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Sample records for ii star formation

  1. Star formation in H II galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Campos, A.; Díaz, A. I.; Terlevich, E.; Rosa-González, D.; Telles, E.; Terlevich, R.

    2013-05-01

    H II galaxies integrated properties have been widely studied. However, little is known about the individual H II regions and their photoionizing stellar clusters. To broaden our knowledge on star formation in low mass star-forming galaxies (like H II galaxies) it is necessary to answer questions like: How does the star formation distributes along the galaxy? Is it possible for them to form super stellar clusters? How does the star formation history on them looks like? To answer those questions the goal of this thesis work is to map (at tens of parsecs resolution) the recent star formation in six H II galaxies with extremely young star-forming bursts (Rosa-González et al. 2007, ApJ, 654, 226). The preliminary results obtained have allowed us to develop a catalog of H II regions (identified for the first time) in these galaxies and the characterization of the young stellar clusters responsible for their photoionization using POPSTAR (Mollá, García-Vargas, & Bressan 2009, MNRAS, 398, 451) stellar populations models.

  2. H II REGIONS: WITNESSES TO MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Keto, Eric R.

    2010-03-10

    We describe the first three-dimensional simulation of the gravitational collapse of a massive, rotating molecular cloud that includes heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation. These models were performed with the FLASH code, incorporating a hybrid, long characteristic, ray-tracing technique. We find that as the first protostars gain sufficient mass to ionize the accretion flow, their H II regions are initially gravitationally trapped, but soon begin to rapidly fluctuate between trapped and extended states, in agreement with observations. Over time, the same ultracompact H II region can expand anisotropically, contract again, and take on any of the observed morphological classes. In their extended phases, expanding H II regions drive bipolar neutral outflows characteristic of high-mass star formation. The total lifetime of H II regions is given by the global accretion timescale, rather than their short internal sound-crossing time. This explains the observed number statistics. The pressure of the hot, ionized gas does not terminate accretion. Instead, the final stellar mass is set by fragmentation-induced starvation. Local gravitational instabilities in the accretion flow lead to the build-up of a small cluster of stars, all with relatively high masses due to heating from accretion radiation. These companions subsequently compete with the initial high-mass star for the same common gas reservoir and limit its mass growth. This is in contrast to the classical competitive accretion model, where the massive stars are never hindered in growth by the low-mass stars in the cluster. Our findings show that the most significant differences between the formation of low-mass and high-mass stars are all explained as the result of rapid accretion within a dense, gravitationally unstable, ionized flow.

  3. STELLAR POPULATIONS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES. II. H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; McGaugh, Stacy; Maciel, Tamela E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu

    2013-08-01

    The luminosities, colors, and H{alpha} emission for 429 H II regions in 54 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies are presented. While the number of H II regions per galaxy is lower in LSB galaxies compared to star-forming irregulars and spirals, there is no indication that the size or luminosity function of H II regions differs from other galaxy types. The lower number of H II regions per galaxy is consistent with their lower total star formation rates. The fraction of the total L{sub H{alpha}} contributed by H II regions varies from 10% to 90% in LSB galaxies (the rest of the H{alpha} emission being associated with a diffuse component) with no correlation with galaxy stellar or gas mass. Bright H II regions have bluer colors, similar to the trend in spirals; their number and luminosities are consistent with the hypothesis that they are produced by the same H II luminosity function as spirals. Comparison with stellar population models indicates that the brightest H II regions in LSB galaxies range in cluster mass from a few 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} (e.g., {rho} Oph) to globular-cluster-sized systems (e.g., 30 Dor) and that their ages are consistent with clusters from 2 to 15 Myr old. The faintest H II regions are comparable to those in the LMC powered by a single O or B star. Thus, star formation in LSB galaxies covers the full range of stellar cluster mass.

  4. Magnetically Controlled Spasmodic Accretion during Star Formation. II. Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of the late accretion phase of the evolution of an axisymmetric, isothermal magnetic disk surrounding a forming star has been formulated in a companion paper. The ``central sink approximation'' is used to circumvent the problem of describing the evolution inside the opaque central region for densities greater than 1011 cm-3 and radii smaller than a few AU. Only the electrons are assumed to be attached to the magnetic field lines, and the effects of both negatively and positively charged grains are accounted for. After a mass of 0.1 Msolar accumulates in the central cell (forming star), a series of magnetically driven outflows and associated outward-propagating shocks form in a quasi-periodic fashion. As a result, mass accretion onto the protostar occurs in magnetically controlled bursts. We refer to this process as spasmodic accretion. The shocks propagate outward with supermagnetosonic speeds. The period of dissipation and revival of the outflow decreases in time, as the mass accumulated in the central sink increases. We evaluate the contribution of ambipolar diffusion to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation during the accretion phase, and we find it to be very significant albeit not sufficient to resolve the entire problem yet. Ohmic dissipation is completely negligible in the disk during this phase of the evolution. The protostellar disk is found to be stable against interchange-like instabilities, despite the fact that the mass-to-flux ratio has temporary local maxima.

  5. The COSMOS-[O II] survey: evolution of electron density with star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasinen, Melanie; Bian, Fuyan; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Gupta, Anshu

    2017-03-01

    Star-forming galaxies at z > 1 exhibit significantly different properties to local galaxies of equivalent stellar mass. Not only are high-redshift star-forming galaxies characterized by higher star formation rates and gas fractions than their local counterparts, they also appear to host star-forming regions with significantly different physical conditions, including greater electron densities. To understand what physical mechanisms are responsible for the observed evolution of the star-forming conditions, we have assembled the largest sample of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.5 with emission-line measurements of the {[O II]}λ λ 3726,3729 doublet. By comparing our z ∼ 1.5 sample to local galaxy samples with equivalent distributions of stellar mass, star formation rate and specific star formation rate we investigate the proposed evolution in electron density and its dependence on global properties. We measure an average electron density of 114_{-27}^{+28} cm^{-3} for our z ∼ 1.5 sample, a factor of 5 greater than the typical electron density of local star-forming galaxies. However, we find no offset between the typical electron densities of local and high-redshift galaxies with equivalent star formation rates. Our work indicates that the average electron density of a sample is highly sensitive to the star formation rates, implying that the previously observed evolution is mainly the result of selection effects.

  6. The reliability of [C II] as an indicator of the star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Cortese, Luca; Fritz, Jacopo

    2011-10-01

    The [C II] 157.74 μm line is an important coolant for the neutral interstellar gas. Since [C II] is the brightest spectral line for most galaxies, it is a potentially powerful tracer of star formation activity. In this paper, we present a calibration of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of the [C II] luminosity for a sample of 24 star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe. This sample includes objects classified as H II regions or low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions, but omits all Seyfert galaxies with a significant contribution from the active galactic nucleus to the mid-infrared photometry. In order to calibrate the SFR against the line luminosity, we rely on both Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet data, which is an ideal tracer of the unobscured star formation, and MIPS 24 μm, to probe the dust-enshrouded fraction of star formation. In the case of normal star-forming galaxies, the [C II] luminosity correlates well with the SFR. However, the extension of this relation to more quiescent (Hα EW ≤ 10 Å) or ultraluminous galaxies should be handled with caution, since these objects show a non-linearity in the ?-to-LFIR ratio as a function of LFIR (and thus, their star formation activity). We provide two possible explanations for the origin of the tight correlation between the [C II] emission and the star formation activity on a global galaxy-scale. A first interpretation could be that the [C II] emission from photodissociation regions (PDRs) arises from the immediate surroundings of star-forming regions. Since PDRs are neutral regions of warm dense gas at the boundaries between H II regions and molecular clouds and they provide the bulk of [C II] emission in most galaxies, we believe that a more or less constant contribution from these outer layers of photon-dominated molecular clumps to the [C II] emission provides a straightforward explanation for this close link between the [C II] luminosity and SFR. Alternatively, we consider the

  7. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION AT THE PERIPHERY OF THE EVOLVED GIANT H II REGION W 39

    SciTech Connect

    Kerton, C. R.; Arvidsson, K.; Alexander, M. J. E-mail: karvidsson@adlerplanetarium.org

    2013-03-15

    We present the first detailed study of the large, {approx}30 pc diameter, inner-Galaxy H II region W 39. Radio recombination line observations combined with H I absorption spectra and Galactic rotation models show that the region lies at V{sub LSR} = +65.4 {+-} 0.5 km s{sup -1}, corresponding to a near kinematic distance of 4.5 {+-} 0.2 kpc. Analysis of radio continuum emission shows that the H II region is being powered by a cluster of OB stars with a combined hydrogen-ionizing luminosity of log (Q) {>=} 50, and that there are three compact H II regions located on the periphery of W 39, each with log (Q) {approx} 48.5 (single O7-O9 V star equivalent). In the infrared, W 39 has a hierarchical bubble morphology, and is a likely site of sequential star formation involving massive stars. Kinematic models of the expansion of W 39 yield timescales of the order of Myr, consistent with a scenario where the formation of the smaller H II regions has been triggered by the expansion of W 39. Using Spitzer GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL data, we show that star formation activity is not distributed uniformly around the periphery of W 39 but is concentrated in two areas that include the compact H II regions as well as a number of intermediate-mass Class I and Class II young stellar objects.

  8. Complexes of triggered star formation in supergiant shell of Holmberg II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Oleg V.; Lozinskaya, Tatiana A.; Moiseev, Alexei V.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    We report a detailed analysis of all regions of current star formation in the walls of the supergiant H I shell (SGS) in the galaxy Holmberg II based on observations with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the Russian 6-m telescope. We compare the structure and kinematics of ionized gas with that of atomic hydrogen and with the stellar population of the SGS. Our deep Hα images and archival images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope demonstrate that current star formation episodes are larger and more complicated than previously thought: they represent unified star-forming complexes with sizes of several hundred pc rather than `chains' of separate bright nebulae in the walls of the SGS. The fact that we are dealing with unified complexes is evidenced by identified faint shell-like structures of ionized and neutral gas which connect several distinct bright H II regions. Formation of such complexes is due to the feedback of stars with very inhomogeneous ambient gas in the walls of the SGS. The arguments supporting an idea about the triggering of star formation in SGS by the H I supershells collision are presented. We also found a faint ionized supershell inside the H I SGS expanding with a velocity of no greater than 10-15 km s-1. Five OB stars located inside the inner supershell are sufficient to account for its radiation, although a possibility of leakage of ionizing photons from bright H II regions is not ruled out as well.

  9. Multi-wavelength study of triggered star formation around 25 H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ning, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Chuan-Peng

    2014-01-01

    We investigate 25 H II regions that show bubble morphology in 13CO(1-0) and infrared data, to search for quantitative evidence of triggered star formation by processes described by the collect and collapse (CC) and radiatively driven implosion (RDI) models. These H II regions display the morphology of a complete or partial bubble at 8 μm, and are all associated with the molecular clouds that surround them. We found that the electron temperature ranges from 5627 K to 6839 K in these H II regions, and the average electron temperature is 6083 K. The age of these H II regions is from 3.0 × 105 yr to 1.7 × 106 yr, and the mean age is 7.7 × 105 yr. Based on the morphology of the associated molecular clouds, we divide these H II regions into three groups, which may support CC and RDI models. We select 23 young IRAS sources which have an infrared luminosity of > 103Lsolar in 19 H II regions. In addition, we identify some young stellar objects (including Class I sources), which are only concentrated in H II regions G29.007+0.076, G44.339-0.827 and G47.028+0.232. The poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions of the three H II regions all show a cometary globule. Comparing the age of each H II region with the characteristic timescales for star formation, we suggest that the three H II regions can trigger clustered star formation by an RDI process. In addition, we detect seven molecular outflows in the five H II regions for the first time. These outflow sources may be triggered by the corresponding H II regions.

  10. Star Formation Activity in the Galactic H II Region Sh2-297

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, K. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.; Dewangan, L. K.; Tamura, M.

    2012-11-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the Galactic H II region Sh2-297, located in the Canis Major OB1 complex. Optical spectroscopic observations are used to constrain the spectral type of ionizing star HD 53623 as B0V. The classical nature of this H II region is affirmed by the low values of electron density and emission measure, which are calculated to be 756 cm-3 and 9.15 × 105 cm-6 pc using the radio continuum observations at 610 and 1280 MHz, and Very Large Array archival data at 1420 MHz. To understand local star formation, we identified the young stellar object (YSO) candidates in a region of area ~7farcm5 × 7farcm5 centered on Sh2-297 using grism slitless spectroscopy (to identify the Hα emission line stars), and near infrared (NIR) observations. NIR YSO candidates are further classified into various evolutionary stages using color-color and color-magnitude (CM) diagrams, giving 50 red sources (H - K > 0.6) and 26 Class II-like sources. The mass and age range of the YSOs are estimated to be ~0.1-2 M ⊙ and 0.5-2 Myr using optical (V/V-I) and NIR (J/J-H) CM diagrams. The mean age of the YSOs is found to be ~1 Myr, which is of the order of dynamical age of 1.07 Myr of the H II region. Using the estimated range of visual extinction (1.1-25 mag) from literature and NIR data for the region, spectral energy distribution models have been implemented for selected YSOs which show masses and ages to be consistent with estimated values. The spatial distribution of YSOs shows an evolutionary sequence, suggesting triggered star formation in the region. The star formation seems to have propagated from the ionizing star toward the cold dark cloud LDN1657A located west of Sh2-297.

  11. Line formation in Be star envelopes. II. Disk oscillations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, W.; Hanuschik, R. W.

    1997-04-01

    We present numerical model calculations for an especially interesting class of Hα emission line profiles from Be star disks, those with asymmetric shape and long-term variability (so-called class 2 profiles). As an underlying model for the disk we investigate the hypothesis of Okazaki (1997A&A...318..548O) that these profiles are caused by a distortion of a quasi-Keplerian disk. The distortion has the form of a one-armed global disk oscillation (density and velocity wave). The radiation transfer in the disk is calculated with an improved version of the spatially implicit 3D radiative transfer code of Hummel (1994). The resulting sets of Hα emission line profiles reproduce well the observed structures of fully-resolved class 2 Hα emission lines, like double peaks and winebottle-type shoulders. For high inclinations, shell-type profiles result. It is shown that the full variety of observed profile shapes is caused by the interaction of kinematical and non-coherent scattering broadening. While this result has already been found by Hummel (1994) for the symmetric (class 1) Hα profiles, it is proven here for the second major profile class as well. The comparison between observed and theoretical emission shows that the model of global disk oscillations is in full agreement with the observed shapes and the cyclic long-term variability of class 2 profiles.

  12. Star formation thresholds in H II galaxies with H I companions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Christopher L.; Brinks, Elias; Pogge, Richard W.; Skillman, Evan D.

    1994-01-01

    We present high resolution Very Large Array (VLA) 21 cm line observations of five H II galaxies combined with previous lower resolution data from Taylor et al. (1993) and optical broadband R and H-alpha Charge Coupled Device (CCD) images of the systems. Following Kennicutt (1989) we calculated the threshold H I surface density for star formation for the H II galaxies and compared the location and shape of this predicted threshold density contour with the optical shape of the galaxies. We find generally a good correlation between these two, although a constant density contour of 10(exp 21)/sq cm fits the images of the optical galaxies equally as well. The H I synthesis observations have revealed that the H II galaxies have sharply peaked H I radial profiles, in contrast to the relatively flattened profiles of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, suggesting that large central concentrations of gas are a necessary condition for the occurrence of bursts of massive star formation seen in H II galaxies. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that LSB galaxies represent the quiescent phase of H II galaxies, if a suitable mechanism exists (such as galaxy interactions) to cause H I to concentrate at the center of LSB galaxies prior to the onset of the burst of star formation. However, it is noted that the H II galaxies (and dwarf galaxies in general) span a relatively large range in mass. Since many properties correlate with mass (e.g., gas mass fraction), we point out that great care needs to be taken in choosing the proper comparison samples of LSB and H II galaxies.

  13. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG POPULATION OF THE H II COMPLEX Sh2-294

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Chauhan, N.; Jose, J.; Ojha, D. K.; Pandey, B.

    2012-08-10

    The Sh2-294 H II region ionized by a single B0V star features several infrared excess sources, a photodissociation region, and also a group of reddened stars at its border. The star formation scenario in this region seems to be quite complex. In this paper, we present follow-up results of Sh2-294 H II region at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), coupled with H{sub 2} (2.12 {mu}m) observation, to characterize the young population of the region and to understand its star formation history. We identified 36 young stellar object (YSO, Class I, Class II, and Class I/II) candidates using IRAC color-color diagrams. It is found that Class I sources are preferentially located at the outskirts of the H II region and associated with enhanced H{sub 2} emission; none of them are located near the central cluster. Combining the optical to mid-infrared (MIR) photometry of the YSO candidates and using the spectral energy distribution fitting models, we constrained stellar parameters and the evolutionary status of 33 YSO candidates. Most of them are interpreted by the model as low-mass (<4 M{sub Sun }) YSOs; however, we also detected a massive YSO ({approx}9 M{sub Sun }) of Class I nature, embedded in a cloud of visual extinction of {approx}24 mag. Present analysis suggests that the Class I sources are indeed a younger population of the region relative to Class II sources (age {approx} 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr). We suggest that the majority of the Class I sources, including the massive YSOs, are second-generation stars of the region whose formation is possibly induced by the expansion of the H II region powered by a {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr B0 main-sequence star.

  14. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE GALACTIC H II COMPLEX S255-S257

    SciTech Connect

    Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Bhatt, B. C.; Tamura, M.; Mohan, V.; Zinchenko, I.

    2011-09-10

    We present results on the star formation activity of an optically obscured region containing an embedded cluster (S255-IR) and molecular gas between two evolved H II regions, S255 and S257. We have studied the complex using optical and near-infrared (NIR) imaging, optical spectroscopy, and radio continuum mapping at 15 GHz, along with Spitzer-IRAC results. We found that the main exciting sources of the evolved H II regions S255 and S257 and the compact H II regions associated with S255-IR are of O9.5-B3 V nature, consistent with previous observations. Our NIR observations reveal 109 likely young stellar object (YSO) candidates in an area of {approx}4.'9 x 4.'9 centered on S255-IR, which include 69 new YSO candidates. To see the global star formation, we constructed the V - I/V diagram for 51 optically identified IRAC YSOs in an area of {approx}13' x 13' centered on S255-IR. We suggest that these YSOs have an approximate age between 0.1 and 4 Myr, indicating a non-coeval star formation. Using spectral energy distribution models, we constrained physical properties and evolutionary status of 31 and 16 YSO candidates outside and inside the gas ridge, respectively. The models suggest that the sources associated with the gas ridge are younger (mean age {approx}1.2 Myr) than the sources outside the gas ridge (mean age {approx}2.5 Myr). The positions of the young sources inside the gas ridge at the interface of the H II regions S255 and S257 favor a site of induced star formation.

  15. Star formation towards the Galactic H II region RCW 120. Herschel observations of compact sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, M.; Zavagno, A.; Deharveng, L.; Russeil, D.; Anderson, L. D.; Men'shchikov, A.; Schneider, N.; Hill, T.; Motte, F.; Mège, P.; LeLeu, G.; Roussel, H.; Bernard, J.-P.; Traficante, A.; Paradis, D.; Tigé, J.; André, P.; Bontemps, S.; Abergel, A.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The expansion of H ii regions can trigger the formation of stars. An overdensity of young stellar objects is observed at the edges of H ii regions but the mechanisms that give rise to this phenomenon are not clearly identified. Moreover, it is difficult to establish a causal link between H ii -region expansion and the star formation observed at the edges of these regions. A clear age gradient observed in the spatial distribution of young sources in the surrounding might be a strong argument in favor of triggering. Aims: We aim to characterize the star formation observed at the edges of H ii regions by studying the properties of young stars that form there. We aim to detect young sources, derive their properties and their evolution stage in order to discuss the possible causal link between the first-generation massive stars that form the H ii region and the young sources observed at their edges. Methods: We have observed the Galactic H ii region RCW 120 with Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometers at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 μm. We produced temperature and H2 column density maps and use the getsources algorithm to detect compact sources and measure their fluxes at Herschel wavelengths. We have complemented these fluxes with existing infrared data. Fitting their spectral energy distributions with a modified blackbody model, we derived their envelope dust temperature and envelope mass. We computed their bolometric luminosities and discuss their evolutionary stages. Results: The overall temperatures of the region (without background subtraction) range from 15 K to 24 K. The warmest regions are observed towards the ionized gas. The coldest regions are observed outside the ionized gas and follow the emission of the cold material previously detected at 870 μm and 1.3 mm. The H2 column density map reveals the distribution of the cold medium to be organized in filaments and highly structured. Column densities range from 7 × 1021 cm-2 up to 9 × 1023 cm-2

  16. Triggered star formation at the borders of the H ii region Sh 2-217

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, J.; Massi, F.; Zavagno, A.; Deharveng, L.; Lefloch, B.

    2011-03-01

    Context. This paper is part of our ongoing study of star formation at the borders of Galactic H ii regions. In this paper, we report our observations and analysis of Sharpless 217 (Sh 2-217). Aims: We study the stars and gas in and around H ii regions to see if the various physical parameters derived from the data (such as column densities, masses, sizes, and timescales) are consistent with the predictions of a simple model of the collect-and-collapse mechanism. This should indicate whether stars forming in molecular gas at the borders of the H ii regions could have been triggered by the expansion of the ionized gas. Methods: We observed the emission of various molecules and transitions towards Sh 2-217, and obtained both near-infrared photometry in the H and K bands, and near-infrared images in [Fe ii] and H2 narrow-band filters of the stars in a molecular condensation at the edge of the H ii region, where an UC H ii region is also located. For the atomic and ionized hydrogen gas, we used literature data. Results: Several molecular condensations are found on the borders of Sh 2-217 and both behind and in front of the ionized emission. We find signs of star formation (an UC H ii region, outflows, and water masers). The masses of the larger molecular condensations, derived from 13CO-data, are ≳330-1100 M⊙, while smaller clumps or cores within them have up to several tens of solar masses. The morphology of the atomic and molecular gas associated with Sh 2-217, especially the condensations of molecular gas on its border, and the presence of star forming activity within them, is strongly indicative of it being the result of star formation triggered by the expansion of the ionized region, following the collect-and-collapse scenario. Application of a simple model illustrates that the present radii of both Sh 2-217 and the UC H ii region, the masses of the condensations, and the timescales needed to sweep up these amounts of gas and allow massive stars to form in them

  17. A multiwavelength investigation of the H II region S311: young stellar population and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ojha, D. K.; Samal, M. R.; Mallick, K. K.; Jose, J.; Ogura, K.; Richichi, Andrea; Irawati, Puji; Kobayashi, N.; Eswaraiah, C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a multiwavelength investigation of the young stellar population and star formation activities around the H II region Sharpless 311. Using our deep near-infrared observations and archival Spitzer-IRAC observations, we have detected a total of 125 young stellar objects (YSOs) in an area of ˜86 arcmin2. The YSO sample includes eight Class I and 117 Class II candidate YSOs. The mass completeness of the identified YSO sample is estimated to be 1.0 M⊙. The ages and masses of the majority of the candidate YSOs are estimated to be in the range ˜0.1-5 Myr and ˜0.3-6 M⊙, respectively. The 8-μm image of S311 displays an approximately spherical cavity around the ionizing source, which was possibly created by the expansion of the H II region. The spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs reveals that a significant number of them are distributed systematically along the 8-μm emission with a majority clustered around the eastern border of the H II region. Four clumps/compact H II regions are detected in the radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, which may have been formed during the expansion of the H II region. The estimated dynamical age of the region, main-sequence lifetime of the ionizing source, the spatial distribution and ages of the candidate YSOs indicate triggered star formation in the complex.

  18. A Submillimeter View of Star Formation near the H II Region KR 140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerton, C. R.; Martin, P. G.; Johnstone, D.; Ballantyne, D. R.

    2001-05-01

    We present the results of 450 and 850 μm continuum mapping of the H II region KR 140 using the Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) instrument on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). KR 140 is a small (5.7 pc diameter) H II region at a distance of 2.3+/-0.3 kpc. Five of the six IRAS point sources near KR 140 were mapped in this study. Our analysis shows that two of these IRAS sources are embedded late B-type stars lying well outside the H II region, two are a part of the dust shell surrounding the H II region, and one is the combined emission from an ensemble of smaller sources unresolved by IRAS. We have discovered a number of relatively cold submillimeter sources not visible in the IRAS data, ranging in size from 0.2 to 0.7 pc and in mass from 0.5 to 130 Msolar. The distribution of masses for all sources is well characterized by a power law N(>M)~M-α with α=0.5+/-0.04, in agreement with the typical mass function for clumped structures of this scale in molecular clouds. Several of the submillimeter sources are found at the H II molecular gas interface and have probably been formed as the result of the expansion of the H II region. Many of the submillimeter sources we detect are gravitationally bound and most of these follow a mass-size relationship expected for objects in virial equilibrium with nonthermal pressure support. Upon the loss of nonthermal support, they could be sites of star formation. Along with the two B stars that we have identified as possible cluster members along with VES 735, we argue that five nearby highly reddened stars are in a pre-main-sequence stage of evolution.

  19. [C II] 158 μm EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION TRACER

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D.; Wolfire, M. G.; Smith, J. D.; Croxall, K. V.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Helou, G.; Walter, F.; Meidt, S. E.; Leroy, A. K.; Draine, B.; Brandl, B. R.; Armus, L.; Sandstrom, K. M.; Dale, D. A.; Aniano, G.; Hunt, L. K.; Galametz, M.; and others

    2015-02-10

    The [C II] 157.74 μm transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [C II] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [C II] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The uncertainty of the Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} calibration is ±0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted Σ{sub [C} {sub II]} – Σ{sub SFR} correlation is valid over almost five orders of magnitude in Σ{sub SFR}, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [C II] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [C II] finds that heating efficiencies are 1%-3% in normal galaxies.

  20. The H II Region KR 140: Spontaneous Formation of a High-Mass Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Kerton, C. R.; Martin, P. G.

    2000-08-01

    We have used a multiwavelength data set from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS) to study the Galactic H II region KR 140, both on the scale of the nebula itself and in the context of the star-forming activity in the nearby W3/W4/W5 complex of molecular clouds and H II regions. From both radio and infrared data we have found a covering factor of about 0.5 for KR 140, and we interpret the nebula as a bowl-shaped region viewed close to face on. Extinction measurements place the region on the near side of its parent molecular cloud. The nebula is kept ionized by one O8.5 V(e) star, VES 735, which is less than a few million years old. CO data show that VES 735 has disrupted much of the original molecular cloud for which the estimated mass and density are about 5000 Msolar and 100 cm-3, respectively. KR 140 is isolated from the nearest star-forming activity, in W3. Our data suggest that KR 140 is an example of spontaneous (i.e., nontriggered) formation of, unusually, a high-mass star.

  1. The Massive Star Population in M101. II. Spatial Variations in the Recent Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, Skyler; Humphreys, Roberta M.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate star formation history (SFH) as a function of radius in M101 using archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry. We derive the SFH from the resolved stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to stellar populations traced by Hα, far-ultraviolet, and near-ultraviolet emission, we find that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Hα is 15%-35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Hα emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into modeled ratios, we find that we are able to reproduce the observed values at large radii (low metallicity), but at small radii (high metallicity) the modeled and observed ratios are discrepant.

  2. The massive star population in M101. II. Spatial variations in the recent star formation history

    SciTech Connect

    Grammer, Skyler; Humphreys, Roberta M. E-mail: roberta@umn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We investigate star formation history (SFH) as a function of radius in M101 using archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry. We derive the SFH from the resolved stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to stellar populations traced by Hα, far-ultraviolet, and near-ultraviolet emission, we find that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Hα is 15%-35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Hα emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into modeled ratios, we find that we are able to reproduce the observed values at large radii (low metallicity), but at small radii (high metallicity) the modeled and observed ratios are discrepant.

  3. Massive Star Formation of the SGR a East H (sub II) Regions Near the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-01-01

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km/s molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of approximately 6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 micron) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa alpha, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 =/- 3 solar mass star with a luminosity of 8 +/- 3 x 10(exp 4) Solar luminosity . The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3x (exp 4) years giving a mass flux approximately 3 x 10(exp -5) Solar Mass / year and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  4. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION OF THE SGR A EAST H II REGIONS NEAR THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Lacy, J. H.; Wardle, M.; Whitney, B.; Bushouse, H.; Roberts, D. A.; Arendt, R. G.

    2010-12-20

    A group of four compact H II regions associated with the well-known 50 km s{sup -1} molecular cloud is the closest site of on-going star formation to the dynamical center of the Galaxy, at a projected distance of {approx}6 pc. We present a study of ionized gas based on the [Ne II] (12.8 {mu}m) line, as well as multi-frequency radio continuum, Hubble Space Telescope Pa{alpha}, and Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations of the most compact member of the H II group, Sgr A East H II D. The radio continuum image at 6 cm shows that this source breaks up into two equally bright ionized features, D1 and D2. The spectral energy distribution of the D source is consistent with it being due to a 25 {+-} 3 M{sub sun} star with a luminosity of 8 {+-} 3 x 10{sup 4} L{sub sun}. The inferred mass, effective temperature of the UV source, and the ionization rate are compatible with a young O9-B0 star. The ionized features D1 and D2 are considered to be ionized by UV radiation collimated by an accretion disk. We consider that the central massive star photoevaporates its circumstellar disk on a timescale of 3 x 10{sup 4} years giving a mass flux {approx}3 x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and producing the ionized material in D1 and D2 expanding in an inhomogeneous medium. The ionized gas kinematics, as traced by the [Ne II] emission, is difficult to interpret, but it could be explained by the interaction of a bipolar jet with surrounding gas along with what appears to be a conical wall of lower velocity gas. The other H II regions, Sgr A East A-C, have morphologies and kinematics that more closely resemble cometary flows seen in other compact H II regions, where gas moves along a paraboloidal surface formed by the interaction of a stellar wind with a molecular cloud.

  5. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. II - The pre-main-sequence G star HDE 283572

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.; Brown, A.; Linsky, J. L.; Rydgren, A. E.; Vrba, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports the detection of HDE 283572, a ninth-magnitude G star 8 arcmin south of RY Tau, as a bright X-ray source. The observations reveal this object to be a fairly massive (about 2 solar masses) pre-main-sequence star associated with the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. It exhibits few of the characteristics of the classical T Tauri stars and is a good example of a 'naked' T Tauri star. The star is a mid-G subgiant, of about three solar radii and rotates with a period of 1.5 d. The coronal and chromospheric surface fluxes are similar to those of the most active late type stars (excluding T Tauri stars). The X-ray and UV lines most likely arise in different atmospheric structures. Radiative losses are some 1000 times the quiet solar value and compare favorably with those of T Tauri stars.

  6. Interaction between the H II region and AFGL 333-Ridge: Implications for the star formation scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Makoto; Soejima, Takashi; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Burns, Ross A.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the star formation activities in the AFGL 333 region, which is in the vicinity of the W 4 expanding bubble, by conducting NH3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) mapping observations with the 45 m Nobeyama Radio Telescope an angular resolution of 75″. The morphology of the NH3 (1,1) map shows a bow-shaped structure with the size of 2.0 × 0.6 pc as seen in the dust continuum. At the interface between the W 4 bubble and the dense NH3 cloud, the compact H II region G134.2+0.8, associated with IRAS 02245+6115, is located. Interestingly, just at the north and south of G134.2+0.8 we found NH3 emission exhibiting large velocity widths of ˜2.8 km s-1, compared to 1.8 km s-1 at the other positions. As the possibility of mechanical energy injection through the activity of young stellar objects (YSOs) is low, we considered the origin of the large turbulent gas motion as an indication of interaction between the compact H II region and the periphery of the dense molecular cloud. We also found expanding motion of the CO emission associated with G134.2+0.8. The overall structure of the AFGL 333-Ridge might have been formed by the expanding bubble of W 4. However, the small velocity widths observed to the west of IRAS 02245+6115, around the center of the dense molecular cloud, suggest that interaction with the compact H II region is limited. Therefore the YSOs (dominantly Class 0/I) in the core of the AFGL 333-Ridge dense molecular cloud most likely formed in quiescent mode. As previously suggested for the large-scale star formation in the W 3 giant molecular cloud, our results show an apparent coexistence of induced and quiescent star formations in this region. It appears that star formation in the AFGL 333 region has proceeded without significant external triggers, but accompanying stellar feedback environment.

  7. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  8. Tidal Tales II: Molecular Gas and Star Formation in the Tidal Tails of Minor Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul A.; Groppi, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    While major mergers and their tidal debris are well studied, equal mass galaxy mergers are relatively rare compared to minor mergers (mass ratio <0.3).Minor mergers are less energetic than major mergers, but more common in the observable universe, and thus likely played a pivotal role in the formation of most large galaxies. Tidal debris regions have large amounts of neutral gas but a lower gas density and may have higher turbulence. We use star formation tracers such as young star cluster populations and H-alpha and CII emission to determine the different factors that may influence star formation in tidal debris. These tracers were compared to the reservoirs of molecular and neutral gas available for star formation to estimate the star formation efficiency (SFE). The SFR in tidal debris can reach up to 50% of the total star formation in the system. The SFE of tidal tails in minor mergers can range over orders of magnitude on both local and global scales. From the tidal debris environments in our study, this variance appears to stem from the formation conditions of the debris. Current surveys of the 2.12 micron line of molecular hydrogen, CO(1-0), and HI for 15 minor mergers, are providing a larger sample of environments to study the threshold for star formation that can inform star formation models, particularly at low densities.

  9. ON THE LINK BETWEEN ASSOCIATED Mg II ABSORBERS AND STAR FORMATION IN QUASAR HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Menard, Brice E-mail: menard@pha.jhu.edu

    2012-04-01

    A few percent of quasars show strong associated Mg II absorption, with velocities (v{sub off}) lying within a few thousand km s{sup -1} from the quasar systemic redshift. These associated absorption line (AAL) systems are usually interpreted as absorbers that are either intrinsic to the quasar and its host, or arising from external galaxies clustering around the quasar. Using composite spectra of {approx}1800 Mg II AAL quasars selected from SDSS DR7 at 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 2, we show that quasars with AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} have a prominent excess in [O II] {lambda}3727 emission (detected at >7{sigma}) at rest relative to the quasar host, compared to unabsorbed quasars. We interpret this [O II] excess as due to enhanced star formation in the quasar host. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} are physically associated with the quasar and its host. AAL quasars also have dust reddening lying between normal quasars and the so-called dust-reddened quasars. We suggest that the unique properties of AAL quasars can be explained if they are the transitional population from heavily dust-reddened quasars to normal quasars in the formation process of quasars and their hosts. This scenario predicts a larger fraction of young bulges, disturbed morphologies, and interactions of AAL quasar hosts compared to normal quasars. The intrinsic link between associated absorbers and quasar hosts opens a new window to probe massive galaxy formation and galactic-scale feedback processes, and provides a crucial test of the evolutionary picture of quasars.

  10. Deep Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of IC 1613. II. The Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, Abhijit; Gallagher, J. S.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Mateo, Mario

    2003-10-01

    We have taken deep images of an outlying field in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 with the WFPC2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the standard broadband F555W (V, 8 orbits) and F814W (I, 16 orbits) filters. The photometry reaches to V=27.7 (MV=+3.4) and I=27.1 (MI=+2.8) at the 50% completeness level, the deepest to date for an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy. We analyze the resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and compare it with CMDs created from theoretical stellar models using three different methods to derive a star formation history (SFH) as well as constrain the chemical evolution for IC 1613. All three methods find an enhanced star formation rate (SFR), at roughly the same magnitude (factor of 3), over roughly the same period (from 3 to 6 Gyr ago). Additionally, all three methods were driven to similar age-metallicity relationships (AMR) that show an increase from [Fe/H]~-1.3 at earliest times to [Fe/H]~-0.7 at present. Good agreement is found between the AMR which is derived from the CMD analysis and that which can be inferred from the derived SFH at all but the earliest ages. The agreement between the three models and the self-consistency of the derived chemical enrichment history support the reality of the derived SFH of IC 1613 and, more generally, are supportive of the practice of constructing galaxy SFHs from CMDs. A comparison of the newly observed outer field with an earlier studied central field of IC 1613 shows that the SFR in the outer field has been significantly depressed during the last Gyr. This implies that the optical scale length of the galaxy has been decreasing with time and that comparison of galaxies at intermediate redshift with present-day galaxies should take this effect into account. Comparing the CMD of the outer field of IC 1613 with CMDs of Milky Way dSph companions, we find strong similarities between IC 1613 and the more distant dSph companions (Carina, Fornax, Leo I, and Leo II) in that all are dominated

  11. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  12. Spitzer Follow-up of HST Observations of Star Formation in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jeff; Bally, John; Desch, Steve; Healy, Kevin; Snider, Keely

    2005-06-01

    Images of regions of star formation taken with HST have given us an extraordinary view of young stellar objects and their natal environments. These views differ tremendously between low-mass YSOs seen in regions of isolated low-mass star formation such as Taurus-Auriga, and the proplyds, EGGs, and other structures seen in regions of massive star formation. While YSOs in Taurus spend their adolescence buried in the dark interiors of molecular clouds, YSOs near massive stars quickly find themselves overrun by ionization fronts and exposed to the intense UV radiation from nearby massive stars. This difference in environment has a profound effect on the way in which the protoplanetary disk around a star evolves -- a fact that is of great importance to us, given the strength of the evidence suggesting that the Sun formed near a massive star. But HST while HST can inform us about the evolution of YSOs in HII region environments once they are overrun by ionization fronts, it cannot show us the birth of the stars themselves. These remain hidden in the dense molecular material beyond the ionized volumes of these regions. Only Spitzer can show us the properties of the YSOs that lie hidden in the dark shadows of HST images of HII regions, and only Spitzer can provide us with information about PDRs, warm dust, and other tracers of the interaction of massive stars with their surroundings. The combination of HST and Spitzer observations of star forming regions is far greater than the sum of its parts. If we are to build a complete picture of low-mass star formation and the evolution of disks near massive stars, we need to combine HST and Spitzer observations of the same regions. In this proposal we request time to obtain both IRAC and MIPS 24 micron images of each HII region that has been observed by HST, but has yet to be observed with Spitzer. Together with previous images obtained from the archives, this will comprise an indispensible data set for testing hypotheses about

  13. On star formation in stellar systems. II - Photoionization in protodwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamical calculations are used to study the effects of the onset of star formation on the residual gas in a primordial low-mass Local-Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the size range 0.3-1.0 kpc. It is demonstrated that photoionization in the presence of a moderate gas-density gradient can be responsible for gas ejection on a time-scale of a few times 10 to the 7th yr. The results indicate that, given a normal initial mass function, many protodwarf galaxies may have been dispersed by the onset of star formation.

  14. Spitzer Analysis of H II Region Complexes in the Magellanic Clouds: Determining a Suitable Monochromatic Obscured Star Formation Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, B.; Gordon, K. D.; Babler, B.; Block, M.; Bolatto, A. D.; Bracker, S.; Carlson, L. R.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Hora, J. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Madden, S. C.; Meade, M.; Meixner, M.; Misselt, K.; Oey, M. S.; Oliveira, J. M.; Robitaille, T.; Sewilo, M.; Shiao, B.; Vijh, U. P.; Whitney, B.

    2010-06-01

    H II regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. To study the H II regions, we compute the bolometric infrared flux, or total infrared (TIR), by integrating the flux from 8 to 500 μm. The TIR provides a measure of the obscured star formation because the UV photons from hot young stars are absorbed by dust and re-emitted across the mid-to-far-infrared (IR) spectrum. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the TIR and produces an accurate obscured SFR over large spatial scales. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and 16 Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) H II region complexes using the Spitzer Space Telescope's IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 8 μm) and MIPS (24, 70, 160 μm) bands. Ultraviolet rocket data (1500 and 1900 Å) and SHASSA Hα data are also included. All data are convolved to the MIPS 160 μm resolution (40 arcsec full width at half-maximum), and apertures have a minimum radius of 35''. The IRAC, MIPS, UV, and Hα spatial analysis are compared with the spatial analysis of the TIR. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC H II region spectral energy distributions (SEDs) peak around 70 μm at all radii, from ~10 to ~400 pc from the central ionizing sources. As a result, we find the following: the sizes of H II regions as probed by 70 μm are approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (≈70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70 μm flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70 μm ~ 0.45TIR); the 1σ standard deviation of the 70 μm fluxes, normalized by TIR, is a lower fraction of the mean (0.05-0.12 out to ~220 pc) than the normalized 8, 24, and 160 μm normalized fluxes (0.12-0.52); and these results are the same for the LMC and the SMC

  15. The Elephant Trunk Nebula and the Trumpler 37 cluster: contribution of triggered star formation to the total population of an H II region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Feigelson, Eric D.; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Broos, Patrick S.; Kuhn, Michael A.; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2012-11-01

    Rich young stellar clusters produce H II regions whose expansion into the nearby molecular cloud is thought to trigger the formation of new stars. However, the importance of this mode of star formation is uncertain. This investigation seeks to quantify triggered star formation (TSF) in IC 1396A (aka the Elephant Trunk Nebula), a bright-rimmed cloud (BRC) on the periphery of the nearby giant H II region IC 1396 produced by the Trumpler 37 cluster. X-ray selection of young stars from Chandra X-ray Observatory data is combined with existing optical and infrared surveys to give a more complete census of the TSF population. Over 250 young stars in and around IC 1396A are identified; this doubles the previously known population. A spatio-temporal gradient of stars from the IC 1396A cloud towards the primary ionizing star HD 206267 is found. We argue that the TSF mechanism in IC 1396A is a radiation-driven implosion process persisting over several million years. Analysis of the X-ray luminosity and initial mass functions indicates that >140 stars down to 0.1 M⊙ were formed by TSF. Considering other BRCs in the IC 1396 H II region, we estimate the TSF contribution for the entire H II region exceeds 14-25 per cent today, and may be higher over the lifetime of the H II region. Such triggering on the periphery of H II regions may be a significant mode of star formation in the Galaxy.

  16. Star Formation in Self-gravitating Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Episodic Formation of Broad-line Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Min; Du, Pu; Baldwin, Jack A.; Ge, Jun-Qiang; Hu, Chen; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-02-01

    This is the second in a series of papers discussing the process and effects of star formation in the self-gravitating disk around the supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We have previously suggested that warm skins are formed above the star-forming (SF) disk through the diffusion of warm gas driven by supernova explosions. Here we study the evolution of the warm skins when they are exposed to the powerful radiation from the inner part of the accretion disk. The skins initially are heated to the Compton temperature, forming a Compton atmosphere (CAS) whose subsequent evolution is divided into four phases. Phase I is the duration of pure accumulation supplied by the SF disk. During phase II clouds begin to form due to line cooling and sink to the SF disk. Phase III is a period of preventing clouds from sinking to the SF disk through dynamic interaction between clouds and the CAS because of the CAS overdensity driven by continuous injection of warm gas from the SF disk. Finally, phase IV is an inevitable collapse of the entire CAS through line cooling. This CAS evolution drives the episodic appearance of broad-line regions (BLRs). We follow the formation of cold clouds through the thermal instability of the CAS during phases II and III, using linear analysis. Since the clouds are produced inside the CAS, the initial spatial distribution of newly formed clouds and angular momentum naturally follow the CAS dynamics, producing a flattened disk of clouds. The number of clouds in phases II and III can be estimated, as well as the filling factor of clouds in the BLR. Since the cooling function depends on the metallicity, the metallicity gradients that originate in the SF disk give rise to different properties of clouds in different radial regions. We find from the instability analysis that clouds have column density N H <~ 1022 cm-2 in the metal-rich regions whereas they have N H >~ 1022 cm-2 in the metal-poor regions. The metal-rich clouds compose

  17. A Multiwavelength Study of Star Formation in the Vicinity of Galactic H II Region Sh 2-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, M. R.; Pandey, A. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Kulkarni, V. K.; Kusakabe, N.; Tamura, M.; Bhatt, B. C.; Thompson, M. A.; Sagar, R.

    2010-05-01

    We present multiwavelength investigation of morphology, physical-environment, stellar contents, and star formation activity in the vicinity of star-forming region Sh 2-100. It is found that the Sh 2-100 region contains seven H II regions of ultracompact and compact nature. The present estimation of distance for three H II regions, along with the kinematic distance for others, suggests that all of them belong to the same molecular cloud complex. Using near-infrared photometry, we identified the most probable ionizing sources of six H II regions. Their approximate photometric spectral type estimates suggest that they are massive early-B to mid-O zero-age-main-sequence stars and agree well with radio continuum observations at 1280 MHz, for sources whose emissions are optically thin at this frequency. The morphology of the complex shows a non-uniform distribution of warm and hot dust, well mixed with the ionized gas, which correlates well with the variation of average visual extinction (~4.2-97 mag) across the region. We estimated the physical parameters of ionized gas with the help of radio continuum observations. We detected an optically visible compact nebula located to the south of the 850 μm emission associated with one of the H II regions and the diagnostic of the optical emission line ratios gives electron density and electron temperature of ~0.67 × 103 cm-3 and ~104 K, respectively. The physical parameters suggest that all the H II regions are in different stages of evolution, which correlate well with the probable ages in the range ~0.01-2 Myr of the ionizing sources. The spatial distribution of infrared excess stars, selected from near-infrared and Infrared Array Camera color-color diagrams, correlates well with the association of gas and dust. The positions of infrared excess stars, ultracompact and compact H II regions at the periphery of an H I shell, possibly created by a WR star, indicate that star formation in Sh 2-100 region might have been induced

  18. Mapping the star formation history of Mrk 86. II. Stellar populations and global interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil de Paz, A.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, continuation of Gil de Paz et al. (Paper I), we derive the main properties of the stellar populations in the Blue Compact Dwarf galaxy Mrk 86. Ages, stellar masses, metallicites and burst strengths have been obtained using the combination of Monte Carlo simulations, a maximum likelihood estimator and Cluster and Principal Component Analysis. The three stellar populations detected show well defined properties. We have studied the underlying stellar population, which shows an age between 5-13 Gyr and no significant color gradients. The intermediate aged (30 Myr old) central starburst show a very low dust extinction with high burst strength and high stellar mass content ( ~ 9x106 Msun). Finally, the properties of 46 low-metallicity ( ~ 1/10 Zsun ) star-forming regions were also studied. The properties derived suggest that the most recent star-forming activity in Mrk 86 was triggered by the evolution of a superbubble originated at the central starburst by the energy deposition of stellar winds and supernova explosions. This superbubble produced the blowout of a fraction of the interstellar medium at distances of about 1 kpc with high gas surface densities, leading to the activation of the star formation. Finally, different mechanisms for the star formation triggering in this massive central starburst are studied, including the merging with a low mass companion and the interaction with UGC 4278. We have assumed a distance to Mrk 86 of 6.9 Mpc.

  19. Low-metallicity Star Formation and Pop III-II Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2010-10-01

    The first stars in the universe were typically very massive, but those near us are not. The metallicity in the star-forming gas is thought to have played a key role in this transition of characteristic stellar mass scale. By studying the evolution of low-metallicity star-forming clouds up to the formation of protostars by way of radiation hydrodynamics with spherical symmetry, we discuss their fragmentation mass scales. The critical metallicity for low-mass fragmentation is in the range of Zcr = 10-6-10-5Zsolar. Although the exact value is still unknown due to uncertain dust nature in the early universe, the small value of Zcr means that low-mass star formation begun just after the first episode of metal enrichment. We also evaluate the upper limit on the stellar mass by the stellar feedback. Owing to the higher density in the envelope and thus higher protostellar accretion rate, the upper limit of stellar mass increases toward lower matallicity.

  20. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. II. Searching for signatures of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-07-10

    We search for signatures of reionization in the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies (10{sup 4} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}). The SFHs are derived from color-magnitude diagrams using archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. Only five quenched galaxies (And V, And VI, And XIII, Leo IV, and Hercules) are consistent with forming the bulk of their stars before reionization, when full uncertainties are considered. Observations of 13 of the predicted 'true fossils' identified by Bovill and Ricotti show that only two (Hercules and Leo IV) indicate star formation quenched by reionization. However, both are within the virial radius of the Milky Way and evidence of tidal disturbance complicates this interpretation. We argue that the late-time gas capture scenario posited by Ricotti for the low mass, gas-rich, and star-forming fossil candidate Leo T is observationally indistinguishable from simple gas retention. Given the ambiguity between environmental effects and reionization, the best reionization fossil candidates are quenched low mass field galaxies (e.g., KKR 25).

  1. SIRTF and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Four problems in the field of star formation that can be attacked to advantage with SIRTF are discussed: (1) the patterns of star formation in spiral galaxies, (2) the physical mechanism for bimodal star formation, (3) the nature of bipolar outflows from young stellar objects, and (4) the birth of brown dwarfs. In each case, SIRTF can provide the crucial combination of high angular resolution with great sensitivity over a broad range of wavelengths that is needed to address the relevant issues.

  2. Massive Star Formation in a Gravitationally-Lensed H II Galaxy at z = 3.357

    SciTech Connect

    Villar-Martin, M; Stern, D; Hook, R N; Rosati, P; Lombardi, M; Humphrey, A; Fosbury, R; Stanford, S A; Holden, B P

    2004-03-02

    The Lynx arc, with a redshift of 3.357, was discovered during spectroscopic follow-up of the z = 0.570 cluster RX J0848+4456 from the ROSAT Deep Cluster Survey. The arc is characterized by a very red R - K color and strong, narrow emission lines. Analysis of HST WFPC 2 imaging and Keck optical and infrared spectroscopy shows that the arc is an H II galaxy magnified by a factor of {approx} 10 by a complex cluster environment. The high intrinsic luminosity, the emission line spectrum, the absorption components seen in Ly{alpha} and C IV, and the restframe ultraviolet continuum are all consistent with a simple H II region model containing {approx} 10{sup 6} hot O stars. The best fit parameters for this model imply a very hot ionizing continuum (T{sub BB} {approx} 80, 000 K), high ionization parameter (log U {approx} -1), and low nebular metallicity (Z/Z{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} 0.05). The narrowness of the emission lines requires a low mass-to-light ratio for the ionizing stars, suggestive of an extremely low metallicity stellar cluster. The apparent overabundance of silicon in the nebula could indicate enrichment by past pair instability supernovae, requiring stars more massive than {approx}140M{sub {circle_dot}}.

  3. Protostellar Outflows and Radiative Feedback from Massive Stars. II. Feedback, Star-formation Efficiency, and Outflow Broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Rolf; Turner, Neal J.; Yorke, Harold W.

    2016-11-01

    We perform two-dimensional axially symmetric radiation hydrodynamic simulations to assess the impact of outflows and radiative force feedback from massive protostars by varying when the protostellar outflow starts, and to determine the ratio of ejection to accretion rates and the strength of the wide-angle disk wind component. The star-formation efficiency, i.e., the ratio of final stellar mass to initial core mass, is dominated by radiative forces and the ratio of outflow to accretion rates. Increasing this ratio has three effects. First, the protostar grows slower with a lower luminosity at any given time, lowering radiative feedback. Second, bipolar cavities cleared by the outflow become larger, further diminishing radiative feedback on disk and core scales. Third, the higher momentum outflow sweeps up more material from the collapsing envelope, decreasing the protostar's potential mass reservoir via entrainment. The star-formation efficiency varies with the ratio of ejection to accretion rates from 50% in the case of very weak outflows to as low as 20% for very strong outflows. At latitudes between the low-density bipolar cavity and the high-density accretion disk, wide-angle disk winds remove some of the gas, which otherwise would be part of the accretion flow onto the disk; varying the strength of these wide-angle disk winds, however, alters the final star-formation efficiency by only ±6%. For all cases, the opening angle of the bipolar outflow cavity remains below 20° during early protostellar accretion phases, increasing rapidly up to 65° at the onset of radiation pressure feedback.

  4. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  5. Comparative internal kinematics of the H II regions in interacting and isolated galaxies: implications for massive star formation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John E.; Font, Joan; García-Lorenzo, Begoña; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Fathi, Kambiz; James, Philip A.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Cisternas, Mauricio

    2015-08-01

    We have observed 12 interacting galaxy pairs using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GH αFaS (Galaxy H α Fabry-Perot system) on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma. We present here the Hα surface brightness, velocity and velocity dispersion maps for the 10 systems we have not previously observed using this technique, as well as the physical properties (sizes, Hα luminosities and velocity dispersion) of 1259 H II regions from the full sample. We also derive the physical properties of 1054 H II regions in a sample of 28 isolated galaxies observed with the same instrument in order to compare the two populations of H II regions. We find a population of the brightest H II regions for which the scaling relations, for example the relation between the Hα luminosity and the radius, are clearly distinct from the relations for the regions of lower luminosity. The regions in this bright population are more frequent in the interacting galaxies. We find that the turbulence, and also the star formation rate (SFR), are enhanced in the H II regions in the interacting galaxies. We have also extracted the Hα equivalent widths for the H II regions of both samples, and we have found that the distribution of H II region ages coincides for the two samples of galaxies. We suggest that the SFR enhancement is brought about by gas flows induced by the interactions, which give rise to gravitationally bound gas clouds which grow further by accretion from the flowing gas, producing conditions favourable to star formation.

  6. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Van Loo, Sven; Christie, Duncan; Collins, David

    2017-02-01

    We investigate giant molecular cloud collisions and their ability to induce gravitational instability and thus star formation. This mechanism may be a major driver of star formation activity in galactic disks. We carry out a series of 3D, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments and clumps. Heating and cooling functions are implemented based on photo-dissociation region models that span the atomic-to-molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. The clouds are initialized with supersonic turbulence and a range of magnetic field strengths and orientations. Collisions at various velocities and impact parameters are investigated. Comparing and contrasting colliding and non-colliding cases, we characterize morphologies of dense gas, magnetic field structure, cloud kinematic signatures, and cloud dynamics. We present key observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, especially: relative orientations between magnetic fields and density structures, like filaments; 13CO(J = 2-1), 13CO(J = 3-2), and 12CO(J = 8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra; and cloud virial parameters. We compare these results to observed Galactic clouds.

  7. Globules and pillars in Cygnus X. II. Massive star formation in the globule IRAS 20319+3958

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djupvik, A. A.; Comerón, F.; Schneider, N.

    2017-02-01

    Globules and pillars, impressively revealed by the Spitzer and Herschel satellites, for example, are pervasive features found in regions of massive star formation. Studying their embedded stellar populations can provide an excellent laboratory to test theories of triggered star formation and the features that it may imprint on the stellar aggregates resulting from it. We studied the globule IRAS 20319+3958 in Cygnus X by means of visible and near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy, complemented with mid-infrared Spitzer/IRAC imaging, in order to obtain a census of its stellar content and the nature of its embedded sources. Our observations show that the globule contains an embedded aggregate of about 30 very young (≲1 Myr) stellar objects, for which we estimate a total mass of 90 M⊙. The most massive members are three systems containing early B-type stars. Two of them most likely produced very compact H II regions, one of them being still highly embedded and coinciding with a peak seen in emission lines characterising the photon dominated region (PDR). Two of these three systems are resolved binaries, and one of those contains a visible Herbig Be star. An approximate derivation of the mass function of the members of the aggregate gives hints of a slope at high masses shallower than the classical Salpeter slope, and a peak of the mass distribution at a mass higher than that at which the widely adopted log-normal initial mass function peaks. The emission distribution of H2 and Brγ, tracing the PDR and the ionised gas phase, respectively, suggests that molecular gas is distributed as a shell around the embedded aggregate, filled with centrally-condensed ionised gas. Both, the morphology and the low excitation of the H II region, indicate that the sources of ionisation are the B stars of the embedded aggregate, rather than the external UV field caused by the O stars of Cygnus OB2. The youth of the embedded cluster, combined with the isolation of the globule

  8. [O II] emitters at z ˜ 4.6 in the GOODS field: a homogeneous measure of evolving star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, K. D.; McMahon, R. G.; Venemans, B. P.; Banerji, M.; Lewis, J. R.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of a high-redshift, z = 4.6, survey of [O II] λ3727 emission line galaxies in the GOODS-S field. The survey uses deep near-infrared data in the NB2090 (λc = 2.095 μm, Δ λ = 0.02 μm) and Ks (λc = 2.146 μm, Δ λ = 0.324 μm) filters taken with the European Southern Observatory instrument, HAWK-I. The images reach an emission line flux limit (5σ) of 3.16 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm -2. At z = 4.6, the survey probes a comoving volume of ˜6680 Mpc3. Three [O II] emission line candidates at z ˜ 4.6 are selected using the Lyman-break criteria. Photometric redshift analysis supports the conclusion that these are genuine [O II] emitters, ruling out a z < 3 solution entirely for one of the candidates. In the analysis presented in this paper, two scenarios are considered: first, all three candidates are genuine [O II] emitters and secondly, only the most likely candidate is a genuine [O II] emitter. We use the line fluxes of these objects to place confidence limits on the star formation rate density (SFRD) in bright (log(L[O ii ])>42.0) [O II] emission line galaxies. Assuming an observed [O II]/Hα line ratio of 0.45 and A(Hα) = 1.0 mag, we report an SFRD of ρdot*(log(L[O ii ])>42.0)=0.058 M yr -1 Mpc -3 in our objects. Using small number statistics, we then place a 50 per cent confidence interval on the global star formation rate of ρdot;*(log(L[O ii ])>42.0)=0.058±0.013 M yr -1 Mpc -3. By combining our results with those from low-z surveys, we compile the first homogeneous set of measurements of the SFRD in bright [O II] emitters from z = 0 to 4.6. From this, we conclude that there was an increase in the SFRD in the brightest [O II] emitters of at least a factor of 2 between z = 4.6 and 1.85.

