Science.gov

Sample records for ii supernovae model

  1. Supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the /sup 56/Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed.

  2. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  3. TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: MODEL LIGHT CURVES AND STANDARD CANDLE RELATIONSHIPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Woosley, S. E.

    2009-10-01

    A survey of Type II supernovae explosion models has been carried out to determine how their light curves and spectra vary with their mass, metallicity, and explosion energy. The presupernova models are taken from a recent survey of massive stellar evolution at solar metallicity supplemented by new calculations at subsolar metallicity. Explosions are simulated by the motion of a piston near the edge of the iron core and the resulting light curves and spectra are calculated using full multi-wavelength radiation transport. Formulae are developed that describe approximately how the model observables (light curve luminosity and duration) scale with the progenitor mass, explosion energy, and radioactive nucleosynthesis. Comparison with observational data shows that the explosion energy of typical supernovae (as measured by kinetic energy at infinity) varies by nearly an order of magnitude-from 0.5 to 4.0 x 10{sup 51} ergs, with a typical value of approx0.9 x 10{sup 51} ergs. Despite the large variation, the models exhibit a tight relationship between luminosity and expansion velocity, similar to that previously employed empirically to make SNe IIP standardized candles. This relation is explained by the simple behavior of hydrogen recombination in the supernova envelope, but we find a sensitivity to progenitor metallicity and mass that could lead to systematic errors. Additional correlations between light curve luminosity, duration, and color might enable the use of SNe IIP to obtain distances accurate to approx20% using only photometric data.

  4. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. EXPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Eduardo; Garcia-Senz, Domingo; Cabezon, Ruben M.; DomInguez, Inmaculada E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu E-mail: inma@ugr.es

    2009-04-20

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). However, all attempts to find a convincing ignition mechanism based on a delayed detonation in a destabilized, expanding, white dwarf have been elusive so far. One of the possibilities that has been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock that confines a carbon-oxygen rich core, while transforming the kinetic energy of the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work, we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of PRD models from the time of detonation initiation up to homologous expansion. Different models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M {sub defl}, give explosions spanning a range of kinetic energies, K {approx} (1.0-1.2) x 10{sup 51} erg, and {sup 56}Ni masses, M({sup 56}Ni) {approx} 0.6-0.8 M {sub sun}, which are compatible with what is expected for typical Type Ia supernovae. Spectra and light curves of angle-averaged spherically symmetric versions of the PRD models are discussed. Type Ia supernova spectra pose the most stringent requirements on PRD models.

  5. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  6. Cosmological Parameter Uncertainties from SALT-II Type Ia Supernova Light Curve Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Guy, J.; Kessler, R.; Astier, P.; Marriner, J.; Betoule, M.; Sako, M.; El-Hage, P.; Biswas, R.; Pain, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Regnault, N.; Frieman, J. A.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-08-29

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ~120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ~255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ~290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w (input) – w (recovered)) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty, the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  7. Cosmological parameter uncertainties from SALT-II type Ia supernova light curve models

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; El-Hage, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Marriner, J.; Biswas, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schneider, D. P.

    2014-09-20

    We use simulated type Ia supernova (SN Ia) samples, including both photometry and spectra, to perform the first direct validation of cosmology analysis using the SALT-II light curve model. This validation includes residuals from the light curve training process, systematic biases in SN Ia distance measurements, and a bias on the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Using the SN-analysis package SNANA, we simulate and analyze realistic samples corresponding to the data samples used in the SNLS3 analysis: ∼120 low-redshift (z < 0.1) SNe Ia, ∼255 Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe Ia (z < 0.4), and ∼290 SNLS SNe Ia (z ≤ 1). To probe systematic uncertainties in detail, we vary the input spectral model, the model of intrinsic scatter, and the smoothing (i.e., regularization) parameters used during the SALT-II model training. Using realistic intrinsic scatter models results in a slight bias in the ultraviolet portion of the trained SALT-II model, and w biases (w {sub input} – w {sub recovered}) ranging from –0.005 ± 0.012 to –0.024 ± 0.010. These biases are indistinguishable from each other within the uncertainty; the average bias on w is –0.014 ± 0.007.

