean hemodynamic response observed during a dialysis session was a drop in cardiac output, in stroke volume, in mean arterial pressure, and in central blood volume, whereas heart rate increased. Total peripheral resistance did not change significantly. Overall, this pattern remained stable over time in both groups and was uninfluenced by ARB treatment. The total number of intradialytic hypotensive episodes was (placebo/ARB) 50/63 (P = 0.4). Ultrafiltration volume, left ventricular mass index, plasma albumin, and change in intradialytic total peripheral resistance were significantly associated with intradialytic hypotension in a multivariate logistic regression analysis based on

  17. Topaz-II reactor control unit development

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, F.J.; Jensen, D.; Logothetis, J.

    1994-12-31

    The development for a new digital reactor control unit for the Topaz-II reactor is described. The unit is expected to provide the means for automated control during a possible Topaz flight experiment. The breadboard design and development is discussed.

  18. Use of ELVIS II platform for random process modelling and analysis of its probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Nugmanov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of probability density function estimation for a random process is one of the most common in practice. There are several methods to solve this problem. Presented laboratory work uses methods of the mathematical statistics to detect patterns in the realization of random process. On the basis of ergodic theory, we construct algorithm for estimating univariate probability density distribution function for a random process. Correlational analysis of realizations is applied to estimate the necessary size of the sample and the time of observation. Hypothesis testing for two probability distributions (normal and Cauchy) is used on the experimental data, using χ2 criterion. To facilitate understanding and clarity of the problem solved, we use ELVIS II platform and LabVIEW software package that allows us to make the necessary calculations, display results of the experiment and, most importantly, to control the experiment. At the same time students are introduced to a LabVIEW software package and its capabilities.

  19. A pilot randomized controlled trial of deprescribing.

    PubMed

    Beer, Christopher; Loh, Poh-Kooi; Peng, Yan Gee; Potter, Kathleen; Millar, Alasdair

    2011-04-01

    Polypharmacy and adverse drug reactions are frequent and important among older people. Few clinical trials have evaluated systematic withdrawal of medications among older people. This small, open, study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a randomized controlled deprescribing trial. Ten volunteers living in the community (recruited by media advertising) and 25 volunteers living in residential aged-care facilities (RCFs) were randomized to intervention or control groups. The intervention was gradual withdrawal of one target medication. The primary outcome was the number of intervention participants in whom medication withdrawal could be achieved. Other outcomes measures were quality of life, medication adherence, sleep quality, and cognitive impairment. Participants were aged 80 ± 11 years and were taking 9 ± 2 medications. Fifteen participants commenced medication withdrawal and all ceased or reduced the dose of their target medication. Two subjects withdrew; one was referred for clinical review, and one participant declined further dose reductions. A randomized controlled trial of deprescribing was acceptable to participants. Recruitment in RCFs is feasible. Definitive trials of deprescribing are required.

  20. Recent randomized controlled trials in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Banglawala, Sarfaraz M; Lawrence, Lauren A; Franko-Tobin, Emily; Soler, Zachary M; Schlosser, Rodney J; Ioannidis, John

    2015-03-01

    To assess recent trends in the prevalence and quality of reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in 4 otolaryngology journals. Methodology and reporting analysis. Randomized controlled trials in 4 otolaryngology journals. All RCTs published from 2011 to 2013 in 4 major otolaryngology journals were examined for characteristics of study design, quality of design and reporting, and funding. Of 5279 articles published in 4 leading otolaryngology journals from 2011 to 2013, 189 (3.3%) were RCTs. The majority of RCTs were clinical studies (86%), with the largest proportion consisting of sinonasal topics (31%). Most interventions were medical (46%), followed by surgical (38%) and mixed (16%). In terms of quality, randomization method was reported in 54% of RCTs, blinding in 33%, and adverse events in 65%. Intention-to-treat analysis was used in 32%; P values were reported in 87% and confidence intervals in 10%. Research funding was most often absent or not reported (55%), followed by not-for-profit (25%). Based on review of 4 otolaryngology journals, RCTs are still a small proportion of all published studies in the field of otolaryngology. There seem to be trends toward improvement in quality of design and reporting of RCTs, although many quality features remain suboptimal. Practitioners both designing and interpreting RCTs should critically evaluate RCTs for quality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  1. Optimal two-stage log-rank test for randomized phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Minjung; Jung, Sin-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials are conducted to determine whether a new treatment is safe and efficacious compared to a standard therapy. We consider randomized clinical trials with right censored time to event endpoint, called survival time here. The two-sample log-rank test is popularly used to test if the experimental therapy has a longer survival distribution than the control therapy or not. We consider an early stopping for futility only or for both futility and efficacy. For planning such clinical trials, this article presents two-stage designs that are optimal in the sense that either the maximal sample size or the expected sample size when the experimental therapy is futile or superior is minimized under the given type I and II error rates. Optimal designs for a range of design parameters are tabulated and evaluated using simulations.

  2. A Phase II/III randomized controlled trial comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 for lower rectal cancer with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1310 (PRECIOUS study).

    PubMed

    Ohue, Masayuki; Iwasa, Satoru; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shiozawa, Manabu; Ito, Masaaki; Yasui, Masayoshi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    A randomized phase II/III trial was started in May 2015 comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin for lower rectal cancer patients with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis. The standard arm is total mesorectal excision or tumor-specific mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection (LND) followed by postoperative chemotherapy (modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin; 12 cycles). The experimental (perioperative chemotherapy) arm is six courses of modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin before and six courses after total mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection. The aim of this trial is to confirm the superiority of perioperative chemotherapy. A total of 330 patients will be enrolled over 7 years. The primary endpoint in Phase II part is proportion of R0 resection and that in Phase III part is overall survival. Secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, local progression-free survival, etc. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000017603 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm].

  3. A Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Siltuximab (Anti-IL-6 mAb) and Bortezomib versus Bortezomib Alone in Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Robert Z.; Gercheva, Liana; Williams, Cathy; Sutherland, Heather; Robak, Tadeusz; Masszi, Tamás; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Cavenagh, James D.; Špička, Ivan; Maiolino, Angelo; Suvorov, Alexander; Bladé, Joan; Samoylova, Olga; Puchalski, Thomas A.; Reddy, Manjula; Bandekar, Rajesh; van de Velde, Helgi; Xie, Hong; Rossi, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    We compared the safety and efficacy of siltuximab (S), an anti-interleukin-6 chimeric monoclonal antibody, plus bortezomib (B) with placebo (plc)+B in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma in a randomized phase II study. Siltuximab was given by 6 mg/kg IV every 2 weeks. On progression, B was discontinued and high-dose dexamethasone could be added to S/plc. Response and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed pre-dexamethasone by EBMT criteria. For the 281 randomized patients, median PFS for S+B and plc+B was 8.0 and 7.6 months (HR 0.869, p=0.345), overall response rate was 55% vs. 47% (p=0.213), complete response rate was 11% vs. 7%, and median overall survival (OS) was 30.8 vs. 36.8 months (HR 1.353, p=0.103). Sustained suppression of C-reactive protein, a marker reflective of inhibition of interleukin-6 activity, was seen with S+B. Siltuximab did not affect B pharmacokinetics. S/plc discontinuation (75% vs. 66%), grade ≥3 neutropenia (49% vs. 29%), thrombocytopenia (48% vs. 34%), and all-grade infections (62% vs. 49%) occurred more frequently with S+B. The addition of siltuximab to bortezomib did not appear to improve PFS or OS despite a numerical increase in response rate in patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. PMID:25294016

  4. Paclitaxel, bevacizumab, and everolimus/placebo as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer: a randomized placebo-controlled phase II trial of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Denise A; Bosserman, Linda D; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Harwin, William N; Morgan, Susan K; Priego, Victor M; Peacock, Nancy W; Bass, J David; Burris, Howard A; Hainsworth, John D

    2015-11-01

    Amplified PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling is common in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The mTOR inhibitor everolimus improves progression-free survival (PFS) when added to steroidal aromatase inhibitor therapy. This randomized phase II trial compares the efficacy of paclitaxel/bevacizumab/everolimus and paclitaxel/bevacizumab/placebo as first-line treatment for MBC. Patients with untreated HER2-negative MBC were randomized (1:1) to receive 28-day cycles of paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) IV (days 1, 8, and 15) and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg IV (days 1, 15) with either everolimus 10 mg (Arm 1) or placebo (Arm 2) daily. Treatment continued (evaluation every 8 weeks) until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Treatment of 110 patients allowed detection of an improvement in median PFS from 11 to 16 months (70 % power, α = 0.10). Between August 2009 and June 2011, 113 patients (median age 58 years; 88 % ER or PR positive) were randomized (Arm 1, 56; Arm 2, 57). Patients in both arms received a median of six treatment cycles. Median PFS (95 % CI) was 9.1 months (6.8-18.8) for Arm 1, and 7.1 months (5.6-10.8) for Arm 2 (p = 0.89). Comparisons of other efficacy endpoints were also similar in the two treatment arms. Patients receiving everolimus had more anemia, stomatitis, diarrhea, rash, and arthralgia/myalgia, although the overall incidence of severe (grade 3/4) toxicity was similar. The addition of everolimus did not improve the efficacy of weekly paclitaxel/bevacizumab as first-line treatment for patients with HER2-negative MBC. These results contrast with the demonstrated efficacy of adding everolimus to either hormonal or HER2-targeted therapy in previously treated patients.

  5. ADULTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Krupa N.; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B.; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N.; McMahon, James M.; Hall, William J.; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. Methods A total of 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to one of two groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. Results The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Measures of autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Across the groups, improvement in intrinsic regulation and QOL correlated with an improvement in physical function (p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that a physical activity counseling program grounded in SDT can improve physical function, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. PMID:26867045

  6. Enhancing adoptive parenting: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Alan; Monck, Elizabeth; Leese, Morven; McCrone, Paul; Sharac, Jessica

    2010-10-01

    The aim was to conduct a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate two parenting programmes designed for adopters of children late placed from care. Adoptive parents, with children between 3 and 8 years who were screened to have serious behavioural problems early in the placement, participated in home-based, manualized, parenting programmes delivered by trained and supervised family social workers. The adopters who agreed to join the study were randomly allocated to one of two parenting interventions or to a "services as usual" group. Baseline, immediate post-intervention and six-month follow-ups were assessed using questionnaires and adopter interviews. No cases were lost to follow-up at any point and satisfaction was high with both parenting interventions. At the six-month follow-up, a significant difference (p < 0.007) was found for "satisfaction with parenting" in favour of the intervention group (Effect Size d = 0.7). Negative parenting approaches were reduced in the intervention group. However, no significant differences in child problems were found between the intervention groups and control group, adjusting for baseline scores. Costs analysis showed that a relatively modest investment in post-adoption support would be well spent in improving adopters' satisfaction with parenting in the intervention group compared to the routine service group.

  7. Sham Electroacupuncture Methods in Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zi-xian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-guang; Chen, Shuang; Yang, Wen-ting; Zheng, Xia-wei; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2017-01-01

    Sham electroacupuncture (EA) control is commonly used to evaluate the specific effects of EA in randomized-controlled trials (RCTs). However, establishing an inert and concealable sham EA control remains methodologically challenging. Here, we aimed to systematically investigate the sham EA methods. Eight electronic databases were searched from their inception to April 2015. Ten out of the 17 sham EA methods were identified from 94 RCTs involving 6134 participants according to three aspects: needle location, depth of needle insertion and electrical stimulation. The top three most frequently used types were sham EA type A, type L and type O ordinally. Only 24 out of the 94 trials reported credibility tests in six types of sham EA methods and the results were mainly as follows: sham EA type A (10/24), type B (5/24) and type Q (5/24). Compared with sham EA controls, EA therapy in 56.2% trials reported the specific effects, of which the highest positive rate was observed in type N (3/4), type F (5/7), type D (4/6) and type M (2/3). In conclusion, several sham EA types were identified as a promising candidate for further application in RCTs. Nonetheless, more evidence for inert and concealable sham EA control methods is needed. PMID:28106094

  8. Hormone-Balancing Effect of Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Lepidium peruvianum Chacon): (II) Physiological and Symptomatic Responses of Early-Postmenopausal Women to Standardized doses of Maca in Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multi-Centre Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Meissner, H O; Mscisz, A; Reich-Bilinska, H; Kapczynski, W; Mrozikiewicz, P; Bobkiewicz-Kozlowska, T; Kedzia, B; Lowicka, A; Barchia, I

    2006-12-01

    This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-corrected, outpatient, multi-centre (five sites) clinical study, in which a total of 168 Caucasian early-postmenopausal women volunteers (age>49 years) participated after fulfilling the criteria: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) >30 IU/ml and estrogen (E2) <40 pg/ml levels at admission. They were randomly allocated to Placebo and Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Maca-GO) treatment, according to different monthly treatment sequences scheduled for each site. Two 500 mg vegetable hard gel capsules with Maca-GO or Placebo powder were self-administered twice daily with meals (total 2 g/day) during three (Trial I; n=102) or four (Trial II; n=66) months study periods. At the baseline and follow- up monthly intervals, blood levels of FSH, E2, progesterone (PRG) and lutinizing hormone (LH), as well as serum cholesterol (CHOL), triglycerides (TRG), high- and low density lipoproteins (HDL and LDL) were measured. Menopausal symptoms were assessed according to Greene's Score (GMS) and Kupperman's Index (KMI). Data were analyzed using multivariate technique on blocs of monthly results in one model and Maca versus Placebo contrast in another model. A total of 124 women concluded the study. Maca-GO significantly stimulated production of E2 (P<0.001) with a simultaneous suppression (P<0.05) of blood FSH, increase (P<0.05) in HDL. Maca-GO significantly reduced both frequency and severity of individual menopausal symptoms (hot flushes and night sweating in particular) resulting in significant (P<0.001) alleviation of KMI (from 22 to 10), thus, offering an attractive non-hormonal addition to the choices available to early-postmenopausal women in the form of a natural plant alternative to Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) - hence, reducing dependence on hormone therapy programs.

  9. A multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II controlled study of rh-endostatin (Endostar) in combination with chemotherapy in previously untreated extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun; Li, Lu; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Li; Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhiwei; Huang, Cheng; Guo, Shuliang; Zhang, Yiping; Song, Xiangqun; Yu, Yongfeng; Zhou, Caicun; Li, Wei; Liao, Meilin; Li, Baolan; Xu, Liyan; Chen, Ping; Hu, Chunhong; Hu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    Based on promising efficacy in a single-arm study, a randomized phase II trial was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of adding rh-endostatin (Endostar) to first-line standard etoposide and carboplatin (EC) chemotherapy for treatment of extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. One hundred forty Chinese patients with pathologically confirmed, extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer were randomly assigned to EC alone or rh-endostatin + EC for 4-6 cycles, followed by single-agent rh-endostatin until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints included overall survival, Objective response rate (ORR), and quality of life. Median PFS was 6.4 months with rh-endostatin + EC (n = 69) and 5.9 months with EC (n = 69) (hazard ratio 0.8 [95% confidence interval 0.6-1.1]). PFS was significantly higher with rh-endostatin + EC than with EC (hazard ratio 0.4 [0.2-0.9; p = 0.020]) in female. Median overall survival was similar in both groups (12.1 versus 12.4 months, respectively [p = 0.82]). ORR was higher in the rh-endostatin + EC group (75.4%) than in the EC group (66.7%) (p = 0.348). The efficacy of rh-endostatin + EC relative to that of EC was reflected by greater improvements in patient-assessed quality of life scores after 4 and 6 weeks of treatment. There was no difference between each regimen in the incidence of nonhematological or Grade III-IV hematological toxicities. Addition of rh-endostatin to EC for the treatment of extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer had an acceptable toxicity profile, but did not improve overall survival, PFS, and ORR.

  10. A Phase II Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Safety and Efficacy Study of Lenalidomide in Lumbar Radicular Pain with a Long-Term Open-Label Extension Phase.

    PubMed

    Manning, Donald C; Gimbel, Joseph; Wertz, Robert; Rauck, Richard; Cooper, Alyse; Zeldis, Jerome B; Levinsky, Dale M

    2017-03-01

    This phase II study assessed lenalidomide efficacy and safety. Three-phase core study: 14-day prerandomization, 12-week treatment, and 52-week open-label extension. Fourteen US centers from July 2005 to July 2007. Chronic lumbar radicular pain patients without history of nerve injury or deficit. Subjects were randomized (1:1) to double-blind treatment with lenalidomide 10 mg or placebo once daily for 12 weeks, followed by a 52-week open-label extension. A 12-week, single-center, randomized-withdrawal (1:2, lenalidomide:placebo), exploratory study with open-label extension was undertaken in 12 subjects from the core extension who were naïve to neuropathic medications and with at least a two-point decrease from baseline average daily Pain Intensity-Numerical Rating Scale score. Of 180 subjects enrolled, 176 had at least one postbaseline measure; 132 completed the 12-week treatment phase. In the core study, no statistically significant difference in Pain Intensity-Numerical Rating Scale mean change (-0.02, P  =   0.958) was observed at week 12 between lenalidomide and placebo; proportions achieving pain reduction at week 12 and other secondary measures were comparable between lenalidomide and placebo. In the exploratory study, week 12 mean changes in Pain Intensity-Numerical Rating Scale scores were -0.05 (lenalidomide: N = 3) and 2.11 (placebo: N = 8). Mean changes in Brief Pain Inventory-short form interference scores were -3.33 and 8.38, respectively; scores at six months were maintained or decreased in 10 of 12 subjects. While this study does not support lenalidomide use in an unselected lumbar radicular pain population, an immunomodulating agent may relieve pain in select subjects naïve to neuropathic pain medications. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00120120.

  11. Neurosurgical Randomized Controlled Trials-Distance Travelled.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tej D; Veeravagu, Anand; Mittal, Vaishali; Esparza, Rogelio; Johnson, Eli; Ioannidis, John P A; Grant, Gerald A

    2017-06-21

    The evidence base for many neurosurgical procedures has been limited. We performed a comprehensive and systematic analysis of study design, quality of reporting, and trial results of neurosurgical randomized controlled trials (RCTs). To systematically assess the design and quality characteristics of neurosurgical RCTs. From January 1961 to June 2016, RCTs with >5 patients assessing any 1 neurosurgical procedure against another procedure, nonsurgical treatment, or no treatment were retrieved from MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane Library. The median sample size in the 401 eligible RCTs was 73 patients with a mean patient age of 49.6. Only 111 trials (27.1%) described allocation concealment, 140 (34.6%) provided power calculations, and 117 (28.9%) were adequately powered. Significant efficacy or trend for efficacy was claimed in 226 reports (56.4%), no difference between the procedures was found in 166 trials (41.4%), and significant harm was reported in 9 trials (2.2%). Trials with a larger sample size were more likely to report randomization mode, specify allocation concealment, and power calculations (all P < .001). Government funding was associated with better specification of power calculations ( P = .008) and of allocation concealment ( P = .026), while industry funding was associated with reporting significant efficacy ( P = .02). Reporting of funding, specification of randomization mode and primary outcomes, and mention of power calculations improved significantly (all, P < .05) over time. Several aspects of the design and reporting of RCTs on neurosurgical procedures have improved over time. Better powered and accurately reported trials are needed in neurosurgery to deliver evidence-based care and achieve optimal outcomes.

  12. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of periodontal applications of a living tissue-engineered human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute. II. Comparison to the subepithelial connective tissue graft: a randomized controlled feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas G; McGuire, Michael K; Nunn, Martha E

    2005-06-01

    The subepithelial connective tissue graft, traditionally harvested from the patient's palate, is commonly used for root coverage in periodontal recession defects. This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of a living human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute (HF-DDS) compared to a connective tissue graft (CTG) for root coverage in these situations. Thirteen patients were selected for this study. Each patient had Miller Class I or II bilateral facial recession defects > or =3 mm on two non-adjacent teeth. The test tooth received an HF-DDS graft, while a CTG was placed on the control site. The 10 test surgeries were performed by one operator and three pilot surgeries were performed by another surgeon. Eight of the HF-DDS sites received a single thickness of material; five received a double thickness. Clinical measurements were taken at baseline; 1 week; and 1, 3, and 6 months following surgery. Parameters measured were plaque index, recession depth, clinical attachment levels, recession width, probing depth, and width of keratinized tissue. All clinical readings were taken by a masked, calibrated examiner. There were no statistically significant differences between the test and control groups. The amount of root coverage was slightly greater for the control group than for the test group, but statistically the difference was insignificant. The width of the recession defect measured at the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ) for the test group was slightly smaller than that of the control group at the conclusion of the study. The amount of keratinized tissue was the same in both groups at 6 months. The probing depth was slightly greater in the control group as was the gain in clinical attachment, but neither was statistically significant. The amount of root coverage obtained when one layer of HF-DDS was used compared to the amount of coverage obtained when two layers were used approached statistical significance, but the small sample size may have been responsible

  13. Twelve-week, multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative phase II/III study of benzoyl peroxide gel in patients with acne vulgaris: A secondary publication.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi; Furukawa, Fukumi; Matsunaga, Kayoko; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Igarashi, Atsuyuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Nobukazu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Nagare, Toshitaka; Katsuramaki, Tsuneo

    2017-03-11

    A placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, comparative, multicenter study was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) gel, administrated once daily for 12 weeks to Japanese patients with acne vulgaris. Efficacy was evaluated by counting all inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. Safety was evaluated based on adverse events, local skin tolerability scores and laboratory test values. All 609 subjects were randomly assigned to receive the study products (2.5% and 5% BPO and placebo), and 607 subjects were included in the full analysis set, 544 in the per protocol set and 609 in the safety analyses. The median rates of reduction from baseline to the last evaluation of the inflammatory lesion counts, the primary end-point, in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 72.7% and 75.0%, respectively, and were significantly higher than that in the placebo group (41.7%). No deaths or other serious adverse events were observed. The incidences of adverse events in the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups were 56.4% and 58.8%, respectively; a higher incidence than in the placebo group, but there was no obvious difference between the 2.5% and 5% BPO groups. All adverse events were mild or moderate in severity. Most adverse events did not lead to study product discontinuation. The results suggested that both 2.5% and 5% BPO are useful for the treatment of acne vulgaris.

  14. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Phase II Study of Onartuzumab Plus Bevacizumab Versus Placebo Plus Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma: Efficacy, Safety, and Hepatocyte Growth Factor and O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase Biomarker Analyses.

    PubMed

    Cloughesy, Timothy; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Recht, Lawrence; Brandes, Alba A; Pineda, Estela; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chinot, Olivier L; Balana, Carmen; Macdonald, David R; Westphal, Manfred; Hopkins, Kirsten; Weller, Michael; Bais, Carlos; Sandmann, Thomas; Bruey, Jean-Marie; Koeppen, Hartmut; Liu, Bo; Verret, Wendy; Phan, See-Chun; Shames, David S

    2017-01-20

    Purpose Bevacizumab regimens are approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma in many countries. Aberrant mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) expression has been reported in glioblastoma and may contribute to bevacizumab resistance. The phase II study GO27819 investigated the monovalent MET inhibitor onartuzumab plus bevacizumab (Ona + Bev) versus placebo plus bevacizumab (Pla + Bev) in recurrent glioblastoma. Methods At first recurrence after chemoradiation, bevacizumab-naïve patients with glioblastoma were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive Ona (15 mg/kg, once every 3 weeks) + Bev (15 mg/kg, once every 3 weeks) or Pla + Bev until disease progression. The primary end point was progression-free survival by response assessment in neuro-oncology criteria. Secondary end points were overall survival, objective response rate, duration of response, and safety. Exploratory biomarker analyses correlated efficacy with expression levels of MET ligand hepatocyte growth factor, O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation, and glioblastoma subtype. Results Among 129 patients enrolled (Ona + Bev, n = 64; Pla + Bev, n = 65), baseline characteristics were balanced. The median progression-free survival was 3.9 months for Ona + Bev versus 2.9 months for Pla + Bev (hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.72 to 1.56; P = .7444). The median overall survival was 8.8 months for Ona + Bev and 12.6 months for Pla + Bev (hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.88 to 2.37; P = .1389). Grade ≥ 3 adverse events were reported in 38.5% of patients who received Ona + Bev and 35.9% of patients who received Pla + Bev. Exploratory biomarker analyses suggested that patients with high expression of hepatocyte growth factor or unmethylated O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase may benefit from Ona + Bev. Conclusion There was no evidence of further clinical benefit with the addition of onartuzumab to bevacizumab compared with bevacizumab plus placebo in unselected patients with

  15. Smart structures for rotorcraft control (SSRC) II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacot, A. Dean; Dadone, Leo

    1998-06-01

    The Smart Structures for Rotor Control (SSRC) is a consortium under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Smart Structures program. Phase I of the program was administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, with Boeing Seattle as the consortium administrator, and MIT, PSU and Boeing Helicopters as the other principal consortium members. Phase II, renamed Smart Materials and Structures Demonstration Consortium (SMSDC), is a combination of the proposed Phase II efforts of SSRC and the Boeing MESA Smart Materials Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) program. This paper summarizes the SSRC efforts, introduces the SMSDC program, and provides a framework for the relationships between specific SSRC technical papers in this conference. The SSRC objectives were to research smart structure methods to achieve reduced rotorcraft vibration, reduce acoustic noise, and increased performance. The SSRC program includes dynamic piezoelectric actuation of flaps on the rotor blades, distributed dynamic piezo actuation of the rotor twist, and quasi-steady rotor twist control using shape memory alloys. The objective of Phase II is then to fly a rotorcraft to demonstrate such a system.

  16. Safety and acceptability of vaginal disinfection with benzalkonium chloride in HIV infected pregnant women in west Africa: ANRS 049b phase II randomized, double blinded placebo controlled trial. DITRAME Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Msellati, P.; Meda, N.; Leroy, V.; Likikouet, R.; Van de Perre, P.; Cartoux, M.; Bonard, D.; Ouangre, A.; Combe, P.; Gautier-Charpenti..., L.; Sylla-Koko, F.; Lassalle, R.; Dosso, M.; Welffens-Ekra, C.; Dabis, F.; Mandelbrot, L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the tolerance and acceptability in Africa of a perinatal intervention to prevent vertical HIV transmission using benzalkonium chloride disinfection. DESIGN: A randomized, double blinded phase II trial. SETTING: Prenatal care units in Abidjan (Cote d'Ivoire) and Bobo-Dioulasso (Burkina Faso). PATIENTS: Women accepting testing and counselling who were seropositive for HIV-1 and under 37 weeks of pregnancy were eligible. A total of 108 women (54 in each group) enrolled from November 1996 to April 1997, with their informed consent. INTERVENTION: Women self administered daily a vaginal suppository of 1% benzalkonium chloride or matched placebo from 36 weeks of pregnancy, and a single intrapartum dose. The neonate was bathed with 1% benzalkonium chloride solution or placebo within 30 minutes after birth. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse events were recorded weekly, with a questionnaire and speculum examination in women through delivery, and examination of the neonate through day 30. The incidence of genital signs and symptoms in the women and cutaneous or ophthalmological events in newborns were compared between groups on an intent to treat basis. RESULTS: The median duration of prepartum treatment was 21 days (range 0-87 days). Compliance was 87% for prepartum and 69% for intrapartum treatment, and 88% for the neonatal bath, without differences between the two groups. In women, the most frequent event was leucorrhoea; the incidence of adverse events did not differ between treatment groups. In children, the incidence of dermatitis and conjunctivitis did not differ between the benzalkonium chloride and placebo groups (p = 0.16 and p = 0.29, respectively). CONCLUSION: Vaginal disinfection with benzalkonium chloride is a feasible and well tolerated intervention in west Africa. Its efficacy in preventing vertical HIV transmission remains to be demonstrated. 


 PMID:10754950

  17. Oral liarozole in the treatment of patients with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis: results of a randomized, double-blind, multinational, placebo-controlled phase II/III trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahlquist, A; Blockhuys, S; Steijlen, P; van Rossem, K; Didona, B; Blanco, D; Traupe, H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Oral liarozole, a retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agent, may be an alternative to systemic retinoid therapy in patients with lamellar ichthyosis. Objective To demonstrate the efficacy and safety of once-daily oral liarozole in the treatment of moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis. Methods This was a double-blind, multinational, parallel phase II/III trial (NCT00282724). Patients aged ≥ 14 years with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis [Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) score ≥ 3] were randomized 3 : 3 : 1 to receive oral liarozole (75 or 150 mg) or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Assessments included: IGA; a five-point scale for erythema, scaling and pruritus severity; Short Form-36 health survey; Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI); and safety parameters. The primary efficacy variable was response rate at week 12 (responder: ≥ 2-point decrease in IGA from baseline). Results Sixty-four patients were enrolled. At week 12, 11/27 (41%; liarozole 75 mg), 14/28 (50%; liarozole 150 mg) and one out of nine (11%; placebo) patients were responders; the difference between groups (liarozole 150 mg vs. placebo) was not significant (P = 0·056). Mean IGA and scaling scores decreased from baseline in both liarozole groups at weeks 8 and 12 vs. placebo; erythema and pruritus scores were similar between treatment groups. Improvement in DLQI score was observed in both liarozole groups. Treatment with liarozole for 12 weeks was well tolerated. Conclusions The primary efficacy variable did not reach statistical significance, possibly owing to the small sample size following premature termination. However, once-daily oral liarozole, 75 and 150 mg, improved scaling and DLQI and was well tolerated in patients with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis. PMID:24102348

  18. Phase II/III weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine or carboplatin versus gemcitabine/carboplatin as first-line treatment of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (the tnAcity study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Denise A; Brufsky, Adam; Coleman, Robert E; Conte, Pierfranco F; Cortes, Javier; Glück, Stefan; Nabholtz, Jean-Mark A; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce; Beck, Robert M; Ko, Amy; Renschler, Markus F; Barton, Debora; Harbeck, Nadia

    2015-12-16

    Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive disease with unmet clinical needs. In a phase III study of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer, first-line gemcitabine/carboplatin resulted in a median progression-free survival of 4.6 months. nab-paclitaxel-based regimens (with gemcitabine or carboplatin±bevacizumab) also demonstrated efficacy and safety in first-line phase II trials of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative metastatic breast cancer. In this international, multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II/III trial, the efficacy and safety of first-line nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine or with carboplatin will be compared with gemcitabine/carboplatin (control arm) for metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. In the phase II portion, 240 patients with measurable metastatic triple-negative breast cancer and treatment-naive for metastatic disease will be randomized 1:1:1 (stratified by disease-free interval: ≤1 versus>1 year) to nab-paclitaxel 125 mg/m2 plus gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2, nab-paclitaxel 125 mg/m2 plus carboplatin area under the curve 2 mg×min/mL, or gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 plus carboplatin area under the curve 2 mg×min/mL, all given on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle. Investigator-assessed progression-free survival (primary endpoint), overall response rate, overall survival, and safety will be assessed. A ranking algorithm of five efficacy and safety parameters will be used to pick the "winner" of the nab-paclitaxel regimens. In the phase III portion, 550 patients will be randomized 1:1 (stratified by disease-free interval: ≤1 versus >1 year, and prior adjuvant/neoadjuvant taxane use) to the nab-paclitaxel combination arm selected from the phase II portion or to the control arm. Patients in phase II will not be part of the phase III population. The phase III primary endpoint is blinded, independently-assessed progression-free survival; secondary endpoints include blinded, independently-assessed overall response

  19. Laparoscopy Assisted versus Open Distal Gastrectomy with D2 Lymph Node Dissection for Advanced Gastric Cancer: Design and Rationale of a Phase II Randomized Controlled Multicenter Trial (COACT 1001)

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Byung Ho; Reim, Daniel; Eom, Bang Wool; Yu, Wan Sik; Park, Young Kyu; Ryu, Keun Won; Lee, Young Joon; Yoon, Hong Man; Lee, Jun Ho; Jeong, Oh; Jeong, Sang Ho; Lee, Sang Eok; Lee, Sang Ho; Yoon, Ki Young; Seo, Kyung Won; Chung, Ho Young; Kwon, Oh Kyoung; Kim, Tae Bong; Lee, Woon Ki; Park, Seong Heum; Sul, Ji-Young; Yang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Jong Seok

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer has gained acceptance and popularity worldwide. However, laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer is still controversial. Therefore, we propose this prospective randomized controlled multi-center trial in order to evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopy assisted D2-gastrectomy for advanced stage gastric cancer. Materials and Methods Patients undergoing distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer staged cT2/3/4 cN0/1/2/3a cM0 by endoscopy and computed tomography are eligible for enrollment after giving their informed consent. Patients will be randomized either to laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy or open distal gastrectomy. Sample size calculation revealed that 102 patients are to be included per treatment arm. The primary endpoint is the non-compliance rate of D2 dissection; relevant secondary endpoints are three-year disease free survival, surgical and postoperative complications, hospital stay and unanimity rate of D2 dissection evaluated by reviewing the intraoperative video documentation. Discussion Oncologic safety is the major concern regarding laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer. Therefore, the non-compliance rate of clearing the N2 area was chosen as the most important parameter for the technical feasibility of the laparoscopic procedure. Furthermore, surgical quality will be carefully reviewed, that is, three independent experts will review the video records and score with a check list. For a long-term result, disease free survival is considered a secondary endpoint for this trial. This study will offer promising evidence of the feasibility and safety of Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer.Trial Registration: NCT01088204 (international), NCCCTS-09-448 (Korea). PMID:24156036

  20. Randomized controlled trials - a matter of design.

    PubMed

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial.

  1. Pediatric Nephrologists’ Beliefs Regarding Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Aaron G; Oron, Assaf P; Symons, Jordan M; Flynn, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatrics and pediatric nephrology lag behind adult medicine in producing randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Physician attitudes have been shown to play a significant role in RCT enrollment. Methods We surveyed members of the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology regarding beliefs about RCTs and factors influencing decisions to recommend RCT enrollment. Regression analyses were used to identify effects of variables on an aggregate score summarizing attitudes toward RCTs. Results 130 replies were received. 66% had enrolled patients in RCTs. Respondents in practice >15 years were more likely to have recruited a patient to a RCT than those in practice <5 years. Respondents were more willing to recommend RCT enrollment if the study was multicenter, patients were sicker or had a poorer prognosis, or if the parent or participant received a financial incentive versus the provider. In multiple regression analysis, history of enrolling patients in a RCT was the only significant predictor of higher aggregate RCT-friendly attitude. Conclusions Many pediatric nephrologists have never enrolled a patient in a RCT, particularly those in practice <5 years. Respondents who have not enrolled patients in RCTs have a less RCT-friendly attitude. Provision of improved training and resources might increase participation of junior providers in RCTs. PMID:24379023

  2. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jie; Chen, Xinguang; Li, Sijian

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2) in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP). Design Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention. Setting Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China. Participants A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients) or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients). Intervention KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke. Outcome Measures Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome), blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome), and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome) were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention. Results Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p < .05) and stroke (5.11% vs. 9.90%, p<0.05), and moderate reduction in blood pressure (-3.72mmHg in DBP and -2.92 mmHg in DBP) at 6-month post-intervention; and significant increases in physical activity at 3- (d = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.85) and 6-month (d = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.85) post-intervention, respectively. Conclusion The program KM2H2 is efficacious to reduce the

  3. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jie; Chen, Xinguang; Li, Sijian

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2) in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP). Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention. Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China. A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients) or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients). KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke. Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome), blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome), and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome) were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention. Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p < .05) and stroke (5.11% vs. 9.90%, p<0.05), and moderate reduction in blood pressure (-3.72 mmHg in DBP and -2.92 mmHg in DBP) at 6-month post-intervention; and significant increases in physical activity at 3- (d = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.85) and 6-month (d = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.85) post-intervention, respectively. The program KM2H2 is efficacious to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke among senior patients who are on anti

  4. Rosuvastatin 1.2 mg In Situ Gel Combined With 1:1 Mixture of Autologous Platelet-Rich Fibrin and Porous Hydroxyapatite Bone Graft in Surgical Treatment of Mandibular Class II Furcation Defects: A Randomized Clinical Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Karvekar, Shruti; Nagpal, Kanika; Patnaik, Kaushik; Raju, Arjun; Singh, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of regenerative materials have been tried and tested in the treatment of furcation defects. Rosuvastatin (RSV) is a new synthetic, second-generation, sulfur-containing, hydrophilic statin with potent anti-inflammatory and osseodifferentiation mechanisms of action. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a platelet concentrate having sustained release of various growth factors with regenerative potential to treat periodontal defects. Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) bone grafting material has a clinically satisfactory response when used to fill periodontal intrabony defects. This double-masked randomized study is designed to evaluate the potency of a combination of 1.2 mg RSV in situ gel with a 1:1 mixture of autologous PRF and HA bone graft in the surgical treatment of mandibular Class II furcation defects compared with autologous PRF and HA bone graft placed after open-flap debridement (OFD). One hundred five mandibular furcation defects were treated with OFD + placebo gel (group 1), PRF + HA with OFD (group 2), or 1.2 mg RSV gel + PRF + HA with OFD (group 3). Clinical and radiologic parameters (i.e., probing depth [PD], relative vertical and relative horizontal clinical attachment level [rvCAL and rhCAL], intrabony defect depth, and percentage of defect fill) were recorded at baseline and 9 months postoperatively. Mean PD reduction was greater in group 2 (3.68 ± 1.07 mm) and group 3 (4.62 ± 1.03 mm) than group 1 (2.11 ± 1.25 mm), and mean rvCAL and rhCAL gain were greater in group 2 (3.31 ± 0.52 and 2.97 ± 0.56 mm, respectively) and group 3 (4.17 ± 0.70 and 4.05 ± 0.76 mm) compared with group 1 (1.82 ± 0.78 and 1.62 ± 0.64 mm). A significantly greater percentage of mean bone fill was found in group 2 (54.69% ± 1.93%) and group 3 (61.94% ± 3.54%) compared with group 1 (10.09% ± 4.28%). Treatment of furcation defects with 1.2 mg RSV in situ gel combined with autologous PRF and porous HA bone graft results in significant improvements of clinical and

  5. The effect of topical diclofenac 3% and calcitriol 3 μg/g on superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) and nodular basal cell carcinoma (nBCC): A phase II, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brinkhuizen, Tjinta; Frencken, Kiki J A; Nelemans, Patty J; Hoff, Marlou L S; Kelleners-Smeets, Nicole W J; Zur Hausen, Axel; van der Horst, Michiel P J; Rennspiess, Dorit; Winnepenninckx, Véronique J L; van Steensel, Maurice A M; Mosterd, Klara

    2016-07-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin-D derivatives can target signaling pathways activated in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We investigated the efficacy of topically applied diclofenac sodium 3% gel, calcitriol 3 μg/g ointment, and a combination of both in superficial BCC (sBCC) and nodular BCC. Patients with a primary, histologically proven sBCC (n = 64) or nodular BCC (n = 64) were randomized to topical diclofenac, calcitriol, combination of both, or no topical treatment (control group). After self-application twice daily under occlusion (8 weeks), tumors were excised. Primary outcome was posttreatment expression levels of proliferation (Ki-67) and antiapoptosis (B-cell lymphoma [Bcl-2]) immunohistochemical markers. Secondary outcomes were histologic clearance, adverse events, application-site reactions, and patient compliance. sBCC treated with diclofenac showed a significant decrease in Ki-67 (P < .001) and Bcl-2 (P = .001), and after combination therapy for Ki-67 (P = .012). Complete histologic tumor regression was seen in 64.3% (P = .0003) of sBCC (diclofenac) and 43.8% (P = .007) of sBCC (combination therapy) compared with 0.0% of controls. No significant changes were found in nodular BCC. Application-site reactions were mostly mild to moderate. The sample size was small. Our results suggest that topical diclofenac is a promising new treatment for sBCC. Its mode of action differs from available noninvasive therapies, and thus has an additive value. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation the effect of 50 and 100 mg doses of Cuminum cyminum essential oil on glycemic indices, insulin resistance and serum inflammatory factors on patients with diabetes type II: A double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Sahar; Sattari, Roghieh; Ghavamzadeh, Sa'id

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 50 and 100 mg doses of green cumin essential oil on glycemic and inflammatory indices in patients with diabetes type II. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, subjects were divided into three groups after selecting them randomly according to the inclusion criteria: 1 - Cuminum cyminum capsule (100 mg/day,n = 33), 2 - C. cyminum capsule (50 mg/day, n = 33), and 3 - placebo (n = 33). Before and after 8 weeks of intervention, a blood sample was taken. The findings demonstrated that the mean of the FBS, glycosylated hemoglobin (HgA1c) and the serum levels of insulin were significantly decreased and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) was significantly increased in the groups receiving the 100 mg supplement (P < 0.001) and 50 mg supplement, but these indices were increased in the placebo group. The mean serum levels of TNF-α and hsCRP were significantly decreased, and serum levels of adiponectin was significantly increased at the end of the study in the groups receiving 100 mg (P < 0.001) and 50 mg (P = 0.008) supplement as well as in the group who received the placebo. There were no significant change in HOMA-B and QUICKI as insulin resistance parameters. Administering C. cyminum supplement in patients with diabetes type II may decrease the serum levels of insulin, FBS, and glycosylated hemoglobin and also the inflammatory indices of TNF-α and hsCRP and increased the serum levels of adiponectin. In addition it may control the complications of diabetes type II in these patients.