  9. A 158 {mu}m [C II] LINE SURVEY OF GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1-2: AN INDICATOR OF STAR FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, G. J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Ferkinhoff, C.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Fiolet, N. E-mail: steve@mpe.mpg.d

    2010-12-01

    We have detected the 158 {mu}m [C II] line from 12 galaxies at z {approx} 1-2. This is the first survey of this important star formation tracer at redshifts covering the epoch of maximum star formation in the universe and quadruples the number of reported high-z [C II] detections. The line is very luminous, between <0.024% and 0.65% of the far-infrared (FIR) continuum luminosity of our sources, and arises from photodissociation regions on molecular cloud surfaces. An exception is PKS 0215+015, where half of the [C II] emission could arise from X-ray-dominated regions near the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). The L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub FIR} ratio in our star formation-dominated systems is {approx}8 times larger than that of our AGN-dominated systems. Therefore this ratio selects for star formation-dominated systems. Furthermore, the L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub FIR} and L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub (CO(1-0))} ratios in our star-forming galaxies and nearby starburst galaxies are the same, so that luminous star-forming galaxies at earlier epochs (z {approx} 1-2) appear to be scaled-up versions of local starbursts entailing kiloparsec-scale starbursts. Most of the FIR and [C II] radiation from our AGN-dominated sample (excepting PKS 0215+015) also arises from kiloparsec-scale star formation, but with far-UV radiation fields {approx}8 times more intense than in our star formation-dominated sample. We speculate that the onset of AGN activity stimulates large-scale star formation activity within AGN-dominated systems. This idea is supported by the relatively strong [O III] line emission, indicating very young stars, that was recently observed in high-z composite AGN/starburst systems. Our results confirm the utility of the [C II] line, and in particular, the L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub (FIR)} and L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios as tracers of star formation in galaxies at high redshifts.

  10. The effects of interactions on spiral galaxies. II - Disk star-formation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.; Roettiger, Kurt A.; Keel, William C.; Van Der Hulst, J. M.; Hummel, E.

    1987-01-01

    H-alpha emission-line and IRAS far-IR observations of interacting spiral and irregular galaxies are here used to assess the influence of interactions on their global star-formation rates. Two samples of interacting galaxies were observed: a complete sample of close pairs, and an Arp atlas sample of peculiar systems. When compared to a control sample of single galaxies, both samples of interacting systems exhibit systematically higher levels of H-alpha and infrared emission on average, and a larger dispersion in emission properties. Emission levels in the very active system are much more strongly correlated with the properties of the interaction than with the internal properties of the galaxies themselves. Strong disk emission is almost always accompanied by unusually strong nuclear activity. Simple star-formation burst models can reproduce the observed H-alpha equivalent widths and broadband colors of most of the galaxies. The bursts are relatively short (few times 10 million yr) and rarely involve more than 1-2 percent of a galaxy's total mass.

  11. Star formation towards the southern cometary H II region IRAS 17256-3631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veena, V. S.; Vig, S.; Tej, A.; Varricatt, W. P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Chandrasekhar, T.; Ashok, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    IRAS 17256-3631 is a southern Galactic massive star-forming region located at a distance of 2 kpc. In this paper, we present a multiwavelength investigation of the embedded cluster, the H II region, as well as the parent cloud. Radio images at 325, 610 and 1372 MHz were obtained using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India while the near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy were carried out using United Kingdom Infrared Telescope and Mt. Abu Infrared Telescope, India. The near-infrared K-band image reveals the presence of a partially embedded infrared cluster. The spectral features of the brightest star in the cluster, IRS-1, spectroscopically agree with a late O or early B star and could be the driving source of this region. Filamentary H2 emission detected towards the outer envelope indicates the presence of highly excited gas. The parent cloud is investigated at far-infrared to millimetre wavelengths and 18 dust clumps have been identified. The spectral energy distributions of these clumps have been fitted as modified blackbodies and the best-fitting peak temperatures are found to range from 14 to 33 K, while the column densities vary from 0.7 to 8.5 × 1022 cm-2. The radio maps show a cometary morphology for the distribution of ionized gas that is density bounded towards the north-west and ionization bounded towards the south-east. This morphology is better explained with the champagne flow model as compared to the bow-shock model. Using observations at near-, mid- and far-infrared, submillimetre and radio wavelengths, we examine the evolutionary stages of various clumps.

  12. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. II. Signatures of gravitational collapse of IRDCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Tremblin, P.; Ossenkopf, V.; Peretto, N.; Simon, R.; Bontemps, S.; Federrath, C.

    2015-06-01

    We analyse column density and temperature maps derived from Herschel dust continuum observations of a sample of prominent, massive infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) i.e. G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, G28.37+0.07, and G28.53-0.25. We disentangle the velocity structure of the clouds using 13CO 1→0 and 12CO 3→2 data, showing that these IRDCs are the densest regions in massive giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and not isolated features. The probability distribution function (PDF) of column densities for all clouds have a power-law distribution over all (high) column densities, regardless of the evolutionary stage of the cloud: G11.11-0.12, G18.82-0.28, and G28.37+0.07 contain (proto)-stars, while G28.53-0.25 shows no signs of star formation. This is in contrast to the purely log-normal PDFs reported for near and/or mid-IR extinction maps. We only find a log-normal distribution for lower column densities, if we perform PDFs of the column density maps of the whole GMC in which the IRDCs are embedded. By comparing the PDF slope and the radial column density profile of three of our clouds, we attribute the power law to the effect of large-scale gravitational collapse and to local free-fall collapse of pre- and protostellar cores for the highest column densities. A significant impact on the cloud properties from radiative feedback is unlikely because the clouds are mostly devoid of star formation. Independent from the PDF analysis, we find infall signatures in the spectral profiles of 12CO for G28.37+0.07 and G11.11-0.12, supporting the scenario of gravitational collapse. Our results are in line with earlier interpretations that see massive IRDCs as the densest regions within GMCs, which may be the progenitors of massive stars or clusters. At least some of the IRDCs are probably the same features as ridges (high column density regions with N> 1023 cm-2 over small areas), which were defined for nearby IR-bright GMCs. Because IRDCs are only confined to the densest (gravity dominated

  13. Properties of galaxy groups in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey - II. Active galactic nucleus feedback and star formation truncation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, Simone M.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; Croton, Darren J.; Moore, Ben

    2006-11-01

    Successfully reproducing the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and the bimodality in the galaxy distribution requires a mechanism that can truncate star formation in massive haloes. Current models of galaxy formation consider two such truncation mechanisms: strangulation, which acts on satellite galaxies, and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, which predominantly affects central galaxies. The efficiencies of these processes set the blue fraction of galaxies, fblue(L, M), as a function of galaxy luminosity, L, and halo mass, M. In this paper, we use a galaxy group catalogue extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to determine fblue(L, M). To demonstrate the potential power of these data as a benchmark for galaxy formation models, we compare the results to the semi-analytical model for galaxy formation of Croton et al. Although this model accurately fits the global statistics of the galaxy population, as well as the shape of the conditional LF, there are significant discrepancies when the blue fraction of galaxies as a function of mass and luminosity is compared between the observations and the model. In particular, the model predicts (i) too many faint satellites in massive haloes, (ii) a blue fraction of satellites that is much too low, and (iii) a blue fraction of centrals that is too high and with an inverted luminosity dependence. In the same order, we argue that these discrepancies owe to (i) the neglect of tidal stripping in the semi-analytical model, (ii) the oversimplified treatment of strangulation, and (iii) improper modelling of dust extinction and/or AGN feedback. The data presented here will prove useful to test and calibrate future models of galaxy formation and, in particular, to discriminate between various models for AGN feedback and other star formation truncation mechanisms.

  14. A study of four galactic small H II regions: Searching for spontaneous and sequential star formation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung-Ju

    This thesis describes observational studies of four small star-forming H II regions (KR 7, KR 81, KR 120 and KR 140) and star-formation scenario associated with the Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) in each region. In addition to that, we also present an analysis of HCO+ (J=3→2) and H13CO+ (J=3→2) observations of the Massive (M ˜ 20 M[special character omitted] ) submillimeter/infrared source IRAS 01202+6133 located on the periphery of the H II region. In this research, we improved existing 1-D radiative transfer model for a collapsing core that happens in the early phase -- Class I protostar -- of star formation. The molecular gas surrounding an H II region is thought to be a place where star formation can be induced. We selected four small H II region in order to minimize the feedbacks and dynamics from multiple exciting sources. These regions are very young and ionized by the single O or B spectral type stars. A space based telescope Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) used for identifying and classifying the YSOs population surrounding a sample of H II regions. First, we used WISE data from AllWISE catalog with some constrains such as spatial coordinates, signal-to-noise ratio and contaminations. After we retrieved sources from catalog in each region, we classified YSOs with two different methods; color-color diagram and spectral index (alpha). Based on the color-color diagram using WISE 3.4 mum, 4.6 mum and 12 mum bands, we classified the YSOs as Class I, Class II and using 3.4 mum, 4.6 mum and 22 mum, we were able to classify Transition Disks and Class III YSOs. 2MASS and WISE combined color-color diagram also used in order to compare the classification only use of WISE color-color diagram. Considering a reddening effect from 2MASS Ks band, the classification from both WISE only and 2MASS, WISE combined color-colordiagram. A spectral index (alpha) also can be used as classifying YSOs. Based on the WISE magnitude, spectral index (alpha) can be derived

  15. Chemical evolution in the early phases of massive star formation. II. Deuteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, T.; Shirley, Y. L.; Beuther, H.; Semenov, D.; Linz, H.; Albertsson, T.; Henning, Th.

    2015-07-01

    The chemical evolution in high-mass star-forming regions is still poorly constrained. Studying the evolution of deuterated molecules allows distinguishing between subsequent stages of high-mass star formation regions based on the strong temperature dependence of deuterium isotopic fractionation. We observed a sample of 59 sources including 19 infrared dark clouds, 20 high-mass protostellar objects, 11 hot molecular cores and 9 ultra-compact Hii regions in the (3-2) transitions of the four deuterated molecules, DCN, DNC, DCO+, and N2D+ as well as their non-deuterated counterparts. The overall detection fraction of DCN, DNC, and DCO+ is high and exceeds 50% for most of the stages. N2D+ was only detected in a few infrared dark clouds and high-mass protostellar objects. This may be related to problems in the bandpass at the transition frequency and to low abundances in the more evolved, warmer stages. We find median D/H ratios of 0.02 for DCN, 0.005 for DNC, 0.0025 for DCO+, and 0.02 for N2D+. While the D/H ratios of DNC, DCO+, and N2D+ decrease with time, DCN/HCN peaks at the hot molecular core stage. We only found weak correlations of the D/H ratios for N2D+ with the luminosity of the central source and the FWHM of the line, and no correlation with the H2 column density. In combination with a previously observed set of 14 other molecules (Paper I), we fitted the calculated column densities with an elaborate 1D physico-chemical model with time-dependent D-chemistry including ortho- and para-H2 states. Good overall fits to the observed data were obtained with the model. This is one of the first times that observations and modeling were combined to derive chemically based best-fit models for the evolution of high-mass star formation including deuteration. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-20

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ {sub g}, and molecular, Σ{sub H2}, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ{sub sfr}, of the molecular-rich (Σ{sub H2} ≥ Σ{sub HI}/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, Σ{sub sfr}=A{sub g}Σ{sub g,2}{sup 1.5}; a 'Constant Molecular' law, Σ{sub sfr} = A {sub H2}Σ{sub H2,2}; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-Ω' law, Σ{sub sfr}=B{sub Ω}Σ{sub g}Ω; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, Σ{sub sfr} = B {sub CC}Σ {sub g}Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v {sub circ}/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  17. A Test of Star Formation Laws in Disk Galaxies. II. Dependence on Dynamical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-01

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ g , and molecular, ΣH2, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σsfr, of the molecular-rich (ΣH2 >= ΣHI/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a "Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)" law, \\Sigma _{sfr}=A_g\\Sigma _{g,2}^{1.5}; a "Constant Molecular" law, Σsfr = A H2ΣH2, 2; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz & McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, & Tumlinson (KMT09); a "Gas-Ω" law, \\Sigma _{sfr}=B_\\Omega \\Sigma _g\\Omega; and a shear-driven "giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision" law, Σsfr = B CCΣ g Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v circ/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  18. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    . Complementing this study of normal star-forming galaxies, my study of quasar host galaxies utilizes narrow- and medium-band images of eight Palomar-Green (PG) quasars from the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using images of a point-spread function (PSF) star in the same filters, I subtract the PSF of the quasar from each of the target images. The residual light images clearly show the host galaxies of the respective quasars. The narrow-band images were chosen to be centered on the Hbeta, [O II ], [O III], and Paalpha emission lines, allowing the use of line ratios and luminosities to create extinction and star formation maps. Additionally, I utilize the line-ratio maps to distinguish AGN-powered line emission from star formation powered line emission with line-diagnostic diagrams. I find star formation in each of the eight quasar host galaxies in my study. The bulk star-formation rates are lower than expected, suggesting that quasar host galaxies may be dynamically more advanced than previously believed. Seven of the eight quasar host galaxies in this study have higher-than-typical mass-specific star-formation rates. Additionally, I see evidence of shocked gas, supporting the hypotheses presented in earlier works that suggest that AGN activity quenches star formation in its host galaxy by disrupting its gas reservoir.

  19. H II Region G46.5-0.2: The Interplay between Ionizing Radiation, Molecular Gas, and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Li, Jin Zeng; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju

    2015-06-01

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey (13CO J = 1-0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive (12CO, 13CO, C18O J = 3-2, HCO+, and HCN J = 4-3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10‧ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  20. H ii REGION G46.5-0.2: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN IONIZING RADIATION, MOLECULAR GAS, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Paron, S.; Ortega, M. E.; Dubner, G.; Petriella, A.; Giacani, E.; Yuan, Jing-Hua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hongli; Huang, Ya Fang; Zhang, Si-Ju; Wu, Yuefang

    2015-06-15

    H ii regions are particularly interesting because they can generate dense layers of gas and dust, elongated columns or pillars of gas pointing toward the ionizing sources, and cometary globules of dense gas where triggered star formation can occur. Understanding the interplay between the ionizing radiation and the dense surrounding gas is very important to explain the origin of these peculiar structures, and hence to characterize triggered star formation. G46.5-0.2 (G46), a poorly studied galactic H ii region located at about 4 kpc, is an excellent target for performing this kind of study. Using public molecular data extracted from the Galactic Ring Survey ({sup 13}CO J = 1–0) and from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope data archive ({sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, C{sup 18}O J = 3–2, HCO{sup +}, and HCN J = 4–3), and infrared data from the GLIMPSE and MIPSGAL surveys, we perform a complete study of G46, its molecular environment, and the young stellar objects (YSOs) placed around it. We found that G46, probably excited by an O7V star, is located close to the edge of the GRSMC G046.34-00.21 molecular cloud. It presents a horse-shoe morphology opening in the direction of the cloud. We observed a filamentary structure in the molecular gas likely related to G46 and not considerable molecular emission toward its open border. We found that about 10′ to the southwest of G46 there are some pillar-like features, shining at 8 μm and pointing toward the H ii region open border. We propose that the pillar-like features were carved and sculpted by the ionizing flux from G46. We found several YSOs likely embedded in the molecular cloud grouped in two main concentrations: one, closer to the G46 open border consisting of Class II type sources, and another mostly composed of Class I type YSOs located just ahead of the pillar-like features, strongly suggesting an age gradient in the YSO distribution.

  1. The anatomy of the NGC5044 group - II. Stellar populations and star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, J. Trevor; Proctor, Robert N.; Rasmussen, Jesper; Brough, Sarah; Forbes, Duncan A.

    2009-07-01

    The distribution of galaxy properties in groups and clusters holds important information on galaxy evolution and growth of structure in the Universe. While clusters have received appreciable attention in this regard, the role of groups as fundamental to formation of the present-day galaxy population has remained relatively unaddressed. Here, we present stellar ages, metallicities and α-element abundances derived using Lick indices for 67 spectroscopically confirmed members of the NGC5044 galaxy group with the aim of shedding light on galaxy evolution in the context of the group environment. We find that galaxies in the NGC5044 group show evidence for a strong relationship between stellar mass and metallicity, consistent with their counterparts in both higher and lower mass groups and clusters. Galaxies show no clear trend of age or α-element abundance with mass, but these data form a tight sequence when fitted simultaneously in age, metallicity and stellar mass. In the context of the group environment, our data support the tidal disruption of low-mass galaxies at small group-centric radii, as evident from an apparent lack of galaxies below ~109Msolar within ~100kpc of the brightest group galaxy. Using a joint analysis of absorption- and emission-line metallicities, we are able to show that the star-forming galaxy population in the NGC5044 group appears to require gas removal to explain the ~1.5dex offset between absorption- and emission-line metallicities observed in some cases. A comparison with other stellar population properties suggests that this gas removal is dominated by galaxy interactions with the hot intragroup medium.

  2. Comparing M31 and Milky Way satellites: The extended star formation histories of Andromeda II and Andromeda XVI

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio; McConnachie, Alan; Stetson, Peter B.; Bernard, Edouard J.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Irwin, Mike; Martin, Nicolas F.; Mayer, Lucio; Navarro, Julio F.

    2014-07-01

    We present the first comparison between the lifetime star formation histories (SFHs) of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites. Using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we obtained deep optical imaging of Andromeda II (And II; M{sub V} = –12.0; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 6.7) and Andromeda XVI (And XVI; M{sub V} = –7.5; log(M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) ∼ 4.9) yielding color-magnitude diagrams that extend at least 1 mag below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, and are similar in quality to those available for the MW companions. And II and And XVI show strikingly similar SFHs: both formed 50%-70% of their total stellar mass between 12.5 and 5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 5-0.5) and both were abruptly quenched ∼5 Gyr ago (z ∼ 0.5). The predominance of intermediate age populations in And XVI makes it qualitatively different from faint companions of the MW and clearly not a pre-reionization fossil. Neither And II nor And XVI appears to have a clear analog among MW companions, and the degree of similarity in the SFHs of And II and And XVI is not seen among comparably faint-luminous pairs of MW satellites. These findings provide hints that satellite galaxy evolution may vary substantially among hosts of similar stellar mass. Although comparably deep observations of more M31 satellites are needed to further explore this hypothesis, our results underline the need for caution when interpreting satellite galaxies of an individual system in a broader cosmological context.

  3. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  4. OLD MAIN-SEQUENCE TURNOFF PHOTOMETRY IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND ITS SPATIAL GRADIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Noelia E. D.; Gallart, Carme; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Aparicio, Antonio; Costa, Edgardo; Mendez, Rene A. E-mail: carme@iac.e E-mail: antapaj@iac.e E-mail: rmendez@das.uchile.c

    2009-11-10

    approx7%-12% of the total psi(t) in our fields of the wing area. This is not an exceptional increment as compared with the average psi(t) but is very significant in the sense that these eastern fields are the only ones of this study in which star formation is currently going on. There is also a strong dichotomy between east/southeast and west in the current irregular shape of the SMC. We find that this dichotomy is produced by the youngest population and began approx1.0 Gyr ago or later. The age of the old population is similar at all radii and at all azimuth, and we constrain the age of this oldest population to be more than approx12 Gyr. We do not find yet a region dominated by a true, old, Milky-Way-like, halo at 4.5 kpc from the SMC center, indicating either that this old stellar halo does not exist in the SMC or that its contribution to the stellar populations, at the galactocentric distances of our outermost field, is negligible. Finally, we derive the age-metallicity relation and find that, in all fields, the metallicity increased continuously from early epochs until the present. This is in good agreement with the results from the Ca II triplet, a completely independent method, constituting an external consistency proof of IAC-pop in determining the chemical enrichment law.

  5. Embedded Protostellar Disks Around (Sub-)Solar Stars. II. Disk Masses, Sizes, Densities, Temperatures, and the Planet Formation Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.

    2011-03-01

    We present basic properties of protostellar disks in the embedded phase of star formation (EPSF), which is difficult to probe observationally using available observational facilities. We use numerical hydrodynamics simulations of cloud core collapse and focus on disks formed around stars in the 0.03-1.0 M sun mass range. Our obtained disk masses scale near-linearly with the stellar mass. The mean and median disk masses in the Class 0 and I phases (M mean d,C0 = 0.12 M sun, M mdn d,C0 = 0.09 M sun and M mean d,CI = 0.18 M sun, M mdn d,CI = 0.15 M sun, respectively) are greater than those inferred from observations by (at least) a factor of 2-3. We demonstrate that this disagreement may (in part) be caused by the optically thick inner regions of protostellar disks, which do not contribute to millimeter dust flux. We find that disk masses and surface densities start to systematically exceed that of the minimum mass solar nebular for objects with stellar mass as low as M * = 0.05-0.1 M sun. Concurrently, disk radii start to grow beyond 100 AU, making gravitational fragmentation in the disk outer regions possible. Large disk masses, surface densities, and sizes suggest that giant planets may start forming as early as in the EPSF, either by means of core accretion (inner disk regions) or direct gravitational instability (outer disk regions), thus breaking a longstanding stereotype that the planet formation process begins in the Class II phase.

  6. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  7. Spiral structure and star formation. II - Stellar lifetimes and cloud kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausman, M. A.; Roberts, W. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability studies using continuum gas dynamical calculations becomes questionable in connection with the apparent clumpiness of the Galaxy's interstellar medium (ISM). Roberts and Hausman (1984) have, therefore, presented a detailed model of a disk galaxy in which the ISM consists entirely of 'cloud particles', which orbit ballistically in the galaxy's gravitational field, collide inelastically with one another, and give birth to and subsequently interact with young star associations. The effects of changing the clouds's collisional mean free path have been examined, and the variations in the young star system's spiral morphology have been explored. The present investigation is concerned with a further study of this clumpy, cloudy ISM model, taking into account longer mean free path models likely to be appropriate for systems of molecular clouds. Attention is also given to the kinematics of clouds as they orbit under the influence of galactic gravity, collisions, and supernova remnants.

  8. OMEGA - OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in A901/2: II. - Environmental influence on integrated star formation properties and AGN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez del Pino, Bruno; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Chies-Santos, Ana L.; Weinzirl, Tim; Bamford, Steven P.; Gray, Meghan E.; Böhm, Asmus; Wolf, Christian; Maltby, David T.

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of the star formation and AGN activity for galaxies in the Abell 901/2 multi-cluster system at z ˜ 0.167 as part of the OMEGA survey. Using Tuneable Filter data obtained with the OSIRIS instrument at the GTC we produce spectra covering the Hα and [N II] spectral lines for more than 400 galaxies. Using optical emission-line diagnostics, we identify a significant number of galaxies hosting AGN, which tend to have high masses and a broad range of morphologies. Moreover, within the environmental densities probed by our study, we find no environmental dependence on the fraction of galaxies hosting AGN. The analysis of the integrated Hα emission shows that the specific star formation rates (SSFRs) of a majority of the cluster galaxies are below the field values for a given stellar mass. We interpret this result as evidence for a slow decrease in the star formation activity of star-forming galaxies as they fall into higher-density regions, contrary to some previous studies which suggested a rapid truncation of star formation. We find that most of the intermediate- and high-mass spiral galaxies go through a phase in which their star formation is suppressed but still retain significant star-formation activity. During this phase, these galaxies tend to retain their spiral morphology while their colours become redder. The presence of this type of galaxies in high density regions indicates that the physical mechanism responsible for suppressing star-formation affects mainly the gas component of the galaxies, suggesting that ram-pressure stripping or starvation are potentially responsible.

  9. Processes and problems in secondary star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I.; Whitaker, R.W.; Sandford M.T. II

    1984-03-01

    Recent developments relating the conditions in molecular clouds to star formation triggered by a prior stellar generation are reviewed. Primary processes are those that lead to the formation of a first stellar generation. The secondary processes that produce stars in response to effects caused by existing stars are compared and evaluated in terms of the observational data presently available. We discuss the role of turbulence to produce clumpy cloud structures and introduce new work on colliding inter-cloud gas flows leading to non-linear inhomogeneous cloud structures in an intially smooth cloud. This clumpy morphology has important consequences for secondary formation. The triggering processes of supernovae, stellar winds, and H II regions are discussed with emphasis on the consequences for radiation driven implosion as a promising secondary star formation mechanism. Detailed two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of radiation driven implosion are discussed. This mechanism is shown to be highly efficient in synchronizing the formation of new stars in congruent to 1-3 x 10/sup 4/ years and could account for the recent evidence for new massive star formation in several UCHII regions. It is concluded that, while no single theory adequately explains the variety of star formation observed, a uniform description of star formation is likely to involve several secondary processes. Advances in the theory of star formation will require multiple dimensional calculations of coupled processes. The important non-linear interactions include hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and magnetic fields.

  10. Binary stars - Formation by fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of binary star formation by capture, separate nuclei, fission and fragmentation are compared, assessing the success of theoretical attempts to explain the observed properties of main-sequence binary stars. The theory of formation by fragmentation is examined, discussing the prospects for checking the theory against observations of binary premain-sequence stars. It is concluded that formation by fragmentation is successful at explaining many of the key properties of main-sequence binary stars.

  11. An analysis of star formation with Herschel in the Hi-GAL Survey. II. The tips of the Galactic bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veneziani, M.; Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S.; Di Giorgio, A.; Fukui, Y.; Maiolo, B. M. T.; Maruccia, Y.; Mizuno, A.; Mizuno, N.; Molinari, S.; Mottram, J. C.; Moore, T. J. T.; Onishi, T.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Piacentini, F.; Plume, R.; Russeil, D.; Strafella, F.

    2017-02-01

    Context. We present the physical and evolutionary properties of prestellar and protostellar clumps in the Herschel Infrared GALactic plane survey (Hi-GAL) in two large areas centered in the Galactic plane and covering the tips of the long Galactic bar at the intersection with the spiral arms. The areas fall in the longitude ranges 19° <ℓ < 33° and 340° < ℓ < 350°, while latitude is -1° < b < 1°. Newly formed high mass stars and prestellar objects are identified and their properties derived and compared. A study is also presented on five giant molecular complexes at the further edge of the bar, identified through ancillary 12CO(1-0) data from the NANTEN observatory. Aims: One of the goals of this analysis is assessing the role of spiral arms in the star-formation processes in the Milky Way. It is, in fact, still a matter of debate if the particular configuration of the Galactic rotation and potential at the tips of the bar can trigger star formation. Methods: The star-formation rate was estimated from the quantity of proto-stars expected to form during the collapse of massive turbulent clumps into star clusters. The expected quantity of proto-stars was estimated by the possible final cluster configurations of a given initial turbulent clump. This new method was developed by applying a Monte Carlo procedure to an evolutionary model of turbulent cores and takes into account the wide multiplicity of sources produced during the collapse. Results: The star-formation rate density values at the tips are 1.2±0.3×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2} and 1.5±0.3×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2} in the first and fourth quadrant, respectively. The same values estimated on the entire field of view, that is including the tips of the bar and background and foreground regions, are 0.9±0.2×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2} and 0.8±0.2×10-3 M_⊙/{yr kpc^2}. The conversion efficiency indicates the percentage amount of material converted into stars and is approximately 0.8% in the first quadrant and 0

  12. Gaining Insight into Star Formation: Resolved Star Formation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebst, Kelley; Scowen, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Until recently astronomers have used star formation laws to measure the star formation rate and star formation efficiency of galaxies only on global scales because of the poor resolution of available data. What I am now capable of producing is a spatially resolved star formation law that can provide direct insight into the physical processes that govern star formation and assess the short-term nature of bursts of star formation and the longer-term nature of larger-scale events that can dictate the global distribution of stars and the ultimate fate of a galaxy as a whole. I am using exquisite narrowband optical data from a variety of sources, including the Hubble Space Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory, etc., in conjunction with infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey and the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, neutral gas data from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, and molecular gas data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Survey of Nearby Galaxies, to provide star formation rates and star formation efficiencies on previously inaccessible small spatial scales across a suite of galaxies that represent a range of star formation environments and scales. My sample includes 18 spiral galaxies ranging from 2.1 to 15.1 Mpc in distance and offers a large range of morphological types (i.e. a large range of star formation environments). I am using these data to test different models of star formation modes under a variety of physical conditions and relate the variations I observe to the known local physical conditions and the associated star formation histories for each locale within each galaxy.This is the heart of the matter - that the nature and evolution of the local physical environment intimately influences how stars can form, how quickly and how massive those stars are allowed to form, and as a result how they shape the local conditions for subsequent star formation. It is this tracking of the stellar ecology that is vital for

  13. Multi-wavelength studies of spectacular ram-pressure stripping of a galaxy. II. Star formation in the tail

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Masafumi; Gu, Liyi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo; Fujita, Yutaka; Akahori, Takuya; Hattori, Takashi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2013-12-01

    With multiband photometric data in public archives, we detected four intracluster star-forming regions in the Virgo Cluster. Two of them were at a projected distance of 35 kpc from NGC 4388 and the other two were 66 kpc away. Our new spectroscopic observations revealed that their recessional velocities were comparable to the ram-pressure-stripped tail of NGC 4388 and confirmed the association. The stellar mass of the star-forming regions ranged from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 4.5} M {sub ☉} except for that of the faintest one, which was <10{sup 3} M {sub ☉}. The metallicity was comparable to a solar abundance and the age of the stars was ∼10{sup 6.8} yr. Their young stellar age meant that the star formation should have started after the gas was stripped from NGC 4388. This implied in situ condensation of the stripped gas. We also found that two star-forming regions were located near the leading edge of a filamentary dark cloud. The extinction of the filament was smaller than that derived from the Balmer decrement of the star-forming regions, implying that the dust in the filament would be locally dense around the star-forming regions.

  14. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S.; Cotton, W. D.; Chandler, C.; Churchwell, E. B.; Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fender, R. P.; Gledhill, T. M.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Hindson, L.; Jackson, J. M.; Kurtz, S. E.; Marti, J. [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s and others

    2013-03-01

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  15. He II emitters in the VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Population III star formation or peculiar stellar populations in galaxies at 2 < z < 4.6?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, P.; Le Fèvre, O.; Charlot, S.; Contini, T.; Cucciati, O.; Garilli, B.; Zamorani, G.; Adami, C.; Bardelli, S.; Le Brun, V.; Lemaux, B.; Maccagni, D.; Pollo, A.; Pozzetti, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zucca, E.

    2013-08-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to identify He II emitters at 2 < z < 4.6 and to constrain the source of the hard ionizing continuum that powers the He II emission. Methods: We assembled a sample of 277 galaxies with a highly reliable spectroscopic redshift at 2 < z < 4.6 from the VIMOS-VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) Deep and Ultra-Deep data, and we identified 39 He II λ1640 emitters. We studied their spectral properties, measuring the fluxes, equivalent widths (EW), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) for most relevant lines, including He II λ1640, Lyα line, Si II λ1527, and C IV λ1549. Results: About 10% of galaxies at z ~ 3 and iAB ≤ 24.75 show He II in emission, with rest frame equivalent widths EW0 ~ 1-7 Å, equally distributed between galaxies with Lyα in emission or in absorption. We find 11 (3.9% of the global population) reliable He II emitters with unresolved He II lines (FWHM0 < 1200 km s-1), 13 (4.6% of the global population) reliable emitters with broad He II emission (FWHM0 > 1200 km s-1), 3 active galactic nuclei (AGN), and an additional 12 possible He II emitters. The properties of the individual broad emitters are in agreement with expectations from a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) model. Instead, the properties of the narrow emitters are not compatible with this model, nor with predictions of gravitational cooling radiation produced by gas accretion, unless this is severely underestimated by current models by more than two orders of magnitude. Rather, we find that the EW of the narrow He II line emitters are in agreement with expectations for a Population III (PopIII) star formation, if the episode of star formation is continuous, and we calculate that a PopIII star formation rate (SFR) of 0.1-10 M⊙ yr-1 alone is enough to sustain the observed He II flux. Conclusions: We conclude that narrow He II emitters are powered either by the ionizing flux from a stellar population rare at z ~ 0 but much more common at z ~ 3, or by PopIII star formation. As proposed by

  16. APERTURE SYNTHESIS OBSERVATIONS OF CO, HCN, AND 89 GHz CONTINUUM EMISSION TOWARD NGC 604 IN M33: SEQUENTIAL STAR FORMATION INDUCED BY A SUPERGIANT H II REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Rie; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kurono, Yasutaka; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Tosaki, Tomoka; Tamura, Yoichi; Kuno, Nario; Kawabe, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    We present the results from new Nobeyama Millimeter Array observations of CO(1-0), HCN(1-0), and 89 GHz continuum emission toward NGC 604, known as the supergiant H II region in the nearby galaxy M33. Our high spatial resolution images (4.''2 x 2.''6, corresponding to 17 pc x 11 pc physical size) of CO emission allowed us to uncover 10 individual molecular clouds that have masses of (0.8-7.4) x10{sup 5} M{sub sun} and sizes of 5-29 pc, comparable to those of typical Galactic giant molecular clouds. Moreover, we detected for the first time HCN emission in the two most massive clouds and 89 GHz continuum emission at the rims of the 'H{alpha} shells'. The HCN and 89 GHz continuum emission are offset from the CO peak and are distributed in the direction of the central cluster. Three out of ten CO clouds are well correlated with the H{alpha} shells both in spatial and velocity domains, implying an interaction between molecular gas and the expanding H II region. The CO clouds show varieties in star formation efficiencies (SFEs), which are estimated from the 89 GHz emission and combination of H{alpha} and Spitzer 24 {mu}m data. Furthermore, we found that the SFEs decrease with increasing projected distance measured from the heart of the central OB star cluster in NGC 604, suggesting radial changes in the evolutionary stages of the molecular clouds in the course of stellar cluster formation. Our results provide further support to the picture of sequential star formation in NGC 604 initially proposed by Tosaki et al. with the higher spatially resolved molecular clouds, in which an isotropic expansion of the H II region pushes gases outward, which accumulates to form dense molecular clouds, and then induces massive star formations.

  17. Evolution of the H β + [O III] and [O II] luminosity functions and the [O II] star formation history of the Universe up to z ˜ 5 from HiZELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khostovan, A. A.; Sobral, D.; Mobasher, B.; Best, P. N.; Smail, I.; Stott, J. P.; Hemmati, S.; Nayyeri, H.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the H β + [O III] and [O II] luminosity functions from z ˜ 0.8 to ˜5 in four redshift slices per emission line using data from the High-z Emission Line Survey (HiZELS). This is the first time that the H β + [O III] and [O II] luminosity functions have been studied at these redshifts in a self-consistent analysis. This is also the largest sample of [O II] and H β + [O III] emitters (3475 and 3298 emitters, respectively) in this redshift range, with large comoving volumes ˜1 × 106 Mpc-3 in two independent volumes (COSMOS and UDS), greatly reducing the effects of cosmic variance. The emitters were selected by a combination of photometric redshift and colour-colour selections, as well as spectroscopic follow-up, including recent spectroscopic observations using DEIMOS and MOSFIRE on the Keck Telescopes and FMOS on Subaru. We find a strong increase in L⋆ and a decrease in φ⋆ for both H β + [O III] and [O II] emitters. We derive the [O II] star formation history of the Universe since z ˜ 5 and find that the cosmic star formation rate density (SFRD) rises from z ˜ 5 to ˜3 and then drops towards z ˜ 0. We also find that our star formation history is able to reproduce the evolution of the stellar mass density up to z ˜ 5 based only on a single tracer of star formation. When comparing the H β + [O III] SFRDs to the [O II] and H α SFRD measurements in the literature, we find that there is a remarkable agreement, suggesting that the H β + [O III] sample is dominated by star-forming galaxies at high-z rather than AGNs.

  18. IONIZED GAS KINEMATICS AT HIGH RESOLUTION. V. [Ne ii], MULTIPLE CLUSTERS, HIGH EFFICIENCY STAR FORMATION, AND BLUE FLOWS IN HE 2–10

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Sara; Turner, Jean; Lacy, John; Greathouse, Thomas

    2015-11-20

    We measured the 12.8 μm [Ne ii] line in the dwarf starburst galaxy He 2–10 with the high-resolution spectrometer TEXES on the NASA IRTF. The data cube has a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of ∼1″ and a total velocity resolution, including thermal broadening, of ∼5 km s{sup −1}. This makes it possible to compare the kinematics of individual star-forming clumps and molecular clouds in the three dimensions of space and velocity, and allows us to determine star formation efficiencies. The kinematics of the ionized gas confirm that the starburst contains multiple dense clusters. From the M/R of the clusters and the ≃30%–40% star formation efficiencies, the clusters are likely to be bound and long lived, like globulars. Non-gravitational features in the line profiles show how the ionized gas flows through the ambient molecular material, as well as a narrow velocity feature, which we identify with the interface of the H ii region and a cold dense clump. These data offer an unprecedented view of the interaction of embedded H ii regions with their environment.

  19. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-03-15

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  20. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  1. Star formation rates from [C II] 158 μm and mid-infrared emission lines for starbursts and active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, L.; Lebouteiller, V.; Weedman, D.; Barry, D.; Spoon, H.; Samsonyan, A.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Houck, J. E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu

    2014-07-20

    A summary is presented for 130 galaxies observed with the Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer instrument to measure fluxes for the [C II] 158 μm emission line. Sources cover a wide range of active galactic nucleus to starburst classifications, as derived from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon strength measured with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Redshifts from [C II] and line to continuum strengths (equivalent width (EW) of [C II]) are given for the full sample, which includes 18 new [C II] flux measures. Calibration of L([C II)]) as a star formation rate (SFR) indicator is determined by comparing [C II] luminosities with mid-infrared [Ne II] and [Ne III] emission line luminosities; this gives the same result as determining SFR using bolometric luminosities of reradiating dust from starbursts: log SFR = log L([C II)]) – 7.0, for SFR in M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and L([C II]) in L{sub ☉}. We conclude that L([C II]) can be used to measure SFR in any source to a precision of ∼50%, even if total source luminosities are dominated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN) component. The line to continuum ratio at 158 μm, EW([C II]), is not significantly greater for starbursts (median EW([C II]) = 1.0 μm) compared to composites and AGNs (median EW([C II]) = 0.7 μm), showing that the far-infrared continuum at 158 μm scales with [C II] regardless of classification. This indicates that the continuum at 158 μm also arises primarily from the starburst component within any source, giving log SFR = log νL{sub ν}(158 μm) – 42.8 for SFR in M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and νL{sub ν}(158 μm) in erg s{sup –1}.

  2. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  3. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.; Karska, A.; Messias, H.; van der Werf, P.; Hunt, L. K.; Baes, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rizzo, J. R.; Rossi, A.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Schady, P.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims: Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas in the closest galaxy hosting a GRB (980425). Methods: We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [O i] 63 μm spectroscopy, and an APEX/SHeFI CO(2-1) line detection and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. Results: The GRB 980425 host has elevated [C ii]/FIR and [O i]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rates (SFR) derived from line ([C ii], [O i], Hα) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [C ii] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy centre, whereas [O i] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [O i] flux indicates that there is high radiation field and high gas density at these positions, as derived from modelling of photo-dissociation regions. The [C ii]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Indeed, its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [C ii]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. Conclusions: The [O i] and H i concentrations and the high radiation field and density close to the GRB position are consistent with the hypothesis of a very recent (at most a few tens of Myr ago) inflow of atomic gas triggering star formation. In this scenario dust has not had time to build up (explaining high line-to-continuum ratios). Such a recent enhancement of star formation activity would indeed manifest itself in high SFRline/SFRcontinuum ratios because the line indicators are sensitive only to recent (≲10 Myr) activity, whereas the continuum indicators measure

  4. The ISLAndS Project. II. The Lifetime Star Formation Histories of Six Andomeda dSphS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Monelli, Matteo; Weisz, Daniel R.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Aparicio, Antonio; Bernard, Edouard J.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Cassisi, Santi; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Gallart, Carme; Irwin, Mike J.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Martínez-Vázquez, Clara E.; Mayer, Lucio; McConnachie, Alan W.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Navarro, Julio F.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2017-03-01

    The Initial Star formation and Lifetimes of Andromeda Satellites (ISLAndS) project employs Hubble Space Telescope imaging to study a representative sample of six Andromeda dSph satellite companion galaxies. Our main goal is to determine whether the star formation histories (SFHs) of the Andromeda dSph satellites demonstrate significant statistical differences from those of the Milky Way (MW). Our deep observations yield a time resolution at the oldest ages of ∼1 Gyr, allowing meaningful comparisons to the MW satellites. The six dSphs present a variety of SFHs (e.g., a significant range in quenching times, {τ }q, from 9 to 6 Gyr ago) that are not strictly correlated with luminosity or present distance from M31. In agreement with observations of MW companions of similar mass, there is no evidence of complete quenching of star formation by the cosmic UV background responsible for reionization, but the possibility of a degree of quenching at reionization cannot be ruled out. We do not find significant differences between the SFHs of the members and non-members of the vast, thin plane of satellites. The SFHs of the ISLAndS M31 dSphs appear to be more uniform than those of the MW dSphs. Specifically, the primary difference between the SFHs of the ISLAndS dSphs and MW dSph companions of similar luminosities and host distances is the absence of late-quenching ({τ }q≤slant 5 {Gyr}) dSphs in the ISLAndS sample. Thus, models that can produce satellite populations with and without late-quenching satellites are of extreme interest. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs #13028, 13739.

  5. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. II. The Star-formation History of the Starburst Region NGC 2070 in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, M.; Sabbi, E.; van der Marel, R. P.; Tosi, M.; Zaritsky, D.; Anderson, J.; Lennon, D. J.; Aloisi, A.; de Marchi, G.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Smith, L. J.; Zeidler, P.

    2015-10-01

    We present a study of the recent star formation (SF) of 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the panchromatic imaging survey Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. In this paper we focus on the stars within 20 pc of the center of 30 Doradus, the starburst region NGC 2070. We recovered the SF history by comparing deep optical and near-infrared color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with state-of-the-art synthetic CMDs generated with the latest PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolution Code (PARSEC) models, which include all stellar phases from pre-main-sequence to post-main-sequence. For the first time in this region we are able to measure the SF using intermediate- and low-mass stars simultaneously. Our results suggest that NGC 2070 experienced prolonged activity. In particular, we find that the SF in the region (1) exceeded the average LMC rate ≈ 20 Myr ago, (2) accelerated dramatically ≈ 7 Myr ago, and (3) reached a peak value 1-3 Myr ago. We did not find significant deviations from a Kroupa initial mass function down to 0.5 {M}⊙ . The average internal reddening E(B-V) is found to be between 0.3 and 0.4 mag. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  6. The interstellar medium and star formation in edge-on galaxies. II. NGC 4157, 4565, and 5907

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Kijeong; Wong, Tony; Xue, Rui; Rand, Richard J.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Hulst, J. M. van der; Benjamin, Robert; Murphy, Eric J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a study of the vertical structure of the gaseous and stellar disks in a sample of edge-on galaxies (NGC 4157, 4565, and 5907) using BIMA/CARMA {sup 12}COJ=1→0, VLA Hi, and Spitzer 3.6 μm data. In order to take into account projection effects when we measure the disk thickness as a function of radius, we first obtain the inclination by modeling the radio data. Using the measurement of the disk thicknesses and the derived radial profiles of gas and stars, we estimate the corresponding volume densities and vertical velocity dispersions. Both stellar and gas disks have smoothly varying scale heights and velocity dispersions, contrary to assumptions of previous studies. Using the velocity dispersions, we find that the gravitational instability parameter Q follows a fairly uniform profile with radius and is ⩾1 across the star-forming disk. The star formation law has a slope that is significantly different from those found in more face-on galaxy studies, both in deprojected and pixel-by-pixel plots. Midplane gas pressure based on the varying scale heights and velocity dispersions appears to roughly hold a power-law correlation with the midplane volume density ratio.

  7. Characterizing Spiral Arm and Interarm Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, K.; Blanc, G. A.; Schinnerer, E.; Groves, B.; Adamo, A.; Hughes, A.; Meidt, S.

    2016-08-01

    Interarm star formation contributes significantly to a galaxy’s star formation budget and provides an opportunity to study stellar birthplaces unperturbed by spiral arm dynamics. Using optical integral field spectroscopy of the nearby galaxy NGC 628 with VLT/MUSE, we construct Hα maps including detailed corrections for dust extinction and stellar absorption to identify 391 H ii regions at 35 pc resolution over 12 kpc2. Using tracers sensitive to the underlying gravitational potential, we associate H ii regions with either arm (271) or interarm (120) environments. Using our full spectral coverage of each region, we find that most physical properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) of H ii regions are independent of environment. We calculate the fraction of Hα luminosity due to the background of diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contaminating each H ii region, and find the DIG surface brightness to be higher within H ii regions than in the surroundings, and slightly higher within arm H ii regions. Use of the temperature-sensitive [S ii]/Hα line ratio instead of the Hα surface brightness to identify the boundaries of H ii regions does not change this result. Using the dust attenuation as a tracer of the gas, we find depletion times consistent with previous work (2 × 109 yr) with no differences between the arm and interarm, but this is very sensitive to the DIG correction. Unlike molecular clouds, which can be dynamically affected by the galactic environment, we see fairly consistent properties of H ii regions in both arm and interarm environments. This suggests either a difference in star formation and feedback in arms or a decoupling of dense star-forming clumps from the more extended surrounding molecular gas.

  8. Star formation in the inner Galaxy - a far-infrared and radio study of two H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, D.F.; Dinerstein, H.L.; Harvey, P.M.; Evans, N.J. II; Werner, M.W.

    1985-09-01

    Far-infrared and radio continuum maps have been made of two inner-Galaxy H II region complexes, G30.8-0.0 and G25.4-0.2, along with radio and molecular line measurements at selected positions. The far-IR emission from each region is dominated by two sources. For both G25.4 and G30.8, the distribution of the emission is similar to that of the radio emission, indicating that OB stars provide most of the heating. There is evidence that extinction plays an important role in G30.8, even in the far-IR. A near-IR point source has been detected in G30.8 at the position of peak far-IR color temperature. This source may be the ionizing star for the core of G30.8. Measurement of forbidden S III 9532 A from G25.4SE indicates that the extinction toward this source is very low, which is difficult to reconcile with previously determined distance measurements to this source. 49 references.

  9. DWARF GALAXY FORMATION WITH H{sub 2}-REGULATED STAR FORMATION. II. GAS-RICH DARK GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Madau, Piero; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-10-10

    We present a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of dwarf galaxies at redshifts z ∼> 2.5 using a physically motivated model for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation. Our simulation, performed using the Enzo code and reaching a peak resolution of 109 proper parsecs at z = 2.5, extends the results of Kuhlen et al. to significantly lower redshifts. We show that a star formation prescription regulated by the local H{sub 2} abundance leads to the suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxy halos with M{sub h} ∼< 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and to a large population of gas-rich 'dark galaxies' at z = 2.5 with low star formation efficiencies and gas depletion timescales >20 Gyr. The fraction of dark galaxies is 60% at M{sub h} ≅ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and increases rapidly with decreasing halo mass. Dark galaxies form late and their gaseous disks never reach the surface densities, ∼> 5700 M{sub ☉} pc{sup –2} (Z/10{sup –3} Z{sub ☉}){sup –0.88}, that are required to build a substantial molecular fraction. Despite this large population of dark galaxies, we show that our H{sub 2}-regulated simulation is consistent with both the observed luminosity function of galaxies and the cosmological mass density of neutral gas at z ∼> 2.5. Moreover, our results provide a theoretical explanation for the recent detection in fluorescent Lyα emission of gaseous systems at high redshift with little or no associated star formation. We further propose that H{sub 2}-regulation may offer a fresh solution to a number of outstanding 'dwarf galaxy problems' in ΛCDM. In particular, H{sub 2}-regulation leads galaxy formation to become effectively stochastic on mass scales of M{sub h} ∼ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, and thus these massive dwarfs are not 'too big to fail'.

  10. Gas Surface Density, Star Formation Rate Surface Density, and the Maximum Mass of Young Star Clusters in a Disk Galaxy. II. The Grand-design Galaxy M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas (Σgas), molecular gas (\\Sigma _H_2), neutral gas (\\Sigma _{H\\,\\scriptsize{I}}), and star formation rate (ΣSFR) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M_3rd \\propto \\Sigma _H\\,\\scriptsize{I}^{0.4 +/- 0.2}, whereM 3rd is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation withΣgas,ΣH2, orΣSFR. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M_3rd \\propto \\Sigma _{H\\,\\scriptsize{I}}^{0.6 +/- 0.1} and M_3rd \\propto \\Sigma _gas^{0.5 +/- 0.2}; there is no correlation with either \\Sigma _H_2 orΣSFR. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M_3rd \\propto \\Sigma _gas^{3.8 +/- 0.3}, M_3rd \\propto \\Sigma _H_2^{1.2 +/- 0.1}, and M_3rd \\propto \\Sigma _SFR^{0.9 +/- 0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet traveled too far from their birth sites, the poor resolution of the radio data compared to the physical sizes of the clusters results in measuredΣ that are likely quite

  11. ALMACAL II: Extreme Star Formation Rate Densities in Dusty Starbursts Revealed by ALMA 20 mas Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Zwaan, M. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Biggs, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    We present ultrahigh spatial resolution (∼20 mas or 150 pc) ALMA observations of the dust continuum at 920 μm and 1.2 mm in two submillimeter sources at z = 3.442, ALMACAL–1 (A–1: {S}870μ {{m}}=6.5+/- 0.2 {mJy}) and ALMACAL–2 (A–2: {S}870μ {{m}}=4.4+/- 0.2 {mJy}). About half of the star formation in each of these sources is dominated by a single compact clump (FWHM size of ∼350 pc). In A–1, two additional fainter clumps are found. The star formation rate (SFR) surface densities of all these clumps are extremely high, {{{Σ }}}{SFR}∼ 1200 to ∼ 3000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2, the highest rates found in high-redshift galaxies. Given their geometry and identical redshifts, there is a possibility that A–1 and A–2 are the lensed images of a single background source that are gravitationally amplified by the blazar host. If this were the case, the effective radius of the dusty galaxy in the source plane would be {R}{eff}∼ 40 {pc} and the demagnified SFR surface density would be {{{Σ }}}{SFR} ∼ 10,000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2, comparable with the eastern nucleus of Arp 220. Although we cannot rule out an AGN contribution, our results suggest that a significant percentage of the enormous far-IR luminosity in some dusty starbursts is extremely compact. The high {{{Σ }}}{SFR} in these sources could only be measured thanks to the ultrahigh-resolution ALMA observations used in this work, demonstrating that long-baseline observations are essential to study and interpret the properties of dusty starbursts in the early Universe.

  12. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical CO5BOLD model atmospheres of red giant stars. II. Spectral line formation in the atmosphere of a giant located near the RGB tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kučinskas, A.; Steffen, M.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Dobrovolskas, V.; Ivanauskas, A.; Klevas, J.; Prakapavičius, D.; Caffau, E.; Bonifacio, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the role of convection in the formation of atomic and molecular lines in the atmosphere of a red giant star. For this purpose we study the formation properties of spectral lines that belong to a number of astrophysically important tracer elements, including neutral and singly ionized atoms (Li I, N I, O I, Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Si II, S I, K I, Ca I, Ca II, Ti I, Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Co I, Ni I, Zn I, Sr II, Ba II, and Eu II), and molecules (CH, CO, C2, NH, CN, and OH). Methods: We focus our investigation on a prototypical red giant located close to the red giant branch (RGB) tip (Teff = 3660 K, log g = 1.0, [M/H] = 0.0). We used two types of model atmospheres, 3D hydrodynamical and classical 1D, calculated with the CO5BOLD and LHD stellar atmosphere codes, respectively. Both codes share the same atmospheric parameters, chemical composition, equation of state, and opacities, which allowed us to make a strictly differential comparison between the line formation properties predicted in 3D and 1D. The influence of convection on the spectral line formation was assessed with the aid of 3D-1D abundance corrections, which measure the difference between the abundances of chemical species derived with the 3D hydrodynamical and 1D classical model atmospheres. Results: We find that convection plays a significant role in the spectral line formation in this particular red giant. The derived 3D-1D abundance corrections rarely exceed ± 0.1 dex when lines of neutral atoms and molecules are considered, which is in line with the previous findings for solar-metallicity red giants located on the lower RGB. The situation is different with lines that belong to ionized atoms, or to neutral atoms with high ionization potential. In both cases, the corrections for high-excitation lines (χ > 8 eV) may amount to Δ3D-1D ~ -0.4 dex. The 3D-1D abundance corrections generally show a significant wavelength dependence; in most cases they are smaller in

  13. The formation of sunlike stars.

    PubMed

    Lada, C J; Shu, F H

    1990-05-04

    Understanding how stars like the sun formed constitutes one of the principal challenges confronting modern astrophysics. In recent years, advances in observational technology, particularly at infrared and millimeter wavelengths, have produced an avalanche of critical data and unexpected discoveries about the process of star formation, which is blocked from external view at optical and shorter wavelengths by an obscuring blanket of interstellar dust. Fueled by this new knowledge, a comprehensive empirical picture of stellar genesis is beginning to emerge, laying the foundations for a coherent theory of the birth of sunlike stars.

  14. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M⊙ and collapsing at redshifts z ≈ 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae.

  15. Theoretical Considerations of Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the formation of massive stars. The formation of massive stars is different in many ways from the formation of other stars. The presentation shows the math, and the mechanisms that must be possible for a massive star to form.

  16. Star formation and gas supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  17. Being WISE II: Reducing the Influence of Star formation History on the Mass-to-Light Ratio of Quiescent Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Mark A.; Van de Ven, Glenn; Schinnerer, Eva; Crain, Robert A.; Meidt, Sharon; Groves, Brent; Bower, Richard G.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-12-01

    Stellar population synthesis models can now reproduce the photometry of old stellar systems (age \\gt 2 Gyr) in the near-infrared (NIR) bands at 3.4 and 4.6 μm (WISE W1 and W2 or IRAC 1 and 2). In this paper, we derive stellar mass-to-light ratios for these and optical bands, and confirm that the NIR M/L shows dramatically reduced sensitivity to both age and metallicity compared to optical bands, and further, that this behavior leads to significantly more robust stellar masses for quiescent galaxies with [Fe/H] ≳ -0.5 regardless of star-formation history (SFH). We then use realistic early-type galaxy SFHs and metallicity distributions from the EAGLE simulations of galaxy formation to investigate two methods to determine the appropriate M/L for a galaxy. (1) We show that the uncertainties introduced by an unknown SFH can be largely removed using a spectroscopically inferred luminosity-weighted age and metallicity for the population to select the appropriate single stellar population (SSP) equivalent M/L. Using this method, the maximum systematic error due to SFH on the M/L of an early-type galaxy is \\lt 4 % at 3.4 μm and typical uncertainties due to errors in the age and metallicity create a scatter of ≲ 13 % . The equivalent values for optical bands are more than two to three times greater, even before considering uncertainties associated with internal dust extinction. (2) We demonstrate that if the EAGLE SFHs and metallicities accurately reproduce the true properties of early-type galaxies, the use of an iterative approach to select a mass dependent M/L can provide even more accurate stellar masses for early-type galaxies, with typical uncertainties of \\lt 9 % .

  18. Absorption of gamma-ray photons in a vacuum neutron star magnetosphere: II. The formation of 'lightnings'

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Ya. N. Sob'yanin, D. N.

    2011-10-15

    The absorption of a high-energy photon from the external cosmic gamma-ray background in the inner neutron star magnetosphere triggers the generation of a secondary electron-positron plasma and gives rise to a lightning-a lengthening and simultaneously expanding plasma tube. It propagates along magnetic fields lines with a velocity close to the speed of light. The high electron-positron plasma generation rate leads to dynamical screening of the longitudinal electric field that is provided not by charge separation but by electric current growth in the lightning. The lightning radius is comparable to the polar cap radius of a radio pulsar. The number of electron-positron pairs produced in the lightning in its lifetime reaches 10{sup 28}. The density of the forming plasma is comparable to or even higher than that in the polar cap regions of ordinary pulsars. This suggests that the radio emission from individual lightnings can be observed. Since the formation time of the radio emission is limited by the lightning lifetime, the possible single short radio bursts may be associated with rotating radio transients (RRATs).

  19. Coevolution of metallicity and star formation in galaxies to z ≃ 3.7 - II. A theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie; Dayal, Pratika; Magrini, Laura; Ferrara, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Recent work suggests that galaxy evolution, and the build-up of stellar mass (M*) over cosmic time, is characterized by changes with redshift of star formation rate (SFR) and oxygen abundance (O/H). In a companion paper, we have compiled a large data set to study Metallicity Evolution and Galaxy Assembly (MEGA), consisting of ˜1000 galaxies to z ≃ 3.7 with a common O/H calibration. Here we interpret the MEGA scaling relations of M*, SFR, and O/H with an updated version of the model presented by Dayal et al. This model successfully reproduces the observed O/H ratio of ˜80 000 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to within 0.05-0.06 dex. By extending the model to the higher redshift MEGA sample, we find that although the specific mass loading of outflows does not change measurably during the evolution, the accretion rate and gas content of galaxies increase significantly with redshift. These two effects can explain, either separately or possibly in tandem, the observed lower metal abundance of high-z galaxies.

  20. BUDHIES II: a phase-space view of H I gas stripping and star formation quenching in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Smith, Rory; Candlish, Graeme N.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Verheijen, Marc A. W.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of H I gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z = 0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep H I Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity versus position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their H I gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of H I-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-type) galaxies in the infall region of the cluster that cannot easily be explained with our model of ram-pressure stripping alone. We discuss different possible additional mechanisms that could be at play, including the pre-processing of galaxies in their previous environment. Our results are strengthened by the distribution of galaxy colours (optical and UV) in phase-space, that suggests that after a (gas-rich) field galaxy falls into the cluster, it will lose its gas via ram-pressure stripping, and as it settles into the cluster, its star formation will decay until it is completely quenched. Finally, this work demonstrates the utility of phase-space diagrams to analyse the physical processes driving the evolution of cluster galaxies, in particular H I gas stripping.

  1. Star formation at z=1.47 from HiZELS: an H>α+[O II] double-blind study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Best, Philip N.; Matsuda, Yuichi; Smail, Ian; Geach, James E.; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents the results from the first wide and deep dual narrow-band survey to select Hα and [O II] line emitters at z= 1.47 ± 0.02, exploiting synergies between the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope and the Subaru telescope by using matched narrow-band filters in the H and z' bands. The Hα survey at z= 1.47 reaches a 3σ flux limit of FHα≈ 7 × 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 (corresponding to a limiting star formation rate (SFR) in Hα of ≈7 M⊙ yr-1) and detects ≈200 Hα emitters over 0.7 deg2, while the much deeper [O II] survey reaches an effective flux of ≈7 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 (SFR in [O II] of ˜1 M⊙ yr-1), detecting ≈1400 z= 1.47 [O II] emitters in a matched comoving volume of ˜2.5 × 105 Mpc3. The combined survey results in the identification of 190 simultaneous Hα and [O II] emitters at z= 1.47. Hα and [O II] luminosity functions are derived and both are shown to evolve significantly from z˜ 0 in a consistent way. The SFR density of the Universe at z= 1.47 is evaluated, with the Hα analysis yielding ρSFR= 0.16 ± 0.05 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 and the [O II] analysis ρSFR= 0.17 ± 0.04 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3. The measurements are combined with other studies, providing a self-consistent measurement of the star formation history of the Universe over the last ˜11 Gyr. By using a large comparison sample at z˜ 0.1, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), [O II]/Hα line ratios are calibrated as probes of dust extinction. Hα emitters at z˜ 1.47 show on average AHα≈ 1 mag, the same as found by SDSS in the local Universe. It is shown that although dust extinction correlates with SFR, the relation evolves by about ˜0.5 mag from z˜ 1.5 to ˜0, with local relations overpredicting the dust extinction corrections at high z by that amount. Stellar mass is found to be a much more fundamental extinction predictor, with the same relation between mass and dust extinction being valid at both z˜ 0 and ˜1.5, at least for low and moderate stellar

  2. Are long gamma-ray bursts biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II. Star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Salvaterra, R.; D'Avanzo, P.; Mannucci, F.; Fernandez-Soto, A.; Boissier, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Atek, H.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Cristiani, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Flores, H.; Gallego, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Hammer, F.; Perley, D. A.; Pescalli, A.; Petitjean, P.; Puech, M.; Rafelski, M.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and might therefore be a potentially powerful tool for tracing cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z< 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the effect of the environment on GRB formation. Methods: We studied host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z< 1 bright LGRBs. We used the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplemented the data set with previously measured stellar masses M⋆. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M⋆ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies. Results: We find that LGRB hosts at z< 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to 12 +log ≤ft( frac{OHright)} 8.4-8.5, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are consistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of an increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z< 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless, the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevents us from investigating more quantitatively whether the starburst incidence is such as expected

  3. Influence of stellar multiplicity on planet formation. II. Planets are less common in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ji; Fischer, Debra A.; Xie, Ji-Wei; Ciardi, David R.

    2014-08-20

    Almost half of the stellar systems in the solar neighborhood are made up of multiple stars. In multiple-star systems, planet formation is under the dynamical influence of stellar companions, and the planet occurrence rate is expected to be different from that of single stars. There have been numerous studies on the planet occurrence rate of single star systems. However, to fully understand planet formation, the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems needs to be addressed. In this work, we infer the planet occurrence rate in multiple-star systems by measuring the stellar multiplicity rate for planet host stars. For a subsample of 56 Kepler planet host stars, we use adaptive optics (AO) imaging and the radial velocity (RV) technique to search for stellar companions. The combination of these two techniques results in high search completeness for stellar companions. We detect 59 visual stellar companions to 25 planet host stars with AO data. Three stellar companions are within 2'' and 27 within 6''. We also detect two possible stellar companions (KOI 5 and KOI 69) showing long-term RV acceleration. After correcting for a bias against planet detection in multiple-star systems due to flux contamination, we find that planet formation is suppressed in multiple-star systems with separations smaller than 1500 AU. Specifically, we find that compared to single star systems, planets in multiple-star systems occur 4.5 ± 3.2, 2.6 ± 1.0, and 1.7 ± 0.5 times less frequently when a stellar companion is present at a distance of 10, 100, and 1000 AU, respectively. This conclusion applies only to circumstellar planets; the planet occurrence rate for circumbinary planets requires further investigation.

  4. Gemini/GRACES spectroscopy of stars in Tri II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, K. A.; Starkenburg, E.; Malo, L.; Martin, N.; Laevens, B. P. M.

    2017-04-01

    The chemical abundance ratios and radial velocities for two stars in the recently discovered Triangulum II faint dwarf galaxy have been determined from high-resolution, medium signal-to-noise ratio spectra from the Gemini Remote Access to CFHT ESPaDonS Spectrograph facility. These stars have stellar parameters and metallicities similar to those derived from their photometry and medium-resolution Ca II triplet spectra, and supports that Triangulum II has a metallicity spread consistent with chemical evolution in a dwarf galaxy. The elemental abundances show that both stars have typical calcium abundances and barium upper limits for their metallicities, but low magnesium and sodium. This chemical composition resembles some stars in dwarf galaxies, attributed to inhomogeneous mixing in a low star formation environment, and/or yields from only a few supernova events. One of our targets (Star40) has an enhancement in potassium, and resembles some stars in the unusual outer halo star cluster, NGC 2419. Our other target (Star46) appears to be a binary based on a change in its radial velocity (Δvrad = 24.5 ±2.1 km s-1). This is consistent with variations found in binary stars in other dwarf galaxies. While this serves as a reminder of the high binary fraction in these ultrafaint dwarf galaxies, this particular object has had little impact on the previous determination of the velocity dispersion in Triangulum II.

  5. Star Formation in MUSCEL Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; Wang, Sharon Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary star-formation histories for a subset of the low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in the MUSCEL (MUltiwavelength observations of the Structure, Chemistry, and Evolution of LSB galaxies) program. These histories are fitted against ground-based IFU spectra in tandem with space-based UV and IR photometry. MUSCEL aims to use these histories along with kinematic analyses to determine the physical processes that have caused the evolution of LSB galaxies to diverge from their high surface brightness counterparts.

  6. K band SINFONI spectra of two z ~ 5 submillimeter galaxy systems: upper limits to the unobscured star formation from [O II] optical emission line searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Guilherme S.; Colina, Luis; López, Javier Piqueras; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Arribas, Santiago

    2016-10-01

    We present deep SINFONI K-band integral field spectra of two submillimeter galaxy systems (SMG): BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, at z = 4.69 and 4.55, respectively. Spectra extracted for each object in the two systems do not show any signature of the [O ii]λλ3726, 29 Å emission-lines, placing upper flux limits of 3.9 and 2.5 × 10-18erg s-1 cm-2for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234, respectively. Using the relation between the star formation rate (SFR) and the luminosity of the [O ii] doublet, we estimate unobscured SFR upper limits of ~ 10-15 M⊙ yr-1and ~30-40 M⊙ yr-1for the objects of the two systems, respectively. For the SMGs, these values are at least two orders of magnitude lower than those derived from SED and IR luminosities. The differences on the SFR values would correspond to internal extinction of, at least, 3.4-4.9 and 2.1-3.6 mag in the visual for BR 1202-0725 and J1000+0234 SMGs, respectively. The upper limit for the [O ii]-derived SFR in one of the LAEs (Lyα2) in the BR1202-0725 system is at least one order of magnitude lower than the previous SFR derived from infrared tracers, while both estimates are in good agreement for Lyα1. The lower limits to the internal extinction in these two Lyman-alpha emitters are 0.6 mag and 1.3 mag, respectively. No evidence for [O ii] emission associated with Lyα1 is identified in our data, implying that residuals of the K-band sky emission lines after subtraction in medium-band imaging data could provide the adequate flux.

  7. Ionization and Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Murray, S. D.; Burkert, A.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a set of high resolution simulations on the impact of the UV-radiation of massive stars on the turbulent interstellar medium with the tree-SPH code iVINE. This parameter study includes different levels and driving scales of the turbulence, different ionizing flux as well as different temperatures and densities of the cold gas. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures adjacent to the HII region. From the simulations we are able to derive a criterion for the formation of pillar-like structures and thus the formation of cores and stars. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly on the tips of the structures. We also derive column densities and velocity profiles of our simulations and find these to be in very good agreement with the observations of trunks and cores. In addition, we investigate the further evolution of the pillars once the massive star explodes. This leads to a supernova triggered scenario for the formation of our Solar System.

  8. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  9. Star formation inside a galactic outflow.

    PubMed

    Maiolino, R; Russell, H R; Fabian, A C; Carniani, S; Gallagher, R; Cazzoli, S; Arribas, S; Belfiore, F; Bellocchi, E; Colina, L; Cresci, G; Ishibashi, W; Marconi, A; Mannucci, F; Oliva, E; Sturm, E

    2017-04-13

    Recent observations have revealed massive galactic molecular outflows that may have the physical conditions (high gas densities) required to form stars. Indeed, several recent models predict that such massive outflows may ignite star formation within the outflow itself. This star-formation mode, in which stars form with high radial velocities, could contribute to the morphological evolution of galaxies, to the evolution in size and velocity dispersion of the spheroidal component of galaxies, and would contribute to the population of high-velocity stars, which could even escape the galaxy. Such star formation could provide in situ chemical enrichment of the circumgalactic and intergalactic medium (through supernova explosions of young stars on large orbits), and some models also predict it to contribute substantially to the star-formation rate observed in distant galaxies. Although there exists observational evidence for star formation triggered by outflows or jets into their host galaxy, as a consequence of gas compression, evidence for star formation occurring within galactic outflows is still missing. Here we report spectroscopic observations that unambiguously reveal star formation occurring in a galactic outflow at a redshift of 0.0448. The inferred star-formation rate in the outflow is larger than 15 solar masses per year. Star formation may also be occurring in other galactic outflows, but may have been missed by previous observations owing to the lack of adequate diagnostics.

  10. Star formation law in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The Schmidt law (SF law) in the Milky Way was investigated using 3D distribution maps of H II regions and H I and molecular (H2) gases with spatial resolutions of ˜1 kpc in the Galactic plane and a few tens of pc in the vertical direction. H II regions were shown to be distributed in a star-forming (SF) disk with nearly constant vertical full thickness 92 pc in spatial coincidence with the molecular gas disk. The vertically averaged volume star formation rate (SFR) ρSFR in the SF disk is related to the surface SFR ΣSFR by ρSFR/[M⊙ yr-1 kpc-3] = 9.26 × ΣSFR/[M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2]. The SF law fitted by a single power law of gas density in the form of Σ _SFR∝ ρ _SFR∝ ρ _gas^α and ∝ Σ _gas^β showed indices of α =0.78 ± 0.05 for ρ _H_2 and 2.15 ± 0.08 for ρtotal, and β = 1.14 ± 0.23 for Σtotal, where ρ and Σ denote volume and surface densities, respectively. The star formation rate is shown to be directly related to the molecular gas, but indirectly to H I and total gas densities. The dependence of the SF law on the gaseous phase is explained by the phase transition theory between H I and H2.

  11. Star Formation Regions in LDN 1667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2015-09-01

    A group of three star formation regions in the dark cloud LDN 1667 is examined. All three of these regions contain Trapezium type systems. 12C(1-0) observations are made of the part of the molecular cloud LDN 1667 associated with one of the star formation regions. Three molecular clouds were detected, one of which (the main cloud) has a red and a blue outflow. Three stars from the star formation regions are found to have annular nebulae and one star has a conical nebula. The dark cloud LDN 1667 is associated with a radial system of dark globules which is formed by the star HD 57061.

  12. LINE PROFILES OF CORES WITHIN CLUSTERS. II. SIGNATURES OF DYNAMICAL COLLAPSE DURING HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Rowan J.; Shetty, Rahul; Klessen, Ralf S.; Beuther, Henrik; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2013-07-01

    Observations of atomic or molecular lines can provide important information about the physical state of star-forming regions. In order to investigate the line profiles from dynamical collapsing massive star-forming regions (MSFRs), we model the emission from hydrodynamic simulations of a collapsing cloud in the absence of outflows. By performing radiative transfer calculations, we compute the optically thick HCO{sup +} and optically thin N{sub 2}H{sup +} line profiles from two collapsing regions at different epochs. Due to large-scale collapse, the MSFRs have large velocity gradients, reaching up to 20 km s{sup -1} pc{sup -1} across the central core. The optically thin lines typically contain multiple velocity components resulting from the superposition of numerous density peaks along the line of sight. The optically thick lines are only marginally shifted to the blue side of the optically thin line profiles, and frequently do not have a central depression in their profiles due to self-absorption. As the regions evolve, the lines become brighter and the optically thick lines become broader. The lower-order HCO{sup +} (1-0) transitions are better indicators of collapse than the higher-order (4-3) transitions. We also investigate how the beam sizes affect profile shapes. Smaller beams lead to brighter and narrower lines that are more skewed to the blue in HCO{sup +} relative to the true core velocity, but show multiple components in N{sub 2}H{sup +}. High-resolution observations (e.g., with Atacama Large Millimeter Array) can test these predictions and provide insights into the nature of MSFRs.

  13. Star Formation in Henize 206

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    explosion millions of years ago. The shock waves from that explosion impacted a cloud of nearby hydrogen gas, compressed it, and started a new generation of star formation. The death of one star led to the birth of many new stars. This is particularly evident in the MIPS inset, where the 24-micron emission peaks correspond to newly formed stars. The ultraviolet and visible-light photons from the new stars are absorbed by surrounding dust and re-radiated at longer infrared wavelengths, where it is detected by Spitzer.

    This emission nebula was cataloged by Karl Henize (HEN-eyes) while spending 1948-1951 in South Africa doing research for his Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Michigan. Henize later became a NASA astronaut and, at age 59, became the oldest rookie to fly on the Space Shuttle during an eight-day flight of the Challenger in 1985. He died just short of his 67th birthday in 1993 while attempting to climb the north face of Mount Everest, the world's highest peak.

  14. MASSIVE STAR FORMATION IN NGC 2074

    SciTech Connect

    Fleener, Christine E.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, Robert A.; Payne, James T.; Chen, C.-H. Rosie

    2010-01-15

    Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have revealed a large population of young stellar objects (YSOs), but complementary high-resolution images in the optical or near-IR wavelengths are still needed to resolve the multiplicity and immediate environments of the YSOs. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged the star-forming region NGC 2074 in the LMC during its 100,000th orbit, providing an opportunity to more closely examine the YSOs and their environments in this region. We have studied the 10 YSO candidates identified from Spitzer observations, confirming their nature and determining their physical parameters by modeling their spectral energy distributions. The majority of the YSOs and central stars of ultracompact H II regions in NGC 2074 have masses consistent with spectral types of early B to late O. The co-existence of massive early-type O stars and the less massive YSOs indicates that their formation may have started at a similar time, a few 10{sup 5} yr ago. NGC 2074 provides an opportunity to study the evolution of massive stars at their infancy.

  15. On the Formation of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaper, L.; Ellerbroek, L.; Ochsendorf, B.; Bik, A.

    2012-12-01

    The birth process and (early) evolution of massive stars is still poorly understood. Heavy extinction hides their birthplaces from view and the short formation timescale limits the sample of objects to be studied. So far, our physical knowledge of massive YSOs has been derived from near-IR imaging and spectroscopy, revealing populations of young OB-type stars, some still surrounded by a disk, others apparently ‘normal’ main sequence stars powering H II regions. The most important spectral features of OB-type stars are, however, located in the UV and optical range. With the new optical/near-infrared spectrograph X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope it is possible to extend the spectral coverage of these massive YSOs into the optical range. Our first results are very promising: the discovery of a jet demonstrates that one of our mYSOs is still actively accreting. Furthermore, the first firm spectral classification of another mYSO results in the precise location on a pre-main-sequence track.

  16. STAR FORMATION IN 30 DORADUS

    SciTech Connect

    De Marchi, Guido; Spezzi, Loredana; Sirianni, Marco; Andersen, Morten; Paresce, Francesco; Panagia, Nino; Mutchler, Max; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard; Beccari, Giacomo; Balick, Bruce; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Marcella Carollo, C.; Disney, Michael J.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.

    2011-09-20

    Using observations obtained with the Wide-Field Camera 3 on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have studied the properties of the stellar populations in the central regions of 30 Dor in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The observations clearly reveal the presence of considerable differential extinction across the field. We characterize and quantify this effect using young massive main-sequence stars to derive a statistical reddening correction for most objects in the field. We then search for pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars by looking for objects with a strong (>4{sigma}) H{alpha} excess emission and find about 1150 of them over the entire field. Comparison of their location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram with theoretical PMS evolutionary tracks for the appropriate metallicity reveals that about one-third of these objects are younger than {approx}4 Myr, compatible with the age of the massive stars in the central ionizing cluster R 136, whereas the rest have ages up to {approx}30 Myr, with a median age of {approx}12 Myr. This indicates that star formation has proceeded over an extended period of time, although we cannot discriminate between an extended episode and a series of short and frequent bursts that are not resolved in time. While the younger PMS population preferentially occupies the central regions of the cluster, older PMS objects are more uniformly distributed across the field and are remarkably few at the very center of the cluster. We attribute this latter effect to photo-evaporation of the older circumstellar disks caused by the massive ionizing members of R 136.

  17. A possible formation channel for blue hook stars in globular cluster - II. Effects of metallicity, mass ratio, tidal enhancement efficiency and helium abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenxin; Zhao, Gang; Zeng, Aihua; Shen, Lihua; Lan, Zhongjian; Jiang, Dengkai; Han, Zhanwen

    2016-12-01

    Employing tidally enhanced stellar wind, we studied in binaries the effects of metallicity, mass ratio of primary to secondary, tidal enhancement efficiency and helium abundance on the formation of blue hook (BHk) stars in globular clusters (GCs). A total of 28 sets of binary models combined with different input parameters are studied. For each set of binary model, we presented a range of initial orbital periods that is needed to produce BHk stars in binaries. All the binary models could produce BHk stars within different range of initial orbital periods. We also compared our results with the observation in the Teff-logg diagram of GC NGC 2808 and ω Cen. Most of the BHk stars in these two GCs locate well in the region predicted by our theoretical models, especially when C/N-enhanced model atmospheres are considered. We found that mass ratio of primary to secondary and tidal enhancement efficiency have little effects on the formation of BHk stars in binaries, while metallicity and helium abundance would play important roles, especially for helium abundance. Specifically, with helium abundance increasing in binary models, the space range of initial orbital periods needed to produce BHk stars becomes obviously wider, regardless of other input parameters adopted. Our results were discussed with recent observations and other theoretical models.

  18. Stellar Dynamical Processes in Massive Star and Star Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jonathan; Eyer, L.

    2009-01-01

    We study how high precision astrometric measurements by SIM and GAIA of stars involved in dynamical ejection events from star clusters can constrain theories of massive star and star cluster formation. We focus on the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). First, we investigate the scientific potential associated with an accurate measurement of the distance and proper motion of Theta 1 Ori C, which is the most massive star in the cluster and was recently involved (about 4000 years ago) in the ejection of a B star: the Becklin-Neugebauer (BN) star. The motion of the BN star has taken it close to a massive protostar, known as source I, where it appears to have influenced the accretion and outflow activity, most likely by a tidal interaction with the accretion disk. An accurate proper motion measurement of Theta 1 Ori C will constrain BN's initial motion, allowing us to search for deflections caused by the gravitational potential of the massive protostar. Second, we search the Hipparcos catalog for candidate runaway stars, i.e. that have been dynamically ejected from the cluster over the course of the last several Myr. SIM and GAIA observations of these stars will be needed to confirm their origin from the ONC. The results of this study will constrain the star cluster formation timescale and the statistics of the population of ejected stars. JCT acknowledges support from from NSF CAREER grant AST-0645412 and a grant from NASA for SIM Science Studies.

  19. Infrared observations of OB star formation in NGC 6334

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Gatley, I.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared photometry and maps from 2 to 100 microns are presented for three of the principal far infrared sources in NGC 6334. Each region is powered by two or more very young stars. The distribution of dust and ionized gas is probably strongly affected by the presence of the embedded stars; one of the sources is a blister H II region, another has a bipolar structure, and the third exhibits asymmetric temperature structure. The presence of protostellar objects throughout the region suggests that star formation has occurred nearly simultaneously in the whole molecular cloud rather than having been triggered sequentially from within. Previously announced in STAR as N83-16263

  20. Nonuniversal star formation efficiency in turbulent ISM

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-29

    Here, we present a study of a star formation prescription in which star formation efficiency depends on local gas density and turbulent velocity dispersion, as suggested by direct simulations of SF in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We test the model using a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-sized galaxy with a self-consistent treatment of turbulence on unresolved scales. We show that this prescription predicts a wide variation of local star formation efficiency per free-fall time, $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff} \\sim 0.1 - 10\\%$, and gas depletion time, $t_{\\rm dep} \\sim 0.1 - 10$ Gyr. In addition, it predicts an effective density threshold for star formation due to suppression of $\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$ in warm diffuse gas stabilized by thermal pressure. We show that the model predicts star formation rates in agreement with observations from the scales of individual star-forming regions to the kiloparsec scales. This agreement is non-trivial, as the model was not tuned in any way and the predicted star formation rates on all scales are determined by the distribution of the GMC-scale densities and turbulent velocities $\\sigma$ in the cold gas within the galaxy, which is shaped by galactic dynamics. The broad agreement of the star formation prescription calibrated in the GMC-scale simulations with observations, both gives credence to such simulations and promises to put star formation modeling in galaxy formation simulations on a much firmer theoretical footing.

  1. Star formation sustained by gas accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Almeida, Jorge; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Muñoz-Tuñón, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy

    2014-07-01

    Numerical simulations predict that metal-poor gas accretion from the cosmic web fuels the formation of disk galaxies. This paper discusses how cosmic gas accretion controls star formation, and summarizes the physical properties expected for the cosmic gas accreted by galaxies. The paper also collects observational evidence for gas accretion sustaining star formation. It reviews evidence inferred from neutral and ionized hydrogen, as well as from stars. A number of properties characterizing large samples of star-forming galaxies can be explained by metal-poor gas accretion, in particular, the relationship among stellar mass, metallicity, and star-formation rate (the so-called fundamental metallicity relationship). They are put forward and analyzed. Theory predicts gas accretion to be particularly important at high redshift, so indications based on distant objects are reviewed, including the global star-formation history of the universe, and the gas around galaxies as inferred from absorption features in the spectra of background sources.

  2. Molecular cloud evolution and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1985-01-01

    The present state of knowledge of the relationship between molecular clouds and young stars is reviewed. The determination of physical parameters from molecular line observations is summarized, and evidence for fragmentation of molecular clouds is discussed. Hierarchical fragmentation is reviewed, minimum fragment scales are derived, and the stability against fragmentation of both spherically and anisotropically collapsing clouds is discussed. Observational evidence for high-velocity flows in clouds is summarized, and the effects of winds from pre-main sequence stars on molecular gas are discussed. The triggering of cloud collapse by enhanced pressure is addressed, as is the formation of dense shells by spherical outflows and their subsequent breakup. A model for low-mass star formation is presented, and constraints on star formation from the initial mass function are examined. The properties of giant molecular clouds and massive star formation are described. The implications of magnetic fields for cloud evolution and star formation are addressed.

  3. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  4. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS PAIRS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. II. EVIDENCE FOR TIDALLY ENHANCED STAR FORMATION AND BLACK HOLE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xin; Shen Yue; Strauss, Michael A.

    2012-01-20

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are occasionally seen in pairs, suggesting that tidal encounters are responsible for the accretion of material by both central supermassive black holes (BHs). In Paper I of this series, we selected a sample of AGN pairs with projected separations r{sub p} < 100 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc and velocity offsets <600 km s{sup -1} from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and quantified their frequency. In this paper, we address the BH accretion and recent star formation properties in their host galaxies. AGN pairs experience stronger BH accretion, as measured by their [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosities (corrected for contribution from star formation) and Eddington ratios, than do control samples of single AGNs matched in redshift and host-galaxy stellar mass. Their host galaxies have stronger post-starburst activity and younger mean stellar ages, as indicated by stronger H{delta} absorption and smaller 4000 A break in their spectra. The BH accretion and recent star formation in the host galaxies both increase with decreasing projected separation in AGN pairs, for r{sub p} {approx}< 10-30 h{sup -1}{sub 70} kpc. The intensity of BH accretion, the post-starburst strength, and the mean stellar ages are correlated between the two AGNs in a pair. The luminosities and Eddington ratios of AGN pairs are correlated with recent star formation in their host galaxies, with a scaling relation consistent with that observed in single AGNs. Our results suggest that galaxy tidal interactions enhance both BH accretion and host-galaxy star formation in close AGN pairs, even though the majority of low-redshift AGNs are not coincident with on-going interactions.

  5. Hierarchical Star Formation Across Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Most stars form in clusters. This fact has emerged from the finding that "embedded clusters account for the 70 - 90% fraction of all stars formed in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs)." While this is the case at scales of few 10 parsecs, typical for GMCs, a look at star-forming galaxies in the Local Group (LG) shows significant populations of enormous loose complexes of early-type stars extending at scales from few 100 to few 1000 parsecs. The fact that these stellar complexes host extremely large numbers of loosely distributed massive blue stars implies either that stars form also in an unbound fashion or they are immediately dislocated from their original compact birthplaces or both. The Legacy Extra-Galactic UV Survey (LEGUS) has produced remarkable collections of resolved early-type stars in 50 star-forming LG galaxies, suited for testing ideas about recent star formation. I will present results from our ongoing project on star formation across LEGUS disk galaxies. We characterize the global clustering behavior of the massive young stars in order to understand the morphology of star formation over galactic scales. This morphology appears to be self-similar with fractal dimensions comparable to those of the molecular interstellar medium, apparently driven by large-scale turbulence. Our clustering analysis reveals compact stellar systems nested in larger looser concentrations, which themselves are the dense parts of unbound complexes and super-structures, giving evidence of hierarchical star formation up to galactic scales. We investigate the structural and star formation parameters demographics of the star-forming complexes revealed at various levels of compactness. I will discuss the outcome of our correlation and regression analyses on these parameters in an attempt to understand the link between galactic disk dynamics and morphological structure in spiral and ring galaxies of the local universe.

  6. A simple theory of bimodal star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, J.

    1987-01-01

    A model of bimodal star formation is presented, wherein massive stars form in giant molecular clouds (GNC), at a rate regulated by supernovae energy feedback through the interstellar medium, the heat input also ensuring that the initial mass function (IMF) remains skewed towards massive stars. The low mass stars form at a constant rate. The formation of the GMC is governed by the dynamics of the host galaxy through the rotation curve and potential perturbations such as a spiral density wave. The characteristic masses, relative normalizations, and rates of formation of the massive and low mass modes of star formation may be tightly constrained by the requirements of the chemical evolution in the Solar Neighborhood. Good fits were obtained for the age metallicity relation and the metallicity structure of thin disk and spheroid stars only for a narrow range of these parameters.

  7. CARMA Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies (STING). II. Molecular Gas Star Formation Law and Depletion Time across the Blue Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A.; Ott, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({\\Sigma _H_2}\\gtrsim 20 M ⊙ pc-2) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N mol ~ 0.96 ± 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, τmol dep ~ 2.30 ± 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between τmol dep and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M * ~ 109.7-1011.5 M ⊙). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H2 conversion factor.

  8. On the impact of empirical and theoretical star formation laws on galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia Del P.; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.; Bower, Richard G.; Benson, Andrew J.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the consequences of applying different star formation laws in the galaxy formation model GALFORM. Three broad star formation laws are implemented: the empirical relations of Kennicutt and Schmidt and Blitz & Rosolowsky and the theoretical model of Krumholz, McKee & Tumlinson. These laws have no free parameters once calibrated against observations of the star formation rate (SFR) and gas surface density in nearby galaxies. We start from published models, and investigate which observables are sensitive to a change in the star formation law, without altering any other model parameters. We show that changing the star formation law (i) does not significantly affect either the star formation history of the universe or the galaxy luminosity functions in the optical and near-infrared, due to an effective balance between the quiescent and burst star formation modes, (ii) greatly affects the cold gas contents of galaxies and (iii) changes the location of galaxies in the SFR versus stellar mass plane, so that a second sequence of 'passive' galaxies arises, in addition to the known 'active' sequence. We show that this plane can be used to discriminate between the star formation laws.

  9. Triggered Star Formation Surrounding Wolf-Rayet Star HD 211853

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie; Wu, Yuefang; Zhang, Huawei; Qin, Sheng-Li

    2012-05-01

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 103 cm-3 and kinematic temperature ~20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core "A," which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the "collect and collapse" process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core "A" seem to be affected by the "radiation-driven implosion" process.

  10. Star-forming galaxy models: Blending star formation into TREESPH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihos, J. Christopher; Hernquist, Lars

    1994-01-01

    We have incorporated star-formation algorithms into a hybrid N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (TREESPH) in order to describe the star forming properties of disk galaxies over timescales of a few billion years. The models employ a Schmidt law of index n approximately 1.5 to calculate star-formation rates, and explicitly include the energy and metallicity feedback into the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Modeling the newly formed stellar population is achieved through the use of hybrid SPH/young star particles which gradually convert from gaseous to collisionless particles, avoiding the computational difficulties involved in creating new particles. The models are shown to reproduce well the star-forming properties of disk galaxies, such as the morphology, rate of star formation, and evolution of the global star-formation rate and disk gas content. As an example of the technique, we model an encounter between a disk galaxy and a small companion which gives rise to a ring galaxy reminiscent of the Cartwheel (AM 0035-35). The primary galaxy in this encounter experiences two phases of star forming activity: an initial period during the expansion of the ring, and a delayed phase as shocked material in the ring falls back into the central regions.

  11. Insights into high mass star formation from methanol maser observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Hontas Freeman

    2013-06-01

    We present high angular resolution data on Class I and Class II methanol masers, together with other tracers of star formation like H2O masers, ultracompact (UC) ionized hydrogen (H II) regions, and 4.5 um infrared sources, taken from the literature. The aim is to study what these data tell us about the process of high mass star formation; in particular, whether disk-outflow systems are compatible with the morphology exhibited by Class I and Class II methanol masers. Stars form in the dense cores inside molecular clouds, and while the process of the formation of stars like our Sun is reasonably well understood, details of the formation of stars with masses eight times that of our Sun or greater, the so-called high mass stars, remain a mystery. Being compact and bright sources, masers provide an excellent way to observe high mass star forming regions. In particular, Class II methanol masers are found exclusively in high mass star forming regions. Based on the positions of the Class I and II methanol and H2O masers, UCHII regions and 4.5 um infrared sources, and the center velocities (vLSR) of the Class I methanol and H2O masers, compared to the vLSR of the Class II methanol masers, we propose three disk-outflow models that may be traced by methanol masers. In all three models, we have located the Class II methanol maser near the protostar, and the Class I methanol maser in the outflow, as is known from observations during the last twenty years. In our first model, the H2O masers trace the linear extent of the outflow. In our second model, the H2O masers are located in a circumstellar disk. In our third model, the H2O masers are located in one or more outflows near the terminating shock where the outflow impacts the ambient interstellar medium. Together, these models reiterate the utility of coordinated high angular resolution observations of high mass star forming regions in maser lines and associated star formation tracers.

  12. Sequentially triggered star formation in OB associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preibisch, Thomas; Zinnecker, Hans

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in galactic and extragalactic OB associations. We will first review in detail the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have provided comprehensive information on the stellar content and the ages of the different OB subgroups. These data have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history of the association in some detail and provided important insight into the activity in the rho Oph and Lupus dark clouds, and with the origin of several young stellar groups in the southern sky. After discussing evidence for triggered star formation in and around various other Galactic OB associations (e.g. Ori OB1, Per OB2) we will compare the observational results with recent models of rapid star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium (cf. Briceno et al. chapter in Protostars and Planets V, in press).

  13. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION IN THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Waller, William H.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Patten, Brian M.; Tamura, Motohide E-mail: william.waller@tufts.edu E-mail: bpatten@nsf.gov

    2009-03-15

    At {approx} 400 pc, the Horsehead Nebula (B33) is the closest radiatively sculpted pillar to the Sun, but the state and extent of star formation in this structure is not well understood. We present deep near-infrared (IRSF/SIRIUS JHK {sub S}) and mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) observations of the Horsehead Nebula to characterize the star-forming properties of this region and to assess the likelihood of triggered star formation. Infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are used to identify young stars based on infrared excess emission and positions to the right of the zero-age main sequence, respectively. Of the 45 sources detected at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, three bona fide and five candidate young stars are identified in this 7' x 7' region. Two bona fide young stars have flat infrared spectral energy distributions and are located at the western irradiated tip of the pillar. The spatial coincidence of the protostars at the leading edge of this elephant trunk is consistent with the radiation-driven implosion model of triggered star formation. There is no evidence, however, for sequential star formation within the immediate {approx} 1.'5 (0.17 pc) region from the cloud/H II region interface.

  14. An Infrared Census of Star Formation in the Horsehead Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Waller, William H.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Patten, Brian M.; Tamura, Motohide

    2009-03-01

    At ~ 400 pc, the Horsehead Nebula (B33) is the closest radiatively sculpted pillar to the Sun, but the state and extent of star formation in this structure is not well understood. We present deep near-infrared (IRSF/SIRIUS JHK S) and mid-infrared (Spitzer/IRAC) observations of the Horsehead Nebula to characterize the star-forming properties of this region and to assess the likelihood of triggered star formation. Infrared color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are used to identify young stars based on infrared excess emission and positions to the right of the zero-age main sequence, respectively. Of the 45 sources detected at both near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, three bona fide and five candidate young stars are identified in this 7' × 7' region. Two bona fide young stars have flat infrared spectral energy distributions and are located at the western irradiated tip of the pillar. The spatial coincidence of the protostars at the leading edge of this elephant trunk is consistent with the radiation-driven implosion model of triggered star formation. There is no evidence, however, for sequential star formation within the immediate ~ 1farcm5 (0.17 pc) region from the cloud/H II region interface.

  15. Coronet: A Star-Formation Neighbor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    While perhaps not quite as well known as its star-formation cousin Orion, the Corona Australis region (containing, at its heart, the Coronet cluster) is one of the nearest and most active regions of ongoing star formation. At only about 420 light-years away, the Coronet is over three times closer than the Orion nebula is to Earth. The Coronet contains a loose cluster of a few dozen young stars with a wide range of masses and at various stages of evolution, giving astronomers an opportunity to observe embryonic stars simultaneously in several wavelengths.

    This composite image shows the Coronet in X-rays from Chandra (purple) and infrared from Spitzer (orange, green, and cyan). The Spitzer data show young stars plus diffuse emission from dust. Due to the host of young stars in different life stages in the Coronet, astronomers can use these data to pinpoint details of how the youngest stars evolve.

  16. Filamentary star formation in NGC 1275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, R. E. A.; Ryon, J. E.; Gallagher, J. S.; Kotulla, R.; O'Connell, R. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Conselice, C. J.; Hicks, A.; Rosario, D.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-10-01

    We examine the star formation in the outer halo of NGC 1275, the central galaxy in the Perseus cluster (Abell 426), using far-ultraviolet and optical images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We have identified a population of very young, compact star clusters with typical ages of a few Myr. The star clusters are organized on multiple kiloparsec scales. Many of these star clusters are associated with `streaks' of young stars, the combination of which has a cometary appearance. We perform photometry on the star clusters and diffuse stellar streaks, and fit their spectral energy distributions to obtain ages and masses. These young stellar populations appear to be normal in terms of their masses, luminosities and cluster formation efficiency; <10 per cent of the young stellar mass is located in star clusters. Our data suggest star formation is associated with the evolution of some of the giant gas filaments in NGC 1275 that become gravitationally unstable on reaching and possibly stalling in the outer galaxy. The stellar streaks then could represent stars moving on ballistic orbits in the potential well of the galaxy cluster. We propose a model where star-forming filaments, switched on ˜50 Myr ago and are currently feeding the growth of the NGC 1275 stellar halo at a rate of ≈-2 to 3 M⊙ yr-1. This type of process may also build stellar haloes and form isolated star clusters in the outskirts of youthful galaxies.

  17. StarFISH: For Inferring Star-formation Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jason; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2012-04-01

    StarFISH is a suite of programs designed to determine the star formation history (SFH) of a stellar population, given multicolor stellar photometry and a library of theoretical isochrones. It constructs a library of synthetic color-magnitude diagrams from the isochrones, which includes the effects of extinction, photometric errors and completeness, and binarity. A minimization routine is then used to determine the linear combination of synthetic CMDs that best matches the observed photometry. The set of amplitudes modulating each synthetic CMD describes the star formation history of the observed stellar population.

  18. RADIATION-HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF ORION-LIKE STAR CLUSTERS. II. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION FROM WINDS, TURBULENCE, AND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.; McKee, Christopher F.

    2012-07-20

    We report a series of simulations of the formation of a star cluster similar to the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), including both radiative transfer and protostellar outflows, and starting from both smooth and self-consistently turbulent initial conditions. Each simulation forms >150 stars and brown dwarfs, yielding a stellar mass distribution that ranges from <0.1 M{sub Sun} to >10 M{sub Sun }. We show that a simulation that begins with self-consistently turbulent density and velocity fields embedded in a larger turbulent volume, and that includes protostellar outflows, produces an initial mass function (IMF) that is consistent both with that of the ONC and the Galactic field, at least within the statistical power provided by the number of stars formed in our simulations. This is the first simulation published to date that reproduces the observed IMF in a cluster large enough to contain massive stars, and where the peak of the mass function is determined by a fully self-consistent calculation of gas thermodynamics rather than a hand-imposed equation of state. This simulation also produces a star formation rate that, while still somewhat too high, is much closer to observed values than if we omit either the larger turbulent volume or the outflows. Moreover, we show that the combination of outflows, self-consistently turbulent initial conditions, and turbulence continually fed by motions on scales larger than that of the protocluster yields an IMF that is in agreement with observations and invariant with time, resolving the 'overheating' problem in which simulations without these features have an IMF peak that shifts to progressively higher masses over time as more and more of the gas is heated, inconsistent with the observed invariance of the IMF. The simulation that matches the observed IMF also qualitatively reproduces the observed trend of stellar multiplicity strongly increasing with mass. We show that this simulation produces massive stars from distinct massive

  19. Star formation in the Magellanic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of their proximity, the Magellanic Clouds provide the opportunity to conduct a detailed study of the history and current state of star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies. There is considerable evidence that star formation in the Clouds was and is proceeding in a manner different from that found in a typical well-ordered spiral galaxy. Star formation in both Clouds appears to have undergone a number of relatively intense bursts. There exist a number of similarities and differences in the current state of star formation in the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way. Examination of Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) sources with ground based telescopes allows identification of highly evolved massive stars with circumstellar shells as well as several types of compact emission line objects.

  20. Star formation at low rates - the impact of lacking massive stars on stellar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Gerhard; Steyrleithner, Patrick; Recchi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Due to their low masses dwarf galaxies experience low star-formation rates resulting in stellar cluster masses insufficient to fill the initial mass function (IMF) to the uppermost mass. Numerical simulations usually do not account for the completeness of the IMF, but treat a filed IMF by numbers, masses, and stellar feedback by fractions. To ensure that only entire stars are formed, we consider an IMF filled from the lower-mass regime and truncated where at least one entire massive star is formed. By 3D simulations we investigate the effects of two possible IMFs on the evolution of dwarf galaxies: filled vs. truncated IMF. For the truncated IMF the star-formation self-regulation is suppressed, while the energy release by typeII supernovae is larger, both compared to the filled IMF. Moreover, the abundance ratios of particular elements yielded from massive and intermediate-mass stars differ significantly between the two IMF distributions.

  1. Fragmentation in massive star formation.

    PubMed

    Beuther, Henrik; Schilke, Peter

    2004-02-20

    Studies of evolved massive stars indicate that they form in a clustered mode. During the earliest evolutionary stages, these regions are embedded within their natal cores. Here we present high-spatial-resolution interferometric dust continuum observations disentangling the cluster-like structure of a young massive star-forming region. The derived protocluster mass distribution is consistent with the stellar initial mass function. Thus, fragmentation of the initial massive cores may determine the initial mass function and the masses of the final stars. This implies that stars of all masses can form via accretion processes, and coalescence of intermediate-mass protostars appears not to be necessary.

  2. Infrared observations of OB star formation in NGC 6334

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, P. M.; Gatley, I.

    1982-01-01

    Infrared photometry and maps from 2 to 100 microns are presented for three of the principal far infrared sources in NGC 6334. Each region is powered by two or more very young stars. The distribution of dust and ionized gas is probably strongly affected by the presence of the embedded stars; one of the sources is a blister H II region, another has a bipolar structure, and the third exhibits asymmetric temperature structure. The presence of protostellar objects throughout the region suggests that star formation has occurred nearly simultaneously in the whole molecular cloud rather than having been triggered sequentially from within.

  3. Nonuniversal star formation efficiency in turbulent ISM

    DOE PAGES

    Semenov, Vadim A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-07-29

    Here, we present a study of a star formation prescription in which star formation efficiency depends on local gas density and turbulent velocity dispersion, as suggested by direct simulations of SF in turbulent giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We test the model using a simulation of an isolated Milky Way-sized galaxy with a self-consistent treatment of turbulence on unresolved scales. We show that this prescription predicts a wide variation of local star formation efficiency per free-fall time,more » $$\\epsilon_{\\rm ff} \\sim 0.1 - 10\\%$$, and gas depletion time, $$t_{\\rm dep} \\sim 0.1 - 10$$ Gyr. In addition, it predicts an effective density threshold for star formation due to suppression of $$\\epsilon_{\\rm ff}$$ in warm diffuse gas stabilized by thermal pressure. We show that the model predicts star formation rates in agreement with observations from the scales of individual star-forming regions to the kiloparsec scales. This agreement is non-trivial, as the model was not tuned in any way and the predicted star formation rates on all scales are determined by the distribution of the GMC-scale densities and turbulent velocities $$\\sigma$$ in the cold gas within the galaxy, which is shaped by galactic dynamics. The broad agreement of the star formation prescription calibrated in the GMC-scale simulations with observations, both gives credence to such simulations and promises to put star formation modeling in galaxy formation simulations on a much firmer theoretical footing.« less

  4. Resolving the Star Formation in Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladders, Michael

    2012-10-01

    The fundamental unit of star formation in the Universe is neither a star, nor a galaxy, but a star forming region with a typical scale of at most 100s of parsecs. Even at full HST resolution, these regions are unresolved beyond rather modest redshifts. HST has - and continues to be - heavily invested in studies of distant galaxies, yet has been fundamentally unable to study the relevant physical scales of star formation in the distant Universe. We propose here to overcome this resolution barrier by imaging a total of 73 strongly lensed galaxies at z~1-3 discovered in the SDSS. The combination of the exquisite image quality of HST with the magnification boost due to strong lensing will allow robust measurements of the sizes, luminosities, star formation rates and stellar populations of individual star-forming clumps in these galaxies, providing the first ever comprehensive data on star formation at its fundamental scale over the entire peak of the star formation history in the Universe. The proposed observations build on the extensive legacy of HST deep fields - including the ongoing MCT CANDELS program. A number of ancillary science goals - not least amongst them the study of the lensing systems proper - are also enabled by the proposed data.

  5. Star Formation in a Crossing Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2000-02-01

    Observations suggest that star formation occurs in only one or two crossing times for a range of scales spanning a factor of ~1000. These observations include (1) measurements of embedded cluster ages in comparison with the cloud core dynamical times, (2) measurements of the age difference versus separation for clusters in the Large Magellanic Clouds in comparison with the crossing time versus size correlation for molecular clouds, (3) the hierarchical structure of embedded young clusters, and (4) the high fraction of dense clouds that contain star formation. Such a short overall timescale for star formation implies that sources of turbulent energy or internal feedback are not required to explain or extend cloud lifetimes and that star and protostar interactions cannot be important for the stellar initial mass function. Stars appear in a cloud as if they freeze out of the gas, preserving the turbulent-driven gas structure in their birth locations. The Galaxy-wide star formation rate avoids the Zuckerman-Evans catastrophe, which has long been a concern for molecular clouds that evolve this quickly, because the multifractal structure of interstellar gas ensures that only a small fraction of the mass is able to form stars. Star formation on large scales operates more slowly than on small scales, but in most cases the whole process is over in only a few dynamical times.

  6. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). II. MOLECULAR GAS STAR FORMATION LAW AND DEPLETION TIME ACROSS THE BLUE SEQUENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Xue Rui; Wong, Tony; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Bigiel, Frank; Rosolowsky, Erik; Blitz, Leo; West, Andrew A.; Ott, Juergen

    2012-02-01

    We present an analysis of the relationship between molecular gas and current star formation rate surface density at sub-kiloparsec and kiloparsec scales in a sample of 14 nearby star-forming galaxies. Measuring the relationship in the bright, high molecular gas surface density ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}>20 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2}) regions of the disks to minimize the contribution from diffuse extended emission, we find an approximately linear relation between molecular gas and star formation rate surface density, N{sub mol} {approx} 0.96 {+-} 0.16, with a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} {approx} 2.30 {+-} 1.32 Gyr. We show that in the molecular regions of our galaxies there are no clear correlations between {tau}{sup mol}{sub dep} and the free-fall and effective Jeans dynamical times throughout the sample. We do not find strong trends in the power-law index of the spatially resolved molecular gas star formation law or the molecular gas depletion time across the range of galactic stellar masses sampled (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 9.7}-10{sup 11.5} M{sub Sun }). There is a trend, however, in global measurements that is particularly marked for low-mass galaxies. We suggest that this trend is probably due to the low surface brightness CO J = 1-0, and it is likely associated with changes in CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor.

  7. The Center for Star Formation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D.; Bell, K. R.; Laughlin, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Center for Star Formation Studies, a consortium of scientists from the Space Science Division at Ames and the Astronomy Departments of the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Cruz, conducts a coordinated program of theoretical research on star and planet formation. Under the directorship of D. Hollenbach (Ames), the Center supports postdoctoral fellows, senior visitors, and students; meets regularly at Ames to exchange ideas and to present informal seminars on current research; hosts visits of outside scientists; and conducts a week-long workshop on selected aspects of star and planet formation each summer.

  8. Computational and theoretical investigations of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Mark Reuben

    I investigate three related questions in the theory of star formation. First, I consider the physical mechanism of massive star formation. Massive stars reach the main sequence while still accreting from their natal clouds, leading to a huge radiation pressure force on dust grains suspended in the incoming gas. Early calculations found that this limits stellar masses to [Special characters omitted.] 20--40 [Special characters omitted.] , far smaller than the most massive stars observed. I demonstrate two new mechanisms by which accretion can continue despite radiation pressure. First, radiation holding up a massive infalling envelope is subject to Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which forces the accreting gas into optically thick filaments that are shielded from radiation and channel gas to the star. Second, massive protostars have powerful outflows that punch optically thin cavities through the envelope. These channel radiation away from the accreting gas, greatly reducing the radiation pressure force it experiences. Second, I argue that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) does not originate from the "competitive accretion" of unbound gas by seed protostars. I provide an approximate solution to the problem of Bondi- Hoyle accretion in a turbulent medium, and use this solution to show that the rate of competitive accretion in environments like observed star-forming regions is too low to substantially affect the masses of newborn stars. Only if star-forming clumps undergo a global collapse to a state far denser than any thus far observed is competitive accretion a viable mechanism for producing the IMF. Third, I give a theoretical prediction for the star formation rate in a medium where star formation is regulated by supersonic turbulence. Starting from the approximation that stars form in any region that is sufficiently overdense for the local potential energy to exceed the turbulent kinetic energy, I derive a formula for the star formation rate in terms of the

  9. Formation of Massive Stars: Theoretical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews theoretical considerations of the formation of massive stars. It addresses the questions that assuming a gravitationally unstable massive clump, how does enough material become concentrated into a sufficiently small volume within a sufficiently short time? and how does the forming massive star influence its immediate surroundings to limit its mass?

  10. Star Formation in Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohm-Palmer, Robbie Christopher

    I have explored the star formation histories of the dwarf irregular galaxies Sextans A and GR 8. I measured photometry of individual stars from images taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. With the photometry I constructed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) in the B, V, and I. I investigated the errors in the photometry extraction, and conducted artificial star tests to measure the photometric limits. The high resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope allowed photometric measurements that were far more accurate than ground-based observations. For galaxies at these distances (1-2 Mpc), the accuracy of stellar photometry from ground-based observations is limited by crowding of stellar images. The high accuracy photometry showed a clear separation of the main sequence from the massive, blue, core He-burning stars (HeB). These are stars in the bluest extent of the so-called 'blue-loop' phase of stellar evolution. This is the first time this phase of evolution has been clearly identified in a low metallicity system. The distributions of stars in the CMDs agreed very well with stellar evolution model predictions. I have used the CMDs to calculate the recent star formation histories of both galaxies. The main sequence luminosity function provided the star formation rate (SFR) over the past ~50 Myr. I developed a new technique for calculating the SFR from the blue HeB luminosity function. Furthermore, the blue HeB evolutionary phase has a one-to-one relation between age and magnitude. This allowed me to calculate the position, as well as the strength of star formation over the past ~500 Myr. The star formation was found in concentrated regions. These regions are of order 100 pc across and last of order 100 Myr. The regions were found near the highest density HI gas. I estimated the gas-to-star conversion efficiency to be 5-10%. The results from GR 8 suggest that the star forming gas clouds may be self-gravitating, and that each cloud

  11. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    The formation of stars and star clusters is a major unresolved problem in astrophysics. It is central to modeling stellar populations and understanding galaxy luminosity distributions in cosmological models. Young massive clusters are major components of starburst galaxies, while globular clusters are cornerstones of the cosmic distance scale and represent vital laboratories for studies of stellar dynamics and stellar evolution. Yet how these clusters form and how rapidly and efficiently they expel their natal gas remain unclear, as do the consequences of this gas expulsion for cluster structure and survival. Also unclear is how the properties of low-mass clusters, which form from small-scale instabilities in galactic disks and inform much of our understanding of cluster formation and star-formation efficiency, differ from those of more massive clusters, which probably formed in starburst events driven by fast accretion at high redshift, or colliding gas flows in merging galaxies. Modeling cluster formation requires simulating many simultaneous physical processes, placing stringent demands on both software and hardware. Simulations of galaxies evolving in cosmological contexts usually lack the numerical resolution to simulate star formation in detail. They do not include detailed treatments of important physical effects such as magnetic fields, radiation pressure, ionization, and supernova feedback. Simulations of smaller clusters include these effects, but fall far short of the mass of even single young globular clusters. With major advances in computing power and software, we can now directly address this problem. We propose to model the formation of massive star clusters by integrating the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code into the Astrophysical Multi-purpose Software Environment (AMUSE) framework, to work with existing stellar-dynamical and stellar evolution modules in AMUSE. All software will be freely distributed on-line, allowing

  12. Star Formation History In Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Li-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Interacting and merging galaxies are believed to play an important role in many aspects of galactic evolution. Their violent interactions can trigger starbursts, which lead to formation of young globular clusters. Therefore the ages of these young globular clusters can be interpreted to yield the timing of interaction-triggered events, and thus provide a key to reconstruct the star formation history in merging galaxies. The link between galaxy interaction and star formation is well established, but the triggers of star formation in interacting galaxies are still not understood. To date there are two competing formulas that describe the star formation mechanism--density-dependent and shock-induced rules. Numerical models implementing the two rules predict significantly different star formation histories in merging galaxies. My dissertation combines these two distinct areas of astrophysics, stellar evolution and galactic dynamics, to investigate the star formation history in galaxies at various merging stages. Begin with NGC 4676 as an example, I will briefly describe its model and illustrate the idea of using the ages of clusters to constrain the modeling. The ages of the clusters are derived from spectra that were taken with multi-object spectroscopy on Keck. Using NGC 7252 as a second example, I will present a state of the art dynamical model which predicts NGC7252's star formation history and other properties. I will then show a detailed comparison and analysis between the clusters and the modeling. In the end, I will address this important link as the key to answer the fundamental question of my thesis: what is the trigger of star formation in merging galaxies?

  13. THE JAMES CLERK MAXWELL TELESCOPE NEARBY GALAXIES LEGACY SURVEY. II. WARM MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN THREE FIELD SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, B. E.; Wilson, C. D.; Sinukoff, E.; Israel, F. P.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Serjeant, S.; Bendo, G. J.; Clements, D. L.; Brinks, E.; Irwin, J. A.; Knapen, J. H.; Leech, J.; Tan, B. K.; Matthews, H. E.; Muehle, S.; Mortimer, A. M. J.; Petitpas, G.; Spekkens, K.; Tilanus, R. P. J.; Usero, A. E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.c E-mail: israel@strw.leidenuniv.n

    2010-05-01

    We present the results of large-area {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 emission mapping of three nearby field galaxies, NGC 628, NGC 3521, and NGC 3627, completed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope as part of the Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey. These galaxies all have moderate to strong {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 detections over large areas of the fields observed by the survey, showing resolved structure and dynamics in their warm/dense molecular gas disks. All three galaxies were part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample, and as such have excellent published multiwavelength ancillary data. These data sets allow us to examine the star formation properties, gas content, and dynamics of these galaxies on sub-kiloparsec scales. We find that the global gas depletion time for dense/warm molecular gas in these galaxies is consistent with other results for nearby spiral galaxies, indicating this may be independent of galaxy properties such as structures, gas compositions, and environments. Similar to the results from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey, we do not see a correlation of the star formation efficiency with the gas surface density consistent with the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. Finally, we find that the star formation efficiency of the dense molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO J = 3-2 is potentially flat or slightly declining as a function of molecular gas density, the {sup 12}CO J = 3-2/J = 1-0 ratio (in contrast to the correlation found in a previous study into the starburst galaxy M83), and the fraction of total gas in molecular form.

  14. HOW GALACTIC ENVIRONMENT REGULATES STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Meidt, Sharon E.

    2016-02-10

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  15. Star formation relations in nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Neal J. II; Heiderman, Amanda; Vutisalchavakul, Nalin

    2014-02-20

    We test some ideas for star formation relations against data on local molecular clouds. On a cloud by cloud basis, the relation between the surface density of star formation rate and surface density of gas divided by a free-fall time, calculated from the mean cloud density, shows no significant correlation. If a crossing time is substituted for the free-fall time, there is even less correlation. Within a cloud, the star formation rate volume and surface densities increase rapidly with the corresponding gas densities, faster than predicted by models using the free-fall time defined from the local density. A model in which the star formation rate depends linearly on the mass of gas above a visual extinction of 8 mag describes the data on these clouds, with very low dispersion. The data on regions of very massive star formation, with improved star formation rates based on free-free emission from ionized gas, also agree with this linear relation.

  16. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    More than half of all main sequence stars, and an even larger fraction of pre-main sequence stars, reside in binary or multiple systems (Duquennoy and Mayor 1991; Mathieu et al. 2000). The presence of planet-forming material has been indirectly observed around one or both components of some young binaries, and (Mathieu et al. 2000) numerical simulations of the formation of binary stars suggest that disks form within these systems, as well (Bodenheimer et al. 2000). Terrestrial planets and the cores of giant planets are thought to form by an accretion process within a disk of dust and gas (Safronov 1969; Lissauer 1993), and therefore may be common in binary star systems. In this chapter, we present the results from numerical simulations of the final stages of terrestrial planet formation around one or both stars of a binary.

  17. Induced star formation in interacting galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennicutt, R. C.; Roettiger, K. A.; Keel, W. C.; Vanderhulst, J. M.; Hummel, E.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of H alpha emission line fluxes and FIR fluxes in approx. 100 interacting spirals were used to investigate the effects of close tidal interactions on the disk and nuclear star formation rates in galaxies. Two samples of interacting spirals were studied, a complete sample of close pairs, and a set of strongly perturbed systems from the Arp atlas. Both the integrated H alpha luminosities and FIR luminosities are enhanced in the interacting galaxies, indicating that the encounters indeed trigger massive star formation in many cases. The response of individual galaxies is highly variable, however. A majority of the interacting spirals exhibit normal star formation rates, while a small fraction are undergoing bursts with luminosities which are rarely, if ever, observed in noninteracting systems. Virtually all of the latter are in the Arp sample, indicating that the Arp atlas is heavily biased to the most active star forming systems.

  18. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  19. Star formation - A theoretician's view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.

    1991-01-01

    The present evaluation of the hypothesis that the birth of a sunlike star occurs in four stages, with a critical bipolar outflow phase, notes that observed molecular outflows cannot be initiated from circumstellar disks and must instead represent swept-up shells of gas that are driven by strong protostellar winds. The star can resolve its growing angular-momentum problem only by rejecting a fraction of the material that is fed through the disk in a powerful, magnetocentrifugally-driven wind. Empirical properties measured for well-collimated outflow sources can be accounted for by the interaction of this anisotropic wind with the ambient molecular cloud core.

  20. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Chambers, John; Duncan, Martin J.; Adams, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets within binary star systems, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. We show that the late stages of terrestrial planet formation can indeed take place in a wide variety of binary systems and we have begun to delineate the range of parameter space for which this statement is true. Results of our initial simulations of planetary growth around each star in the alpha Centauri system and other 'wide' binary systems, as well as around both stars in very close binary systems, will be presented.

  1. Complex organic molecules and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmann, A.; Faure, A.

    2014-12-01

    Star forming regions are characterised by the presence of a wealth of chemical species. For the past two to three decades, ever more complex organic species have been detected in the hot cores of protostars. The evolution of these molecules in the course of the star forming process is still uncertain, but it is likely that they are partially incorporated into protoplanetary disks and then into planetesimals and the small bodies of planetary systems. The complex organic molecules seen in star forming regions are particularly interesting since they probably make up building blocks for prebiotic chemistry. Recently we showed that these species were also present in the cold gas in prestellar cores, which represent the very first stages of star formation. These detections question the models which were until now accepted to account for the presence of complex organic molecules in star forming regions. In this article, we shortly review our current understanding of complex organic molecule formation in the early stages of star formation, in hot and cold cores alike and present new results on the formation of their likely precursor radicals.