  7. Computer simulation of vortex pinning in type II superconductors. II. Random point pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, E. H.

    1983-10-01

    Pinning of vortices in a type II superconductor by randomly positioned identical point pins is simulated using the two-dimensional method described in a previous paper (Part I). The system is characterized by the vortex and pin numbers ( N v , N p ), the vortex and pin interaction ranges ( R v , R p ), and the amplitude of the pin potential A p . The computation is performed for many cases: dilute or dense, sharp or soft, attractive or repulsive, weak or strong pins, and ideal or amorphous vortex lattice. The total pinning force F as a function of the mean vortex displacement X increases first linearly (over a distance usually much smaller than the vortex spacing and than R p ) and then saturates, fluctuating about its averagebar F. We interpretbar F as the maximum pinning force j c B of a large specimen. For weak pins the prediction of Larkin and Ovchinnikov for two-dimensional collective pinning is confirmed:bar F=const·bar W/ R p c 66, wherebar W is the mean square pinning force and c 66 is the shear modulus of the vortex lattice. If the initial vortex lattice is chosen highly defective (“amorphous”) the constant is 1.3 3 times larger than for the ideal triangular lattice. This finding may explain the often observed “history effect”. The functionbar F( A p ) exhibits a jump, which for dilute, sharp, attractive pins occurs close to the “threshold value” predicted for isolated pins by Labusch. This jump reflects the onset of plastic deformation of the vortex lattice, and in some cases of vortex trapping, but is not a genuine threshold. For strong pinsbar F˜( N p bar W)1/2 approaches the direct summation limit. For both weak and strong pinning j c B is related to the mean square actual (not maximum) force of each pin. This mean square in general is not proportional to A {/p 2} but, due to relaxation of the vortex lattice, may be smaller or larger than its rigid-lattice limit. Therefore, simple power laws j c ˜ n p A {/p 2} or j c ˜ n p A p in

  8. How chaosity and randomness control human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulmetyev, Renat M.; Yulmetyeva, Dinara; Gafarov, Fail M.

    2005-08-01

    We discuss the fundamental role that chaosity and randomness play in the determination of quality and efficiency of medical treatment. The statistical parameter of non-Markovity from non-equilibrium statistical physics of condensed matters is offered as a quantitative information measure of chaosity and randomness. The role of chaosity and randomness is determined by the phenomenological property, which includes quantitative informational measures of chaosity and randomness and pathology (disease) in a covariant form. Manifestations of the statistical informational behavior of chaosity and randomness are examined while analyzing the chaotic dynamics of RR intervals from human ECG's, the electric signals of a human muscle's tremor of legs in a normal state and at Parkinson disease, the electric potentials of the human brain core from EEG's during epileptic seizure and a human hand finger tremor in Parkinson's disease. The existence of the above stated informational measure allows to introduce the quantitative factor of the quality of treatment. The above-stated examples confirm the existence of new phenomenological property, which is important not only for the decision of medical problems, but also for the analysis of the wide range of problems of physics of complex systems of life and lifeless nature.

  9. Understanding and control of random lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burin, Alexander L.; Cao, Hui; Ratner, Mark A.

    2003-10-01

    Random lasing attracts much attention because it helps to understand coherent phenomena in disordered media and can be used in optoelectronics due to easy preparation (no need in mirrors) and small size of random lasers down to few microns. Recently the remarkable progress in studying the material, geometry and external pumping dependences of laser properties and efficiency has been reached. Lasing emerges from the special random cavities of high quality formed within the active medium. They can be described as the decaying eigenoptical modes within the medium and the optical mode having the minimum decay rate is responsible for lasing. Numerical and analytical studies of the properties of these modes permit to interpret existing experiments and suggest the ways to optimize the performance of lasers.

  10. A primer on randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Likosky, Donald S

    2006-03-01

    Randomized Clinical Trials are held as the gold standard for quantifying the effect of an intervention across two or more groups. In such a trial an intervention is randomly allocated to one of two groups. The benefit of such a trial lies in its ability to establish nearly comparable groups of subjects in all manner except for the effect of the intervention. As such, the effect of a given intervention may be attributed solely to the intervention and not to any other extraneous factor. In the following editorial, we will discuss several issues that are important for understanding how to conduct and interpret randomized trials: choosing the study population, choosing the comparison group, choosing your outcome, study design, data analysis, and issues of inference. This editorial is intended to make the reader an educated consumer of such trial designs.

  11. Brodalumab, a human anti-interleukin-17-receptor antibody in the treatment of Japanese patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis: Efficacy and safety results from a phase II randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hidemi; Niiro, Hiroaki; Ootaki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Brodalumab (KHK4827 or AMG 827) is a human monoclonal antibody that binds to the human interleukin (IL)-17 receptor A and blocks the biological activities of IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-17A/F, and IL-17E also known as IL-25. A 12-week phase 2 trial in the USA, Europe, and other countries showed the good efficacy of brodalumab in treating patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. However, with the exception of a phase 1 study, a clinical trial of brodalumab in psoriasis has not been undertaken in Japan. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of brodalumab in Japanese patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, including psoriatic arthritis, in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative phase 2 study, and to assess the pharmacokinetics of brodalumab. Japanese patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis, including psoriatic arthritis, were randomized to receive 70mg, 140mg, or 210mg of brodalumab, or placebo, injected subcutaneously at baseline and weeks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percentage improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) score from baseline to week 12. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the percentage of patients with ≥75% reduction of PASI scores (PASI 75), ≥90% (PASI 90), and 100% (PASI 100) and the percentage of patients with a static physician's global assessment (sPGA) of 0 (clear) or 1 (almost clear) at week 12. Safety was evaluated by assessing the adverse events (AE) and the patients' hematologic and laboratory values. At week 12, the mean percentage improvements in the PASI scores were 37.7%, 82.2%, 96.8%, and 9.4% in the 70mg, 140mg, 210mg, and placebo groups, respectively, (p<0.001 for all comparisons with placebo). The percentage of patients with PASI 75, PASI 90, and PASI 100 at week 12 were 7.9%, 2.6%, and 0%, respectively, in the placebo group, 25.6%, 15.4%, and 2.6%, respectively, in the 70mg brodalumab group, 78.4%, 64.9%, and

  12. Efficacy and safety of a phospholipid emulsion (GR270773) in Gram-negative severe sepsis: results of a phase II multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-finding clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, R Phillip; Tomayko, John F; Angus, Derek C; Opal, Steven; Cupo, Michael A; McDermott, Sharon; Ducher, Annie; Calandra, Thierry; Cohen, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    To assess the survival benefit and safety profile of low-dose (850 mg/kg) and high-dose (1350 mg/kg) phospholipid emulsion vs. placebo administered as a continuous 3-day infusion in patients with confirmed or suspected Gram-negative severe sepsis. Preclinical and ex vivo studies show that lipoproteins bind and neutralize endotoxin, and experimental animal studies demonstrate protection from septic death when lipoproteins are administered. Endotoxin neutralization correlates with the amount of phospholipid in the lipoprotein particles. A three-arm, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Conducted at 235 centers worldwide between September 2004 and April 2006. A total of 1379 patients participated in the study, 598 patients received low-dose phospholipid emulsion, and 599 patients received placebo. The high-dose phospholipid emulsion arm was stopped, on the recommendation of the Independent Data Monitoring Committee, due to an increase in life-threatening serious adverse events at the fourth interim analysis and included 182 patients. A 28-day all-cause mortality and new-onset organ failure. There was no significant treatment benefit for low- or high-dose phospholipid emulsion vs. placebo for 28-day all-cause mortality, with rates of 25.8% (p = .329), 31.3% (p = .879), and 26.9%, respectively. The rate of new-onset organ failure was not statistically different among groups at 26.3%, 31.3%, 20.4% with low- and high-dose phospholipid emulsion, and placebo, respectively (one-sided p = .992, low vs. placebo; p = .999, high vs. placebo). Of the subjects treated, 45% had microbiologically confirmed Gram-negative infections. Maximal changes in mean hemoglobin levels were reached on day 10 (-1.04 g/dL) and day 5 (-1.36 g/dL) with low- and high-dose phospholipid emulsion, respectively, and on day 14 (-0.82 g/dL) with placebo. Treatment with phospholipid emulsion did not reduce 28-day all-cause mortality, or reduce the onset of new organ failure in patients with

  13. Multiple Shaker Random Vibration Control--An Update

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, D.O.

    1999-02-18

    The theory of the control of multiple shakers driving a single test item is reviewed. Several improvements that have been introduced since the original papers on the subject will be discussed. The improvements include: (1) specification of the control spectra; (2) the control of non-square systems (the number of shakers does not have to be equal to the number of control points); (3) the connection between sine testing, waveform control, and random control; (4) improvements in feedback control; (5) overlap-add versus time domain randomization; and (6) reproduction of non-Gaussian waveforms.

  14. Impact of breast pumping on lactogenesis stage II after cesarean delivery: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chapman, D J; Young, S; Ferris, A M; Pérez-Escamilla, R

    2001-06-01

    Women at risk for delayed onset of lactation are often advised to pump their breasts before lactogenesis stage II to hasten the timing of this process. The effectiveness of this clinical practice has not been previously evaluated. This study investigates the effects of breast pumping before the onset of lactation on early milk transfer and subsequent breastfeeding duration among women giving birth by cesarean delivery. Sixty women were randomly assigned to either the pumping group (n = 30), which used a double electric breast pump for six 10- to 15-minute sessions from 24 to 72 hours postpartum, or to the control group (n = 30), which held the pump to their breasts without suction for the same amount of time. Milk transfer was assessed by test weighing infants before and after 3 breastfeeding sessions daily. Test weight data were fitted to a second-order polynomial curve, to predict milk transfer over time. Breast pumping between 24 and 72 hours after cesarean delivery did not improve milk transfer. Participants in the pumping group tended to have lower milk transfer than did controls. Primiparae in the pumping group breastfed for ~5 months less than their counterparts in the control group; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Breast pumping did not improve milk transfer during the first 72 hours postpartum and may negatively affect breastfeeding duration among primiparous women. lactation, lactogenesis, breast milk, breast pumping, milk expression, breastfeeding, cesarean delivery.

  15. Health-related quality of life in a multicenter randomized controlled comparison of telephonic disease management and automated home monitoring in patients recently hospitalized with heart failure: SPAN-CHF II trial.

    PubMed

    Konstam, Varda; Gregory, Douglas; Chen, Jie; Weintraub, Andrew; Patel, Ayan; Levine, Daniel; Venesy, David; Perry, Kathleen; Delano, Christine; Konstam, Marvin A

    2011-02-01

    Although disease management programs have been shown to provide a number of clinical benefits to patients with heart failure (HF), the incremental impact of an automated home monitoring (AHM) system on health-related quality of life (HRQL) is unknown. We performed a prospective randomized investigation, examining the additive value of AHM to a previously described nurse-directed HF disease management program (SPAN-CHF), with attention to HRQL, in patients with a recent history of decompensated HF. A total of 188 patients were randomized to receive the SPAN-CHF intervention for 90 days, either with (AHM group) or without (NAHM, standard-care group) AHM, with a 1:1 randomization ratio after HF-related hospitalization. HRQL, measured by the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) (Physical, Emotional, and Total scores on MLHFQ) was assessed at 3 time points: baseline, 45 days, and 90 days. Although both treatments (AHM and NAHM) improved HRQL at 45 and 90 days compared with baseline with respect to Physical, Emotional, and Total domain scales, no significant difference emerged between AHM and NAHM groups. AHM and NAHM treatments demonstrated improved HRQL scores at 45 and 90 days after baseline assessment. When comparing 2 state-of the-art disease management programs regarding HRQL outcomes, our results did not support the added value of AHM. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of ZMapp for Ebola Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Data from studies in nonhuman primates suggest that the triple monoclonal antibody cocktail ZMapp is a promising immune-based treatment for Ebola virus disease (EVD). METHODS Beginning in March 2015, we conducted a randomized, controlled trial of ZMapp plus the current standard of care as compared with the current standard of care alone in patients with EVD that was diagnosed in West Africa by polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay. Eligible patients of any age were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either the current standard of care or the current standard of care plus three intravenous infusions of ZMapp (50 mg per kilogram of body weight, administered every third day). Patients were stratified according to baseline PCR cycle-threshold value for the virus (≤22 vs. >22) and country of enrollment. Oral favipiravir was part of the current standard of care in Guinea. The primary end point was mortality at 28 days. RESULTS A total of 72 patients were enrolled at sites in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and the United States. Of the 71 patients who could be evaluated, 21 died, representing an overall case fatality rate of 30%. Death occurred in 13 of 35 patients (37%) who received the current standard of care alone and in 8 of 36 patients (22%) who received the current standard of care plus ZMapp. The observed posterior probability that ZMapp plus the current standard of care was superior to the current standard of care alone was 91.2%, falling short of the prespecified threshold of 97.5%. Frequentist analyses yielded similar results (absolute difference in mortality with ZMapp, −15 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, −36 to 7). Baseline viral load was strongly predictive of both mortality and duration of hospitalization in all age groups. CONCLUSIONS In this randomized, controlled trial of a putative therapeutic agent for EVD, although the estimated effect of ZMapp appeared to be beneficial, the result did not meet the prespecified

  17. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of ZMapp for Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard T; Dodd, Lori; Proschan, Michael A; Neaton, James; Neuhaus Nordwall, Jacquie; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Beigel, John; Tierney, John; Lane, H Clifford; Fauci, Anthony S; Massaquoi, Moses B F; Sahr, Foday; Malvy, Denis

    2016-10-13

    Background Data from studies in nonhuman primates suggest that the triple monoclonal antibody cocktail ZMapp is a promising immune-based treatment for Ebola virus disease (EVD). Methods Beginning in March 2015, we conducted a randomized, controlled trial of ZMapp plus the current standard of care as compared with the current standard of care alone in patients with EVD that was diagnosed in West Africa by polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay. Eligible patients of any age were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive either the current standard of care or the current standard of care plus three intravenous infusions of ZMapp (50 mg per kilogram of body weight, administered every third day). Patients were stratified according to baseline PCR cycle-threshold value for the virus (≤22 vs. >22) and country of enrollment. Oral favipiravir was part of the current standard of care in Guinea. The primary end point was mortality at 28 days. Results A total of 72 patients were enrolled at sites in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and the United States. Of the 71 patients who could be evaluated, 21 died, representing an overall case fatality rate of 30%. Death occurred in 13 of 35 patients (37%) who received the current standard of care alone and in 8 of 36 patients (22%) who received the current standard of care plus ZMapp. The observed posterior probability that ZMapp plus the current standard of care was superior to the current standard of care alone was 91.2%, falling short of the prespecified threshold of 97.5%. Frequentist analyses yielded similar results (absolute difference in mortality with ZMapp, -15 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, -36 to 7). Baseline viral load was strongly predictive of both mortality and duration of hospitalization in all age groups. Conclusions In this randomized, controlled trial of a putative therapeutic agent for EVD, although the estimated effect of ZMapp appeared to be beneficial, the result did not meet the prespecified

  18. Validating Obstetric Emergency Checklists using Simulation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Komal; Rivera-Chiauzzi, Enid Y; Lee, Colleen; Shepard, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter S; Moore-Murray, Tanya; Smith, Heather; Nathan, Lisa; Walker, Katie; Chazotte, Cynthia; Goffman, Dena

    2016-10-01

    Background The World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has demonstrated significant reduction in surgical morbidity. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists District II Safe Motherhood Initiative (SMI) safety bundles include eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) checklists. Objective To determine whether use of the SMI checklists during simulated obstetric emergencies improved completion of critical actions and to elicit feedback to facilitate checklist revision. Study Design During this randomized controlled trial, teams were assigned to use a checklist during one of two emergencies: eclampsia and PPH. Raters scored teams on critical step completion. Feedback was elicited through structured debriefing. Results In total, 30 teams completed 60 scenarios. For eclampsia, trends toward higher completion were noted for blood pressure and airway management. For PPH, trends toward higher completion rates were noted for PPH stage assessment and fundal massage. Feedback resulted in substantial checklist revision. Participants were enthusiastic about using checklists in a clinical emergency. Conclusion Despite trends toward higher rates of completion of critical tasks, teams using checklists did not approach 100% task completion. Teams were interested in the application of checklists and provided feedback necessary to substantially revise the checklists. Intensive implementation planning and training in use of the revised checklists will result in improved patient outcomes.

  19. Analyzing Randomized Controlled Interventions: Three Notes for Applied Linguists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanhove, Jan

    2015-01-01

    I discuss three common practices that obfuscate or invalidate the statistical analysis of randomized controlled interventions in applied linguistics. These are (a) checking whether randomization produced groups that are balanced on a number of possibly relevant covariates, (b) using repeated measures ANOVA to analyze pretest-posttest designs, and…

  20. H II control for model helicopter in hover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moo Seok; Kim, Joon Ki; Han, Jeong Yup; Park, Hong Bae; Kang, Soon Ju

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents mathematical model of six degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) helicopter (ERGO50) in hover, and H II feedback controller which is a powerful technique for the MIMO system as a helicopter. Mathematical model of the helicopter is multi-input multi-output (MIMO) and linearized system which accommodates aerodynamics. H II controller based on optimal control theory is used in a myriad application and plays an important role as a valuable precursor to other advanced methods for future work, when we need to improve stability of the helicopter. We design linear-quadratic-gaussian controller as H II controller. Simulation results show good performance.

  1. A Phase II, Randomized, Double‐Blind, Placebo‐Controlled Study of Simtuzumab in Combination with FOLFIRI for the Second‐Line Treatment of Metastatic KRAS Mutant Colorectal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Al B.; Vyushkov, Dmitry; Yang, Yingsi; Bendell, Johanna; Verma, Udit

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lessons Learned. The safety profile in the patient groups who received FOLFIRI and simtuzumab did not differ from that in the FOLFIRI and placebo group.The addition of simtuzumab to chemotherapy with FOLFIRI does not improve clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic KRAS mutant colorectal carcinoma. Background. Simtuzumab, a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody to lysyl oxidase‐like 2 (LOXL2), blocks desmoplastic reaction in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells in vitro. Methods. Patients with metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutant CRC were randomized to receive second‐line 5‐fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) with either 200 or 700 mg simtuzumab or placebo every 2 weeks in cycles of 28 days. Progression‐free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and safety were assessed. Results. In total, 249 patients were randomized and treated with FOLFIRI/simtuzumab 700 mg (n = 84), FOLFIRI/simtuzumab 200 mg (n = 85), and FOLFIRI/placebo (n = 80). After a median follow‐up of 5.1, 3.8, and 5.5 months, respectively, median PFS for each of the respective treatment groups was 5.5 months (adjusted HR [95% CI], p value versus placebo; 1.32 [0.92, 1.89]; p = .10), 5.4 months (1.45 [1.01, 2.06]; p = .04), and 5.8 months. Median OS was 11.4 months (1.23 [0.80, 1.91]; p = .25), 10.5 months (1.50 [0.98, 2.30]; p = .06), and 16.3 months, respectively. ORR was 11.9%, 5.9%, and 10%, respectively. Simtuzumab was tolerable in metastatic KRAS mutant CRC patients. Conclusion. The addition of simtuzumab to FOLFIRI did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with metastatic KRAS mutant CRC. PMID:28246207

  2. Long-term clinical and economic analysis of the Endeavor drug-eluting stent versus the Driver bare-metal stent: 4-year results from the ENDEAVOR II trial (Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Medtronic AVE ABT-578 Eluting Driver Coronary Stent in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions).

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, Eric L; Wijns, William; Fajadet, Jean; Mauri, Laura; Edwards, Rex; Cowper, Patricia A; Kong, David F; Anstrom, Kevin J

    2009-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate long-term clinical and economic outcomes for subjects receiving Endeavor drug-eluting versus Driver bare-metal stents (both Medtronic CardioVascular, Santa Rosa, California). Early studies found that the drug-eluting stent (DES) was a clinically and economically attractive alternative to the bare-metal stent; however, associations between DES and very late stent thrombosis suggest that longer follow-up is required. We used clinical, resource use and follow-up data from 1,197 subjects randomized to receive Endeavor (n = 598) versus Driver (n = 599) stents in ENDEAVOR II (Randomized Controlled Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of the Medtronic AVE ABT-578 Eluting Driver Coronary Stent in De Novo Native Coronary Artery Lesions) study with Medicare cost weights and quality of life adjustments applied from secondary sources. We compared differences through 4-year follow-up (1,440 days). Patients in both treatment groups had similar baseline characteristics. The use of Endeavor versus Driver reduced 4-year target vessel revascularization rates per 100 subjects (10.4 vs. 21.5; difference: -11.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.0 to -6.1; p < 0.001), with no difference in the rates per 100 subjects of death (5.0 vs. 5.2; difference: -0.2; 95% CI: -2.7 to 2.4; p = 0.90) or nonfatal myocardial infarction (3.2 vs. 4.4; difference: -1.2; 95% CI: -3.4 to 1.0; p = 0.29). After discounting at a 3% annual rate, there were no differences in quality-adjusted survival days (1,093 vs. 1,090; difference: 3; 95% CI: -13 to 19; p = 0.69) and total medical costs ($21,483 vs. $21,680; difference: -$198; 95% CI: -$1,608 to $1,207; p = 0.78). The use of Endeavor versus Driver was associated with a significant reduction in target vessel revascularization through 4-year follow-up with no difference in death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, quality-adjusted survival, or total medical costs. These results are comparable to those for other studies

  3. Emergence of patterns in random processes. II. Stochastic structure in random events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, William I.

    2014-06-01

    Random events can present what appears to be a pattern in the length of peak-to-peak sequences in time series and other point processes. Previously, we showed that this was the case in both individual and independently distributed processes as well as for Brownian walks. In addition, we introduced the use of the discrete form of the Langevin equation of statistical mechanics as a device for connecting the two limiting sets of behaviors, which we then compared with a variety of observations from the physical and social sciences. Here, we establish a probabilistic framework via the Smoluchowski equation for exploring the Langevin equation and its expected peak-to-peak sequence lengths, and we introduce a concept we call "stochastic structure in random events," or SSRE. We extend the Brownian model to include antipersistent processes via autoregressive (AR) models. We relate the latter to describe the behavior of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, and we devise a further test for the validity of the Langevin and AR models. Given our analytic results, we show how the Langevin equation can be adapted to describe population cycles of three to four years observed among many mammalian species in biology.

  4. Emergence of patterns in random processes. II. Stochastic structure in random events.

    PubMed

    Newman, William I

    2014-06-01

    Random events can present what appears to be a pattern in the length of peak-to-peak sequences in time series and other point processes. Previously, we showed that this was the case in both individual and independently distributed processes as well as for Brownian walks. In addition, we introduced the use of the discrete form of the Langevin equation of statistical mechanics as a device for connecting the two limiting sets of behaviors, which we then compared with a variety of observations from the physical and social sciences. Here, we establish a probabilistic framework via the Smoluchowski equation for exploring the Langevin equation and its expected peak-to-peak sequence lengths, and we introduce a concept we call "stochastic structure in random events," or SSRE. We extend the Brownian model to include antipersistent processes via autoregressive (AR) models. We relate the latter to describe the behavior of Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park, and we devise a further test for the validity of the Langevin and AR models. Given our analytic results, we show how the Langevin equation can be adapted to describe population cycles of three to four years observed among many mammalian species in biology.

  5. Active control of multi-dimensional random sound in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Elliott, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated how active control may be applied to the control of random noise in ducts. These implementations, however, have been restricted to frequencies where only plane waves are propagating in the duct. In spite of this, the need for this technology at low frequencies has progressed to the point where commercial products that apply these concepts are currently available. Extending the frequency range of this technology requires the extension of current single channel controllers to multi-variate control systems as well as addressing the problems inherent in controlling higher order modes. The application of active control in the multi-dimensional propagation of random noise in waveguides is examined. An adaptive system is implemented using measured system frequency response functions. Experimental results are presented illustrating attained suppressions of 15 to 30 dB for random noise propagating in multiple modes.

  6. Systematic Review of Integrative Health Care Research: Randomized Control Trials, Clinical Controlled Trials, and Meta-Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    to usual care (control). Also, in the pilot study of the 4 individual Noetic therapies, off-site prayer was associated with the lowest absolute...mortality in-hospital and at 6 months [16]. The parallel randomization to 4 different Noetic therapies across 5 study arms limited the assessment of...interventional cardiac care: the Monitoring and Actualisation of Noetic Trainings (MANTRA) II randomised study ,” Lancet, vol. 366, no. 9481, pp. 211–217, 2005. [18

  7. RANDOM ACCESS CONTROL OF ELECTROLUMINESCENT ELEMENTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) switches were devised to control the luminous emittance of electroluminescent cells in a solid-state display. The technique...purpose of this contract was to establish the feasibility of utilizing the hysteretic effect in cadmium selenide to provide switching and storage to an...array of electroluminescent cells by investigating the cadmium selenide material, by studying panel structure, and by investigating the addressing of

  8. Randomized phase II placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of topical pure emu oil for joint pain related to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor use in postmenopausal women with early breast cancer: JUST (Joints Under Study).

    PubMed

    Chan, Arlene; De Boer, R; Gan, A; Willsher, P; Martin, R; Zissiadis, Y; Miller, K; Bauwens, A; Hastrich, D

    2017-07-09

    Aromatase inhibitors are standard of care in women with hormone receptor-positive early breast cancer. Published evidence demonstrates that adverse effects may have an impact on drug compliance, with arthralgias being one of the most commonly reported adverse effects. Eligible patients were postmenopausal women who had experienced arthralgia following initiation of an aromatase inhibitor. Patients who experienced arthralgias following a minimum of a 3-month treatment on the aromatase inhibitor were randomized to emu oil or placebo oil. The primary endpoint was to assess for a reduction in pain as measured by a visual analogue score after 8 weeks of treatment. Seventy-three patients comprised the intent-to-treat population, and there was no statistically significant benefit with use of EO. However, there was a statistically significant improvement in pain (visual analogue score was -1.28; p < 0.001) and Brief Pain Inventory severity score -0.88 (p < 0.001), as well as functional interference (Brief Pain Inventory interference -1.10 (p < 0.001) for the entire population following an 8-week administration of EO or placebo oil. Arthralgias, as a result of aromatase inhibitor use, may be ameliorated by the use of topical oil massaged onto the joint. Further research into interventions for this common side effect is needed.

  9. History of the Athens Canadian Random Bred and the Athens Random Bred control populations.

    PubMed

    Collins, K E; Marks, H L; Aggrey, S E; Lacy, M P; Wilson, J L

    2016-05-01

    The University of Georgia maintains two meat-type chicken control strains: the Athens Random Bred (ARB) and the Athens Canadian Random Bred (ACRB). The Athens Random Bred was developed from colored plumage commercial meat chicken strains in 1956. The ACRB is a replicate population of the Ottawa Meat Control strain which was developed in 1955 from white plumage commercial meat-type chickens. These genetic lines have been extremely valuable research resources and have been used extensively to provide comparative context to modern meat-type strains. The ACRB may be the oldest pedigreed control commercial meat-type chicken still in existence today. This paper reviews the history of the breed backgrounds for both control populations and reviews research utilizing the ACRB. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Control of glomerular filtration rate by circulating angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Coleman, T G; Guyton, A C; Kastner, P R; Granger, J P

    1981-09-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have provided evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in controlling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) through an efferent arteriolar vasoconstrictor mechanism; however, the relative importance of circulating versus intrarenally formed angiotensin II (ANG II) in this control has not been determined. In the present study, the role of circulating ANG II in regulating GFR during reduced renal artery pressure (RAP) was examined in sodium-depleted dogs. After 90 min of infusion of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor SQ 14225, which presumably inhibited formation of both circulating and intrarenal ANG II, reduction of RAP to 81 +/- 2 mmHg resulted in marked decreases in GFR, filtration fraction (FF), and calculated efferent arteriolar resistance (RE), whereas renal blood flow (RBF) was maintained approximately 40% above initial control levels determined before SQ 14225 infusion. Replacement of circulating ANG II during SQ 14225 infusion, by intravenous infusion of ANG II at rates that decreased RBF to control levels, increased GFR, FF, and RE to levels not significantly different from control while RAP was maintained constant by aortic constriction. These observations suggest that circulating ANG II plays an important role in regulating RE and GFR during reductions in RAP. The importance of intrarenally formed ANG II in controlling GFR remains to be determined.

  11. Short-Term Effectiveness of a Mobile Phone App for Increasing Physical Activity and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial (EVIDENT II Study)

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Rodriguez, Jose I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Martin-Cantera, Carlos; González-Viejo, Mª Natividad; Fernandez-Alonso, Mª Del Carmen; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, Maria Soledad; Schmolling-Guinovart, Yolanda; Maderuelo-Fernandez, Jose-Angel; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of mobile phone apps for improving lifestyles has become generalized in the population, although little is still known about their effectiveness in improving health. Objective We evaluate the effect of adding an app to standard counseling on increased physical activity (PA) and adherence to the Mediterranean diet, 3 months after implementation. Methods A randomized, multicenter clinical trial was carried out. A total of 833 participants were recruited in six primary care centers in Spain through random sampling: 415 in the app+counseling group and 418 in the counseling only group. Counseling on PA and the Mediterranean diet was given to both groups. The app+counseling participants additionally received training in the use of an app designed to promote PA and the Mediterranean diet over a 3-month period. PA was measured with the 7-day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) questionnaire and an accelerometer; adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener questionnaire. Results Participants were predominantly female in both the app+counseling (249/415, 60.0%) and counseling only (268/418, 64.1%) groups, with a mean age of 51.4 (SD 12.1) and 52.3 (SD 12.0) years, respectively. Leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) by 7-day PAR increased in the app+counseling (mean 29, 95% CI 5-53 min/week; P=.02) but not in the counseling only group (mean 17.4, 95% CI –18 to 53 min/week; P=.38). No differences in increase of activity were found between the two groups. The accelerometer recorded a decrease in PA after 3 months in both groups: MVPA mean –55.3 (95% CI –75.8 to –34.9) min/week in app+counseling group and mean –30.1 (95% CI –51.8 to –8.4) min/week in counseling only group. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet increased in both groups (8.4% in app+counseling and 10.4% in counseling only group), with an increase in score of 0.42 and 0.53 points, respectively (P<.001), but no

  12. Short-Term Effectiveness of a Mobile Phone App for Increasing Physical Activity and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial (EVIDENT II Study).

    PubMed

    Recio-Rodriguez, Jose I; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Martin-Cantera, Carlos; González-Viejo, Mª Natividad; Fernandez-Alonso, Mª Del Carmen; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, Maria Soledad; Schmolling-Guinovart, Yolanda; Maderuelo-Fernandez, Jose-Angel; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A; Garcia-Ortiz, Luis

    2016-12-19

    The use of mobile phone apps for improving lifestyles has become generalized in the population, although little is still known about their effectiveness in improving health. We evaluate the effect of adding an app to standard counseling on increased physical activity (PA) and adherence to the Mediterranean diet, 3 months after implementation. A randomized, multicenter clinical trial was carried out. A total of 833 participants were recruited in six primary care centers in Spain through random sampling: 415 in the app+counseling group and 418 in the counseling only group. Counseling on PA and the Mediterranean diet was given to both groups. The app+counseling participants additionally received training in the use of an app designed to promote PA and the Mediterranean diet over a 3-month period. PA was measured with the 7-day Physical Activity Recall (PAR) questionnaire and an accelerometer; adherence to the Mediterranean diet was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener questionnaire. Participants were predominantly female in both the app+counseling (249/415, 60.0%) and counseling only (268/418, 64.1%) groups, with a mean age of 51.4 (SD 12.1) and 52.3 (SD 12.0) years, respectively. Leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) by 7-day PAR increased in the app+counseling (mean 29, 95% CI 5-53 min/week; P=.02) but not in the counseling only group (mean 17.4, 95% CI -18 to 53 min/week; P=.38). No differences in increase of activity were found between the two groups. The accelerometer recorded a decrease in PA after 3 months in both groups: MVPA mean -55.3 (95% CI -75.8 to -34.9) min/week in app+counseling group and mean -30.1 (95% CI -51.8 to -8.4) min/week in counseling only group. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet increased in both groups (8.4% in app+counseling and 10.4% in counseling only group), with an increase in score of 0.42 and 0.53 points, respectively (P<.001), but no difference between groups (P=.86). Leisure-time MVPA

  13. A randomized controlled phase II trial of a novel composition of paclitaxel embedded into neutral and cationic lipids targeting tumor endothelial cells in advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Awada, A; Bondarenko, I N; Bonneterre, J; Nowara, E; Ferrero, J M; Bakshi, A V; Wilke, C; Piccart, M

    2014-04-01

    EndoTAG-1, composed of paclitaxel embedded in liposomal membranes targeting tumor endothelial cells, was evaluated for safety and efficacy in advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). One hundred and forty patients were treated with weekly EndoTAG-1 (22 mg/m(2)) plus paclitaxel (70 mg/m(2)), twice weekly EndoTAG-1 (2× 44 mg/m(2)), or weekly paclitaxel (90 mg/m(2)) for greater than or equal to four cycles (3-week treatment + 1-week rest) or until progression/toxicity. Primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) rate evaluated centrally after four cycles of therapy (week 16). The study was not powered for intergroup comparisons. The PFS rate at week 16 was 59.1% [one-sided 95% CI: 45.6, ∞] on combination treatment, 34.2% [21.6, ∞] on EndoTAG-1, and 48.0% [30.5, ∞] on paclitaxel. Median PFS reached 4.2, 3.4, and 3.7 months, respectively. After complete treatment (week 41 analysis), median overall survival (OS) was 13.0, 11.9, and 13.1 months for the modified Intention-to-Treat (ITT) population and 15.1, 12.5, and 8.9 months for the per-protocol population, respectively. The clinical benefit rate was 53%, 31%, and 36% for the treatment groups. Safety analysis revealed known toxicities of the drugs with slight increases of grade 3/4 neutropenia on combination therapy. Treatment of advanced TNBC with a combination of EndoTAG-1 and standard paclitaxel [Taxol® (Bristol-Myers Squibb GmbH), or equivalent generic formulation] was well tolerated and showed antitumor efficacy. The positive trend needs to be confirmed in a randomized phase III trial. European Clinical Trials Database: EudraCT number 2006-002221-23. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00448305.

  14. A phase II, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of Curcumina and Calendula suppositories for the treatment of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Morgia, Giuseppe; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Urzì, Daniele; Privitera, Salvatore; Castelli, Tommaso; Favilla, Vincenzo; Cimino, Sebastiano

    2017-06-30

    The management of chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III (CP/CPPS) has been always considered complex due to several biopsychological factors underling the disease. In this clinical study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula extract in patients with CP/CPPS III. From June 2015 to January 2016 we enrolled 60 consecutive patients affected by CP/CPPS III in our institution. Patients between 20 and 50 year of age with symptoms of pelvic pain for 3 months or more before study, a total National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score ≥ 15 point and diagnosed with NIH category III. Patients were then allocated to receive placebo (Group A) or treatment (Group B). Treatment consisted of rectal suppositories of Curcumin extract 350 mg (95%) and Calendula extract 80 mg (1 suppository/die for 1 month). Patients of Group B received 1 suppository/die for 1 month of placebo. The primary endpoint of the study was the reduction of NIH-CPSI. The secondary outcomes were the change of peak flow, IIEF-5, VAS score and of premature ejaculation diagnostic tool (PEDT). A total of 48 patients concluded the study protocol. The median age of the all cohort was 32.0 years, the median NIH-CPSI was 20.5, the median IIEF-5 was 18.5, the median PEDT was 11.0, the median VAS score was 7.5 and the median peak flow was 14.0. After 3 months of therapy in group A we observed a significant improvement of NIH-CPSI (-5.5; p < 0.01), IIEF-5 (+ 3.5; p < 0.01), PEDT (-6.5; p < 0.01), peak flow (+2.8; p < 0.01) and VAS (-6.5; p < 0.01) with significant differences over placebo group (all p-value significant). In this phase II clinical trial we showed the clinical efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula in patients with CP/CPPS III. The benefits of this treatment could be related to the reduction of inflammatory cytokines and of inflammatory cells. These results should be confirmed in

  15. SECEC Research Grant 2008 II: Use of platelet- and leucocyte-rich fibrin (L-PRF) does not affect late rotator cuff tendon healing: a prospective randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zumstein, Matthias A; Rumian, Adam; Thélu, Charles Édouard; Lesbats, Virginie; O'Shea, Kieran; Schaer, Michael; Boileau, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Because the retear rate after rotator cuff repairs remains high, methods to improve healing are very much needed. Platelet-rich concentrates have been shown to enhance tenocyte proliferation and promote extracellular matrix synthesis in vitro; however, their clinical benefit remains unclear. We hypothesized that arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) results in better clinical and radiographic outcome at 12 months of follow-up than without L-PRF. Thirty-five patients were randomized to receive arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with L-PRF locally applied to the repair site (L-PRF+ group, n = 17) or without L-PRF (L-PRF- group, n = 18). Preoperative and postoperative clinical evaluation included the Subjective Shoulder Value, visual analog score for pain, Simple Shoulder Test, and Constant-Murley score. The anatomic watertight healing, tendon thickness, and tendon quality was evaluated using magnetic resonance arthrography at 12 months of follow-up. No complications were reported in either group. The mean Subjective Shoulder Value, Simple Shoulder Test, and Constant-Murley scores increased from preoperatively to postoperatively, showing no significant differences between the groups. Complete anatomic watertight healing was found in 11 of 17 in the L-PRF+ group and in 11 of 18 in the L-PRP- group (P = .73). The mean postoperative defect size (214 ± 130 mm(2) in the L-PRF+ group vs 161 ± 149 mm(2) in the L-PRF- group; P = .391) and the mean postoperative tendon quality according to Sugaya (L-PRF+ group: 3.0 ± 1.4, L-PRF- group: 3.0 ± 0.9) were similar in both groups at 12 months of follow-up. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with application of L-PRF yields no beneficial effect in clinical outcome, anatomic healing rate, mean postoperative defect size, and tendon quality at 12 months of follow-up. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. From Basic Biology to Randomized Clinical Trial: The Beta Radiation for ArterioVenous Graft Outflow Stenosis (BRAVO II)

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Arnold, Perry; Seigel, Jeff; Misra, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    The BRAVO-II study was a randomized controlled study of endovascular radiation therapy as compared to sham radiation therapy, following angioplasty of a thrombosed PRFE graft. The results did not show a benefit of endovascular radiation therapy, albeit in the context of an early termination of the study at less than 50% enrollment due to business reasons. Emphasis is laid on the fact that there may still be a role for radiation therapy in specific clinical settings associated with dialysis vascular access dysfunction. PMID:23067015

  17. Random vibration analysis of the Topaz-II nuclear reactor power system. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.E.

    1995-06-01

    The TOPAZ-II Ya-21U is one of six Russian made space nuclear power systems which is based on theomionic power conversion. The U.S. is presently analyzing TOPAZ-II to determine the reliability and feasibility of using this system. A structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit in May 1993 to provide data from which modal parameters could be identified. This test showed the fundamental frequency to be 10.5 Hz, yet the test results that the Russians conducted identified a fundamental frequency of 5 Hz. Another finite element model was created incorporating new developments in TOPAZ-II and modifications to the finite element model to better simulate the mass properties of the TOPAZ-II2. A second structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit 06-09 September 1994. This thesis focuses on the random vibration analysis of the TOPAZ-II Ya-2lU utilizing the most recent test results and the Master Series (updated version) I-DEAS software. The modal respose of the model and simulated random vibration tests were within 8.33%. This model is a feasible tool which can be used to analyze the TOPAZ unit without testing the unit to fatigue.

  18. Evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of HNVAC, an MDCK-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine, in Phase I single centre and Phase II/III multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel assignment studies.

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, V H; Sampath, G; Hegde, Nagendra R; Mohan, V Krishna; Ella, Krishna M

    2014-07-31

    The clinical evaluation of the MDCK-based H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine HNVAC in adults aged 18-65 years is reported. In the Phase I randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-centre study, 160 subjects were parallelly assigned 3:1 to vaccine:placebo groups (n=60:20) with both the aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted vaccine formulations. A single dose of both the formulations containing 15 μg of haemagglutinin protein showed minimal adverse reactions, the most common of which were pain at injection site (11.67%) and fever (10.00%). Both formulations produced 74-81% seroprotection (SRP: titre of ≥40), 67-70% seroconversion (SRC: four-fold increase in titres between days 0 and 21), and a four-fold increase in geometric mean titres (GMT). Aluminium hydroxide did not have a significant effect either on immunogenicity or on reactogenicity. Nevertheless, based on its recognized positive effects on the stability and immunogenicity of many vaccines, and its marginal benefit in both pre-clinical and Phase I studies of HNVAC, alum adjuvanted HNVAC was further tested in a staggered Phase II/III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centre study of 200 and 195 subjects, respectively, parallelly assigned 4:1 to adjuvanted vaccine and placebo groups. In these studies, the most common adverse reactions were pain at injection site (6.88% and 5.77% in Stage 1 and Stage 2, respectively) and fever (7.50% and 7.05%, respectively), and a single dose resulted in 87-90% SRP, 85-86% SRC, and a nearly six-fold increase in GMT, meeting or exceeding licensing criteria. It is concluded that HNVAC is safe and immunogenic to adults of 18-65 years.

  19. Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit for Stroke Caregivers: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bakas, Tamilyn; Austin, Joan K; Habermann, Barbara; Jessup, Nenette M; McLennon, Susan M; Mitchell, Pamela H; Morrison, Gwendolyn; Yang, Ziyi; Stump, Timothy E; Weaver, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    There are few evidence-based programs for stroke family caregivers postdischarge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy of the Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit (TASK II), a nurse-led intervention enabling caregivers to build skills based on assessment of their own needs. A total of 254 stroke caregivers (primarily female TASK II/information, support, and referral 78.0%/78.6%; white 70.7%/72.1%; about half spouses 48.4%/46.6%) were randomized to the TASK II intervention (n=123) or to an information, support, and referral group (n=131). Both groups received 8 weekly telephone sessions, with a booster at 12 weeks. General linear models with repeated measures tested efficacy, controlling for patient hospital days and call minutes. Prespecified 8-week primary outcomes were depressive symptoms (with Patient Health Questionnaire Depressive Symptom Scale PHQ-9 ≥5), life changes, and unhealthy days. Among caregivers with baseline PHQ-9 ≥5, those randomized to the TASK II intervention had a greater reduction in depressive symptoms from baseline to 8, 24, and 52 weeks and greater improvement in life changes from baseline to 12 weeks compared with the information, support, and referral group (P<0.05); but not found for the total sample. Although not sustained at 12, 24, or 52 weeks, caregivers randomized to the TASK II intervention had a relatively greater reduction in unhealthy days from baseline to 8 weeks (P<0.05). The TASK II intervention reduced depressive symptoms and improved life changes for caregivers with mild to severe depressive symptoms. The TASK II intervention reduced unhealthy days for the total sample, although not sustained over the long term. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01275495. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Trial Investigating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara Smallpox Vaccine (MVA-BN®) in 56-80-Year-Old Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Richard N.; Hay, Christine M.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Marbury, Thomas C.; Wagner, Eva; Kreitmeir, Eva; von Krempelhuber, Alfred; Young, Philip; Nichols, Richard; Meyer, Thomas P.; Weigl, Josef; Virgin, Garth; Arndtz-Wiedemann, Nathaly; Chaplin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® is a live, highly attenuated, viral vaccine under advanced development as a non-replicating smallpox vaccine. In this Phase II trial, the safety and immunogenicity of Modified Vaccinia Ankara MVA-BN® (MVA) was assessed in a 56–80 years old population. Methods MVA with a virus titer of 1 x 108 TCID50/dose was administered via subcutaneous injection to 56–80 year old vaccinia-experienced subjects (N = 120). Subjects received either two injections of MVA (MM group) or one injection of Placebo and one injection of MVA (PM group) four weeks apart. Safety was evaluated by assessment of adverse events (AE), focused physical exams, electrocardiogram recordings and safety laboratories. Solicited AEs consisted of a set of pre-defined expected local reactions (erythema, swelling, pain, pruritus, and induration) and systemic symptoms (body temperature, headache, myalgia, nausea and fatigue) and were recorded on a memory aid for an 8-day period following each injection. The immunogenicity of the vaccine was evaluated in terms of humoral immune responses measured with a vaccinia-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) before and at different time points after vaccination. Results Vaccinations were well tolerated by all subjects. No serious adverse event related to MVA and no case of myopericarditis was reported. The overall incidence of unsolicited AEs was similar in both groups. For both groups immunogenicity responses two weeks after the final vaccination (i.e. Visit 4) were as follows: Seroconversion (SC) rates (doubling of titers from baseline) in vaccine specific antibody titers measured by ELISA were 83.3% in Group MM and 82.8% in Group PM (difference 0.6% with 95% exact CI [-13.8%, 15.0%]), and 90.0% for Group MM and 77.6% for Group PM measured by PRNT (difference 12.4% with 95% CI of [-1.1%, 27.0%]). Geometric mean titers (GMT) measured by ELISA two weeks after

  1. Bipolar I and II disorders in a random and representative Australian population.

    PubMed

    Goldney, Robert D; Fisher, Laura J; Grande, Eleonora Dal; Taylor, Anne W; Hawthorne, Graeme

    2005-08-01

    To assess the prevalence of bipolar I and II disorders in an Australian population. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) was administered to 3015 respondents in a random and representative sample in South Australia. Health status, quality of life and demographic data were also collected. There was a 2.5% lifetime prevalence of bipolar I and II disorders delineated by the MDQ. Those people had a significantly greater use of services and a poorer health status and quality of life than those who were MDQ-negative. These results in an Australian population are consistent with other international studies showing a greater prevalence of bipolar disorders than hitherto appreciated.

  2. Multiple input/output random vibration control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.

    1988-01-01

    A multi-input/output random vibration control algorithm was developed based on system identification concepts derived from random vibration spectral analysis theory. The unique features of the algorithm are: (1) the number of input excitors and the number of output control responses need not be identical; (2) the system inverse response matrix is obtained directly from the input/output spectral matrix; and (3) the system inverse response matrix is updated every control loop cycle to accommodate system amplitude nonlinearities. A laboratory demonstration case of two imputs with three outputs is presented to demonstrate the system capabilities.

  3. Simulation of random wind fluctuations. [space shuttle ascent control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, M.

    1974-01-01

    A technique was developed for the simulation of random wind fluctuations for use in computer studies of the space shuttle ascent control. The simulated wind fluctuations were generated using the techniques of control theory that have statistical characteristics similar to the characteristics obtained from wind data at Kennedy Space Center.

  4. Affectionate Writing Reduces Total Cholesterol: Two Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Kory; Mikkelson, Alan C.; Hesse, Colin; Pauley, Perry M.

    2007-01-01

    In two 5-week trials, healthy college students were randomly assigned either to experimental or control groups. Participants in the experimental groups wrote about their affection for significant friends, relatives, and/or romantic partners for 20 minutes on three separate occasions; on the same schedule, those in the control groups wrote about…

  5. Affectionate Writing Reduces Total Cholesterol: Two Randomized, Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Kory; Mikkelson, Alan C.; Hesse, Colin; Pauley, Perry M.

    2007-01-01

    In two 5-week trials, healthy college students were randomly assigned either to experimental or control groups. Participants in the experimental groups wrote about their affection for significant friends, relatives, and/or romantic partners for 20 minutes on three separate occasions; on the same schedule, those in the control groups wrote about…

  6. Chromosome I controls chromosome II replication in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jong Hwan; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2014-02-01

    Control of chromosome replication involves a common set of regulators in eukaryotes, whereas bacteria with divided genomes use chromosome-specific regulators. How bacterial chromosomes might communicate for replication is not known. In Vibrio cholerae, which has two chromosomes (chrI and chrII), replication initiation is controlled by DnaA in chrI and by RctB in chrII. DnaA has binding sites at the chrI origin of replication as well as outside the origin. RctB likewise binds at the chrII origin and, as shown here, to external sites. The binding to the external sites in chrII inhibits chrII replication. A new kind of site was found in chrI that enhances chrII replication. Consistent with its enhancing activity, the chrI site increased RctB binding to those chrII origin sites that stimulate replication and decreased binding to other sites that inhibit replication. The differential effect on binding suggests that the new site remodels RctB. The chaperone-like activity of the site is supported by the finding that it could relieve the dependence of chrII replication on chaperone proteins DnaJ and DnaK. The presence of a site in chrI that specifically controls chrII replication suggests a mechanism for communication between the two chromosomes for replication.

  7. Random allocation in controlled clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Egbewale, Bolaji Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    An allocation strategy that allows for chance placement of participants to study groups is crucial to the experimental nature of randomised controlled trials. Following decades of the discovery of randomisation considerable erroneous opinion and misrepresentations of its concept both in principle and practice still exists. In some circles, opinions are also divided on the strength and weaknesses of each of the random allocation strategies. This review provides an update on various random allocation techniques so as to correct existing misconceptions on this all important procedure. This is a review of literatures published in the Pubmed database on concepts of common allocation techniques used in controlled clinical trials. Allocation methods that use; case record number, date of birth, date of presentation, haphazard or alternating assignment are non-random allocation techniques and should not be confused as random methods. Four main random allocation techniques were identified. Minimisation procedure though not fully a random technique, however, proffers solution to the limitations of stratification at balancing for multiple prognostic factors, as the procedure makes treatment groups similar in several important features even in small sample trials. Even though generation of allocation sequence by simple randomisation procedure is easily facilitated, a major drawback of the technique is that treatment groups can by chance end up being dissimilar both in size and composition of prognostic factors. More complex allocation techniques that yield more comparable treatment groups also have certain drawbacks. However, it is important that whichever allocation technique is employed, unpredictability of random assignment should not be compromised.

  8. Controlled-release phentermine/topiramate in severely obese adults: a randomized controlled trial (EQUIP).

    PubMed

    Allison, David B; Gadde, Kishore M; Garvey, William Timothy; Peterson, Craig A; Schwiers, Michael L; Najarian, Thomas; Tam, Peter Y; Troupin, Barbara; Day, Wesley W

    2012-02-01

    A 56-week randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate safety and efficacy of a controlled-release combination of phentermine and topiramate (PHEN/TPM CR) for weight loss (WL) and metabolic improvements. Men and women with class II and III obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) were randomized to placebo, PHEN/TPM CR 3.75/23 mg, or PHEN/TPM CR 15/92 mg, added to a reduced-energy diet. Primary end points were percent WL and proportions of patients achieving 5% WL. Secondary end points included waist circumference (WC), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting glucose, and lipid measures. In the primary analysis (randomized patients with at least one postbaseline weight measurement who took at least one dose of assigned drug or placebo), patients in the placebo, 3.75/23, and 15/92 groups lost 1.6%, 5.1%, and 10.9% of baseline body weight (BW), respectively, at 56 weeks (P < 0.0001). In categorical analysis, 17.3% of placebo patients, 44.9% of 3.75/23 patients, and 66.7% of 15/92 patients, lost at least 5% of baseline BW at 56 weeks (P < 0.0001). The 15/92 group had significantly greater changes relative to placebo for WC, systolic and diastolic BP, fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The most common adverse events were paresthesia, dry mouth, constipation, dysgeusia, and insomnia. Dropout rate from the study was 47.1% for placebo patients, 39.0% for 3.75/23 patients, and 33.6% of 15/92 patients. PHEN/TPM CR demonstrated dose-dependent effects on weight and metabolic variables in the direction expected to be beneficial with no evidence of serious adverse events induced by treatment.

  9. Comparing treatment fidelity between study arms of a randomized controlled clinical trial for stroke family caregivers.

    PubMed

    McLennon, Susan M; Hancock, Rebecca D; Redelman, Kathleen; Scarton, Lisa J; Riley, Elizabeth; Sweeney, Bobbie; Habermann, Barbara; Jessup, Nenette M; Bakas, Tamilyn

    2016-05-01

    To compare treatment fidelity among treatment arms in the Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit study for stroke caregivers (TASK II) with respect to: 1) protocol adherence; 2) intervention dosage and 3) nurse intervener perspectives. A randomized controlled clinical trial design. Urban, community, midwestern United States. A total of 254 stroke caregivers (mean ±SD age, 54.4 ±11.8 years), 55 (22.0%) males and 199 (78.4%) females) randomized to the TASK II intervention (n=123) or an Information, Support, and Referral comparison group (n=131). TASK II participants received the TASK II Resource Guide; Information, Support, and Referral participants received a standard caregiver brochure. At approximately 8 weeks after discharge, both groups received 8 weekly calls from a nurse, with a booster call 4 weeks later. Protocol adherence was evaluated with the TASK II Checklist for Monitoring Adherence. Intervention dosage was measured by the number of minutes caregivers spent reading materials and talking with the nurse. Nurse intervener perspectives were obtained through focus groups. Protocol adherence was 80% for the TASK II and 92% for the Information, Support, and Referral. As expected, intervention dosage differed between TASK II and Information, Support, and Referral with respect to caregiver time spent reading materials (t=-6.49; P<.001) and talking with the nurse (t=-7.38; P<.001). Focus groups with nurses yielded further evidence for treatment fidelity and recommendations for future trials. These findings substantiate treatment fidelity in both study arms of the TASK II stroke caregiver intervention trial (NIH R01NR010388; ClinicalTrials.govNCT01275495). © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Antidepressants in type II versus type I bipolar depression: A randomized discontinuation trial

    PubMed Central

    Vöhringer, Paul A.; Ostacher, Michael J.; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Holtzman, Niki S.; Thommi, Sairah B.; Whitham, Elizabeth A.; Sullivan, Matthew C.; Baldassano, Claudia F.; Goodwin, Fredrick K.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to test the hypothesis that antidepressants (ADs) may show preferential efficacy and safety among type-II over type-I bipolar disorder (BD) patients. Methods DSM-IV BD-I (n=21) and -II patients (n=49) in acute major depressive episodes were treated with ADs plus mood-stabilizers to euthymia sustained for two months, and then randomized openly to continue or discontinue ADs for up to three years. Outcomes were episode-recurrences and changes in standardized symptom-ratings. Results In follow-up averaging 1.64±0.98 years, both subgroups showed improvement in depressive episode frequency with AD continuation, but contrary to the hypothesis, more improvement was seen in type I than in type II bipolar depression (for type II, mean decrease in depressive episodes per year 0.21 ± 0.26 [CI:0.05, 0.37]; for type I: mean decrease 0.35 ± 0.15 [CI:0.30, 0.41]). Type II subjects continued on ADs had slightly more depressive, but fewer manic/hypomanic, episodes than BD-I subjects. No notable differences were seen in either group in time to a recurrence of mood episodes or total time-in-remission. Conclusions The findings do not confirm the hypothesis that long-term AD treatment in BP-II has better outcomes than in BD-I patients, except somewhat lower risk of manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:26267418

  11. [Impact of the activation of intention to perform physical activity in type II diabetics: a randomized clinical trial].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marco Antonio Vieira; Gouvêa, Giovana Renata; Claro, Anielle Fabiane Buoso; Agondi, Rúbia de Freitas; Cortellazzi, Karine Laura; Pereira, Antonio Carlos; Meneghim, Marcelo de Castro; Mialhe, Fábio Luiz

    2015-03-01

    Type II diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent disease among the adult Brazilian population, and one that can be controlled by interventions such as physical activity, among others. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the impact of a traditional motivational strategy, associated with the activation of intention theory, on adherence to physical activity in patients with type II, diabetes mellitus who are part of the Unified Health System (SUS). Participants were divided into a control group (CG) and an intervention group (IG). In both groups, the traditional motivational strategy was applied, but the activation of intention strategy was only applied to the IG Group. After a two-month follow-up, statistically significant differences were verified between the groups, related to the practice of walking (p = 0.0050), number of days per week (p = 0.0076), minutes per day (p = 0.0050) and minutes walking per week (p = 0.0015). At the end of the intervention, statistically significant differences in abdominal circumference (p = 0.0048) between the groups were observed. The conclusion drawn is that the activation of intention strategy had greater impact on adherence to physical activity and reduction in abdominal circumference in type II diabetics, than traditional motivational strategy.

  12. A phase I followed by a randomized phase II trial of two cycles carboplatin-olaparib followed by olaparib monotherapy versus capecitabine in BRCA1- or BRCA2-mutated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer as first line treatment (REVIVAL): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Philip C; Dackus, Gwen M H E; Marchetti, Serena; van Tinteren, Harm; Sonke, Gabe S; Schellens, Jan H M; Linn, Sabine C

    2016-06-21

    Preclinical studies in breast cancer models showed that BRCA1 or BRCA2 deficient cell lines, when compared to BRCA proficient cell lines, are extremely sensitive to PARP1 inhibition. When combining the PARP1 inhibitor olaparib with cisplatin in a BRCA1-mutated breast cancer mouse model, the combination induced a larger response than either of the two compounds alone. Several clinical studies have investigated single agent therapy or combinations of both drugs, but no randomized clinical evidence exists for the superiority of carboplatin-olaparib versus standard of care therapy in patients with BRCA1- or BRCA2--mutated metastatic breast cancer. This investigator-initiated study contains two parts. Part 1 is a traditional 3 + 3 dose escalation study of the carboplatin-olaparib combination followed by olaparib monotherapy. The carboplatin dose will be escalated from area under the curve (AUC) 3 to AUC 4 with an olaparib dose of 25 mg BID. Olaparib is subsequently escalated to 50, 75, and 100 mg BID until >1/6 of patients develop dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). The dose level below will be the maximum tolerable dose (MTD). It is expected that 15-20 patients are needed in Part I. In Part 2 BRCA1- or BRCA2-mutated HER2-negative breast cancer patients will be randomized between standard capecitabine 1250 mg/m(2) BID day 1-14 q day 22, versus 2 cycles carboplatin-olaparib followed by olaparib monotherapy 300 mg BID. In total 104 events in 110 patients need to be observed to detect a 75 % clinically meaningful improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), from a median of 4 months (control) to 7 months (experimental) assuming a 2-year accrual and ≥6 months of follow-up with 80 % power (5 %, two-sided significance level). After progression on first line treatment, patients will receive physician's best choice of paclitaxel, vinorelbine, eribulin, or capecitabine (experimental arm only) at standard dose. A compassionate use program of olaparib is available

  13. Antidepressants as analgesics: a review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, M E

    2001-01-01

    This review provides an overview of 59 randomized placebo-controlled trials that examined the analgesic effect of antidepressants. To summarize, there is significant evidence that the tricyclic group of antidepressants is analgesic and that trazodone is not; the data regarding selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are conflicting. To date, there are no randomized controlled trials examining the potential analgesic action of nefazodone or venlafaxine, but on the basis of initial clinical reports and its structural similarity to other analgesics, venlafaxine shows promise as an analgesic. PMID:11212591

  14. Telehealth to improve asthma control in pregnancy: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zairina, Elida; Abramson, Michael J; McDonald, Christine F; Li, Jonathan; Dharmasiri, Thanuja; Stewart, Kay; Walker, Susan P; Paul, Eldho; George, Johnson

    2016-07-01

    Poorly controlled asthma during pregnancy is hazardous for both mother and foetus. Better asthma control may be achieved if patients are involved in regular self-monitoring of symptoms and self-management according to a written asthma action plan. Telehealth applications to optimize asthma management and outcomes in pregnant women have not yet been evaluated. This study evaluated the efficacy of a telehealth programme supported by a handheld respiratory device in improving asthma control during pregnancy. Pregnant women with asthma (n = 72) from two antenatal clinics in Melbourne, Australia, were randomized to one of two groups: (i) intervention-involving a telehealth programme (management of asthma with supportive telehealth of respiratory function in pregnancy (MASTERY(©) )) supported by a handheld respiratory device and an Android smart phone application (Breathe-easy(©) ) and written asthma action plan or (ii) control-usual care. The primary outcome was change in asthma control at 3 and 6 months (prenatal). Secondary outcomes included changes in quality of life and lung function, and perinatal/neonatal outcomes. At baseline, participants' mean (± standard deviation) age was 31.4 ± 4.5 years and gestational age 16.7 ± 3.1 weeks. At 6 months, the MASTERY group had better asthma control (P = 0.02) and asthma-related quality of life (P = 0.002) compared with usual care. There were no significant differences between groups in lung function, unscheduled health-care visits, days off work/study, oral corticosteroid use, or perinatal outcomes. Differences between groups were not significant at 3 months. Telehealth interventions supporting self-management are feasible and could potentially improve asthma control and asthma-related quality of life during pregnancy. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  15. Feedback Flow Control for a Pitching Turret (Part II) (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    imposes no penalty on the control input. VII. Closed-loop Control Run with an Advanced Controller Three compensators ( LQR regulators with Kalman...AFRL-RB-WP-TP-2010-3024 FEEDBACK FLOW CONTROL FOR A PITCHING TURRET (PART II) (POSTPRINT) T. Vaithianathan and H.A. Carlson Clear...display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3

  16. A randomized controlled trial of an electronic informed consent process.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Erin; Wong, Bob; Rose, Nancy C; Anderson, Rebecca; Fedor, Beth; Stark, Louisa A; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2014-12-01

    A pilot study assessed an electronic informed consent model within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Participants who were recruited for the parent RCT project were randomly selected and randomized to either an electronic consent group (n = 32) or a simplified paper-based consent group (n = 30). Results from the electronic consent group reported significantly higher understanding of the purpose of the study, alternatives to participation, and who to contact if they had questions or concerns about the study. However, participants in the paper-based control group reported higher mean scores on some survey items. This research suggests that an electronic informed consent presentation may improve participant understanding for some aspects of a research study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Health economic analysis of costs of laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer within a randomized trial (COLOR II).

    PubMed

    Gehrman, Jacob; Björholt, Ingela; Angenete, Eva; Andersson, John; Bonjer, Jaap; Haglind, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies regarding the comparative costs of laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer provide ambiguous conclusions, and there are no large randomized trials or long-term follow-up. A prospective cost-minimization analysis was carried out by using data of clinical resource use from the randomized controlled trial COLOR II. Some data needed for the health economic evaluation were not collected in the clinical trial; therefore, a retrospective data collection was made for COLOR II-patients operated at the largest participating Swedish hospital (n = 105). Sick leave information was provided by the Swedish social insurance agency. Unit costs were collected from Swedish sources. The primary outcome was the difference in mean cost between laparoscopic and open surgery. The COLOR II-trial enrolled 1044 rectal cancer patients randomized between laparoscopic and open surgery 2:1. At the 3-year follow-up data for the clinical variables used in the analysis were available for 74-89 % of patients. Laparoscopic surgery costs the health care sector more than the open technique, both at 28 days ($1910, 95 % CI 677-3143) and 3 years ($3854, 95 % CI 1527-6182) after surgery. There were, however, no differences in long-term costs to society between laparoscopic and open surgery ($684, 95 % CI -5799 to 7166). Though the study found short- and long-term cost differences for the healthcare sector, there was no difference in regard to the long-term societal perspective. Future research is suggested to investigate the effects of sick leave costs using material from a greater number of patients.

  18. Adaptive adjustment of the randomization ratio using historical control data

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Brian P.; Carlin, Bradley P.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prospective trial design often occurs in the presence of “acceptable” [1] historical control data. Typically this data is only utilized for treatment comparison in a posteriori retrospective analysis to estimate population-averaged effects in a random-effects meta-analysis. Purpose We propose and investigate an adaptive trial design in the context of an actual randomized controlled colorectal cancer trial. This trial, originally reported by Goldberg et al. [2], succeeded a similar trial reported by Saltz et al. [3], and used a control therapy identical to that tested (and found beneficial) in the Saltz trial. Methods The proposed trial implements an adaptive randomization procedure for allocating patients aimed at balancing total information (concurrent and historical) among the study arms. This is accomplished by assigning more patients to receive the novel therapy in the absence of strong evidence for heterogeneity among the concurrent and historical controls. Allocation probabilities adapt as a function of the effective historical sample size (EHSS) characterizing relative informativeness defined in the context of a piecewise exponential model for evaluating time to disease progression. Commensurate priors [4] are utilized to assess historical and concurrent heterogeneity at interim analyses and to borrow strength from the historical data in the final analysis. The adaptive trial’s frequentist properties are simulated using the actual patient-level historical control data from the Saltz trial and the actual enrollment dates for patients enrolled into the Goldberg trial. Results Assessing concurrent and historical heterogeneity at interim analyses and balancing total information with the adaptive randomization procedure leads to trials that on average assign more new patients to the novel treatment when the historical controls are unbiased or slightly biased compared to the concurrent controls. Large magnitudes of bias lead to approximately equal

  19. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  20. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Two Online Mathematics Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Haiwen; Woodworth, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    This study applies a randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of supplemental instruction using two online mathematics curricula--DreamBox and Reasoning Mind. It is an independent evaluation intended to generate unbiased results that will help inform the ongoing development of a charter school network's hybrid instructional model, which…

  1. In School Settings, Are All RCTs (Randomized Control Trials) Exploratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; Jaciw, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The motivation for this paper is the authors' recent work on several randomized control trials in which they found the primary result, which averaged across subgroups or sites, to be moderated by demographic or site characteristics. They are led to examine a distinction that the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) makes between "confirmatory"…

  2. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  3. Can the Randomized Controlled Trial Literature Generalize to Nonrandomized Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Rothman, Allison

    2005-01-01

    To determine the extent to which published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapy can be generalized to a sample of outpatients, the authors matched information obtained from charts of patients who had been screened out of RCTs to inclusion and exclusion criteria from published RCT studies. Most of the patients in the sample who had…

  4. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  5. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  6. Can the Randomized Controlled Trial Literature Generalize to Nonrandomized Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Rothman, Allison

    2005-01-01

    To determine the extent to which published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapy can be generalized to a sample of outpatients, the authors matched information obtained from charts of patients who had been screened out of RCTs to inclusion and exclusion criteria from published RCT studies. Most of the patients in the sample who had…

  7. In School Settings, Are All RCTs (Randomized Control Trials) Exploratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Denis; Jaciw, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    The motivation for this paper is the authors' recent work on several randomized control trials in which they found the primary result, which averaged across subgroups or sites, to be moderated by demographic or site characteristics. They are led to examine a distinction that the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) makes between "confirmatory"…

  8. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  9. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  10. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  11. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  12. Ear Acupuncture for Acute Sore Throat: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ear acupuncture for acute sore throat. A randomized controlled trial...Auncular Acupuncture is a low risk option for acute pain control •Battlefield acupuncture (BFA) IS a specific auncular acupuncture technique •BFA IS...Strengths: Prospect1ve RCT •Weaknesses Small sample stze. no sham acupuncture performed, patients not blinded to treatment •Th1s study represents an

  13. Neurocognitive function in bipolar disorder: a comparison between bipolar I and II disorder and matched controls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive deficits have been documented in patients with bipolar disorder. Further, it has been suggested that the degree and type of cognitive impairment differ between bipolar I and bipolar II disorder, but data is conflicting and remains inconclusive. This study aimed to clarify the suggested differences in cognitive impairment between patients with bipolar I and II disorder in a relatively large, clinically stable sample while controlling for potential confounders. Methods 67 patients with bipolar I disorder, 43 with bipolar II disorder, and 86 randomly selected population-based healthy controls were compared. A number of neuropsychological tests were administered, assessing verbal and visual memory and executive functions. Patients were in a stable phase during testing. Results Patients with bipolar type I and type II were cognitively impaired compared to healthy controls, but there were no statistically significant differences between the two subtypes. The strongest predictor of cognitive impairment within the patient group was current antipsychotic treatment. Conclusions The present study suggests that the type and degree of cognitive dysfunction is similar in bipolar I and II patients. Notably, treatment with antipsychotics - but not a history of psychosis - was associated with more severe cognitive impairment. Given that patients with bipolar I disorder are more likely to be on antipsychotic drugs, this might explain why some previous studies have found that patients with type I bipolar disorder are more cognitively impaired than those with type II. PMID:23758923

  14. The computer control system of TARN-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shin-ichi

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes the computer control system of the heavy-ion synchrotron-cooler ring TARN-II. Five CAMAC stations are used for the acceleration and electron-cooling devices and they are controlled by a standard microcomputer through the serial-high-way system. The software development was simplified by using the interpreter language INSBASIC, which is powerful for an accelerator control system. The ramping control of the guiding field of the synchrotron magnet system is also described.

  15. Insect Control (II): Hormones and Viruses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research in the use of hormones and viruses to control insect populations. Although entomologists do not think that pheromones, hormones, and viruses will completely replace more conventional chemical insecticides, they will become increasingly important and will reduce our dependence on traditional insecticides. (JR)

  16. Insect Control (II): Hormones and Viruses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research in the use of hormones and viruses to control insect populations. Although entomologists do not think that pheromones, hormones, and viruses will completely replace more conventional chemical insecticides, they will become increasingly important and will reduce our dependence on traditional insecticides. (JR)

  17. Efficacy of nifedipine and alfuzosin in the management of distal ureteric stones: A randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sameer; Lal, Shyam; Charak, K. S.; Chakravarti, Sumit; Kohli, Supreeti; Ahmad, Shamshad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stone disease is a significant and world-wide health problem. Recently, certain drugs have been used as a supplement to observation alone in an effort to improve spontaneous stone expulsion. We evaluated the efficacy of nifedipine and alfuzosin in the medical treatment of symptomatic, uncomplicated distal ureteral stones. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled prospective study to determine the efficacy of alfuzosin and nifedipine as an adjunctive medical therapy, to increases the stone-expulsion rates in distal ureteric calculus of size ≤10 mm. Investigators and patients were blinded to the randomization scheme. Patients were randomly divided into three equal groups of 35 patients each. Patients in Group I received tablet nifedipine 30 mg/day, Group II received alfuzosin 10 mg/day and Group III was the control group received tablet diclofenac sodium. The patient blood pressure, stone position on imaging, number of pain attacks, time of stone-expulsion, hospital re-admission and any adverse events were assessed. Patients were followed-up weekly and continued until the patient was rendered stone free or up to 28 days. Statistical analysis was performed and P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: Stone-expulsion was observed in 60%, 85.7% and 20% patients in Group I, II and III respectively. A statistically significant difference was noted in between Groups I versus III, Groups II versus III and Groups I versus II (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.0315 respectively). The mean number of pain attacks was 2.91 ± 1.01 for Group I, 1.8 ± 0.83 for Group II, and 2.82 ± 1.12 for Group III, which is statistical significant in Groups II versus III, and Groups I versus II (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). Hospital re-admission rate was less in treatment groups when compare to control group (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The use of alfuzosin and nifedipine as a medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric stones proved to be safe and

  18. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  19. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kris; Bentley, David L

    2012-01-01

    The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5' ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression.

  20. Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit for Stroke Caregivers: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakas, Tamilyn; Austin, Joan K.; Habermann, Barbara; Jessup, Nenette M.; McLennon, Susan M.; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Morrison, Gwendolyn; Yang, Ziyi; Stump, Timothy E.; Weaver, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There are few evidence-based programs for stroke family caregivers post-discharge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate efficacy of the Telephone Assessment and Skill-Building Kit (TASKII), a nurse-led intervention enabling caregivers to build skills based on assessment of their own needs. Methods A total of 254 stroke caregivers (primarily female TASK II/ISR 78.0%/78.6%; white 70.7%/72.1%; about half spouses 48.4%/46.6%) were randomized to the TASKII intervention (n=123) or to an Information, Support, and Referral (ISR) group (n=131). Both groups received 8 weekly telephone sessions, with a booster at 12 weeks. General linear models with repeated measures tested efficacy, controlling for patient hospital days and call minutes. Pre-specified 8 week primary outcomes were depressive symptoms (with Patient Health Questionnaire Depressive Symptom Scale PHQ-9≥5), life changes, and unhealthy days. Results Among caregivers with baseline PHQ-9≥5, those randomized to the TASK II intervention had a greater reduction in depressive symptoms from baseline to 8, 24, and 52 weeks and greater improvement in life changes from baseline to 12 weeks compared to the ISR group (p<.05); but not found for the total sample. Although not sustained at 12, 24, or 52 weeks, caregivers randomized to the TASK II intervention had a relatively greater reduction in unhealthy days from baseline to 8 weeks (p<.05) Conclusions The TASK II intervention reduced depressive symptoms and improved life changes for caregivers with mild to severe depressive symptoms. The TASK II intervention reduced unhealthy days for the total sample, although not sustained over the long term. PMID:26549488

  1. NSLS-II Digital RF Controller Logic and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Holub, B.; Gao, F.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Oliva, J.; Rose, J.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) accelerator consists of the Storage Ring, the Booster Ring and Linac along with their associated cavities. Given the number, types and variety of functions of these cavities, we sought to limit the logic development effort by reuse of parameterized code on one hardware platform. Currently there are six controllers installed in the NSLS-II system. There are two in the Storage ring, two in the Booster ring, one in the Linac and one in the Master Oscillator Distribution system.

  2. The debate: a case for randomized controls in invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, John E

    2006-09-01

    Randomized trials in invasive aspergillosis have evolved over the past decade. Definitions of disease now include specifics of the underlying disease and how this affects interpretation of certain tests, including high resolution computed tomography and smears or cultures of sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage. Study hypotheses have changed from underpowered superiority trials to adequately powered noninferiority trials. Consensus building between Europe and North America has allowed trials to be conducted with the same protocol in both regions, thereby increasing study enrollment. In aggregate, the following outcomes can be drawn from randomized trials: (i) Liposomal amphotericin B is possibly superior to conventional amphotericin B at 14 days and less toxic. Whether the dose of liposomal amphotericin is 1 or 4 mg/kg daily is not as important as other factors in determining outcome of possible aspergillosis; (ii) amphotericin B colloidal dispersion is less nephrotoxic but has more acute infusion-related reactions than conventional amphotericin B; (iii) starting treatment with voriconazole is superior to starting with conventional amphotericin B. In an era of increasing cost containment, it will be the randomized trials that provide the clinician with the information needed to avoid inappropriate use of expensive drugs and drug combinations.