  2. TIME-VARYING DYNAMICAL STAR FORMATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eve J.; Chang, Philip; Murray, Norman

    2015-02-10

    We present numerical evidence of dynamic star formation in which the accreted stellar mass grows superlinearly with time, roughly as t {sup 2}. We perform simulations of star formation in self-gravitating hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that is continuously driven. By turning the self-gravity of the gas in the simulations on or off, we demonstrate that self-gravity is the dominant physical effect setting the mass accretion rate at early times before feedback effects take over, contrary to theories of turbulence-regulated star formation. We find that gravitational collapse steepens the density profile around stars, generating the power-law tail on what is otherwise a lognormal density probability distribution function. Furthermore, we find turbulent velocity profiles to flatten inside collapsing regions, altering the size-line width relation. This local flattening reflects enhancements of turbulent velocity on small scales, as verified by changes to the velocity power spectra. Our results indicate that gas self-gravity dynamically alters both density and velocity structures in clouds, giving rise to a time-varying star formation rate. We find that a substantial fraction of the gas that forms stars arrives via low-density flows, as opposed to accreting through high-density filaments.

  3. Triggered star formation associated with HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Katsuo

    There are two known mechanisms of triggered star formation associated with HII regions. One is the collect-and-collapse process of the shell accumulated around an expanding HII region, and the other is radiation-driven implosion (RDI) of bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) originated from pre-existing cloud clumps. They are very briefly reviewed first. We then present the main results of our recent observations on the RDI star formation in BRCs. Finally, a third possible mechanism of triggering is suggested, which is attributed to the formation of elephant trunk-like structures due to hydrodynamical instability of ionization/shock fronts.

  4. Dwarf Galaxy Formation with H2-regulated Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlen, Michael; Krumholz, Mark R.; Madau, Piero; Smith, Britton D.; Wise, John

    2012-04-01

    We describe cosmological galaxy formation simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo that incorporate a star formation prescription regulated by the local abundance of molecular hydrogen. We show that this H2-regulated prescription leads to a suppression of star formation in low-mass halos (Mh <~ 1010 M ⊙) at z > 4, alleviating some of the dwarf galaxy problems faced by theoretical galaxy formation models. H2 regulation modifies the efficiency of star formation of cold gas directly, rather than indirectly reducing the cold gas content with "supernova feedback." We determine the local H2 abundance in our most refined grid cells (76 proper parsec in size at z = 4) by applying the model of Krumholz, McKee, & Tumlinson, which is based on idealized one-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of H2 formation-dissociation balance in ~100 pc atomic-molecular complexes. Our H2-regulated simulations are able to reproduce the empirical (albeit lower z) Kennicutt-Schmidt relation, including the low Σgas cutoff due to the transition from atomic to molecular phase and the metallicity dependence thereof, without the use of an explicit density threshold in our star formation prescription. We compare the evolution of the luminosity function, stellar mass density, and star formation rate density from our simulations to recent observational determinations of the same at z = 4-8 and find reasonable agreement between the two.

  5. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Cimatti, Andrea; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J.

    2011-09-01

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  6. The Role of Star Formation and AGN in Dust Heating of z=0.3-2.8 Galaxies - II. Informing IR AGN Fraction Estimates through Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roebuck, Eric; Sajina, Anna; Hayward, Christopher C.; Pope, Alexandra; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Hernquist, Lars; Yan, Lin

    2016-12-01

    A key question in extragalactic studies is the determination of the relative roles of stars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in powering dusty galaxies at z ˜ 1-3 where the bulk of star formation and AGN activity took place. In Paper I, we present a sample of 336 24 μm selected (Ultra)Luminous Infrared Galaxies, (U)LIRGs, at z˜ 0.3-2.8, where we focus on determining the AGN contribution to the IR luminosity. Here, we use hydrodynamic simulations with dust radiative transfer of isolated and merging galaxies to investigate how well the simulations reproduce our empirical IR AGN fraction estimates and determine how IR AGN fractions relate to the UV-mm AGN fraction. We find that: (1) IR AGN fraction estimates based on simulations are in qualitative agreement with the empirical values when host reprocessing of the AGN light is considered; (2) for star-forming galaxy (SFG)-AGN composites our empirical methods may be underestimating the role of AGN, as our simulations imply \\gt 50 % AGN fractions, ˜ 3× higher than previous estimates; (3) 6% of our empirically classified SFGs have AGN fractions ≳50%. While this is a small percentage of SFGs, if confirmed it would imply that the true number density of AGNs may be underestimated; (4) this comparison depends on the adopted AGN template—those that neglect the contribution of warm dust lower the empirical fractions by up to two times; and (5) the IR AGN fraction is only a good proxy for the intrinsic UV-mm AGN fraction when the extinction is high ({A}V≳ 1 or up to and including coalescence in a merger).

  7. Terrestrial planet formation surrounding close binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-11-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around both components of some young close binary star systems. Additionally, it has been shown that if planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. Herein, we numerically simulate the late stages of terrestrial planet growth in circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations 0.05 AU⩽a⩽0.4 AU and binary eccentricities 0⩽e⩽0.8. In each simulation, the sum of the masses of the two stars is 1 M, and giant planets are included. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet formation within our Solar System by Chambers [Chambers, J.E., 2001. Icarus 152, 205-224], and around each individual component of the α Centauri AB binary star system by Quintana et al. [Quintana, E.V., Lissauer, J.J., Chambers, J.E., Duncan, M.J., 2002. Astrophys. J. 576, 982-996]. Multiple simulations are performed for each binary star system under study, and our results are statistically compared to a set of planet formation simulations in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn system that begin with essentially the same initial disk of protoplanets. The planetary systems formed around binaries with apastron distances Q≡a(1+e)≲0.2 AU are very similar to those around single stars, whereas those with larger maximum separations tend to be sparcer, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. We also provide formulae that can be used to scale results of planetary accretion simulations to various systems with different total stellar mass, disk sizes, and planetesimal masses and densities.

  8. STARS MDT-II targets mission

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, B.A.; White, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    The Strategic Target System (STARS) was launched successfully on August 31, 1996 from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF) at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). The STARS II booster delivered a payload complement of 26 vehicles atop a post boost vehicle. These targets were designed and the mission planning was achieved to provide for a dedicated mission for view by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Satellite Sensor Suite. Along with the MSX Satellite, other corollary sensors were involved. Included in these were the Airborne Surveillance Test Bed (AST) aircraft, the Cobra Judy sea based radar platform, Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR), and the Kiernan Reentry Measurements Site (KREMS). The launch was a huge success from all aspects. The STARS Booster flew a perfect mission from hardware, software and mission planning respects. The payload complement achieved its desired goals. All sensors (space, air, ship, and ground) attained excellent coverage and data recording.

  9. Accelerating Star Formation in Clusters and Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Francesco; Stahler, Steven W.

    2000-09-01

    We use our own, recently developed pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks to investigate the star formation histories of relatively nearby associations and clusters. We first employ published luminosities and effective temperatures to place the known members of each region in the H-R diagram. We then construct age histograms detailing that region's history. The groups studied include Taurus-Auriga, Lupus, Chamaeleon, ρ Ophiuchi, Upper Scorpius, IC 348, and NGC 2264. This study is the first to analyze a large number of star-forming regions with the same set of theoretical tracks. Our investigation corroborates and extends our previous results on the Orion Nebula Cluster. In all cases, we find that star formation began at a relatively low level some 107 yr in the past and has more recently undergone a steep acceleration. This acceleration, which lasts several million years, is usually continuing through the present epoch. The one clear exception is the OB association Upper Scorpius, where the formation rate climbed upward, peaked, and has now died off. Significantly, this is also the only region of our list that has been largely stripped of molecular gas. The acceleration represents a true physical phenomenon that cannot be explained away by incompleteness of the samples; nor is the pattern of stellar births significantly affected by observational errors or the presence of unresolved binaries. We speculate that increasing star formation activity arises from contraction of the parent cloud. Despite the short timescale for acceleration, the cloud is likely to evolve quasi-statically. Star formation itself appears to be a critical phenomenon, occurring only in locations exceeding some threshold density. The cloud's contraction must reverse itself, and the remnant gas dissipate, in less than 107 yr, even for aggregates containing no massive stars. In this case, molecular outflows from the stars themselves presumably accomplish the task, but the actual dispersal mechanism

  10. Low-metallicity Star Formation (IAU S255)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  11. Neutron-star formation in the carbon-detonation supernova.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. C.; Buchler, J.-R.; Barkat, Z. K.

    1973-01-01

    Neutrino losses, such as those driven by the convective Urca process, may affect the evolution of stars in the mass range from 4 to 8 solar masses so as to lead to collapse of their degenerate carbon/oxygen cores. A corresponding hydrodynamic model is computed which leads to the formation of a 1.3 to 1.4 solar mass neutron star with the expulsion of a small fraction of the mass, about 0.l solar mass at about 20,000 km/sec into the overlying hydrogen envelope. This sets the stage for the Ostriker-Gunn mechanism in which Type II supernovae and pulsars are formed.

  12. Star formation in Lynds dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Tim; Rebull, Luisa

    2008-03-01

    Recent research on star formation in large molecular cloud complexes, such as the Cepheus Flare (Kun 1995), Orion, Perseus (Rebull et al. 2007), and Taurus molecular clouds, have included studies of a number of Lynds dark nebulae (LDN). Less attention has been given to isolated Lynds clouds. Both LDN 981 and LDN 425 are smaller, more isolated, dark molecular clouds that could contain regions of active star formation within them -- they both are associated with IRAS sources, and based on prior shallow surveys, they both have a YSO candidate in the neigborhood. Spitzer observations with IRAC and MIPS will allow us to see deep inside the cloud, deeper than any prior observations could see, and reveal any hidden star formation that is ongoing in these clouds. This project is part of the Spitzer Teachers Program.

  13. Fragmentation of interstellar clouds and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1982-01-01

    The principal issues are addressed: the fragmentation of molecular clouds into units of stellar mass and the impact of star formation on molecular clouds. The observational evidence for fragmentation is summarized, and the gravitational instability described of a uniform spherical cloud collapsing from rest. The implications are considered of a finite pressure for the minimum fragment mass that is attainable in opacity-limited fragmentation. The role of magnetic fields is discussed in resolving the angular momentum problem and in making the collapse anisotropic, with notable consequences for fragmentation theory. Interactions between fragments are described, with emphasis on the effect of protostellar winds on the ambient cloud matter and on inhibiting further star formation. Such interactions are likely to have profound consequences for regulating the rate of star formation and on the energetics and dynamics of molecular clouds.

  14. Resolved star formation on sub-galactic scales in a merger at z = 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Rigby, Jane R.; Teng, Stacy H.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Wuyts, Eva

    2014-08-01

    We present a detailed analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) G141 grism spectroscopy for seven star-forming regions of the highly magnified lensed starburst galaxy RCSGA 032727-132609 at z = 1.704. We measure the spatial variations of the extinction in RCS0327 through the observed Hγ/Hβ emission line ratios, finding a constant average extinction of E(B – V){sub gas} = 0.40 ± 0.07. We infer that the star formation is enhanced as a result of an ongoing interaction, with measured star formation rates derived from demagnified, extinction-corrected Hβ line fluxes for the individual star-forming clumps falling >1-2 dex above the star formation sequence. When combining the HST/WFC3 [O III] λ5007/Hβ emission line ratio measurements with [N II]/Hα line ratios from Wuyts et al., we find that the majority of the individual star-forming regions fall along the local 'normal' abundance sequence. With the first detections of the He I λ5876 and He II λ4686 recombination lines in a distant galaxy, we probe the massive-star content of the star-forming regions in RCS0327. The majority of the star-forming regions have a He I λ5876 to Hβ ratio consistent with the saturated maximum value, which is only possible if they still contain hot O-stars. Two regions have lower ratios, implying that their last burst of new star formation ended ∼5 Myr ago. Together, the He I λ5876 and He II λ4686 to Hβ line ratios provide indirect evidence for the order in which star formation is stopping in individual star-forming knots of this high-redshift merger. We place the spatial variations of the extinction, star formation rate and ionization conditions in the context of the star formation history of RCS0327.

  15. Star formation in proto dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Tenorio-Tagle, G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the onset of star formation on the residual gas in primordial low-mass Local-Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies is studied by a series of hydrodynamical simulations. The models have concentrated on the effect of photoionization. The results indicate that photoionization in the presence of a moderate gas density gradient can eject most of the residual gas on a time scale of a few 10 to the 7th power years. High central gas density combined with inefficient star formation, however, may prevent mass ejection. The effect of supernova explosions is discussed briefly.

  16. Radio continuum, far infrared and star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielebinski, R.; Wunderlich, E.; Klein, U.; Hummel, E.

    1987-01-01

    A very tight correlation was found between the radio emission and the far infrared emission from galaxies. This has been found for various samples of galaxies and is explained in terms of recent star formation. The tight correlation would imply that the total radio emission is a good tracer of star formation. The correlation between the radio power at 5 GHz and the far infrared luminosity is shown. The galaxies are of various morphological types and were selected from the various IRAS circulars, hence the sample is an infrared selected sample. The far infrared luminosities were corrected for the dust temperature. This is significant because it decreases the dispersion in the correlation.

  17. Evolutionary tracks of massive stars during formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2014-02-01

    A model for massive stars is constructed by piecing together evolutionary algorithms for the protostellar structure, the environment, the inflow and the radiation feedback. We investigate specified accretion histories of constant, decelerating and accelerating forms and consider both hot and cold accretion, identified with spherical free-fall and disc accretion, respectively. Diagnostic tools for the interpretation of the phases of massive star formation and testing the evolutionary models are then developed. Evolutionary tracks able to fit Herschel Space Telescope data require the generated stars to be three to four times less massive than in previous interpretations, thus being consistent with clump star formation efficiencies of 10-15 per cent. However, for these cold Herschel clumps, the bolometric temperature is not a good diagnostic to differentiate between accretion models. We also find that neither spherical nor disc accretion can explain the high radio luminosities of many protostars. Nevertheless, we discover a solution in which the extreme ultraviolet flux needed to explain the radio emission is produced if the accretion flow is via free-fall on to hotspots covering less than 10 per cent of the surface area. Moreover, the protostar must be compact, and so has formed through cold accretion. We show that these conclusions are independent of the imposed accretion history. This suggests that massive stars form via gas accretion through discs which, in the phase before the star bloats, download their mass via magnetic flux tubes on to the protostar.

  18. Formation of star tracking reticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. O.; Toft, A. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The present application is directed towards a process for producing high resolution, substantially non-reflective reticles or choppers suitable for use for transmitting in both the visible and near ultra-violet regions, able to withstand reasonable handling and extreme environmental conditions, and capable of operating at speeds of from 2800 to about 9000 revolutions per minute without distortion. In particular, the present invention is directed towards the production or reticles having a quartz base vacuum coated with chromium, chromium-silver alloy, and silver with electrodeposited copper and black chromium thereon, respectively, in the form of a reticle pattern. The quartz permits the transmission of light while the pattern is opaque to light. The reticles of the present invention are intended for use in optical trackers, such as star trackers used in outer space.

  19. The Formation Of Massive Stars And The Effects Of Rotation On Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, A.

    2011-11-01

    We first review the current debates about massive star formation over the last decade. Then we concentrate on the accretion scenario, emphasizing the evidences in favor of it. We study the basic properties of the accretion scenario in the spherical case. In the case of massive stars, the free-fall time is longer than the Kelvin-Helmholtz timescale, so that the massive stars in formation reach thermal equilibrium before the accretion is completed. This is why the history of the accretion rates for massive stars is so critical. We derive analytically the typical accretion rates, their upper and lower limits, showing the importance of dust properties. We examine the basic properties of the disk, their luminosity and temperature in the stationary approximation, as well as their various components. The results of some recent numerical models are discussed with a particular attention to the effects that favor accretion on the central body relatively to the case of spherical accretion. These effects strongly influence the final stellar mass resulting from a collapsing clump in a cloud. We also show some properties of the pre-main sequence tracks of massive stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. During the first part of their evolution up to a mass of about 3M⊙ the forming stars are overluminous, then they are strongly underluminous (with respect to the zero age main sequence) up to a mass of about 10M⊙ until they adjust after a slight overluminosity to the main sequence values. We consider some rotational properties related to star formation. The angular momentum has to be reduced by a factor of about 106 during star formation. Some effects contributing to this reduction have been studied particularly in the case of low- and intermediate-mass stars: disk locking and magnetic braking. We also discuss the case of massive stars and emphasize the effects of the gravity darkening of rotating stars that may favor the accretion from the disk of massive stars in formation.

  20. The H II Region of a Primordial Star

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, Tom; Wise, John H.; Bryan, Greg L.; /Columbia U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2006-06-07

    The concordance model of cosmology and structure formation predicts the formation of isolated very massive stars at high redshifts in dark matter dominated halos of 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 6} Msun. These stars photo-ionize their host primordial molecular clouds, expelling all the baryons from their halos. When the stars die, a relic H II region is formed within which large amounts of molecular hydrogen form which will allow the gas to cool efficiently when gravity assembles it into larger dark matter halos. The filaments surrounding the first star hosting halo are largely shielded and provide the pathway for gas to stream into the halo when the star has died. We present the first fully three dimensional cosmological radiation hydrodynamical simulations that follow all these effects. A novel adaptive ray casting technique incorporates the time dependent radiative transfer around point sources. This approach is fast enough so that radiation transport, kinetic rate equations, and hydrodynamics are solved self-consistently. It retains the time derivative of the transfer equation and is explicitly photon conserving. This method is integrated with the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code enzo, and runs on distributed and shared memory parallel architectures. Where applicable the three dimensional calculation not only confirm expectations from earlier one dimensional results but also illustrate the multi-fold hydrodynamic complexities of H II regions. In the absence of stellar winds the circumstellar environments of the first supernovae and putative early gamma-ray bursts will be of low density {approx}1 cm{sup -3}. Albeit marginally resolved, ionization front instabilities lead to cometary and elephant trunk like small scale structures reminiscent of nearby star forming regions.

  1. The H II Region of a Primordial Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Tom; Wise, John H.; Bryan, Greg L.

    2007-04-01

    The concordance model of cosmology and structure formation predicts the formation of isolated, very massive stars at high redshifts in dark matter-dominated halos of 105-106 Msolar. These stars photoionize their host primordial molecular clouds, expelling all the baryons from their halos. When the stars die, a relic H II region is formed within which large amounts of molecular hydrogen form that will allow the gas to cool efficiently when gravity assembles it into larger dark matter halos. The filaments surrounding the first star-hosting halo are largely shielded and provide the pathway for gas to stream into the halo when the star has died. We present the first fully three-dimensional cosmological radiation hydrodynamical simulations that follow all these effects. A novel adaptive ray-casting technique incorporates the time-dependent radiative transfer around point sources. This approach is fast enough so that radiation transport, kinetic rate equations, and hydrodynamics are solved self-consistently. It retains the time derivative of the transfer equation and is explicitly photon-conserving. This method is integrated with the cosmological adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo and runs on distributed and shared memory parallel architectures. Where applicable, the three-dimensional calculation not only confirms expectations from earlier one-dimensional results but also illustrates the multifold hydrodynamic complexities of H II regions. In the absence of stellar winds, the circumstellar environments of the first supernovae and putative early gamma-ray bursts will be of low density, ~1 cm-3. Albeit marginally resolved, ionization front instabilities lead to cometary- and elephant trunk-like small-scale structures reminiscent of nearby star-forming regions.

  2. Star formation around supermassive black holes.

    PubMed

    Bonnell, I A; Rice, W K M

    2008-08-22

    The presence of young massive stars orbiting on eccentric rings within a few tenths of a parsec of the supermassive black hole in the galactic center is challenging for theories of star formation. The high tidal shear from the black hole should tear apart the molecular clouds that form stars elsewhere in the Galaxy, and transport of stars to the galactic center also appears unlikely during their lifetimes. We conducted numerical simulations of the infall of a giant molecular cloud that interacts with the black hole. The transfer of energy during closest approach allows part of the cloud to become bound to the black hole, forming an eccentric disk that quickly fragments to form stars. Compressional heating due to the black hole raises the temperature of the gas up to several hundred to several thousand kelvin, ensuring that the fragmentation produces relatively high stellar masses. These stars retain the eccentricity of the disk and, for a sufficiently massive initial cloud, produce an extremely top-heavy distribution of stellar masses. This potentially repetitive process may explain the presence of multiple eccentric rings of young stars in the presence of a supermassive black hole.

  3. Nature of massive emission-line stars of the LMC NGC 1850 star-formation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, H.; Aguayo, G.; Martayan, C.; Baade, D.

    2013-06-01

    Based on an analysis of slitless spectroscopic data we obtained with the ESO Wide Field Imager, we present the identification and nature of 96 massive emission-line stars (ELS) located in and around the LMC clusters NGC 1850, NGC 1855, and NGC 1858. Most of the ELS are concentrated around the young double cluster NGC 1850 and its vicinity. Combined to the photometry and lightcurves, these observations suggest that the NGC 1850 star-formation history has followed different episodes due to the dynamical interaction between clusters, photo-ionization and compression of the associated H II region, leading to other recent star formation burst. The actual ELS localization also seems to indicate a possible mass and spatial segregation with the evolution/age of the clusters.

  4. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  5. Evolution of star formation and gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, Nick Z.

    2013-10-01

    In these lectures I review observations of star-forming molecular clouds in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies to develop a physical intuition for understanding star formation in the local and high-redshift Universe. A lot of this material is drawn from early work in the field since much of the work was done two decades ago and this background is not generally available in the present literature. I also attempt to synthesise our well-developed understanding of star formation in low-redshift galaxies with constraints from theory and observations at high redshift to develop an intuitive model for the evolution of galaxy mass and luminosity functions in the early Universe. The overall goal of this contribution is to provide students with background helpful for analysis of far-infrared (FIR) observations from Herschel and millimetre/submillimetre (mm/submm) imaging with ALMA (the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array). These two instruments will revolutionise our understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM) and associated star formation and galaxy evolution, both locally and in the distant Universe. To facilitate interpreting the FIR spectra of Galactic star-forming regions and high-redshift sources, I develop a model for the dust heating and radiative transfer in order to elucidate the observed infrared (IR) emissions. I do this because I am not aware of a similar coherent discussion in the literature.

  6. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Adams, F. C.; Chambers, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around one or both components of various young close binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. We have simulated the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets in both circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations ($a_B$) in the range 0.05 AU $\\le a_B \\le$ 0.4 AU and binary eccentricities in the range $0 \\le e \\le 0.8$ and circumstellar disks around individual stars with binary separations of tens of AU. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and around individual stars in the Alpha Centauri system (Quintana et al. 2002, A.J., 576, 982); giant planets analogous to Jupiter and Saturn are included if their orbits are stable. The planetary systems formed around close binaries with stellar apastron distances less than or equal to 0.2 AU with small stellar eccentricities are very similar to those formed in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn, whereas planetary systems formed around binaries with larger maximum separations tend to be sparser, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. Likewise, when the binary periastron exceeds 10 AU, terrestrial planets can form over essentially the entire range of orbits allowed for single stars with Jupiter-like planets, although fewer terrestrial planets tend to form within high eccentricity binary systems. As the binary periastron decreases, the radial extent of the terrestrial planet systems is reduced accordingly. When the periastron is 5 AU, the formation of Earth-like planets near 1 AU is compromised.

  7. Star Formation at milli-arcsecond resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudmaijer, R. D.; de Wit, W.-J.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter discusses the use and possibilities of optical and infrared interferometry to study star formation. It starts with a brief overview of the star formation process and highlights the open questions from an observational point of view. These are found at the smallest scales, as this is, inevitably, where all the action such as accretion and outflows, occurs. We then use basic astrophysical concepts to assess which scales and conditions can be probed with existing interferometric set-ups for which we use the ESO/VLTI instrument suite as example. We will concentrate on the more massive stars observed at high resolution with continuum interferometry. Throughout, some of the most recent interferometric results are used as examples of the various processes discussed.

  8. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF)) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF))from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF) derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3sigma confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne ii]12.8 micron and [O iv]26 micron lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L(sub x,SF) and L(sub x,AGN) at the 3 sigma level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  9. Star Formation at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Could stars be forming in the inhospitable environment near Sagittarius A* in the heart of the Milky Way? A possible signature of low-mass star formation has recently been found just two light-years from the black hole at the center of our galaxy — a region that was previously thought to be too hostile for such activity. Searching for Signatures: Previous observations of the central few light-years of the Milky Way had focused on a population of about 200 massive, young and very bright stars in tight orbits around Sgr A*. These stars are only a few million years old and prompted scientists to wonder: have they somehow managed to form in situ, in spite of their close proximity to the black hole, or did they form further out and then migrate in? Motivated by this mystery, Farhad Yusef-Zadeh of Northwestern University and collaborators looked for evidence of even younger stars close to Sagittarius A*, which would demonstrate that star formation in the area is an ongoing process. Using the Very Large Array (VLA), the collaboration discovered several small sources in one arm of activity near Sgr A*. This 34-GHz image provides a close-up view of two protoplanetary disk candidates (labeled P26 and P8) located near Sgr A*. These objects are outlined on the right side by a bow shock caused by impacting stellar wind that streams from the young, hot stars closer to the Galactic center. The disks are thought to contain recently-formed, low-mass stars. (Credit: Yusef-Zadeh et al., 2015) Heated Disks: The team identified these sources as candidate photoevaporative protoplanetary disks, or “proplyds” — areas of dense, ionized gas and dust surrounding young, newly formed stars. The proplyd candidates are between 10,000 and 100,000 years old, and they lie along the edge of a large molecular cloud. It is likely that this cloud produced the disks by providing a reservoir of gas to feed the star-formation activity. The region surrounding these proplyds is blasted with harsh

  10. Galaxy Interactions with FIRE: Mapping Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We utilize a suite of 75 simulations of galaxies in idealised major mergers (stellar mass ratio ~2.5:1), with a wide range of orbital parameters, to investigate the spatial extent of interaction-induced star formation. Two versions are used, one based on a Kennicult-like subgrid model (Gadget, Springel & Hernquist 2003); the other based on the new Feedback In Realistic Environments model (FIRE, Hopkins et al. 2014). Although the total star formation in galaxy encounters is generally elevated relative to isolated galaxies, we find that this elevation is a combination of intense enhancements within the central kpc and moderately suppressed activity at large galacto-centric radii. This effect appears to be stronger in the older Gadget model. Suppression is the disk is also found in the FIRE runs, but at larger scales. This is because tidal torques are weaker in the newer FIRE model, leading to a more extended nuclear starburt. Our predictions of the radial dependence of triggered star formation, and specifically the suppression of star formation beyond kpc-scales, will be testable with the next generation of integral-field spectroscopic surveys.

  11. Star formation across cosmic time and its influence on galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freundlich, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Observations show that ten billion years ago, galaxies formed their stars at rates up to twenty times higher than now. As stars are formed from cold molecular gas, a high star formation rate means a significant gas supply, and galaxies near the peak epoch of star formation are indeed much more gas-rich than nearby galaxies. Is the decline of the star formation rate mostly driven by the diminishing cold gas reservoir, or are the star formation processes also qualitatively different earlier in the history of the Universe? Ten billion years ago, young galaxies were clumpy and prone to violent gravitational instabilities, which may have contributed to their high star formation rate. Stars indeed form within giant, gravitationally-bound molecular clouds. But the earliest phases of star formation are still poorly understood. Some scenarii suggest the importance of interstellar filamentary structures as a first step towards core and star formation. How would their filamentary geometry affect pre-stellar cores? Feedback mechanisms related to stellar evolution also play an important role in regulating star formation, for example through powerful stellar winds and supernovae explosions which expel some of the gas and can even disturb the dark matter distribution in which each galaxy is assumed to be embedded. This PhD work focuses on three perspectives: (i) star formation near the peak epoch of star formation as seen from observations at sub-galactic scales; (ii) the formation of pre-stellar cores within the filamentary structures of the interstellar medium; and (iii) the effect of feedback processes resulting from star formation and evolution on the dark matter distribution.

  12. Externally fed star formation: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Motahareh; Stahler, Steven W.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate, through a series of numerical calculations, the evolution of dense cores that are accreting external gas up to and beyond the point of star formation. Our model clouds are spherical, unmagnetized configurations with fixed outer boundaries, across which gas enters subsonically. When we start with any near-equilibrium state, we find that the cloud's internal velocity also remains subsonic for an extended period, in agreement with observations. However, the velocity becomes supersonic shortly before the star forms. Consequently, the accretion rate building up the protostar is much greater than the benchmark value c_s^3/G, where cs is the sound speed in the dense core. This accretion spike would generate a higher luminosity than those seen in even the most embedded young stars. Moreover, we find that the region of supersonic infall surrounding the protostar races out to engulf much of the cloud, again in violation of the observations, which show infall to be spatially confined. Similar problematic results have been obtained by all other hydrodynamic simulations to date, regardless of the specific infall geometry or boundary conditions adopted. Low-mass star formation is evidently a quasi-static process, in which cloud gas moves inward subsonically until the birth of the star itself. We speculate that magnetic tension in the cloud's deep interior helps restrain the infall prior to this event.

  13. Dense cloud formation and star formation in a barred galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimori, M.; Habe, A.; Sorai, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Hirota, A.; Namekata, D.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the properties of massive, dense clouds formed in a barred galaxy and their possible relation to star formation, performing a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation with the gravitational potential obtained from the 2MASS data from the barred spiral galaxy, M83. Since the environment for cloud formation and evolution in the bar region is expected to be different from that in the spiral arm region, barred galaxies are a good target to study the environmental effects on cloud formation and the subsequent star formation. Our simulation uses for an initial 80 Myr isothermal flow of non-self gravitating gas in the barred potential, then including radiative cooling, heating and self-gravitation of the gas for the next 40 Myr, during which dense clumps are formed. We identify many cold, dense gas clumps for which the mass is more than 104 M⊙ (a value corresponding to the molecular clouds) and study the physical properties of these clumps. The relation of the velocity dispersion of the identified clump's internal motion with the clump size is similar to that observed in the molecular clouds of our Galaxy. We find that the virial parameters for clumps in the bar region are larger than that in the spiral arm region. From our numerical results, we estimate star formation in the bar and spiral arm regions by applying the simple model of Krumholz & McKee (2005). The mean relation between star formation rate and gas surface density agrees well with the observed Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. The star formation efficiency in the bar region is ˜60 per cent of the spiral arm region. This trend is consistent with observations of barred galaxies.

  14. Neutral hydrogen and star formation in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Evan D.

    1987-01-01

    The Very Large Array and WSTR H I synthesis observations of seven irregular galaxies are presented. The total H I images of four Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies and three larger more distant irregular galaxies are constructed at the identical resolution of 500 pc. When compared to H II region distributions derived from H alpha images, all galaxies studied show an excellent correlation between the H I surface density and the presence of H II regions. This correlation is most easily interpreted in terms of a requisite threshold H I surface density for massive star formation. This threshold is 1 x 10 to the 21st power H I atoms/sq cm for a resolution of 500 pc. Giant extragalactic H II regions are only found near H I surface densities of a factor of 3 to 5 times this threshold level. The observed threshold implies a Jeans length of 150 pc, which is the same as the size scale at which the structure in the H I complexes correlates well with the H II region distribution. This, combined with the fact that in none of the galaxies observed is there H I above the threshold level with concomitant H II regions, implies an exclusively gravitational origin for the star formation events. That is, there is no need to involve a trigger as in the SSPSF theory (Seiden 1983) or feedback as in Dopita (1985).

  15. ANALYTICAL STAR FORMATION RATE FROM GRAVOTURBULENT FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-12-20

    We present an analytical determination of the star formation rate (SFR) in molecular clouds, based on a time-dependent extension of our analytical theory of the stellar initial mass function. The theory yields SFRs in good agreement with observations, suggesting that turbulence is the dominant, initial process responsible for star formation. In contrast to previous SFR theories, the present one does not invoke an ad hoc density threshold for star formation; instead, the SFR continuously increases with gas density, naturally yielding two different characteristic regimes, thus two different slopes in the SFR versus gas density relationship, in agreement with observational determinations. Besides the complete SFR derivation, we also provide a simplified expression, which reproduces the complete calculations reasonably well and can easily be used for quick determinations of SFRs in cloud environments. A key property at the heart of both our complete and simplified theory is that the SFR involves a density-dependent dynamical time, characteristic of each collapsing (prestellar) overdense region in the cloud, instead of one single mean or critical freefall timescale. Unfortunately, the SFR also depends on some ill-determined parameters, such as the core-to-star mass conversion efficiency and the crossing timescale. Although we provide estimates for these parameters, their uncertainty hampers a precise quantitative determination of the SFR, within less than a factor of a few.

  16. Star formation in Kiso measle galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra M.; Elmegreen, B. G.

    2012-05-01

    The Kiso sample of several thousand local ultraviolet-bright galaxies includes galaxies classified as irregular disk galaxies with large star-forming complexes (I,g). We selected a sample of all I,g galaxies with both Sloan Digital Sky Survey images and spectra. They contain up to several dozen giant clumps each, so we refer to them as measle galaxies. We determined ages and masses of the clumps based on a comparison of photometry with population synthesis models of cluster evolution. The spectra were used to determine global star formation rates. Several hundred clumps were measured in the sample, with masses ranging from 10^5 to several x10^8 solar masses, scaling with galaxy absolute g magnitude of -14 to -21 mag. The galaxies are starbursting, sitting above the Groth strip “main sequence” of star formation rate versus galaxy mass by an order of magnitude. These Kiso measle galaxies have 10x the star formation rates of the Kiso tadpole galaxies. We compare their clump luminosity distribution functions with normal disk galaxies.

  17. Accretion and star formation in RQQs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Sarah; Jarvis, Matt; Häußler, Boris; Maddox, Natasha; Kalfountzou, Eleni; Hardcastle, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and star-forming galaxies are well-traced in the radio part of the electromagnetic spectrum, due to emission at these wavelengths being unaffected by dust obscuration. The key processes involved in producing the radio emission are black-hole accretion and star formation, both of which are thought to be crucial in determining how galaxies evolve. Disentangling the two contributions requires multi-wavelength data, and this is the approach we use for our work on radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). In contrast to previous studies, we find that accretion-connected radio emission dominates over that due to star formation, even at very low radio flux-densities. The first sample we describe is selected from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey, whose depth allows the study of very low accretion rates and/or lower-mass black holes. A second sample is obtained from the Spitzer-Herschel Active Galaxy Survey, spanning a factor of ~100 in optical luminosity over a narrow redshift range at z ~ 1. This enables evolutionary effects to be decoupled when comparisons are made with the VIDEO sample. Using radio data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), we find further support that the AGN makes a significant contribution to the radio emission in RQQs. In addition, the levels of accretion and star formation appear to be weakly correlated with each other, and with optical luminosity.

  18. Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Rebecca

    About half of observed exoplanets are estimated to be in binary systems. Understanding planet formation and evolution in binaries is therefore essential for explaining observed exoplanet properties. Recently, we discovered that a highly misaligned circumstellar disk in a binary system can undergo global Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations of the disk inclination and eccentricity. These oscillations likely have a significant impact on the formation and orbital evolution of planets in binary star systems. Planet formation by core accretion cannot operate during KL oscillations of the disk. First, we propose to consider the process of disk mass transfer between the binary members. Secondly, we will investigate the possibility of planet formation by disk fragmentation. Disk self gravity can weaken or suppress the oscillations during the early disk evolution when the disk mass is relatively high for a narrow range of parameters. Thirdly, we will investigate the evolution of a planet whose orbit is initially aligned with respect to the disk, but misaligned with respect to the orbit of the binary. We will study how these processes relate to observations of star-spin and planet orbit misalignment and to observations of planets that appear to be undergoing KL oscillations. Finally, we will analyze the evolution of misaligned multi-planet systems. This theoretical work will involve a combination of analytic and numerical techniques. The aim of this research is to shed some light on the formation of planets in binary star systems and to contribute to NASA's goal of understanding of the origins of exoplanetary systems.

  19. Burst of Star Formation Drives Galactic Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) captures a lumpy bubble of hot gas rising from a cauldron of glowing matter in Galaxy NGC 3079, located 50 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. Astronomers suspect the bubble is being blown by 'winds' or high speed streams of particles, released during a burst of star formation. The bubble's lumpy surface has four columns of gaseous filaments towering above the galaxy's disc that whirl around in a vortex and are expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down on the disc and may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars.

  20. Massive star formation at high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascucci, Ilaria

    2004-05-01

    This thesis studies the early phases of massive stars and their impact on the surrounding. The capabilities of continuum radiative transfer (RT) codes to interpret the observations are also investigated. The main results of this work are: 1) Two massive star-forming regions are observed in the infrared. The thermal emission from the ultra-compact H II regions is resolved and the spectral type of the ionizing stars is estimated. The hot cores are not detected thus implying line-of-sight extinction larger than 200 visual magnitude. 2) The first mid-infrared interferometric measurements towards a young massive star resolve thermal emission on scales of 30-50 AU probing the size of the predicted disk. The visibility curve differs from those of intermediate-mass stars. 3) The close vicinity of Θ1C Ori are imaged using the NACO adaptive optics system. The binary proplyd Orion 168-326 and its interaction with the wind from Θ1C Ori are resolved. A proplyd uniquely seen face-on is also identified. 4) Five RT codes are compared in a disk configuration. The solutions provide the first 2D benchmark and serve to test the reliability of other RT codes. The images/visibilities from two RT codes are compared for a distorted disk. The parameter range in which such a distortion is detectable with MIDI is explored.

  1. Triggered Star Formation From Shock to Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Triggered star formation {TSF} occurs when supersonic flows generated by distant supernova blast waves, stellar winds {wind blown bubbles} or ionization fronts {D-type fronts in HII regions} sweep over a stable cloud. TSF may play a role in massive regions of star formation where winds, HII regions and, eventually, blast-waves sweep through dense, heterogeneous molecular material. In addition TSF has played an important role in discussions of the formation of our own solar system because it offers a natural way of injecting short lived radioactive isotopes {SLRI's} like 26^Al into material which will then form planetary bodies.The purpose of this proposal is to use advanced numerical tools to explore the physics of TSF in greater detail than has been attempted before. Previous studies have not been able to follow triggering past the early stages before a star forms. Our 3-D Adaptive Mesh Refinement {AMR} MHD code contains well tested physics modules which will allow us to track the influence of self-gravity, radiation-transport, cooling by molecules/neutrals/atoms and, finally, the collapse of gas into stars {i.e.condensed gravitating point-like objects or "sink-particles"}. With this tool we will follow triggering well past the formation of the star to explore the creation of accretion disks and their properties. In addition the microphysics routines in the code allow us to make detailed contact with HST observations such as the pillars in the Carina nebula via synthetic observations of line profiles, proper motions, Position-Velocity diagrams and statistics.

  2. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Fang; Li, Jin-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  3. Massive binary stars as a probe of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiminki, Daniel C.

    2010-10-01

    Massive stars are among the largest and most influential objects we know of on a sub-galactic scale. Binary systems, composed of at least one of these stars, may be responsible for several types of phenomena, including type Ib/c supernovae, short and long gamma ray bursts, high-velocity runaway O and B-type stars, and the density of the parent star clusters. Our understanding of these stars has met with limited success, especially in the area of their formation. Current formation theories rely on the accumulated statistics of massive binary systems that are limited because of their sample size or the inhomogeneous environments from which the statistics are collected. The purpose of this work is to provide a higher-level analysis of close massive binary characteristics using the radial velocity information of 113 massive stars (B3 and earlier) and binary orbital properties for the 19 known close massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association. This work provides an analysis using the largest amount of massive star and binary information ever compiled for an O-star rich cluster like Cygnus OB2, and compliments other O-star binary studies such as NGC 6231, NGC 2244, and NGC 6611. I first report the discovery of 73 new O or B-type stars and 13 new massive binaries by this survey. This work involved the use of 75 successful nights of spectroscopic observation at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory in addition to observations obtained using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph at WIYN, the HIRES echelle spectrograph at KECK, and the Hamilton spectrograph at LICK. I use these data to estimate the spectrophotometric distance to the cluster and to measure the mean systemic velocity and the one-sided velocity dispersion of the cluster. Finally, I compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo models, the results of which indicate that the binary fraction of the cluster is 57 +/- 5% and that the indices for the power law distributions, describing the log of the periods, mass

  4. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  5. Star Formation and the Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiding, Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation by regulating the removal of angular momentum from collapsing molecular cloud cores. Hall diffusion is known to be important to the magnetic field behaviour at many of the intermediate densities and field strengths encountered during the gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores into protostars, and yet its role in the star formation process is not well-studied. This thesis describes a semianalytic self-similar model of the collapse of rotating isothermal molecular cloud cores with both Hall and ambipolar diffusion, presenting similarity solutions that demonstrate that the Hall effect has a profound influence on the dynamics of collapse. ... Hall diffusion also determines the strength of the magnetic diffusion and centrifugal shocks that bound the pseudo and rotationally-supported discs, and can introduce subshocks that further slow accretion onto the protostar. In cores that are not initially rotating Hall diffusion can even induce rotation, which could give rise to disc formation and resolve the magnetic braking catastrophe. The Hall effect clearly influences the dynamics of gravitational collapse and its role in controlling the magnetic braking and radial diffusion of the field would be worth exploring in future numerical simulations of star formation.

  6. Turbulence and Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollyday, Gigja; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Little Things Team

    2015-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the nature and role of turbulence in the interstellar medium of dwarf irregular galaxies. Turbulence, resulting from a variety of processes, is a potential source for cloud formation, and thus star formation. We have undertaken an indirect analysis of turbulence via the third (skewness) and fourth (kurtosis) moments of the distribution of atomic hydrogen gas densities using the LITTLE THINGS data for a 40-count sample of nearby (<10.3 Mpc) dwarf galaxies. We followed the formulism used by Burkhart et al. (2010) in a study of the SMC. We found that there is evidence of turbulence in dwarf galaxies at a level comparable to that found in the SMC, but we have found no correlation between integrated star formation rates and integrated kurtosis values nor a clear correlation between kurtosis as a function of radius with gas surface density and star formation profiles. We are grateful for a summer internship provided by the Research Experiences for Undergraduates program at Northern Arizona University, run by Dr. Kathy Eastwood and Dr. David Trilling and funded by the National Science Foundation through grant AST-1004107.

  7. GAS, STARS, AND STAR FORMATION IN ALFALFA DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G. E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: jarle@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov

    2012-06-15

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and H I components of 229 low H I mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H I masses <10{sup 7.7} M{sub Sun} and H I line widths <80 km s{sup -1}. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M{sub *}) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M{sub *} obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper H I mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M{sub *} than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H I depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that H I disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  8. Gas, Stars, and Star Formation in Alfalfa Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Shan; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Brinchmann, Jarle; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Neff, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the global properties of the stellar and Hi components of 229 low H i mass dwarf galaxies extracted from the ALFALFA survey, including a complete sample of 176 galaxies with H i masses <10(sup 7.7) solar mass and Hi line widths <80 kilometers per second. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data are combined with photometric properties derived from Galaxy Evolution Explorer to derive stellar masses (M*) and star formation rates (SFRs) by fitting their UV-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In optical images, many of the ALFALFA dwarfs are faint and of low surface brightness; only 56% of those within the SDSS footprint have a counterpart in the SDSS spectroscopic survey. A large fraction of the dwarfs have high specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and estimates of their SFRs and M* obtained by SED fitting are systematically smaller than ones derived via standard formulae assuming a constant SFR. The increased dispersion of the SSFR distribution at M* approximately less than10(exp 8)M(sub 0) is driven by a set of dwarf galaxies that have low gas fractions and SSFRs; some of these are dE/dSphs in the Virgo Cluster. The imposition of an upper Hi mass limit yields the selection of a sample with lower gas fractions for their M* than found for the overall ALFALFA population. Many of the ALFALFA dwarfs, particularly the Virgo members, have H i depletion timescales shorter than a Hubble time. An examination of the dwarf galaxies within the full ALFALFA population in the context of global star formation (SF) laws is consistent with the general assumptions that gas-rich galaxies have lower SF efficiencies than do optically selected populations and that Hi disks are more extended than stellar ones.

  9. Did the Solar system form in a sequential triggered star formation event?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard J.; Dale, James E.

    2016-02-01

    The presence and abundance of the short-lived radioisotopes (SLRs) 26Al and 60Fe during the formation of the Solar system is difficult to explain unless the Sun formed in the vicinity of one or more massive star(s) that exploded as supernovae. Two different scenarios have been proposed to explain the delivery of SLRs to the protosolar nebula: (i) direct pollution of the protosolar disc by supernova ejecta, and (ii) the formation of the Sun in a sequential star formation event in which supernovae shockwaves trigger further star formation which is enriched in SLRs. The sequentially triggered model has been suggested as being more astrophysically likely than the direct pollution scenario. In this paper, we investigate this claim by analysing a combination of N-body and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of star formation. We find that sequential star formation would result in large age spreads (or even bi-modal age distributions for spatially coincident events) due to the dynamical relaxation of the first star formation event(s). Secondly, we discuss the probability of triggering spatially and temporally discrete populations of stars and find this to be only possible in very contrived situations. Taken together, these results suggest that the formation of the Solar system in a triggered star formation event is as improbable, if not more so, than the direct pollution of the protosolar disc by a supernova.

  10. Observational studies of regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Heather Danielle Blythe

    2013-03-01

    Massive stars have a profound influence on their surroundings. However, relatively little is known about their formation. The study of massive star formation is hindered by a lack of observational evidence, primarily due to difficulties observing massive stars at early stages in their development. The Red MSX Source survey (RMS survey) is a valuable tool with which to address these issues. Near-infrared H- and K-band spectra were taken for 247 candidate massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), selected from the RMS survey. 195 (∼80%) of the targets are YSOs, of which 131 are massive YSOs (LBOL>5E3L⊙, M>8 M⊙). This is the largest spectroscopic study of massive YSOs to date. This study covers minimally obscured objects right through to very red, dusty sources. Almost all YSOs show some evidence for emission lines, though there is a wide variety of observed properties, with HI, H2 Fe II, and CO among the most commonly observed lines. Evidence for disks and outflows was frequently seen. Comparisons of Brγ and H2 emission with low mass YSOs suggest that the emission mechanism for these lines is the same for low-, intermediate-, and high-mass YSOs, i.e. high-mass YSOs appear to resemble scaled-up versions of low-mass YSOs. It was found that the YSOs form an evolutionary sequence, based on their spectra, consistent with the existing theoretical models. Type I YSOs have strong H2 emission, no ionized lines, and are redder than the other two subtypes. As such, these are considered to be the youngest sources. The Type III sources are bluest, and therefore considered to be the oldest subtype. They have strong H I lines and fluorescent Fe II 1.6878 μm emission. They may also have weak H2 emission. Type III sources may even be beginning to form a mini-H II region. XSHOOTER data from 10 Herbig Be stars were analysed. The evidence suggests that winds and disks are common among Herbig stars, as they are among their main sequence classical Be star counterparts. Line

  11. Deuterium Fractionation just after the Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, D.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have recently conducted a five-point strip observation of the DCO+, H13CO+, DNC, HN13C, and N2H+ lines toward low mass Class I protostar L1551 IRS5, and have evaluated the deuterium fractionation ratios DCO+/HCO+ and DNC/HNC. The DCO+/HCO+ ratio is found to be lower toward the protostar position than those toward the adjacent positions. On the other hand, the DNC/HNC ratio does not show such a decrease toward the protostar position. This suggests that the deuterium fractionation ratio of the neutral species is conserved after the star formation. If so, the deuterium fractionation of the neutral species can be used as a novel tracer to investigate the initial condition of the star formation process.

  12. Star Formation and the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bally, John; Boss, Alan; Papanastassiou, Dimitri; Sandford, Scott; Sargent, Anneila

    1988-01-01

    We have seen that studies of nearby star-forming regions are beginning to reveal the first signs of protoplanetary disks. Studies of interstellar and interplanetary grains are starting to provide clues about the processing and incorporation of matter into the Solar System. Studies of meteorites have yielded isotopic anomalies which indicate that some of the grains and inclusions in these bodies are very primitive. Although we have not yet detected a true interstellar grain, some of these materials have not been extensively modified since their removal from the ISM. We are indeed close to seeing our interstellar heritage. The overlap between astronomical and Solar System studies is in its infancy. What future experiments, observations, and missions can be performed in the near future that will greatly enhance our understanding of star formation and the formation of the Solar System?

  13. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  14. Star formation in cooling flow galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiel, Nicolas; Gorgas, Javier

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of central dominant galaxies are reviewed. Through the analysis of absorption spectral features (mainly the strength of the Mg triplet at 5175 A and the break in 4000 A), both in the galaxy centers and along the radii, we will be able to impose limits on the ongoing star formation as the ultimate fate for the large amounts of accreted gas. With the same aim we will carry out a dynamical study based on velocity dispersion measurements.

  15. Turbulence and Star Formation in Interacting Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auge, Connor; Chien, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the turbulent gas motion in the tidal bridges and tails of colliding galaxies to see if there is a relation between this phenomenon and star formation within these galaxies. Previous studies have shown that the higher-order statistical moments, i.e. skewness and kurtosis, of the neutral hydrogen (HI) gas are linked to their turbulent motion in a galaxy. Such turbulences are considered to be potentially crucial in enhancing star formation at regions where the gas density is low, for example, the outer disk of a spiral galaxy, a dwarf galaxy, and tidal tails in an interacting system. Here we present these studies on a sample of colliding galaxy systems in detail. We create skewness and kurtosis maps representing the distribution of turbulent gas in these galaxies as a whole system and of the individual regions we are interested in. These maps also inform us as to whether the gas motion in these regions is sub-sonic or super-sonic. In order to investigate the relation between the turbulent gas motion and the star formation in low-density regions such as tidal tails, we compare these maps to far-ultraviolet images taken by GALEX space telescope.

  16. A GALAXY BLAZES WITH STAR FORMATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Most galaxies form new stars at a fairly slow rate, but members of a rare class known as 'starburst' galaxies blaze with extremely active star formation. Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are perfecting a technique to determine the history of starburst activity in galaxies by using the colors of star clusters. Measuring the clusters' colors yields information about stellar temperatures. Since young stars are blue, and older stars redder, the colors can be related to the ages, somewhat similar to counting the rings in a fallen tree trunk in order to determine the tree's age. The galaxy NGC 3310 is forming clusters of new stars at a prodigious rate. Astronomer Gerhardt Meurer of The Johns Hopkins University leads a team of collaborators who are studying several starburst galaxies, including NGC 3310, which is showcased in this month's Hubble Heritage image. There are several hundred star clusters in NGC 3310, visible in the Heritage image as the bright blue diffuse objects that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. Each of these star clusters represents the formation of up to about a million stars, a process that takes less than 100,000 years. In addition, hundreds of individual young, luminous stars can be seen throughout the galaxy. Once formed, the star clusters become redder with age as the most massive and bluest stars exhaust their fuel and burn out. Measurements in this image of the wide range of cluster colors show that they have ages ranging from about one million up to more than one hundred million years. This suggests that the starburst 'turned on' over 100 million years ago. It may have been triggered when a companion galaxy collided with NGC 3310. These observations may change astronomers' view of starbursts. Starbursts were once thought to be brief episodes, resulting from catastrophic events like a galactic collision. However, the wide range of cluster ages in NGC 3310 suggests that the starbursting can continue for an extended interval, once

  17. Astrochemical studies of galactic star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ronak Yogendra

    2000-08-01

    This thesis characterizes and quantifies a key part of the chemical evolution associated with star formation towards nearby molecular clouds by analyzing the radiation from abundant molecules and their deuterium- substituted counterparts, or deuterated molecules. As clouds evolve to form stars, molecular spectra probe the dynamics. Deuterium fractionation ratios sample the variations in temperature, density and activity of protostellar systems and offer clues into their dynamics. We present three projects to examine the scope and scale of deuterium fractionation of ammonia, NH3, and formylium, HCO+, in low mass star forming regions. Analysis of single aperture NH2D and NH3 spectra from prestellar and protostellar cores indicates the predominance of gas-phase reactions in the production of these species. Our survey suggests that these species deplete onto grain surfaces at late times in the evolution of molecular cores into protostars. Since the collapse of protostars is rapid, deuterium fractionation of ammonia is not likely to be affected substantially by grain chemistry. This should be the case for even more massive molecular clouds such as Orion Molecular Cloud I or Sgr B2. Thus, observed NH2D/NH3 values probe the cold gas-phase evolution of molecular clouds. The relationship between gas dynamics and star formation are explored in our survey of DCO+ and H13CO+. We extend previous analyses of the DCO+HCO+ as a measure of the ionization fraction and magnetic field-neutral coupling of molecular clouds by examining high energy transitions. This method traces warmer, denser gas associated with near-protostellar regions and clustered star formation. Although we find that most DCO+HCO + values are consistent with previous studies, we also discover regions where DCO+HCO+ is larger than predicted by the paradigm of ambipolar diffusion-regulated star formation. Single aperture surveys examine the ambient gas on ~105 AU scales. However, only aperture synthesis studies

  18. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martín, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}≈110 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (≲ 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (Σ{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ≈50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ≈150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-σ relation.

  19. The FMOS-COSMOS survey of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6. II. The mass-metallicity relation and the dependence on star formation rate and dust extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Chu, J.; Hasinger, G.; Kashino, D.; Silverman, J. D.; Kewley, L. J.; Daddi, E.; Renzini, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Nagao, T.; Arimoto, N.; Kartaltepe, J.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Maier, C.; Geller, M. J.; Capak, P.; Ilbert, O.; Kajisawa, M.; Collaboration: COSMOS Team; and others

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the relationships between stellar mass, gas-phase oxygen abundance (metallicity), star formation rate (SFR), and dust content of star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 using Subaru/FMOS spectroscopy in the COSMOS field. The mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at z ∼ 1.6 is steeper than the relation observed in the local universe. The steeper MZ relation at z ∼ 1.6 is mainly due to evolution in the stellar mass where the MZ relation begins to turnover and flatten. This turnover mass is 1.2 dex larger at z ∼ 1.6. The most massive galaxies at z ∼ 1.6 (∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}) are enriched to the level observed in massive galaxies in the local universe. The MZ relation we measure at z ∼ 1.6 supports the suggestion of an empirical upper metallicity limit that does not significantly evolve with redshift. We find an anti-correlation between metallicity and SFR for galaxies at a fixed stellar mass at z ∼ 1.6, which is similar to trends observed in the local universe. We do not find a relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and SFR that is independent of redshift; rather, our data suggest that there is redshift evolution in this relation. We examine the relation between stellar mass, metallicity, and dust extinction, and find that at a fixed stellar mass, dustier galaxies tend to be more metal rich. From examination of the stellar masses, metallicities, SFRs, and dust extinctions, we conclude that stellar mass is most closely related to dust extinction.

  20. Star Formation Beyond the Solar Circle: A Survey of Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerton, Charles R.

    2013-06-01

    This talk will review and distill the results of major radio, infrared, and combined radio/IR, surveys that have focused on the identification and characterization of active regions of star formation in the outer Galaxy. These surveys reveal that, in terms of star formation activity, the Milky Way beyond the solar circle is not a vast wasteland, but rather it is an area containing numerous regions of star formation well placed for detailed individual study, for large-scale studies of star formation within spiral arms, and for comparative studies with star formation occurring in different environments such as the inner Galaxy and Galactic center.

  1. STAR FORMATION ACROSS THE W3 COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Tapia, Mauricio; Megías, Guillermo D.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-15

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  2. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Megías, Guillermo D.; Tapia, Mauricio; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Alves, Joáo F.

    2015-09-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  3. HIERARCHICAL STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY LEGUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Adamo, Angela; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Aloisi, Alessandra; Bright, Stacey N.; Cignoni, Michele; Lee, Janice; Sabbi, Elena; Andrews, Jennifer; Calzetti, Daniela; Annibali, Francesca; Evans, Aaron S.; Johnson, Kelsey; Gallagher III, John S.; Grebel, Eva K.; Hunter, Deidre A.; Kim, Hwihyun; Smith, Linda J.; Thilker, David; and others

    2014-05-20

    Hierarchical structure in ultraviolet images of 12 late-type LEGUS galaxies is studied by determining the numbers and fluxes of nested regions as a function of size from ∼1 to ∼200 pc, and the number as a function of flux. Two starburst dwarfs, NGC 1705 and NGC 5253, have steeper number-size and flux-size distributions than the others, indicating high fractions of the projected areas filled with star formation. Nine subregions in seven galaxies have similarly steep number-size slopes, even when the whole galaxies have shallower slopes. The results suggest that hierarchically structured star-forming regions several hundred parsecs or larger represent common unit structures. Small galaxies dominated by only a few of these units tend to be starbursts. The self-similarity of young stellar structures down to parsec scales suggests that star clusters form in the densest parts of a turbulent medium that also forms loose stellar groupings on larger scales. The presence of super star clusters in two of our starburst dwarfs would follow from the observed structure if cloud and stellar subregions more readily coalesce when self-gravity in the unit cell contributes more to the total gravitational potential.