  3. Control with a random access protocol and packet dropouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyuan; Guo, Ge

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates networked control systems whose actuators communicate with the controller via a limited number of unreliable channels. The access to the channels is decided by a so-called group random access protocol, which is modelled as a binary Markov sequence. Data packet dropouts in the channels are modelled as independent Bernoulli processes. For such systems, a systematic characterisation for controller synthesis is established and stated in terms of the transition probabilities of the Markov protocol and the packet dropout probabilities. The results are illustrated via a numerical example.

  4. NSLS-II Control of Dynamic Aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-10-31

    We have outlined how, by an intuitive approach, the on- and off-momentum dynamic aperture for a synchrotron light source can be estimated from a nonlinear system of algebraic equations for the sextupole/multipole strengths. The approach has only two free parameters: the relative weight for resonance vs. tune shift terms and the tune footprint for stable trajectories in a modern third generation synchrotron light source. In other words, we have established a control theory approach for the medium term (10{sup 3} turns) stability for a dynamic system described by a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations. Equipped with a predictive, quantitative model for stability, we have then evaluated how to improve the control of the dynamics by analyzing and modifying the properties of the corresponding algebraic system. In particular, by changing the number- and characteristics of the parameters, i.e., we have not evaluated how the underlying (linear) optics could be improved. We have also validated our conjectures by numerical simulations with a realistic model. Presumably, our conclusions, summarized in Section 1.0, are a direct result of the presented analysis and observations.

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Computerized Interactive Media-Based Problem Solving Treatment for Depression.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis R; Buckey, Jay C; Ainslie, Ricardo; Tombari, Martin; Stone, William; Hegel, Mark T

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of an interactive media-based, computer-delivered depression treatment program (imbPST) compared to a no-treatment control condition (NTC) in a parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial conducted in an outpatient psychiatric research clinic. 45 adult participants with major depressive disorder or dysthymia were randomized to receive either 6 weekly sessions of imbPST or no treatment (No Treatment Control; NTC). The primary outcome measure was the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II). There was a significant Group x Time interaction effect [F (1.73, 43)= 58.78; p<.001; η2=.58, Cohens d=1.94], such that the patients receiving imbPST had a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms compared to the patients in the NTC condition. Participants in the imbPST group improved their depression symptoms significantly from moderate (BDI-II=21.9±4.20) to mild levels of depression (BDI-II=17.9±4.0) after receiving 3 weekly sessions of imbPST (p<0.001), and progressed to still milder levels of depression after six weekly sessions (BDI-II=14.5±3.7, p<0.001). NTC participants showed no significant reduction in BDI-II scores (BDI-II=21.8±4.2 pre, BDI-II=21.5±5.2 post, N.S.). Additionally, 40% of the imbPST group showed a clinically significant and reliable change in depression levels while none of the NTC group met this criterion. imbPST participants rated the program highly usable on the system usability scale (SUS) after the first session (SUS Session 1=74.6±7.2) and usability scores increased significantly by the last session (SUS Session 6=85.4±5.6). We conclude that imbPST is an effective, engaging, and easily used depression treatment program that warrants further evaluation with heterogeneous depressed populations in a stand-alone, self-administered fashion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effect of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized control clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Indurkar, Maya Sanjeev; Verma, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to prevent gingivitis and its progression into periodontitis. In this present study, the efficacy of ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel was assessed and compared on plaque induced gingivitis. Aim: To evaluate the effect of ozonated oil on plaque induced gingivitis and to compare its efficacy with chlorhexidine gel. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects, aged from 18 to 65 years, with plaque-induced gingivitis were selected from the outpatient Department of Periodontology, Government Dental College and Hospital, Aurangabad, for this study. They were divided randomly into the test or ozonated oil group (Group I) and the control or chlorhexidine gel group (Group II) with 10 subjects in each group. Subjects were randomly assigned to massage their gingiva thrice a day for 3 weeks with ozonated oil (test), and chlorhexidine gel (control). Plaque index and gingival index scores were recorded for the 20 subjects at baseline and after 3 weeks. Results: Ozonated oil (Group I) and chlorhexidine gel (Group II) groups showed statistically significant differences with respect to plaque index and gingival index, from the baseline to 3 weeks (P < 0.001 in both). But the difference between Group I and Group II, at the end of the study period, was not statistically significant with respect to the plaque index and gingival index. Conclusions: The ozonated oil and chlorhexidine gel, both can be used as an effective agent in maintaining and improving gingival health. PMID:27041835

  7. What's in placebos: who knows? Analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Golomb, Beatrice A; Erickson, Laura C; Koperski, Sabrina; Sack, Deanna; Enkin, Murray; Howick, Jeremy

    2010-10-19

    No regulations govern placebo composition. The composition of placebos can influence trial outcomes and merits reporting. To assess how often investigators specify the composition of placebos in randomized, placebo-controlled trials. 4 English-language general and internal medicine journals with high impact factors. 3 reviewers screened titles and abstracts of the journals to identify randomized, placebo-controlled trials published from January 2008 to December 2009. Reviewers independently abstracted data from the introduction and methods sections of identified articles, recording treatment type (pill, injection, or other) and whether placebo composition was stated. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Most studies did not disclose the composition of the study placebo. Disclosure was less common for pills than for injections and other treatments (8.2% vs. 26.7%; P = 0.002). Journals with high impact factors may not be representative. Placebos were seldom described in randomized, controlled trials of pills or capsules. Because the nature of the placebo can influence trial outcomes, placebo formulation should be disclosed in reports of placebo-controlled trials.

  8. Population control II: The population establishment today.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, B

    1997-01-01

    Although population assistance represents a relatively small share of official development assistance, it influences many other aspects of development planning. The organizations that comprise the population establishment have a common purpose--the reduction of population growth in the Third World--but they are not homogeneous and sometimes have conflicting goals and strategies. National governments, multilateral agencies, nongovernmental organizations, foundations, academic centers, and pressure groups all contribute to creating and sustaining what has become a virtual population control industry. Through scholarships, travel grants, awards, and favorable publicity, Third World elites have been encouraged to join the population establishment. The World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the U.N. Fund for Population Activities have pursued explicit strategies for pressuring Third World governments to design and implement population policies, most recently in Africa.

  9. Extrinsic stain removal with a toothpowder: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Khalil; Bokhari, Syed Akhtar Hussain; Haleem, Abdul; Kareem, Abdul; Khan, Ayyaz Ali; Hosein, Tasleem; Khan, Muhammad Usama

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The efficacy of a commercially available toothpowder was compared with toothpaste in removing extrinsic dental stains. Methods In this single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 77 volunteers were included from a residential professional college. All study subjects (control toothpaste users and test toothpowder users) plaque control measures. All study subjects were instructed to rinse with 5 ml 0.12% chlorhexidine mouthwash for 1 minute, twice and one cup of double tea bag solution three times daily for three weeks. Subjects were randomized into test (n=36) and control (n=36) groups. Toothpaste (control) and toothpowder (test) was used for two weeks to see the effects on removing stains on the labial surfaces of 12 anterior teeth. For measuring dental extrinsic stains Lobene Stain Index (SI) was used. Results The amount of stain following the use of toothpaste and toothpowder was more controlled with the experimental toothpowder. For all sites combined, there was evidence that the experimental toothpowder was significantly superior to toothpaste in reducing stain area (p<.001), stain intensity (p<.001) and composite/product (area × intensity) (p<.001). Conclusion Stain removing efficacy of toothpowder was significantly higher as compared with toothpaste. A toothpowder may be expected to be of benefit in controlling and removing extrinsic dental staining. PMID:25505862

  10. Propranolol versus captopril in the treatment of infantile hemangioma (IH): A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Hesham; Rasheed, Hoda; El-Komy, Mohamed M; Hegazy, Rehab A; Gawdat, Heba I; Abdel Halim, Dalia M; Abdel Hay, Rania M; Hegazy, Ranya A; Mohy, Abeer M

    2016-03-01

    Renin-angiotensin system components have been demonstrated in the biology of infantile hemangioma (IH). Captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, is proposed as a therapeutic alternative to oral propranolol. We sought to compare the benefit of propranolol and captopril in the treatment of IH, and to assess angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism in patients with IH and in control subjects. Thirty patients with IH and 35 healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either propranolol or captopril. Assessment was done clinically and by measurement of serum vascular endothelial growth factor and angiotensin II in patients and control subjects. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism was also studied. Clinical improvement was significantly better and faster in the patients treated with propranolol. Both groups showed reduced vascular endothelial growth factor and angiotensin II levels posttreatment, with a significantly higher percentage reduction in the propranolol-treated group. Cardiac side effects were reported only in the captopril-treated group. Baseline vascular endothelial growth factor level was significantly higher, and baseline angiotensin II level was significantly lower, in patients than control subjects. We studied a relatively small number of patients and control subjects. Propranolol shows greater benefit than captopril in the treatment of IH. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Protocol for a Randomized Phase II Trial for Mesh Optimization by Autologous Plasma Coating in Prolapse Repair: IDEAL Stage 3.

    PubMed

    Gerullis, Holger; Barski, Dimitri; Georgas, Evangelos; Borós, Mihaly; Ramon, Albert; Ecke, Thorsten H; Selinski, Silvia; Luedders, Dörte; Kramer, Mario W; Winter, Alexander; Wawroschek, Friedhelm; Otto, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Mesh-related complications especially after vaginal implantation have raised awareness lately because of severe adverse reactions and legal aspects. About 20% of patients suffer from complications after mesh insertion in the anterior vaginal wall. Autologous plasma coating of meshes prior to implantation has shown potential to improve the biocompatibility of meshes in vivo and in vitro. This innovative approach has been developed according to the IDEAL recommendations for surgical innovations. The method has still to be assessed at stage 3 accordingly. A protocol is developed for a prospective single-blinded randomized controlled phase II trial for biocompatibility optimization of anterior vaginal meshes for prolapse repair by autologous plasma coating versus non-coated meshes. The protocol aims at fulfilling the requirements for stage 3 (assessment) according to IDEAL. Eligible for inclusion are women with primary cystocele, requiring a surgical procedure, suitable for randomization, and willing to be randomized. Participants will be followed up by postal questionnaires (6 months post surgery and 12 months post randomization) and will also be reviewed in clinic 12 and 24 months post surgery. Primary endpoint is the assessment of mesh-related complications following the Clavien-Dindo classifications. QoL, sexual function assessment, efficacy, and validation of an already developed long-term register are considered secondary endpoints. To afford a calculated 10% reduction of postoperative complications through plasma-coated meshes vs. non-coated meshes at 1-year follow-up, a total 214 women in each arm will be necessary to achieve 80% power at a significance level of 5%. The protocol for this randomized clinical trial represents the conditions to assess the surgical innovation of plasma coating of meshes in order to improve the meshes' biocompatibility at stage 3 according to the IDEAL recommendations.

  12. (NTF) National Transonic Facility Test 213-SFW Flow Control II,

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-19

    (NTF) National Transonic Facility Test 213-SFW Flow Control II, Fast-MAC Model: The fundamental Aerodynamics Subsonic Transonic-Modular Active Control (Fast-MAC) Model was tested for the 2nd time in the NTF. The objectives were to document the effects of Reynolds numbers on circulation control aerodynamics and to develop and open data set for CFD code validation. Image taken in building 1236, National Transonic Facility

  13. Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Massage in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Anna-Kaisa

    2017-04-03

    Preterm birth affects about 10% of infants born in the United States. Massage therapy is being used in some neonatal intensive care units for its potential beneficial effects on preterm infants. This article reviews published randomized controlled trials on the effects of massage in preterm infants. Most studies evaluating the effect of massage in weight gain in premature infants suggest a positive effect on weight gain. Increase in vagal tone has been reported in infants who receive massage and has been suggested as a possible mechanism for improved weight gain. More studies are needed on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of massage therapy on weight gain in preterm infants. While some trials suggest improvements in developmental scores, decreased stress behavior, positive effects on immune system, improved pain tolerance and earlier discharge from the hospital, the number of such studies is small and further evidence is needed. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed on the effects of massage in preterm infants.

  14. A randomized 10-year prospective follow-up of Class II nanohybrid and conventional hybrid resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the 10-year durability of a nanohybrid resin composite in Class II restorations in a randomized controlled intraindividual comparison with its conventional hybrid resin composite predecessor. Each of 52 participants received at least two Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities were chosen at random to be restored with a nanohybrid resin composite (Excite/Tetric EvoCeram (TEC); n=61) and a conventional hybrid (Excite/Tetric Ceram (TC); n=61). The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then annually for 10 years. The overall performance of the experimental restorations was tested after intra-individual comparison and their ranking was tested using Friedman's two-way ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 5%. Four patient drop-outs with 8 restorations (4TEC, 4TC) were registered during the follow-up. A prediction of the caries risk showed that 16 of the evaluated 52 patients were considered as high risk patients. In total, 22 restorations, 11 TEC (3 premolars, 8 molars) and 11 TC (3 premolars, 8 molars) restorations failed during the 10 years. The main reason for failure was secondary caries (50%). 63% of the recurrent caries lesions were found in high caries risk participants. The overall success rate at 10 years was 80.7%, with an annual failure rate of 1.9%. No statistically significant difference was found in the overall survival rate between the two investigated resin composites. The nanohybrid and the conventional hybrid resin composite showed good clinical effectiveness in extensive Class II restorations during the 10-year study.

  15. [Randomized controlled trials terminated prematurely: beneficial therapy effects].

    PubMed

    Kluth, L A; Rink, M; Ahyai, S A; Fisch, M; Shariat, S F; Dahm, P

    2013-08-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) stopped prematurely for beneficial therapy effects are becoming increasingly more prevalent in the urological literature and often receive great attention in the public and medical media. Urologists who practice evidence-based medicine should be aware of the potential bias and the different reasons why and how early termination of RCTs can and will affect the results. This review provides insights into the challenges clinical urologists face by interpreting the results of prematurely terminated RCTs.

  16. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-05-19

    Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors' efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups--plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen the course of psychosis. Better designed

  17. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. Methods: To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. Results: There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors’ efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Conclusions: Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups—plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen

  18. The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control Systems: Generation II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschbacher, Mark; Bosworth, John

    2006-01-01

    The Second Generation (Gen II) control system for the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) program implements direct adaptive neural networks to demonstrate robust tolerance to faults and failures. The direct adaptive tracking controller integrates learning neural networks (NNs) with a dynamic inversion control law. The term direct adaptive is used because the error between the reference model and the aircraft response is being compensated or directly adapted to minimize error without regard to knowing the cause of the error. No parameter estimation is needed for this direct adaptive control system. In the Gen II design, the feedback errors are regulated with a proportional-plus-integral (PI) compensator. This basic compensator is augmented with an online NN that changes the system gains via an error-based adaptation law to improve aircraft performance at all times, including normal flight, system failures, mispredicted behavior, or changes in behavior resulting from damage.

  19. Generating controllable type-II Weyl points via periodic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomantara, Raditya Weda; Gong, Jiangbin

    2016-12-01

    Type-II Weyl semimetals are a novel gapless topological phase of matter discovered recently in 2015. Similar to normal (type-I) Weyl semimetals, type-II Weyl semimetals consist of isolated band touching points. However, unlike type-I Weyl semimetals which have a linear energy dispersion around the band touching points forming a three-dimensional (3D) Dirac cone, type-II Weyl semimetals have a tilted conelike structure around the band touching points. This leads to various novel physical properties that are different from type-I Weyl semimetals. In order to study further the properties of type-II Weyl semimetals and perhaps realize them for future applications, generating controllable type-II Weyl semimetals is desirable. In this paper, we propose a way to generate a type-II Weyl semimetal via a generalized Harper model interacting with a harmonic driving field. When the field is treated classically, we find that only type-I Weyl points emerge. However, by treating the field quantum mechanically, some of these type-I Weyl points may turn into type-II Weyl points. Moreover, by tuning the coupling strength, it is possible to control the tilt of the Weyl points and the energy difference between two Weyl points, which makes it possible to generate a pair of mixed Weyl points of type-I and type-II. We also discuss how to physically distinguish these two types of Weyl points in the framework of our model via the Landau level structures in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. The results are of general interest to quantum optics as well as ongoing studies of Floquet topological phases.

  20. Randomized Algorithms for Systems and Control: Theory and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    does not display a currently valid OMB control number . 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2008 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2008 to 00-00-2008 4...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Randomized Algorithms for Systems and Control: Theory and Applications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) IEIIT-CNR

  1. A randomized controlled trial to promote volunteering in older adults.

    PubMed

    Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wurm, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    Volunteering is presumed to confer health benefits, but interventions to encourage older adults to volunteer are sparse. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial with 280 community-dwelling older German adults was conducted to test the effects of a theory-based social-cognitive intervention against a passive waiting-list control group and an active control intervention designed to motivate physical activity. Self-reports of weekly volunteering minutes were assessed at baseline (5 weeks before the intervention) as well as 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Participants in the treatment group increased their weekly volunteering minutes to a greater extent than participants in the control groups 6 weeks after the intervention. We conclude that a single, face-to-face group session can increase volunteering among older community-dwelling adults. However, the effects need some time to unfold because changes in volunteering were not apparent 2 weeks after the intervention.

  2. Intracisternal galanin/angiotensin II interactions in central cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Parrado, Concepción; Vela, Carmen; Coveñas, Rafael; Yanaihara, Noboru; Fuxe, Kjell; González-Barón, Salvador; Narváez, José A

    2005-04-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interactions between angiotensin II (Ang II) and galanin(1-29) [GAL(1-29)] or its N-terminal fragment galanin(1-15) [GAL(1-15)] on central cardiovascular control. The involvement of angiotensin type1 (AT1) receptor subtype was analyzed by the AT1 antagonist, DuP 753. Anesthesized male Sprague-Dawley rats received intracisternal microinjections of Ang II (3 nmol) with GAL(1-29) (3 nmol) or GAL(1-15) (0.1 nmol) alone or in combination. The changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) recorded from the femoral artery were analyzed. The injection of Ang II and GAL(1-15) alone did not produce any change in MAP. However, coinjections of both Ang II and GAL(1-15) elicited a significant vasopressor response. This response was blocked by DuP 753. Ang II and GAL(1-15) alone produced an increase in HR. The coinjections of Ang II with GAL(1-15) induced an increase in HR not significantly different from the tachycardia produced by each peptide. The presence of DuP 753 counteracted this response. GAL(1-29) alone elicited a transient vasopressor response that disappeared in the presence of Ang II. The coinjections of Ang II with GAL(1-29) and with DuP 753 restored the transient vasopressor effect produced by GAL(1-29). GAL(1-29) produced a slight but significant tachycardic effect that was not modified in the presence of Ang II. The presence of DuP 753 did not modify the tachycardic response produced by Ang II and GAL(1-29). These results give indications for the existence of a differential modulatory effect of Ang II with GAL(1-15) and GAL(1-29) on central blood pressure response that might be dependent on the activity of the angiotensin AT1 receptor subtype.

  3. Randomly Sampled-Data Control Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kuoruey

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to solve the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) problem with random time sampling. Such a sampling scheme may arise from imperfect instrumentation as in the case of sampling jitter. It can also model the stochastic information exchange among decentralized controllers to name just a few. A practical suboptimal controller is proposed with the nice property of mean square stability. The proposed controller is suboptimal in the sense that the control structure is limited to be linear. Because of i. i. d. assumption, this does not seem unreasonable. Once the control structure is fixed, the stochastic discrete optimal control problem is transformed into an equivalent deterministic optimal control problem with dynamics described by the matrix difference equation. The N-horizon control problem is solved using the Lagrange's multiplier method. The infinite horizon control problem is formulated as a classical minimization problem. Assuming existence of solution to the minimization problem, the total system is shown to be mean square stable under certain observability conditions. Computer simulations are performed to illustrate these conditions.

  4. Robotic Compared With Laparoscopic Sacrocolpopexy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Mueller, Elizabeth R.; Tarnay, Christopher; Smith, Bridget; Stroupe, Kevin; Rosenman, Amy; Brubaker, Linda; Bresee, Catherine; Kenton, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Laparoscopic and robotic sacrocolpopexy are widely used for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) treatment. Evidence comparing outcomes and costs is lacking. We compared costs and clinically relevant outcomes in women randomized to laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy compared with robotic sacrocolpopexy. Methods: Participants with symptomatic stage POP II or greater, including significant apical support loss, were randomized to either laparoscopic or robotic sacrocolpopexy. We compared surgical costs (including costs for robot, initial hospitalization) and re-hospitalization within 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain, POP quantification, symptom severity and quality of life, and adverse events. Results: We randomized 78 women [mean age 59 years]: laparoscopic (n=38), robotic (n=40). The robotic sacrocolpopexy group had higher initial hospital costs ($19,616 vs. $11,573, p < 0.001) and over 6 weeks, hospital costs remained higher for robotic sacrocolpopexy ($20,898 vs. $12,170, p < 0.001). When we excluded costs of robot purchase and maintenance, we did not detect a statistical difference in initial day of surgery costs of robotic vs. laparoscopic ($12,586 vs. $11,573; p = 0.160) or hospital costs over 6 weeks ($13,867 vs. $12,170; p = 0.060). The robotic group had longer operating room times (202.8 min vs. 178.4 min, p = 0.030) and higher pain scores 1-week after surgery (3.5 ± 2.1 vs. 2.6 ± 2.2; p = 0.044). There were no group differences in symptom bother by Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, POP stage, or rate of adverse events. Conclusion: Costs of robotic sacrocolpopexy are higher than laparoscopic, while short-term outcomes and complications are similar. Primary cost differences resulted from robot maintenance and purchase costs. PMID:24463657

  5. Subarachnoid morphine versus TAP blocks for enhanced recovery after caesarean section delivery: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jarraya, Anouar; Zghal, Jamil; Abidi, Sofiene; Smaoui, Mohamed; Kolsi, Kamel

    2016-12-01

    Subarachnoid morphine is widely used for pain relief in enhanced recovery program after cesarean section in spite of its side effects. However, the role of TAP block is still controversial. The aim of our study was to compare the impact of these analgesic techniques (subarachnoid morphine and TAP block) on enhanced recovery after cesarean section. In this randomized controlled trial, we included patients scheduled for cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomized in two groups. Group I: received spinal anesthesia with 100μg of subarachnoid morphine. Group II: received spinal anesthesia without subarachnoid morphine followed by an ultrasound-guided TAP block. We assessed the time required for mobilization, for re-establishment of gastrointestinal transit and for breast-feeding. TAP block allowed earlier postoperative mobilization. Time required for getting up was significantly lower in group II (9.4h versus 6.9h; P=0.024) as well as time required for walking (12.4h versus 7.4h; P=0.001). TAP block allowed earlier re-establishment of gastrointestinal transit (11.2h in group I versus 8.1h in group II; P<0.001). TAP block seems to be suitable with enhanced recovery programs. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of Placebo in a Manual Therapy Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Bjørn Russell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    At present, no consensus exists among clinical and academic experts regarding an appropriate placebo for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). Therefore, we investigated whether it was possible to conduct a chiropractic manual-therapy RCT with placebo. Seventy migraineurs were randomized to a single-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial that consisted of 12 treatment sessions over 3 months. The participants were randomized to chiropractic SMT or placebo (sham manipulation). After each session, the participants were surveyed on whether they thought they had undergone active treatment (“yes” or “no”) and how strongly they believed that active treatment was received (numeric rating scale 0–10). The outcome measures included the rate of successful blinding and the certitude of the participants’ beliefs in both treatment groups. At each treatment session, more than 80% of the participants believed that they had undergone active treatment, regardless of group allocation. The odds ratio for believing that active treatment was received was >10 for all treatment sessions in both groups (all p < 0.001). The blinding was maintained throughout the RCT. Our results strongly demonstrate that it is possible to conduct a single-blinded manual-therapy RCT with placebo and to maintain the blinding throughout 12 treatment sessions given over 3 months. PMID:26145718

  7. Validation of Placebo in a Manual Therapy Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chaibi, Aleksander; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Bjørn Russell, Michael

    2015-07-06

    At present, no consensus exists among clinical and academic experts regarding an appropriate placebo for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). Therefore, we investigated whether it was possible to conduct a chiropractic manual-therapy RCT with placebo. Seventy migraineurs were randomized to a single-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial that consisted of 12 treatment sessions over 3 months. The participants were randomized to chiropractic SMT or placebo (sham manipulation). After each session, the participants were surveyed on whether they thought they had undergone active treatment ("yes" or "no") and how strongly they believed that active treatment was received (numeric rating scale 0-10). The outcome measures included the rate of successful blinding and the certitude of the participants' beliefs in both treatment groups. At each treatment session, more than 80% of the participants believed that they had undergone active treatment, regardless of group allocation. The odds ratio for believing that active treatment was received was >10 for all treatment sessions in both groups (all p < 0.001). The blinding was maintained throughout the RCT. Our results strongly demonstrate that it is possible to conduct a single-blinded manual-therapy RCT with placebo and to maintain the blinding throughout 12 treatment sessions given over 3 months.

  8. In utero Repair of Myelomeningocele: Rationale, Initial Clinical Experience and a Randomized Controlled Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Enrico; Flake, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Myelomeningocele (MMC), one of the most common congenital malformations, can result in severe lifelong disabilities, including paraplegia, hydrocephalus, Arnold-Chiari II malformation, incontinence, sexual dysfunction, skeletal deformations, and mental impairment. MMC was the first nonlethal anomaly to be treated by fetal surgery. Studies in animals provide compelling evidence that the primary cause of the neurological deficit associated with MMC is not simply incomplete neurulation but rather chronic mechanical injury and amniotic-fluid-induced chemical trauma that progressively damage the exposed neural tissue during gestation. Initial results suggest that the surgical repair of MMC before 25 weeks of gestation may preserve neurological function, reverse the hindbrain herniation of the Arnold-Chiari II malformation, and obviate the need for postnatal placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. As it is currently unknown whether fetal surgery for MMC is truly beneficial compared to standard postnatal care, a randomized, controlled clinical trial has been initiated within the United States. PMID:22479081

  9. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Caries Prevention in Dental Practice.

    PubMed

    Tickle, M; O'Neill, C; Donaldson, M; Birch, S; Noble, S; Killough, S; Murphy, L; Greer, M; Brodison, J; Verghis, R; Worthington, H V

    2017-07-01

    We conducted a parallel group randomized controlled trial of children initially aged 2 to 3 y who were caries free, to prevent the children becoming caries active over the subsequent 36 mo. The setting was 22 dental practices in Northern Ireland, and children were randomly assigned by a clinical trials unit (CTU) (using computer-generated random numbers, with allocation concealed from the dental practice until each child was recruited) to the intervention (22,600-ppm fluoride varnish, toothbrush, 50-mL tube of 1,450 ppm fluoride toothpaste, and standardized, evidence-based prevention advice) or advice-only control at 6-monthly intervals. The primary outcome measure was conversion from caries-free to caries-active states. Secondary outcome measures were number of decayed, missing, or filled teeth (dmfs) in caries-active children, number of episodes of pain, and number of extracted teeth. Adverse reactions were recorded. Calibrated external examiners, blinded to the child's study group, assessed the status of the children at baseline and after 3 y. In total, 1,248 children (624 randomized to each group) were recruited, and 1,096 (549 intervention, 547 control) were included in the final analyses. Eighty-seven percent of intervention and 86% of control children attended every 6-mo visit ( P = 0.77). A total of 187 (34%) in the intervention group converted to caries active compared to 213 (39%) in the control group (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-1.04; P = 0.11). Mean dmfs of those with caries in the intervention group was 7.2 compared to 9.6 in the control group ( P = 0.007). There was no significant difference in the number of episodes of pain between groups ( P = 0.81) or in the number of teeth extracted in caries-active children ( P = 0.95). Ten children in the intervention group had adverse reactions of a minor nature. This well-conducted trial failed to demonstrate that the intervention kept children caries free, but there was evidence that once

  10. The Effectiveness of Propolis on Gingivitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E.; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Methods: Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days −14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). Results: The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13–22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Conclusions: Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period. PMID:25380344

  11. Laser Acupuncture for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Raith, Wolfgang; Schmölzer, Georg M; Resch, Bernhard; Reiterer, Fritz; Avian, Alexander; Koestenberger, Martin; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2015-11-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is usually treated with opiate derivatives and supported with nonpharmacological treatment. This prospective, randomized, controlled, blinded, single-center study was carried out between March 2009 and November 2014. Newborn infants diagnosed with NAS after maternal opioid substitution therapy were eligible for inclusion. Infants were randomly allocated to the acupuncture group (combining laser acupuncture and pharmacological therapy of morphine and phenobarbital) or control group (pharmacological therapy alone). Laser acupuncture was performed with a LABpen MED 10 (675 nm/10 mW) at 5 ear and 4 body acupuncture points, bilaterally, and sessions were repeated every day. The primary outcome measure was duration of oral morphine therapy for NAS. Secondary outcomes included highest single Finnegan score, time to highest single Finnegan score, maximum amount of oral morphine solution (in milliliters per kilogram and milligrams per kilogram), time to maximum amount of oral morphine solution, and length of hospital stay. Twenty-eight newborns (14 in each group) were eligible for analysis. Duration of oral morphine therapy was significantly reduced in the acupuncture group compared with the control group (28 vs 39 days, respectively, P = .019). In addition, we observed a significantly reduced length of hospital stay in the acupuncture group compared with the control group (35 days [interquartile range 25 to 47] vs 50 days [36 to 66], P = .048). Adjunctive laser acupuncture significantly reduced the duration of morphine therapy in newborns with NAS. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. The effectiveness of propolis on gingivitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bretz, Walter A; Paulino, Niraldo; Nör, Jacques E; Moreira, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    A randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a propolis rinse on induced gingivitis by using the co-twin study design. Twenty-one twin pairs (n=42) were enrolled in a gingivitis study with oral hygiene promotion (14 days) and gingivitis induction (21 days). During the gingivitis induction phase, one member of the twin pair was randomly assigned to a 2% typified propolis rinse, and the other was assigned a color-matched 0.05% sodium fluoride plus 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride rinse (positive control). Patients rinsed twice daily with 20 mL for 30 seconds for 21 days. Gingivitis was measured on days -14 (baseline), 0 (after hygiene phase), and 21 (after no-hygiene phase) by using the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) and by standard digital imaging of the gum tissues (G-parameter). The 38 persons who completed the study (age 13-22 years) were well balanced according to PBS at baseline and G-parameter after the initial hygiene phase. After 21 days without oral hygiene, the propolis rinse and positive control rinse groups did not differ significantly for average PBS measurements or G-parameter. Use of a 2% typified propolis rinse was equivalent to a positive control rinse during a 21-day no-hygiene period.

  13. Aromatherapy and behaviour disturbances in dementia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, J; Brown, R; Coulter, F; Irvine, E; Copland, C

    2001-10-01

    A random controlled trial of the relaxing effects of an aromatherapy massage on disordered behaviour in dementia was conducted. Twenty-one patients were randomly allocated into one of three conditions, aromatherapy and massage (AM), conversation and aromatherapy (CA) and massage only (M). AM showed the greatest reduction in the frequency of excessive motor behaviour of all three conditions. This reached statistical significance between the hours of three and four pm (p < 0.05). Post hoc analysis suggested that at this time of day the AM consistently reduced motor behaviour when compared with CA (p = 0.05). This provides preliminary evidence of a measurable sedative effect of aromatherapy massage on dementia within a robust scientific paradigm. Further research is recommended with an expanded sample size. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Paper Tape Prevents Foot Blisters: A Randomized Prevention Trial Assessing Paper Tape in Endurance Distances II (Pre-TAPED II).

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Sharp, Louis J; Christensen, Mark; Phillips, Caleb; DiTullio, Alexandra; Dalton, Andrew; Ng, Pearlly; Shangkuan, Jennifer; Shea, Katherine; Krabak, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether paper tape prevents foot blisters in multistage ultramarathon runners. Multisite prospective randomized trial. The 2014 250-km (155-mile) 6-stage RacingThePlanet ultramarathons in Jordan, Gobi, Madagascar, and Atacama Deserts. One hundred twenty-eight participants were enrolled: 19 (15%) from the Jordan, 35 (27%) from Gobi, 21 (16%) from Madagascar, and 53 (41%) from the Atacama Desert. The mean age was 39.3 years (22-63) and body mass index was 24.2 kg/m (17.4-35.1), with 31 (22.5%) females. Paper tape was applied to a randomly selected foot before the race, either to participants' blister-prone areas or randomly selected location if there was no blister history, with untaped areas of the same foot used as the control. Development of a blister anywhere on the study foot. One hundred six (83%) participants developed 117 blisters, with treatment success in 98 (77%) runners. Paper tape reduced blisters by 40% (P < 0.01, 95% confidence interval, 28-52) with a number needed to treat of 1.31. Most of the study participants had 1 blister (78%), with most common locations on the toes (n = 58, 50%) and heel (n = 27, 23%), with 94 (80%) blisters occurring by the end of stage 2. Treatment success was associated with earlier stages [odds ratio (OR), 74.9, P < 0.01] and time spent running (OR, 0.66, P = 0.01). Paper tape was found to prevent both the incidence and frequency of foot blisters in runners.

  15. Ketorolac does not increase perioperative bleeding: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Gobble, Ryan M; Hoang, Han L T; Kachniarz, Bart; Orgill, Dennis P

    2014-03-01

    Postoperative pain control is essential for optimal patient outcomes. Ketorolac is an attractive alternative for achieving pain control postoperatively, but concerns over postoperative bleeding have limited its use. Computer searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were performed. Twenty-seven double-blind, randomized, controlled studies were reviewed by two independent investigators for the incidence of adverse events, including postoperative bleeding. Comprehensive meta-analysis software was used to evaluate the differences between ketorolac and control groups. Twenty-seven studies with 2314 patients were analyzed. Postoperative bleeding occurred in 33 of 1304 patients (2.5 percent) in the ketorolac group compared with 21 of 1010 (2.1 percent) in the control group (OR, 1.1; 95 percent CI, 0.61 to 2.06; p = 0.72). Adverse events were similar in the groups, 31.7 percent in the control group and 27.9 percent in the ketorolac group (OR, 0.64; 95 percent CI, 0.41 to 1.01; p = 0.06). There was a lower incidence of adverse effects with low-dose ketorolac (OR, 0.49; 95 percent CI, 0.27 to 0.91; p = 0.02). Pain control with ketorolac was superior to controls and equivalent to opioids. This is the first meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials examining whether there is increased postoperative bleeding with ketorolac. Postoperative bleeding was not significantly increased with ketorolac compared with controls, and adverse effects were not statistically different between the groups. Pain control was found to be superior with ketorolac compared with controls. Ketorolac should be considered for postoperative pain control, especially to limit the use of opioid pain medications. Therapeutic, II.

  16. Biomimetic propulsion under random heaving conditions, using active pitch control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politis, Gerasimos; Politis, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    Marine mammals travel long distances by utilizing and transforming wave energy to thrust through proper control of their caudal fin. On the other hand, manmade ships traveling in a wavy sea store large amounts of wave energy in the form of kinetic energy for heaving, pitching, rolling and other ship motions. A natural way to extract this energy and transform it to useful propulsive thrust is by using a biomimetic wing. The aim of this paper is to show how an actively pitched biomimetic wing could achieve this goal when it performs a random heaving motion. More specifically, we consider a biomimetic wing traveling with a given translational velocity in an infinitely extended fluid and performing a random heaving motion with a given energy spectrum which corresponds to a given sea state. A formula is invented by which the instantaneous pitch angle of the wing is determined using the heaving data of the current and past time steps. Simulations are then performed for a biomimetic wing at different heave energy spectra, using an indirect Source-Doublet 3-D-BEM, together with a time stepping algorithm capable to track the random motion of the wing. A nonlinear pressure type Kutta condition is applied at the trailing edge of the wing. With a mollifier-based filtering technique, the 3-D unsteady rollup pattern created by the random motion of the wing is calculated without any simplifying assumptions regarding its geometry. Calculated unsteady forces, moments and useful power, show that the proposed active pitch control always results in thrust producing motions, with significant propulsive power production and considerable beneficial stabilizing action to ship motions. Calculation of the power required to set the pitch angle prove it to be a very small percentage of the useful power and thus making the practical application of the device very tractable.

  17. Testimony Therapy With Ritual: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Esala, Jennifer J; Taing, Sopheap

    2017-02-01

    Testimony therapy can provide low-cost, brief, simple, and culturally adaptable psychosocial services in low-income countries (Agger, Raghuvanshi, Khan, Polatin, & Laursen, 2009). Nonetheless, there have been no well-controlled studies of testimony therapy. We report the analyses of a randomized controlled trial designed to assess the effectiveness of testimony therapy plus a culturally adapted ceremony in reducing mental health symptoms among Khmer Rouge torture survivors from across Cambodia. Using multilevel modeling, we compared symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression between a treatment (n = 45) and a control group (n = 43) at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. We found that testimony therapy plus ceremony significantly reduced symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (d = 0.49), anxiety (d = 0.44), and depression (d = 0.53).

  18. NSAID Use after Bariatric Surgery: a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Yska, Jan Peter; Gertsen, Sanneke; Flapper, Gerbrich; Emous, Marloes; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N

    2016-12-01

    Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be avoided in bariatric surgery patients. If use of an NSAID is inevitable, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) should also be used. To determine the effect of an, compared to care-as-usual, additional intervention to reduce NSAID use in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, and to determine the use of PPIs in patients who use NSAIDs after bariatric surgery. A randomized controlled intervention study in patients after bariatric surgery. Patients were randomized to an intervention or a control group. The intervention consisted of sending a letter to patients and their general practitioners on the risks of use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery and the importance of avoiding NSAID use. The control group received care-as-usual. Dispensing data of NSAIDs and PPIs were collected from patients' pharmacies: from a period of 6 months before and from 3 until 9 months after the intervention. Two hundred forty-eight patients were included (intervention group: 124; control group: 124). The number of users of NSAIDs decreased from 22 to 18 % in the intervention group and increased from 20 to 21 % in the control group (NS). The use of a PPI with an NSAID rose from 52 to 55 % in the intervention group, and from 52 to 69 % in the control group (NS). Informing patients and their general practitioners by letter, in addition to care-as-usual, is not an effective intervention to reduce the use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery (trial number NTR3665).

  19. Partner randomized controlled trial: study protocol and coaching intervention.

    PubMed

    Garbutt, Jane M; Highstein, Gabrielle; Yan, Yan; Strunk, Robert C

    2012-04-02

    Many children with asthma live with frequent symptoms and activity limitations, and visits for urgent care are common. Many pediatricians do not regularly meet with families to monitor asthma control, identify concerns or problems with management, or provide self-management education. Effective interventions to improve asthma care such as small group training and care redesign have been difficult to disseminate into office practice. This paper describes the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate a 12-month telephone-coaching program designed to support primary care management of children with persistent asthma and subsequently to improve asthma control and disease-related quality of life and reduce urgent care events for asthma care. Randomization occurred at the practice level with eligible families within a practice having access to the coaching program or to usual care. The coaching intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Targeted behaviors included 1) effective use of controller medications, 2) effective use of rescue medications and 3) monitoring to ensure optimal control. Trained lay coaches provided parents with education and support for asthma care, tailoring the information provided and frequency of contact to the parent's readiness to change their child's day-to-day asthma management. Coaching calls varied in frequency from weekly to monthly. For each participating family, follow-up measurements were obtained at 12- and 24-months after enrollment in the study during a telephone interview. The primary outcomes were the mean change in 1) the child's asthma control score, 2) the parent's quality of life score, and 3) the number of urgent care events assessed at 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes reflected adherence to guideline recommendations by the primary care pediatricians and included the proportion of children prescribed controller medications, having maintenance care visits at least twice a year

  20. Partner randomized controlled trial: study protocol and coaching intervention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many children with asthma live with frequent symptoms and activity limitations, and visits for urgent care are common. Many pediatricians do not regularly meet with families to monitor asthma control, identify concerns or problems with management, or provide self-management education. Effective interventions to improve asthma care such as small group training and care redesign have been difficult to disseminate into office practice. Methods and design This paper describes the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate a 12-month telephone-coaching program designed to support primary care management of children with persistent asthma and subsequently to improve asthma control and disease-related quality of life and reduce urgent care events for asthma care. Randomization occurred at the practice level with eligible families within a practice having access to the coaching program or to usual care. The coaching intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Targeted behaviors included 1) effective use of controller medications, 2) effective use of rescue medications and 3) monitoring to ensure optimal control. Trained lay coaches provided parents with education and support for asthma care, tailoring the information provided and frequency of contact to the parent's readiness to change their child's day-to-day asthma management. Coaching calls varied in frequency from weekly to monthly. For each participating family, follow-up measurements were obtained at 12- and 24-months after enrollment in the study during a telephone interview. The primary outcomes were the mean change in 1) the child's asthma control score, 2) the parent's quality of life score, and 3) the number of urgent care events assessed at 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes reflected adherence to guideline recommendations by the primary care pediatricians and included the proportion of children prescribed controller medications, having maintenance

  1. Epicatechin, procyanidins, cocoa, and appetite: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, James A; O'Donnell, Ryan; Shurpin, Miriam; Kordunova, Dorina

    2016-09-01

    In 2 randomized controlled trials, it was reported that dark chocolate acutely decreased appetite in human subjects, but the authors did not assess the types or concentrations of cocoa compounds that are needed. Other studies have suggested that the cocoa compounds epicatechin and procyanidins may be involved. We sought to test the hypotheses that, compared with placebo (an alkalized cocoa mixture containing essentially no epicatechin or procyanidins), the following beverages cause a decrease in appetite: 1) a nonalkalized cocoa mixture; 2) epicatechin plus placebo; and 3) procyanidins plus placebo. We measured the concentrations of cocoa compounds in all beverages. We used a 4-way randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled trial that was balanced for period and carryover effects in 28 healthy, young-adult men. We also conducted a smaller (n = 14), parallel, secondary randomized trial in which we explored the effects of higher doses of epicatechin and procyanidins. Our primary measure of appetite was ad libitum pizza intake 150 min after beverage ingestion. We used a linear mixed-model analysis. Intakes of beverages with the nonalkalized cocoa mixture that contained 0.6 mg epicatechin, 0.2 mg catechin, and 2.9 mg monomer-decamer procyanidins/kg body weight did not decrease pizza intake significantly (P = 0.29) compared with intake of the placebo. In the smaller secondary trial, a combination of epicatechin and the nonalkalized cocoa mixture that contained 1.6 mg epicatechin/kg body weight significantly decreased pizza intake by 18.7% (P = 0.04). Our nonalkalized cocoa mixture was associated with an acute decrease in food intake only after being supplemented with epicatechin. It is possible that epicatechin at a dose of >1.6 mg/kg body weight, alone or in concert with appropriate catalytic cocoa compounds, may be useful for helping people control their food intakes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02408289. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Minorities.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A; McDermott, Michael P; Trief, Paula M; Goodman, Steven R; Morse, Gene D; LaGuardia, Jennifer G; Sharp, Daryl; Ryan, Richard M

    2016-07-01

    To conduct a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of different mentoring interventions on the basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented minorities and women in academia. Participants were 150 mentor/protégé dyads from three academic medical centers and eight other colleges and universities in western and central New York, randomized from 2010 to 2013 into mentor training (using principles of self-determination theory); peer mentoring for protégés; mentor training and peer mentoring for protégés combined; or control/usual practice. Protégé participants were graduate students, fellows, and junior faculty who were from underrepresented groups based on race, ethnicity, gender, or disability.The primary analysis was a comparison of intervention effects on changes in protégés' satisfaction of their basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy, and relatedness) with their mentor. They completed a well-validated, online questionnaire every two months for one year. There was no significant effect at the end of one year of either mentor training or peer mentoring on protégés' psychological basic need satisfaction with mentor specifically or at work in general. Exploratory analyses showed a significant effect of the mentor-based intervention on the protégés' overall psychological need satisfaction with their mentor at two months, the time point closest to completing mentor training. This randomized controlled trial showed a potential short-term effect of mentor training on changing basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented scholars with their mentors. Despite the lack of sustained effect of either mentor training or peer mentoring, these short-term changes suggest feasibility and potential for future study.

  3. Randomized controlled trial design in rheumatoid arthritis: the past decade

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Vibeke; Sokolove, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Much progress has occurred over the past decade in rheumatoid arthritis trial design. Recognized challenges have led to the establishment of a clear regulatory pathway to demonstrate efficacy of a new therapeutic. The use of pure placebo beyond 12 to 16 weeks has been demonstrated to be unethical and thus background therapy and/or early rescue has become regular practice. Goals of remission and 'treating to targets' may prove more relevant to identify real-world use of new and existing therapeutics. Identification of rare adverse events associated with new therapies has resulted in intensive safety evaluation during randomized controlled trials and emphasis on postmarketing surveillance and use of registries. PMID:19232061

  4. Neighborhood Effects in a Behavioral Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Sandi L.; Leonard, Tammy; Murdoch, James; Hughes, Amy; McQueen, Amy; Gupta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions intended to modify health behaviors may be influenced by neighborhood effects which can impede unbiased estimation of intervention effects. Examining a RCT designed to increase colorectal cancer (CRC) screening (N=5,628), we found statistically significant neighborhood effects: average CRC test use among neighboring study participants was significantly and positively associated with individual patient’s CRC test use. This potentially important spatially-varying covariate has not previously been considered in a RCT. Our results suggest that future RCTs of health behavior interventions should assess potential social interactions between participants, which may cause intervention arm contamination and may bias effect size estimation. PMID:25456014

  5. Medication reconciliation at patient admission: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Antonio E.; Lombardi, Natália F.; Andrzejevski, Vânia S.; Frandoloso, Gibran; Correr, Cassyano J.; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure length of hospital stay (LHS) in patients receiving medication reconciliation. Secondary characteristics included analysis of number of preadmission medications, medications prescribed at admission, number of discrepancies, and pharmacists interventions done and accepted by the attending physician. Methods: A 6 month, randomized, controlled trial conducted at a public teaching hospital in southern Brazil. Patients admitted to general wards were randomized to receive usual care or medication reconciliation, performed within the first 72 hours of hospital admission. Results: The randomization process assigned 68 patients to UC and 65 to MR. LHS was 10±15 days in usual care and 9±16 days in medication reconciliation (p=0.620). The total number of discrepancies was 327 in the medication reconciliation group, comprising 52.6% of unintentional discrepancies. Physicians accepted approximately 75.0% of the interventions. Conclusion: These results highlight weakness at patient transition care levels in a public teaching hospital. LHS, the primary outcome, should be further investigated in larger studies. Medication reconciliation was well accepted by physicians and it is a useful tool to find and correct discrepancies, minimizing the risk of adverse drug events and improving patient safety. PMID:27011775

  6. Corticosteroid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhong-Min; Wang, Shi-Ji; Zhao, Shu-Jie; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Ying; Wang, Yu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent reports about the benefits of corticosteroid therapy in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have shown conflicting results. We aimed to explore the effects of corticosteroid therapy in SAP patients on patient outcomes by performing a meta-analysis. Methods: Databases (Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedicine Database, and China Academic Journal Full-Text Database) were queried for all relevant, randomized, controlled trials investigating corticosteroid therapy in patients with SAP. Results: Six randomized, controlled trials including 430 SAP patients were identified. Corticosteroid therapy for SAP was associated with reductions in the length of hospital stay, the need for surgical intervention, and the mortality rate (weighted mean difference [WMD]: -9.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -16.91 to -2.04, P = 0.01; odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.18-0.67, P = 0.002; OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.94, P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the complication rates or Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores in patients with or without corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion: Corticosteroid therapy may improve outcomes in patients with SAP. PMID:26339332

  7. Fuzzy logic in control systems: Fuzzy logic controller. I, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chuen Chien

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and applications of fuzzy-logic controllers (FLCs) are examined in an analytical review. The fundamental principles of fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic are recalled; the basic FLC components (fuzzification and defuzzification interfaces, knowledge base, and decision-making logic) are described; and the advantages of FLCs for incorporating expert knowledge into a control system are indicated. Particular attention is given to fuzzy implication functions, the interpretation of sentence connectives (and, also), compositional operators, and inference mechanisms. Applications discussed include the FLC-guided automobile developed by Sugeno and Nishida (1985), FLC hardware systems, FLCs for subway trains and ship-loading cranes, fuzzy-logic chips, and fuzzy computers.

  8. A randomized parallel-group dietary study for stages II-IV ovarian cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Raheem J; Garcia-Prieto, Celia; Berglund, Maria; Hernandez, Mike; Hajek, Richard A; Handy, Beverly; Brown, Jubilee; Jones, Lovell A

    2012-03-01

    Few studies have examined the dietary habits of ovarian cancer survivors. Therefore, we conducted a study to assess the feasibility and impact of two dietary interventions for ovarian cancer survivors. In this randomized, parallel-group study, 51 women (mean age, 53 years) diagnosed with stages II-IV ovarian cancer were recruited and randomly assigned to a low fat, high fiber (LFHF) diet or a modified National Cancer Institute diet supplemented with a soy-based beverage and encapsulated fruit and vegetable juice concentrates (FVJCs). Changes in clinical measures, serum carotenoid and tocopherol levels, dietary intake, anthropometry, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were assessed with paired t-tests. The recruitment rate was 25%, and the retention rate was 75% at 6 months. At baseline, 28% and 45% of women met guidelines for intake of fiber and of fruits and vegetables, respectively. After 6 months, total serum carotenoid levels and α- and β-carotene concentrations were significantly increased in both groups (P<0.01); however, β-carotene concentrations were increased more in the FVJC group. Serum β-cryptoxanthin levels, fiber intake (+5.2g/day), and daily servings of juice (+0.9 servings/day) and vegetables (+1.3 servings/day) were all significantly increased in the LFHF group (all P<0.05). Serum levels of albumin, lutein and zeaxanthin, retinol, and retinyl palmitate were significantly increased in the FVJC group (all P<0.05). No changes in cancer antigen-125, anthropometry, or HRQOL were observed. Overall, this study supports the feasibility of designing dietary interventions for stages II-IV ovarian cancer survivors and provides preliminary evidence that a low fat high fiber diet and a diet supplemented with encapsulated FVJC may increase phytonutrients in ovarian cancer survivors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mental practice enhances surgical technical skills: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sonal; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Sirimanna, Pramudith; Moran, Aidan; Grantcharov, Teodor; Kneebone, Roger; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara

    2011-02-01

    To assess the effects of mental practice on surgical performance. Increasing concerns for patient safety have highlighted a need for alternative training strategies outside the operating room. Mental practice (MP), "the cognitive rehearsal of a task before performance," has been successful in sport and music to enhance skill. This study investigates whether MP enhances performance in laparoscopic surgery. After baseline skills testing, 20 novice surgeons underwent training on an evidence-based virtual reality curriculum. After randomization using the closed envelope technique, all participants performed 5 Virtual Reality (VR) laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC). Mental practice participants performed 30 minutes of MP before each LC; control participants viewed an online lecture. Technical performance was assessed using video Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills-based global ratings scale (scored from 7 to 35). Mental imagery was assessed using a previously validated Mental Imagery Questionnaire. Eighteen participants completed the study. There were no intergroup differences in baseline technical ability. Learning curves were demonstrated for both MP and control groups. Mental practice was superior to control (global ratings) for the first LC (median 20 vs 15, P = 0.005), second LC (20.5 vs 13.5, P = 0.001), third LC (24 vs 15.5, P < 0.001), fourth LC (25.5 vs 15.5, P < 0.001) and the fifth LC (27.5 vs 19.5, P = 0.00). The imagery for the MP group was also significantly superior to the control group across all sessions (P < 0.05). Improved imagery significantly correlated with better quality of performance (ρ 0.51–0.62, Ps < 0.05). This is the first randomized controlled study to show that MP enhances the quality of performance based on VR laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This may be a time- and cost-effective strategy to augment traditional training in the OR thus potentially improving patient care.

  10. A randomized controlled trial of qigong for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Fibromyalgia is difficult to treat and requires the use of multiple approaches. This study is a randomized controlled trial of qigong compared with a wait-list control group in fibromyalgia. Methods One hundred participants were randomly assigned to immediate or delayed practice groups, with the delayed group receiving training at the end of the control period. Qigong training (level 1 Chaoyi Fanhuan Qigong, CFQ), given over three half-days, was followed by weekly review/practice sessions for eight weeks; participants were also asked to practice at home for 45 to 60 minutes per day for this interval. Outcomes were pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function, and these were recorded at baseline, eight weeks, four months and six months. Immediate and delayed practice groups were analyzed individually compared to the control group, and as a combination group. Results In both the immediate and delayed treatment groups, CFQ demonstrated significant improvements in pain, impact, sleep, physical function and mental function when compared to the wait-list/usual care control group at eight weeks, with benefits extending beyond this time. Analysis of combined data indicated significant changes for all measures at all times for six months, with only one exception. Post-hoc analysis based on self-reported practice times indicated greater benefit with the per protocol group compared to minimal practice. Conclusions This study demonstrates that CFQ, a particular form of qigong, provides long-term benefits in several core domains in fibromyalgia. CFQ may be a useful adjuvant self-care treatment for fibromyalgia. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938834. PMID:22863206

  11. Barbed suture for gastrointestinal closure: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Demyttenaere, Sebastian V; Nau, Peter; Henn, Matthew; Beck, Catherine; Zaruby, Jeffrey; Primavera, Michael; Kirsch, David; Miller, Jeffrey; Liu, James J; Bellizzi, Andrew; Melvin, W Scott

    2009-09-01

    In an effort to make laparoscopic suturing more efficient, the V-Loc advanced wound closure device (Covidien, Mansfield, MA) has been produced. This device is a self-anchoring barbed suture that obviates the need for knot tying. The goal of this initial feasibility study was to investigate the use of the barbed suture in gastrointestinal enterotomy closure. A randomized study of 12 pigs comparing enterotomy closure with barbed versus a nonbarbed suture of similar tensile strength was performed. To this end, 25 mm enterotomies were made in the stomach (1 control, 1 treatment), jejunum (2 controls, 2 treatments), and descending colon (1 control, 1 treatment). Animals were killed at 3, 7, and 14 days postoperatively (4 each group) and their gastrointestinal tracts harvested; 6 of the 8 enterotomies from each pig underwent burst strength testing. The remaining 2 were fixed in formalin and sent for histological examination. All 12 pigs survived until they were killed without any major complications. Enterotomy closure with barbed suture revealed adhesion scores, burst strength pressures, and histology scores that were similar to those for the control. Jejunal closures resulted in 6 failures at 7 days (3 control, 3 barbed) and 4 failures at 14 days (2 control, 2 barbed). The barbed suture significantly reduced suturing time in the stomach, jejunum, and colon. The V-Loc wound closure device appears to offer comparable gastrointestinal closure to 3-0 Maxon while being significantly faster. Further studies with V-Loc are required to assess its use in laparoscopic surgery.

  12. IS “RESCUE” THERAPY ETHICAL IN RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS?

    PubMed Central

    Holubkov, Richard; Michael Dean, J.; Berger, John; Anand, K. J. S.; Carcillo, Joseph; Meert, Kathleen; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher; Harrison, Rick; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Objective There is a commonly held belief that randomized, placebo-controlled trials in pediatric critical care should incorporate “rescue” therapy (open-label administration of active drug) when a child’s condition is deteriorating. The ethical, conceptual and analytic challenges related to “rescue” therapy in randomized trials can be misrepresented. Design Narrative review. Methods The ethical basis of “rescue” therapy, the equipoise concept, and intention-to-treat analysis are examined in the setting of a hypothetical randomized trial comparing corticosteroids versus placebo in pediatric septic shock. Findings The perceived need for “rescue” therapy may be partly motivated by the moral imperative to save a child’s life. However, allowing “rescue” therapy in a trial is misconceived and inconsistent with equipoise regarding the efficacy of the study drug. If “rescue” therapy is permitted, intention-to-treat analysis can only compare immediate versus delayed use of the study drug. When “rescue” therapy is beneficial, the observed treatment effect is substantially diminished from true effect of the study drug, leading to increased sample size and thereby placing more children at risk (18 “excess” placebo-arm deaths occur in our hypothetical example). Analysis of a trial incorporating “rescue” therapy cannot definitively assess overall efficacy of the agent, or distinguish beneficial or harmful treatment effects related to timing of drug use. Conclusions While a “rescue” therapy component in a randomized trial may be perceived as ethically desirable, inconsistency of “rescue” therapy with full equipoise may itself raise significant ethical concerns. Increased sample sizes expose more children to the risks of study participation, including death. Researchers should be aware that clinical trials designed with “rescue” therapy cannot definitively determine the beneficial or harmful effects of a treatment per se, and

  13. Efficacy of Yoga for Vasomotor Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Sherman, Karen J.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Caan, Bette; Sternfeld, Barbara; Carpenter, Janet S.; Learman, Lee A.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Cohen, Lee S.; Joffe, Hadine; Anderson, Garnet L.; Larson, Joseph C.; Hunt, Julie R.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of yoga in alleviating VMS frequency and bother. Methods Three by two factorial design, randomized, controlled. Eligible women were randomized to yoga (n=107), exercise (n=106), or usual activity (n=142), and were simultaneously randomized to double-blind comparison of omega-3 fatty acid (n=177) or placebo (n=178) capsules. Yoga intervention was twelve, weekly, 90-minute yoga classes with daily home practice. Primary outcomes were VMS frequency and bother assessed by daily diaries at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included insomnia symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index) at baseline and 12 weeks. Results Among 249 randomized women, 237 (95%) completed 12-week assessments. Mean baseline VMS frequency was 7.4/day (95% CI 6.6, 8.1) in the yoga group and 8.0/day (95% CI 7.3, 8.7) in the usual activity group. Intent-to-treat analyses included all participants with response data (n=237). There was no difference between intervention groups in change in VMS frequency from baseline to 6 and 12 weeks (mean difference (yoga – usual activity) from baseline −0.3 (95% CI −1.1, 0.5) at 6 weeks and −0.3 (95% CI −1.2, 0.6) at 12 weeks (p=0.119 across both time points). Results were similar for VMS bother. At week 12, yoga was associated with an improvement in insomnia symptoms (mean difference [yoga-usual activity] in change –Insomnia Severity Index, 1.3 [95% CI −2.5, −0.1][p=0.007]). Conclusion Among healthy women, 12 weeks of yoga class plus home practice compared with usual activity did not improve VMS frequency or bother, but reduced insomnia symptoms. PMID:24045673

  14. Conservative treatment of retinoblastoma: a prospective phase II randomized trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by local treatments and chemothermotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lumbroso-Le Rouic, L; Aerts, I; Hajage, D; Lévy-Gabriel, C; Savignoni, A; Algret, N; Cassoux, N; Bertozzi, A-I; Esteve, M; Doz, F; Desjardins, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intraocular retinoblastoma treatments often combine chemotherapy and focal treatments. A first prospective protocol of conservative treatments in our institution showed the efficacy of the use of two courses of chemoreduction with etoposide and carboplatin, followed by chemothermotherapy using carboplatin as a single agent and diode laser. In order to decrease the possible long-term toxicity of chemotherapy due to etoposide, a randomized neoadjuvant phase II protocol was conducted using vincristine–carboplatin vs etoposide–carboplatin. Patients and methods The study was proposed when initial tumor characteristics did not allow front-line local treatments. Patients included in this phase II noncomparative randomized study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy received vincristin–carboplatin (new arm) vs etoposide–carboplatin (our reference arm). They were subsequently treated by local treatments and chemothermotherapy. Primary end point was the need for secondary enucleation or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) not exceeding 40% at 2 years. Results A total of 65 eyes in 55 children were included in the study (May 2004 to August 2009). Of these, 32 eyes (27 children) were treated in the arm etoposide–carboplatin and 33 eyes (28 children) in the arm vincristin–carboplatin. At 2 years after treatment, 23/33 (69.7%) eyes were treated and salvaged without EBRT or enucleation in the arm vincristin–carboplatin and 26/32 (81.2%) in the arm etoposide–carboplatin. Conclusion Even if the two treatment arms could be considered as sufficiently active according to the study decision rules, neoadjuvant chemotherapy by two cycles of vincristine–carboplatin followed by chemothermotherapy appear to offer less optimal local control than the etoposide–carboplatin combination. PMID:26427984

  15. A randomized phase II study of pomegranate extract for men with rising PSA following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paller, CJ; Ye, X; Wozniak, PJ; Gillespie, BK; Sieber, PR; Greengold, RH; Stockton, BR; Hertzman, BL; Efros, MD; Roper, RP; Liker, HR; Carducci, MA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pomegranate juice has been associated with PSA doubling time (PSADT) elongation in a single-arm phase II trial. This study assesses biological activity of two doses of pomegranate extract (POMx) in men with recurrent prostate cancer, using changes in PSADT as the primary outcome. METHODS This randomized, multi-center, double-blind phase II, dose-exploring trial randomized men with a rising PSA and without metastases to receive 1 or 3 g of POMx, stratified by baseline PSADT and Gleason score. Patients (104) were enrolled and treated for up to 18 months. The intent-to-treat (ITT) population was 96% white, with median age 74.5 years and median Gleason score 7. This study was designed to detect a 6-month on-study increase in PSADT from baseline in each arm. RESULTS: Overall, median PSADT in the ITT population lengthened from 11.9 months at baseline to 18.5 months after treatment (P<0.001). PSADT lengthened in the low-dose group from 11.9 to 18.8 months and 12.2 to 17.5 months in the high-dose group, with no significant difference between dose groups (P =0.554). PSADT increases >100% of baseline were observed in 43% of patients. Declining PSA levels were observed in 13 patients (13%). In all, 42% of patients discontinued treatment before meeting the protocol-definition of PSA progression, or 18 months, primarily due to a rising PSA. No significant changes occurred in testosterone. Although no clinically significant toxicities were seen, diarrhea was seen in 1.9% and 13.5% of patients in the 1- and 3-g dose groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS POMx treatment was associated with ≥6 month increases in PSADT in both treatment arms without adverse effects. The significance of this on-study slowing of PSADT remains unclear, reinforcing the need for placebo-controlled studies in this patient population. PMID:22689129

  16. Preventing Patient-to-Worker Violence in Hospitals: Outcome of a Randomized Controlled Intervention.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, Judith E; Hamblin, Lydia; Russell, Jim; Upfal, Mark J; Luborsky, Mark; Janisse, James; Essenmacher, Lynnette

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a randomized controlled intervention on the incidence of patient-to-worker (Type II) violence and related injury in hospitals. Forty-one units across seven hospitals were randomized into intervention (n = 21) and control (n = 20) groups. Intervention units received unit-level violence data to facilitate development of an action plan for violence prevention; no data were presented to control units. Main outcomes were rates of violent events and injuries across study groups over time. Six months post-intervention, incident rate ratios of violent events were significantly lower on intervention units compared with controls (incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29 to 0.80). At 24 months, the risk for violence-related injury was lower on intervention units, compared with controls (IRR 0.37, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.83). This data-driven, worksite-based intervention was effective in decreasing risks of patient-to-worker violence and related injury.

  17. Tumor and circulating biomarkers in patients with second-line hepatocellular carcinoma from the randomized phase II study with tivantinib

    PubMed Central

    Rimassa, Lorenza; Abbadessa, Giovanni; Personeni, Nicola; Porta, Camillo; Borbath, Ivan; Daniele, Bruno; Salvagni, Stefania; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Trojan, Jörg; De Toni, Enrico N.; Weiss, Alan; Miles, Steven; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Lencioni, Monica; Lamar, Maria E.; Wang, Yunxia; Shuster, Dale; Schwartz, Brian E.; Santoro, Armando

    2016-01-01

    ARQ 197-215 was a randomized placebo-controlled phase II study testing the MET inhibitor tivantinib in second-line hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. It identified tumor MET as a key biomarker in HCC. Aim of this research was to study the prognostic and predictive value of tumor (MET, the receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by the homonymous MNNG-HOS transforming gene) and circulating (MET, hepatocyte growth factor [HGF], alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) biomarkers in second-line HCC. Tumor MET-High status was centrally assessed by immunohistochemistry. Circulating biomarkers were centrally analyzed on serum samples collected at baseline and every 4-8 weeks, using medians as cut-off to determine High/Low status. Tumor MET, tested in 77 patients, was more frequently High after (82%) versus before (40%) sorafenib. A significant interaction (p = 0.04) between tivantinib and baseline tumor MET in terms of survival was observed. Baseline circulating MET and HGF (102 patients) High status correlated with shorter survival (HR 0.61, p = 0.03, and HR 0.60, p = 0.02, respectively), while the association between AFP (104 patients) or VEGF (103 patients) status and survival was non-significant. Conclusions: Tumor MET levels were higher in patients treated with sorafenib. Circulating biomarkers such as MET and HGF may be prognostic in second-line HCC. These results need to be confirmed in larger randomized clinical trials. PMID:27579536

  18. Phase II, randomized, open, controlled study of AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 pre-pandemic influenza vaccine in children aged 3 to 9 years: follow-up of safety and immunogenicity persistence at 24 months post-vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Domingo, Javier; Baldó, José-María; Planelles-Catarino, Maria Victoria; Garcés-Sánchez, María; Ubeda, Isabel; Jubert–Rosich, Angels; Marès, Josep; Garcia-Corbeira, Pilar; Moris, Philippe; Teko, Maurice; Vanden Abeele, Carline; Gillard, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background An AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 influenza vaccine elicited broad and persistent immune responses with an acceptable safety profile up to 6 months following the first vaccination in children aged 3–9 years. Methods In this follow-up of the Phase II study, we report immunogenicity persistence and safety at 24 months post-vaccination in children aged 3–9 years. The randomized, open-label study assessed two doses of H5N1 A/Vietnam/1194/2004 influenza vaccine (1·9 μg or 3·75 μg hemagglutinin antigen) formulated with AS03A or AS03B (11·89 mg or 5·93 mg tocopherol, respectively). Control groups received seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine. Safety was assessed prospectively and included potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs). Immunogenicity was assessed by hemagglutination-inhibition assay 12 and 24 months after vaccination; cross-reactivity and cell-mediated responses were also assessed. (NCT00502593). Results The safety population included 405 children. Over 24 months, five events fulfilled the criteria for pIMDs, of which four occurred in H5N1 vaccine recipients, including uveitis (n = 1) and autoimmune hepatitis (n = 1), which were considered to be vaccine-related. Overall, safety profiles of the vaccines were clinically acceptable. Humoral immune responses at 12 and 24 months were reduced versus those observed after the second dose of vaccine, although still within the range of those observed after the first dose. Persistence of cell-mediated immunity was strong, and CD4+ T cells with a TH1 profile were observed. Conclusions Two doses of an AS03-adjuvanted H5N1 influenza vaccine in children showed low but persistent humoral immune responses and a strong persistence of cell-mediated immunity, with clinically acceptable safety profiles up to 24 months following first vaccination. PMID:25652873

  19. Exercise training in mitochondrial myopathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cejudo, Pilar; Bautista, Juan; Montemayor, Teodoro; Villagómez, Rafael; Jiménez, Luis; Ortega, Francisco; Campos, Yolanda; Sánchez, Hildegard; Arenas, Joaquín

    2005-09-01

    Patients with mitochondrial myopathies (MM) usually suffer from exercise intolerance due to their impaired oxidative capacity and physical deconditioning. We evaluated the effects of a 12-week supervised randomized rehabilitation program involving endurance training in patients with MM. Twenty MM patients were assigned to a training or control group. For three nonconsecutive days each week, patients combined cycle exercise at 70% of their peak work rate with three upper-body weight-lifting exercises performed at 50% of maximum capacity. Training increased maximal oxygen uptake (28.5%), work output (15.5%), and minute ventilation (40%), endurance performance (62%), walking distance in shuttle walking test (+95 m), and peripheral muscle strength (32%-62%), and improved Nottingham Health Profile scores (21.47%) and clinical symptoms. Control MM patients did not change from baseline. Results show that our exercise program is an adequate training strategy for patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

  20. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations: A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, Jan W V; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and then yearly during 5 years. Caries risk and bruxing habits of the participants were estimated. No post-operative sensitivity was reported. At 5-year 183, 68 Class I and 115 Class II, restorations were evaluated. Ten restorations failed (5.5%), all Class II, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramX mono+-only restorations. The main reasons for failure were tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1.3% (p=0.12). For the Class II restorations, the AFR was 1.4% and 2.1%, respectively. The stress decreasing flowable bulk-fill resin composite technique showed good durability during the 5-year follow-up. The use of a 4mm incremental technique with the flowable bulk-fill resin composite showed during the 5-year follow up slightly better, but not statistical significant, durability compared to the conventional 2mm layering technique in posterior resin composite restorations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Standardization for subgroup analysis in randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) emphasize the average or overall effect of a treatment (ATE) on the primary endpoint. Even though the ATE provides the best summary of treatment efficacy, it is of critical importance to know whether the treatment is similarly efficacious in important, predefined subgroups. This is why the RCTs, in addition to the ATE, also present the results of subgroup analysis for preestablished subgroups. Typically, these are marginal subgroup analysis in the sense that treatment effects are estimated in mutually exclusive subgroups defined by only one baseline characteristic at a time (e.g., men versus women, young versus old). Forest plot is a popular graphical approach for displaying the results of subgroup analysis. These plots were originally used in meta-analysis for displaying the treatment effects from independent studies. Treatment effect estimates of different marginal subgroups are, however, not independent. Correlation between the subgrouping variables should be addressed for proper interpretation of forest plots, especially in large effectiveness trials where one of the goals is to address concerns about the generalizability of findings to various populations. Failure to account for the correlation between the subgrouping variables can result in misleading (confounded) interpretations of subgroup effects. Here we present an approach called standardization, a commonly used technique in epidemiology, that allows for valid comparison of subgroup effects depicted in a forest plot. We present simulations results and a subgroup analysis from parallel-group, placebo-controlled randomized trials of antibiotics for acute otitis media.

  2. Psychosocial Telephone Intervention for Dementia Caregivers: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tremont, Geoffrey; Davis, Jennifer D.; Papandonatos, George D.; Ott, Brian R.; Fortinsky, Richard H.; Gozalo, Pedro; Yue, Mun Sang; Bryant, Kimberly; Christine, Grover; Bishop, Duane S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying effective and accessible interventions for dementia caregivers is critical as dementia prevalence increases. Objective Examine the effects of a telephone-based intervention on caregiver well-being. Design Randomized, controlled trial. Setting Academic medical center. Participants 250 distressed, family, dementia caregivers. Intervention Caregivers randomized to receive 16 telephone contacts over 6 months of either the Family Intervention: Telephone Tracking–Caregiver (FITT-C) or Telephone Support (TS). Outcome Primary outcome variables were family caregivers’ depressive symptoms, burden, and reactions to care recipients’ behavior problems at 6 months. Results The FITT-C intervention resulted in significantly improved caregiver depressive symptoms (p = 0.003; 27% net improvement) and less severe reactions to care-recipient depressive behaviors (p = 0.009; 29% net improvement) compared to the control condition (TS). Conclusion An entirely telephone-based intervention improves caregivers’ depressive symptoms and reactions to behavior problems in the care recipient and is comparable to reported results of face-to-face interventions. PMID:25074341

  3. Antenatal hypnosis training and childbirth experience: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Werner, Anette; Uldbjerg, Niels; Zachariae, Robert; Wu, Chun Sen; Nohr, Ellen A

    2013-12-01

    Childbirth is a demanding event in a woman's life. The aim of this study was to explore whether a brief intervention in the form of an antenatal course in self-hypnosis to ease childbirth could improve the childbirth experience. In a randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial, 1,222 healthy nulliparous women were allocated to one of three groups during pregnancy: A hypnosis group participating in three 1-hour sessions teaching self-hypnosis to ease childbirth, a relaxation group receiving three 1-hour lessons in various relaxation methods and Mindfulness, and a usual care group receiving ordinary antenatal care only. Wijmas Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ) was used to measure the childbirth experience 6 weeks postpartum. The intention-to-treat analysis indicated that women in the hypnosis group experienced their childbirth as better compared with the other two groups (mean W-DEQ score of 42.9 in the Hypnosis group, 47.2 in the Relaxation group, and 47.5 in the Care as usual group (p = 0.01)). The tendency toward a better childbirth experience in the hypnosis group was also seen in subgroup analyses for mode of delivery and for levels of fear. In this large randomized controlled trial, a brief course in self-hypnosis improved the women's childbirth experience. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Random total antiepileptic drug levels and seizure control during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Al-Bunyan, M A

    2001-04-01

    To study the correlation of randomly-tested total antiepileptic plasma levels and seizure control in a retrospectively collected group of pregnant epileptic Saudi women. The medical records of 30 Saudi epileptic female patients were reviewed during their subsequent pregnancies (total of 50). The type of antiepileptic drugs used during each pregnancy, the dose of each drug and the corresponding total plasma levels were noted. Antiepileptic drugs assay were carried out randomly during pregnancy either by TDX or a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method. A total of 50 pregnancies were studied. The most common seizure type in these women was complex partial seizure followed by primary generalized epilepsy, myoclonic seizures and of least occurrence was the simple partial seizure with secondary generalization. All patients were received antiepileptic drugs, including either carbamazepine, phenytoin, valporic acid, phenobarbitone or clonazepam. In a total of 24 pregnancies (48%), the serum levels of antiepileptic drugs were subtherapeutic during the first trimester. Recurrent seizures occurred in a total of 20 pregnancies (40%) especially in the 3rd trimester. It is concluded that subtherapeutic serum levels of antiepileptic drugs correlated highly with the increased frequency of seizure in these pregnant women. Monitoring of state of seizure control in epileptic pregnant women should be made regularly during the course of their pregnancies.

  5. Random total antiepilectic drug levels and seizure control during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Al-Bunyan, M A

    2001-04-01

    To study the correlation of randomly-tested total antiepileptic plasma levels and seizure control in a retrospectively collected group of pregnant epileptic Saudi women. The medical records of 30 Saudi epileptic female patients were reviewed during their subsequent pregnancies (total of 50). The type of antiepileptic drugs used during each pregnancy, the dose of each drug and the corresponding total plasma levels were noted. Antiepileptic drugs assay were carried out randomly during pregnancy either by TDX or a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method. A total of 50 pregnancies were studied. The most common seizure type in these women was complex partial seizure followed by primary generalized epilepsy, myoclonic seizures and of least occurrence was the simple partial seizure with secondary generalization. All patients were received antiepileptic drugs, including either carbamazepine, phenytoin, valporic acid, phenobarbitone or clonazepam. In a total of 24 pregnancies (48%), the serum levels of antiepileptic drugs were subtherapeutic during the first trimester. Recurrent seizures occurred in a total of 20 pregnancies (40%) especially in the 3rd trimester. It is concluded that subtherapeutic serum levels of antiepileptic drugs correlated highly with the increased frequency of seizure in these pregnant women. Monitoring of state of seizure control in epileptic pregnant women should be made regularly during the course of their pregnancies.

  6. Bibliometric analysis of the literature of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, Ming-yueh; Yang, Yen-hsu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a significant issue and the randomized controlled trial (RCT) literature plays a fundamental role in developing EBM. This study investigates the features of RCT literature based on bibliometric methods. Growth of the literature, publication types, languages, publication countries, and research subjects are addressed. The distribution of journal articles was also examined utilizing Bradford's law and Bradford-Zipf's law. Method: The MEDLINE database was searched for articles indexed under the publication type “Randomized Control Trial,” and articles retrieved were counted and analyzed using Microsoft Access, Microsoft Excel, and PERL. Results: From 1990 to 2001, a total of 114,850 citations dealing with RCTs were retrieved. The literature growth rate, from 1965 to 2001, is steadily rising and follows an exponential model. Journal articles are the predominant form of publication, and the multicenter study is extensively used. English is the most commonly used language. Conclusions: Generally, RCTs are found in publications concentrating on cardiovascular disease, cancer, asthma, postoperative conditon, health, and anesthetics. Zone analysis and graphical formulation from Bradford's law of scattering shows variations from the standard Bradford model. Forty-two core journals were identified using Bradford's law. PMID:16239941

  7. A randomized controlled trial of home tooth-whitening products.

    PubMed

    Lo, Edward C M; Wong, Anthony H H; McGrath, Colman

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of two marketed home tooth-whitening products. A randomized controlled clinical trial involving 87 adults who were randomly allocated into one of three groups: (1) 6% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips, (2) 18% carbamide peroxide whitening gel, and (3) a placebo (fluoride toothpaste) control group. Subjects were instructed individually and then used the given product daily for 2 consecutive weeks. Color was determined in brightness (L*), yellowness (b*) and redness (a*) [color space] at baseline and 8 weeks after dispensing the product by employing a high resolution digital camera (Fuji HC1000 CCD) to image the subject's anterior maxillary teeth under standard polarized lighting conditions. The subjects also completed a questionnaire on self-satisfaction with the treatment outcome. One-way ANOVA (Bonferroni test) demonstrated significant differences in color between the three groups with changes in brightness (L*, P< 0.001), yellowness (b*, P< 0.001) and redness (a*, P < 0.001). Changes in L* a* b* was greatest among those who used the 6% hydrogen peroxide whitening strips. Subjects in the whitening strip group also rated that product significantly (P < 0.01) more favorably than other groups with respect to the amount of whiteness improvement, as well as whitening satisfaction and overall impression while there is no significant difference between the whitening gel and the placebo groups.