  4. Investigation of Star Formation: Instrumentation and Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd Justin

    A thorough exploration of star formation necessitates observation across the electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, observations in the submillimeter and ultra-violet allow one to observe very early stage star formation and to trace the evolution from molecular cloud collapse to stellar ignition. Submillimeter observations are essential for piercing the heart of heavily obscured stellar nurseries to observe star formation in its infancy. Ultra-violet observations allow one to observe stars just after they emerge from their surrounding environment, allowing higher energy radiation to escape. To make detailed observations of early stage star formation in both spectral regimes requires state-of-the-art detector technology and instrumentation. In this dissertation, I discuss the calibration and feasibility of detectors developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and specially processed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to increase their quantum efficiency at far-ultraviolet wavelengths. A cursory treatment of the delta-doping process is presented, followed by a thorough discussion of calibration procedures developed at JPL and in the Laboratory for Astronomical and Space Instrumentation at ASU. Subsequent discussion turns to a novel design for a Modular Imager Cell forming one possible basis for construction of future large focal plane arrays. I then discuss the design, fabrication, and calibration of a sounding rocket imaging system developed using the MIC and these specially processed detectors. Finally, I discuss one scientific application of sub-mm observations. I used data from the Heinrich Hertz Sub-millimeter Telescope and the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) to observe sub-millimeter transitions and continuum emission towards AFGL 2591. I tested the use of vibrationally excited HCN emission to probe the protostellar accretion disk structure. I measured vibrationally excited HCN line ratios in order to elucidate the appropriate excitation mechanism. I find

  5. The roles of atomic and molecular gas on the redshift evolution of star formation and metallicity in galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2013-03-01

    We study the redshift evolution of neutral and molecular gas in the interstellar medium with the results from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution, which track the cold gas related physical processes in radially resolved galaxy disks. Two kinds of prescriptions are adopted to describe the conversion between molecular and neutral gas in the ISM: one is related to the gas surface density and gas metallicity based on the model results by Krumholz, Mckee & Tumlinson; the other is related the pressure of ISM. We try four types of star formation laws in the models to study the effect of the molecular gas component and the star formation time scale on the model results, and find that the H2 dependent star formation rate with constant star formation efficiency is the preferred star formation law. We run the models based on both Millennium and Millennium II Simulation haloes, and the model parameters are adjusted to fit the observations at z = 0 from THINGS/HERACLES and ALFALFA/COLD GASS. We give predictions for the redshift evolution of cosmic star formation density, H2 to HI cosmic ratios, gas to star mass ratios and gas metallicity vs stellar mass relation. Based on the model results, we find that: (i) the difference in the H2 to HI ratio at z > 3 between the two H2 fraction prescriptions can help future observations to test which prescription is better; (ii) a constant redshift independent star formation time scale will postpone the star formation processes at high redshift and cause obvious redshift evolution for the relation between gas metallicity and stellar mass in galaxies at z < 3.

  6. The Hall effect in star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braiding, C. R.; Wardle, M.

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation by regulating the removal of angular momentum from collapsing molecular cloud cores. Hall diffusion is known to be important to the magnetic field behaviour at many of the intermediate densities and field strengths encountered during the gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores into protostars, and yet its role in the star formation process is not well studied. We present a semianalytic self-similar model of the collapse of rotating isothermal molecular cloud cores with both Hall and ambipolar diffusion, and similarity solutions that demonstrate the profound influence of the Hall effect on the dynamics of collapse. The solutions show that the size and sign of the Hall parameter can change the size of the protostellar disc by up to an order of magnitude and the protostellar accretion rate by 50 per cent when the ratio of the Hall to ambipolar diffusivities is varied between -0.5 ≤ηH/ηA≤ 0.2. These changes depend upon the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the axis of rotation and create a preferred handedness to the solutions that could be observed in protostellar cores using next-generation instruments such as ALMA. Hall diffusion also determines the strength and position of the shocks that bound the pseudo and rotationally supported discs, and can introduce subshocks that further slow accretion on to the protostar. In cores that are not initially rotating (not examined here), Hall diffusion can even induce rotation, which could give rise to disc formation and resolve the magnetic braking catastrophe. The Hall effect clearly influences the dynamics of gravitational collapse and its role in controlling the magnetic braking and radial diffusion of the field merits further exploration in numerical simulations of star formation.

  7. The Star-Formation Region SNO 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulbudaghian, A. L.

    2014-06-01

    The star-formation region SNO 87 is associated with the dark cloud LDN 212. 12CO(1-0) observations of a part of the molecular cloud associated with SNO 87 show that it lies somewhat to the north of the densest part of the molecular cloud. There is a bipolar molecular outflow from SNO 87, both branches of which are blue, i.e., the velocity is directed toward us with a velocity of ~3.5 km/s relative to the cloud. 12CO(1-0) observations of a part of the cloud lying to the E of SNO 87 show that this part of the cloud rotates with an angular velocity Ω = 2.44·10-14 s-1. SNO 87 contains several stars that are coupled with nebular filaments, bursts, and Herbig-Haro objects. It is also associated with the point source IRAS 18064-2413.

  8. A search for technetium (Tc II) in barium stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little-Marenin, Irene R.; Little, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched without success for the lines of Tc II at 2647.02, 2610.00 and 2543.24 A in IUE spectra of the barium stars HR 5058, Omicron Vir, and Zeta Cap. The lack of Tc II implies that the observed s-process enhancements were produced more than half a million years ago and supports the suggestion that the spectral peculiarities of barium stars are probably related to the binary nature of the stars.

  9. Probing triggered star formation: young stars associated with AFGL333 in W3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. S.; Jose, J.; Sherry, W. H.; Meyer, M.

    2014-03-01

    We present our observational studies on star formation associated with the AFGL333 complex and W3-south cluster in the high density layer (HDL) region located in between the W3 giant molecular cloud and W4 H II region. This region is suggested to be experiencing triggered/assisted mode of star formation. We have conducted a multi-wavelength study of the region using optical, near- and mid-IR data. Using Spitzer data and from our deep near-IR observations we identified and classified young stellar objects. We present preliminary results on census of young stellar population, extinction map, stellar density, and spatial distribution of the young stars in the region. We find about 580 YSOs associated with AFGL333. The ages of YSO candidates range between 0.1-5 Myr with wide age spread. Spatial distribution of class I and class II sources suggests that the IR dark cloud (IRDC) region harbors more class I sources than its surrounding area, suggesting relatively younger YSO population.

  10. Formation of the first stars and quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiman, Z.

    We examine various observable signatures of the first generation of stars and low-luminosity quasars, including the metal enrichment, radiation background, and dust opacity/emission that they produce. We calculate the formation history of collapsed baryonic halos, based on an extension of the Press-Schechter formalism, incorporating the effects of pressure and H2-dissociation. We then use the observed CH ratio at z=3 in the Lyman-α forest clouds to obtain an average the star formation efficiency in these halos. Similarly, we fit the efficiency of black-hole formation, and the shape of quasar light curves, to match the observed quasar luminosity function (LF) between z=2-4, and use this fit to extrapolate the quasar LF to faint magnitudes and high redshifts. To be consistent with the lack of faint point-sources in the Hubble Deep Field, we impose a lower limit of ~ 75 km s-1 for the circular velocities of halos harboring central black holes. We find that in a λCDM model, stars reionize the IGM at zreion=9-13, and quasars at z=12. Observationally, zreion can be measured by the forthcoming MAP and Planck Surveyor satellites, via the damping of CMB anisotropies by ~10% on small angular scales due to electron scattering. We show that if reionization occurs later, at 5 <~ zreion <~ 10, then it can be measured from the spectra of individual sources. We also find that the Next Generation Space Telescope will be able to directly image about 1-40 star clusters, and a few faint quasars, from z > 10 per square arcminute. The amount of dust produced by the first supernovae has an optical depth of τ=0.1-1 towards high redshift sources, and the reprocessed UV flux of stars and quasars distorts the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) by a Compton y-parameter comparable to the COBE limit, y ~ 1.5 × 10-5.

  11. Bursty star formation feedback and cooling outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Teresita; Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Slyz, Adrianne; Devriendt, Julien

    2016-10-01

    We study how outflows of gas launched from a central galaxy undergoing repeated starbursts propagate through the circum-galactic medium (CGM), using the simulation code RAMSES. We assume that the outflow from the disc can be modelled as a rapidly moving bubble of hot gas at ˜1 kpc above disc, then ask what happens as it moves out further into the halo around the galaxy on ˜100 kpc scales. To do this, we run 60 two-dimensional simulations scanning over parameters of the outflow. Each of these is repeated with and without radiative cooling, assuming a primordial gas composition to give a lower bound on the importance of cooling. In a large fraction of radiative-cooling cases we are able to form rapidly outflowing cool gas from in situ cooling of the flow. We show that the amount of cool gas formed depends strongly on the `burstiness' of energy injection; sharper, stronger bursts typically lead to a larger fraction of cool gas forming in the outflow. The abundance ratio of ions in the CGM may therefore change in response to the detailed historical pattern of star formation. For instance, outflows generated by star formation with short, intense bursts contain up to 60 per cent of their gas mass at temperatures <5 × 104 K; for near-continuous star formation, the figure is ≲5 per cent. Further study of cosmological simulations, and of idealized simulations with e.g. metal-cooling, magnetic fields and/or thermal conduction, will help to understand the precise signature of bursty outflows on observed ion abundances.

  12. Interstellar MHD Turbulence and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    This chapter reviews the nature of turbulence in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and its connections to the star formation (SF) process. The ISM is turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating, and is subject to heating and cooling processes that control its thermodynamic behavior, causing it to behave approximately isobarically, in spite of spanning several orders of magnitude in density and temperature. The turbulence in the warm and hot ionized components of the ISM appears to be trans- or subsonic, and thus to behave nearly incompressibly. However, the neutral warm and cold components are highly compressible, as a consequence of both thermal instability (TI) in the atomic gas and of moderately-to-strongly supersonic motions in the roughly isothermal cold atomic and molecular components. Within this context, we discuss: (1) the production and statistical distribution of turbulent density fluctuations in both isothermal and polytropic media; (2) the nature of the clumps produced by TI, noting that, contrary to classical ideas, they in general accrete mass from their environment in spite of exhibiting sharp discontinuities at their boundaries; (3) the density-magnetic field correlation (and, at low densities, lack thereof) in turbulent density fluctuations, as a consequence of the superposition of the different wave modes in the turbulent flow; (4) the evolution of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio (MFR) in density fluctuations as they are built up by dynamic compressions; (5) the formation of cold, dense clouds aided by TI, in both the hydrodynamic (HD) and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) cases; (6) the expectation that star-forming molecular clouds are likely to be undergoing global gravitational contraction, rather than being near equilibrium, as generally believed, and (7) the regulation of the star formation rate (SFR) in such gravitationally contracting clouds by stellar feedback which, rather than keeping the clouds from collapsing, evaporates and disperses

  13. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  14. Star formation along the Hubble sequence. Radial structure of the star formation of CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.; Cid Fernandes, R.; Pérez, E.; García-Benito, R.; López Fernández, R.; Lacerda, E. A. D.; Cortijo-Ferrero, C.; de Amorim, A. L.; Vale Asari, N.; Sánchez, S. F.; Walcher, C. J.; Wisotzki, L.; Mast, D.; Alves, J.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Galbany, L.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Márquez, I.; Masegosa, J.; Mollá, M.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The spatially resolved stellar population content of today's galaxies holds important information for understanding the different processes that contribute to the star formation and mass assembly histories of galaxies. The aim of this paper is to characterize the radial structure of the star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies in the nearby Universe as represented by a uniquely rich and diverse data set drawn from the CALIFA survey. The sample under study contains 416 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy, covering a wide range of Hubble types and stellar masses ranging from M⋆ ~ 109 to 7 × 1011 M⊙. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to derive 2D maps and radial profiles of the intensity of the star formation rate in the recent past (ΣSFR), as well as related properties, such as the local specific star formation rate (sSFR), defined as the ratio between ΣSFR and the stellar mass surface density (μ⋆). To emphasize the behavior of these properties for galaxies that are on and off the main sequence of star formation (MSSF), we stack the individual radial profiles in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and several stellar masses. Our main results are: (a) the intensity of the star formation rate shows declining profiles that exhibit very small differences between spirals with values at R = 1 half light radius (HLR) within a factor two of ΣSFR ~ 20 M⊙Gyr-1pc-2. The dispersion in the ΣSFR(R) profiles is significantly smaller in late type spirals (Sbc, Sc, Sd). This confirms that the MSSF is a sequence of galaxies with nearly constant ΣSFR. (b) sSFR values scale with Hubble type and increase radially outward with a steeper slope in the inner 1 HLR. This behavior suggests that galaxies are quenched inside-out and that this process is faster in the central, bulge-dominated part than in the disks. (c) As a whole and at all radii, E and S0 are off the MSSF with SFR much smaller than spirals of the

  15. Late Pop III Star Formation During the Epoch of Reionization: Results from the Renaissance Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on the formation of Population III (Pop III) stars at redshift 7.6 from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich radiation transport hydrodynamics cosmological adaptive-mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. In a survey volume of about 220 comoving Mpc3, we found 14 Pop III galaxies with recent star formation. The surprisingly late formation of Pop III stars is possible due to two factors: (i) the metal enrichment process is local and slow, leaving plenty of pristine gas to exist in the vast volume; and (ii) strong Lyman-Werner radiation from vigorous metal-enriched star formation in early galaxies suppresses Pop III formation in (“not so”) small primordial halos with mass less than ˜3 × 107 M ⊙. We quantify the properties of these Pop III galaxies and their Pop III star formation environments. We look for analogs to the recently discovered luminous Ly α emitter CR7, which has been interpreted as a Pop III star cluster within or near a metal-enriched star-forming galaxy. We find and discuss a system similar to this in some respects, however, the Pop III star cluster is far less massive and luminous than CR7 is inferred to be.

  16. The Star Formation History of Void Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanonik, Kathryn

    The Cosmic Web that permeates our universe is defined by the alignment of galaxies into filaments, clusters, and walls, as well as by the voids between them which are (mostly) empty. Void galaxies, found occupying these underdense regions, are an environmentally defined population whose isolated nature and extreme environment provides an ideal opportunity to test theories of galaxy formation and evolution. Their existence also poses a well defined observational constraint to Lambda CDM cosmological models. We propose to do UV imaging of a sample of SDSS selected void galaxies located in the deepest underdensities of nearby voids. Our galaxies were selected using the Delaunay Tesselation Field estimator, a novel, purely structural and geometric technique, to produce a sample that more uniformly represents the void galaxy population. In addition, we use a powerful new backend of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope that allows us to probe the neutral gas content in a huge volume around each targeted void galaxy, while still resolving individual galaxy kinematics and detecting faint companions in H I. We specifically aim to study the star formation history of these systems, which appear to be in a more youthful stage of their evolution than field galaxies. With this combination of UV and H I data we will address questions ranging from how galaxies get their gas, how they form stars, and what role environment plays in these processes.

  17. Chemical complexity and star-formation in merging galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. A.; Heiderman, A.; Iono, D.; VIXENS Team

    2013-03-01

    When galaxies merge the resulting conditions are some of the most extreme found anywhere in nature. Large gas flows, shocks and active black holes all can affect the ISM. Nearby merging galaxies with strong starbursts are the only places where we can conduct detailed study of star formation in conditions that mimic those under which the majority of stars in the universe formed. Here we study molecular gas tracers in 8 galaxies selected from the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) survey. Each galaxy has also been observed using the integral field unit spectrograph VIRUS-P, allowing us to investigate the relation between the chemical state of the gas, star formation and total gas content. Full details can be found in Heiderman et al. (2011). Here we report on new results obtained from IRAM-30m/NRO-45m 3mm line surveys towards 14 positions in these 8 merging galaxies. We detect ≈ 25 different molecular transitions towards these objects, many which have never been observed in these galaxies before. Our measurements show that the mean fraction of dense gas increases in later-stage mergers (Fig. 1, left), as does the average optical depth of the gas. Molecular diagnostic diagrams (Fig. 1, right) show that molecular regions we probe are, in general, UV photon dominated. Triggered AGN activity, and/or cosmic ray ionisation (from SNe II in the starburst) are not yet energetically important in determining the state of the gas.

  18. Effects of Ionization Feedback in Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Thomas; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present 3D high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of massive star formation. We model the collapse of a massive molecular cloud core forming a high-mass star in its center. We use a version of the FLASH code that has been extended by including sink particles which are a source of both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. The sink particles evolve according to a prestellar model which determines the stellar and accretion luminosities. Radiation transfer is done using the hybrid characteristics raytracing approach on the adaptive mesh developed by Rijkhorst et al. (2006). The radiative transfer module has been augmented to allow simulations with arbitrarily high resolution. Our highest resolution models resolve the disk scale height by at least 16 zones. Opacities for non-ionizing radiation have been added to account for the accretion heating, which is expected to be strong at the initial stage of star formation and believed to prevent fragmentation. Studies of collapsing massive cores show the formation of a gravitationally highly unstable disk. The accretion heating is not strong enough to suppress this instability. The ionizing radiation builds up an H II region around the protostar, which destroys the accretion disk close to it. We describe preliminary results, with a focus on how long the H II region remains confined by the accretion flow, and whether it can ever cut off accretion entirely. Thomas Peters acknowledges support from a Kade Fellowship for his visit to the American Museum of Natural History. He is a fellow of the International Max Planck Research School for Astronomy and Cosmic Physics at the University of Heidelberg and the Heidelberg Graduate School of Fundamental Physics. We also thank the DFG for support via the Emmy Noether Grant BA 3607/1 and the individual grant KL1358/5.

  19. STAR FORMATION AND YOUNG STELLAR CONTENT IN THE W3 GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Ingraham, Alana; Martin, Peter G.; Polychroni, Danae; Moore, Toby J. T.

    2011-12-10

    In this work, we have carried out an in-depth analysis of the young stellar content in the W3 giant molecular cloud (GMC). The young stellar object (YSO) population was identified and classified in the Infrared Array Camera/Multiband Imaging Photometer color-magnitude space according to the 'Class' scheme and compared to other classifications based on intrinsic properties. Class 0/I and II candidates were also compared to low-/intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars selected through their colors and magnitudes in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find that a reliable color/magnitude selection of low-mass PMS stars in the infrared requires prior knowledge of the protostar population, while intermediate-mass objects can be more reliably identified. By means of the minimum spanning tree algorithm and our YSO spatial distribution and age maps, we investigated the YSO groups and the star formation history in W3. We find signatures of clustered and distributed star formation in both triggered and quiescent environments. The central/western parts of the GMC are dominated by large-scale turbulence likely powered by isolated bursts of star formation that triggered secondary star formation events. Star formation in the eastern high-density layer (HDL) also shows signs of quiescent and triggered stellar activity, as well as extended periods of star formation. While our findings support triggering as a key factor for inducing and enhancing some of the major star-forming activity in the HDL (e.g., W3 Main/W3(OH)), we argue that some degree of quiescent or spontaneous star formation is required to explain the observed YSO population. Our results also support previous studies claiming a spontaneous origin for the isolated massive star(s) powering KR 140.

  20. Star formation and chemical abundances in clumpy irregular galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, A.M.; Edwards, S.; Heidmann, J.

    1982-01-15

    Clumpy irregular galaxies consist of several bright clumps which are huge H II complexes (about 100 times brighter and more massive than 30 Doradus) and contain about 10/sup 5/ O and B stars. Image-tube spectrograms with 1--3 A resolution have been obtained of the brightest emission regions of three clumpy galaxies and one candidate clumpy galaxy with the Mauna Kea 2.24 m telescope. The electron temperatures were found to be in the range 7000--9000 K and electron densities a few hundred cm/sup 3/: quite typical for normal H II regions. The abundances of O, N. S in Mrk 432 are comparable to those in Orion, while the three clumpy galaxies are slightly deficient in O and S (by factors of 2 to 4) and N (by factors of 3 to 6). The galaxies appear to be normal (like Sc galaxies) in mass and composition. Supernovae remnants are indicated by the high (S II)/H..cap alpha.. ratio. Possible triggering mechanisms for the exceptional star formation activity are discussed.

  1. Star formation and multi-phase interstellar medium in the first galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricotti, M.; Parry, O.; Polisensky, E.; Bovill, M.

    Star formation and metal enrichment in the first galaxies is discussed emphasizing similarities to the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Universe. I present preliminary results from new radiation-hydrodynamic cosmological simulations for the formation of the first galaxies performed with the ART code. The simulations include a detailed model for star formation in a multi-phase ISM, including H_2 formation catalyzed by H- and on dust grains. The first metals are provided by Population III stars, while Population II star formation takes place in resolved molecular clouds. The properties of the first galaxies in these new simulations are in agreement with previous lower resolution simulations in which was found remarkable similarities between the fossils of the first galaxies and the faintest dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group.

  2. The Spatially Resolved Star Formation History of NGC 300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogarten, S. M.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Williams, B. F.

    2009-01-01

    We present the star formation histories (SFH) of two regions in NGC 300 from the ACS Nearby Galaxies Survey Treasury (ANGST). ANGST is using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to determine the star formation histories of a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies. We demonstrate that even small regions within a galaxy contain enough stars to derive the SFH by comparing color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of the resolved stellar populations to synthetic CMDs from stellar evolution models. Of the two regions selected, one can be identified as star-forming from its UV, Hα, and dust emission. The SFH of this region shows significant star formation over the past 10 Myr, unlike a non-star-forming region of the same size. These preliminary results will form the basis of a larger study of spatially-resolved star formation in nearby spirals.

  3. Ongoing Massive Star Formation in the Bulge of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; Panagia, N.; Scuderi, S.; Romaniello, M.; Spaans, M.; de Wit, W. J.; Kirshner, R.

    2002-02-01

    ``hiding'' within the point sources. For the ``bluest'' sources, the upper limit is only a few hundred Msolar. We conclude that the formation of massive stars outside clusters (or in very low mass clusters) is occurring in the bulge of M51. The estimated star formation rate in the bulge of M51 is (1-2)×10-3 Msolar yr-1, depending on the adopted initial mass function. With the observed total amount of gas in the bulge, ~4×105 Msolar, and the observed normal gas-to-dust ratio of ~150, this star formation rate could be sustained for about (2-4)×108 yr. This suggests that the ongoing massive star formation in the bulge of M51 is fed/triggered by the interaction with its companion about 4×108 yr ago. The star formation in the bulge of M51 is compared with that in bulges of other spirals. Theoretical predictions of star formation suggest that isolated massive stars might be formed in clouds in which H2, [O I] 63 μm and [C II] 158 μm are the dominant coolants. This is expected to occur in regions of rather low optical depth, AV<=1, with a hot source that can dissociate the CO molecules. These conditions are met in the bulge of M51, where the extinction is low and where CO can be destroyed by the radiation from the bright nuclear starburst cluster in the center. The mode of formation of massive stars in the bulge of M51 may resemble the star formation in the early universe, when the CO and dust contents were low because of the low metallicity. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  4. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies: Life in a Rough Neighborhood

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S

    2003-10-16

    Star formation within dwarf galaxies is governed by several factors. Many of these factors are external, including ram-pressure stripping, tidal stripping, and heating by external UV radiation. The latter, in particular, may prevent star formation in the smallest systems. Internal factors include negative feedback in the form of UV radiation, winds and supernovae from massive stars. These act to reduce the star formation efficiency within dwarf systems, which may, in turn, solve several theoretical and observational problems associated with galaxy formation. In this contribution, we discuss our recent work being done to examine the importance of the many factors in the evolution of dwarf galaxies.

  5. Tidal resonances in binary star systems. II - Slowly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. E.

    1988-12-01

    The potential energy of tidal interactions in a binary system with rotating components is formulated as a perturbation Hamiltonian which self-consistently couples the dynamics of the rotating stars' oscillations and orbital motion. The action-angle formalism used to discuss tidal resonances in the nonrotating case (Alexander, 1987) is extended to rotating stars. The behavior of a two-mode system and the procedure for treating an arbitrary number of modes are discussed.

  6. Ram pressure induced star formation in Abell 3266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsall, Brittany

    An X-ray observation of the merging galaxy cluster Abell 3266 was obtained via the ROSAT PSPC. This information, along with spectroscopic data from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-clusters Survey (i.e. WINGS), were used to investigate whether ram pressure is a mechanism that influences star formation. Galaxies exhibiting ongoing star formation are identified by the presence of strong Balmer lines (Hbeta), known to correspond to early type stars. Older galaxies where a rapid increase in star formation has recently ceased, known as E+A galaxies, are identified by strong Hbeta absorption coupled with little to no [OII] emission. The correlation between recent star formation and "high" ram pressure, as defined by Kapferer et al. (2009) as ≥ 5 x 10-11 dyn cm-2, was tested and lead to a contradiction of the previously held belief that ram pressure influences star formation on the global cluster scale.

  7. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  8. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  9. Circumnuclear Star Formation in Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquette, Melissa; Hicks, Erin K.; Mueller Sanchez, Francisco; Malkan, Matthew Arnold; Davies, Richard

    2017-01-01

    We examine a group of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies to determine whether there exists a correlation between the circumnuclear starburst age and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus. Using data from the Keck OSIRIS Nearby AGN (KONA) survey, we have a sample size of 40 Seyfert galaxies (split between Seyfert 1s and 2s), in which we measure the circumnuclear properties down to a few tens of parsecs. We determine the age of the most recent episode of circumnuclear star formation by analyzing the equivalent width of the Br Gamma 2.16 micron emission line and further constrain the age using measurements of the K-band mass to light ratio. The results of these analyses will be presented, including a comparison of the Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 subsamples.

  10. Violent Star Formation in NGC 2363: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Rosa M.; Perez, Enrique; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Vilchez, Jose M.; Terlevich, Elena; Terlevich, Roberto; Telles, Eduardo; Rodríguez Espinosa, Jose M.; Mas-Hesse, Miguel; Garcia-Vargas, Maria Luisa; Diaz, Angeles I.; Cepa, Jordi; Castaneda, Hector

    1996-12-01

    In the paper "Violent Star Formation in NGC 2363" by Rosa M. Gonzalez- Delgado, Enrique Perez, Guillermo Tenorio-Tagle, Jose M. Vilchez, Elena Terlevich, Roberto Terlevich, Eduardo Telles, Jose M. Rodriguez-Espinosa, Miguel Mas-Hesse, Maria Luisa Garcia-Vargas, Angeles I. Diaz, Jordi Cepa, and Hector Castaneda (ApJ, 437,239 [1994)), there are three errors in Section 5.4. The Paschen discontinuity in knot A is (0.82 +/- 0.19) x 10^-16^ ergs s^-1^ cm^-2^ A^-1^, the coefficient in the formula in page 258 is 2.445 x 10^11^, and the units in the ordinate axis of Figure 16 are 10^-15^ ergs cm^-2^ s^-1^ A^-1^. These are typographical errors, and they do not affect the determination of the electron temperature using the Paschen jump and the discussion and conclusions in this paper.

  11. Tracking star formation in dwarf cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody Millard

    The evolution of galaxies in dense environments can be affected by close encounters with neighboring galaxies and interactions with the intracluster medium (ICM). Dwarf galaxies may be especially susceptible to these effects due to their low mass. The goal of my dissertation research is to look for signs of star formation in cluster dwarf galaxies by measuring and comparing the r- and u-band luminosity functions of 15 low redshift Abell galaxy clusters using archival data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions are measured in four cluster-centric annuli from stacked cluster data. To account for differences in cluster optical richness, each cluster is scaled according to r200, where r200 is the radius of a sphere, centered on the cluster, whose average density is 200 times the critical density of the universe. The outer region of the cluster sample shows an increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band luminosity function relative to the r-band, indicating star formation in dwarf galaxies. The blue fraction for dwarf galaxies steadily rises with increasing cluster-centric radii. The change in the blue fraction of giant galaxies also increases, but at a lower rate. Additionally, the inner regions of clusters ranging from 0.185 < z < 0.7 from the "Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH)" are used to generate blue- and red-band luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions. Comparisons of the inner region of the CLASH and CFHT clusters show an increase in the blue fraction of dwarf galaxies with redshift that is not present in giant galaxies.

  12. Magnetic Stars After the Hayashi Phase. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolevskij, Yu. V.

    2016-09-01

    The properties of magnetic stars derived from observational data are analyzed. The degree of "magnetic" braking of parent protostars, which depends the magnetic field and mass, is studied. The conditions under which magnetic and "normal" nonmagnetic stars are separated, which appear to depend only on the rotational velocity of the protostars, are examined. The reasons for differences in the average magnitudes of the magnetic field in massive and low-mass magnetic stars are analyzed. The magnetic field structures of magnetic stars and their stability over time (rigidity of rotation) are examined.

  13. ON THE LACK OF EVOLUTION IN GALAXY STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Conroy, Charlie

    2013-01-10

    Using reconstructed galaxy star formation histories, we calculate the instantaneous efficiency of galaxy star formation (i.e., the star formation rate divided by the baryon accretion rate) from z = 8 to the present day. This efficiency exhibits a clear peak near a characteristic halo mass of 10{sup 11.7} M{sub Sun }, which coincides with longstanding theoretical predictions for the mass scale relevant to virial shock heating of accreted gas. Above the characteristic halo mass, the efficiency falls off as the mass to the minus four-thirds power; below the characteristic mass, the efficiency falls off at an average scaling of mass to the two-thirds power. By comparison, the shape and normalization of the efficiency change very little since z = 4. We show that a time-independent star formation efficiency simply explains the shape of the cosmic star formation rate since z = 4 in terms of dark matter accretion rates. The rise in the cosmic star formation from early times until z = 2 is especially sensitive to galaxy formation efficiency. The mass dependence of the efficiency strongly limits where most star formation occurs, with the result that two-thirds of all star formation has occurred inside halos within a factor of three of the characteristic mass, a range that includes the mass of the Milky Way.

  14. On the formation of Be stars through binary interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-11-20

    Be stars are rapidly rotating B-type stars. The origin of their rapid rotation is not certain, but binary interaction remains as a possibility. In this work, we investigate the formation of Be stars resulting from mass transfer in binaries in the Galaxy. We calculate binary evolution with both stars evolving simultaneously and consider different possible mass accretion histories for the accretor. From the calculated results, we obtain the critical mass ratios q {sub cr} that determine the stability of the mass transfer. We also numerically calculate the parameter λ in common envelope evolution and then incorporate both q {sub cr} and λ into the population synthesis calculations. We present the predicted numbers and characteristics of Be stars in binary systems with different types of companions, including helium stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. We find that in Be/neutron star binaries, the Be stars can have a lower mass limit ∼8 M {sub ☉} if they are formed by stable (i.e., without the occurrence of common envelope evolution) and nonconservative mass transfer. We demonstrate that isolated Be stars may originate from both mergers of two main-sequence stars and disrupted Be binaries during the supernova explosions of the primary stars, but mergers seem to play a much more important role. Finally, the fraction of Be stars that have involved binary interactions in all B-type stars can be as high as ∼13%-30%, implying that most Be stars may result from binary interaction.

  15. Star formation in X-ray cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    The basic equations for X-ray cluster cooling flows, including the effects of star formation, are derived. It is confirmed that cooling flows are thermally unstable, and it is found that the fastest-growing linear perturbations in the flow are radial, comoving, and isobaric. A local approximation for the star formation rate is developed which allows analytic solutions to be found for both isobaric and gravity-dominated cooling flows. These solutions are used to show how star formation reduces the gas density, thereby lowering the cooling rate, which raises the gas temperature relative to the non-star-forming case. The analytic solutions are also used to estimate the spatial distribution of newly formed stars. It is found that star formation must proceed at a nearly maximal rate if isothermal mass profiles are to result.

  16. The Star Formation History of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebel, E. K.; Brandner, W.

    1997-05-01

    We present a movie of the star formation history of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) based on its stellar content. We use the present-day spatial distribution of blue and red supergiants, Cepheids, clusters and associations, and RR Lyrae stars to study the age structure and to identify areas of pronounced star formation as a function of time and position. Age estimates for different stellar populations are based on theoretical isochrones, evolutionary models, and recent calibrations of SWB types of clusters. De-reddening of the individual stars and clusters results in a large-scale extinction map for the LMC. We discuss our results in terms of internal/external trigger mechanisms of star formation and different star formation modes.

  17. KEY ISSUES REVIEW: Insights from simulations of star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Richard B.

    2007-03-01

    Although the basic physics of star formation is classical, numerical simulations have yielded essential insights into how stars form. They show that star formation is a highly nonuniform runaway process characterized by the emergence of nearly singular peaks in density, followed by the accretional growth of embryo stars that form at these density peaks. Circumstellar discs often form from the gas being accreted by the forming stars, and accretion from these discs may be episodic, driven by gravitational instabilities or by protostellar interactions. Star-forming clouds typically develop filamentary structures, which may, along with the thermal physics, play an important role in the origin of stellar masses because of the sensitivity of filament fragmentation to temperature variations. Simulations of the formation of star clusters show that the most massive stars form by continuing accretion in the dense cluster cores, and this again is a runaway process that couples star formation and cluster formation. Star-forming clouds also tend to develop hierarchical structures, and smaller groups of forming objects tend to merge into progressively larger ones, a generic feature of self-gravitating systems that is common to star formation and galaxy formation. Because of the large range of scales and the complex dynamics involved, analytic models cannot adequately describe many aspects of star formation, and detailed numerical simulations are needed to advance our understanding of the subject. 'The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers.' Richard W Hamming, in Numerical Methods for Scientists and Engineers (1962) 'There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.' William Shakespeare, in Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (1604)

  18. Star formation and the nature of bipolar outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Ruden, Steven P.; Lada, Charles J.; Lizano, Susana

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a simple physical model for the bipolar molecular outflows that frequently accompany star formation. The model forges an intrinsic link between the bipolar flow phenomenon and the process of star formation, and it helps to explain many of the systematics known for existing sources.

  19. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  20. Formative Assessment Probes: Where Are the Stars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    Gazing at the night sky is a familiar experience for many elementary students. Depending on where children live, they can often look out a window and see the Moon and stars. Children may have seen the Moon and stars in television shows, movies, posters, or children's picture books. Regardless of whether they see the Moon and stars firsthand or…

  1. SPECTRA OF TYPE II CEPHEID CANDIDATES AND RELATED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E. G.; Rogalla, Danielle; Thacker-Lynn, Lauren E-mail: drogall1@bigred.unl.edu

    2011-02-15

    We present low-resolution spectra for variable stars in the Cepheid period range from the ROTSE-I Demonstration Project and the All Sky Automated Survey, some of which were previously identified as type II Cepheid candidates. We have derived effective temperatures, gravities, and metallicities from the spectra. Based on this, three types of variables were identified: Cepheid strip stars, cool stars that lie along the red subgiant and giant branch, and cool main-sequence stars. Many fewer type II Cepheids were found than expected and most have amplitudes less than 0.4 mag. The cool variables include many likely binaries as well as intrinsic variables. Variation among the main-sequence stars is likely to be mostly due to binarity or stellar activity.

  2. Inner Milky Way Raging with Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    More than 444,580 frames from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope were stitched together to create this portrait of the raging star-formation occurring in the inner Milky Way.

    As inhabitants of a flat galactic disk, Earth and its solar system have an edge-on view of their host galaxy, like looking a glass dish from its edge. From our perspective, most of the galaxy is condensed into a blurry narrow band of light that stretches completely around the sky, also known as the galactic plane.

    In this mosaic the galactic plane is broken up into five components: the far-left side of the plane (top image); the area just left of the galactic center (second to top); galactic center (middle); the area to the right of galactic center (second to bottom); and the far-right side of the plane (bottom). Together, these panels represent more than 50 percent of our entire Milky Way galaxy.

    The red haze that permeates the picture comes from organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are illuminated by light from massive baby stars. On Earth, these molecules are found in automobile exhaust, or charred barbeque grills anywhere carbon molecules are burned incompletely.

    The patches of black are dense, obscuring dust clouds impenetrable by even Spitzer's super-sensitive infrared eyes. Bright arcs of white throughout the image are massive stellar incubators. The bluish-white haze that hovers heavily in the middle panel is starlight from the older stellar population towards the center of the galaxy.

    This picture was taken with Spitzer's infrared array camera, as part of the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) project. This is a four-color composite where blue is 3.6-micron light, green is 4.5 microns, orange is 5.8 microns and red is 8.0 microns.

  3. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. I - The naked T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    Einstein X-ray observations of regions of active star formation in Taurus, Ophiuchus, and Corona Australis show a greatly enhanced surface density of stellar X-ray sources over that seen in other parts of the sky. Many of the X-ray sources are identified with low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars which are not classical T Tauri stars. The X-ray, photometric, and spectroscopic data for these stars are discussed. Seven early K stars in Oph and CrA are likely to be 1-solar-mass post-T Tauri stars with ages of 10-million yr. The late K stars in Taurus are not post-T Tauri, but 'naked' T Tauri stars, which are coeval with the T Tauri stars, differing mainly in the lack of a circumstellar envelope.

  4. Bimodal star formation - Constraints from the solar neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chemical evolution resulting from a simple model of bimodal star formulation is investigated, using constraints from the solar neighborhood to set the parameters of the initial mass function and star formation rate. The two modes are an exclusively massive star mode, which forms stars at an exponentially declining rate, and a mode which contains stars of all masses and has a constant star formation rate. Satisfactory agreement with the age-metallicity relation for the thin disk and with the metallicity structure of the thin-disk and spheroid stars is possible only for a small range of parameter values. The preferred model offers a resolution to several of the long-standing problems of galactic chemical evolution, including explanations of the age-metallicity relation, the gas consumption time scale, and the stellar cumulative metallicity distributions.

  5. Formation of Molecular Clouds and Initial Conditions of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, including the effects of radiative cool- ing/heating, chemical reactions, self-gravity and thermal conduction, we investigate the formation of molecular clouds in the multi-phase interstellar medium. We consider the formation of molecular clouds due to accretion of HI clouds as suggested by recent observations. Our simulations show that the initial HI medium is piled up behind the shock waves induced by accretion flows. Since the accreting medium is highly inhomogeneous as a consequence of thermal instability, a newly formed molecular cloud becomes very turbulent owing to the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The kinetic energy of the turbulence dominates the thermal, magnetic, and gravitational energies. However, the kinetic energy measured using CO-fraction-weighted density is comparable to the other energies, once the CO molecules are sufficiently formed as a result of UV shielding. This suggests that the true kinetic energy of turbulence in molecular clouds as a whole can be much larger than the kinetic energy of turbulence estimated by using line widths of molecular emission. We find that dense clumps in the molecular cloud show the following evolution: the typical plasma beta of the clumps is roughly constant; the size-ělocity dispersion relation follows Larson's law, irrespective of the density; and the clumps evolve into magnetically supercritical cores by clump-clump collisions. These statistical properties would represent the initial conditions of star formation.

  6. The impact of galactic environment on star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Schinnerer, Eva; Groves, Brent; Adamo, Angela; Hughes, Annie; Meidt, Sharon; SFNG Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    While spiral arms are the most prominent sites for star formation in disk galaxies, interarm star formation contributes significantly to the overall star formation budget. However, it is still an open question if the star formation proceeds differently in the arm and inter-arm environment. We use deep VLT/MUSE optical IFU spectroscopy to resolve and fully characterize the physical properties of 428 interarm and arm HII regions in the nearby grand design spiral galaxy NGC 628. Unlike molecular clouds (the fuel for star formation) which exhibit a clear dependence on galactic environment, we find that most HII region properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) are independent of environment. One clear exception is the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contribution to the arm and interarm flux (traced via the temperature sensitive [SII]/Halpha line ratio inside and outside of the HII region boundaries). We find a systematically higher DIG background within HII regions, particularly on the spiral arms. Correcting for this DIG contamination can result in significant (70%) changes to the star formation rate measured. We also show preliminary results comparing well-corrected star formation rates from our MUSE HII regions to ALMA CO(2-1) molecular gas observations at matched 1"=50pc resolution, tracing the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law at the scales relevant to the physics of star formation. We estimate the timescales relevant for GMC evolution using distance from the spiral arm as a proxy for age, and test whether star formation feedback or galactic-scale dynamical processes dominate GMC disruption.

  7. The Impact Of Galactic Environment On Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, Kathryn

    2016-09-01

    While spiral arms are the most prominent sites for star formation in disk galaxies, interarm star formation contributes significantly to the overall star formation budget. However, it is still an open question if the star formation proceeds differently in the arm and inter-arm environment. We use deep VLT/MUSE optical IFU spectroscopy to resolve and fully characterize the physical properties of 428 interarm and arm HII regions in the nearby grand design spiral galaxy NGC 628. Unlike molecular clouds (the fuel for star formation) which exhibit a clear dependence on galactic environment, we find that most HII region properties (luminosity, size, metallicity, ionization parameter) are independent of environment. One clear exception is the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) contribution to the arm and interarm flux (traced via the temperature sensitive [SII]/Halpha line ratio inside and outside of the HII region boundaries). We find a systematically higher DIG background within HII regions, particularly on the spiral arms. Correcting for this DIG contamination can result in significant (70%) changes to the star formation rate measured. We also show preliminary results comparing well@corrected star formation rates from our MUSE HII regions to ALMA CO(2-1) molecular gas observations at matched 1"=35pc resolution, tracing the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation law at the scales relevant to the physics of star formation. We estimate the timescales relevant for GMC evolution using distance from the spiral arm as a proxy for age, and test whether star formation feedback or galactic@scale dynamical processes dominate GMC disruption.

  8. Terrestrial Planet Formation Around Close Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets around close binary stars, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. The sum of the masses of the two stars is one solar mass, and the initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and in the Alpha Centauri wide binary star system. Giant planets &are included in the simulations, as they are in most simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet accumulation in our Solar System. When the stars travel on a circular orbit with semimajor axis of up to 0.1 AU about their mutual center of mass, the planetary embryos grow into a system of terrestrial planets that is statistically identical to those formed about single stars, but a larger semimajor axis and/or a significantly eccentric binary orbit can lead to significantly more dynamically hot terrestrial planet systems.

  9. Terrestrial Planet Formation around Low-Mass Stars: Effect of the Mass of Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshino, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has detected several thousand planets and candidates.Their central stars are mainly FGK-type stars.It is difficult to observe M-stars by using visible light since M-stars have their peak radiation in the infrared region.However, recently there are several survey projects for planets around M-stars such as the InfraRed Doppler (IRD) survey of the Subaru telescope.Therefore it is expected that the number of planets around M-stars will increase in the near future.The habitable zone of M-stars is closer to the stars than that of G-stars.For this reason, the possibility of finding habitable planets is expected to be higher.Here we study the formation of close-in terrestrial planets by giant impacts of protoplanets around low-mass stars by using N-body simulations.An important parameter that controls formation processes is the ratio between the physical radius of a planet and its Hill radius, which decreases with the stellar mass.We systematically change the mass of the central stars and investigate its effects on terrestrial planet formation.We find that the mass of the maximum planet decreases with the mass of central stars, while the number of planets in the system increases.We also find that the orbital separation of adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radius increases with the stellar mass.

  10. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  11. Star Formation in Nuclear Rings of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  12. Clustered star formation and the origin of stellar masses.

    PubMed

    Pudritz, Ralph E

    2002-01-04

    Star clusters are ubiquitous in galaxies of all types and at all stages of their evolution. We also observe them to be forming in a wide variety of environments, ranging from nearby giant molecular clouds to the supergiant molecular clouds found in starburst and merging galaxies. The typical star in our galaxy and probably in others formed as a member of a star cluster, so star formation is an intrinsically clustered and not an isolated phenomenon. The greatest challenge regarding clustered star formation is to understand why stars have a mass spectrum that appears to be universal. This review examines the observations and models that have been proposed to explain these fundamental issues in stellar formation.

  13. The Star Formation in Radio Survey: Mapping Star Formation in Nearby Galaxies with 33GHz Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Dillon; Murphy, Eric J.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Nyland, Kristina; Condon, James J.; Helou, George; Meier, David S.; Ott, Juergen; Schinnerer, Eva; Turner, Jean

    2015-01-01

    We present initial results from the 33GHz phase of the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS), including a gallery of 2" resolution Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) images and spatially resolved thermal / synchrotron emission models in a subset of sources. The SFRS is targeting 118 galaxy nuclei and extranuclear star-forming regions in 56 nearby (d < 30Mpc) galaxies included in the Spitzer/SINGS and Herschel/KINGFISH legacy programs. VLA observations of the entire sample have recently been completed at 3GHz (S band), 15GHz (Ku band) and 33GHz (Ka band). For an initial subset of 9 targets, we have also obtained 90GHz ALMA continuum and line imaging during cycle 1 observations.The frequency spacing of our complete radio data set will allow us to accurately measure the radio spectral index of these targets, in order to model the physical processes that produce the radio emission. In particular, 33GHz observations of HII regions probe free-free emission, providing a sensitive, dust-unbiased measure of the current star formation activity in each complex. We can use the differences between 33GHz derived star formation rates and those derived with other tracers such as synchrotron radiation, extinction corrected UV and Hα emission, and infrared luminosity to examine the dependence of each tracer on separately measured variables such as extinction, metallicity and ionizing radiation field strength. Consequently, these data will help calibrate other empirically-derived star formation rate diagnostics that are more easily measured for high redshift studies, and help interpret rest-frame 33GHz observations from a new generation of deep high frequency (>10GHz) radio surveys.As an example of the science that can be done with SFRS data, we have used our images along with an archival 1.4GHz and a new 5GHz VLA image to map the spectral index, spectral curvature, and the separated thermal and synchrotron components of NGC1266, a low level AGN with a mass outflow rate of > 50 M⊙ / yr

  14. Star Formation near Berkeley 59: Embedded Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosvick, J. M.; Majaess, D.

    2013-12-01

    A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (~2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, 12CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 μm) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v LSR = -15 to -17 km s-1, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (-15.7 km s-1), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction AV and distance of 15 ± 2 mag and 830 ± 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

  15. Massive star-formation regions in the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, J.B.; Thompson, I.B.

    1988-08-01

    Optical and UV spectroscopy of stars from six compact, luminous groups or clusters in the SMC and LMC is presented. The groups are characterized by high concentrations of nebulosity or starlight confined to areas smaller than 30 arcsec on a side, in which some stars can be resolved. The spectra and fluxes are used to derive luminosities and effective temperatures for the stars. Spectroscopic and stellar wind properties are also noted. It is found that the stars are all of O and B-type, with low extinction. The stars generally have little or no sign of stellar winds, and often have spectral peculiarities, such as weak lines or mixed spectral indicators. Most spectra have strong, broad Ly-alpha absorption, and some have broad Ca II absorption. The stars are placed on the H-R diagram, and it is argued that some of them are massive stars in pre-main-sequence stages of their evolution. 8 references.

  16. Dissecting galaxies: spatial and spectral separation of emission excited by star formation and AGN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Hampton, Elise J.; Shastri, Prajval; Scharwächter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Bhatt, Harish; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2016-10-01

    The optical spectra of Seyfert galaxies are often dominated by emission lines excited by both star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. Standard calibrations (such as for the star formation rate) are not applicable to such composite (mixed) spectra. In this paper, we describe how integral field data can be used to spectrally and spatially separate emission associated with star formation from emission associated with accretion on to an AGN. We demonstrate our method using integral field data for two AGN host galaxies (NGC 5728 and NGC 7679) from the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7). The spectra of NGC 5728 and NGC 7679 form clear sequences of AGN fraction on standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams. We show that the emission line luminosities of the majority (>85 per cent) of spectra along each AGN fraction sequence can be reproduced by linear superpositions of the emission line luminosities of one AGN dominated spectrum and one star formation dominated spectrum. We separate the Hα, Hβ, [N II]λ6583, [S II]λλ6716, 6731, [O III]λ5007 and [O II]λλ3726, 3729 luminosities of every spaxel into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. The decomposed emission line images are used to derive the star formation rates and AGN bolometric luminosities for NGC 5728 and NGC 7679. Our calculated values are mostly consistent with independent estimates from data at other wavelengths. The recovered star-forming and AGN components also have distinct spatial distributions which trace structures seen in high-resolution imaging of the galaxies, providing independent confirmation that our decomposition has been successful.

  17. Shocks and star formation in Stephan's Quintet. I. Gemini spectroscopy of Hα-bright knots

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Cluver, M. E.; Appleton, P. N.; Guillard, P.; Trancho, G.; Bastian, N.; Charlton, J. C.; Fedotov, K.; Gallagher, S. C.; Smith, L. J.; Struck, C. J.

    2014-03-20

    We present a Gemini-GMOS spectroscopic study of Hubble Space Telescope (HST)-selected Hα-emitting regions in Stephan's Quintet (HCG 92), a nearby compact galaxy group, with the aim of disentangling the processes of shock-induced heating and star formation in its intra-group medium. The ≈40 sources are distributed across the system, but most densely concentrated in the ∼kiloparsec-long shock region. Their spectra neatly divide them into narrow- and broad-line emitters, and we decompose the latter into three or more emission peaks corresponding to spatial elements discernible in HST imaging. The emission-line ratios of the two populations of Hα-emitters confirm their nature as H II regions (90% of the sample) or molecular gas heated by a shock front propagating at ≲300 km s{sup –1}. Their redshift distribution reveals interesting three-dimensional structure with respect to gas-phase baryons, with no H II regions associated with shocked gas, no shocked regions in the intruder galaxy NGC 7318B, and a sharp boundary between shocks and star formation. We conclude that star formation is inhibited substantially, if not entirely, in the shock region. Attributing those H II regions projected against the shock to the intruder, we find a lopsided distribution of star formation in this galaxy, reminiscent of pileup regions in models of interacting galaxies. The Hα luminosities imply mass outputs, star formation rates, and efficiencies similar to nearby star-forming regions. Two large knots are an exception to this, being comparable in stellar output to the prolific 30 Doradus region. We also examine Stephan's Quintet in the context of compact galaxy group evolution, as a paradigm for intermittent star formation histories in the presence of a rich, X-ray-emitting intra-group medium. All spectra are provided as supplemental materials.

  18. Carbon Stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud: Luminosities, Colors, and Implications for the History of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Edgardo; Frogel, Jay A.

    1996-12-01

    We present RI and JHK photometry for 888 and 204 carbon (C) stars, respectively, of the 1035 C stars found by Blanco and his collaborators in 52 fields of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The results of our analysis of the data fall into two categories: (1) Derivation of the physical properties of the stars and a comparison with models. (2) The variation in C star properties with position in the LMC and implications for the history of star formation. For the 197 stars with data in all 5 photometric bands, we derive an equation that gives m_bol_(+/-0.34 mag) from the R_0_ and I_0_ data alone. With m_bol_ for 895 LMC C stars we derive a luminosity function that is closely similar to those for previous (but an order of magnitude smaller) samples of both field and cluster LMC C stars. We find only two C stars brighter than m_bol_ = 12.5 and fewer than 10 fainter than 15.5. A comparison of our derived bolometric magnitudes and effective temperatures for the LMC C stars with the models of Lattanzio [ApJ, 311,708(1986); ApJS, 76,215 (1991)] leads us to conclude that ~1 M_sun_ is the minimum mass required to produce a Population II C star. In addition, the observed lower limit we find to the C star luminosities corresponds to the luminosity at which a 1 M_sun_ Pop II star is predicted to have its first major thermal pulse. From a comparison of field and cluster C star color-magnitude diagrams, we conclude that the range in age and metallicity of the LMC field C stars is at least as great as those from LMC clusters. The metallicity range of the field C stars, though, appears to extend to a significantly higher value based on our finding that red C stars with (J - K)_0_ > 1.9 are three to four times more common in the field sample than in cluster stars and a similar difference previously noted between field and cluster M giants [Frogel & Blanco, ApJ, 365, 168 (1990)]. For each field observed we derive a luminosity m_bol_(t) that should be related to the transition

  19. Drama of HII regions: Clustered and Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinzeng; YUAN, Jinghua; LIU, Hongli; Wu, Yuefang; Huang, Yafang

    2015-08-01

    Intense ultraviolet radiation from young massive stars ionizes ambient material leading to the formation of HII regions which have keen impact upon the birth of new stars in the vicinities. The strong radiation may be responsible for the dispersal of molecular clouds to hinder star formation, while the expansion of HII regions would collect neutral material to form dense layers which may be gravitationally unstable to collapse to give birth to new stars.In order to understand the star formation process under the influence of HII regions, we have carried out extensive investigations to well selected star-forming regions which all have been profoundly affected by existing massive O type stars. On the basis of multi-wavelength data from mid-infrared to millimeter collected using Spitzer, Herschel, and ground based radio telescope, the physical status of interstellar medium and star formation in these regions have been revealed. Clustered and sequential star formation have been detected toward well known HII regions, such as IC1396 and Sh-155. In a relatively large infrared dust bubble, active star formation is undergoing and the shell is still expanding. Socked features and signs of triggered star formation have been tentatively detected in a relatively small bubble. The dense cores in the Rosette Molecular Complex detected at 1.1 mm using SMA have been speculated to have a likely triggered origin according to their spatial distribution. Although some observational results have been obtained, more efforts are necessary to reach trustworthy conclusions. And more regions will be extensively explored based on multi-wavelength observations, especially the data collected using the Herschel Space Observatory.

  20. The Star Formation History of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jason; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2009-11-01

    We present the first ever global, spatially resolved reconstruction of the star formation history (SFH) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), based on the application of our StarFISH analysis software to the multiband photometry of 20 million of its stars from the Magellanic Clouds Photometric Survey. The general outlines of our results are consistent with previously published results: following an initial burst of star formation, there was a quiescent epoch from approximately 12 to 5 Gyr ago. Star formation then resumed and has proceeded until the current time at an average rate of roughly 0.2 M sun yr-1, with temporal variations at the factor of 2 level. The re-ignition of star formation about 5 Gyr ago, in both the LMC and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), is suggestive of a dramatic event at that time in the Magellanic system. Among the global variations in the recent star formation rate are peaks at roughly 2 Gyr, 500 Myr, 100 Myr, and 12 Myr. The peaks at 500 Myr and 2 Gyr are nearly coincident with similar peaks in the SFH of the SMC, suggesting a joint history for these galaxies extending back at least several Gyr. The chemical enrichment history recovered from our StarFISH analysis is in broad agreement with that inferred from the LMC's star cluster population, although our constraints on the ancient chemical enrichment history are weak. We conclude from the concordance between the star formation and chemical enrichment histories of the field and cluster populations that the field and cluster star formation modes are tightly coupled.

  1. The efficiency of star formation in clustered and distributed regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, Ian A.; Smith, Rowan J.; Clark, Paul C.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the formation of both clustered and distributed populations of young stars in a single molecular cloud. We present a numerical simulation of a 104 M⊙ elongated, turbulent, molecular cloud and the formation of over 2500 stars. The stars form both in stellar clusters and in a distributed mode, which is determined by the local gravitational binding of the cloud. A density gradient along the major axis of the cloud produces bound regions that form stellar clusters and unbound regions that form a more distributed population. The initial mass function (IMF) also depends on the local gravitational binding of the cloud with bound regions forming full IMFs whereas in the unbound, distributed regions the stellar masses cluster around the local Jeans mass and lack both the high-mass and the low-mass stars. The overall efficiency of star formation is ≈ 15 per cent in the cloud when the calculation is terminated, but varies from less than 1 per cent in the regions of distributed star formation to ≈ 40 per cent in regions containing large stellar clusters. Considering that large-scale surveys are likely to catch clouds at all evolutionary stages, estimates of the (time-averaged) star formation efficiency (SFE) for the giant molecular cloud reported here is only ≈ 4 per cent. This would lead to the erroneous conclusion of slow star formation when in fact it is occurring on a dynamical time-scale.

  2. Global star formation in the L1630 molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lada, Elizabeth A.

    1992-01-01

    The first systematic and coordinated surveys for both dense gas and young stellar objects within a single molecular cloud, the L1630 molecular cloud are compared. It is found that (1) star formation in the L1630 molecular cloud occurs almost exclusively within the dense gas; (2) star formation does not occur uniformly throughout the dense gas and is strongly favored in a few very massive dense cores, where efficient conversion of molecular gas into stars has resulted in the production of rich stellar clusters; and (3) high gas densities and high gas mass may be necessary but not sufficient conditions for the formation of star clusters since two of the five most massive dense cores in the cloud have very low levels of star formation activity.

  3. Bursts of star formation in computer simulations of dwarf galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Comins, N.F.

    1984-09-01

    A three-dimensional Stochastic Self-Propagating Star Formation (SSPSF) model of compact galacies is presented. Two phases of gas, active and inactive, are present, and permanent depletion of gas in the form of long lived, low mass stars and remnants occurs. Similarly, global infall of gas from a galactic halo or through galactic cannibalism is permitted. We base our parameters on the observed properties of the compact blue galaxy I Zw 36. Our results are that bursts of star formation occur much more frequently in these runs than continuous nonbursting star formation, suggesting that the blue compact galaxies are probably undergoing bursts rather than continuous, nonbursting low-level star formation activity.

  4. TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul; Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy; Heavens, Alan; Clarkson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

  5. Star Formation in Lynds Dark Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Bemis, G. E.; Paulsen, K. M.; Yueh, N. J.; Rebull, L. M.; DeWolf, C.; DeWolf, T.; Brock, S.; Boerna, J.; Schaefers, J.; McDonald, D. W.; McDonald, J.; Troudt, B.; Wilkinson, B.; Guastella, P.; Peter, A.; Wassmer, W.; Haber, R.; Scaramucci, A.; Spuck, T. S.; Butchart, J.; Holcomb, A.; Karns, B.; Kennedy, S.; Siegel, R.; Weiser, S.; Connelley, M.

    2009-01-01

    Our team observed two Lynds clouds (LDN 425 and LDN 981) using the Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8 microns), and MIPS (24 microns). A preliminary literature search provided IRAS data indicating star formation may be taking place in LDN 425 and LDN 981. The goals of this project were to further explore the known young stellar objects (YSOs) in the two clouds and to search for additional embedded YSOs. In this poster we present our observational methods and the results of our observations including SEDs, color-color diagrams, and color composite images. This research was made possible through the Spitzer Space Telescope Research Program for Teachers and Students and was funded by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Please see our companion education posters by McDonald et al. titled "Spitzer - Hot and Colorful Student Activities" and Guastella et al. entitled "Research Based Astronomy in The Secondary Classroom: Lessons Developed for Investigating YSOs Using APT, Excel, and MOPEX".

  6. Infrared and optical studies of the Chamaeleon II and Lupus low-mass star forming regions .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzi, L.; Alcalá, J. M.; Chapman, N.; Covino, E.; Evans, N. J., II; Frasca, A.; Gandolfi, D.; Huard, T. L.; Oliveira, I.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Merín, B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    The Spitzer Legacy survey ``From Molecular Cores to Planet-forming Disks'' \\citep[c2d][]{Eva03} provided infrared observations of sources that span the evolutionary sequence from molecular cores to proto-planetary disks, encompassing a wide range of star-forming environments. These overall observations allowed to study crucial steps in the formation of stars and planets with unprecedented sensitivity. We present some results from the Spitzer observations and complementary data in the low-mass star forming regions in Chamaeleon II and Lupus. We focus, in particular, on the star-formation history and activity of these clouds, the low-mass end of their IMF and the envelope/disk properties of their young populations.

  7. Star formation in the "Gulf of Mexico"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armond, T.; Reipurth, B.; Bally, J.; Aspin, C.

    2011-04-01

    We present an optical/infrared study of the dense molecular cloud, L935, dubbed "The Gulf of Mexico", which separates the North America and the Pelican nebulae, and we demonstrate that this area is a very active star forming region. A wide-field imaging study with interference filters has revealed 35 new Herbig-Haro objects in the Gulf of Mexico. A grism survey has identified 41 Hα emission-line stars, 30 of them new. A small cluster of partly embedded pre-main sequence stars is located around the known LkHα 185-189 group of stars, which includes the recently erupting FUor HBC 722.

  8. X-ray insights into star and planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Feigelson, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    Although stars and planets form in cold environments, X-rays are produced in abundance by young stars. This review examines the implications of stellar X-rays for star and planet formation studies, highlighting the contributions of NASA’s (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Chandra X-ray Observatory. Seven topics are covered: X-rays from protostellar outflow shocks, X-rays from the youngest protostars, the stellar initial mass function, the structure of young stellar clusters, the fate of massive stellar winds, X-ray irradiation of protoplanetary disks, and X-ray flare effects on ancient meteorites. Chandra observations of star-forming regions often show dramatic star clusters, powerful magnetic reconnection flares, and parsec-scale diffuse plasma. X-ray selected samples of premain sequence stars significantly advance studies of star cluster formation, the stellar initial mass function, triggered star-formation processes, and protoplanetary disk evolution. Although X-rays themselves may not play a critical role in the physics of star formation, they likely have important effects on protoplanetary disks by heating and ionizing disk gases. PMID:20404197

  9. X-ray insights into star and planet formation.

    PubMed

    Feigelson, Eric D

    2010-04-20

    Although stars and planets form in cold environments, X-rays are produced in abundance by young stars. This review examines the implications of stellar X-rays for star and planet formation studies, highlighting the contributions of NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Chandra X-ray Observatory. Seven topics are covered: X-rays from protostellar outflow shocks, X-rays from the youngest protostars, the stellar initial mass function, the structure of young stellar clusters, the fate of massive stellar winds, X-ray irradiation of protoplanetary disks, and X-ray flare effects on ancient meteorites. Chandra observations of star-forming regions often show dramatic star clusters, powerful magnetic reconnection flares, and parsec-scale diffuse plasma. X-ray selected samples of premain sequence stars significantly advance studies of star cluster formation, the stellar initial mass function, triggered star-formation processes, and protoplanetary disk evolution. Although X-rays themselves may not play a critical role in the physics of star formation, they likely have important effects on protoplanetary disks by heating and ionizing disk gases.

  10. STAR FORMATION IN THE BULLET CLUSTER. I. THE INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND STAR FORMATION RATE ,

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Mi Chung; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Markevitch, Maxim; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2010-12-20

    The Bullet Cluster is a massive galaxy cluster at z = 0.297 undergoing a major supersonic (Mach 3) merger event. Using data from Spitzer MIPS and the Infrared Array Camera, optical imaging, and optical spectroscopy, we present the global star formation rate (SFR) of this unique cluster. Using a 90% spectroscopically complete sample of 37 star-forming MIPS confirmed cluster members out to R < 1.7 Mpc, and the Rieke et al. relation to convert from 24 {mu}m flux to SFR, we calculate an integrated obscured SFR of 267 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a specific SFR of 28 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} per 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}. The cluster mass normalized integrated SFR of the Bullet Cluster is among the highest in a sample of eight other clusters and cluster mergers from the literature. Five LIRGs and one ULIRG contribute 30% and 40% of the total SFR of the cluster, respectively. To investigate the origin of the elevated specific SFR, we compare the infrared luminosity function (IR LF) of the Bullet Cluster to those of Coma (evolved to z = 0.297) and CL1358+62. The Bullet Cluster IR LF exhibits an excess of sources compared to the IR LFs of the other massive clusters. A Schechter function fit of the Bullet Cluster IR LF yields L* = 44.68 {+-} 0.11 erg s{sup -1}, which is {approx}0.25 and 0.35 dex brighter than L* of evolved Coma and CL1358+62, respectively. The elevated IR LF of the Bullet Cluster relative to other clusters can be explained if we attribute the 'excess' star-forming IR galaxies to a population associated with the infalling group that has not yet been transformed into quiescent galaxies. In this case, the timescale required for quenching star formation in the cluster environment must be longer than the timescale since the group's accretion-a few hundred million years. We suggest that 'strangulation' is likely to be an important process in the evolution of star formation in clusters.

  11. QUANTIFYING NON-STAR-FORMATION-ASSOCIATED 8 {mu}m DUST EMISSION IN NGC 628

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, Alison F.; Calzetti, Daniela; Thilker, David A.; Aniano, Gonzalo; Draine, Bruce T.; Hunt, Leslie K.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Sandstrom, Karin; Smith, J. D. T.

    2013-01-10

    Combining H{alpha} and IRAC images of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 628, we find that between 30% and 43% of its 8 {mu}m dust emission is not related to recent star formation. Contributions from dust heated by young stars are separated by identifying H II regions in the H{alpha} map and using these areas as a mask to determine the 8 {mu}m dust emission that must be due to heating by older stars. Corrections are made for sub-detection-threshold H II regions, photons escaping from H II regions, and for young stars not directly associated with H II regions (i.e., 10-100 Myr old stars). A simple model confirms that this amount of 8 {mu}m emission can be expected given dust and PAH absorption cross sections, a realistic star formation history, and the observed optical extinction values. A Fourier power spectrum analysis indicates that the 8 {mu}m dust emission is more diffuse than the H{alpha} emission (and similar to observed H I), supporting our analysis that much of the 8 {mu}m-emitting dust is heated by older stars. The 8 {mu}m dust-to-H{alpha} emission ratio declines with galactocentric radius both within and outside of H II regions, probably due to a radial increase in disk transparency. In the course of this work, we have also found that intrinsic diffuse H{alpha} fractions may be lower than previously thought in galaxies, if the differential extinction between H II regions and diffuse regions is taken into account.

  12. Testing diagnostics of triggered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Harries, Tim J.; Acreman, David M.

    2012-10-01

    We produce synthetic images and SEDs from radiation hydrodynamical simulations of radiatively driven implosion. The imaged bright rimmed clouds (BRCs) are morphologically similar to those actually observed in star-forming regions. Using nebular diagnostic optical collisional line ratios, simulated Very Large Array (VLA) radio images, Hα imaging and SED fitting we compute the neutral cloud and ionized boundary layer (IBL) gas densities and temperatures and perform a virial stability analysis for each cloud. We determine that the neutral cloud temperatures derived by SED fitting are hotter than the dominant neutral cloud temperature by 1-2 K due to emission from warm dust. This translates into a change in the calculated cloud mass by 8-35 per cent. Using a constant mass conversion factor (Cν) for BRCs of different class is found to give rise to errors in the cloud mass of up to a factor of 3.6. The IBL electron temperature calculated using diagnostic line ratios is more accurate than assuming the canonical value adopted for radio diagnostics of 104 K. Both radio diagnostics and diagnostic line ratios are found to underestimate the electron density in the IBL. Each system is qualitatively correctly found to be in a state in which the pressure in the IBL is greater than the supporting cloud pressure, implying that the objects are being compressed. We find that observationally derived mass-loss estimates agree with those on the simulation grid and introduce the concept of using the mass-loss flux to give an indication of the relative strength of photoevaporative flow between clouds. The effect of beam size on these diagnostics in radio observations is found to be a mixing of the bright rim and ambient cloud and H II region fluxes, which leads to an underestimate of the cloud properties relative to a control diagnostic.

  13. THE HCN/HNC ABUNDANCE RATIO TOWARD DIFFERENT EVOLUTIONARY PHASES OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Kee-Tae E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr

    2015-07-20

    Using the H{sup 13}CN and HN{sup 13}C J = 1–0 line observations, the abundance ratio of HCN/HNC has been estimated for different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and ultracompact H ii regions (UCH iis). IRDCs were divided into “quiescent IRDC cores (qIRDCc)” and “active IRDC cores (aIRDCc),” depending on star formation activity. The HCN/HNC ratio is known to be higher at active and high temperature regions related to ongoing star formation, compared to cold and quiescent regions. Our observations toward 8 qIRDCc, 16 aIRDCc, 23 HMPOs, and 31 UCH iis show consistent results; the ratio is 0.97 (±0.10), 2.65 (±0.88), 4.17 (±1.03), and 8.96 (±3.32) in these respective evolutionary stages, increasing from qIRDCc to UCH iis. The change of the HCN/HNC abundance ratio, therefore, seems directly associated with the evolutionary stages of star formation, which have different temperatures. One suggested explanation for this trend is the conversion of HNC to HCN, which occurs effectively at higher temperatures. To test the explanation, we performed a simple chemical model calculation. In order to fit the observed results, the energy barrier of the conversion must be much lower than the value provided by theoretical calculations.

  14. Towards universal hybrid star formation rate estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, M.; Kennicutt, R.; Calzetti, D.; Dale, D.; Galametz, M.; Sauvage, M.; Croxall, K.; Draine, B.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Kumari, N.; Hunt, L.; De Looze, I.; Pellegrini, E.; Relaño, M.; Smith, J.-D.; Tabatabaei, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. To compute the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies from the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), it is essential to take the obscuration by dust into account. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the infrared (IR). Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. Aims: In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes fundamentally drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. In so doing, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation at local and global scales, taking the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies into account. Methods: We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially resolved far-UV to far-IR spectral energy distributions of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said properties. Results: We find that hybrid UV+IR estimators strongly depend on the stellar mass surface density (in particular at 70 μm and 100 μm) and on the sSFR (in particular at 24 μm and the total infrared). Consequently, the IR scaling coefficients for UV obscuration can vary by almost an order of magnitude: from 1.55 to 13.45 at 24 μm for instance. This result contrasts with other groups who found relatively constant coefficients with small deviations. We exploit these variations to construct a new class of adaptative hybrid estimators based on observed UV to near-IR colours and near-IR luminosity densities per unit area. We find that they can reliably be extended to entire galaxies. Conclusions: The new estimators provide better estimates of attenuation-corrected UV emission than classical hybrid estimators

  15. Cosmic reionization by stellar sources: Population II stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokasian, Aaron; Abel, Tom; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker

    2003-09-01

    comparisons with observational constraints on the neutral fraction of hydrogen at z~ 6 derived from the z= 6.28 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar of Becker and coworkers. We find that, given the amplitude and form of the underlying star formation predictions, an escape fraction near fesc= 0.10-0.20 is most consistent with the observational results. In these models, reionization is expected to have occurred between z~ 7-8, although the IGM remains fairly opaque until z~= 6. Our method is also capable of handling the simultaneous reionization of the helium component in the IGM, allowing us to explore the plausibility of the scenario where sources with harder spectra are primarily responsible for reionization. In this case, we find that if the sources responsible for reionizing hydrogen by z~ 8 had spectra similar to active galactic nuclei, then the helium component of the IGM should have been reionized by z~ 6. We find that such an early reionization epoch for helium does not necessarily conflict with observational constraints obtained at z~= 3, but may be challenged by future observations at higher redshifts. The recent WMAP measurements of the electron scattering optical depth (τe= 0.17 +/- 0.04 according to the `model independent' analysis of Kogut et al.) appear to be inconsistent with the relatively late onset of reionization by the normal Population II type stars that we consider. In order to simultaneously match the observations from the z= 6.28 SDSS quasar and the optical depth measurement from WMAP with the sources modelled here, we require a boosting factor for the number of ionizing photons released in the fesc= 0.20 model which evolves from unity at z= 6 to >~50 by z~ 18. Such a steep enhancement in the stellar production rate of ionizing photons would be consistent with an IMF that becomes more and more top heavy with increasing redshift.

  16. Advanced Spectral Library II: Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Stars are the bright matter of the Universe. Without them, it would be a dull and dreary place indeed: no light, no heavy elements, no planets, no life. It also is safe to say that stellar spectroscopy is a cornerstone of astrophysics, providing much of what we know concerning temperatures and masses of stars, their compositions, planets, and the dynamics and evolution of the galaxies they inhabit. This is especially true for the satellite ultraviolet, owing to the rich collection of atomic and ionic transitions found there. Unfortunately, the archive of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph rarely achieves the high S/N of the best ground-based spectra, and relatively few objects have the full wavelength coverage for which the powerful, highly multiplexed, second generation Hubble instrument was designed. Our aim is to collect STIS UV echelle spectra - comparable in S/N and resolution to the best ground-based material - for a diverse sample of representative stars, to build an Advanced Spectral Library; a foundation for astrophysical exploration: stellar, interstellar, and beyond. Our first effort, in Cycle 18, involved cool stars. Now we turn attention to the hot side of the H-R diagram.Our Treasury program will provide detailed stellar "atlases," based on advanced processing of the STIS echellegrams. Members of our broad collaboration will analyze these data for specific purposes, such as dynamics of O-star mass-loss; detection of rare species in sharp-lined B stars; and properties and kinematics of local interstellar clouds; but public release {based on the "ASTRAL-I" model} will enable many other investigations by a much wider community, for decades to come.

  17. College Students' Preinstructional Ideas about Stars and Star Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Prather, Edward E.; Johnson, Bruce; Slater, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    This study (Note 1) investigated the beliefs about stars that students hold when they enter an undergraduate introductory astronomy course for nonscience majors. Students' preinstructional ideas were investigated through the use of several student-supplied-response (SSR) surveys, which asked students to describe their ideas about topics such as…

  18. Efficient star formation in the bright bar of M83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, S. D.; Strom, S. E.; Young, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    The bright molecular bar in M83 was detected standing out as a 100% enhancement of molecular emission with respect to the off-bar emission at the same radii. The spatial variations in the star formation efficiency, as traced by H alpha emission and the surface density of the interstellar gas, in M83 and M51 were compared. Both the central bar of M83 and the spiral arms of M51 are regions characterized by high massive star formation rates. For M83, it is ascribed that both the gas surface density and the star formation efficiency are high to the hydrodynamics of the central region.

  19. STAR FORMATION NEAR BERKELEY 59: EMBEDDED PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rosvick, J. M.; Majaess, D.

    2013-12-01

    A group of suspected protostars in a dark cloud northwest of the young (∼2 Myr) cluster Berkeley 59 and two sources in a pillar south of the cluster have been studied in order to determine their evolutionary stages and ascertain whether their formation was triggered by Berkeley 59. Narrowband near-infrared observations from the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic, {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2) and SCUBA-2 (450 and 850 μm) observations from the JCMT, 2MASS, and WISE images, and data extracted from the IPHAS survey catalog were used. Of 12 sources studied, two are Class I objects, while three others are flat/Class II, one of which is a T Tauri candidate. A weak CO outflow and two potential starless cores are present in the cloud, while the pillar possesses substructure at different velocities, with no outflows present. The CO spectra of both regions show peaks in the range v {sub LSR} = –15 to –17 km s{sup –1}, which agrees with the velocity adopted for Berkeley 59 (–15.7 km s{sup –1}), while spectral energy distribution models yield an average interstellar extinction A{sub V} and distance of 15 ± 2 mag and 830 ± 120 pc, respectively, for the cloud, and 6.9 mag and 912 pc for the pillar, indicating that the regions are in the same vicinity as Berkeley 59. The formation of the pillar source appears to have been triggered by Berkeley 59. It is unclear whether Berkeley 59 triggered the association's formation.

  20. Long-period variable stars in NGC 147 and NGC 185 - I. Their star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedani Golshan, Roya; Javadi, Atefeh; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Khosroshahi, Habib; Saremi, Elham

    2017-04-01

    NGC 147 and NGC 185 are two of the most massive satellites of the Andromeda galaxy (M 31). Close together in the sky, of similar mass and morphological type dE, they possess different amounts of interstellar gas and tidal distortion. The question therefore is, how do their histories compare? Here, we present the first reconstruction of the star formation histories of NGC 147 and NGC 185 using long-period variable stars. These represent the final phase of evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars at the asymptotic giant branch, when their luminosity is related to their birth mass. Combining near-infrared photometry with stellar evolution models, we construct the mass function and hence the star formation history. For NGC 185, we found that the main epoch of star formation occurred 8.3 Gyr ago, followed by a much lower, but relatively constant star formation rate. In the case of NGC 147, the star formation rate peaked only 7 Gyr ago, staying intense until ∼3 Gyr ago, but no star formation has occurred for at least 300 Myr. Despite their similar masses, NGC 147 has evolved more slowly than NGC 185 initially, but more dramatically in more recent times. This is corroborated by the strong tidal distortions of NGC 147 and the presence of gas in the centre of NGC 185.

  1. On the Star Formation Properties of Void Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal M.; Moreno, Jackeline; White, Amanda; Vogeley, Michael S.; Hoyle, Fiona; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2016-11-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on timescales of 10 and 100 Myr, using Hα emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable H i detections from ALFALFA. For the full H i detected sample, SSFRs do not vary systematically with large-scale environment. However, investigating only the H i detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend toward higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit H i mass (known as the star formation efficiency; SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall H i detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies still does not reveal a statistically significant difference between SFEs in voids versus walls. These results suggest that void environments, on average, provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution allowing for higher specific star formation rates while forming stars with similar efficiencies to those in walls.

  2. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  3. Star formation in RCW 108: Triggered or spontaneous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, F.; Schneider, N.; Russeil, D.

    2005-04-01

    We present visible, near infrared and mm-wave observations of RCW 108, a molecular cloud complex in the Ara OB1 association that is being eroded by the energetic radiation of two O-type stars in the nearby cluster NGC 6193. The western part of the RCW108 molecular cloud, for which we derive a mass of ~8000 M⊙, contains an embedded compact HII region, IRAS 16362-4845, ionized by an aggregate of early-type stars for which we estimate a mass of ˜ 210 M⊙. The spectral type of the earliest star is O9, as confirmed by the visible spectrum of the compact HII region. We notice a lack of stars later than A0 in the aggregate, at least having the moderate reddenings that are common among its B-type stars, and we speculate that this might be a consequence of the extreme youth of the aggregate. We also note the existence of a dense ionized clump (n > 104 cm-3) appearing near the main ionizing star of the compact HII region. We examine the distribution of stars displaying infrared excesses projected across the molecular cloud. While many of them are located in the densest (n ˜ 104-5 cm-3) area of the molecular cloud near the position of IRAS 16362-4845, we also find a group concentrating towards the edge of the cloud that faces NGC 6193, as well as some other stars beyond the edge of the molecular cloud. The intense ionizing radiation field by the O stars in NGC 6193 is a clear candidate trigger of star formation in the molecular cloud, and we suggest that the existence and arrangement of stars in this region of the molecular cloud supports a scenario in which their formation may be a consequence of this. However, infrared excess stars are also present in some areas of the opposite side of the cloud, where no obvious candidate external trigger is identified. The existence of such tracers of recent star formation scattered across the more massive molecular cloud associated with IRAS 16362-4845, and the low star formation efficiency that we derive, indicate that it is in a

  4. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE AND THE SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE AT FIXED MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa

    2010-09-20

    From the Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, I construct two volume-limited samples with luminosities -20.5 {<=} M{sub r} {<=} -18.5 and -22.5{<=}M{sub r} {<=}-20.5, respectively, to explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR) and the specific star formation rate (SSFR) at fixed morphology. It is found that in these two volume-limited samples, galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime. I divide each volume-limited Main galaxy sample into two distinct populations, the early type and the late type, and observe that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR of galaxies remains true at fixed morphology: the SFR and SSFR of galaxies in the densest regime is still preferentially lower than that of the ones in the lowest density regime with the same morphological type. I also note that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR of late-type galaxies is stronger than that of early-type galaxies.

  6. The era of star formation in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, C. L.; Gettings, D. P.; Zeimann, G. R.; Snyder, G. F.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Pope, A.; Alberts, S.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Stern, D.; Moustakas, L. A.; Brown, M. J. I.; Chary, R.-R.; Dey, Arjun; Galametz, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Miller, E. D.; Moustakas, J.

    2013-12-20

    We analyze the star formation properties of 16 infrared-selected, spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). We present new spectroscopic confirmation for six of these high-redshift clusters, five of which are at z > 1.35. Using infrared luminosities measured with deep Spitzer/Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer observations at 24 μm, along with robust optical + IRAC photometric redshifts and spectral-energy-distribution-fitted stellar masses, we present the dust-obscured star-forming fractions, star formation rates, and specific star formation rates in these clusters as functions of redshift and projected clustercentric radius. We find that z ∼ 1.4 represents a transition redshift for the ISCS sample, with clear evidence of an unquenched era of cluster star formation at earlier times. Beyond this redshift, the fraction of star-forming cluster members increases monotonically toward the cluster centers. Indeed, the specific star formation rate in the cores of these distant clusters is consistent with field values at similar redshifts, indicating that at z > 1.4 environment-dependent quenching had not yet been established in ISCS clusters. By combining these observations with complementary studies showing a rapid increase in the active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, a stochastic star formation history, and a major merging episode at the same epoch in this cluster sample, we suggest that the starburst activity is likely merger-driven and that the subsequent quenching is due to feedback from merger-fueled AGNs. The totality of the evidence suggests we are witnessing the final quenching period that brings an end to the era of star formation in galaxy clusters and initiates the era of passive evolution.

  7. On star formation in stellar systems. I - Photoionization effects in protoglobular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Lin, D. N. C.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1986-01-01

    The progressive ionization and subsequent dynamical evolution of nonhomogeneously distributed low-metal-abundance diffuse gas after star formation in globular clusters are investigated analytically, taking the gravitational acceleration due to the stars into account. The basic equations are derived; the underlying assumptions, input parameters, and solution methods are explained; and numerical results for three standard cases (ionization during star formation, ionization during expansion, and evolution resulting in a stable H II region at its equilibrium Stromgren radius) are presented in graphs and characterized in detail. The time scale of residual-gas loss in typical clusters is found to be about the same as the lifetime of a massive star on the main sequence.

  8. Triggered star formation & feedback in the ring galaxy, NGC 922

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, O. Ivy; Koribalski, Baerbel; Meurer, Gerhardt; Zwaan, Martin; Bekki, Kenji; Garcia-Appadoo, Diego; Vlahakis, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    Star formation (and its cessation) play an integral role in galaxy evolution. However, the physical processes that govern how and when stars form in galaxies is still not fully understood. Although rare, ring galaxies provide an excellent testbed for studying two opposing compression-driven processes, namely the large-scale triggering of star formation versus the subsequent destructive feedback effects of newly-formed massive stars on nearby molecular clouds (and future star formation). Due to the simplicity of the collision, we can constrain the interaction timescales very well and hence obtain good boundary conditions for when stars can be formed within the observed ring. We propose to map the neutral gas content of NGC 922--- a recently-discovered ring galaxy that also happens to be one of the closest. We have obtained excellent observations of the stellar components from the Hubble Space Telescope for this object and we are only lacking information about its gas properties. These proposed observations will shed light on: (1) the balance between neutral and molecular gas content in the ISM of the ring galaxy; (2) the physical processes that dominate the galactic-scale triggering and suppression of star formation galaxies; (3) the kinematics and location of gas that has been disrupted and stripped from this galaxy pair; and (4) the validity of our simulated interaction model for the formation of NGC 922.

  9. The StarLight formation-flying interferometer system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duren, R.; Lay, O.

    2002-01-01

    The StarLight Project, scheduled for a 6-month mission in 2006, will demonstrate the new technologies of spaceborne long-baseline optical interferometry and precision formation flying necessary for the Terrestrial Planet Finder and other future astropohysics missions.

  10. Connecting the density structure of molecular clouds with star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    In the current paradigm of turbulence-regulated interstellar medium (ISM), star formation rates of entire galaxies are intricately linked to the density structure of the individual molecular clouds. This density structure is essentially encapsulated in the probability distribution function of volume densities (ρ-PDF), which directly affects the star formation rates predicted by analytic models. Contrasting its fundamental role, the ρ-PDF function has remained virtually unconstrained by observations. I describe in this contribution the recent progress in attaining observational constraints for the column density PDFs (N-PDFs) of molecular clouds that function as a proxy of the ρ-PDFs. Specifically, observational works point towards a universal correlation between the shape of the N-PDFs and star formation activity in molecular clouds. The correlation is in place from the scales of a parsec up to the scales of entire galaxies, making it a fundamental, global link between the ISM structure and star formation.

  11. Theoretical Developments in Understanding Massive Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, Harold W.; Bodenheimer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Except under special circumstances massive stars in galactic disks will form through accretion. The gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core will initially produce one or more low mass quasi-hydrostatic objects of a few Jupiter masses. Through subsequent accretion the masses of these cores grow as they simultaneously evolve toward hydrogen burning central densities and temperatures. We review the evolution of accreting (proto-)stars, including new results calculated with a publicly available stellar evolution code written by the authors.

  12. Early-stage Massive Star Formation near the Galactic Center: Sgr C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, S.; Ginsburg, A.; Johnston, K.; Beuther, H.; Bally, J.; Cyganowski, C. J.; Battersby, C.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopy and 1 mm line and continuum observations of a recently identified site of high mass star formation likely to be located in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) near Sgr C. Located on the outskirts of the massive evolved H II region associated with Sgr C, the area is characterized by an Extended Green Object (EGO) measuring ~10'' in size (0.4 pc), whose observational characteristics suggest the presence of an embedded massive protostar driving an outflow. Our data confirm that early-stage star formation is taking place on the periphery of the Sgr C H II region, with detections of two protostellar cores and several knots of H2 and Brackett γ emission alongside a previously detected compact radio source. We calculate the cores' joint mass to be ~103 M ⊙, with column densities of 1-2 × 1024 cm-2. We show the host molecular cloud to hold ~105 M ⊙ of gas and dust with temperatures and column densities favorable for massive star formation to occur, however, there is no evidence of star formation outside of the EGO, indicating that the cloud is predominantly quiescent. Given its mass, density, and temperature, the cloud is comparable to other remarkable non-star-forming clouds such as G0.253 in the eastern CMZ.

  13. Direct measurements of dust attenuation in z ∼ 1.5 star-forming galaxies from 3D-HST: Implications for dust geometry and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Sedona H.; Kriek, Mariska; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Wuyts, Stijn; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-06-10

    The nature of dust in distant galaxies is not well understood, and until recently few direct dust measurements have been possible. We investigate dust in distant star-forming galaxies using near-infrared grism spectra of the 3D-HST survey combined with archival multi-wavelength photometry. These data allow us to make a direct comparison between dust around star-forming regions (A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}) and the integrated dust content (A {sub V,} {sub star}). We select a sample of 163 galaxies between 1.36 ≤ z ≤ 1.5 with Hα signal-to-noise ratio ≥5 and measure Balmer decrements from stacked spectra to calculate A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II}. First, we stack spectra in bins of A {sub V,} {sub star}, and find that A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} = 1.86 A {sub V,} {sub star}, with a significance of σ = 1.7. Our result is consistent with the two-component dust model, in which galaxies contain both diffuse and stellar birth cloud dust. Next, we stack spectra in bins of specific star formation rate (log SSFR), star formation rate (log SFR), and stellar mass (log M {sub *}). We find that on average A {sub V,} {sub H} {sub II} increases with SFR and mass, but decreases with increasing SSFR. Interestingly, the data hint that the amount of extra attenuation decreases with increasing SSFR. This trend is expected from the two-component model, as the extra attenuation will increase once older stars outside the star-forming regions become more dominant in the galaxy spectrum. Finally, using Balmer decrements we derive dust-corrected Hα SFRs, and find that stellar population modeling produces incorrect SFRs if rapidly declining star formation histories are included in the explored parameter space.

  14. Exploring the Connection Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in the Local Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman. T. M.; Ptak, Andrew; Schiminovich, D.; O'Dowd, M.; Bertincourt, B.

    2012-01-01

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from SDSS and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic con- tributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [NeII] 12.8 micron emission-line is well correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGN show a clear excess of [NeIII] 15.6 micron emission relative to star forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including: the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [NeV] 14.3 micron to [NeII] micron 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7, 11.3, and 17 micron PAH features, and the optical "D" parameter which measures the distance a source lies from the locus of star forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN-dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 micron feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  15. EXPLORING THE CONNECTION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.; Schiminovich, D.; Bertincourt, B.; O'Dowd, M.

    2012-10-10

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic contributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m emission line is well correlated with the star formation rate measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star-forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGNs show a clear excess of [Ne III] 15.6 {mu}m emission relative to star-forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [Ne V] 14.3 {mu}m to [Ne II] {mu}m 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7 {mu}m, 11.3 {mu}m, and 17 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features, and the optical 'D' parameter which measures the distance at which a source lies from the locus of star-forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 {mu}m feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  16. Hierarchical Star Formation in Turbulent Media: Evidence from Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasha, Kathryn; Elmegreen, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the positions and ages of star clusters in eight local galaxies and find a correlation between the age difference and separation of cluster pairs. We infer that cluster formation is correlated in time such that clusters that are close to each have similar ages. In addition, the age between cluster pairs increases with their separation to the 0.3 - 0.6 power, close to the expected slope of 0.5 that would arise in a turbulent-driven interstellar medium. This suggests that not only is star formation hierarchical both in space and in time, but that the duration of star formation depends on the region of interest: smaller regions will form stars over a shorter time frame whereas larger regions form stars over a longer time frame.

  17. Environmental regulation of cloud and star formation in galactic bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, F.; Bournaud, F.; Emsellem, E.; Agertz, O.; Athanassoula, E.; Combes, F.; Elmegreen, B.; Kraljic, K.; Motte, F.; Teyssier, R.

    2015-12-01

    The strong time-dependence of the dynamics of galactic bars yields a complex and rapidly evolving distribution of dense gas and star forming regions. Although bars mainly host regions void of any star formation activity, their extremities can gather the physical conditions for the formation of molecular complexes and mini-starbursts. Using a sub-parsec resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a Milky Way-like galaxy, we probe these conditions to explore how and where bar (hydro-)dynamics favours the formation or destruction of molecular clouds and stars. The interplay between the kpc-scale dynamics (gas flows, shear) and the parsec-scale (turbulence) is key to this problem. We find a strong dichotomy between the leading and trailing sides of the bar, in term of cloud fragmentation and in the age distribution of the young stars. After orbiting along the bar edge, these young structures slow down at the extremities of the bar, where orbital crowding increases the probability of cloud-cloud collision. We find that such events increase the Mach number of the cloud, leading to an enhanced star formation efficiency and finally the formation of massive stellar associations, in a fashion similar to galaxy-galaxy interactions. We highlight the role of bar dynamics in decoupling young stars from the clouds in which they form, and discuss the implications on the injection of feedback into the interstellar medium (ISM), in particular in the context of galaxy formation.

  18. Star Formation and Dynamics in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, Michela; Gualandris, Alessia

    The centre of our Galaxy is one of the most studied and yet enigmatic places in the Universe. At a distance of about 8 kpc from our Sun, the Galactic centre (GC) is the ideal environment to study the extreme processes that take place in the vicinity of a supermassive black hole (SMBH). Despite the hostile environment, several tens of early-type stars populate the central parsec of our Galaxy. A fraction of them lie in a thin ring with mild eccentricity and inner radius ˜ 0.04 pc, while the S-stars, i.e. the ˜ 30 stars closest to the SMBH ( lesssim 0.04 pc), have randomly oriented and highly eccentric orbits. The formation of such early-type stars has been a puzzle for a long time: molecular clouds should be tidally disrupted by the SMBH before they can fragment into stars. We review the main scenarios proposed to explain the formation and the dynamical evolution of the early-type stars in the GC. In particular, we discuss the most popular in situ scenarios (accretion disc fragmentation and molecular cloud disruption) and migration scenarios (star cluster inspiral and Hills mechanism). We focus on the most pressing challenges that must be faced to shed light on the process of star formation in the vicinity of a SMBH.

  19. Unveiling Hidden Massive Stars: Star Formation and the IMF in Carina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Michael; Povich, Matthew; McSwain, M. Virginia

    2014-02-01

    We propose two nights of observations with the OSIRIS IR spectrograph on SOAR to obtain spectra for a large sample of massive star candidates within the Carina Nebula. Target stars have been identified as OB candidates through the use of combined X-ray emission and IR SED fitting and are too extincted to be readily observed at optical wavelengths. We will obtain K-band spectroscopy of 56 highly extincted stars in order to identify their spectral type and luminosity class. The proposed observations will confirm or reject individual stars as massive members of the Carina nebula star forming complex. The placement of these stars around the nebula will address questions on the process of triggered star formation, and the wide distribution of targets may shed light on the idea that OB stars can form in isolation. Additionally, any new OB stars will bolster the high-mass end of the stellar IMF and lead to a more accurate determine of the total stellar mass and a better understanding of the recent star formation history within the region.

  20. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  1. Star Formation in Isolated Cores: A Solitary Existence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee; Allen, Lori; Chapman, Nicholas; Harvey, Paul; Lai, Shih-Ping; Looney, Leslie; Myers, Phil

    2004-09-01

    The standard theories of star formation address the formation of a single star in isolation. Dark cloud cores are often cited as examples of isolated, individual star formation. Because of the density of these cores, observations to date have not had the sensitivity to really examine the core structure and search for the youngest and lowest mass sub-stellar objects. We propose to observe ten dark cores, five without associated stars and five with an associated star in all four IRAC bands and MIPS 24 micron. In addition, we will combine these observations with deep JHK ground-based imaging. We will observe the youngest sub-stellar objects down to 10 Jupiter masses, map the column density structure via extinction measurements, and image faint extended emission, such as outflows that are indicative of cloud-star interaction. Our overall goal is to test standard star formation theory by identifying the entire stellar and sub-stellar content of the cores and the relation of these objects to the gas and dust distribution.

  2. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  3. Heavy element abundances and massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Silk, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) remains a great challenge in astronomy. In the solar neighborhood, the IMF is reasonable well determined for stellar masses from about 0.1 to 60 solar mass. However, outside the solar neighborhood, the IMF is poorly known. Among those frequently discussed arguments favoring a different IMF outside the solar neighborhood are the estimated time to consume the remaining gas in spiral galaxies, and the high rate of forming massive stars in starburst galaxies. An interesting question then is whether there may be an independent way of testing possible variations in the IMF. Indeed, the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are mostly synthesized in massive stars, so increasing, or decreasing, the fraction of massive stars naturally leads to a variation in the heavy element yield, and thus, the metallicity. The observed abundance should severely constrain any deviations of the IMF from the locally determined IMF. We focus on element oxygen, which is the most abundant heavy element in the interstellar medium. Oxygen is ejected only by massive stars that can become Type 1 supernovae, and the oxygen abundance is, therefore, a sensitive function of the fraction of massive stars in the IMF. Adopting oxygen enables us to avoid uncertainties in Type 1 supernovae. We use the nucleosynthesis results to calculate the oxygen yield for given IMF. We then calculate the oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium assuming instantaneous recycling of oxygen.

  4. Hubble studies generations of star formation in neighbouring galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    N11B Credits: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)/HEIC The iridescent tapestry of star birth The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures the iridescent tapestry of star birth in a neighbouring galaxy in this panoramic view of glowing gas, dark dust clouds, and young, hot stars. The star-forming region, catalogued as N11B lies in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), located only 160 000 light-years from Earth. With its high resolution, the Hubble Space Telescope is able to view details of star formation in the LMC as easily as ground-based telescopes are able to observe stellar formation within our own Milky Way galaxy. One neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), lies in the constellation of Dorado and contains a number of regions harbouring recent and ongoing star formation. One of these star-forming region, N11B, is shown in this Hubble image. It is a subregion within a larger area of star formation called N11. N11 is the second largest star-forming region in LMC. It is only surpassed in the size and activity by ‘the king of stellar nurseries’, 30 Doradus, located at the opposite side of LMC. N11B Credits: NASA/ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)/HEIC A view of star formation The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures the iridescent tapestry of star birth in a neighbouring galaxy in this panoramic view of glowing gas, dark dust clouds, and young, hot stars. The star-forming region, catalogued as N11B lies in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), located only 160 000 light-years from Earth. With its high resolution, the Hubble Space Telescope is able to view details of star formation in the LMC as easily as ground-based telescopes are able to observe stellar formation within our own Milky Way galaxy. One neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), lies in the constellation of Dorado and contains a number of regions harbouring recent and ongoing star formation. One of these star-forming regions, N11B, is shown in

  5. Segue 1 -- A Compressed Star Formation History before Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, David; Frebel, Anna; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2016-02-01

    Segue 1 is the current best candidate for a “first galaxy,” a system that experienced only a single, short burst of star formation and has since remained unchanged. Here we present possible star formation scenarios that can explain Segue 1’s unique metallicity distribution. While the majority of stars in all other ultra-faint dwarfs are within 0.5 dex of the mean [Fe/H] for the galaxy, five of the seven stars in Segue 1 have a spread of Δ[Fe/H] > 0.8 dex. We show that this distribution of metallicities cannot be explained by a gradual buildup of stars, but instead requires clustered star formation. Chemical tagging allows the separate unresolved delta functions in abundance space to be associated with discrete events in space and time. This provides an opportunity to put the enrichment events into a time sequence and unravel the history of the system. We investigate two possible scenarios for the star formation history of Segue 1 using Fyris Alpha simulations of gas in a 107 M⊙ dark matter halo. The lack of stars with intermediate metallicities -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 can be explained either by a pause in star formation caused by supernova feedback or by the spread of metallicities resulting from one or two supernovae in a low-mass dark matter halo. Either possibility can reproduce the metallicity distribution function (MDF) as well as the other observed elemental abundances. The unusual MDF and the low luminosity of Segue 1 can be explained by it being a first galaxy that originated with Mvir ˜ 107M⊙ at z ˜ 10.

  6. Star formation and the distribution of HI and infrared emission in M51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, Richard J.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Rice, W.

    1990-01-01

    H I, infrared, CO, H alpha and beta band observations of M51, the prototypical grand-design spiral galaxy, are used to study the consequences of star formation for the distribution of H I and dust. Using the H I and CO data sets new tests of the idea that the H I is largely a dissociation product in star-forming regions were performed. It was confirmed that the H I spiral arms are generally coincident with the H II region arms, and offset downstream from the CO arms. The radial distributions of total gas, H alpha and H I surface density have a simple explanation in the dissociation picture. The distributions also demonstrate how the surface density of H I might be related to the star formation efficiency in molecule-rich galaxies. The large width of the H I regions along the arms compared to that of the H II regions can be understood in terms of a simple Stroemgren sphere calculation. The longer lifetime of the stars producing dissociating radiation vs. those producing ionizing radiation will also contribute to the greater width of the H I arms if stars are continuously forming on the arms. The lack of detailed coincidence of the H I and H II regions along the inner arms has a variety of possible explanations within the dissociation scenario. Two simple tests to probe the origin of the IRAS emission in M51 were performed.

  7. Outer Disk Star Formation in HI selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurer, G. R.

    2017-03-01

    The HI in galaxies often extends past their conventionally defined optical extent. I report results from our team which has been probing low intensity star formation in outer disks using imaging in Hα and ultraviolet. Using a sample of hundreds of HI selected galaxies, we confirm that outer disk HII regions and extended UV disks are common. Hence outer disks are not dormant but are dimly forming stars. Although the ultraviolet light in galaxies is more centrally concentrated than the HI, the UV/HI ratio (the Star Formation Efficiency) is nearly constant, with a slight dependency on surface brightness. This result is well accounted for in a model where disks maintain a constant stability parameter Q. This model also accounts for how the ISM and star formation are distributed in the bright parts of galaxies, and how HI appears to trace the distribution of dark matter in galaxy outskirts.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Hasan, Hashima (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report details work done in a project involving spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star-formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data including some from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and other spectroscopic databases. We will include four kinds of regions: (1) disks around more evolved objects; (2) young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star-formation regions; (3) star formation in external, bright IR (infrared) galaxies; and (4) the galactic center. During this period, work proceeded fully on track and on time. Details on workshops and conferences attended and research results are presented. A preprint article entitled 'The Far Infrared Lines of OH as Molecular Cloud Diagnostics' is included as an appendix.

  9. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  10. High-redshift major mergers weakly enhance star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fensch, J.; Renaud, F.; Bournaud, F.; Duc, P.-A.; Agertz, O.; Amram, P.; Combes, F.; Di Matteo, P.; Elmegreen, B.; Emsellem, E.; Jog, C. J.; Perret, V.; Struck, C.; Teyssier, R.

    2017-02-01

    Galaxy mergers are believed to trigger strong starbursts. This is well assessed by observations in the local Universe. However, the efficiency of this mechanism has poorly been tested so far for high-redshift, actively star-forming, galaxies. We present a suite of pc-resolution hydrodynamical numerical simulations to compare the star formation process along a merging sequence of high- and low-redshift galaxies, by varying the gas mass fraction between the two models. We show that, for the same orbit, high-redshift gas-rich mergers are less efficient than low-redshift ones at producing starbursts; the star formation rate excess induced by the merger and its duration are both around 10 times lower than in the low gas fraction case. The mechanisms that account for the star formation triggering at low redshift - the increased compressive turbulence, gas fragmentation, and central gas inflows - are only mildly, if not at all, enhanced for high gas fraction galaxy encounters. Furthermore, we show that the strong stellar feedback from the initially high star formation rate in high-redshift galaxies does not prevent an increase of the star formation during the merger. Our results are consistent with the observed increase of the number of major mergers with increasing redshift being faster than the respective increase in the number of starburst galaxies.

  11. ON THE STAR FORMATION LAW FOR SPIRAL AND IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2015-12-01

    A dynamical model for star formation on a galactic scale is proposed in which the interstellar medium is constantly condensing to star-forming clouds on the dynamical time of the average midplane density, and the clouds are constantly being disrupted on the dynamical timescale appropriate for their higher density. In this model, the areal star formation rate scales with the 1.5 power of the total gas column density throughout the main regions of spiral galaxies, and with a steeper power, 2, in the far outer regions and in dwarf irregular galaxies because of the flaring disks. At the same time, there is a molecular star formation law that is linear in the main and outer parts of disks and in dIrrs because the duration of individual structures in the molecular phase is also the dynamical timescale, canceling the additional 0.5 power of surface density. The total gas consumption time scales directly with the midplane dynamical time, quenching star formation in the inner regions if there is no accretion, and sustaining star formation for ∼100 Gyr or more in the outer regions with no qualitative change in gas stability or molecular cloud properties. The ULIRG track follows from high densities in galaxy collisions.

  12. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color-magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%-8% for young, 10-100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  13. Bimodal star formation - Constraints from galaxy colors at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that at early epochs the light from elliptical galaxies is dominated by stars with an initial mass function (IMF) which is deficient in low-mass stars, relative to the solar neighborhood is investigated. V-R colors for the optical counterparts of 3CR radio sources offer the most severe constraints on the models. Reasonable fits are obtained to both the blue, high-redshift colors and the redder, low-redshift colors with a model galaxy which forms with initially equal star formation rates in each of two IMF modes: one lacking low-mass stars, and one with stars of all masses. The net effect is that the time-integrated IMF has twice as many high-mass stars as the solar neighborhood IMF, relative to low mass stars. A conventional solar neighborhood IMF does not simultaneously account for both the range in colors at high redshift and the redness of nearby ellipticals, with any single star formation epoch. Models with a standard IMF require half the stellar population to be formed in a burst at low redshift z of about 1.

  14. Delayed star formation in isolated dwarf galaxies: Hubble space telescope star formation history of the Aquarius dwarf irregular

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Andrew A.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Leaman, Ryan E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: abrooks@physics.rutgers.edu

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained deep images of the highly isolated (d = 1 Mpc) Aquarius dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 210) with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) reaches more than a magnitude below the oldest main-sequence turnoff, allowing us to derive the star formation history (SFH) over the entire lifetime of the galaxy with a timing precision of ≈10% of the lookback time. Using a maximum likelihood fit to the CMD we find that only ≈10% of all star formation in Aquarius took place more than 10 Gyr ago (lookback time equivalent to redshift z ≈ 2). The star formation rate increased dramatically ≈6-8 Gyr ago (z ≈ 0.7-1.1) and then declined until the present time. The only known galaxy with a more extreme confirmed delay in star formation is Leo A, a galaxy of similar M {sub H} {sub I}/M {sub *}, dynamical mass, mean metallicity, and degree of isolation. The delayed stellar mass growth in these galaxies does not track the mean dark matter accretion rate from CDM simulations. The similarities between Leo A and Aquarius suggest that if gas is not removed from dwarf galaxies by interactions or feedback, it can linger for several gigayears without cooling in sufficient quantity to form stars efficiently. We discuss possible causes for the delay in star formation including suppression by reionization and late-time mergers. We find reasonable agreement between our measured SFHs and select cosmological simulations of isolated dwarfs. Because star formation and merger processes are both stochastic in nature, delayed star formation in various degrees is predicted to be a characteristic (but not a universal) feature of isolated small galaxies.

  15. Molecular Clouds, Star Formation and Galactic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoville, Nick; Young, Judith S.

    1984-01-01

    Radio observations show that the gigantic clouds of molecules where stars are born are distributed in various ways in spiral galaxies, perhaps accounting for the variation in their optical appearance. Research studies and findings in this area are reported and discussed. (JN)

  16. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION IN A DOUBLE SHELL NEAR W51A

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Lee, Youngung; Bieging, John H.; Kulesa, Craig A.

    2009-08-10

    We present Heinrich Hertz Telescope CO observations of the shell structure near the active star-forming complex W51A to investigate the process of star formation triggered by the expansion of an H II region. The CO observations confirm that dense molecular material has been collected along the shell detected in Spitzer IRAC images. The CO distribution shows that the shell is blown out toward a lower density region to the northwest. Total hydrogen column density around the shell is high enough to form new stars. We find two CO condensations with the same central velocity of 59 km s{sup -1} to the east and north along the edge of the IRAC shell. We identify two young stellar objects in early evolutionary stages (Stage 0/I) within the densest molecular condensation. From the CO kinematics, we find that the H II region is currently expanding with a velocity of 3.4 km s{sup -1}, implying that the shell's expansion age is {approx}1 Myr. This timescale is in good agreement with numerical simulations of the expansion of the H II region (Hosokawa and Inutsuka). We conclude that the star formation on the border of the shell is triggered by the expansion of the H II region.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star formation in early-type galaxies (Longhetti+ 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhetti, M.; Bressan, A.; Chiosi, C.; Rampazzo, R.

    1999-04-01

    We analyze the star formation properties of a sample of 21 shell galaxies and 30 early-type galaxies members of interacting pairs, located in low density environments (Longhetti et al., 1998, Cat. , 1998A&AS..130..267L). The study is based on new models developed to interpret the information coming from `blue' HδFeI, H+K(CaII) and D4000 line-strength indices proposed by Rose (1984AJ.....89.1238R; 1985AJ.....90.1927R) and Hamilton (1985ApJ...297..371H). We find that the last star forming event that occurred in the nuclear region of shell galaxies is statistically old (from 0.1 up to several Gyr) with respect to the corresponding one in the sub-sample of pair galaxies (<0.1Gyr or even ongoing star formation). If the stellar activity is somehow related to the formation of shells, as predicted by several dynamical models of galaxy interaction, shells have to be considered long lasting structures. Since pair members show evidence of very recent star formation, we suggest that either large reservoirs of gas have to be present to maintain active star formation, if these galaxies are on periodic orbits, or most of the pair members in the present sample are experiencing unbound encounters. (1 data file).

  18. PROGRESSIVE STAR FORMATION IN THE YOUNG GALACTIC SUPER STAR CLUSTER NGC 3603

    SciTech Connect

    Beccari, Giacomo; Spezzi, Loredana; De Marchi, Guido; Andersen, Morten; Paresce, Francesco; Young, Erick; Panagia, Nino; Bond, Howard; Balick, Bruce; Calzetti, Daniela; Carollo, C. Marcella; Disney, Michael J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, Donald N. B.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Saha, Abhijit

    2010-09-10

    Early Release Science observations of the cluster NGC 3603 with the WFC3 on the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope allow us to study its recent star formation history. Our analysis focuses on stars with H{alpha} excess emission, a robust indicator of their pre-main sequence (PMS) accreting status. The comparison with theoretical PMS isochrones shows that 2/3 of the objects with H{alpha} excess emission have ages from 1 to 10 Myr, with a median value of 3 Myr, while a surprising 1/3 of them are older than 10 Myr. The study of the spatial distribution of these PMS stars allows us to confirm their cluster membership and to statistically separate them from field stars. This result establishes unambiguously for the first time that star formation in and around the cluster has been ongoing for at least 10-20 Myr, at an apparently increasing rate.

  19. MASSIVE STARS IN THE LOCAL GROUP: Implications for Stellar Evolution and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Philip

    The galaxies of the Local Group serve as important laboratories for understanding the physics of massive stars. Here I discuss what is involved in identifying various kinds of massive stars in nearby galaxies: the hydrogen-burning O-type stars and their evolved He-burning evolutionary descendants, the luminous blue variables, red supergiants, and Wolf-Rayet stars. Primarily I review what our knowledge of the massive star population in nearby galaxies has taught us about stellar evolution and star formation. I show that the current generation of stellar evolutionary models do well at matching some of the observed features and provide a look at the sort of new observational data that will provide a benchmark against which new models can be evaluated.

  20. Emission-line stars in the Canis Major star-formation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiramihardja, S. D.; Kogure, T.; Nakano, M.; Yoshida, S.

    Using the Schmidt telescope of the Kiso Observatory, H-alpha-emission stars have been surveyed in the Canis Major star-formation region and its adjacent reference area. In the area of about 58 square degrees a total of 179 H-alpha-emission stars have been found in the magnitude range between V = 6 and 15 with a majority in the V = 11-14 range. Based on the color properties and on the location relative to the CMa R1 association, the stars are provisionally classified into two main groups of early-type H-alpha-emission stars and of T Tauri candidates. It is found that the early-type H-alpha-emission stars are distributed rather uniformly over the survey area in contrast to the group of T Tauri candidates which show good coincidence with the CMa R1 association in the surface distribution.

  1. THE MILKY WAY PROJECT: A STATISTICAL STUDY OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH INFRARED BUBBLES

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrew, S.; Robitaille, T. P.; Simpson, R.; Lintott, C. J.; Bressert, E.; Povich, M. S.; Sherman, R.; Schawinski, K.; Wolf-Chase, G.

    2012-08-10

    The Milky Way Project citizen science initiative recently increased the number of known infrared bubbles in the inner Galactic plane by an order of magnitude compared to previous studies. We present a detailed statistical analysis of this data set with the Red MSX Source (RMS) catalog of massive young stellar sources to investigate the association of these bubbles with massive star formation. We particularly address the question of massive triggered star formation near infrared bubbles. We find a strong positional correlation of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and H II regions with Milky Way Project bubbles at separations of <2 bubble radii. As bubble sizes increase, a statistically significant overdensity of massive young sources emerges in the region of the bubble rims, possibly indicating the occurrence of triggered star formation. Based on numbers of bubble-associated RMS sources, we find that 67% {+-} 3% of MYSOs and (ultra-)compact H II regions appear to be associated with a bubble. We estimate that approximately 22% {+-} 2% of massive young stars may have formed as a result of feedback from expanding H II regions. Using MYSO-bubble correlations, we serendipitously recovered the location of the recently discovered massive cluster Mercer 81, suggesting the potential of such analyses for discovery of heavily extincted distant clusters.

  2. EXTENDED SCHMIDT LAW: ROLE OF EXISTING STARS IN CURRENT STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Yong; Helou, George; Yan Lin; Armus, Lee; Wu Yanling; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Papovich, Casey

    2011-06-01

    We propose an 'extended Schmidt law' with explicit dependence of the star formation efficiency (SFE = SFR/M{sub gas}) on the stellar mass surface density ({Sigma}{sub star}). This relation has a power-law index of 0.48 {+-} 0.04 and a 1{sigma} observed scatter on the SFE of 0.4 dex, which holds over five orders of magnitude in the stellar density for individual global galaxies, including various types and especially the low-surface-brightness (LSB) galaxies that deviate significantly from the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) law. When applying it to regions of a sample of 12 spiral galaxies at sub-kiloparsec resolution, the extended Schmidt law not only holds for LSB regions but also shows significantly smaller scatters both within and across galaxies compared with the KS law. We argue that this new relation points to the role of existing stars in regulating the SFE, thus better encoding the star formation physics. Comparison with physical models of star formation recipes shows that the extended Schmidt law can be reproduced by some models including gas free fall in a stellar-gravitational potential and pressure-supported star formation. By implementing this new law into the analytic model of gas accretion in {Lambda}CDM, we show that it can reproduce the observed main sequence of star-forming galaxies (a relation between the SFR and stellar mass) from z = 0 up to z = 2.

  3. Small-scale star formation at low metallicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccall, Marshall L.; Hill, Robert; English, Jayanne

    1990-01-01

    Massive star formation in a low metallicity environment is investigated by studying the morphology of small HII regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud. A classification scheme based upon the symmetry of form in the light of H-alpha is proposed to make possible an examination of the properties of blister candidates with respect to nebulas embedded in a more uniform medium. A new diagnostic of size is developed to derive quantitative information about the ionized gas and ionizing stars. The asymmetrical surface-brightness distribution of many HII regions demonstrates that massive stars often form at the edge of dense neutral clouds. However, the existence of many symmetrical nebulas with similar sizes, luminosities, and surface brightnesses shows that massive star formation often occurs within these clouds. Nevertheless, the statistics of the two different forms indicate that the rate of massive star formation declines less steeply with radius across host clouds than in the Milky Way, suggesting that external triggering may play a larger role in initiating star formation.

  4. NGC 1097:Constraining mechanisms for star formation with the VLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Sarah; Sheth, Kartik; Balser, Dana S.; Yarber, Aara'L.

    2015-01-01

    The project goal is to trace the precise location of star forming regions in the barred spiral NGC 1097. Specifically we want to better understand how the star formation progresses in the bar and at the bar ends. Our hydrodynamic gas flow model indicates gas flow should never cross dust lanes yet previous azimuthal cross-correlation analysis have indicated that the Hα emission is offset on the leading side of the bar dust lanes. It is critical to verify the precise locations of the stars forming regions. Is the star formation initiated in the dust lanes, or perhaps in dust spurs on the trailing side of the galaxy? We will measure synchrotron and thermal radiation contributions to quantify recent activity and compare to existing Hα, GALEX, archival VLA, and new ALMA Cycle 0 and Cycle 1 observations. This project will help catalog current and past star formation activity in the bar of NGC 1097 and thus help constrain the mechanisms for star formation.

  5. Autonomous formation flying sensor for the Star Light Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aung, M.; Purcell, G.; Tien, J.; Young, L.; Srinivasan, J.; Ciminera, M. A.; Chong, Y. J.; Amaro, L. R.; Young, L. E.

    2002-01-01

    The StarLight Mission, an element of NASA's Origins Program, was designed for first-time demonstration of two technologies: formation flying optical interferometry between spacecraft and autonomous precise formation flying of an array of spacecraft to support optical interferometry. The design overview and results of the technology effort are presented in this paper.

  6. Effective temperature of ionizing stars of extragalactic H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, O. L.; Hägele, G. F.; Cardaci, M. V.; Krabbe, A. C.

    2017-04-01

    The effective temperature (Teff) of the radiation field of the ionizing star(s) of a large sample of extragalactic H II regions was estimated using the R = log([O II] (λλ3726 + 29)/[O III] λ5007) index. We used a grid of photoionization models to calibrate the Teff-R relation finding that it has a strong dependence with the ionizing parameter, while it shows a weak direct dependence with the metallicity (variations in Z imply variations in U) of both the stellar atmosphere of the ionizing star and the gas phase of the H II region. Since the R index varies slightly with the Teff for values larger than 40 kK, the R index can be used to derive the Teff in the 30-40 kK range. A large fraction of the ionization parameter variation is due to differences in the temperature of the ionizing stars and then the use of the (relatively) low Teff dependent S2 = [S II] (λλ6717 + 31)/Hα emission-line ratio to derive the ionization parameter is preferable over others in the literature. We propose linear metallicity dependent relationships between S2 and U. Teff and metallicity estimations for a sample of 865 H II regions, whose emission-line intensities were compiled from the literature, do not show any Teff-Z correlation. On the other hand, it seems to be hints of the presence of an anticorrelation between Teff-U. We found that the majority of the studied H II regions (∼87 per cent) present Teff values in the range between 37 and 40 kK, with an average value of 38.5(±1) kK. We also studied the variation of Teff as a function of the galactocentric distance for 14 spiral galaxies. Our results are in agreement with the idea of the existence of positive Teff gradients along the disc of spiral galaxies.

  7. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY'S NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Pfuhl, O.; Fritz, T. K.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Ott, T.; Dodds-Eden, K.; Zilka, M.; Sternberg, A.; Maness, H.

    2011-11-10

    We present spatially resolved imaging and integral field spectroscopy data for 450 cool giant stars within 1 pc from Sgr A*. We use the prominent CO bandheads to derive effective temperatures of individual giants. Additionally we present the deepest spectroscopic observation of the Galactic center (GC) so far, probing the number of B9/A0 main-sequence stars (2.2-2.8 M{sub sun}) in two deep fields. From spectrophotometry we construct a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of the red giant population and fit the observed diagram with model populations to derive the star formation history of the nuclear cluster. We find (1) that the average nuclear star formation rate dropped from an initial maximum {approx}10 Gyr ago to a deep minimum 1-2 Gyr ago and increased again during the last few hundred Myrs, (2) that roughly 80% of the stellar mass formed more than 5 Gyr ago, and (3) that mass estimates within R {approx} 1 pc from Sgr A* favor a dominant star formation mode with a 'normal' Chabrier/Kroupa initial mass function for the majority of the past star formation in the GC. The bulk stellar mass seems to have formed under conditions significantly different from the young stellar disks, perhaps because at the time of the formation of the nuclear cluster the massive black hole and its sphere of influence were much smaller than today.