  8. Psychosocial telephone intervention for dementia caregivers: A randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tremont, Geoffrey; Davis, Jennifer D; Papandonatos, George D; Ott, Brian R; Fortinsky, Richard H; Gozalo, Pedro; Yue, Mun Sang; Bryant, Kimberly; Grover, Christine; Bishop, Duane S

    2015-05-01

    Identifying effective and accessible interventions for dementia caregivers is critical as dementia prevalence increases. Examine the effects of a telephone-based intervention on caregiver well-being. Randomized, controlled trial. Academic medical center. Two hundred and fifty distressed, family, dementia caregivers. Caregivers randomized to receive 16 telephone contacts over 6 months of either the Family Intervention: Telephone Tracking-Caregiver (FITT-C) or Telephone Support (TS). Primary outcome variables were family caregivers' depressive symptoms, burden, and reactions to care recipients' behavior problems at 6 months. The FITT-C intervention resulted in significantly improved caregiver depressive symptoms (P = .003; 27% net improvement) and less severe reactions to care-recipient depressive behaviors (P = .009; 29% net improvement) compared with the control condition (TS). An entirely telephone-based intervention improves caregivers' depressive symptoms and reactions to behavior problems in the care recipient and is comparable with reported results of face-to-face interventions. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Online psychoeducational support for infertile women: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cousineau, Tara M.; Green, Traci C.; Corsini, Evelyn; Seibring, A; Showstack, Marianne T.; Applegarth, Linda; Davidson, Marie; Perloe, Mark

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The study goal was to develop and test the effectiveness of a brief online education and support program for female infertility patients. METHODS A randomized-controlled trial was conducted. Using a Solomon-four group design, 190 female patients were recruited from three US fertility centers and were randomized into two experimental and two no-treatment control groups. The psychological outcomes assessed included infertility distress, infertility self-efficacy, decisional conflict, marital cohesion and coping style. Program dosage and satisfaction were also assessed at four weeks follow-up. RESULTS Women exposed to the online program significantly improved in the area of social concerns (P = 0.038) related to infertility distress, and felt more informed about a medical decision with which they were contending (P = 0.037). Trends were observed for decreased global stress (P = 0.10), sexual concerns (P = 0.059), distress related to child-free living (P = 0.063), increased infertility self-efficacy (P = 0.067) and decision making clarity (P = 0.079). A dosage response was observed in the experimental groups for women who spent >60 min online for decreased global stress (P = 0.028) and increased self efficacy (P = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS This evidence-based eHealth program for women experiencing infertility suggests that a web-based patient education intervention can have beneficial effects in several psychological domains and may be a cost effective resource for fertility practices. PMID:18089552

  10. Randomized Controlled Trial of Primary Care Pediatric Parenting Programs

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Huberman, Harris S.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether pediatric primary care–based programs to enhance parenting and early child development reduce media exposure and whether enhanced parenting mediates the effects. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Urban public hospital pediatric primary care clinic. Participants A total of 410 mother-newborn dyads enrolled after childbirth. Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 interventions, the Video Interaction Project (VIP) and Building Blocks (BB) interventions, or to a control group. The VIP intervention comprised 1-on-1 sessions with a child development specialist who facilitated interactions in play and shared reading through review of videotapes made of the parent and child on primary care visit days; learning materials and parenting pamphlets were also provided. The BB intervention mailed parenting materials, including age-specific newsletters suggesting activities to facilitate interactions, learning materials, and parent-completed developmental questionnaires (Ages and Stages questionnaires). Outcome Measures Electronic media exposure in the home using a 24-hour recall diary. Results The mean (SD) exposure at 6 months was 146.5 (125.0) min/d. Exposure to VIP was associated with reduced total duration of media exposure compared with the BB and control groups (mean [SD] min/d for VIP, 131.6 [118.7]; BB, 151.2 [116.7]; control, 155.4 [138.7]; P=.009). Enhanced parent-child interactions were found to partially mediate relations between VIP and media exposure for families with a ninth grade or higher literacy level (Sobel statistic=2.49; P=.01). Conclusion Pediatric primary care may represent an important venue for addressing the public health problem of media exposure in young children at a population level. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00212576 PMID:21199979

  11. Local Treatment of Unresectable Colorectal Liver Metastases: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Coevorden, Frits; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.; Borel-Rinkes, Inne; Ledermann, Jonathan A.; Poston, Graeme; Bechstein, Wolf; Lentz, Marie-Ange; Mauer, Murielle; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Cutsem, Eric; Ducreux, Michel; Nordlinger, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tumor ablation is often employed for unresectable colorectal liver metastases. However, no survival benefit has ever been demonstrated in prospective randomized studies. Here, we investigate the long-term benefits of such an aggressive approach. Methods: In this randomized phase II trial, 119 patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases (n < 10 and no extrahepatic disease) received systemic treatment alone or systemic treatment plus aggressive local treatment by radiofrequency ablation ± resection. Previously, we reported that the primary end point (30-month overall survival [OS] > 38%) was met. We now report on long-term OS results. All statistical tests were two-sided. The analyses were according to intention to treat. Results: At a median follow up of 9.7 years, 92 of 119 (77.3%) patients had died: 39 of 60 (65.0%) in the combined modality arm and 53 of 59 (89.8%) in the systemic treatment arm. Almost all patients died of progressive disease (35 patients in the combined modality arm, 49 patients in the systemic treatment arm). There was a statistically significant difference in OS in favor of the combined modality arm (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.38 to 0.88, P = .01). Three-, five-, and eight-year OS were 56.9% (95% CI = 43.3% to 68.5%), 43.1% (95% CI = 30.3% to 55.3%), 35.9% (95% CI = 23.8% to 48.2%), respectively, in the combined modality arm and 55.2% (95% CI = 41.6% to 66.9%), 30.3% (95% CI = 19.0% to 42.4%), 8.9% (95% CI = 3.3% to 18.1%), respectively, in the systemic treatment arm. Median OS was 45.6 months (95% CI = 30.3 to 67.8 months) in the combined modality arm vs 40.5 months (95% CI = 27.5 to 47.7 months) in the systemic treatment arm. Conclusions: This phase II trial is the first randomized study demonstrating that aggressive local treatment can prolong OS in patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases. PMID:28376151

  12. Randomized controlled trial of atorvastatin in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease: LEADe.

    PubMed

    Feldman, H H; Doody, R S; Kivipelto, M; Sparks, D L; Waters, D D; Jones, R W; Schwam, E; Schindler, R; Hey-Hadavi, J; DeMicco, D A; Breazna, A

    2010-03-23

    There is some evidence that statins may have a protective and symptomatic benefit in Alzheimer disease (AD). The LEADe study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluating the efficacy and safety of atorvastatin in patients with mild to moderate AD. This was an international, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study. Subjects had mild to moderate probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination score 13-25), were aged 50-90 years, and were taking donepezil 10 mg daily for > or 3 months prior to screening. Entry low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (LDL-C) were > 95 and < 195 mg/dL. Patients were randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/day or placebo for 72 weeks followed by a double-blind, 8-week atorvastatin withdrawal phase. Coprimary endpoints were changes in cognition (Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale [ADAS-Cog]) and global function (Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Clinical Global Impression of Change [ADCS-CGIC]) at 72 weeks. A total of 640 patients were randomized in the study. There were no significant differences in the coprimary endpoints of ADAS-cog or ADCS-CGIC or the secondary endpoints. Atorvastatin was generally well-tolerated. In this large-scale randomized controlled trial evaluating statin therapy as a treatment for mild to moderate Alzheimer disease, atorvastatin was not associated with significant clinical benefit over 72 weeks. This treatment was generally well-tolerated without unexpected adverse events. This study provides Class II evidence that intensive lipid lowering with atorvastatin 80 mg/day in patients with mild to moderate probable Alzheimer disease (aged 50-90), taking donepezil, with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels between 95 and 195 mg/dL over 72 weeks does not benefit cognition (as measured by Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale) (p = 0.26) or global function (as measured by Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Clinical Global Impression of Change) (p = 0

  13. Ghana randomized air pollution and health study (GRAPHS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jack, Darby W; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Wylie, Blair J; Chillrud, Steve N; Whyatt, Robin M; Ae-Ngibise, Kenneth A; Quinn, Ashlinn K; Yawson, Abena Konadu; Boamah, Ellen Abrafi; Agyei, Oscar; Mujtaba, Mohammed; Kaali, Seyram; Kinney, Patrick; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2015-09-22

    Household air pollution exposure is a major health risk, but validated interventions remain elusive. The Ghana Randomized Air Pollution and Health Study (GRAPHS) is a cluster-randomized trial that evaluates the efficacy of clean fuels (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) and efficient biomass cookstoves in the Brong-Ahafo region of central Ghana. We recruit pregnant women into LPG, efficient cookstove, and control arms and track birth weight and physician-assessed severe pneumonia incidence in the first year of life. A woman is eligible to participate if she is in the first or second trimester of pregnancy and carrying a live singleton fetus, if she is the primary cook, and if she does not smoke. We hypothesize that babies born to intervention mothers will weigh more and will have fewer cases of physician-assessed severe pneumonia in the first year of life. Additionally, an extensive personal air pollution exposure monitoring effort opens the way for exposure-response analyses, which we will present alongside intention-to-treat analyses. Major funding was provided by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, The Thrasher Research Fund, and the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves. Household air pollution exposure is a major health risk that requires well-tested interventions. GRAPHS will provide important new evidence on the efficacy of both efficient biomass cookstoves and LPG, and will thus help inform health and energy policies in developing countries. The trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov on 13 April 2011 with the identifier NCT01335490 .

  14. Secnidazole Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Sharon L; Nyirjesy, Paul; Waldbaum, Arthur S; Schwebke, Jane R; Morgan, Franklin G; Adetoro, Nikki A; Braun, Carol J

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate secnidazole as a single oral dose treatment for bacterial vaginosis in a phase 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In a phase 2, randomized, double-blind, dose-ranging, placebo-controlled study, women with bacterial vaginosis who met all Amsel criteria (discharge; pH 4.7 or greater; 20% or greater clue cells; positive whiff test) were randomized one to one to one at 24 U.S. centers to 1 or 2 g secnidazole compared with placebo. The primary endpoint was clinical cure (normalization of discharge, amine odor, and clue cells) 21-30 days after treatment. Secondary endpoints included microbiologic cure, defined as a Nugent score of 0-3, and therapeutic cure, defined as meeting criteria for both clinical and microbiologic cure. The modified intent to treat was used for efficacy analyses and included all randomized patients who met the enrollment criteria. Assuming a clinical cure rate of 40% in the active groups and 15% in the placebo group, a sample size of 52 patients per group provided approximately 80% power to detect a significant difference between groups (.05 level [two-sided]) using a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. Between May and September 2014, 215 patients were enrolled. In the intent-to-treat population, the clinical cure rate was 65.3% for the 2-g group, 49.3% for the 1-g group, and 19.4% for the placebo group. The modified intent-to-treat population included 188 women (median age 33 years; 32% with four or more bacterial vaginosis episodes in the previous year; 54% black) with baseline Nugent scores 4 or greater. Clinical, microbiologic, and therapeutic cure rates were 67.7%, 40.3%, and 40.3% for 2 g secnidazole and 51.6%, 23.4%, and 21.9% for 1 g secnidazole compared with 17.7%, 6.5%, and 6.5% for placebo, respectively (P<.05 for secnidazole compared with placebo; all endpoints). Both doses were well-tolerated. Oral granules containing 1 and 2 g secnidazole were superior to placebo in bacterial vaginosis treatment (P<.001 for

  15. Phase II prospective randomized trial of a low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation in men undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Aronson, William J; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnard, R James; Henning, Susanne; Huang, Min; Jardack, Patricia M; Liu, Bingrong; Gray, Ashley; Wan, Junxiang; Konijeti, Ramdev; Freedland, Stephen J; Castor, Brandon; Heber, David; Elashoff, David; Said, Jonathan; Cohen, Pinchas; Galet, Colette

    2011-12-01

    Preclinical studies suggest lowering dietary fat and decreasing the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases the risk of prostate cancer development and progression. We conducted a phase II randomized trial to test the effect of decreasing dietary fat combined with decreasing the dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio on biomarkers related to prostate cancer development and progression. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to receive a low-fat diet with 5 grams of fish oil daily (dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 2:1) or a control Western diet (omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 15:1) for four to six weeks prior to surgery. The primary endpoint was change in serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) between arms. Secondary endpoints were serum IGFBP-1, prostate prostaglandin E2 levels, omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratios, COX-2, and markers of proliferation and apoptosis. Fifty-five patients were randomized and 48 completed the trial. There was no treatment difference in the primary outcome. Positive secondary outcomes in the low-fat fish oil versus Western group were reduced benign and malignant prostate tissue omega-6:omega-3 ratios, reduced proliferation (Ki-67 index), and reduced proliferation in an ex vivo bioassay when patient sera was applied to prostate cancer cells in vitro. In summary, four to six weeks of a low-fat diet and fish oil capsules to achieve an omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 2:1 had no effect on serum IGF-1 levels, though in secondary analyses, the intervention resulted in decreased prostate cancer proliferation and decreased prostate tissue omega-6:omega-3 ratios. These results support further studies evaluating reduction of dietary fat with fish oil supplementation on modulating prostate cancer biology. 2011 AACR

  16. Phase II Prospective Randomized Trial of a Low-Fat Diet with Fish Oil Supplementation in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, William J.; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnard, R. James; Henning, Susanne; Jardack, Patricia M.; Liu, Bingrong; Gray, Ashley; Wan, Junxiang; Konijeti, Ramdev; Freedland, Stephen J.; Castor, Brandon; Heber, David; Elashoff, David; Said, Jonathan; Cohen, Pinchas; Galet, Colette

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest lowering dietary fat and decreasing the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases the risk of prostate cancer development and progression. We conducted a phase II randomized trial to test the effect of decreasing dietary fat combined with decreasing the dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio on biomarkers related to prostate cancer development and progression. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to receive a low-fat diet with 5 grams of fish oil daily (dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 2:1) or a control western diet (omega-6:omega-3 ratio of 15:1) for 4–6 weeks prior to surgery. The primary endpoint was change in serum IGF-1 between arms. Secondary endpoints were serum IGFBP-1, prostate prostaglandin E-2 levels, omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratios, COX-2 and markers of proliferation and apoptosis. Fifty-five patients were randomized and 48 completed the trial. There was no treatment difference in the primary outcome. Positive secondary outcomes in the low-fat fish oil vs. western group were reduced benign and malignant prostate tissue omega-6:omega-3 ratios, reduced proliferation (Ki67 index), and reduced proliferation in an ex-vivo bioassay when patient sera was applied to prostate cancer cells in vitro. In summary, 4–6 weeks of a low-fat diet and fish oil capsules to achieve an omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 2:1 had no effect on serum IGF-1 levels, though in secondary analyses the intervention resulted in decreased prostate cancer proliferation and decreased prostate tissue omega-6:omega-3 ratios. These results support further studies evaluating reduction of dietary fat with fish oil supplementation on modulating prostate cancer biology. PMID:22027686

  17. Dynamic response analysis of closed-loop control system for random intelligent truss structure under random forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Jianjun; Zhou, Yabin; Cui, Mingtao

    2004-07-01

    Considering the randomness of structural damping, physical parameters of structural materials, geometric dimensions of active bars and passive bars, applied loads and control forces simultaneously, the problems of dynamic response analysis of closed-loop control system based on probability for the random intelligent truss structures are studied in this paper. The computational expressions of numerical characteristics of structural dynamic response of closed-loop control system are derived by means of the mode superposition method. Through the engineering examples, the influences of the randomness of them on structural dynamic response are inspected and some significant conclusions are obtained.

  18. Effects of Yoga on Heart Rate Variability and Depressive Symptoms in Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chu, I-Hua; Wu, Wen-Lan; Lin, I-Mei; Chang, Yu-Kai; Lin, Yuh-Jen; Yang, Pin-Chen

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of a 12-week yoga program on heart rate variability (HRV) and depressive symptoms in depressed women. This was a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-six sedentary women scoring ≥14 on the Beck Depression Inventory-II were randomized to either the yoga or the control group. The yoga group completed a 12-week yoga program, which took place twice a week for 60 min per session and consisted of breathing exercises, yoga pose practice, and supine meditation/relaxation. The control group was instructed not to engage in any yoga practice and to maintain their usual level of physical activity during the course of the study. Participants' HRV, depressive symptoms, and perceived stress were assessed at baseline and post-test. The yoga group had a significant increase in high-frequency HRV and decreases in low-frequency HRV and low frequency/high frequency ratio after the intervention. The yoga group also reported significantly reduced depressive symptoms and perceived stress. No change was found in the control group. A 12-week yoga program was effective in increasing parasympathetic tone and reducing depressive symptoms and perceived stress in women with elevated depressive symptoms. Regular yoga practice may be recommended for women to cope with their depressive symptoms and stress and to improve their HRV.

  19. Long-term efficacy and safety of biodegradable-polymer biolimus-eluting stents: main results of the Basel Stent Kosten-Effektivitäts Trial-PROspective Validation Examination II (BASKET-PROVE II), a randomized, controlled noninferiority 2-year outcome trial.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Christoph; Galatius, Soeren; Jeger, Raban; Gilgen, Nicole; Skov Jensen, Jan; Naber, Christoph; Alber, Hannes; Wanitschek, Maria; Eberli, Franz; Kurz, David J; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Moccetti, Tiziano; Rickli, Hans; Weilenmann, Daniel; Vuillomenet, André; Steiner, Martin; Von Felten, Stefanie; Vogt, Deborah R; Wadt Hansen, Kim; Rickenbacher, Peter; Conen, David; Müller, Christian; Buser, Peter; Hoffmann, Andreas; Pfisterer, Matthias

    2015-01-06

    Biodegradable-polymer drug-eluting stents (BP-DES) were developed to be as effective as second-generation durable-polymer drug-eluting stents (DP-DES) and as safe >1 year as bare-metal stents (BMS). Thus, very late stent thrombosis (VLST) attributable to durable polymers should no longer appear. To address these early and late aspects, 2291 patients presenting with acute or stable coronary disease needing stents ≥3.0 mm in diameter between April 2010 and May 2012 were randomly assigned to biolimus-A9-eluting BP-DES, second-generation everolimus-eluting DP-DES, or thin-strut silicon-carbide-coated BMS in 8 European centers. All patients were treated with aspirin and risk-adjusted doses of prasugrel. The primary end point was combined cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and clinically indicated target-vessel revascularization within 2 years. The combined secondary safety end point was a composite of VLST, myocardial infarction, and cardiac death. The cumulative incidence of the primary end point was 7.6% with BP-DES, 6.8% with DP-DES, and 12.7% with BMS. By intention-to-treat BP-DES were noninferior (predefined margin, 3.80%) compared with DP-DES (absolute risk difference, 0.78%; -1.93% to 3.50%; P for noninferiority 0.042; per protocol P=0.09) and superior to BMS (absolute risk difference, -5.16; -8.32 to -2.01; P=0.0011). The 3 stent groups did not differ in the combined safety end point, with no decrease in events >1 year, particularly VLST with BP-DES. In large vessel stenting, BP-DES appeared barely noninferior compared with DP-DES and more effective than thin-strut BMS, but without evidence for better safety nor lower VLST rates >1 year. Findings challenge the concept that durable polymers are key in VLST formation. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01166685. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Classroom and simulation team training: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clay-Williams, Robyn; McIntosh, Catherine A; Kerridge, Ross; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-07-01

    To test the hypotheses that classroom and simulation-based crew resource management (CRM) training interventions improve teamwork attitudes and behaviours of participants and that classroom training combined with simulation-based training provide synergistic improvements. A randomized controlled trial. Area Health Service in New South Wales, Australia. A total of 157 doctors, nurses and midwives randomized into one of four groups, consisting of three intervention groups and a control group. One-day CRM-based classroom course; one-day CRM style simulation-based training or classroom training followed by simulation-based training. Pre- and post-test quantitative participant teamwork attitudes, and post-test quantitative trainee reactions, knowledge and behaviour. Ninety-four doctors, nurses and midwives completed pre-intervention attitude questionnaires and 60 clinicians completed post-intervention assessments. No positive changes in teamwork attitudes were found associated with classroom or simulation training. Positive changes were found in knowledge (mean difference 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-2.43, P = 0.002), self-assessed teamwork behaviour (mean difference 2.69, 95% CI 0.90-6.13, P = 0.009) and independently observed teamwork behaviour (mean difference 2.30, 95% CI 0.30-4.30, P = 0.027) when classroom-only trained group was compared with control; however, these changes were not found in the group that received classroom followed by simulation training. Classroom-based training alone resulted in improvements in participant knowledge and observed teamwork behaviour. The study found no additional impact of simulation training.

  1. A randomized controlled trial of financial incentives for weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Volpp, Kevin G.; John, Leslie K; Troxel, Andrea B; Norton, Laurie; Fassbender, Jennifer; Loewenstein, George

    2012-01-01

    Context Identifying effective strategies for treating obesity is both a clinical challenge and a public health priority due to the health consequences of obesity. Objective To determine whether common decision errors identified by behavioral economists such as prospect theory, loss aversion, and regret could be used to design an effective weight loss intervention. Design 3-arm randomized controlled trial in which participants were randomized to either usual care (weigh ins once a month) or one of two financial incentives arms. One incentive arm used deposit contracts in which participants put their own money at risk (matched 1:1 by the study) which they would lose if they failed to lose weight. The second used lottery-based incentives in which participants who met the weight loss target had each day a 1 in 5 chance of winning a small reward ($10) and a 1 in 100 chance of winning a large reward ($100). All participants were given a weight loss goal of 1 pound per week for 16 weeks, and results were analyzed using intention-to-treat analysis of variance models. Setting Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Patients 57 patients with BMIs between 30-40 aged between 30 and 70, with no contraindications for study participation. Main Outcome Measures Weight loss after 16 weeks. Results Participants in both incentive groups lost significantly more weight than participants in the control group (3.9 pounds); (Lottery = 13.1 lbs; p-value for lottery vs. control .014; deposit contract = 14.0 lbs, p-value vs. control .003). 47.4% of deposit contract participants and 52.6% of lottery arm participants met the 16-pound weight loss goal compared to 10.5% in the control group (p-value 0.014.). By the end of 7 months, substantial amounts of weight were regained; however, incentive participants weighed significantly less than they did at the study start whereas controls did not. Low lost to follow-up rates (7.0%) during the weight loss phase of the study suggest that both

  2. Liquid Medication Errors and Dosing Tools: A Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Parker, Ruth M; Sanders, Lee M; Dreyer, Benard P; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Bailey, Stacy; Patel, Deesha A; Jimenez, Jessica J; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Jacobson, Kara; Hedlund, Laurie; Smith, Michelle C J; Maness Harris, Leslie; McFadden, Terri; Wolf, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    Poorly designed labels and packaging are key contributors to medication errors. To identify attributes of labels and dosing tools that could be improved, we examined the extent to which dosing error rates are affected by tool characteristics (ie, type, marking complexity) and discordance between units of measurement on labels and dosing tools; along with differences by health literacy and language. Randomized controlled experiment in 3 urban pediatric clinics. English- or Spanish-speaking parents (n = 2110) of children ≤8 years old were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 study arms and given labels and dosing tools that varied in unit pairings. Each parent measured 9 doses of medication (3 amounts [2.5, 5, and 7.5 mL] and 3 tools [1 cup, 2 syringes (0.2- and 0.5-mL increments)]), in random order. Outcome assessed was dosing error (>20% deviation; large error defined as > 2 times the dose). A total of 84.4% of parents made ≥1 dosing error (21.0% ≥1 large error). More errors were seen with cups than syringes (adjusted odds ratio = 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.2-5.1) across health literacy and language groups (P < .001 for interactions), especially for smaller doses. No differences in error rates were seen between the 2 syringe types. Use of a teaspoon-only label (with a milliliter and teaspoon tool) was associated with more errors than when milliliter-only labels and tools were used (adjusted odds ratio = 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.4). Recommending oral syringes over cups, particularly for smaller doses, should be part of a comprehensive pediatric labeling and dosing strategy to reduce medication errors. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Preconception maternal nutrition: a multi-site randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research directed to optimizing maternal nutrition commencing prior to conception remains very limited, despite suggestive evidence of its importance in addition to ensuring an optimal nutrition environment in the periconceptional period and throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Methods/Study design This is an individually randomized controlled trial of the impact on birth length (primary outcome) of the time at which a maternal nutrition intervention is commenced: Arm 1: ≥ 3 mo preconception vs. Arm 2: 12-14 wk gestation vs. Arm 3: none. 192 (derived from 480) randomized mothers and living offspring in each arm in each of four research sites (Guatemala, India, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo). The intervention is a daily 20 g lipid-based (118 kcal) multi-micronutient (MMN) supplement. Women randomized to receive this intervention with body mass index (BMI) <20 or whose gestational weight gain is low will receive an additional 300 kcal/d as a balanced energy-protein supplement. Researchers will visit homes biweekly to deliver intervention and monitor compliance, pregnancy status and morbidity; ensure prenatal and delivery care; and promote breast feeding. The primary outcome is birth length. Secondary outcomes include: fetal length at 12 and 34 wk; incidence of low birth weight (LBW); neonatal/infant anthropometry 0-6 mo of age; infectious disease morbidity; maternal, fetal, newborn, and infant epigenetics; maternal and infant nutritional status; maternal and infant microbiome; gut inflammatory biomarkers and bioactive and nutritive compounds in breast milk. The primary analysis will compare birth Length-for-Age Z-score (LAZ) among trial arms (independently for each site, estimated effect size: 0.35). Additional statistical analyses will examine the secondary outcomes and a pooled analysis of data from all sites. Discussion Positive results of this trial will support a paradigm shift in attention to nutrition of all females of

  4. Individual placement and support in Sweden - a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bejerholm, Ulrika; Areberg, Cecilia; Hofgren, Caisa; Sandlund, Mikael; Rinaldi, Miles

    2015-01-01

    Currently there is no evidence on the effectiveness of Individual Placement and Support (IPS) in Sweden. To determine the effectiveness of IPS on vocational outcomes among people with severe mental illness (SMI) in a Swedish context. A secondary aim was to evaluate a community integration effect. A randomized controlled trial with a parallel design was used. Mental health outpatients with SMI were randomized to IPS or traditional vocational rehabilitation (TVR) services. The allocation status was assessor-blinded. The primary outcome was competitive employment. All vocational outcomes were collected continuously, and socio-demographic and clinical variables at baseline, 6 and 18 months. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00960024. One hundred and twenty participants were randomized. Eighty seven per cent were assessed after 6 months, and 73% after 18 months. IPS was more effective than TVR in terms of gaining employment at 18-month follow-up (46% vs. 11%; difference 36%, 95% CI 18-54), along with the amount of working hours and weeks, longer job tenure periods and income. Cox regression analysis showed that IPS participants gained employment five times quicker than those in TVR. Ninety per cent of the IPS participants became involved in work, internships or education, i.e. activities integrated in mainstream community settings, while 24% in the TVR group achieved this. IPS is effective in a Swedish context in terms of gaining employment and becoming integrated within the local community. The welfare system presented obstacles for gaining competitive employment directly and it was indicated that internships delayed time to first competitive employment.

  5. Meaninglessness in terminally ill cancer patients: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Murata, Hisayuki; Kishi, Emi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2009-04-01

    Although recent empirical studies reveal that fostering patients' perception of meaning in their lives is an essential task for palliative care clinicians, few studies have reported the effects of training programs for nurses specifically aimed at improving these skills. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of an educational workshop focusing on patients' feelings of meaninglessness on nurses' confidence, self-reported practice, and attitudes toward caring for such patients, in addition to burnout and meaning of life. The study was designed as a single-institution, randomized controlled trial using a waiting list control. The intervention consisted of eight 180-minute training sessions over four months, including lectures and exercises using structured assessment. A total of 41 nurses were randomly allocated to three groups, which were separately trained, and all were evaluated four times at three-month intervals (before intervention, between each intervention, and after the last intervention). Assessments included validated Confidence and Self-Reported Practice scales, the Attitudes Toward Caring for Patients Feeling Meaningless Scale (including willingness to help, positive appraisal, and helplessness items), the Maslach Burnout Scale, job satisfaction, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual (FACIT-Sp). One participant withdrew from the study before the baseline evaluation, and the remaining 40 nurses completed the study. The nurses were all female and had a mean age of 31+/-6.4, and mean clinical experience of 8.9+/-5.5 years. There were no significant differences in background among the groups. The intervention effects were statistically significant on the Confidence Scale, the Self-Reported Practice Scale, and the willingness to help, positive appraisal, and helplessness subscales, in addition to the overall levels of burnout, emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment, job satisfaction

  6. Diabetes Prevention in Hispanics: Report From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Carosso, Elizabeth; Mariscal, Norma; Islas, Ilda; Ibarra, Genoveva; Holte, Sarah; Copeland, Wade; Linde, Sandra; Thompson, Beti

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hispanics are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle interventions are effective in preventing diabetes and restoring glucose regulation. Methods We recruited Hispanic men and women (N = 320) who were residents of the Lower Yakima Valley, Washington, aged 18 years or older with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels higher than 6% to a parallel 2-arm randomized-controlled trial conducted from 2008 through 2012. The trial compared participants in the intervention arm, who received an immediate educational curriculum (n = 166), to participants in the control arm, who received a delayed educational curriculum (n = 154). The home-based curriculum consisted of 5 sessions led by community health workers and was designed to inform participants about diabetes, diabetes treatment, and healthy dietary and physical activity behaviors. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention and control arms, and analysts were blinded as to participant arm. We evaluated intervention effects on HbA1c levels; frequency (times per week) of fruit and vegetable consumption; and frequency (times per week) of mild, moderate, and strenuous leisure-time physical activity. At baseline, 3 months, and 6 months after randomization, participants completed a questionnaire and provided a blood sample. Analysts were blinded to intervention arm. Results The immediate intervention group (−0.64% [standard error (SE) 0.10]) showed a significant improvement in HbA1c scores (–37.5%, P = .04) compared with the delayed intervention group (–0.44%, P = .14). No significant changes were seen for dietary end points or changes in physical activity. We did observe a trend of greater increases in frequency of moderate and vigorous physical activity and a smaller increase in mild physical activity in the immediate intervention group than in the delayed intervention group. Conclusion This home-based intervention delivered by CHWs was associated with a clinically and statistically

  7. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  8. A randomized controlled trial of different buccal misoprostol doses in mifepristone medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Chong, Erica; Tsereteli, Tamar; Nguyen, Nhu Ngoc Thi; Winikoff, Beverly

    2012-09-01

    An 800-mcg dose of buccal misoprostol following mifepristone has been shown to be highly effective in terminating pregnancies through 63 days since the last menstrual period (LMP) (B. Winikoff, I.G. Dzuba, M.D. Creinin, et al., Two distinct oral routes of misoprostol in mifepristone medical abortion: a randomized controlled trial. Obstet Gynecol 2008; 112: 1303-1310). However, a two 200-mcg misoprostol pill option would simplify administration, and potentially reduce costs and increase women's satisfaction. This study compares a 400-mcg dose (Group I) to an 800-mcg dose (Group II) of buccal misoprostol. Eligible and consenting women requesting medical termination of early pregnancy (n=1122) were randomized and instructed to take misoprostol 36 to 48 h after taking 200 mg mifepristone. Follow-up visits occurred 12 to 15 days after mifepristone administration. Ninety-six percent of women in both groups had successful abortions. Women in Group I experienced significantly less vomiting and fever/chills than women in Group II. Ninety-six percent of women in both groups found the procedure very satisfactory or satisfactory. Four hundred micrograms of buccal misoprostol is as effective as the standard 800-mcg dose in terminating pregnancies up to 63 days LMP and reduces side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Childhood Obesity and Asthma Control in the GALA II and SAGE II Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Oh, Sam S.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Sen, Saunak; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Avila, Pedro C.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; LeNoir, Michael A.; Lurmann, Fred; Meade, Kelley; Serebrisky, Denise; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Thyne, Shannon M.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Obesity is associated with increased asthma morbidity, lower drug responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids, and worse asthma control. However, most prior investigations on obesity and asthma control have not focused on pediatric populations, considered environmental exposures, or included minority children. Objectives: To examine the association between body mass index categories and asthma control among boys and girls; and whether these associations are modified by age and race/ethnicity. Methods: Children and adolescents ages 8–19 years (n = 2,174) with asthma were recruited from the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) Study and the Study of African Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE II). Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and their confidence intervals (95% CI) for worse asthma control. Measurements and Main Results: In adjusted analyses, boys who were obese had a 33% greater chance of having worse asthma control than their normal-weight counterparts (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.04–1.71). However, for girls this association varied with race and ethnicity (P interaction = 0.008). When compared with their normal-weight counterparts, obese African American girls (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.41–1.05) were more likely to have better controlled asthma, whereas Mexican American girls had a 1.91 (95% CI, 1.12–3.28) greater odds of worse asthma control. Conclusions: Worse asthma control is uniformly associated with increased body mass index in boys. Among girls, the direction of this association varied with race/ethnicity. PMID:23392439

  10. Internet-enhanced management of fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Kuper, David; Segar, Michelle; Mohan, Niveditha; Sheth, Manish; Clauw, Daniel J

    2010-12-01

    Both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have demonstrated efficacy in the management of fibromyalgia (FM). Non-pharmacological interventions however are far less likely to be used in clinical settings, in part due to limited access. This manuscript presents the findings of a randomized controlled trail of an Internet-based exercise and behavioral self-management program for FM designed for use in the context of a routine clinical care. 118 individuals with FM were randomly assigned to either (a) standard care or (b) standard care plus access to a Web-Enhanced Behavioral Self-Management program (WEB-SM) grounded in cognitive and behavioral pain management principles. Individuals were assessed at baseline and again at 6 months for primary endpoints: reduction of pain and an improvement in physical functioning. Secondary outcomes included fatigue, sleep, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and a patient global impression of improvement. Individuals assigned to the WEB-SM condition reported significantly greater improvement in pain, physical functioning, and overall global improvement. Exercise and relaxation techniques were the most commonly used skills throughout the 6 month period. A no-contact, Internet-based, self-management intervention demonstrated efficacy on key outcomes for FM. While not everyone is expected to benefit from this approach, this study demonstrated that non-pharmacological interventions can be efficiently integrated into routine clinical practice with positive outcomes.

  11. Reiki for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Assefi, Nassim; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective Fibromyalgia is a common, chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine, including Reiki. Our objective was to determine whether Reiki is beneficial as an adjunctive fibromyalgia treatment. Design This was a factorial designed, randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. Setting/location The study setting was private medical offices in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area. Subjects The subjects were comprised 100 adults with fibromyalgia. Intervention Four (4) groups received twice-weekly treatment for 8 weeks by either a Reiki master or actor randomized to use direct touch or no touch (distant therapy). Outcome measures The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by visual analog scale at weeks 4, 8, and 20 (3 months following end of treatment). Secondary outcomes were physical and mental functioning, medication use, and health provider visits. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by selfreport. Improvement between groups was examined in an intention-to-treat analysis. Results Neither Reiki nor touch had any effect on pain or any of the secondary outcomes. All outcome measures were nearly identical among the 4 treatment groups during the course of the trial. Conclusion Neither Reiki nor touch improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Energy medicine modalities such as Reiki should be rigorously studied before being recommended to patients with chronic pain symptoms. PMID:18991519

  12. Reiki for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Assefi, Nassim; Bogart, Andy; Goldberg, Jack; Buchwald, Dedra

    2008-11-01

    Fibromyalgia is a common, chronic pain condition for which patients frequently use complementary and alternative medicine, including Reiki. Our objective was to determine whether Reiki is beneficial as an adjunctive fibromyalgia treatment. This was a factorial designed, randomized, sham-controlled trial in which participants, data collection staff, and data analysts were blinded to treatment group. The study setting was private medical offices in the Seattle, Washington metropolitan area. The subjects were comprised 100 adults with fibromyalgia. Four (4) groups received twice-weekly treatment for 8 weeks by either a Reiki master or actor randomized to use direct touch or no touch (distant therapy). The primary outcome was subjective pain as measured by visual analog scale at weeks 4, 8, and 20 (3 months following end of treatment). Secondary outcomes were physical and mental functioning, medication use, and health provider visits. Participant blinding and adverse effects were ascertained by self-report. Improvement between groups was examined in an intention-to-treat analysis. Neither Reiki nor touch had any effect on pain or any of the secondary outcomes. All outcome measures were nearly identical among the 4 treatment groups during the course of the trial. Neither Reiki nor touch improved the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Energy medicine modalities such as Reiki should be rigorously studied before being recommended to patients with chronic pain symptoms.

  13. Postoperative pain relief following hysterectomy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Raghvendra, K. P.; Thapa, Deepak; Mitra, Sukanya; Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder; Huria, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women experience moderate to severe postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a new modality for providing postoperative pain relief in these patients. Materials and Methods: The present study was a single center, prospective randomized trial. After the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, patients were randomized to either epidural group: Epidural block placement + general anesthesia (GA) or TAP group: Single shot TAP block + GA. Patients in both the groups received standard general anesthetic technique and intravenous tramadol patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative period. Patients were monitored for tramadol consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) both at rest and on coughing, hemodynamics, and side effects at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Results: The total consumption of tramadol in 24 h was greater in TAP group as compared to epidural group (68.8 [25.5] vs. 5.3 [11.6] mg, P < 0.001). The VAS scores at rest and on coughing were higher in TAP group as compared to the epidural group at 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.05). None of the patients in either group had any adverse effects. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia provided greater tramadol-sparing effect with superior analgesia postoperatively as compared to TAP block in patients up to 24 h following TAH. PMID:27499592

  14. Improving pediatric prevention via the internet: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Christakis, Dimitri A; Zimmerman, Frederick J; Rivara, Frederick P; Ebel, Beth

    2006-09-01

    Innovations to improve the delivery of pediatric preventive care are needed. We enrolled children, 0 to 11 years of age, into a factorial, randomized, controlled trial of a tailored, evidence-based, Web site (MyHealthyChild) that provided information on prevention topics before a scheduled well-child visit. There were 2 components of the intervention, namely, parental Web content and provider notification. Parental Web content provided information to parents about prevention topics; provider notification communicated to physicians topics that were of interest to parents. We assigned 887 children randomly to 4 groups (usual care, content only, content and notification, or notification only). Outcomes were determined with telephone follow-up surveys conducted 2 to 4 weeks after the visit. Poisson regression analysis was used to determine the independent effects of each intervention on the number of topics discussed and the number of preventive practices implemented. Parents in the notification/content group and in the notification-only group reported discussing more MyHealthyChild topics with their provider. Parents in the notification/content group and in the content-only group reported implementing more MyHealthyChild topic suggestions (such as use of a safety device). A Web-based intervention can activate parents to discuss prevention topics with their child's provider. Delivery of tailored content can promote preventive practices.