  8. A SPITZER CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE PIPE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Forbrich, Jan; Lada, Charles J.; Muench, August A.; Alves, Joao

    2009-10-10

    The Pipe Nebula, a large nearby molecular cloud, lacks obvious signposts of star formation in all but one of more than 130 dust extinction cores that have been identified within it. In order to quantitatively determine the current level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula, we analyzed 13 deg{sup 2} of sensitive mid-infrared maps of the entire cloud, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer at wavelengths of 24 mum and 70 mum, to search for candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the high-extinction regions. We argue that our search is complete for class I and typical class II YSOs with luminosities of L {sub bol} approx 0.2 L {sub sun} and greater. We find only 18 candidate YSOs in the high-extinction regions of the entire Pipe cloud. Twelve of these sources are previously known members of a small cluster associated with Barnard 59, the largest and most massive dense core in the cloud. With only six candidate class I and class II YSOs detected toward extinction cores outside of this cluster, our findings emphatically confirm the notion of an extremely low level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula. The resulting star formation efficiency for the entire cloud mass is only approx0.06%.

  9. Anatomy of a Spiral Arm: Gas, Dust and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon; Pety, Jerome; Leroy, Adam; Hughes, Annie; Colombo, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Spiral arms can be easily depicted in disk galaxies from the numerous young stars associated with them. However, it is on a fundamental level not clear where, how and when star formation starts relative to the spiral arm. We address these questions by utilizing high 1-3'' resolution observation of the total and dense molecular gas in a spiral arm segment of the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51 from PAWS (PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey) in combination with observations of young stars, HII regions and dust emission. We build a complete picture of the onset, progression and impact of star formation for this segment and discuss this picture in light of theoretical expectations.

  10. The critical density for star formation in HII galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Christopher L.; Brinks, Elias; Skillman, Evan D.

    1993-01-01

    The star formation rate (SFR) in galaxies is believed to obey a power law relation with local gas density, first proposed by Schmidt (1959). Kennicutt (1989) has shown that there is a threshold density above which star formation occurs, and for densities at or near the threshold density, the DFR is highly non-linear, leading to bursts of star formation. Skillman (1987) empirically determined this threshold for dwarf galaxies to be approximately 1 x 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), at a linear resolution of 500pc. During the course of our survey for HI companion clouds to HII galaxies, we obtained high resolution HI observations of five nearby HII galaxies. HII galaxies are low surface brightness, rich in HI, and contain one or a few high surface brightness knots whose optical spectra resemble those of HII regions. These knots are currently experiencing a burst of star formation. After Kennicutt (1989) we determine the critical density for star formation in the galaxies, and compare the predictions with radio and optical data.

  11. The role of turbulence in star formation laws and thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Kraljic, Katarina; Renaud, Florent; Bournaud, Frédéric; Combes, Françoise; Elmegreen, Bruce; Emsellem, Eric; Teyssier, Romain

    2014-04-01

    The Schmidt-Kennicutt relation links the surface densities of gas to the star formation rate in galaxies. The physical origin of this relation, and in particular its break, i.e., the transition between an inefficient regime at low gas surface densities and a main regime at higher densities, remains debated. Here, we study the physical origin of the star formation relations and breaks in several low-redshift galaxies, from dwarf irregulars to massive spirals. We use numerical simulations representative of the Milky Way and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds with parsec up to subparsec resolution, and which reproduce the observed star formation relations and the relative variations of the star formation thresholds. We analyze the role of interstellar turbulence, gas cooling, and geometry in drawing these relations at 100 pc scale. We suggest in particular that the existence of a break in the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation could be linked to the transition from subsonic to supersonic turbulence and is independent of self-shielding effects. With this transition being connected to the gas thermal properties and thus to the metallicity, the break is shifted toward high surface densities in metal-poor galaxies, as observed in dwarf galaxies. Our results suggest that together with the collapse of clouds under self-gravity, turbulence (injected at galactic scale) can induce the compression of gas and regulate star formation.

  12. Unveiling the Role of Galactic Rotation on Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utreras, José; Becerra, Fernando; Escala, Andrés

    2016-12-01

    We study the star formation process at galactic scales and the role of rotation through numerical simulations of spiral and starburst galaxies using the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo. We focus on the study of three integrated star formation laws found in the literature: the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) and Silk-Elmegreen (SE) laws, and the dimensionally homogeneous equation proposed by Escala {{{Σ }}}{SFR}\\propto \\sqrt{G/L}{{{Σ }}}{gas}1.5. We show that using the last we take into account the effects of the integration along the line of sight and find a unique regime of star formation for both types of galaxies, suppressing the observed bi-modality of the KS law. We find that the efficiencies displayed by our simulations are anti-correlated with the angular velocity of the disk Ω for the three laws studied in this work. Finally, we show that the dimensionless efficiency of star formation is well represented by an exponentially decreasing function of -1.9{{Ω }}{t}{ff}{ini}, where {t}{ff}{ini} is the initial free-fall time. This leads to a unique galactic star formation relation which reduces the scatter of the bi-modal KS, SE, and Escala relations by 43%, 43%, and 35%, respectively.

  13. The Star Formation Properties of Void Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorman, Crystal; Vogeley, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation properties of two large samples of galaxies from the SDSS in large-scale cosmic voids on time scales of 10 Myr and 100 Myr, using Ha emission line strengths and GALEX FUV fluxes, respectively. The first sample consists of 109,818 optically selected galaxies. We find that void galaxies in this sample have higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs; star formation rates per unit stellar mass) than similar stellar mass galaxies in denser regions. The second sample is a subset of the optically selected sample containing 8070 galaxies with reliable S/N HI detections from ALFALFA. For the HI detected sample, SSFRs are similar regardless of large-scale environment. Investigating only the HI detected dwarf galaxies reveals a trend towards higher SSFRs in voids. Furthermore, we estimate the star formation rate per unit HI mass, known as the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a galaxy, as a function of environment. For the overall HI detected population, we notice no environmental dependence. Limiting the sample to dwarf galaxies again reveals a trend towards higher SFEs in voids. These results suggest that void environments provide a nurturing environment for dwarf galaxy evolution.

  14. Nothing to Hide -- An X-ray Survey of Star Formation Activity in the Pipe Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Posselt, Bettina; Lada, Charles J.; Covey, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    The Pipe Nebula, a large nearby molecular cloud, lacks obvious signposts of star formation in all but one of more than 130 dust extinction cores that have been identified within it. In a recent mid-infrared survey using Spitzer-MIPS to cover 13 square degrees, we have established that the star formation efficiency for the entire cloud is only ˜0.06%. The mid-infrared data are most sensitive for the earliest evolutionary stages of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs), covering class I protostars and typical class II sources (classical T Tauri stars). X-ray observations allow us to extend our survey to constrain any population of classical and weak-line T Tauri stars. In a first step, we use the ROSAT All-Sky Survey to constrain any overall T Tauri star population of the Pipe Nebula. Due to the fact that the Pipe Nebula is at a distance of only 130 pc, the ROSAT survey is already quite sensitive. Assuming a typical level of extinction, the completeness for G- and K-type stars is estimated to be about 50%. Subsequently, we use XMM-Newton observations pointed at three high-extinction regions within the Pipe Nebula to analyze these areas at higher sensitivity. These three regions are Barnard 59, the only core with ongoing star formation, the ``ring'' (i.e., the highest extinction region in the ``bowl'' of the Pipe), and Barnard 68. We additionally analyze the YSOs of Barnard 59 in the radio continuum to constrain high-energy processes. Overall, our results corroborate our previous Spitzer result that the star formation efficiency of the Pipe Nebula is very low.

  15. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS WITH IN SITU STAR FORMATION: NUCLEAR CORES AND AGE SEGREGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, Danor; Perets, Hagai B.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear stellar cluster (NSCs) are known to exist around massive black holes (MBHs) in galactic nuclei. Two formation scenarios were suggested for their origin: (1) buildup of NSCs from consecutive infall of stellar clusters and (2) continuous in situ star formation. Though the cluster infall scenario has been extensively studied, the in situ formation scenario has been hardly explored. Here we use Fokker-Planck (FP) calculations to study the effects of star formation on the buildup of NSCs and its implications for their long-term evolution and their resulting structure. We use the FP equation to describe the evolution of stellar populations and add appropriate source terms to account for the effects of newly formed stars. We show that continuous star formation even 1-2 pc away from the MBH can lead to the buildup of an NSC with properties similar to those of the Milky Way NSC. We find that the structure of the old stellar population in the NSC with in situ star formation could be very similar to the steady-state Bahcall-Wolf cuspy structure. However, its younger populations do not yet achieve a steady state. In particular, formed/evolved NSCs with in situ star formation contain differential age-segregated stellar populations that are not yet fully mixed. Younger stellar populations formed in the outer regions of the NSC have a cuspy structure toward the NSC outskirts, while showing a core-like distribution inward, with younger populations having larger core sizes. In principal, such a structure can give rise to an apparent core-like radial distribution of younger stars, as observed in the Galactic center.

  16. The Star Formation History of the Lupus Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocholski, A. J.; Hughes, J. D.

    1999-05-01

    In light of recent HIPPARCOS observations we have revised the distance to the Lupus dark cloud complex upwards. This, along with the adoption of newer pre-main sequence mass tracks and isochrones have led to a new mass function and age distribution. We use calculated masses and ages to discuss the progression of star formation through the Lupus clouds, with particular reference to Lupus 3, which is forming intermediate (3-5Mo) stars and a multitude of very low mass stars (<0.3 Mo).

  17. Rosette: Understanding Star Formation in Molecular Cloud Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng

    2010-09-01

    We propose Chandra imaging of three embedded clusters in the Rosette Molecular Cloud (RMC) complex. With complementary existing Spitzer and FLAMINGOS infrared surveys, the Chandra observation is critical for us to: (1) create a complete census of the young stars in the cloud; (2) study the spatial distribution of the young stars in different evolutionary stages within the RMC and the disk frequency in the embedded clusters; (3) construct X-ray Luminosity Function (XLF) and Initial Mass Function (IMF) for the clusters to examine XLF/IMF variations; (4) elucidate star formation history in this complex.

  18. The PdBI Arcsecond Whirlpool Survey (PAWS): The Role of Spiral Arms in Cloud and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinnerer, Eva; Meidt, Sharon E.; Colombo, Dario; Chandar, Rupali; Dobbs, Clare L.; García-Burillo, Santiago; Hughes, Annie; Leroy, Adam K.; Pety, Jérôme; Querejeta, Miguel; Kramer, Carsten; Schuster, Karl F.

    2017-02-01

    The process that leads to the formation of the bright star-forming sites observed along prominent spiral arms remains elusive. We present results of a multi-wavelength study of a spiral arm segment in the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M51 that belongs to a spiral density wave and exhibits nine gas spurs. The combined observations of the (ionized, atomic, molecular, dusty) interstellar medium with star formation tracers (H ii regions, young <10 Myr stellar clusters) suggest (1) no variation in giant molecular cloud (GMC) properties between arm and gas spurs, (2) gas spurs and extinction feathers arising from the same structure with a close spatial relation between gas spurs and ongoing/recent star formation (despite higher gas surface densities in the spiral arm), (3) no trend in star formation age either along the arm or along a spur, (4) evidence for strong star formation feedback in gas spurs, (5) tentative evidence for star formation triggered by stellar feedback for one spur, and (6) GMC associations being not special entities but the result of blending of gas arm/spur cross sections in lower resolution observations. We conclude that there is no evidence for a coherent star formation onset mechanism that can be solely associated with the presence of the spiral density wave. This suggests that other (more localized) mechanisms are important to delay star formation such that it occurs in spurs. The evidence of star formation proceeding over several million years within individual spurs implies that the mechanism that leads to star formation acts or is sustained over a longer timescale.

  19. Photoionising feedback and the star formation rates in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, J. M.; Bonnell, I. A.; Wood, K.; Dale, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the effects of ionising photons on accretion and stellar mass growth in a young star forming region, using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code coupled to a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. Methods: We introduce the framework with which we correct stellar cluster masses for the effects of photoionising (PI) feedback and compare to the results of a full ionisation hydrodynamics code. Results: We present results of our simulations of star formation in the spiral arm of a disk galaxy, including the effects of photoionising radiation from high mass stars. We find that PI feedback reduces the total mass accreted onto stellar clusters by ≈23% over the course of the simulation and reduces the number of high mass clusters, as well as the maximum mass attained by a stellar cluster. Mean star formation rates (SFRs) drop from SFRcontrol = 4.2 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1 to SFRMCPI = 3.2 × 10-2 M⊙ yr-1 after the inclusion of PI feedback with a final instantaneous SFR reduction of 62%. The overall cluster mass distribution appears to be affected little by PI feedback. Conclusions: We compare our results to the observed extra-galactic Schmidt-Kennicutt relation and the observed properties of local star forming regions in the Milky Way and find that internal photoionising (PI) feedback is unlikely to reduce SFRs by more than a factor of ≈2 and thus may play only a minor role in regulating star formation.

  20. Formation and composition of planets around very low mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Y.; Benz, W.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The recent detection of planets around very low mass stars raises the question of the formation, composition, and potential habitability of these objects. Aims: We use planetary system formation models to infer the properties, in particular their radius distribution and water content, of planets that may form around stars ten times less massive than the Sun. Methods: Our planetary system formation and composition models take into account the structure and evolution of the protoplanetary disk, the planetary mass growth by accretion of solids and gas, as well as planet-planet, planet-star, and planet-disk interactions. Results: We show that planets can form at small orbital period in orbit about low-mass stars. We show that the radius of the planets is peaked at about 1 R⊕ and that they are, in general, volatile rich especially if proto-planetary disks orbiting this type of stars are long lived. Conclusions: Close-in planets orbiting low-mass stars similar in terms of mass and radius to those recently detected can be formed within the framework of the core-accretion paradigm as modeled here. The properties of protoplanetary disks, and their correlation with the stellar type, are key to understand their composition.

  1. New View of Distant Galaxy Reveals Furious Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    A furious rate of star formation discovered in a distant galaxy shows that galaxies in the early Universe developed either much faster or in a different way from what astronomers have thought. "This galaxy is forming stars at an incredible rate," said Wei-Hao Wang, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The galaxy, Wang said, is forming the equivalent of 4,000 Suns a year. This is a thousand times more violent than our own Milky Way Galaxy. Location of Distant Galaxy Visible-light, left (from HST) and Infrared, right, (from Spitzer) Images: Circles indicate location of GOODS 850-5. CREDIT: Wang et al., STScI, Spitzer, NASA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (1 MB) The galaxy, called GOODS 850-5, is 12 billion light-years from Earth, and thus is seen as it was only about 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang. Wang and his colleagues observed it using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Young stars in the galaxy were enshrouded in dust that was heated by the stars and radiated infrared light strongly. Because of the galaxy's great distance from Earth, the infrared light waves have been stretched out to submillimeter-length radio waves, which are seen by the SMA. The waves were stretched or "redshifted," as astronomers say, by the ongoing expansion of the Universe. "This evidence for prolific star formation is hidden by the dust from visible-light telescopes," Wang explained. The dust, in turn, was formed from heavy elements that had to be built up in the cores of earlier stars. This indicates, Wang said, that significant numbers of stars already had formed, then spewed those heavy elements into interstellar space through supernova explosions and stellar winds. "Seeing the radiation from this heated dust revealed star formation we could have found in no other way," Wang said. Similar dusty galaxies in the early Universe may contain most of the

  2. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hangyu; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Stanciu, Lia A.

    2015-08-14

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. - Highlights: • Cu(II) promoted the annular protofibril formation of α-synuclein in vitro. • Cu(II) postponed the in vitro fibrillization of α-synuclein. • Neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils.

  3. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Andreas; Hartmann, Lee E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu

    2013-08-10

    Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density {Sigma} of {Sigma}{sub c} {approx} 120 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} (A{sub K} {approx} 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area {Sigma}{sub SFR} with increasing {Sigma}, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of {Sigma}{sub SFR}, approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of {Sigma}{sub SFR} versus {Sigma} in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -3} for low-mass regions and A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -1} for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse.

  4. Modeling jet and outflow feedback during star cluster formation

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Schrön, Martin; Banerjee, Robi; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2014-08-01

    Powerful jets and outflows are launched from the protostellar disks around newborn stars. These outflows carry enough mass and momentum to transform the structure of their parent molecular cloud and to potentially control star formation itself. Despite their importance, we have not been able to fully quantify the impact of jets and outflows during the formation of a star cluster. The main problem lies in limited computing power. We would have to resolve the magnetic jet-launching mechanism close to the protostar and at the same time follow the evolution of a parsec-size cloud for a million years. Current computer power and codes fall orders of magnitude short of achieving this. In order to overcome this problem, we implement a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for launching jets and outflows, which demonstrably converges and reproduces the mass, linear and angular momentum transfer, and the speed of real jets, with ∼1000 times lower resolution than would be required without the SGS model. We apply the new SGS model to turbulent, magnetized star cluster formation and show that jets and outflows (1) eject about one-fourth of their parent molecular clump in high-speed jets, quickly reaching distances of more than a parsec, (2) reduce the star formation rate by about a factor of two, and (3) lead to the formation of ∼1.5 times as many stars compared to the no-outflow case. Most importantly, we find that jets and outflows reduce the average star mass by a factor of ∼ three and may thus be essential for understanding the characteristic mass of the stellar initial mass function.

  5. Star Formation at Low Metallicity in Local Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce; Hunter, Deidre Ann; Rubio, Monica; Brinks, Elias; Cortés, Juan R.; Cigan, Phil

    2016-01-01

    The radial profiles of star formation rates and surface mass densities for gas and stars have been compiled for 20 local dwarf irregular galaxies and converted into disk scale heights and Toomre Q values. The scale heights are relatively large compared to the galaxy sizes (~0.6 times the local radii) and generally increase with radius in a flare. The gaseous Q values are high, ~4, at most radii and even higher for the stars. Star formation proceeds even with these high Q values in a normal exponential disk as viewed in the far ultraviolet. Such normal star formation suggests that Q is not relevant to star formation in dIrrs. The star formation rate per unit area always equals approximately the gas surface density divided by the midplane free fall time with an efficiency factor of about 1% that decreases systematically with radius in approximate proportion to the gas surface density. We view this efficiency variation as a result of a changing molecular fraction in a disk where atomic gas dominates both stars and molecules. In a related study, CO observations with ALMA of star-forming regions at the low metallicities of these dwarfs, which averages 13% solar, shows, in the case of the WLM galaxy, tiny CO clouds inside much larger molecular and atomic hydrogen envelopes. The CO cloud mass fraction within the molecular region is only one percent or so. Nevertheless, the CO clouds have properties that are similar to solar neighborhood clouds: they satisfy the size-linewidth relation observed in the LMC, SMC, and other local dwarfs where CO has been observed, and the same virial mass versus luminosity relation. This uniforming of CO cloud properties seems to be the result of a confining pressure from the weight of the overlying molecular and atomic shielding layers. Star formation at low metallicity therefore appears to be a three dimensional process independent of 2D instabilities involving Q, in highly atomic gas with relatively small CO cores, activated at a rate

  6. AGB and RGB stars as tracers of the early and intermediate star-formation history.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.

    The Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are the largest members of the Local Group, and their evolution is affected by the evolution of their host as a whole. At the same time, they themselves play an important role in the evolution of the Local Group. Considerable information can be obtained for the Local Group, but little is known about the distances and the full star-formation history of its galaxies. RGB and AGB stars are the keys to trace the full star-formation history of nearby galaxies. These stars are usually the most prominent population of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, but it has been shown (Gallart et al. 1994; Aparicio & Gallart 1994) that they are also observable in dwarf irregular galaxies. This will open the door to the study of the earliest star-formation processes taking place in these galaxies. The star-formation history of the Local Group galaxies is a crucial piece of information for answering basic questions about the evolutionary history of the group.

  7. Simultaneous observations of Ca II K and Mg II k in T Tauri stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvet, N.; Basri, G.; Imhoff, C. L.; Giampapa, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    The first simultaneous, calibrated observations of the Ca II K and Mg II k resonance lines in T Tauri stars are presented. It is found that for T Tauri stars with mass greater than 1.5 solar mass, which have radiative cores and tend to be fast rotators, the k line seems to arise in an extended region (probably also responsible for the H-alpha emission), whereas the K line apparently originates closer to the highly inhomogeneous stellar surface. The lower mass stars, which are fully convective and tend to be slow rotators, are more easily described by a largely chromospheric model, consistent with main-sequence activity structures but at greater values of the nonradiative flux. The strongest emission-line stars in the low-mass group, however, are also likely to have extended k line regions.

  8. Star Formation Studies with SOFIA and its Synergy with TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Buizer, James

    2014-07-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a modified Boeing 747 aircraft equipped with a 2.5m telescope that performs observations at high altitude from the optical to the sub-mm. The observatory just reached full operational capability in April of this year. Given that it is slated for a 20-year mission lifetime, SOFIA will overlap TMT by more than a decade. I will discuss the contrasting and complementary features of SOFIA and TMT in the context of star formation, discuss some of the early results from SOFIA in this field, and finish with a discussion of how TMT data can enhance and extended our understanding of star formation processes.[This talk could also be generalized to discuss more about synergies between SOFIA and TMT in a broader context (not just star formation), should the organizers prefer that.

  9. Star Formation in Undergraduate ALFALFA Team Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Haynes, Martha P.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Troischt, Parker; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) Groups project is a coordinated study of gas and star formation properties of galaxies in and around 36 nearby (z<0.03) groups and clusters of varied richness, morphological type mix, and X-ray luminosity. By studying a large range of environments and considering the spatial distributions of star formation, we probe mechanisms of gas depletion and morphological transformation. The project uses ALFALFA HI observations, optical observations, and digital databases like SDSS, and incorporates work undertaken by faculty and students at different institutions within the UAT. Here we present results from our wide area Hα and broadband R imaging project carried out with the WIYN 0.9m+MOSAIC/HDI at KPNO, including an analysis of radial star formation rates and extents of galaxies in the NGC 5846, Abell 779, NRGb331, and HCG 69 groups/clusters. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and AST-1637339.

  10. Star formation in the M17 SW giant molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Fazio, G. G.

    1982-01-01

    The first high-sensitivity, high-resolution far-IR survey of an entire molecular cloud complex is presented. The 20 km/s M17 SW complex, in addition to the three luminous M17 sources, contains 10 sources spread over 110 pc. The 10 lower luminosity sources divide into two groups: small blister sources powered by late O stars and compact sources powered by clusters of early B stars. No compact far-IR sources with luminosities between the detection limit and 10,000 solar luminosities were detected. Three possible formation mechanisms for the stars that power the far-IR sources in the M17 SW complex are examined. Sequential formation cannot explain the sources seen throughout the complex. Some type of stochastic formation mechanism or collapse induced by a spiral density wave could explain the observations.

  11. Connecting Galaxies, Halos, and Star Formation Rates Across Cosmic Time

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2008-06-02

    A simple, observationally-motivated model is presented for understanding how halo masses, galaxy stellar masses, and star formation rates are related, and how these relations evolve with time. The relation between halo mass and galaxy stellar mass is determined by matching the observed spatial abundance of galaxies to the expected spatial abundance of halos at multiple epochs--i.e. more massive galaxies are assigned to more massive halos at each epoch. This 'abundance matching' technique has been shown previously to reproduce the observed luminosity- and scale-dependence of galaxy clustering over a range of epochs. Halos at different epochs are connected by halo mass accretion histories estimated from N-body simulations. The halo-galaxy connection at fixed epochs in conjunction with the connection between halos across time provides a connection between observed galaxies across time. With approximations for the impact of merging and accretion on the growth of galaxies, one can then directly infer the star formation histories of galaxies as a function of stellar and halo mass. This model is tuned to match both the observed evolution of the stellar mass function and the normalization of the observed star formation rate--stellar mass relation to z {approx} 1. The data demands, for example, that the star formation rate density is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10.0-10.5} M{sub {circle_dot}} from 0 < z < 1, and that such galaxies over these epochs reside in halos with M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 11.5-12.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The star formation rate--halo mass relation is approximately Gaussian over the range 0 < z < 1 with a mildly evolving mean and normalization. This model is then used to shed light on a number of issues, including (1) a clarification of 'downsizing', (2) the lack of a sharp characteristic halo mass at which star formation is truncated, and (3) the dominance of star formation over merging to the stellar build-up of galaxies

  12. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Star Formation Rate Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetti, D.

    2011-03-01

    As images and spectra from ISO and Spitzer have provided increasingly higher-fidelity representations of the mid-infrared (MIR) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from galaxies and galactic and extra-galactic regions, more systematic efforts have been devoted to establishing whether the emission in this wavelength region can be used as a reliable star formation rate indicator. This has also been in response to the extensive surveys of distant galaxies that have accumulated during the cold phase of the Spitzer Space Telescope. Results so far have been somewhat contradictory, reflecting the complex nature of the PAHs and of the mid-infrared-emitting dust in general. The two main problems faced when attempting to define a star formation rate indicator based on the mid-infrared emission from galaxies and star-forming regions are: (1) the strong dependence of the PAH emission on metallicity; (2) the heating of the PAH dust by evolved stellar populations unrelated to the current star formation. I review the status of the field, with a specific focus on these two problems, and will try to quantify the impact of each on calibrations of the mid-infrared emission as a star formation rate indicator.

  13. Signatures of Star Cluster Formation by Cold Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  14. Triggering star formation by both radiative and mechanical AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Gan, Zhao-Ming; Xie, Fu-Guo

    2013-08-01

    We perform two dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations to study the positive active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback which triggers, rather than suppresses, star formation. Recently, it was shown by Nayakshin et al. and Ishibashi et al. that star formation occurs when the cold interstellar medium (ISM) is squeezed by the impact of mass outflow or radiation pressure, respectively. Mass outflow is ubiquitous in this astrophysical context, and radiation pressure is also important if the AGN is luminous. For the first time in this subject, we incorporate both mass outflow feedback and radiative feedback into our model. Consequently, the ISM is shocked into shells by the AGN feedback, and these shells soon fragment into clumps and filaments because of Rayleigh-Taylor and thermal instabilities. We have two major findings: (1) the star formation rate can indeed be very large in the clumps and filaments. However, the resultant star formation rate density is too large compared with previous works, which is mainly because we ignore the fact that most of the stars that are formed would be disrupted when they move away from the galactic center. (2) Although radiation pressure feedback has a limited effect, when mass outflow feedback is also included, they reinforce each other. Specifically, in the gas-poor case, mass outflow is always the dominant contributor to feedback.

  15. Formation of Planets Around the Sun and Other Stars.

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Doug

    2005-11-14

    Formation of Planets around the Sun and other stars. The quest to understand the formation of planets and planetary systems has entered an era of renaissance. Driven by observational discoveries in solar system exploration, protostellar disks, and extra solar planets, we have established a rich data bank which contains not only relic clues around mature stars, including the Sun, but also direct image of ongoing processes around young stars. For the first time in this scientific endeavor, we have adequate information to construct quantitative models to account for the ubiquity of planets and diversity of planetary systems. Some of the most intriguing theoretical questions facing us today include: a) how did the planets in the solar system form with their present-day mass, composition, and orbital elements, b) is planet formation a deterministic or chaotic process, and c) what are the observable signatures of planet formation and evolution around nearby young and mature stars? I will present a comprehensive scenario which suggests a) gas giant planets formed through coagulation of planetsimals and gas accretion onto earth-like cores; b) the final assemblage of the terrestrial planets in the solar system occurred through the propagation of Jupiter's secular resonance 4-30 Myrs after the emergence of the gas giant; and c) although they are yet to be discovered, Earth-like planets are expected to be common around nearby stars.

  16. SIGNATURES OF STAR CLUSTER FORMATION BY COLD COLLAPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Aleksandra; Hartmann, Lee; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    2015-12-10

    Subvirial gravitational collapse is one mechanism by which star clusters may form. Here we investigate whether this mechanism can be inferred from observations of young clusters. To address this question, we have computed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the initial formation and evolution of a dynamically young star cluster through cold (subvirial) collapse, starting with an ellipsoidal, turbulently seeded distribution of gas, and forming sink particles representing (proto)stars. While the initial density distributions of the clouds do not have large initial mass concentrations, gravitational focusing due to the global morphology leads to cluster formation. We use the resulting structures to extract observable morphological and kinematic signatures for the case of subvirial collapse. We find that the signatures of the initial conditions can be erased rapidly as the gas and stars collapse, suggesting that kinematic observations need to be made early in cluster formation and/or at larger scales, away from the growing cluster core. Our results emphasize that a dynamically young system is inherently evolving on short timescales, so that it can be highly misleading to use current-epoch conditions to study aspects such as star formation rates as a function of local density. Our simulations serve as a starting point for further studies of collapse including other factors such as magnetic fields and stellar feedback.

  17. Cosmic infrared background measurements and star formation history from Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Serra

    2014-05-01

    We present new measurements of Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) anisotropies using Planck. Combining HFI data with IRAS, the angular auto- and cross-frequency power spectrum is measured from 143 to 3000 GHz. After careful removal of the contaminants (cosmic microwave background anisotropies, Galactic dust and Sunyaev-Zeldovich emission), and a complete study of systematics, the CIB power spectrum is measured with unprecedented signal to noise ratio from angular multipoles l ~ 150 to 2500. The interpretation based on the halo model is able to associate star-forming galaxies with dark matter halos and their subhalos, using a parametrized relation between the dust-processed infrared luminosity and (sub-)halo mass, and it allows to simultaneously fit all auto- and cross- power spectra very well. We find that the star formation history is well constrained up to redshifts around 2, and agrees with recent estimates of the obscured star-formation density using Spitzer and Herschel. However, at higher redshift, the accuracy of the star formation history measurement is strongly degraded by the uncertainty in the spectral energy distribution of CIB galaxies. We also find that the mean halo mass which is most efficient at hosting star formation is log(M eff/M ⊙) = 12.6 and that CIB galaxies have warmer temperatures as redshift increases.

  18. CEPHEID VARIABLE STARS IN THE PEGASUS DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY: CONSTRAINTS ON THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Meschin, I.; Gallart, C.; Aparicio, A.; Rosenberg, A.; Cassisi, S. E-mail: carme@iac.es E-mail: alf@iac.es

    2009-03-15

    Observations of the resolved stars obtained over a period of 11 years in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy Pegasus have been used to search for Cepheid variable stars. Images were obtained in 55 epochs in the V band and in 24 epochs in the I band. We have identified 26 Cepheids and have obtained their light curves and periods. On the basis of their position in the period-luminosity (PL) diagram, we have classified them as 18 fundamental modes and eight first overtone Cepheids. Two PL relations for Cepheids have been used to derive the distance, resulting in 1.07 {+-} 0.05 Mpc. We present the VARFINDER code which finds the variable stars and their predicted periods in a given synthetic color-magnitude diagram computed with IAC-star and we propose the use of the Cepheid population as a constraint of the star formation history of Pegasus.

  19. Does star formation proceed differently in metal-poor galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouteiller, Vianney

    2014-10-01

    The importance of molecular gas in the star-formation process has been questioned by recent theoretical studies. When metals are scarce, star formation could proceed before the molecular fraction becomes significant, making cold atomic gas the key pre-requisite for star formation. The best case studies are blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), with their prominent star-formation episode and yet with little or no evidence of molecular gas. Current observations do not provide strong constraints on the presence of dense atomic gas in BCDs nor on the fraction of molecular gas.We propose to examine the HI region of 9 nearby BCDs selected from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey. Our program relies on the synergy of Hubble and Herschel, by calculating the gas cooling rate from the fine-structure level of ionized carbon, a parameter that can be determined both in the FUV with COS (probing the diffuse gas through the 1335.7A CII* absorption) and in the FIR with Herschel (probing the denser gas through the [CII] 157um emission). This comparison allows us to constrain the volume filling factor of dense vs. diffuse gas. The program we propose will allow us to examine how this fraction varies with metallicity, star-formation rate, and total gas mass. We will also be able to quantify the mass of molecular gas and evaluate its actual importance for star formation. Finally, a secondary objective is to characterize the main gas heating mechanisms in the HI region of BCDs and in particular the validity of the photoelectric effect paradigm in sources with a low dust-to-gas ratio, with potential implications for high-redshift galaxies.

  20. Limits on Population III star formation with the most iron-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bennassuti, M.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Valiante, R.; Omukai, K.

    2017-02-01

    We study the impact of star-forming minihaloes, and the initial mass function (IMF) of Population III (Pop III) stars, on the Galactic halo metallicity distribution function (MDF) and on the properties of C-enhanced and C-normal stars at [Fe/H] < -3. For our investigation we use a data-constrained merger tree model for the Milky Way formation, which has been improved to self-consistently describe the physical processes regulating star formation in minihaloes, including the poor sampling of the Pop III IMF. We find that only when star-forming minihaloes are included the low-Fe tail of the MDF is correctly reproduced, showing a plateau that is built up by C-enhanced metal-poor stars imprinted by primordial faint supernovae. The incomplete sampling of the Pop III IMF in inefficiently star-forming minihaloes (<10-3 M⊙ yr-1) strongly limits the formation of pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), with progenitor masses mPopIII = [140-260] M⊙, even when a flat Pop III IMF is assumed. Second-generation stars formed in environments polluted at >50 per cent level by PISNe are thus extremely rare, corresponding to ≈0.25 per cent of the total stellar population at [Fe/H] < -2, which is consistent with recent observations. The low-Fe tail of the MDF strongly depends on the Pop III IMF shape and mass range. Given the current statistics, we find that a flat Pop III IMF model with mPopIII = [10-300] M⊙ is disfavoured by observations. We present testable predictions for Pop III stars extending down to lower masses, with mPopIII = [0.1-300] M⊙.

  1. DUST-OBSCURED STAR FORMATION IN INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Rose A.; Desai, Vandana; Rudnick, Gregory; Poggianti, Bianca; Bell, Eric F.; Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis; Jablonka, Pascale; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Moustakas, John; Rines, Kenneth E-mail: jmoustakas@ucsd.ed

    2010-09-01

    We present Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m observations of sixteen 0.4 < z < 0.8 galaxy clusters drawn from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey. This is the first large 24 {mu}m survey of clusters at intermediate redshift. The depth of our imaging corresponds to a total IR luminosity of 8 x 10{sup 10} L{sub sun}, just below the luminosity of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), and 6{sup +1}{sub -1}% of M{sub V} < -19 cluster members show 24 {mu}m emission at or above this level. We compare with a large sample of coeval field galaxies and find that while the fraction of cluster LIRGs lies significantly below that of the field, the IR luminosities of the field and cluster galaxies are consistent. However, the stellar masses of the EDisCS LIRGs are systematically higher than those of the field LIRGs. A comparison with optical data reveals that {approx}80% of cluster LIRGs are blue and the remaining 20% lie on the red sequence. Of LIRGs with optical spectra, 88{sup +4} {sub -5}% show [O II] emission with EW([O II]) > 5 A, and {approx}75% exhibit optical signatures of dusty starbursts. On average, the fraction of cluster LIRGs increases with projected clustercentric radius but remains systematically lower than the field fraction over the area probed (<1.5x R {sub 200}). The amount of obscured star formation declines significantly over the 2.4 Gyr interval spanned by the EDisCS sample, and the rate of decline is the same for the cluster and field populations. Our results are consistent with an exponentially declining LIRG fraction, with the decline in the field delayed by {approx}1 Gyr relative to the clusters.

  2. Star formation rates and abundance gradients in disk galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Analytic models for the evolution of disk galaxies are presented, placing special emphasis on the radial properties. These models are straightforward extensions of the original Schmidt (1959, 1963) models, with a dependence of star formation rate on gas density. The models provide successful descriptions of several measures of galactic disk evolution, including solar neighborhood chemical evolution, the presence and amplitude of metallicity and color gradients in disk galaxies, and the global rates of star formation in disk galaxies, and aid in the understanding of the apparent connection between young and old stellar populations in spiral galaxies.

  3. Upper limit on star formation and metal enrichment in minihaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Renyue

    2017-02-01

    An analysis of negative radiative feedback from resident stars in minihaloes is performed. It is found that the most effective mechanism to suppress star formation is provided by infrared photons from resident stars via photodetachment of H-. It is shown that a stringent upper bound on (total stellar mass, metallicity) of (˜1000 M⊙, -3.3 ± 0.2) in any newly minted atomic cooling halo can be placed, with the actual values possibly significantly lower. This has both important physical ramifications on formation of stars and supermassive black seeds in atomic cooling haloes at high redshift, pertaining to processes of low-temperature metal cooling, dust formation and fragmentation, and direct consequences on the faint end galaxy luminosity function at high redshift and cosmological reionization. The luminosity function of galaxies at the epoch of reionization may be substantially affected due to the combined effect of a diminished role of minihaloes and an enhanced contribution from Population III stars in atomic cooling haloes. Upcoming results on reionization optical depth from Planck High-Frequency Instrument data may provide a significant constraint on and a unique probe of this star formation physical process in minihaloes. As a numerical example, in the absence of significant contributions from minihaloes with virial masses below 1.5 × 108 M⊙, the reionization optical depth is expected to be no greater than 0.065, whereas allowing for minihaloes of masses as low as (107 M⊙, 106.5 M⊙) to form stars unconstrained by this self-regulation physical process, the reionization optical depth is expected to exceed (0.075, 0.085), respectively.

  4. StarPy: Quenched star formation history parameters of a galaxy using MCMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Simmons, B. D.; Schawinski, K.; Marshall, P. J.; Bamford, S.; Fortson, L.; Kaviraj, S.; Masters, K. L.; Melvin, T.; Nichol, R. C.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2016-09-01

    StarPy derives the quenching star formation history (SFH) of a single galaxy through the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method code emcee (ascl:1303.002). The sample function implements the emcee EnsembleSampler function for the galaxy colors input. Burn-in is run and calculated for the length specified before the sampler is reset and then run for the length of steps specified. StarPy provides the ability to use the look-up tables provided or creating your own.

  5. STAR FORMATION IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS: CONTINUOUS OR SINGLE-AGE BURSTS?

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, David; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Sutherland, Ralph

    2015-01-30

    We model the chemical evolution of six ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs): Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I based on their recently determined star formation histories. We show that two single-age bursts cannot explain the observed [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] distribution in these galaxies and that some self-enrichment is required within the first burst. An alternative scenario is modeled, in which star formation is continuous except for short interruptions when one or more supernovae temporarily blow the dense gas out from the center of the system. This model allows for self-enrichment and can reproduce the chemical abundances of the UFDs in which the second burst is only a trace population. We conclude that the most likely star formation history is one or two extended periods of star formation, with the first burst lasting for at least 100 Myr. As found in earlier work, the observed properties of UFDs can be explained by formation at a low mass (M{sub vir}∼10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), rather than being stripped remnants of much larger systems.

  6. STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY HALO TRACED BY THE OOSTERHOFF DICHOTOMY AMONG GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sohee; Lee, Young-Wook

    2015-06-22

    In our recent investigation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy in the multiple population paradigm, we have suggested that the RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters (GCs) of Oosterhoff groups I, II, and III are produced mostly by first, second, and third generation stars (G1, G2, and G3), respectively. Here we show, for the first time, that the observed dichotomies in the inner and outer halo GCs can be naturally reproduced when these models are extended to all metallicity regimes, while maintaining reasonable agreements in the horizontal-branch type versus [Fe/H] correlations. In order to achieve this, however, specific star formation histories are required for the inner and outer halos. In the inner halo GCs, the star formation commenced and ceased earlier with a relatively short formation timescale between the subpopulations (∼0.5 Gyr), while in the outer halo, the formation of G1 was delayed by ∼0.8 Gyr with a more extended timescale between G1 and G2 (∼1.4 Gyr). This is consistent with the dual origin of the Milky Way halo. Despite the difference in detail, our models show that the Oosterhoff period groups observed in both outer and inner halo GCs are all manifestations of the “population-shift” effect within the instability strip, for which the origin can be traced back to the two or three discrete episodes of star formation in GCs.

  7. Star Formation in Ultrafaint Dwarfs: Continuous or Single-Age Bursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, David; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Sutherland, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    We model the chemical evolution of six ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs): Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I based on their recently determined star formation histories. We show that two single-age bursts cannot explain the observed [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] distribution in these galaxies and that some self-enrichment is required within the first burst. An alternative scenario is modeled, in which star formation is continuous except for short interruptions when one or more supernovae temporarily blow the dense gas out from the center of the system. This model allows for self-enrichment and can reproduce the chemical abundances of the UFDs in which the second burst is only a trace population. We conclude that the most likely star formation history is one or two extended periods of star formation, with the first burst lasting for at least 100 Myr. As found in earlier work, the observed properties of UFDs can be explained by formation at a low mass ({{M}vir}∼ {{10}7} M⊙), rather than being stripped remnants of much larger systems.

  8. Nuclear Star Formation in the Hot-Spot Galaxy NGC 2903

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Ryder, S. D.; Knapen, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    We present high-resolution near-infrared imaging obtained using adaptive optics and HST/NICMOS and ground-based spectroscopy of the hot-spot galaxy NGC 2903. Our near-infrared resolution imaging enables us to resolve the infrared hot spots into individual young stellar clusters or groups of these. The spatial distribution of the stellar clusters is not coincident with that of the bright H II regions, as revealed by the HST/NICMOS Pace image. Overall, the circumnuclear star formation in NGC 2903 shows a ring-like morphology with an approximate diameter of 625 pc. The SF properties of the stellar clusters and H II regions have been studied using the photometric and spectroscopic information in conjunction with evolutionary synthesis models. The population of bright stellar clusters shows a very narrow range of ages, 4 to 7 x 10(exp 6) yr after the peak of star formation, or absolute ages 6.5 to 9.5 x 10(exp 6) yr (for the assumed short-duration Gaussian bursts), and luminosities similar to the clusters found in the Antennae interacting galaxy. This population of young stellar clusters accounts for some 7 - 12% of the total stellar mass in the central 625 pc of NGC 2903. The H II regions in the ring of star formation have luminosities close to that of the super-giant H II region 30 Doradus, they are younger than the stellar clusters, and will probably evolve into bright infrared stellar clusters similar to those observed today. We find that the star formation efficiency in the central regions of NGC 2903 is higher than in normal galaxies, approaching the lower end of infrared luminous galaxies.

  9. Effect of Population III Multiplicity on Dark Star Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Pawlik, Andreas H.; Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    We numerically study the mutual interaction between dark matter (DM) and Population III (Pop III) stellar systems in order to explore the possibility of Pop III dark stars within this physical scenario. We perform a cosmological simulation, initialized at z approx. 100, which follows the evolution of gas and DM. We analyze the formation of the first mini halo at z approx. 20 and the subsequent collapse of the gas to densities of 10(exp 12)/cu cm. We then use this simulation to initialize a set of smaller-scale 'cut-out' simulations in which we further refine the DM to have spatial resolution similar to that of the gas. We test multiple DM density profiles, and we employ the sink particle method to represent the accreting star-forming region. We find that, for a range of DM configurations, the motion of the Pop III star-disk system serves to separate the positions of the protostars with respect to the DM density peak, such that there is insufficient DM to influence the formation and evolution of the protostars for more than approx. 5000 years. In addition, the star-disk system causes gravitational scattering of the central DM to lower densities, further decreasing the influence of DM over time. Any DM-powered phase of Pop III stars will thus be very short-lived for the typical multiple system, and DM will not serve to significantly prolong the life of Pop III stars.

  10. PRECIPITATION-REGULATED STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, G. Mark; O’Shea, Brian W.; Donahue, Megan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2015-07-20

    Galaxy growth depends critically on the interplay between radiative cooling of cosmic gas and the resulting energetic feedback that cooling triggers. This interplay has proven exceedingly difficult to model, even with large supercomputer simulations, because of its complexity. Nevertheless, real galaxies are observed to obey simple scaling relations among their primary observable characteristics. Here we show that a generic emergent property of the interplay between cooling and feedback can explain the observed scaling relationships between a galaxy's stellar mass, its total mass, and its chemical enrichment level, as well as the relationship between the average orbital velocity of its stars and the mass of its central black hole. These relationships naturally result from any feedback mechanism that strongly heats a galaxy's circumgalactic gas in response to precipitation of colder clouds out of that gas, because feedback then suspends the gas in a marginally precipitating state.

  11. A STAR FORMATION LAW FOR DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Hunter, Deidre A. E-mail: dah@lowell.edu

    2015-06-01

    The radial profiles of gas, stars, and far-ultraviolet radiation in 20 dwarf Irregular galaxies are converted to stability parameters and scale heights for a test of the importance of two-dimensional (2D) instabilities in promoting star formation. A detailed model of this instability involving gaseous and stellar fluids with self-consistent thicknesses and energy dissipation on a perturbation crossing time gives the unstable growth rates. We find that all locations are effectively stable to 2D perturbations, mostly because the disks are thick. We then consider the average volume densities in the midplanes, evaluated from the observed H i surface densities and calculated scale heights. The radial profiles of the star-formation rates are equal to about 1% of the H i surface densities divided by the free fall times at the average midplane densities. This 1% resembles the efficiency per unit free fall time commonly found in other cases. There is a further variation of this efficiency with radius in all of our galaxies, following the exponential disk with a scale length equal to about twice the stellar mass scale length. This additional variation is modeled by the molecular fraction in a diffuse medium using radiative transfer solutions for galaxies with the observed dimensions and properties of our sample. We conclude that star formation is activated by a combination of three-dimensional gaseous gravitational processes and molecule formation. Implications for outer disk structure and formation are discussed.

  12. Star formation triggered by galaxy interactions in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, Florent; Famaey, Benoit; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    Together with interstellar turbulence, gravitation is one key player in star formation. It acts both at galactic scales in the assembly of gas into dense clouds and inside those structures for their collapse and the formation of pre-stellar cores. To understand to what extent the large-scale dynamics govern the star formation activity of galaxies, we present hydrodynamical simulations in which we generalize the behaviour of gravity to make it differ from Newtonian dynamics in the low-acceleration regime. We focus on the extreme cases of interacting galaxies, and compare the evolution of galaxy pairs in the dark matter paradigm to that in the Milgromian dynamics (MOND) framework. Following up on the seminal work by Tiret & Combes, this paper documents the first simulations of galaxy encounters in MOND with a detailed Eulerian hydrodynamical treatment of baryonic physics, including star formation and stellar feedback. We show that similar morphologies of the interacting systems can be produced by both the dark matter and MOND formalisms, but require a much slower orbital velocity in the MOND case. Furthermore, we find that the star formation activity and history are significantly more extended in space and time in MOND interactions, in particular in the tidal debris. Such differences could be used as observational diagnostics and make interacting galaxies prime objects in the study of the nature of gravitation at galactic scales.

  13. New insights on the formation of nuclear star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillard, Nicolas; Emsellem, Eric; Renaud, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear clusters (NCs) are common stellar systems in the centres of galaxies. Yet, the physical mechanisms involved in their formation are still debated. Using a parsec-resolution hydrodynamical simulation of a dwarf galaxy, we propose an updated formation scenario for NCs. In this `wet migration scenario', a massive star cluster forms in the gas-rich disc, keeping a gas reservoir, and growing further while it migrates to the centre via a combination of interactions with other substructures and dynamical friction. A wet merger with another dense cluster and its own gas reservoir can occur, although this is not a prerequisite for the actual formation of the NC. The merging process does significantly alter the properties of the NC (mass, morphology, star formation history), also quenching the ongoing local star formation activity, thus leading to interesting observational diagnostics for the physical origin of NCs. A population of lower mass clusters co-exist during the simulation, but these are either destroyed via tidal forces, or have high angular momentum preventing them to interact with the NC and contribute to its growth. The proposed updated scenario emphasizes the role of gas reservoirs associated with the densest star clusters formed in a gas-rich low-mass galaxy.

  14. Dark Matter Substructure, Galaxy Assembly and Star Formation Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simha, Vimal

    2011-01-01

    We use cosmological SPH simulations to study galaxy growth and the relationship between dark matter halos and the galaxies that form in them. We find that the distinction between central and satellite galaxies in our simulation is weaker than expected in simple models where only central galaxies are able to accrete mass and `receive' mergers of less massive systems. Instead, in our simulation, satellite galaxies continue to accrete gas and convert it to stars after halo mergers with a larger parent halo. Satellites in our simulation are 0.1-0.2 magnitudes bluer than in models that assume no gas accretion on to satellites after a halo merger (instantaneous `strangulation'), which is sufficient to shift galaxies across the boundary from the `red sequence' to the `blue cloud'. Subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) is a technique for assigning luminosities to simulated dark matter substructures by assuming a strictly monotonic relationship between luminosity and halo mass at the epoch of accretion. We carry out N-body and SPH simulations of a cosmological volume with identical initial conditions, finding that SHAM successfully matches the stellar masses and luminosities of SPH galaxies at a wide range of epochs, albeit with relatively small amounts of scatter. In our SPH simulations that include momentum driven winds, the results are more complex. We examine the relationship between halo assembly and star formation histories with the goal of extending SHAM to a wider domain of observables such as star formation history and colour. In order to guide efforts to fit star formation histories to observed colours or spectra, we investigate parametric fits to the star formation histories of SPH galaxies finding that some commonly used models fail to describe the star formation histories of SPH galaxies but other simple two parameter models achieve greater success.

  15. On the cosmic evolution of the specific star formation rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, M. D.; van Driel, W.; Le Tiran, L.; Di Matteo, P.; Haywood, M.

    2015-05-01

    The apparent correlation between the specific star formation rate (sSFR) and total stellar mass (M⋆) of galaxies is a fundamental relationship indicating how they formed their stellar populations. To attempt to understand this relation, we hypothesize that the relation and its evolution is regulated by the increase in the stellar and gas mass surface density in galaxies with redshift, which is itself governed by the angular momentum of the accreted gas, the amount of available gas, and by self-regulation of star formation. With our model, we can reproduce the specific SFR - M⋆ relations at z ~ 1-2 by assuming gas fractions and gas mass surface densities similar to those observed for z = 1-2 galaxies. We further argue that it is the increasing angular momentum with cosmic time that causes a decrease in the surface density of accreted gas. The gas mass surface densities in galaxies are controlled by the centrifugal support (i.e., angular momentum), and the sSFR is predicted to increase as, sSFR(z) = (1 + z)3/tH0, as observed (where tH0 is the Hubble time and no free parameters are necessary). In addition, the simple evolution for the star-formation intensity we propose is in agreement with observations of Milky Way-like galaxies selected through abundance matching. At z ≳ 2, we argue that star formation is self-regulated by high pressures generated by the intense star formation itself. The star formation intensity must be high enough to either balance the hydrostatic pressure (a rather extreme assumption) or to generate high turbulent pressure in the molecular medium which maintains galaxies near the line of instability (i.e. Toomre Q ~ 1). We provide simple prescriptions for understanding these self-regulation mechanisms based on solid relationships verified through extensive study. In all cases, the most important factor is the increase in stellar and gas mass surface density with redshift, which allows distant galaxies to maintain high levels of s

  16. ALMA Reveals Potential Localized Dust Enrichment from Massive Star Clusters in II Zw 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consiglio, S. Michelle; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara; Meier, David S.

    2016-12-01

    We present subarcsecond images of submillimeter CO and continuum emission from a local galaxy forming massive star clusters: the blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. At ˜0.″4 resolution (20 pc), the CO(3-2), CO(1-0), 3 mm, and 870 μm continuum maps illustrate star formation on the scales of individual molecular clouds. Dust contributes about one-third of the 870 μm continuum emission, with free-free accounting for the rest. On these scales, there is not a good correspondence between gas, dust, and free-free emission. Dust continuum is enhanced toward the star-forming region as compared to the CO emission. We suggest that an unexpectedly low and spatially variable gas-to-dust ratio is the result of rapid and localized dust enrichment of clouds by the massive clusters of the starburst.

  17. Angular momentum evolution during star and planetary system formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Claire L.; Greaves, Jane S.

    2014-01-01

    We focused on analysing the role played by protoplanetary disks in the evolution of angular momentum during star formation. If all the angular momentum contained within collapsing pre-stellar cores was conserved during their formation, proto-stars would reach rotation rates exceeding their break-up velocities before they reached the main sequence (Bodenheimer 1995). In order to avoid this occuring, methods by which proto-stars can lose angular momentum must exist. Angular momentum can be transferred from star to disk via stellar magnetic field lines through a process called magnetic braking (Camenzind 1990; Königl 1991). Alternatively, the stellar angular momentum can be lost from the star-disk system entirely via stellar- or disk-winds (e.g. Pelletier & Pudritz 1992; Matt & Pudritz 2005). The proportion of lost stellar angular momentum retained within the protoplanetary disk is important to studies of planetary system formation. If the bulk motion within the disk remains Keplerian, any increase of angular momentum in the disk causes an outward migration of disk material and an expansion of the disk. Therefore, an increase in disk angular momentum may cause a reduction in the disk surface density, often used to indicate the disk's ability to form planets. We made use of multi-wavelength data available in the literature to directly calculate the stellar and disk angular momenta for two nearby regions of star formation. Namely, these were the densely populated and highly irradiated Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and the comparitively sparse Taurus-Auriga region. Due to the limited size of the ONC dataset, we produced an average surface density profile for the region. We modelled the stars as solid body rotators due to their fully convective nature (Krishnamurthi et al. 1997) and assumed the disks are flat and undergo Keplerian rotation about the same rotation axis as the star. We observed the older disks within each of the two star forming regions to be preferentially

  18. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ∼ 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  19. Connecting the Dense Gas and Young Stars in the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee G.; Storm, Shaye; Looney, Leslie; Lee, Katherine I.; Fernandez Lopez, Manuel; Ostriker, Eve C.; Chen, Che-Yu; CLASSy Team

    2016-01-01

    The CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy) imaged the dense gas structure and kinematics in five, roughly 1 pc scale regions in the Serpens and Perseus clouds with 7" angular resolution. The spatial distribution and Class of the young stellar population (YSOs) is available for these regions from the Spitzer c2d and Gould Belt surveys, with added sources from the Herschel 70 micron images. Together, these datasets allow us to compare, for the first time at similar spatial resolutions, the distributions of the dense gas and YSOs over regions containing up to 90 identified YSOs. This enables a detailed look at the separation between YSOs and the nearest dense gas peak and a measure of overall relationship between the YSO and dense gas distributions. We find that most Class 0 YSOs are forming in the highest column density regions: leaves in the dendrogram analysis utilized by CLASSy. In Serpens and Perseus, we find that 29% and 38%, respectively, of the leaves have identified embedded YSOs. Class 1 sources are less confined to leaf locations; Class II sources are distributed throughout regions, mostly away from hierarchical peaks. This trend could be due to a modest (0.1 km/sec) velocity difference between YSOs and their natal cores, or due to the YSOs consuming or dispersing their natal cores.

  20. Raman Scattered He II 4332 and Photoionization Model in the Symbiotic Star V1016 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.-W.; Heo, J.-E.; Lee, B.-C.

    2014-08-01

    Symbiotic stars are wide binary systems of a white dwarf and a mass losing giant. They exhibit unique Raman scattered features as a result of inelastic scattering of far UV line photons by atomic hydrogen. Co-existence of a far UV He II emission region and a thick H I region in symbiotic stars is necessary for the formation of Raman-scattered features blueward of hydrogen Balmer emission lines. Being a single electron atom, He II has the same atomic structure as the hydrogen atom and hence emits far UV emission lines that are slightly blueward of hydrogen Lyman lines. These far UV He II emission lines can be Raman scattered to appear blueward of hydrogen Balmer lines. In particular, the symbiotic star V1016 Cyg is found to exhibit Raman scattered He II 4332 feature in the BOES high resolution spectrum. Our profile fitting of Raman scattered He II 4332 is consistent with the mass loss geometry proposed by Jung & Lee (2004). We use the photoionization code ‘ CLOUDY' to estimate the far UV He II emission lines and make comparisons with the observed Raman scattered He II 4332 blueward of Hγ in the high resolution echelle V1016 Cyg. The emission nebula is assumed to be of uniform density of 108 cm-3 that is illuminated by a black body characterized by its temperature and total luminosity. With our comparisons we conclude that the Raman scattered He II features are consistent with the existence of a photoionized nebula by a hot black body source with temperature 7-8× 104 K with a luminosity 1038erg s-1.

  1. STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES AND THE HOST GALAXY IN THREE H II GALAXIES: Mrk 36, UM 408, AND UM 461

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, P.; Telles, E.; Nigoche-Netro, A.

    2011-11-15

    We present a stellar population study of three H II galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high-resolution near-infrared J, H, and K{sub p} broadband and Br{gamma} narrowband images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine the relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low-luminosity H II galaxies is {approx}10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses {approx}>10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently and likely simultaneously over short timescales in their host galaxies, triggered by some internal mechanism. Finally, the fraction of the total cluster mass with respect to the low surface brightness (or host galaxy) mass, considering our complete range in ages, is less than 1%.

  2. The interstellar medium and star formation in local galaxies: Variations of the star formation law in simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, Fernando; Escala, Andrés

    2014-05-01

    We use the adaptive mesh refinement code Enzo to model the interstellar medium (ISM) in isolated local disk galaxies. The simulation includes a treatment for star formation and stellar feedback. We get a highly supersonic turbulent disk, which is fragmented at multiple scales and characterized by a multi-phase ISM. We show that a Kennicutt-Schmidt relation only holds when averaging over large scales. However, values of star formation rates and gas surface densities lie close in the plot for any averaging size. This suggests an intrinsic relation between stars and gas at cell-size scales, which dominates over the global dynamical evolution. To investigate this effect, we develop a method to simulate the creation of stars based on the density field from the snapshots, without running the code again. We also investigate how the star formation law is affected by the characteristic star formation timescale, the density threshold, and the efficiency considered in the recipe. We find that the slope of the law varies from ∼1.4 for a free-fall timescale, to ∼1.0 for a constant depletion timescale. We further demonstrate that a power law is recovered just by assuming that the mass of the new stars is a fraction of the mass of the cell m {sub *} = ερ{sub gas}Δx {sup 3}, with no other physical criteria required. We show that both efficiency and density threshold do not affect the slope, but the right combination of them can adjust the normalization of the relation, which in turn could explain a possible bi-modality in the law.