  15. Nebulized Magnesium Sulfate in Acute Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Modaresi, Mohammad Reza; Faghihinia, Jamal; Kelishadi, Roya; Reisi, Mohsen; Mirlohi, Shahrokh; Pajhang, Farhad; Sadeghian, Majid

    2015-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of nebulized magnesium sulfate as a bronchodilator in infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis. This three-center double masked randomized clinical trial comprised 120 children with moderate to severe bronchiolitis. They were randomly assigned into two groups: the first group was treated with nebulized magnesium sulfate (40 mg/kg) and nebulized epinephrine (0.1 ml/kg) and the second group (control) was treated with nebulized epinephrine (0.1 ml/kg). The primary outcome was the length of hospital stay. The use of oxygen, temperature, oxygen saturation (SPO2), pulse rate (PR), respiratory rate (RR) and respiratory distress assessment instrument (RDAI) score were measured in the beginning of the study and during hospitalization. The mean (SD) age of 120 infants was 5.1(± 2.6) mo and 60% were boys. The length of hospital stay was not different between the two groups (P > 0.01). Use of oxygen supplementation, SPO2 and vital signs were similar in the two groups. Improvement in RDAI score was significantly better in infants treated with nebulized magnesium sulfate than in the other group (P 0.01). Thus, in infants with acute bronchiolitis, the effect of nebulized magnesium sulfate is comparable to nebulized epinephrine. However nebulized magnesium sulfate can improve the clinical score so it may have additive effect to reduce symptoms during hospitalization.

  16. The feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of esophagectomy for esophageal cancer - the ROMIO (Randomized Oesophagectomy: Minimally Invasive or Open) study: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need for evidence of the clinical effectiveness of minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of esophageal cancer, but randomized controlled trials in surgery are often difficult to conduct. The ROMIO (Randomized Open or Minimally Invasive Oesophagectomy) study will establish the feasibility of a main trial which will examine the clinical and cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive and open surgical procedures for the treatment of esophageal cancer. Methods/Design A pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT), in two centers (University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust and Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust) will examine numbers of incident and eligible patients who consent to participate in the ROMIO study. Interventions will include esophagectomy by: (1) open gastric mobilization and right thoracotomy, (2) laparoscopic gastric mobilization and right thoracotomy, and (3) totally minimally invasive surgery (in the Bristol center only). The primary outcomes of the feasibility study will be measures of recruitment, successful development of methods to monitor quality of surgery and fidelity to a surgical protocol, and development of a core outcome set to evaluate esophageal cancer surgery. The study will test patient-reported outcomes measures to assess recovery, methods to blind participants, assessments of surgical morbidity, and methods to capture cost and resource use. ROMIO will integrate methods to monitor and improve recruitment using audio recordings of consultations between recruiting surgeons, nurses, and patients to provide feedback for recruiting staff. Discussion The ROMIO study aims to establish efficient methods to undertake a main trial of minimally invasive surgery versus open surgery for esophageal cancer. Trial registration The pilot trial has Current Controlled Trials registration number ISRCTN59036820(25/02/2013) at http://www.controlled-trials.com; the ROMIO trial record at that site gives a link to the original version of

  17. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect.

  18. Treating depression and substance use: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Sarah B.; Watkins, Katherine E.; Hepner, Kimberly A.; Paddock, Susan M.; Munjas, Brett; Osilla, Karen C.; Perry, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Few integrated substance use and depression treatments have been developed for delivery in outpatient substance abuse treatment settings. To meet the call for more ‘transportable’ interventions, we conducted a pilot study to test a group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression and substance use that was designed for delivery by outpatient substance abuse treatment counselors. Seventy-three outpatient clients were randomized to usual care enhanced with group CBT or usual care alone, and assessed at three time points (baseline, three and six months post-baseline). Our results demonstrated that the treatment was acceptable and feasible for delivery by substance abuse treatment staff, despite challenges with recruiting clients. Both depressive symptoms and substance use were reduced by the intervention, but were not significantly different from the control group. These results suggest that further research is warranted to enhance the effectiveness of treatment for co-occurring disorders in these settings. PMID:22301087

  19. Randomized controlled trial quality in pediatric physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Paci, Matteo; Landi, Niccolò; Marchettini, Mariangela; Baccini, Marco

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the reported quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in pediatric physical therapy (PPT) and changes with time. All RCTs sourced from PEDro database and scored using the PEDro scale were included. RCTs were classified as high- or low quality both with the original cut-off of 6 and a modified cut-off of 5. The relationship between PEDro scores and year of publication was also investigated. One thousand three hundred sixty-seven articles were analyzed. According to the PEDro scale original and modified cut-off, 29% and 56% of the articles were classified as high-quality studies, respectively. The number of RCTs and the average PEDro score increased between 1962 and 2012. However, since some items of the scale could be more frequently satisfied, a further improvement of the quality of RCTs in PPT is recommended.

  20. Family Caregiver Training Program (FCTP): A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Winston, Kristin; Winkler, Sandra L; Donovan, Mary L

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Family Caregiver Training Program (FCTP) for caregivers of people with dementia. A random assignment control group research design with a 3-mo follow-up was implemented. Thirty-six family caregivers of people with dementia demonstrated an increase in activity of daily living (ADL) knowledge (p < .001) and maintenance of that knowledge 3 mo posttest. Caregiver confidence, regardless of group assignment, improved; however, it was not maintained. Burden, depression, and occupational performance and satisfaction remained unchanged for the intervention group; however, physical health as it pertained to quality of life improved 3 mo posttest (p < .001). Findings demonstrate that the FCTP can effectively provide knowledge to family caregivers on how to assist people with dementia with ADLs. Even when standard care was provided, there was limited information on ADLs that family caregivers faced daily.

  1. Randomized controlled trials in environmental health research: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2008-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are becoming increasingly common in environmental health research. Like all studies involving human subjects, environmental health RCTs raise many ethical challenges, ranging from obtaining informed consent to minimizing risks to protecting privacy and confidentiality. One of the most important issues raised by these studies is whether it is ethical to withhold effective environmental health interventions from research subjects in order to satisfy scientific objectives. Although environmental health investigators usually do not have professional obligations to provide medical care to research subjects, they have ethical obligations to avoid exploiting them. Withholding interventions from research subjects can be ethical, provided that it does not lead to exploitation of individuals or groups. To avoid exploiting individuals or groups, investigators should ensure that research subjects and study populations receive a fair share of the benefits of research.

  2. [Insulin infusion in intensive care: randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Miranda, Milena Penteado Ferraro; Crespo, Jeiel Carlos Lamonica; Secoli, Silvia Regina

    2013-06-01

    This randomized controlled trial compared the use of an intensive and conventional insulin protocol on clinical outcomes in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, in the first 72 hours. It was conducted at a university hospital in the city of São Paulo. Patients (n=46) were allocated into two groups: intensive glycemic (blood glucose between 80-110mg/dl) and conventional (180-220mg/dl). The Student's t-test and chi-square test were used for data analysis. A statistically significant (p<0.001) difference was observed in mean glycemia, but there was no difference in the variables of mean minimum arterial pressure (p=0.06) or maximum (p=0.11), serum creatinine (p=0,33) or in mortality (p=0.11). Although there was no difference between the groups regarding mortality, hemodynamic instability in the conventional group was longer and the only deaths occurred in it.

  3. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Gum, Si Nae; Paik, Jean Kyung; Lim, Hyo Hee; Kim, Kyong-Chol; Ogasawara, Kazuya; Inoue, Kenichi; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of nattokinase supplementation on blood pressure in subjects with pre-hypertension or stage 1 hypertension. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 86 participants ranging from 20 to 80 years of age with an initial untreated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 130 to 159 mmHg received nattokinase (2,000 FU/capsule) or a placebo capsule for 8 weeks. Seventy-three subjects completed the protocol. Compared with the control group, the net changes in SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were -5.55 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -0.57 mmHg; p<0.05) and -2.84 mmHg (CI, -5.33 to -0.33 mmHg; p<0.05), respectively, after the 8-week intervention. The corresponding net change in renin activity was -1.17 ng/mL/h for the nattokinase group compared with the control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, nattokinase supplementation resulted in a reduction in SBP and DBP. These findings suggest that increased intake of nattokinase may play an important role in preventing and treating hypertension.

  4. Ameliorating children's reading-comprehension difficulties: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Paula J; Snowling, Margaret J; Truelove, Emma; Hulme, Charles

    2010-08-01

    Children with specific reading-comprehension difficulties can read accurately, but they have poor comprehension. In a randomized controlled trial, we examined the efficacy of three interventions designed to improve such children's reading comprehension: text-comprehension (TC) training, oral-language (OL) training, and TC and OL training combined (COM). Children were assessed preintervention, midintervention, postintervention, and at an 11-month follow-up. All intervention groups made significant improvements in reading comprehension relative to an untreated control group. Although these gains were maintained at follow-up in the TC and COM groups, the OL group made greater gains than the other groups did between the end of the intervention and follow-up. The OL and COM groups also demonstrated significant improvements in expressive vocabulary compared with the control group, and this was a mediator of the improved reading comprehension of the OL and COM groups. We conclude that specific reading-comprehension difficulties reflect (at least partly) underlying oral-language weaknesses that can be effectively ameliorated by suitable teaching.

  5. [Randomized controlled study on acupuncture treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Hua; Li, Lu-Qian; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Juan; Dai, Yi-Shuang; Xu, Dong-Hua; Tang, Chun-Zhi

    2010-07-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of acpuncture treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Nighty cases of CFS were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, 45 cases in each group. The observation group was treated with acupunture at Renying (ST 9), Fengfu (GV 16), Baihui (GV 20); the control group was treated with 250 mL 5% Glucose injectio combined with 20 mL Shenmai injectio. Fatigue Scale (FS) was used to compare the scores between the two groups after treatment. The total scores in the observation group were 9.37 +/- 2.33 and 5.41 +/- 1.96 before and after treatment respectively, and in the control group, they were 9.08 +/- 2.27 and 7.34 +/- 2.03 respectively. FS brainwork integral, physical fatigue integral, and total integral all decreased after treatment in two groups (all P < 0.001), and it decreased much more obviously in the observation group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Both of the acpuncture treatment and Shenmai injectio are able to decrease fatigue scale score, improve the fatigue symptoms of CFS patients, and the effect of acupucture treatment is obviously superior to that of Shenmai injectio.

  6. Biofeedback Training in Crisis Managers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Brunner, B; Oppenrieder, S; Duschek, S

    2017-06-01

    Working in crisis environments represents a major challenge, especially for executive personnel engaged in directing disaster operations, i.e. crisis managers. Crisis management involves operating under conditions of extreme stress resulting, for instance, from high-level decision-making, principal responsibility for personnel, multitasking or working under conditions of risk and time pressure. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a newly developed biofeedback training procedure based on electrodermal activity, especially designed for the target group of crisis managers. The training comprised exercises promoting acquisition of control over sympathetic arousal under resting conditions and during exposure to visual, acoustic and cognitive stressors resembling situations related to crisis management. In a randomized controlled design, 36 crisis managers were assigned to either a biofeedback training group or waiting list control group. Subjective stress was assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. In the training group, stress level markedly decreased; the decrease remained stable at follow-up 2 months after the training. The results indicate that biofeedback training in crisis management is an effective method for stress management that may help to reduce vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and stress-related disease.

  7. Tacrolimus monotherapy in membranous nephropathy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Praga, M; Barrio, V; Juárez, G Fernández; Luño, J

    2007-05-01

    Membranous nephropathy is a common cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults. Although some patients with membranous nephropathy achieve a spontaneous remission, renal function continues to deteriorate in others. We conducted a prospective randomized trial evaluating monotherapy with tacrolimus to achieve complete or partial remission in patients with biopsy-proven membranous nephropathy. Twenty-five patients received tacrolimus (0.05 mg/kg/day) over 12 months with a 6-month taper, whereas 23 patients were in the control group. The probability of remission in the treatment group was 58, 82, and 94% after 6, 12, and 18 months but only 10, 24, and 35%, respectively in the control group. The decrease in proteinuria was significantly greater in the treatment group. Notably, six patients in the control group and only one in the treatment group reached the secondary end point of a 50% increase in their serum creatinine. No patient in the tacrolimus group showed a relapse during the taper period. Nephrotic syndrome reappeared in almost half of the patients who were in remission by the 18th month after tacrolimus withdrawal. We conclude that tacrolimus is a very useful therapeutic option for patients with membranous nephropathy and preserved renal function. The majority of patients experienced remission with a significant reduction in the risk for deteriorating renal function.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mentoring Interventions for Underrepresented Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Vivian; Martina, Camille A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Trief, Paula; Goodman, Steven R.; Morse, Gene D.; LaGuardia, Jennifer G.; Sharp, Daryl; Ryan, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the effects of different mentoring interventions on the basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented minorities and women in academia. Method Participants were 150 mentor/protégé dyads from three academic medical centers and eight other colleges and universities in western and central New York, randomized from 2010–2013 into: mentor training (using principles of self-determination theory); peer mentoring for protégés; mentor training and peer mentoring for protégés combined; or control/usual practice. Protégé participants were graduate students, fellows and junior faculty who were from underrepresented groups based on race, ethnicity, gender, or disability. The primary analysis was a comparison of intervention effects on changes in protégés’ satisfaction of their basic psychological needs (competence, autonomy and relatedness) with their mentor. They completed a well-validated, online questionnaire every 2 months for 1 year. Results There was no significant effect at the end of 1 year of either mentor training or peer mentoring on protégés’ psychological basic need satisfaction with mentor specifically or at work in general. Exploratory analyses showed a significant effect of the mentor-based intervention on the protégés’ overall psychological need satisfaction with their mentor at 2 months, the time point closest to completing mentor training. Conclusions This RCT showed a potential short-term effect of mentor training on changing basic psychological need satisfaction of underrepresented scholars with their mentors. Despite the lack of sustained effect of either mentor training or peer mentoring, these short-term changes suggest feasibility and potential for future study. PMID:26717501

  9. Hockey Fans in Training: A Pilot Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Gill, Dawn P; Zou, Guangyong; De Cruz, Ashleigh; Riggin, Brendan; Bartol, Cassandra; Danylchuk, Karen; Hunt, Kate; Wyke, Sally; Gray, Cindy M; Bunn, Christopher; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2017-07-17

    Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated: 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial; and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 weeks and 12 months. Male fans of 2 ice hockey teams (35-65 years; body-mass index ≥28 kg/m) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (Wait-list Control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-week active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behaviour change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-week minimally-supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity; private online social network; standardized emails; booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 weeks (both groups), and 12 months (intervention group only), included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, self-rated health. Eighty men were recruited in 4 weeks; trial retention was >80% at 12 weeks and >75% at 12 months. At 12 weeks, the intervention group lost 3.6 (95% CI: -5.26, -1.90) kg more than the comparator (p<0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet and self-rated health at 12 weeks; most sustained to 12 months. Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial.

  10. Randomized controlled trial of Anticipatory and Preventive multidisciplinary Team Care

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Liddy, Clare; Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Legault, Frances; Dalziel, Bill; Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE T o examine whether quality of care (QOC) improves when nurse practitioners and pharmacists work with family physicians in community practice and focus their work on patients who are 50 years of age and older and considered to be at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. SETTING A family health network with 8 family physicians, 5 nurses, and 11 administrative personnel serving 10 000 patients in a rural area near Ottawa, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Patients 50 years of age and older at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes (N = 241). INTERVENTIONS At-risk patients were randomly assigned to receive usual care from their family physicians or Anticipatory and Preventive Team Care (APTCare) from a collaborative team composed of their physicians, 1 of 3 nurse practitioners, and a pharmacist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of care for chronic disease management (CDM) for diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. RESULTS Controlling for baseline demographic characteristics, the APTCare approach improved CDM QOC by 9.2% (P < .001) compared with traditional care. The APTCare intervention also improved preventive care by 16.5% (P < .001). We did not observe significant differences in other secondary outcome measures (intermediate clinical outcomes, quality of life [Short-Form 36 and health-related quality of life scales], functional status [instrumental activities of daily living scale] and service usage). CONCLUSION Additional resources in the form of collaborative multidisciplinary care teams with intensive interventions in primary care can improve QOC for CDM in a population of older at-risk patients. The appropriateness of this intervention will depend on its cost-effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT00238836 (CONSORT) PMID:20008582

  11. Randomized controlled trials: who fails run-in?

    PubMed

    Rees, Judy R; Mott, Leila A; Barry, Elizabeth L; Baron, John A; Figueiredo, Jane C; Robertson, Douglas J; Bresalier, Robert S; Peacock, Janet L

    2016-07-29

    Early identification of participants at risk of run-in failure (RIF) may present opportunities to improve trial efficiency and generalizability. We conducted a partial factorial-design, randomized, controlled trial of calcium and vitamin D to prevent colorectal adenoma recurrence at 11 centers in the United States. At baseline, participants completed two self-administered questionnaires (SAQs) and a questionnaire administered by staff. Participants in the full factorial randomization (calcium, vitamin D, both, or neither) received a placebo during a 3-month single-blinded run-in; women electing to take calcium enrolled in a two-group randomization (calcium with vitamin D, or calcium alone) and received calcium during the run-in. Using logistic regression models, we examined baseline factors associated with RIF in three subgroups: men (N = 1606) and women (N = 301) in the full factorial randomization and women in the two-group randomization (N = 666). Overall, 314/2573 (12 %) participants failed run-in; 211 (67 %) took fewer than 80 % of their tablets (poor adherence), and 103 (33 %) withdrew or were uncooperative. In multivariable models, 8- to 13-fold variation was seen by study center in odds of RIF risk in the two largest groups. In men, RIF decreased with age (adjusted odds ratio [OR] per 5 years 0.85 [95 % confidence interval, CI; 0.76-0.96]) and was associated with being single (OR 1.65 [95 % CI; 1.10-2.47]), not graduating from high school (OR 2.77 [95 % CI; 1.58-4.85]), and missing SAQ data (OR 1.97 [1.40-2.76]). Among women, RIF was associated primarily with health-related factors; RIF risk was lower with higher physical health score (OR 0.73 [95 % CI; 0.62-0.86]) and baseline multivitamin use (OR 0.44 [95 % CI; 0.26-0.75]). Women in the 5-year colonoscopy surveillance interval were at greater risk of RIF than those with 3-year follow-up (OR 1.91 [95 % CI; 1.08-3.37]), and the number of prescription medicines taken was also

  12. Randomized Comparison of Percutaneous Repair and Surgery for Mitral Regurgitation: 5-Year Results of EVEREST II.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ted; Kar, Saibal; Elmariah, Sammy; Smart, Steven C; Trento, Alfredo; Siegel, Robert J; Apruzzese, Patricia; Fail, Peter; Rinaldi, Michael J; Smalling, Richard W; Hermiller, James B; Heimansohn, David; Gray, William A; Grayburn, Paul A; Mack, Michael J; Lim, D Scott; Ailawadi, Gorav; Herrmann, Howard C; Acker, Michael A; Silvestry, Frank E; Foster, Elyse; Wang, Andrew; Glower, Donald D; Mauri, Laura

    2015-12-29

    In EVEREST II (Endovascular Valve Edge-to-Edge Repair Study), treatment of mitral regurgitation (MR) with a novel percutaneous device showed superior safety compared with surgery, but less effective reduction in MR at 1 year. This study sought to evaluate the final 5-year clinical outcomes and durability of percutaneous mitral valve (MV) repair with the MitraClip device compared with conventional MV surgery. Patients with grade 3+ or 4+ MR were randomly assigned to percutaneous repair with the device or conventional MV surgery in a 2:1 ratio (178:80). Patients prospectively consented to 5 years of follow-up. At 5 years, the rate of the composite endpoint of freedom from death, surgery, or 3+ or 4+ MR in the as-treated population was 44.2% versus 64.3% in the percutaneous repair and surgical groups, respectively (p = 0.01). The difference was driven by increased rates of 3+ to 4+ MR (12.3% vs. 1.8%; p = 0.02) and surgery (27.9% vs. 8.9%; p = 0.003) with percutaneous repair. After percutaneous repair, 78% of surgeries occurred within the first 6 months. Beyond 6 months, rates of surgery and moderate-to-severe MR were comparable between groups. Five-year mortality rates were 20.8% and 26.8% (p = 0.4) for percutaneous repair and surgery, respectively. In multivariable analysis, treatment strategy was not associated with survival. Patients treated with percutaneous repair more commonly required surgery for residual MR during the first year after treatment, but between 1- and 5-year follow-up, comparably low rates of surgery for MV dysfunction with either percutaneous or surgical therapy endorse the durability of MR reduction with both repair techniques. (EVEREST II Pivotal Study High Risk Registry; NCT00209274). Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Electroacupuncture for Primary Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Wing-Fai; Chung, Ka-Fai; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Yap, Tuan-Gee; Law, Andrew C.K.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture for the treatment of primary insomnia. Design: Randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group. Setting: A university-based sleep clinic. Participants: Community sample of 60 Chinese adult volunteers who report having insomnia 3 or more nights per week, whose symptoms meet the DSM-IV criteria for primary insomnia for at least 3 months, and who have an Insomnia Severity Index total score of at least 15. Participants were screened with polysomnography and the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV prior to randomization. Intervention: Electroacupuncture at Yintang (EX-HN3), Baihui (GV20), bilateral ear Shenmen, Sishencong (EX-HN1), and Anmian (EX) 3 times per week for 3 weeks or placebo acupuncture using Streitberger needles at the same points. Measurements and Results: Self-reported questionnaires, 1-week sleep diaries, and 3-day actigraphy were collected at baseline and 1 week after treatment. The Insomnia Severity Index was used as the primary outcome measure. Both groups showed significant improvement compared with the pretreatment baseline. One-way analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline scores showed that there were significantly greater improvements in sleep efficiency by sleep diary and actigraphy in the electroacupuncture group. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in the Insomnia Severity Index and other outcome measures. The proportions of subjects having less than 30 minutes of wake after sleep onset and a sleep efficiency of at least 85% at the posttreatment visit were significantly higher in the electroacupuncture group. All adverse events were mild in severity. Conclusion: We found a slight advantage of electroacupuncture over placebo acupuncture in the short-term treatment of primary insomnia. Because of some limitations of the current study, further studies are necessary to verify the effectiveness of acupuncture

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Meditation for Chronic Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Jason C.; Manber, Rachel; Segal, Zindel; Xia, Yinglin; Shapiro, Shauna; Wyatt, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic insomnia. Design: Three-arm, single-site, randomized controlled trial. Setting: Academic medical center. Participants: Fifty-four adults with chronic insomnia. Interventions: Participants were randomized to either mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBTI), or an eight-week self-monitoring (SM) condition. Measurements and Results: Patient-reported outcome measures were total wake time (TWT) from sleep diaries, the pre-sleep arousal scale (PSAS), measuring a prominent waking correlate of insomnia, and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) to determine remission and response as clinical endpoints. Objective sleep measures were derived from laboratory polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. Linear mixed models showed that those receiving a meditation-based intervention (MBSR or MBTI) had significantly greater reductions on TWT minutes (43.75 vs 1.09), PSAS (7.13 vs 0.16), and ISI (4.56 vs 0.06) from baseline-to-post compared to SM. Post hoc analyses revealed that each intervention was superior to SM on each of the patient-reported measures, but no significant differences were found when comparing MBSR to MBTI from baseline-to-post. From baseline to 6-month follow-up, MBTI had greater reductions in ISI scores than MBSR (P < 0.05), with the largest difference occurring at the 3-month follow-up. Remission and response rates in MBTI and MBSR were sustained from post-treatment through follow-up, with MBTI showing the highest rates of treatment remission (50%) and response (78.6%) at the 6-month follow-up. Conclusions: Mindfulness meditation appears to be a viable treatment option for adults with chronic insomnia and could provide an alternative to traditional treatments for insomnia. Trial Registration: Mindfulness-Based Approaches to Insomnia: clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT00768781 Citation: Ong JC, Manber R, Segal Z, Xia Y

  15. Randomized Phase II Study Investigating Pazopanib Versus Weekly Paclitaxel in Relapsed or Progressive Urothelial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert J; Hussain, Syed A; Protheroe, Andrew S; Birtle, Alison; Chakraborti, Prabir; Huddart, Robert A; Jagdev, Satinder; Bahl, Amit; Stockdale, Andrew; Sundar, Santhanam; Crabb, Simon J; Dixon-Hughes, Judith; Alexander, Laura; Morris, Anna; Kelly, Caroline; Stobo, Jon; Paul, James; Powles, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Purpose Two previous single-arm trials have drawn conflicting conclusions regarding the activity of pazopanib in urothelial cancers after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients and Methods This randomized (1:1) open-label phase II trial compared the efficacy of pazopanib 800 mg orally with paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2) days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) in the second-line setting. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results Between August 2012 and October 2014, 131 patients, out of 140 planned, were randomly assigned. The study was terminated early on the recommendation of the independent data monitoring committee because of futility. Final analysis after the preplanned number of deaths (n = 110) occurred after a median follow-up of 18 months. One hundred fifteen deaths had occurred at the final data extract presented here. Median OS was 8.0 months for paclitaxel (80% CI, 6.9 to 9.7 months) and 4.7 months for pazopanib (80% CI, 4.2 to 6.4 months). The hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for baseline stratification factors was 1.28 (80% CI, 0.99 to 1.67; one-sided P = .89). Median progression-free survival was 4.1 months for paclitaxel (80% CI, 3.0 to 5.6 months) and 3.1 months for pazopanib (80% CI, 2.7 to 4.6 months; HR, 1.09; 80% CI, 0.85 to 1.40; one-sided P = .67). Discontinuations for toxicity occurred in 7.8% and 23.1% for paclitaxel and pazopanib, respectively. Conclusion Pazopanib did not have greater efficacy than paclitaxel in the second-line treatment of urothelial cancers. There was a trend toward superior OS for paclitaxel.

  16. Nivolumab for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial.

    PubMed

    Motzer, Robert J; Rini, Brian I; McDermott, David F; Redman, Bruce G; Kuzel, Timothy M; Harrison, Michael R; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Drabkin, Harry A; George, Saby; Logan, Theodore F; Margolin, Kim A; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Lambert, Alexandre M; Waxman, Ian M; Hammers, Hans J

    2015-05-01

    Nivolumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G4 programmed death-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody that restores T-cell immune activity. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity, dose-response relationship, and safety of nivolumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients with clear-cell mRCC previously treated with agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway were randomly assigned (blinded ratio of 1:1:1) to nivolumab 0.3, 2, or 10 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the dose-response relationship as measured by progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. A total of 168 patients were randomly assigned to the nivolumab 0.3- (n = 60), 2- (n = 54), and 10-mg/kg (n = 54) cohorts. One hundred eighteen patients (70%) had received more than one prior systemic regimen. Median PFS was 2.7, 4.0, and 4.2 months, respectively (P = .9). Respective ORRs were 20%, 22%, and 20%. Median OS was 18.2 months (80% CI, 16.2 to 24.0 months), 25.5 months (80% CI, 19.8 to 28.8 months), and 24.7 months (80% CI, 15.3 to 26.0 months), respectively. The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was fatigue (24%, 22%, and 35%, respectively). Nineteen patients (11%) experienced grade 3 to 4 treatment-related AEs. Nivolumab demonstrated antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile across the three doses studied in mRCC. No dose-response relationship was detected as measured by PFS. These efficacy and safety results in mRCC support study in the phase III setting. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Nivolumab for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results of a Randomized Phase II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Motzer, Robert J.; Rini, Brian I.; McDermott, David F.; Redman, Bruce G.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Harrison, Michael R.; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Drabkin, Harry A.; George, Saby; Logan, Theodore F.; Margolin, Kim A.; Plimack, Elizabeth R.; Lambert, Alexandre M.; Waxman, Ian M.; Hammers, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nivolumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G4 programmed death–1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody that restores T-cell immune activity. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity, dose-response relationship, and safety of nivolumab in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Patients and Methods Patients with clear-cell mRCC previously treated with agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway were randomly assigned (blinded ratio of 1:1:1) to nivolumab 0.3, 2, or 10 mg/kg intravenously once every 3 weeks. The primary objective was to evaluate the dose-response relationship as measured by progression-free survival (PFS); secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), and safety. Results A total of 168 patients were randomly assigned to the nivolumab 0.3- (n = 60), 2- (n = 54), and 10-mg/kg (n = 54) cohorts. One hundred eighteen patients (70%) had received more than one prior systemic regimen. Median PFS was 2.7, 4.0, and 4.2 months, respectively (P = .9). Respective ORRs were 20%, 22%, and 20%. Median OS was 18.2 months (80% CI, 16.2 to 24.0 months), 25.5 months (80% CI, 19.8 to 28.8 months), and 24.7 months (80% CI, 15.3 to 26.0 months), respectively. The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was fatigue (24%, 22%, and 35%, respectively). Nineteen patients (11%) experienced grade 3 to 4 treatment-related AEs. Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile across the three doses studied in mRCC. No dose-response relationship was detected as measured by PFS. These efficacy and safety results in mRCC support study in the phase III setting. PMID:25452452

  18. Pilates in heart failure patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; d'Avila, Veridiana Moraes

    2012-12-01

    Conventional cardiac rehabilitation program consist of 15 min of warm-up, 30 min of aerobic exercise and followed by 15 min calisthenics exercise. The Pilates method has been increasingly applied for its therapeutic benefits, however little scientific evidence supports or rebukes its use as a treatment in patients with heart failure (HF). Investigate the effects of Pilates on exercise capacity variables in HF. Sixteen pts with HF, left ventricular ejection fraction 27 ± 14%, NYHA class I-II were randomly assigned to conventional cardiac rehabilitation program (n = 8) or mat Pilates training (n = 8) for 16 weeks of 30 min of aerobic exercise followed by 20 min of the specific program. At 16 weeks, pts in the mat Pilates group and conventional group showed significantly increase on exercise time 11.9 ± 2.5 to 17.8 ± 4 and 11.7 ± 3.9 to 14.2 ± 4 min, respectively. However, only the Pilates group increased significantly the ventilation (from 56 ± 20 to 69 ± 17 L/min, P = 0.02), peak VO(2) (from 20.9 ± 6 to 24.8 ± 6 mL/kg/min, P = 0.01), and O(2) pulse (from 11.9 ± 2 to 13.8 ± 3 mL/bpm, P = 0.003). The Pilates group showed significantly increase in peak VO(2) when compared with conventional group (24.8 ± 6 vs. 18.3 ± 4, P = 0.02). The result suggests that the Pilates method may be a beneficial adjunctive treatment that enhances functional capacity in patients with HF who are already receiving standard medical therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Zonisamide for Bipolar Depression: A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Adjunctive Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dauphinais, Deborah; Knable, Michael; Rosenthal, Joshua; Polanski, Mark; Rosenthal, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Objective This is the first multicenter, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adjunctive zonisamide for the treatment of bipolar depression. Experimental design One hundred two patients with bipolar disorder, type I or II in the depressed phase of illness were randomized to either adjunctive zonisamide or placebo. The study consisted of three phases, a 7 to 30 day screening and stabilization phase, 6 weeks of blinded treatment and a 1 to 3 week discontinuation phase. MADRS score was the primary outcome variable. Secondary outcome measures included the YMRS, CGI-S, CGI-I, Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q), and an a priori analysis of response and remission. Metabolic parameters including weight, waist-hip ratio, body mass index, fasting glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were also evaluated. Side effects were measured using the SAFTEE. Principal observations There were no statistically significant differences in response between subjects treated with adjunctive zonisamide vs. placebo controls for the primary or secondary outcome measures. There were also no differences between the groups with regard to response rate or remission rate. Conclusions In contrast to preliminary open label studies that suggested a role for zonisamide in bipolar depression, we could not confirm these results in a large double blind controlled study. PMID:27738356

  20. Lifestyle Intervention on Metabolic Syndrome and its Impact on Quality of Life: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saboya, Patrícia Pozas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Zimmermann, Paulo Roberto; Gustavo, Andreia da Silva; Macagnan, Fabricio Edler; Feoli, Ana Pandolfo; Oliveira, Margareth da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Background Lifestyle intervention programs can reduce the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and, therefore, reduce the risk for cardiac disease, one of the main public health problems nowadays. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the effects of three types of approach for lifestyle change programs in the reduction of metabolic parameters, and to identify its impact on the quality of life (QOL) of individuals with MetS. Methods A randomized controlled trial included 72 individuals with MetS aged 30-59 years. Individuals were randomized into three groups of multidisciplinary intervention [Standard Intervention (SI) - control group; Group Intervention (GI); and Individual Intervention (II)] during 12 weeks. The primary outcome was change in the metabolic parameters, and secondarily, the improvement in QOL measures at three moments: baseline, 3 and 9 months. Results Group and individual interventions resulted in a significant reduction in body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure at 3 months and the improvement of QOL, although it was significantly associated with the physical functioning domain. However, these changes did not remain 6 months after the end of intervention. Depression and anxiety were significantly associated with worse QOL, although they showed no effect on the response to intervention. Conclusion Multidisciplinary intervention, especially in a group, might be an effective and economically feasible strategy in the control of metabolic parameters of MetS and improvement of QOL compared to SI, even in a dose-effect relationship. PMID:27982160

  1. Myopia Control with Bifocal Contact Lenses: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Aller, Thomas A; Liu, Maria; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-04-01

    Most studies have reported only minimal reductions in myopia progression with bifocal or progressive multifocal spectacles, although somewhat larger, although mostly still clinically insignificant, effects have been reported in children with nearpoint esophoria and/or accommodative dysfunctions. The CONTROL study was a 1-year, prospective, randomized, clinical trial of bifocal contact lenses for control of myopia in children with eso fixation disparities at near. Eighty-six myopic subjects, aged 8 to 18 years, were enrolled in the study after passing the screening examination. Of these, 79 completed lens assignment and 78 completed the study. The mean refractive error of these 79 subjects was -2.69 ± 1.40D (SD), and all had progressed by -0.50D or more since their last examination. All subjects also had eso fixation disparity at near. Subjects were randomly assigned to wear either Vistakon Acuvue 2 (single-vision soft contact lenses [SVSCLs]) or Vistakon Acuvue Bifocal (bifocal soft contact lenses [BFSCLs]). Bifocal adds were selected to neutralize the associated phoria. Treatment outcomes included cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length, assessed in terms of changes after 6 and 12 months of treatment from pretreatment baseline values. The BFSCLs significantly slowed myopia progression, with statistically significant differences between the treatment groups after 6 months. After 12 months of treatment, the SVSCL group had progressed by -0.79 ± 0.43D compared with -0.22 ± 0.34D for the BFSCL group (cycloplegic objective spherical equivalent, average of two eyes). Corresponding axial length changes were 0.24 ± 0.17 mm and 0.05 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. All of these differences were found to be statistically significant (unpaired t-tests, p < 0.001). The distance center bifocal contact lenses tested in this study achieved greater control over myopia progression and axial elongation (>70%) compared with most published results with multifocal spectacles. Further

  2. ORCHIDS: an Observational Randomized Controlled Trial on Childhood Differential Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes). However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-)environment interactions to obtain more insight into a) moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b) behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-)environment interactions in an experimental design. Methods/Design The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training). In a screening, families with children aged 4–8 who show mild to (sub)clinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest), after 6 months (i.e., posttest), and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up). Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-)environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s) received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and will manifest

  3. Three-year Randomized Clinical Study of a One-step Universal Adhesive and a Two-step Self-etch Adhesive in Class II Composite Restorations.

    PubMed

    van Dijken, Jan Wv; Pallesen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate in a randomized clinical evaluation the 3-year clinical durability of a one-step universal adhesive and compare it intraindividually with a 2-step self-etch adhesive in Class II restorations. Each of 57 participants (mean age 58.3 years) received at least two extended Class II restorations that were as similar as possible. The cavities in each of the 60 individual pairs of cavities were randomly distributed to the 1-step universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal: AU) and the control 2-step self-etch adhesive (Optibond XTR: OX). A low shrinkage composite (Aelite LS) was used for all restorations, which were evaluated using slightly modified USPHS criteria at baseline and 1, 2, and 3 years. 114 Class II restorations were evaluated at three years. Eight restorations, 3 AU and 5 OX, failed during the follow-up, resulting in 94.7% (AU) and 91.2% (OX) success rates (p > 0.05). Annual failure rates were 1.8% and 2.9%, respectively.The main reason for failure was composite fracture. Class II composite restorations placed with a 1-step universal adhesive showed good short-term efficacy.

  4. Phenobarbitone versus phenytoin for treatment of neonatal seizures: an open-label randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Garima; Upadhyay, Amit; Pathak, Umesh; Chawla, Deepak; Goel, Sneh P

    2013-08-01

    To compare the efficacy of phenobarbitone and phenytoin for treatment of neonatal seizures in term and near-term neonates. Open labeled randomized controlled trial. Neonatal intensive care unit of a level II unit from India, from November 2008 to September 2009. All term and late pre-term neonates admitted with clinically apparent seizures and not having any transient metabolic disorders (hypoglycemia or hypocalcemia) were randomly assigned. Phenobarbitone (n=54) or phenytoin (n=55) intravenously 20 mg/kg/dose over 20-30 min. Neonates whose seizures were not controlled by the assigned drug were then crossed over to be treated with other drug in same dose. Clinical control of seizures (seizure free period of 24 hours after giving anticonvulsant). Baseline characteristics including mean birthweight, gestation age and sex were comparable in both groups. Seizures were controlled in 8 of the 55 (14.5%) neonates who received phenytoin, as compared to 39 of 54 (72.2%) neonates who received phenobarbitone (P <0.001). In babies not responding to assigned drugs, after cross-over to the other drug, seizure control was achieved in 44/55 (80%) of the neonates assigned to receive phenytoin first as compared to 49/54 (91%) of those assigned to receive phenobarbitone first (P=0.014). After maximum dose of phenobarbitone seizures were controlled in 49/55(89%) in phenytoin group and 52/54 (96%) in phenobarbitone group (P<0.05). Phenobarbitone is more efficacious than phenytoin in control of clinical seizures in term or near-term neonates, irrespective of etiology. To evaluate serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during the induction phase of chemotherapy.

  5. Effectiveness of multimodal pain management after bipolar hemiarthroplasty for hip fracture: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Ha, Yong-Chan; Kim, Jin-Yun; Woo, Young-Cheol; Lee, Jae-Sung; Jang, Eui-Chan

    2013-02-20

    Appropriate pain management affects outcome after hip fracture surgery. Although multimodal pain management is commonly used for pain control for patients undergoing elective surgery, few studies have evaluated its use in those undergoing hip fracture surgery. This prospective randomized study was designed to determine the clinical value of multimodal pain management with preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular multimodal drug injections in patients undergoing bipolar hip hemiarthroplasty. Of eighty-two cognitively intact elderly patients about to undergo bipolar hemiarthroplasty after a hip fracture, forty-three were randomly assigned to receive preemptive pain medication and intraoperative periarticular injections (Group I) and thirty-nine were assigned to not receive preemptive medication and injections (Group II). These two groups were compared with regard to the pain level on postoperative days one, four, and seven; at discharge; and when they started walking and standing exercises. Total amounts of fentanyl used, the frequency of use of patient-controlled analgesia, patient satisfaction at discharge, and perioperative complications were recorded. Group I had a lower pain level than Group II on postoperative days one and four, but no intergroup difference in pain level was observed on postoperative day seven. The total amount of fentanyl used and the frequency of use of patient-controlled analgesia were also lower in Group I. Patient satisfaction at discharge was higher in Group I. No significant intergroup differences were found in the times until the patients walked or performed standing exercises or in the complications. Multimodal pain management provides additional pain relief until the fourth postoperative day, improves patient satisfaction at discharge, and reduces total narcotic consumption for postoperative pain management after hip hemiarthroplasty for hip fractures.

  6. Antibiotics in third molar extraction; are they really necessary: A non-inferiority randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ankit; Roychoudhury, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila; Pandey, Sandeep; Singh, Surender; Das, Bimal K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotic resistance is now a serious problem, although it was not so only a few years ago. The need of the hour is to give clear evidence of the efficacy of antibiotic use, or lack thereof, to the surgeon for a procedure as common as mandibular third molar surgery. Aim: This study aimed to evaluate whether postoperative combined amoxicillin and clavulanic acid in mandibular third molar extraction is effective in preventing inflammatory complications. Study and Design: The study was structured as a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Materials and Methods: A study was designed wherein the 96 units (two bilaterally similar impacted mandibular third molars per head in 48 patients) were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (Group I and Group II). Each patient served as his/her own control. Each patient received 625 mg of combined amoxicillin and clavulanic acid 1 h before surgery. In the case of third molars belonging to Group I, 625 mg of combined amoxicillin and clavulanic acid TDS was continued for 3 days; in Group II, placebo in similar-looking packs was continued for 3 days. The patients were evaluated on the third and seventh postoperative days for signs of clinical infection and for microbial load evaluation. Statistical Analysis: The data between the two groups were statistically analyzed by the two-tailed Fisher's exact test, with a 95% confidence interval. Results: The difference was not statistically significant between the test group and the control group with regard to erythema, dehiscence, swelling, pain, trismus, and infection based on microbial load. The data were statistically significant for alveolar osteitis, with the occurrence of alveolar osteitis (14.58%) in the placebo group. Conclusion: Postoperative antibiotics are recommended only for patients undergoing contaminated, long-duration surgery. PMID:25937728

  7. Association of run-in periods with weight loss in obesity randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Affuso, O; Kaiser, K A; Carson, T L; Ingram, K H; Schwiers, M; Robertson, H; Abbas, F; Allison, D B

    2014-01-01

    Study-level design characteristics that inform the optimal design of obesity randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been examined in few studies. A pre-randomization run-in period is one such design element that may influence weight loss. We examined 311 obesity RCTs published between 1 January 2007 and 1 July 2009 that examine d weight loss or weight gain prevention as a primary or secondary end-point. Variables included run-in period, pre-post intervention weight loss, study duration (time), intervention type, percent female and degree of obesity. Linear regression was used to estimate weight loss as a function of (i) run-in (yes/no) and (ii) run-in, time, percent female, body mass index and intervention type. Interaction terms were also examined. Approximately 19% (18.6%) of the studies included a run-in period, with pharmaceutical studies having the highest frequency. Although all intervention types were associated with weight loss (Mean = 2.80 kg, SD = 3.52), the inclusion of a pre-randomization run-in was associated with less weight loss (P = 0.0017) compared with studies that did not include a run-in period. However, this association was not consistent across intervention types. Our results imply that in trials primarily targeting weight loss in adults, run-in periods may not be beneficial for improving weight loss outcomes in interventions. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  8. Mixing Methods in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs): Validation, Contextualization, Triangulation, and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, James P.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Dorner, Lisa; Barnes, Carol; May, Henry; Huff, Jason; Camburn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we described how we mixed research approaches in a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) of a school principal professional development program. Using examples from our study we illustrate how combining qualitative and quantitative data can address some key challenges from validating instruments and measures of mediator variables to…

  9. Mixing Methods in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs): Validation, Contextualization, Triangulation, and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, James P.; Pareja, Amber Stitziel; Dorner, Lisa; Barnes, Carol; May, Henry; Huff, Jason; Camburn, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we described how we mixed research approaches in a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) of a school principal professional development program. Using examples from our study we illustrate how combining qualitative and quantitative data can address some key challenges from validating instruments and measures of mediator variables to…

  10. Control Capacity and A Random Sampling Method in Exploring Controllability of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Tao; Barabási, Albert-László

    2013-01-01

    Controlling complex systems is a fundamental challenge of network science. Recent advances indicate that control over the system can be achieved through a minimum driver node set (MDS). The existence of multiple MDS's suggests that nodes do not participate in control equally, prompting us to quantify their participations. Here we introduce control capacity quantifying the likelihood that a node is a driver node. To efficiently measure this quantity, we develop a random sampling algorithm. This algorithm not only provides a statistical estimate of the control capacity, but also bridges the gap between multiple microscopic control configurations and macroscopic properties of the network under control. We demonstrate that the possibility of being a driver node decreases with a node's in-degree and is independent of its out-degree. Given the inherent multiplicity of MDS's, our findings offer tools to explore control in various complex systems. PMID:23912679

  11. Teaching children to cross streets safely: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schwebel, David C; McClure, Leslie A; Severson, Joan

    2014-07-01

    Child pedestrian injury is a global public health challenge. This randomized, controlled trial considered comparative efficacy of individualized streetside training, training in a virtual pedestrian environment, training using videos and Web sites, plus no-training control, to improve children's street-crossing ability. Pedestrian safety was evaluated among 231 7- and 8-year-olds using both streetside (field) and laboratory-based (virtual environment) trials before intervention group assignment, immediately posttraining, and 6 months posttraining. All training groups received 6 30-min sessions. Four outcomes assessed pedestrian safety: start delay (temporal lag before initiating crossing), hits/close calls (collisions/near-misses with vehicles in simulated crossings), attention to traffic (looks left and right, controlled for time), and missed opportunities (safe crossing opportunities that were missed). Results showed training in the virtual pedestrian environment and especially individualized streetside training resulted in safer pedestrian behavior postintervention and at follow-up. As examples, children trained streetside entered safe traffic gaps more quickly posttraining than control group children and children trained streetside or in the virtual environment had somewhat fewer hits/close calls in postintervention VR trials. Children showed minimal change in attention to traffic posttraining. Children trained with videos/websites showed minimal learning. Both individualized streetside training and training within virtual pedestrian environments may improve 7- and 8-year-olds' street-crossing safety. Individualized training has limitations of adult time and labor. Virtual environment training has limitations of accessibility and cost. Given the public health burden of child pedestrian injuries, future research should explore innovative strategies for effective training that can be broadly disseminated.

  12. Teaching Children to Cross Streets Safely: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schwebel, David C.; McClure, Leslie A.; Severson, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Child pedestrian injury is a global public health challenge. This randomized controlled trial considered comparative efficacy of individualized streetside training, training in a virtual pedestrian environment, training using videos and websites, plus no-training control, to improve children’s street-crossing ability. Methods Pedestrian safety was evaluated among 231 seven- and eight-year-olds using both streetside (field) and laboratory-based (virtual environment) trials prior to intervention group assignment, immediately post-training, and six months post-training. All training groups received six 30-minute sessions. Four outcomes assessed pedestrian safety: start delay (temporal lag before initiating crossing), hits/close calls (collisions/near-misses with vehicles in simulated crossings), attention to traffic (looks left and right, controlled for time), and missed opportunities (safe crossing opportunities that were missed). Results Results showed training in the virtual pedestrian environment and especially individualized streetside training resulted in safer pedestrian behavior post-intervention and at follow-up. As examples, children trained streetside entered safe traffic gaps more quickly post-training than control group children and children trained streetside or in the virtual environment had somewhat fewer hits/close calls in post-intervention VR trials. Children showed minimal change in attention to traffic post-training. Children trained with videos/websites showed minimal learning. Conclusion Both individualized streetside training and training within virtual pedestrian environments may improve 7- and 8-year-olds’ street-crossing safety. Individualized training has limitations of adult time and labor. Virtual environment training has limitations of accessibility and cost. Given the public health burden of child pedestrian injuries, future research should explore innovative strategies for effective training that can be broadly

  13. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation support application on a smartphone - randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tomohiko; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Nishiyama, Chika; Murakami, Yukiko; Ando, Masahiko; Kawamura, Takashi; Tasaki, Osamu; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Shimazu, Takeshi; Iwami, Taku

    2015-01-01

    This simulation trial aimed to compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with and without the newly-developed CPR support application on smartphones. In this trial, participants were randomly assigned to either the CPR support application group or the control group, stratified by sex and previous CPR training. Participants' CPR skills were evaluated by a 2-min case-based scenario test using the Leardal Resusci Anne PC Skill reporting Manikin System(®). The outcome measures were the proportion of chest compressions performed in each group and the number of total chest compressions and appropriate chest compressions performed during the 2-min test period. A total of 84 participants were enrolled and completed the protocol. All participants in the CPR support application group performed chest compressions, compared with only 31 (75.6%) in the control group (P<0.001). Among participants who performed chest compressions during the 2-min test period, the number of total chest compressions was significantly higher in the CPR support application group than in the control group (211.6±29.5 vs. 77.0±43.3, P<0.001). The number of appropriate chest compressions tended to be greater in the CPR support application group than in the control group, although it was statistically insignificant (30.3±57.3 vs. 17.2±28.7, P=0.246). In this cohort of laypersons, the newly-developed CPR support application for smartphones contributed to increasing the implementation rate and the number of total chest compressions performed and may assist in improving the survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (UMIN000004740).

  14. Behavioral neurocardiac training in hypertension: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Robert P; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J; Kamath, Markad V; Picton, Peter E; Chessex, Caroline; Hiscock, Natalie; Powell, Jonathan; Catt, Michael; Hendrickx, Hilde; Talbot, Duncan; Chen, Maggie H

    2010-04-01

    It is not established whether behavioral interventions add benefit to pharmacological therapy for hypertension. We hypothesized that behavioral neurocardiac training (BNT) with heart rate variability biofeedback would reduce blood pressure further by modifying vagal heart rate modulation during reactivity and recovery from standardized cognitive tasks ("mental stress"). This randomized, controlled trial enrolled 65 patients with uncomplicated hypertension to BNT or active control (autogenic relaxation), with six 1-hour sessions over 2 months with home practice. Outcomes were analyzed with linear mixed models that adjusted for antihypertensive drugs. BNT reduced daytime and 24-hour systolic blood pressures (-2.4+/-0.9 mm Hg, P=0.009, and -2.1+/-0.9 mm Hg, P=0.03, respectively) and pulse pressures (-1.7+/-0.6 mm Hg, P=0.004, and -1.4+/-0.6 mm Hg, P=0.02, respectively). No effect was observed for controls (P>0.10 for all indices). BNT also increased RR-high-frequency power (0.15 to 0.40 Hz; P=0.01) and RR interval (P<0.001) during cognitive tasks. Among controls, high-frequency power was unchanged (P=0.29), and RR interval decreased (P=0.03). Neither intervention altered spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (P>0.10). In contrast to relaxation therapy, BNT with heart rate variability biofeedback modestly lowers ambulatory blood pressure during wakefulness, and it augments tonic vagal heart rate modulation. It is unknown whether efficacy of this treatment can be improved with biofeedback of baroreflex gain. BNT, alone or as an adjunct to drug therapy, may represent a promising new intervention for hypertension.

  15. Mobile health, exercise and metabolic risk: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Robert J; Stuckey, Melanie I; Shapiro, Sheree; Gill, Dawn P

    2014-10-18

    It was hypothesized that a mobile health (mHealth) intervention would elicit greater improvements in systolic blood pressure and other cardiometabolic risk factors at 12 weeks, which would be better maintained over 52 weeks, compared to the active control intervention. Eligible participants (≥2 metabolic syndrome risk factors) were randomized to the mHealth intervention (n = 75) or the active control group (n = 74). Blood pressure and other cardiometabolic risk factors were measured at baseline and at 12, 24 and 52 weeks. Both groups received an individualized exercise prescription and the intervention group additionally received a technology kit for home monitoring of biometrics and physical activity. Analyses were conducted on 67 participants in the intervention group (aged 56.7 ± 9.7 years; 71.6% female) and 60 participants in the active control group (aged 59.1 ± 8.4 years; 76.7% female). At 12 weeks, baseline adjusted mean change in systolic blood pressure (primary outcome) was greater in the active control group compared to the intervention group (-5.68 mmHg; 95% CI -10.86 to -0.50 mmHg; p = 0.03), but there were no differences between groups in mean change for secondary outcomes. Over 52-weeks, the difference in mean change for systolic blood pressure was no longer apparent between groups, but remained significant across the entire population (time: p < 0.001). In participants with increased cardiometabolic risk, exercise prescription alone had greater short-term improvements in systolic blood pressure compared to the mHealth intervention, though over 52 weeks, improvements were equal between interventions. ClinicalTrials.gov http://NCT01944124.

  16. Rationale and design of the allogeneiC human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in patients with aging fRAilTy via intravenoUS delivery (CRATUS) study: A phase I/II, randomized, blinded and placebo controlled trial to evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cell infusion in patients with aging frailty

    PubMed Central

    Golpanian, Samuel; DiFede, Darcy L.; Pujol, Marietsy V.; Lowery, Maureen H.; Levis-Dusseau, Silvina; Goldstein, Bradley J.; Schulman, Ivonne H.; Longsomboon, Bangon; Wolf, Ariel; Khan, Aisha; Heldman, Alan W.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a syndrome associated with reduced physiological reserves that increases an individual's vulnerability for developing increased morbidity and/or mortality. While most clinical trials have focused on exercise, nutrition, pharmacologic agents, or a multifactorial approach for the prevention and attenuation of frailty, none have studied the use of cell-based therapies. We hypothesize that the application of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (allo-hMSCs) as a therapeutic agent for individuals with frailty is safe and efficacious. The CRATUS trial comprises an initial non-blinded phase I study, followed by a blinded, randomized phase I/II study (with an optional follow-up phase) that will address the safety and pre-specified beneficial effects in patients with the aging frailty syndrome. In the initial phase I protocol, allo-hMSCs will be administered in escalating doses via peripheral intravenous infusion (n=15) to patients allocated to three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=5, 20 million allo-hMSCs), Group 2 (n=5, 100 million allo-hMSCs), and Group 3 (n=5, 200 million allo-hMSCs). Subsequently, in the randomized phase, allo-hMSCs or matched placebo will be administered to patients (n=30) randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of two doses of MSCs versus placebo: Group A (n=10, 100 million allo-hMSCs), Group B (n=10, 200 million allo-hMSCs), and Group C (n=10, placebo). Primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCs administered in frail older individuals. This study will determine the safety of intravenous infusion of stem cells and compare phenotypic outcomes in patients with aging frailty. PMID:26933813

  17. Usual and unusual care: existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Kenneth E; Mohr, David C; Davidson, Karina W; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions and the role of extrinsic health care services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Selective qualitative review. Extrinsic health care services, also known as nonstudy care, have important but under-recognized effects on the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Usual care, treatment-as-usual, standard of care, and other existing practice control groups pose a variety of methodological and ethical challenges, but they play a vital role in behavioral intervention research. This review highlights the need for a scientific consensus statement on control groups in behavioral trials.

  18. Usual and Unusual Care: Existing Practice Control Groups In Randomized Controlled Trials of Behavioral Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Freedland, Kenneth E.; Mohr, David C.; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the use of existing practice control groups in randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions, and the role of extrinsic healthcare services in the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Method Selective qualitative review. Results Extrinsic healthcare services, also known as nonstudy care, have important but under-recognized effects on the design and conduct of behavioral trials. Usual care, treatment as usual, standard of care, and other existing practice control groups pose a variety of methodological and ethical challenges, but they play a vital role in behavioral intervention research. Conclusion This review highlights the need for a scientific consensus statement on control groups in behavioral trials. PMID:21536837

  19. Prognostic interaction patterns in diabetes mellitus II: A random-matrix-theory relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aparna; Pawar, Amit Kumar; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    We analyze protein-protein interactions in diabetes mellitus II and its normal counterpart under the combined framework of random matrix theory and network biology. This disease is the fifth-leading cause of death in high-income countries and an epidemic in developing countries, affecting around 8 % of the total adult population in the world. Treatment at the advanced stage is difficult and challenging, making early detection a high priority in the cure of the disease. Our investigation reveals specific structural patterns important for the occurrence of the disease. In addition to the structural parameters, the spectral properties reveal the top contributing nodes from localized eigenvectors, which turn out to be significant for the occurrence of the disease. Our analysis is time-efficient and cost-effective, bringing a new horizon in the field of medicine by highlighting major pathways involved in the disease. The analysis provides a direction for the development of novel drugs and therapies in curing the disease by targeting specific interaction patterns instead of a single protein.

  20. Prognostic interaction patterns in diabetes mellitus II: A random-matrix-theory relation.

    PubMed

    Rai, Aparna; Pawar, Amit Kumar; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    We analyze protein-protein interactions in diabetes mellitus II and its normal counterpart under the combined framework of random matrix theory and network biology. This disease is the fifth-leading cause of death in high-income countries and an epidemic in developing countries, affecting around 8% of the total adult population in the world. Treatment at the advanced stage is difficult and challenging, making early detection a high priority in the cure of the disease. Our investigation reveals specific structural patterns important for the occurrence of the disease. In addition to the structural parameters, the spectral properties reveal the top contributing nodes from localized eigenvectors, which turn out to be significant for the occurrence of the disease. Our analysis is time-efficient and cost-effective, bringing a new horizon in the field of medicine by highlighting major pathways involved in the disease. The analysis provides a direction for the development of novel drugs and therapies in curing the disease by targeting specific interaction patterns instead of a single protein.

  1. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Hollifield, Michael; Sinclair-Lian, Nityamo; Warner, Teddy D; Hammerschlag, Richard

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential efficacy and acceptability of accupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). People diagnosed with PTSD were randomized to either an empirically developed accupuncture treatment (ACU), a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or a wait-list control (WLC). The primary outcome measure was self-reported PTSD symptoms at baseline, end treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Repeated measures MANOVA was used to detect predicted Group X Time effects in both intent-to-treat (ITT) and treatment completion models. Compared with the WLC condition in the ITT model, accupuncture provided large treatment effects for PTSD (F [1, 46] = 12.60; p < 0.01; Cohen's d = 1.29), similar in magnitude to group CBT (F [1, 47] = 12.45; p < 0.01; d = 1.42) (ACU vs. CBT, d = 0.29). Symptom reductions at end treatment were maintained at 3-month follow-up for both interventions. Accupuncture may be an efficacious and acceptable nonexposure treatment option for PTSD. Larger trials with additional controls and methods are warranted to replicate and extend these findings.

  2. Prevention of pathological gambling: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Jason P; Nicki, Richard M

    2007-01-01

    Although the gambling industry is expanding rapidly throughout North America and around the world, there are only a few empirically evaluated programs aimed at the prevention of pathological gambling (PG). The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of a new prevention program aimed at PG. The Stop & Think! program was designed to teach at-risk video lottery terminal (VLT) gamblers cognitive restructuring and problem-solving skills that may help to prevent the development of PG. These skills were taught through a variety of methods - including an automated educational presentation, video and text vignettes, audio training tapes, and skill rehearsal. The program was evaluated using a randomized, 2-group experimental design with a wait-list control group and pre-, post-, and follow-up measures. Results indicated that, compared with the control group, the experimental group was less at risk for developing a gambling problem after the program. The experimental group endorsed fewer gambling-related cognitive distortions, engaged in less VLT gambling, and had lower scores on a measure of PG. The results of this study provide the basis for the implementation of the Stop & Think! program in the province of Prince Edward Island, Canada, and perhaps other jurisdictions too.

  3. Biofeedback treatment for Tourette syndrome: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoko; Cavanna, Andrea E; Critchley, Hugo D; Stern, Jeremy J; Robertson, Mary M; Joyce, Eileen M

    2014-03-01

    To study the clinical effectiveness of biofeedback treatment in reducing tics in patients with Tourette syndrome. Despite advances in the pharmacologic treatment of patients with Tourette syndrome, many remain troubled by their tics, which may be resistant to multiple medications at tolerable doses. Electrodermal biofeedback is a noninvasive biobehavioral intervention that can be useful in managing neuropsychiatric and neurologic conditions. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of electrodermal biofeedback training in 21 patients with Tourette syndrome. After training the patients for 3 sessions a week over 4 weeks, we observed a significant reduction in tic frequency and improved indices of subjective well-being in both the active-biofeedback and sham-feedback (control) groups, but there was no difference between the groups in these measurements. Furthermore, the active-treatment group did not demonstrably learn to reduce their sympathetic electrodermal tone using biofeedback. Our findings indicate that this form of biofeedback training was unable to produce a clinical effect greater than placebo. The main confounding factor appeared to be the 30-minute duration of the training sessions, which made it difficult for patients to sustain a reduction in sympathetic tone when their tics themselves were generating competing phasic electrodermal arousal responses. Despite a negative finding in this study, electrodermal biofeedback training may have a role in managing tics if optimal training schedules can be identified.

  4. HealthLinks Randomized Controlled Trial: Design and Baseline Results

    PubMed Central

    Hammerback, Kristen; Allen, Claire L.; Parrish, Amanda T.; Chan, K. Gary; Kohn, Marlana J.; Teague, Sara; Beresford, Shirley A.A.; Helfrich, Christian D.; Harris, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Small employers, especially those in low-wage industries, frequently lack the capacity and resources to implement evidence-based health promotion interventions without support and assistance. The purpose of this paper is to (a) describe the intervention design and study protocol of the HealthLinks Trial and (b) report baseline findings. This study is a three-arm randomized controlled trial testing the impact of the HealthLinks intervention on worksites’ adoption and implementation of evidence-based interventions. Group 1 will receive HealthLinks, Group 2 will receive HealthLinks plus wellness committees, and Group 3 will be a delayed control group. Seventy-eight employers are participating in the study; 3302 employees across the worksites participated in baseline data collection. Employers and employees will participate in follow-up surveys at one and two years after baseline to measure implementation (one year) and maintenance (two years) of HealthLinks interventions. Study outcomes will determine whether HealthLinks is an effective approach to increasing evidence-based health promotion in small, low-wage worksites and whether wellness committees are a capacity-building tool that increases HealthLinks’ effectiveness. PMID:26946121

  5. Randomized controlled trials for influenza drugs and vaccines: a review of controlled human infection studies.

    PubMed

    Balasingam, Shobana; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2016-08-01

    Controlled human infection, the intentional infection of healthy volunteers, allows disease pathogenesis to be studied and vaccines and therapeutic interventions to be evaluated in a controlled setting. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials of countermeasures for influenza that used the experimental human infection platform was performed. The primary objective was to document the scope of trials performed to date and the main efficacy outcome in the trials. The secondary objective was to assess safety and identify serious adverse events. The PubMed database was searched for randomized controlled influenza human challenge studies with predetermined search terms. Review papers, papers without outcomes, community-acquired infections, duplicated data, pathogenesis studies, and observational studies were excluded. Twenty-six randomized controlled trials published between 1947 and 2014 fit the study inclusion criteria. Two-thirds of these trials investigated antivirals and one-third investigated influenza vaccines. Among 2462 subjects inoculated with influenza virus, the incidence of serious adverse events was low (0.04%). These challenge studies helped to down-select three antivirals and one vaccine that were subsequently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Controlled human infection studies are an important research tool in assessing promising influenza vaccines and antivirals. These studies are performed quickly and are cost-effective and safe, with a low incidence of serious adverse events. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Rural providers' access to online resources: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Laura J.; McElfresh, Karen R.; Warner, Teddy D.; Stromberg, Tiffany L.; Trost, Jaren; Jelinek, Devin A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research determined the usage and satisfaction levels with one of two point-of-care (PoC) resources among health care providers in a rural state. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, twenty-eight health care providers in rural areas were stratified by occupation and region, then randomized into either the DynaMed or the AccessMedicine study arm. Study participants were physicians, physician assistants, and nurses. A pre- and post-study survey measured participants' attitudes toward different information resources and their information-seeking activities. Medical student investigators provided training and technical support for participants. Data analyses consisted of analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t tests, and Cohen's d statistic to compare pre- and post-study effects sizes. Results Participants in both the DynaMed and the AccessMedicine arms of the study reported increased satisfaction with their respective PoC resource, as expected. Participants in both arms also reported that they saved time in finding needed information. At baseline, both arms reported too little information available, which increased to “about right amounts of information” at the completion of the study. DynaMed users reported a Cohen's d increase of +1.50 compared to AccessMedicine users' reported use of 0.82. DynaMed users reported d2 satisfaction increases of 9.48 versus AccessMedicine satisfaction increases of 0.59 using a Cohen's d. Conclusion Participants in the DynaMed arm of the study used this clinically oriented PoC more heavily than the users of the textbook-based AccessMedicine. In terms of user satisfaction, DynaMed users reported higher levels of satisfaction than the users of AccessMedicine. PMID:26807050

  7. Dextrose Prolotherapy for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rabago, David; Patterson, Jeffrey J.; Mundt, Marlon; Kijowski, Richard; Grettie, Jessica; Segal, Neil A.; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Knee osteoarthritis is a common, debilitating chronic disease. Prolotherapy is an injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain. We conducted a 3-arm, blinded (injector, assessor, injection group participants), randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis. METHODS Ninety adults with at least 3 months of painful knee osteoarthritis were randomized to blinded injection (dextrose prolotherapy or saline) or at-home exercise. Extra- and intra-articular injections were done at 1, 5, and 9 weeks with as-needed additional treatments at weeks 13 and 17. Exercise participants received an exercise manual and in-person instruction. Outcome measures included a composite score on the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; 100 points); knee pain scale (KPS; individual knee), post-procedure opioid medication use, and participant satisfaction. Intention-to-treat analysis using analysis of variance was used. RESULTS No baseline differences existed between groups. All groups reported improved composite WOMAC scores compared with baseline status (P <.01) at 52 weeks. Adjusted for sex, age, and body mass index, WOMAC scores for patients receiving dextrose prolotherapy improved more (P <.05) at 52 weeks than did scores for patients receiving saline and exercise (score change: 15.3 ± 3.5 vs 7.6 ± 3.4, and 8.2 ± 3.3 points, respectively) and exceeded the WOMAC-based minimal clinically important difference. Individual knee pain scores also improved more in the prolotherapy group (P = .05). Use of prescribed postprocedure opioid medication resulted in rapid diminution of injection-related pain. Satisfaction with prolotherapy was high. There were no adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Prolotherapy resulted in clinically meaningful sustained improvement of pain, function, and stiffness scores for knee osteoarthritis compared with blinded saline injections and at-home exercises. PMID:23690322

  8. Dextrose prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rabago, David; Patterson, Jeffrey J; Mundt, Marlon; Kijowski, Richard; Grettie, Jessica; Segal, Neil A; Zgierska, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a common, debilitating chronic disease. Prolotherapy is an injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain. We conducted a 3-arm, blinded (injector, assessor, injection group participants), randomized controlled trial to assess the efficacy of prolotherapy for knee osteoarthritis. Ninety adults with at least 3 months of painful knee osteoarthritis were randomized to blinded injection (dextrose prolotherapy or saline) or at-home exercise. Extra- and intra-articular injections were done at 1, 5, and 9 weeks with as-needed additional treatments at weeks 13 and 17. Exercise participants received an exercise manual and in-person instruction. Outcome measures included a composite score on the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; 100 points); knee pain scale (KPS; individual knee), post-procedure opioid medication use, and participant satisfaction. Intention-to-treat analysis using analysis of variance was used. No baseline differences existed between groups. All groups reported improved composite WOMAC scores compared with baseline status (P <.01) at 52 weeks. Adjusted for sex, age, and body mass index, WOMAC scores for patients receiving dextrose prolotherapy improved more (P <.05) at 52 weeks than did scores for patients receiving saline and exercise (score change: 15.3 ± 3.5 vs 7.6 ± 3.4, and 8.2 ± 3.3 points, respectively) and exceeded the WOMAC-based minimal clinically important difference. Individual knee pain scores also improved more in the prolotherapy group (P = .05). Use of prescribed postprocedure opioid medication resulted in rapid diminution of injection-related pain. Satisfaction with prolotherapy was high. There were no adverse events. Prolotherapy resulted in clinically meaningful sustained improvement of pain, function, and stiffness scores for knee osteoarthritis compared with blinded saline injections and at-home exercises.

  9. [Chuzhen therapy for sub-health: a randomized controlled study].

    PubMed

    Hu, You-Ping; Xu, Zhen-Jie; Wu, Jia; Xing, Lin; Zhang, Lei-Xiao; Zhang, Jin-Xing; Tan, Hui; Mao, Shi-Zhi; Zhou, Cong-Quan

    2012-11-01

    To observe the effect on intervention of sub-health with pestle needle (Chuzhen). Randomized controlled trail was adopted for this research. One hundred and fifty-three cases were randomly divided into two groups of a Chuzhen group (79 cases) and a massage group (74 cases). Acupoint of Bazhen (Baihui Bazhen, Shendao Bazhen, Zhiyang Bazhen, Mingmen Bazhen, Yaoyangguan Bazhen), Hechelu on the head, the neck and the lumbar area were adopted in Chuzhen group. While regular whole-body massage was applied in the massage group. The human sub-health score, the cornell medical index (CMI) and thermal texture maps system (TTM) technology of the two groups before and after the intervention were observed. 1) After treatment, sub-health condition score, the CMI score, the M-R score and the TTM index were all increased in both groups (all P<0.01) 2) Comparison of D-value of the two groups before and after the intervention: the level of the sub-health score, the total score of CMI, and the index of sleep, pressure, Governor Vessel, Hukou (first web), blood lipid, viscosity of blood, microcirculation of TTM index of the Chuzhen group changed more obvious (all P<0.01), but there was no statistic significances in the M-R score and blood sugar of the TTM (both P>0.05). 3) The sub-health condition score in Chuzhen group was higher than that in the massage group (P<0.01). Chuzhen therapy has definite effect on intervention of sub-health, which is better than regular general massage.

  10. Exercise therapy in hip osteoarthritis--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Krauß, Inga; Steinhilber, Benjamin; Haupt, Georg; Miller, Regina; Martus, Peter; Janßen, Pia

    2014-09-01

    Roughly one in ten persons in the industrialized world suffers from hip osteoarthritis, a disease for which there is no cure. The goal of conservative therapy is to relieve symptoms, preferably with methods that let patients assume responsibility for their own treatment, e.g., physical training. In a randomized controlled trial, we studied the effectiveness of twelve weeks of exercise therapy in patients with hip osteoarthritis (THüKo), compared to no treatment (control group) and placebo ultrasound treatment of the hip (placebo ultrasound group). The primary endpoint was a comparison of the pain scores of the intervention versus control groups on the generic SF-36 health questionnaire. Secondary endpoints included comparisons across all three study groups of scores on the 7 other scales of the SF-36 and on the pain, physical function, and stiffness scales of the osteoarthritis-specific WOMAC Index. The statistical analysis was performed with ANCOVA, with baseline values as a covariate. Between-group effects were subsequently tested pairwise (two-tailed t-tests, alpha = 0.05). As for the primary endpoint, pain reduction was significantly greater in the intervention than in the control group (mean difference 5.7 points, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-11.1 points, p = 0.034). The comparisons across all three study groups (i.e., secondary endpoints, with 71 subjects in the intervention group, 68 in the control group, and 70 in the placebo group) revealed no significant between-group effects with respect to the SF-36. On the WOMAC Index, however, statistically significant differences were found for pain reduction between the intervention and control group (mean difference 7.4 points, 95% CI 3.0-11.8, p = 0.001) and between the intervention and placebo group (mean difference 5.1 points, 95% CI 0.7-9.4, p = 0.024). Comparable mean differences were also found for functional improvement. Twelve weeks of exercise therapy in hip osteoarthritis patients of normal vitality

  11. Prospective randomized phase II Trial of accelerated reepithelialization of superficial second-degree burn wounds using extracorporeal shock wave therapy.

    PubMed

    Ottomann, Christian; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Lavin, Philip T; Gannon, Francis H; Heggeness, Michael H; Thiele, Richard; Schaden, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    As extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can enhance healing of skin graft donor sites, this study focused on shock wave effects in burn wounds. A predefined cohort of 50 patients (6 with incomplete data or lost to follow-up) with acute second-degree burns from a larger study of 100 patients were randomly assigned between December 2006 and December 2007 to receive standard therapy (burn wound debridement/topical antiseptic therapy) with (n = 22) or without (n = 22) defocused ESWT (100 impulses/cm at 0.1 mJ/mm) applied once to the study burn, after debridement. Randomization sequence was computer-generated, and patients were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint, time to complete burn wound epithelialization, was determined by independent, blinded-observer. A worst case scenario was applied to the missing cases to rule out the impact of withdrawal bias. Patient characteristics across the 2 study groups were balanced (P > 0.05) except for older age (53 ± 17 vs. 38 ± 13 years, P = 0.002) in the ESWT group. Mean time to complete (≥95%) epithelialization (CE) for patients that did and did not undergo ESWT was 9.6 ± 1.7 and 12.5 ± 2.2 days, respectively (P < 0.0005). When age (continuous variable) and treatment group (binary) were examined in a linear regression model to control the baseline age imbalance, time to CE, age was not significant (P = 0.33) and treatment group retained significance (P < 0.0005). Statistical significance (P = 0.001) was retained when ESWT cases with missing follow-up were assigned the longest time to CE and when controls with missing follow-up were assigned the shortest time to CE. In this randomized phase II study, application of a single defocused shock wave treatment to the superficial second-degree burn wound after debridement/topical antiseptic therapy significantly accelerated epithelialization. This finding warrants confirmation in a larger phase III trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01242423).

  12. Comparison of ADM and Connective Tissue Graft as the Membrane in Class II Furcation Defect Regeneration: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Farhad, Shirin; Sadighi Shamami, Mehrnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Furcally-involved teeth present unique challenges to the success of periodontal therapy and influence treatment outcomes. This study aimed to assess to compare use of ADM and connective tissue membrane in class II furcation defect regeneration. Materials and methods. 10 patient with 2 bilaterally class II furcation defects in first and/or second maxilla or man-dibular molar without interproximal furcation involvement, were selected. Four weeks after initial phase of treatment, before and thorough the surgery pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level to stent (CAL-S), free gingival margin to stent(FGM-S) , crestal bone to stent (Crest-S), horizontal defect depth to stent (HDD-S) and vertical defect depth to stent (VDD-S) and crestal bone to defect depth measured from stent margin. Thereafter, one side randomly treated using connective tissue and DFDBA (study group) and opposite side received ADM and DFDBA (control group). After 6 months, soft and hard tissue parameters measured again in re-entry. Results. Both groups presented improvements after therapies (P & 0.05). No inter-group differences were seen in PD re-duction (P = 0.275), CAL gain (P = 0.156), free gingival margin (P = 0.146), crest of the bone (P = 0.248), reduction in horizontal defects depth (P = 0.139) and reduction in vertical defects depth (P = 0.149). Conclusion. Both treatments modalities have potential of regeneration without any adverse effect on healing process. Connective tissue grafts did not have significant higher bone fill compared to that of ADM. PMID:25093054

  13. Comparison of ADM and Connective Tissue Graft as the Membrane in Class II Furcation Defect Regeneration: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Farhad, Shirin; Sadighi Shamami, Mehrnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Furcally-involved teeth present unique challenges to the success of periodontal therapy and influence treatment outcomes. This study aimed to assess to compare use of ADM and connective tissue membrane in class II furcation defect regeneration. Materials and methods. 10 patient with 2 bilaterally class II furcation defects in first and/or second maxilla or man-dibular molar without interproximal furcation involvement, were selected. Four weeks after initial phase of treatment, before and thorough the surgery pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level to stent (CAL-S), free gingival margin to stent(FGM-S) , crestal bone to stent (Crest-S), horizontal defect depth to stent (HDD-S) and vertical defect depth to stent (VDD-S) and crestal bone to defect depth measured from stent margin. Thereafter, one side randomly treated using connective tissue and DFDBA (study group) and opposite side received ADM and DFDBA (control group). After 6 months, soft and hard tissue parameters measured again in re-entry. Results. Both groups presented improvements after therapies (P & 0.05). No inter-group differences were seen in PD re-duction (P = 0.275), CAL gain (P = 0.156), free gingival margin (P = 0.146), crest of the bone (P = 0.248), reduction in horizontal defects depth (P = 0.139) and reduction in vertical defects depth (P = 0.149). Conclusion. Both treatments modalities have potential of regeneration without any adverse effect on healing process. Connective tissue grafts did not have significant higher bone fill compared to that of ADM.

  14. Acupuncture in Menopause (AIM) Study: a Pragmatic, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Avis, Nancy E.; Coeytaux, Remy R.; Isom, Scott; Prevette, Kristen; Morgan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the short- and long-term effects of acupuncture on vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and quality of life-related measures. Methods A total of 209 perimenopausal and postmenopausal women aged 45-60 experiencing ≥4 VMS per day recruited from the community and randomized to receive up to 20 acupuncture treatments within the first 6 months (acupuncture group) or the second 6 months (waitlist c