  3. Galaxy bachelors, couples, spouses: Star formation in interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Barger, Kathleen; Richstein, Hannah; SDSS-IV/MaNGA

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the star formation activity in three galaxy systems in different stages of interaction to determine how the environment of galaxies affects their star forming ability and potential. These systems include an isolated galaxy, a pair of interacting galaxies, and a pair of merging galaxies. All of the target galaxies in these systems have similar stellar masses and similar radii and are at similar redshifts. We trace the star formation activity over the past 1-2 Gyr using spatially and kinematically resolved H-alpha emission, H-alpha equivalent width, and 4000-Angstrom break maps. This work is based on data from the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV)/Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), and is part of the Project No.0285 in SDSS-IV.

  4. The physics and modes of star cluster formation: simulations.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Cathie

    2010-02-28

    We review progress in numerical simulations of star cluster formation. These simulations involve the bottom-up assembly of clusters through hierarchical mergers, which produces a fractal stellar distribution at young (approx. 0.5 Myr) ages. The resulting clusters are predicted to be mildly aspherical and highly mass-segregated, except in the immediate aftermath of mergers. The upper initial mass function within individual clusters is generally somewhat flatter than for the aggregate population. Recent work has begun to clarify the factors that control the mean stellar mass in a star-forming cloud and also the efficiency of star formation. The former is sensitive to the thermal properties of the gas while the latter depends both on the magnetic field and the initial degree of gravitational boundedness of the natal cloud. Unmagnetized clouds that are initially bound undergo rapid collapse, which is difficult to reverse by ionization feedback or stellar winds.

  5. Network formation and gelation in telechelic star polymers.

    PubMed

    Wadgaonkar, Indrajit; Chatterji, Apratim

    2017-02-28

    We investigate the efficiency of gelation and network formation in telechelic star polymer melt, where the tips of polymer arms are dipoles while the rest of the monomers are uncharged. Our work is motivated by the experimental observations [A. Kulkarni et al., Macromolecules 48, 6580 (2015)] in which rheological studies of telechelic star polymers of poly-(L-lactide), a bio-degradable polymer, showed a drastic increase in elastic properties (up to 2000 times) compared to corresponding star polymers without the telechelic arm ends. In contrast to previous studies, we avoid using effective attractive Lennard-Jones potentials or dipolar potentials to model telechelic interactions. Instead we use explicit Coulomb positive and negative charges at the tip of polymer-arms of our bead-spring model of star polymers. By our simulations we show that the dipoles at the tip of star arms aggregate together to form clusters of dipoles. Each cluster has contributions from several stars, and in turn each star contributes to several clusters. Thus the entire polymer melt forms a connected network. Network forming tendencies decrease with a decrease of the value of the effective charge constituting the dipole: this can be experimentally realized by choosing a different ionomer for the star tip. We systematically varied the value of dipole charges, the fraction of star-arms with dipoles at the tip, and the length of the arms. The choice of explicit charges in our calculations enables us to make better quantitative predictions about the onset of gelation; moreover we get qualitatively distinct results about structural organization of dipoles within a dipole-cluster.

  6. Network formation and gelation in telechelic star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadgaonkar, Indrajit; Chatterji, Apratim

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the efficiency of gelation and network formation in telechelic star polymer melt, where the tips of polymer arms are dipoles while the rest of the monomers are uncharged. Our work is motivated by the experimental observations [A. Kulkarni et al., Macromolecules 48, 6580 (2015)] in which rheological studies of telechelic star polymers of poly-(L-lactide), a bio-degradable polymer, showed a drastic increase in elastic properties (up to 2000 times) compared to corresponding star polymers without the telechelic arm ends. In contrast to previous studies, we avoid using effective attractive Lennard-Jones potentials or dipolar potentials to model telechelic interactions. Instead we use explicit Coulomb positive and negative charges at the tip of polymer-arms of our bead-spring model of star polymers. By our simulations we show that the dipoles at the tip of star arms aggregate together to form clusters of dipoles. Each cluster has contributions from several stars, and in turn each star contributes to several clusters. Thus the entire polymer melt forms a connected network. Network forming tendencies decrease with a decrease of the value of the effective charge constituting the dipole: this can be experimentally realized by choosing a different ionomer for the star tip. We systematically varied the value of dipole charges, the fraction of star-arms with dipoles at the tip, and the length of the arms. The choice of explicit charges in our calculations enables us to make better quantitative predictions about the onset of gelation; moreover we get qualitatively distinct results about structural organization of dipoles within a dipole-cluster.

  7. Hierarchical star formation across the ring galaxy NGC 6503

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Thilker, David; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Calzetti, Daniela; Lee, Janice C.; Adamo, Angela; Aloisi, Alessandra; Cignoni, Michele; Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Gallagher, John S.; Grasha, Kathryn; Grebel, Eva K.; Davó, Artemio Herrero; Hunter, Deidre A.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Kim, Hwihyun; Nair, Preethi; Nota, Antonella; Pellerin, Anne; Ryon, Jenna; Sabbi, Elena; Sacchi, Elena; Smith, Linda J.; Tosi, Monica; Ubeda, Leonardo; Whitmore, Brad

    2015-10-01

    We present a detailed clustering analysis of the young stellar population across the star-forming ring galaxy NGC 6503, based on the deep Hubble Space Telescope photometry obtained with the Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey. We apply a contour-based map analysis technique and identify in the stellar surface density map 244 distinct star-forming structures at various levels of significance. These stellar complexes are found to be organized in a hierarchical fashion with 95 per cent being members of three dominant super-structures located along the star-forming ring. The size distribution of the identified structures and the correlation between their radii and numbers of stellar members show power-law behaviours, as expected from scale-free processes. The self-similar distribution of young stars is further quantified from their autocorrelation function, with a fractal dimension of ˜1.7 for length-scales between ˜20 pc and 2.5 kpc. The young stellar radial distribution sets the extent of the star-forming ring at radial distances between 1 and 2.5 kpc. About 60 per cent of the young stars belong to the detected stellar structures, while the remaining stars are distributed among the complexes, still inside the ring of the galaxy. The analysis of the time-dependent clustering of young populations shows a significant change from a more clustered to a more distributed behaviour in a time-scale of ˜60 Myr. The observed hierarchy in stellar clustering is consistent with star formation being regulated by turbulence across the ring. The rotational velocity difference between the edges of the ring suggests shear as the driving mechanism for this process. Our findings reveal the interesting case of an inner ring forming stars in a hierarchical fashion.

  8. Carbon Stars In Andromeda. II. Demographics and Photometric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, K.; Dorman, C.; Toloba, E.; Seth, A.; Dalcanton, J.; Nayak, A.; PHAT Collaboration; SPLASH Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of two talks about a sample of newly-discovered carbon stars in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). As explained in the first talk, these stars were identified on the basis of their spectroscopic characteristics using Keck/DEIMOS spectra obtained as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo (SPLASH) survey. We explore the physical properties of strong and weak carbon stars using photometric data from a Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury program: Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT). The PHAT data set includes deep photometry in six filters: two in the ultraviolet, two in the optical, and two in the near infrared. The carbon stars appear to be in the asymptotic giant branch stage of their evolution as evidenced by the fact that they lie above the tip of the red giant branch and are cleanly separated from normal (i.e., oxygen-rich) giants in color-magnitude diagrams. We study the spatial distribution of carbon stars in M31 and use kinematics to determine whether they belong to M31's thin disk, thick disk, or spheroid. These carbon stars serve as highly visible tracers of the intermediate-mass, intermediate-age stellar population in M31; they are important markers in the study of the star-formation history of the galaxy. This research was part of the SPLASH and PHAT collaboration. We are grateful to the National Science Foundation and NASA for funding support. AN's participation was under the auspices of UCSC's Science Internship Program.

  9. Report on the Workshop Herbig Ae/Be Stars: The Missing Link in Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wit, W.-J.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; van den Ancker, M. E.; Calvet, N.

    2014-09-01

    The workshop highlighted the many recent advances within the field of Herbig Ae/Be stars and the close links to star and planet formation. Topics such as magnetospheric accretion and the evolution of dust in discs, the structure of circumstellar discs and the role of walls and gaps and their links to planet formation from many observational aspects were covered. The workshop was dedicated to the life and works of George H. Herbig, who sadly passed away at the end of last year.

  10. Observing Star Formation: From the Interstellar Medium to Star-Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Alyssa A.

    1995-12-01

    In the thirty years since the first mapping of molecular line emission from interstellar clouds, our ``picture" of the interstellar medium has evolved enormously. With only optical observations available, it was (correctly) hypothesized that new stars form from condensations of dense interstellar gas which appear optically as dark or bright nebulae. These early hypotheses often envisioned the overall collapse of whole clouds into stars, or fragmentation of entire clouds into ``Jeans mass"-size clumps. Thirty years of observing the clouds and the star-formation process which takes place within them has, alas, shown these hypotheses to be too simple. Radio-wavelength spectral-line mapping of interstellar gas, far-infrared and sub-millimeter continuum observations of thermal dust emission, and near-infrared and optical spectral and continuum observations of young stellar objects (YSO's) have revealed a detailed--yet nonetheless perplexing--view of the star-formation process. Molecular ``clouds" appear to be wispy, clumpy condensations of interstellar gas, with self-similar density and velocity structure on scales from hundreds of parsecs down to tenths of parsecs. Projected on density maxima in the gas distribution, one often finds point (or very compact) sources whose spectral colors are consistent with their being deeply embedded in dense gas. These sources are often the origin of powerful jets and outflows and are believed to be YSO's. The outflows, which can carry angular momentum away from a YSO, represent an important phase in the star-formation process. I will discuss the current observational ``picture" of star-forming molecular clouds, as well as some of the many theoretical models which have been proposed to explain cloud structure. Current theories and simulations include gravitational, magnetic and dynamical forces and seek to explain how these forces conspire to simultaneously regulate equilibrium, turbulent, and runaway (e.g. star-formation) processes

  11. ORIGIN OF THE GALAXY MASS-METALLICITY-STAR FORMATION RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Harwit, Martin; Brisbin, Drew

    2015-02-20

    We describe an equilibrium model that links the metallicity of low-redshift galaxies to stellar evolution models. It enables the testing of different stellar initial mass functions and metal yields against observed galaxy metallicities. We show that the metallicities of more than 80,000 Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in the low-redshift range 0.07 ≤ z ≤ 0.3 considerably constrain stellar evolution models that simultaneously relate galaxy stellar mass, metallicity, and star formation rates to the infall rate of low-metallicity extragalactic gas and outflow of enriched matter. A feature of our model is that it encompasses both the active star forming phases of a galaxy and epochs during which the same galaxy may lie fallow. We show that the galaxy mass-metallicity-star formation relation can be traced to infall of extragalactic gas mixing with native gas from host galaxies to form stars of observed metallicities, the most massive of which eject oxygen into extragalactic space. Most consequential among our findings is that, on average, extragalactic infall accounts for one half of the gas required for star formation, a ratio that is remarkably constant across galaxies with stellar masses ranging at least from M* = 2 × 10{sup 9} to 6 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}. This leads us to propose that star formation is initiated when extragalactic infall roughly doubles the mass of marginally stable interstellar clouds. The processes described may also account quantitatively for the metallicity of extragalactic space, though to check this the fraction of extragalactic baryons will need to be more firmly established.

  12. Time Dependent Models of Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, M. P.; Shipman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch stars are sites of dust formation and undergo mass loss at rates ranging from 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -4) solar mass/yr. The state-of-the-art in modeling these processes is time-dependent models which simultaneously solve the grain formation and gas dynamics problem. We present results from such a model, which also includes an exact solution of the radiative transfer within the system.

  13. Star formation in NGC 6611 with ADONIS and Hubble.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, D.; Kissell, K.; Shaya, E.; Avizonis, P.; Dowling, D.; Bonaccini, D.

    1996-12-01

    New details of the star-formation process have been revealed by a co-ordinated use of the ADONIS system on the 3.6-metre telescope at La Silla, in combination with data from the WFPC2 Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope. The authors illustrate some of the unique capabilities of the ADONIS system for high-resolution near-infrared observations of the stellar formation process.

  14. Star formation in M16 with ADONIS and Hubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, D.; Bonaccini, D.; Kissell, K.; Shaya, E.; Avizonis, P.; Dowling, D.

    1997-02-01

    New details of the star formation process have been revealed by a coordinated use of the ADONIS system on the 3.6 meter telescope at La Silla with data from the WFPC2 Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope. In this very preliminary report, we illustrate some of the unique capabilities of the ADONIS system for high-resolution observations of the stellar formation processes in the near infrared region.

  15. The optical flares of active star II Pegasi in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shenghong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    We observed the active star II Peg using high-resolution spectrographs of 2.16m telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC and 1.8m telescope at BOAO of KASI from November to December, 2005. By means of spectral subtraction technique, the chromospheric activities of II Peg are analyzed at several activity indicators, including CaII IRT, Hα, NaI D1D2 and HeI D3 lines. The results demonstrate that the magnetic activity of II Peg is very strong, and its chromospheric activities show rotational modulations which imply there are active regions in its chromosphere. Two flare events were hunted during the observations, which were identified by HeI D3 line emission above the continuum. The first flare was happened in November 2005, the second one in December 2005, and they were located in different hemisphere of the star. This may indicate the evolution of active regions. Considering the photospheric spot activities, the possible origin of the detected flares is discussed.

  16. Resolved Star Formation Law In Nearby Infrared-bright Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nurur; Bolatto, A.; Wong, T.; Leroy, A.; Ott, J.; Calzetti, D.; Blitz, L.; Walter, F.; Rosolowsky, E.; West, A.; Vogel, S.; Bigiel, F.; Xue, R.

    2009-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of star formation law is crucial to make progress in understanding galaxy formation and evolution. We are studying this topic using CARMA STING (Survey Toward Infrared-bright Nearby Galaxies), an interferometric CO survey of a sample of 27 star-forming nearby galaxies with a wealth of multi-wavelength data designed to study star formation in environments throughout the blue sequence at sub-kpc scales. We present results for NGC 4254 (M99), one of our sample galaxies. We construct star formation rate surface density (SFRSD) and gas (atomic and molecular) surface density indicators using a combination of high resolution data from CARMA, KPNO, Spitzer, IRAM and VLA. We find a tight correlation between SFRSD and molecular gas surface density (MGSD), whereas the relation between atomic gas surface density and SFRSD shows very large scatter. Within the central 6 kpc (radius) where CARMA is the most sensitive the MGSD derived from CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) shows similar trend, however, in the extended disk the slope, derived from CO(2-1) data alone, gets steeper.

  17. 11HUGS & LVL: Star Formation Properties of Local Volume Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Janice C.; Gil de Paz, A.; Tremonti, C.; Kennicutt, R.; van Zee, L.; Sakai, S.; Funes, J. G.; LVL Team

    2007-12-01

    11HUGS, the 11 Mpc H-alpha UV Galaxy Survey, is a GALEX Legacy program designed to systematically characterize the star formation demographics of the Local Volume using a complete sample of 258 spiral and irregular galaxies within 11 Mpc. The dataset consists of snapshots of the instantaneous massive star formation as captured via narrowband H-alpha imaging, as well as GALEX NUV (1500 Å) and FUV (2300 Å) imaging, which traces star formation over a longer 1e8 yr timescale. UV observations of the 11HUGS sample are now 80% complete, and we use the available data, along with the completed H-alpha component of the survey, to investigate the consistency between UV and H-alpha derived star formation rates over a full range of activities down to ultra-low SFRs of 0.0001 M_sun/yr. We also provide a first look at the span of UV-FIR SED and dust properties using initial data from the follow-on Cycle 4 Spitzer Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey, which is obtaining mid and far-IR imaging for the full sample.

  18. On the IMF in a Triggered Star Formation Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tingtao; Huang, Chelsea X.; Lin, D. N. C.; Gritschneder, Matthias; Lau, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a fundamental issue in the theory of star formation. It is generally fit with a composite power law. Some clues on the progenitors can be found in dense starless cores that have a core mass function (CMF) with a similar shape. In the low-mass end, these mass functions increase with mass, albeit the sample may be somewhat incomplete; in the high-mass end, the mass functions decrease with mass. There is an offset in the turn-over mass between the two mass distributions. The stellar mass for the IMF peak is lower than the corresponding core mass for the CMF peak in the Pipe Nebula by about a factor of three. Smaller offsets are found between the IMF and the CMFs in other nebulae. We suggest that the offset is likely induced during a starburst episode of global star formation which is triggered by the formation of a few O/B stars in the multi-phase media, which naturally emerged through the onset of thermal instability in the cloud-core formation process. We consider the scenario that the ignition of a few massive stars photoionizes the warm medium between the cores, increases the external pressure, reduces their Bonnor-Ebert mass, and triggers the collapse of some previously stable cores. We quantitatively reproduce the IMF in the low-mass end with the assumption of additional rotational fragmentation.

  19. ON THE IMF IN A TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION CONTEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tingtao; Huang, Chelsea X.; Lin, D. N. C.; Gritschneder, Matthias

    2015-07-20

    The origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a fundamental issue in the theory of star formation. It is generally fit with a composite power law. Some clues on the progenitors can be found in dense starless cores that have a core mass function (CMF) with a similar shape. In the low-mass end, these mass functions increase with mass, albeit the sample may be somewhat incomplete; in the high-mass end, the mass functions decrease with mass. There is an offset in the turn-over mass between the two mass distributions. The stellar mass for the IMF peak is lower than the corresponding core mass for the CMF peak in the Pipe Nebula by about a factor of three. Smaller offsets are found between the IMF and the CMFs in other nebulae. We suggest that the offset is likely induced during a starburst episode of global star formation which is triggered by the formation of a few O/B stars in the multi-phase media, which naturally emerged through the onset of thermal instability in the cloud-core formation process. We consider the scenario that the ignition of a few massive stars photoionizes the warm medium between the cores, increases the external pressure, reduces their Bonnor–Ebert mass, and triggers the collapse of some previously stable cores. We quantitatively reproduce the IMF in the low-mass end with the assumption of additional rotational fragmentation.

  20. STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE BARRED SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 4303

    SciTech Connect

    Momose, Rieko; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Koda, Jin E-mail: sokumura@nro.nao.ac.j E-mail: Jin.Koda@stonybrook.ed

    2010-09-20

    We present new {sup 12}CO (J = 1 - 0) observations of the barred galaxy NGC 4303 using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope (NRO45) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). The H{alpha} images of barred spiral galaxies often show active star formation in spiral arms, but less so in bars. We quantify the difference by measuring star formation rate (SFR) and star formation efficiency (SFE) at a scale where local star formation is spatially resolved. Our CO map covers the central 2.'3 region of the galaxy; the combination of NRO45 and CARMA provides a high fidelity image, enabling accurate measurements of molecular gas surface density. We find that SFR and SFE are twice as high in the spiral arms as in the bar. We discuss this difference in the context of the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) law, which indicates a constant SFR at a given gas surface density. The KS law breaks down at our native resolution ({approx}250 pc), and substantial smoothing (to 500 pc) is necessary to reproduce the KS law, although with greater scatter.

  1. Coronagraphic imaging of pre-main-sequence stars: Remnant evvelopes of star formation seen in reflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Golimowski, David A.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained R- and I-band coronagraphic images of the vicinities of 11 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars to search for faint, small-scale reflection nebulae. The inner radius of the search and the field of view are 1.9 arcsec and 1x1 arcmin, respectively. Reflection nebulae were imaged around RY Tau, T Tau,DG Tau, SU Aur, AB Aur, FU Ori, and Z CMa. No nebulae were detected around HBC 347, GG Tau, V773 Tau, and V830 Tau. Categorically speaking, most of the classical T Tauri program stars and all the FU Orionis-type program stars are associated with the reflection nebulae, while none of the weak-line T Tauri program stars are associated with nebulae. The detected nebulae range in size from 250 to 37 000 AU. From the brightness ratios of the stars and nebulae, we obtain a lower limit to the visual extinction of PMS star light through the nebulae of (A(sub V))(sub neb) = 0.1. The lower limits of masses and volume densities of the nebulae associated with the classical T Tauri stars are 10(exp-6) Solar mass and N(sub H) = 10(exp 5)/cu cm, respectively. Lower limits for the nebulae around FU Orionis stars are 10(exp -5) Solar mass and n(sub H) = 10 (exp 5)/cu cm, respectively. Some reflection nebulae may trace the illuminated surfaces of the optically thick dust nebulae, so these mass estimates are not stringent. All the PMS stars with associated nebulae are strong far-infrared emitters. Both the far-infrared emission and the reflection nebulae appear to originate from the remnant envelopes of star formation. The 100 micrometers emitting regions of SU Aur and FU Ori are likely to be cospatial with the reflection nebulae. A spatial discontinuity between FU Ori and its reflection nebula may explain the dip in the far-infrared spectral energy distribution at 60 micrometers. The warped, disk-like nebulae around T Tau and Z CMa are aligned with and embrace the inner star/circumstellar disk systems. The arc-shaped nebula around DG Tau may be in contact with the coaligned inner

  2. Quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Roehlly, Y.; Fossati, M.; Buat, V.; Boissier, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Ciesla, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Serra, P.

    2016-11-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SEDs of the target galaxies were fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies was parametrised using a specific star formation history with two free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These two parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism, which acts on long timescales when starvation processes are at work, but is rapid and efficient when ram pressure occurs. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combined twenty photometric bands in the UV to far-infrared in a new way with three age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution (R 1000) integrated spectroscopy and with Hα narrow-band imaging data. The use of a truncated star formation history significantly increases the quality of the fit in HI-deficient galaxies of the sample, that is to say, in those objects whose atomic gas content has been removed during the interaction with the hostile cluster environment. The typical quenching age of the perturbed late-type galaxies is QA ≲ 300 Myr whenever the activity of star formation is reduced by 50% < QF ≤ 80% and QA ≲ 500 Myr for QF > 80%, while that of the quiescent early-type objects is QA ≃ 1-3 Gyr. The fraction of late-type galaxies with a star formation activity reduced by QF > 80% and with an HI-deficiency parameter HI-def > 0.4 drops by a factor of 5 from the inner half virial radius of the Virgo cluster (R/Rvir < 0.5), where the hot diffuse X-ray emitting gas of the cluster is located, to the outer regions (R/Rvir > 4). The efficient quenching of the

  3. Star and cluster formation in NGC 1275

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richer, Harvey B.; Crabtree, Dennis R.; Fabian, A. C.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1993-01-01

    Luminous, blue, and unresolved objects have been found by imaging the nuclear region of the central galaxy in the Perseus Cluster, NGC 1275. Stellar formation in a cooling flow in which gas clouds confined by weak magnetic fields are allowed to remain at low densities is favored. Cloud-cloud collisions and coagulation in the high cloud density environment at the center of the galaxy then causes some clouds to become gravitationally unstable and to form globular clusters.

  4. Star formation in AGNs at the hundred parsec scale using MIR high-resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruschel-Dutra, Daniel; Rodríguez Espinosa, José Miguel; González Martín, Omaira; Pastoriza, Miriani; Riffel, Rogério

    2017-04-01

    It has been well established in the past decades that the central black hole masses of galaxies correlate with dynamical properties of their harbouring bulges. This notion begs the question of whether there are causal connections between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and its immediate vicinity in the host galaxy. In this paper, we analyse the presence of circumnuclear star formation in a sample of 15 AGN using mid-infrared observations. The data consist of a set of 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and reference continuum images, taken with ground-based telescopes, with sub-arcsecond resolution. By comparing our star formation estimates with AGN accretion rates, derived from X-ray luminosities, we investigate the validity of theoretical predictions for the AGN-starburst connection. Our main results are: (i) circumnuclear star formation is found, at distances as low as tens of parsecs from the nucleus, in nearly half of our sample (7/15); (ii) star formation luminosities are correlated with the bolometric luminosity of the AGN (LAGN) only for objects with LAGN ≥ 1042 erg s-1; (iii) low-luminosity AGNs (LAGN < 1042 erg s-1) seem to have starburst luminosities far greater than their bolometric luminosities.

  5. Tracing Star Formation Around Quasars With Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilton, Lawrence Edward

    2016-09-01

    The feedback processes linking quasar activity to galaxy stellar mass growth are not well understood. If star formation is closely causally linked to black hole accretion, one may expect star formation confined to nuclear regions rather than extended over several kpc scales. Since Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features are widely used as tracers of stellar formation, it is, therefore, possible to use PAH emission detected around QSOs to help resolve this question. PAH data from a sample of 63 QSOs procured from the Spitzer Space Telescope’s Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) is used, employing the Spectroscopic Modelling Analysis and Reduction Tool’s (SMART) Advanced Optimal (AdOpt) extraction routines. A composite spectrum was also produced to help determine the average conditions and compositions of star forming regions. It is found, from our high redshift (>1) sample of QSOs, there is a marginally significant extended star formation on average of 34 scales. At low redshift, the median extension after deconvolving the instrumental point spread function is 3.2 , potentially showing evolutionary variations in star formation activity. However, limitations of the spatial resolving power constrain the ability to make any absolute conclusive remarks. It is also found that the QSO/AGN composite has more neutral PAHs than the starbursting and the main sequence galaxies, consistent with the AGN having no contribution to heating the PAH emission, and also consistent with the average PAH emission found on scales (i.e. not confined to the nuclear regions). A tentative detection of water vapour emission from the gravitationally lensed Einstein Cross quasar, QSO J2237+0305, is also presented suggesting a strong molecular outflow possibly driven by the active nucleus.

  6. The star formation rate distribution function of the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, M. S.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Johnson, B. D.; Wu, Y.; Lee, J. C.; Dale, D.; Engelbracht, C.; Calzetti, D.; Skillman, E.

    2011-08-01

    We present total infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions derived from large representative samples of galaxies at z˜ 0, selected at IR and UV wavelengths from the Imperial IRAS Faint Source Catalogue redshift data base (IIFSCz) catalogue, and the GALEX All-Sky Imaging Survey (AIS), respectively. We augment these with deep Spitzer and GALEX imaging of galaxies in the 11 Mpc Local Volume Legacy (LVL) Survey, allowing us to extend these luminosity functions to lower luminosities (˜106 L⊙), and providing good constraints on the slope of the luminosity function at the extreme faint end for the first time. Using conventional star formation prescriptions, we generate from our data the star formation rate (SFR) distribution function for the local Universe. We find that it has a Schechter form, the faint-end slope has a constant value (to the limits of our data) of α=-1.51 ± 0.08 and the ‘characteristic’ SFR ψ* is 9.2 M⊙ yr-1. We also show the distribution function of the SFR volume density; we then use this to calculate a value for the total SFR volume density at z˜ 0 of 0.025 ± 0.0016 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3, of which ˜20 per cent is occurring in starbursts. Decomposing the total star formation by infrared luminosity, it can be seen that 9 ± 1 per cent is due to LIRGs, and 0.7 ± 0.2 per cent is occurring in ULIRGs. By comparing UV and IR emission for galaxies in our sample, we also calculate the fraction of star formation occurring in dust-obscured environments, and examine the distribution of dusty star formation: we find a very shallow slope at the highly extincted end, which may be attributable to line-of-sight orientation effects as well as conventional internal extinction.

  7. On the Interplay between Star Formation and Feedback in Galaxy Formation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agertz, Oscar; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the star formation-feedback cycle in cosmological galaxy formation simulations, focusing on the progenitors of Milky Way (MW)-sized galaxies. We find that in order to reproduce key properties of the MW progenitors, such as semi-empirically derived star formation histories (SFHs) and the shape of rotation curves, our implementation of star formation and stellar feedback requires (1) a combination of local early momentum feedback via radiation pressure and stellar winds, and subsequent efficient supernovae feedback, and (2) an efficacy of feedback that results in the self-regulation of the global star formation rate on kiloparsec scales. We show that such feedback-driven self-regulation is achieved globally for a local star formation efficiency per free fall time of {{ɛ }ff}≈ 10%. Although this value is larger that the {{ɛ }ff}˜ 1% value usually inferred from the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) relation, we show that it is consistent with direct observational estimates of {{ɛ }ff} in molecular clouds. Moreover, we show that simulations with local efficiency of {{ɛ }ff}≈ 10% reproduce the global observed KS relation. Such simulations also reproduce the cosmic SFH of the MW-sized galaxies and satisfy a number of other observational constraints. Conversely, we find that simulations that a priori assume an inefficient mode of star formation, instead of achieving it via stellar feedback regulation, fail to produce sufficiently vigorous outflows and do not reproduce observations. This illustrates the importance of understanding the complex interplay between star formation and feedback, and the detailed processes that contribute to the feedback-regulated formation of galaxies.

  8. EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.

    2012-12-10

    We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

  9. Visual binary stars: data to investigate formation of binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva,, D.; Malkov,, O.; Yungelson, L.; Chulkov, D.

    Statistics of orbital parameters of binary stars as well as statistics of their physical characteristics bear traces of star formation history. However, statistical investigations of binaries are complicated by incomplete or missing observational data and by a number of observational selection effects. Visual binaries are the most common type of observed binary stars, with the number of pairs exceeding 130 000. The most complete list of presently known visual binary stars was compiled by cross-matching objects and combining data of the three largest catalogues of visual binaries. This list was supplemented by the data on parallaxes, multicolor photometry, and spectral characteristics taken from other catalogues. This allowed us to compensate partly for the lack of observational data for these objects. The combined data allowed us to check the validity of observational values and to investigate statistics of the orbital and physical parameters of visual binaries. Corrections for incompleteness of observational data are discussed. The datasets obtained, together with modern distributions of binary parameters, will be used to reconstruct the initial distributions and parameters of the function of star formation for binary systems.

  10. Inefficient star formation in extremely metal poor galaxies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong; Armus, Lee; Helou, George; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Gao, Yu; Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gu, Qiusheng

    2014-10-16

    The first galaxies contain stars born out of gas with few or no 'metals' (that is, elements heavier than helium). The lack of metals is expected to inhibit efficient gas cooling and star formation, but this effect has yet to be observed in galaxies with an oxygen abundance (relative to hydrogen) below a tenth of that of the Sun. Extremely metal poor nearby galaxies may be our best local laboratories for studying in detail the conditions that prevailed in low metallicity galaxies at early epochs. Carbon monoxide emission is unreliable as a tracer of gas at low metallicities, and while dust has been used to trace gas in low-metallicity galaxies, low spatial resolution in the far-infrared has typically led to large uncertainties. Here we report spatially resolved infrared observations of two galaxies with oxygen abundances below ten per cent of the solar value, and show that stars formed very inefficiently in seven star-forming clumps in these galaxies. The efficiencies are less than a tenth of those found in normal, metal rich galaxies today, suggesting that star formation may have been very inefficient in the early Universe.

  11. Massive Star Formation: Characterising Infall and Outflow in dense cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shaila; Cunningham, Maria; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jones, Paul Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Walsh, Andrew John

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars are some of the most important objects in the Universe, shaping the evolution of galaxies, creating chemical elements, and hence shaping the evolution of the Universe. However, the processes by which they form, and how they shape their environment during their birth processes, are not well understood. We are using NH3 data from the "The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey" (HOPS) to define the positions of dense cores/clumps of gas in the southern Galactic plane that are likely to form stars. Due to its effective critical density, NH3 can detect massive star forming regions effectively compared to other tracers. We did a comparative study with different methods for finding clumps and found Fellwalker as the best. We found ~ 10% of the star forming clumps with multiple components and ~ 90% clumps with single component along the line of sight. Then, using data from the "The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz" (MALT90) survey, we search for the presence of infall and outflow associated with these cores. We will subsequently use the "3D Molecular Line Radiative Transfer Code" (MOLLIE) to constrain properties of the infall and outflow, such as velocity and mass flow. The aim of the project is to determine how common infall and outflow are in star forming cores, hence providing valuable constraints on the timescales and physical process involved in massive star formation.

  12. The First Stars: Binary and Small Multiple Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, A.; Greif, T. H.; Bromm, V.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the formation of metal-free, Population III (Pop III), stars within a minihalo at z˜eq 20 with a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation, starting from cosmological initial conditions. Employing a hierarchical, zoom-in procedure, we achieve sufficient numerical resolution to follow the collapsing gas in the center of the minihalo up to number densities of 1012 cm-3. This allows us to study the protostellar accretion onto the initial hydrostatic core, which we represent as a growing sink particle, in improved physical detail. The accretion process, and in particular its termination, governs the final masses that were reached by the first stars. The primordial initial mass function (IMF), in turn, played an important role in determining to what extent the first stars drove early cosmic evolution. We continue our simulation for 5000 yr after the first sink particle has formed. During this time period, a disk-like configuration is assembled around the first protostar. The disk is gravitationally unstable, develops a pronounced spiral structure, and fragments into several other protostellar seeds. At the end of the simulation, a small multiple system has formed, dominated by a binary with masses ˜ 40 Msun and ˜ 10 Msun. If Pop III stars were to form typically in binaries or small multiples, the standard model of primordial star formation, where single, isolated stars are predicted to form in minihaloes, would have to be modified. This would have crucial consequences for the observational signature of the first stars, such as their nucleosynthetic pattern, and the gravitational-wave emission from possible Pop III black-hole binaries.

  13. Star formation histories from resolved stellar populations in nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogarten, Stephanie Morris

    We present the results of three applications of using resolved stellar populations to derive star formation histories (SFHs) of regions in the nearby spiral galaxies M81 and NGC 300. We use data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) and compare observed color- magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with synthetic CMDs from stellar evolution models to find the best-fitting combination of stellar ages and metallicities. In the outer disk of M81, we probe the stellar populations of small regions which are UV-bright but Ha-faint as well as HII regions. We determine that the HII regions contain more massive stars than the other regions and are therefore consistent with being at least a few Myr younger; however, we cannot rule out a truncated initial mass function as an explanation for the differences between these regions. Our data for NGC 300 cover the location of an unusual optical transient, NGC 300 OT2008-1, which has been speculated to represent a new class of objects. Despite the lack of an optical precursor for this object, we infer the mass of the progenitor by deriving the SFH from the stars surrounding the transient location, under the assumption that since most stars form in clusters, the population should be coeval. We find a star formation event of age 8-13 Myr and determine that the progenitor should be a star which has recently turned off the main sequence, of mass 12-17 [Special characters omitted.] . Expanding our view of NGC 300 to a radial strip of the disk from the center to 5.4 kpc, we divide the galaxy into radial bins and derive the SFH at each location. We find that the percentage of young stars in the outer regions is considerably greater than in the inner regions, but the slope of the surface density of the disk increases only slightly with time.

  14. Star and Planet Formation Science from NASA Mission Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, Lynne

    Over the past decade, NASA's Great Observatories such as Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra, its major international partnership platforms such as XMM-Newton, Herschel and Planck, and its other smaller (approximately) all-sky survey missions such as GALEX, 2MASS, and WISE, have produced a wealth of data on young stars and star forming regions. We propose to collect these particular data from archives and published literature, and organize, co-locate, and serve them in a fully searchable format. Our science needs dictate that we include all relevant photometric and spectroscopic information on known and suspected young (<1-100 Myr of age) nearby (within a few hundred pc to 1 kpc of the Sun) stars. This is a finite and tractable sample of objects, numbering less than 100,000, and the challenge is simply in doing the collation work. We will also use the assembled information to calculate systematically derived parameters for the stars and their disks. Addressable science questions of interest to NASA include those of e.g. stellar accretion history, young star ages and age spreads in clusters, stellar masses and the initial mass function in clusters, stellar angular momentum and activity evolution, circumstellar and debris disk evolution, and planet formation and early planetary system evolution - notably including the correlations with stellar and disk properties. A recent scientific focus has been on young star variability arising from both stellar and circumstellar phenomena, exploiting available time series data from Spitzer/Warm and Kepler/K2 data sets. However, the broader ensemble of NASA data products such as we propose to collect here for these stars, is needed in order to carry out the science analysis for the existing K2 and Spitzer time series data, not just the lightcurves themselves.

  15. A SPITZER VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN THE CYGNUS X NORTH COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Beerer, I. M.; Koenig, X. P.; Hora, J. L.; Keto, E.; Smith, H. A.; Fazio, G. G.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Megeath, S. T.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Allen, L. E.; Kraemer, K. E.; Price, S.; Mizuno, D.; Adams, J. D.; Hernandez, J.; Lucas, P. W.

    2010-09-01

    We present new images and photometry of the massive star-forming complex Cygnus X obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. A combination of IRAC, MIPS, UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey, and Two Micron All Sky Survey data are used to identify and classify young stellar objects (YSOs). Of the 8231 sources detected exhibiting infrared excess in Cygnus X North, 670 are classified as class I and 7249 are classified as class II. Using spectra from the FAST Spectrograph at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory and Hectospec on the MMT, we spectrally typed 536 sources in the Cygnus X complex to identify the massive stars. We find that YSOs tend to be grouped in the neighborhoods of massive B stars (spectral types B0 to B9). We present a minimal spanning tree analysis of clusters in two regions in Cygnus X North. The fraction of infrared excess sources that belong to clusters with {>=}10 members is found to be 50%-70%. Most class II objects lie in dense clusters within blown out H II regions, while class I sources tend to reside in more filamentary structures along the bright-rimmed clouds, indicating possible triggered star formation.

  16. The star cluster formation history of the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardt, H.; Parmentier, G.; Anders, P.; Grebel, E. K.

    2013-03-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the nearest galaxies to us and is one of only few galaxies where the star formation history can be determined from studying resolved stellar populations. We have compiled a new catalogue of ages, luminosities and masses of LMC star clusters and used it to determine the age distribution and dissolution rate of LMC star clusters. We find that the frequency of massive clusters with masses M > 5000 M⊙ is almost constant between 10 and 200 Myr, showing that the influence of residual gas expulsion is limited to the first 10 Myr of cluster evolution or clusters less massive than 5000 M⊙. Comparing the cluster frequency in that interval with the absolute star formation rate, we find that about 15 per cent of all stars in the LMC were formed in long-lived star clusters that survive for more than 10 Myr. We also find that the mass function of LMC clusters younger than 109 Gyr can be fitted by a power-law mass function N(m) ˜ m-α with slope α = 2.3, while older clusters follow a significantly shallower slope and interpret that this is a sign of either incompleteness or the ongoing dissolution of low-mass clusters. Our data show that for ages older than 200 Myr, about 90 per cent of all clusters are lost per dex of lifetime. The implied cluster dissolution rate is significantly faster than that based on analytic estimates and N-body simulations. Our cluster age data finally show evidence for a burst in cluster formation about 109 yr ago, but little evidence for bursts at other ages.

  17. Major mergers are not significant drivers of star formation or morphological transformation around the epoch of peak cosmic star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofthouse, E. K.; Kaviraj, S.; Conselice, C. J.; Mortlock, A.; Hartley, W.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the contribution of major mergers (mass ratios >1: 5) to stellar mass growth and morphological transformations around the epoch of peak cosmic star formation (z ∼ 2). We visually classify a complete sample of massive (M > 1010M⊙) galaxies at this epoch, drawn from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, into late-type galaxies, major mergers, spheroids and disturbed spheroids which show morphological disturbances. Given recent simulation work, which indicates that recent (<0.3-0.4 Gyr) major-merger remnants exhibit clear tidal features in such images, we use the fraction of disturbed spheroids to probe the role of major mergers in driving morphological transformations. The percentage of blue spheroids (i.e. with ongoing star formation) that show morphological disturbances is only 21 ± 4 per cent, indicating that major mergers are not the dominant mechanism for spheroid creation at z ∼ 2 - other processes, such as minor mergers or cold accretion are likely to be the main drivers of this process. We also use the rest-frame U-band luminosity as a proxy for star formation to show that only a small fraction of the star formation budget (∼3 per cent) is triggered by major mergers. Taken together, our results show that major mergers are not significant drivers of galaxy evolution at z ∼ 2.

  18. Environmental effects on star formation in dwarf galaxies and star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasetto, S.; Cropper, M.; Fujita, Y.; Chiosi, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The role of the environment in the formation of a stellar population is a difficult problem in astrophysics. The reason is that similar properties of a stellar population are found in star systems embedded in different environments or, vice versa, similar environments contain stellar systems with stellar populations having different properties. Aims: In this paper, we develop a simple analytical criterion to investigate the role of the environment on the onset of star formation. We will consider the main external agents that influence star formation (i.e. ram pressure, tidal interaction, Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities) in a spherical galaxy moving through an external environment. The theoretical framework developed here has direct applications to the cases of dwarf galaxies in galaxy clusters and dwarf galaxies orbiting our Milky Way system, as well as any primordial gas-rich cluster of stars orbiting within its host galaxy. Methods: We develop an analytic formalism to solve the fluid dynamics equations in a non-inertial reference frame mapped with spherical coordinates. The two-fluids instability at the interface between a stellar system and its surrounding hotter and less dense environment is related to the star formation processes through a set of differential equations. The solution presented here is quite general, allowing us to investigate most kinds of orbits allowed in a gravitationally bound system of stars in interaction with a major massive companion. Results: We present an analytical criterion to elucidate the dependence of star formation in a spherical stellar system (as a dwarf galaxy or a globular cluster) on its surrounding environment useful in theoretical interpretations of numerical results as well as observational applications. We show how spherical coordinates naturally enlighten the interpretation of two-fluids instability in a geometry that directly applies to an astrophysical case. This criterion predicts the

  19. Calibration of Star Formation Rates Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring and mapping star-forming activity in galaxies is a key element for our understanding of their broad- band spectra, and their structure and evolution in our local, as well as the high-redshift Universe. The main tool we use for these measurements is the observed luminosity in various spectral lines and/or continuum bands. However, the available star-formation rate (SFR) indicators are often discrepant and subject to physical biases and calibration uncertainties. We are organizing a special session at the 2012 IAU General Assembly in Beijing, China (August 20-31, 2012) in order to bring together theoreticians and observers working in different contexts of star-formation to discuss the status of current SFR indicators, to identify open issues and to define a strategic framework for their resolution. The is an ideal time to synthesize information from the current golden era of space astrophysics and still have influence on the upcoming missions that will broaden our view of star-formation. We will be including high-energy constraints on SFR in the program and encourage participation from the high energy astrophysics community.

  20. Cosmic evolution of star formation properties of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungeun

    2014-01-01

    Development of bolometer array and camera at submillimeter wavelength has played an important role in detecting submillimeter bright galaxies, so called submillimeter galaxies. These galaxies seem to be progenitors of present-day massive galaxies and account for their considerable contributions to the light from the early universe and their expected high star formation rates if there is a close link between the submillimeter galaxies and the star formation activities, and the interstellar dust in galaxies is mainly heated by the star light. We review assembly of submillimeter galaxies chosen from the AzTEC and the Herschel SPIRE/PACS data archives, and investigate their spectral energy distribution fits including the data at other wavelengths to deduce details about stellar parameters including star formation rates and parameters yielding the metallicity, composition and abundance in dust, and disc structure of these galaxies. This work has been supported in part by Mid-career Researcher Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology 2011-0028001.

  1. Formation of Planets Around the Sun and Other Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Doug

    2005-11-14

    The quest to understand the formation of planets and planetary systems has entered an era of renaissance. Driven by observational discoveries in solar system exploration, protostellar disks, and extra solar planets, we have established a rich data bank which contains not only relic clues around mature stars, including the Sun, but also direct image of ongoing processes around young stars. For the first time in this scientific endeavor, we have adequate information to construct quantitative models to account for the ubiquity of planets and diversity of planetary systems. Some of the most intriguing theoretical questions facing us today include: (a) how did the planets in the solar system form with their present-day mass, composition, and orbital elements, (b) is planet formation a deterministic or chaotic process, and (c) what are the observable signatures of planet formation and evolution around nearby young and mature stars? I will present a comprehensive scenario which suggests (a) gas giant planets formed through coagulation of planetsimals and gas accretion onto earth-like cores; (b) the final assemblage of the terrestrial planets in the solar system occurred through the propagation of Jupiter's secular resonance 4-30 Myrs after the emergence of the gas giant; and (c) although they are yet to be discovered, Earth-like planets are expected to be common around nearby stars.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Star Formation in Galactic and Extragalactic Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frogel, Jay (Technical Monitor); Smith, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    In this program we proposed to perform a series of spectroscopic studies, including data analysis and modeling, of star formation regions using an ensemble of archival space-based data from the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer and Short Wavelength Spectrometer, and to take advantage of other spectroscopic databases including the first results from SIRTF. Our empha- sis has been on star formation in external, bright IR galaxies, but other areas of research have in- cluded young, low or high mass pre-main sequence stars in star formation regions, and the galactic center. The OH lines in the far infrared were proposed as one key focus of this inquiry because the Principal Investigator (H. Smith) had a full set of OH IR lines from IS0 observations. It was planned that during the proposed 2-1/2 year timeframe of the proposal other data (including perhaps from SIRTF) would become available, and we intended to be responsive to these and other such spec- troscopic data sets. Three papers are included:The Infrared Lines of OH: Diagnostics of Molecular Cloud Conditions in Infrared Bright Galaxies; The Far-Infrared Spectrum of Arp 220; andThe Far-Infrared Emission Line and Continuum Spectrum of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1068.

  3. Star Formation in Space and Time: Taurus-Auriga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Francesco; Stahler, Steven W.

    2002-12-01

    To understand the formation of stellar groups, one must first document carefully the birth pattern within real clusters and associations. In this study of Taurus-Auriga, we combine pre-main-sequence ages from our own evolutionary tracks with stellar positions from observational surveys. Aided by the extensive millimeter data on the molecular clouds, we develop a picture of the region's history. Star formation began, at a relatively low level and in a spatially diffuse manner, at least 107 yr in the past. Within the last few million years, new stars have been produced at an accelerating rate, almost exclusively within a confined group of striated cloud filaments. The gas both inside and around the filaments appears to be in force balance. Thus, the appearance of the filaments is due to global, quasi-static contraction of the parent cloud material. Gravity drives this contraction and shock dissipation mediates it, but the internal motion of the gas does not appear to be turbulent. The accelerating nature of recent star formation means that the condensation of cloud cores is a threshold phenomenon, requiring a minimum background density. Other, nearby cloud regions, including Lupus and Chamaeleon, contain some locales that have attained this density, and others that have not. In the latter, we find extensive and sometimes massive molecular gas that is still devoid of young stars.

  4. Observational Research on Star and Planetary System Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.

    1998-01-01

    Institute scientists collaborate with a number of NASA Ames scientists on observational studies of star and planetary system formation to their mutual benefit. As part of this collaboration, SETI scientists have, from 1988 to the present: (1) contributed to the technical studies at NASA Ames of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), an infrared 2.5 meter telescope in a Boeing 747, which will replace the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), a 0.9 meter telescope in a Lockheed C-141. SOFIA will be an important facility for the future exploration of the formation of stars and planetary systems, and the origins of life, and as such will be an important future facility to SETI scientists; (2) worked with the Laboratory Astrophysics Group at Ames, carrying out laboratory studies of the spectroscopic properties of ices and pre-biotic organics, which could be formed in the interstellar or interplanetary media; (3) helped develop a photometric approach for determining the Frequency of Earth-Sized Inner Planets (FRESIP) around solar-like stars, a project (now called Kepler) which complements the current efforts of the SETI Institute to find evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence; and (4) carried out independent observational research, in particular research on the formation of stars and planetary systems using both ground-based telescopes as well as the KAO.

  5. Star formation in Taurus Auriga Perseus and California nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, L. Viktor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Marton, Gabor; Doi, Yasuo; Onishi, Toshikazu; Tokuda, Kazuki

    Star formation and interstellar medium (ISM) structure were investigated in the Taurus, Auriga, Perseus and California (TAP) nearby star forming regions. Properties of the cold ISM was derived using AKARI FIR all sky maps, the Osaka-1.85m CO survey focusing to the all-sky Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC). As many as 1041 infrared point sources were classified as young stellar object (YSO) based on multiband photometric data, and 384 of those are associated to a PGCC object. About 30% of the TAP PGCC clumps have associated YSOs.

  6. Induced massive star formation in the trifid nebula?

    PubMed

    Cernicharo; Lefloch; Cox; Cesarsky; Esteban; Yusef-Zadeh; Mendez; Acosta-Pulido; Garcia Lopez RJ; Heras

    1998-10-16

    The Trifid nebula is a young (10(5) years) galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected with the infrared space observatory. The sources are massive (17 to 60 solar masses) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense, apparently still inactive cores to more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source that powers an optical jet. These observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation in the Trifid nebula.

  7. High-Velocity Star Formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    PubMed

    Graff; Gould

    2000-05-01

    Light-echo measurements show that SN 1987A is 425 pc behind the LMC disk. It is continuing to move away from the disk at 18 km s-1. Thus, it has been suggested that SN 1987A was ejected from the LMC disk. However, SN 1987A is a member of a star cluster, so this entire cluster would have to have been ejected from the disk. We show that the cluster was formed in the LMC disk, with a velocity perpendicular to the disk of about 50 km s-1. Such high-velocity formation of a star cluster is unusual, having no known counterpart in the Milky Way.

  8. The Formation and Early Evolution of Embedded Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Peter

    We propose to combine Spitzer, WISE, Herschel, and other archival spacecraft data with an existing ground- and space-based mm-wave to near-IR survey of molecular clouds over a large portion of the Milky Way, in order to systematically study the formation and early evolution of massive stars and star clusters, and provide new observational calibrations for a theoretical paradigm of this key astrophysical problem. Central Objectives: The Galactic Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is a large, unbiased, uniform, and panchromatic survey of massive star and cluster formation and early evolution, covering 20°x6° of the Galactic Plane. Its uniqueness lies in the comprehensive molecular spectroscopy of 303 massive dense clumps, which have also been included in several archival spacecraft surveys. Our objective is a systematic demographic analysis of massive star and cluster formation, one which has not been possible without knowledge of our CHaMP cloud sample, including all clouds with embedded clusters as well as those that have not yet formed massive stars. For proto-clusters deeply embedded within dense molecular clouds, analysis of these space-based data will: 1. Yield a complete census of Young Stellar Objects in each cluster. 2. Allow systematic measurements of embedded cluster properties: spectral energy distributions, luminosity functions, protostellar and disk fractions, and how these vary with cluster mass, age, and density. Combined with other, similarly complete and unbiased infrared and mm data, CHaMP's goals include: 3. A detailed comparison of the embedded stellar populations with their natal dense gas to derive extinction maps, star formation efficiencies and feedback effects, and the kinematics, physics, and chemistry of the gas in and around the clusters. 4. Tying the demographics, age spreads, and timescales of the clusters, based on pre-Main Sequence evolution, to that of the dense gas clumps and Giant Molecular Clouds. 5. A

  9. Does radiative feedback by the first stars promote or prevent second generation star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2007-03-01

    We study the effect of starlight from the first stars on the ability of other minihaloes in their neighbourhood to form additional stars. The first stars in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe are believed to have formed in minihaloes of total mass ~105-6 Msolar at redshifts z >~ 20, when molecular hydrogen (H2) formed and cooled the dense gas at their centres, leading to gravitational collapse. Simulations suggest that the Population III (Pop III) stars thus formed were massive (~100 Msolar) and luminous enough in ionizing radiation to cause an ionization front (I-front) to sweep outward, through their host minihalo and beyond, into the intergalactic medium. Our previous work suggested that this I-front was trapped when it encountered other, nearby minihaloes, and that it failed to penetrate the dense gas at their centres within the lifetime of the Pop III stars (<~3 Myr). The question of what the dynamical consequences were for these target minihaloes, of their exposure to the ionizing and dissociating starlight from the Pop III star requires further study, however. Towards this end, we have performed a series of detailed, one-dimensional (1D), radiation-hydrodynamical simulations to answer the question of whether star formation in these surrounding minihaloes was triggered or suppressed by radiation from the first stars. We have varied the distance to the source (and, hence, the flux) and the mass and evolutionary stage of the target haloes to quantify this effect. We find (1) trapping of the I-front and its transformation from R-type to D-type, preceded by a shock front; (2) photoevaporation of the ionized gas (i.e. all gas originally located outside the trapping radius); (3) formation of an H2 precursor shell which leads the I-front, stimulated by partial photoionization; and (4) the shock-induced formation of H2 in the minihalo neutral core when the shock speeds up and partially ionizes the gas. The fate of the neutral core is mostly determined by the

  10. Fireworks of Star Formation Light Up a Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Located some 13 million light-years from Earth, NGC 4214 is currently forming clusters of new stars from its interstellar gas and dust. In this Hubble image, we can see a sequence of steps in the formation and evolution of stars and star clusters. The picture was created from exposures taken in several color filters with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. NGC 4214 contains a multitude of faint stars covering most of the frame, but the picture is dominated by filigreed clouds of glowing gas surrounding bright stellar clusters. The youngest of these star clusters are located at the lower right of the picture, where they appear as about half a dozen bright clumps of glowing gas. Young, hot stars have a whitish to bluish color in the Hubble image, because of their high surface temperatures, ranging from 10,000 up to about 50,000 degrees Celsius. The radiation and wind forces from the young stars literally blow bubbles in the gas. Over millions of years, the bubbles increase in size as the stars inside them grow older. Moving to the lower left from the youngest clusters, we find an older star cluster, around which a gas bubble has inflated to the point that there is an obvious cavity around the central cluster. The most spectacular feature in the Hubble picture lies near the center of NGC 4214. This object is a cluster of hundreds of massive blue stars, each of them more than 10,000 times brighter than our own Sun. A vast heart-shaped bubble, inflated by the combined stellar winds and radiation pressure, surrounds the cluster. The expansion of the bubble is augmented as the most massive stars in the center reach the ends of their lives and explode as supernovae. The principal astronomers are: John MacKenty, Jesus Maiz-Apellaniz (Space Telescope Science Institute), Colin Norman (Johns Hopkins University), Nolan Walborn (Space Telescope Science Institute), Richard Burg (Johns Hopkins University), Richard Griffiths (Carnegie Mellon University), and Rosemary Wyse

  11. Star Formation around Mid-Infrared Bubble N37: Evidence of Cloud-Cloud Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baug, T.; Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    We have performed a multi-wavelength analysis of a mid-infrared (MIR) bubble N37 and its surrounding environment. The selected 15‧ × 15‧ area around the bubble contains two molecular clouds (N37 cloud; {V}{lsr} ˜ 37-43 km s-1, and C25.29+0.31; {V}{lsr} ˜ 43-48 km s-1) along the line of sight. A total of seven OB stars are identified toward the bubble N37 using photometric criteria, and two of them are spectroscopically confirmed as O9V and B0V stars. The spectro-photometric distances of these two sources confirm their physical association with the bubble. The O9V star appears to be the primary ionizing source of the region, which is also in agreement with the desired Lyman continuum flux analysis estimated from the 20 cm data. The presence of the expanding H ii region is revealed in the N37 cloud, which could be responsible for the MIR bubble. Using the 13CO line data and photometric data, several cold molecular condensations as well as clusters of young stellar objects (YSOs) are identified in the N37 cloud, revealing ongoing star formation (SF) activities. However, the analysis of ages of YSOs and the dynamical age of the H ii region do not support the origin of SF due to the influence of OB stars. The position-velocity analysis of 13CO data reveals that two molecular clouds are interconnected by a bridge-like structure, favoring the onset of a cloud-cloud collision process. The SF activities (i.e., the formation of YSO clusters and OB stars) in the N37 cloud are possibly influenced by the cloud-cloud collision.

  12. SINGLE-STAR H II REGIONS AS A PROBE OF MASSIVE STAR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Pellegrini, E. W.

    2013-06-01

    The shape of OB-star ionizing spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is a critical component in many diagnostics of galaxy and interstellar medium properties. To quantitatively examine the shape of the OB-star SED, we compare long slit observations of single-star, Large Magellanic Cloud H II regions to the predictions from CLOUDY photoionization simulations that use CoStar, TLUSTY, and WM-basic stellar atmosphere models as the ionizing source. For each atmosphere model, we run grids of H II region simulations with the effective temperature (T{sub eff}) of the star as a free parameter. The best SEDs from each atmosphere code are found by matching the predicted emission-line spectra with those observed from the nebulae. By assuming a clumpy gas distribution, all atmosphere codes are able to reproduce the observed emission lines, except at the highest energy transitions {approx}> 40 eV. Taking into account both low and high energy transitions, we find that simulations using WM-basic produce the best agreement with the observed line ratios. The rates of ionizing photons from different atmosphere models vary systematically with the relative hardness of the SEDs. However, in general the rates produced by the model SEDs, for standard log(g) = 4.0 models, are consistent with the rates derived from the H{alpha} luminosities. We find that our effective temperatures inferred from the nebular ionization balance are consistent with those predicted by conventional photospheric-based calibrations from the literature. We suggest that future spectral type to T{sub eff} calibrations can be constructed from nebular data.

  13. Single-star H II Regions as a Probe of Massive Star Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Pellegrini, E. W.

    2013-06-01

    The shape of OB-star ionizing spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is a critical component in many diagnostics of galaxy and interstellar medium properties. To quantitatively examine the shape of the OB-star SED, we compare long slit observations of single-star, Large Magellanic Cloud H II regions to the predictions from CLOUDY photoionization simulations that use CoStar, TLUSTY, and WM-basic stellar atmosphere models as the ionizing source. For each atmosphere model, we run grids of H II region simulations with the effective temperature (T eff) of the star as a free parameter. The best SEDs from each atmosphere code are found by matching the predicted emission-line spectra with those observed from the nebulae. By assuming a clumpy gas distribution, all atmosphere codes are able to reproduce the observed emission lines, except at the highest energy transitions >~ 40 eV. Taking into account both low and high energy transitions, we find that simulations using WM-basic produce the best agreement with the observed line ratios. The rates of ionizing photons from different atmosphere models vary systematically with the relative hardness of the SEDs. However, in general the rates produced by the model SEDs, for standard log(g) = 4.0 models, are consistent with the rates derived from the Hα luminosities. We find that our effective temperatures inferred from the nebular ionization balance are consistent with those predicted by conventional photospheric-based calibrations from the literature. We suggest that future spectral type to T eff calibrations can be constructed from nebular data.

  14. MACHO observations of Type II cepheids and RV Tauri