  8. Theoretical models for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-09-21

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the ..gamma..-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars (M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of /sup 4/He and /sup 14/N prior to their collapse on the pair instability.

  9. Type II Supernova Energetics and Comparison of Light Curves to Shock-cooling Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; Vreeswijk, Paul; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, Peter E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Valenti, Stefano; Sand, David; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, Joel; Leonard, Douglas C.; Horst, J. Chuck; Armen, Stephen F.; Fedrow, Joseph M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Mazzali, Paulo; Pian, Elena; Sternberg, Assaf; Matheson, Thomas; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, Sanja

    2016-03-01

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, with \\gt 5 detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1-3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2-20) × 1051 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), and have a mean energy per unit mass of < E/M> =0.85× {10}51 erg/(10 {M}⊙ ), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ({{Δ }}{m}15), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. This limits the possible power sources for such events.

  10. Type II supernova energetics and comparison of light curves to shock-cooling models

    DOE PAGES

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Horesh, Assaf; Khazov, Danny; Ofek, Eran O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, Iair; Manulis, Ilan; Yaron, Ofer; et al

    2016-03-16

    During the first few days after explosion, Type II supernovae (SNe) are dominated by relatively simple physics. Theoretical predictions regarding early-time SN light curves in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands are thus quite robust. We present, for the first time, a sample of 57 R-band SN II light curves that are well-monitored during their rise, withmore » $$\\gt 5$$ detections during the first 10 days after discovery, and a well-constrained time of explosion to within 1–3 days. We show that the energy per unit mass (E/M) can be deduced to roughly a factor of five by comparing early-time optical data to the 2011 model of Rabinak & Waxman, while the progenitor radius cannot be determined based on R-band data alone. We find that SN II explosion energies span a range of E/M = (0.2–20) × 1051 erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), and have a mean energy per unit mass of $$\\langle E/M\\rangle =0.85\\times {10}^{51}$$ erg/(10 $${M}_{\\odot }$$), corrected for Malmquist bias. Assuming a small spread in progenitor masses, this indicates a large intrinsic diversity in explosion energy. Moreover, E/M is positively correlated with the amount of 56Ni produced in the explosion, as predicted by some recent models of core-collapse SNe. We further present several empirical correlations. The peak magnitude is correlated with the decline rate ($${\\rm{\\Delta }}{m}_{15}$$), the decline rate is weakly correlated with the rise time, and the rise time is not significantly correlated with the peak magnitude. Faster declining SNe are more luminous and have longer rise times. Lastly, this limits the possible power sources for such events.« less

  11. Light echoes - Type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1987-01-01

    Type II supernovae (SNs) light curves show a remarkable range of shapes. Data have been collected for the 12 Type II SNs that have light curve information for more than four months past maximum. Contrary to previous reports, it is found that (1) the decay rate after 100 days past maximum varies by almost an order of magnitude and (2) the light curve shapes are not bimodally distributed, but actually form a continuum. In addition, it is found that the extinctions to the SNs are related to the light curve shapes. This implies that the absorbing dust is local to the SNs. The dust is likely to be part of a circumstellar shell emitted by the SN progenitor that Dwek (1983) has used to explain infrared echoes. The optical depth of the shell can get quite large. In such cases, it is found that the photons scattered and delayed by reflection off dust grains will dominate the light curve several months after peak brightness. This 'light echo' offers a straightforward explanation of the diversity of Type II SN light curves.

  12. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae. II. EnergyEvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale,Mike

    2006-03-28

    The convective period leading up to a Type Ia supernova (SNIa) explosion is characterized by very low Mach number flows, requiringhydrodynamical methods well-suited to long-time integration. We continuethe development of the low Mach number equation set for stellar scaleflows by incorporating the effects of heat release due to externalsources. Low Mach number hydrodynamics equations with a time-dependentbackground state are derived, and a numerical method based on theapproximate projection formalism is presented. We demonstrate throughvalidation with a fully compressible hydrodynamics code that this lowMach number model accurately captures the expansion of the stellaratmosphere as well as the local dynamics due to external heat sources.This algorithm provides the basis for an efficient simulation tool forstudying the ignition of SNe Ia.

  13. Discovery and Observations of the Unusually Luminous Type-Defying II-P/II-L Supernova ASASSN-13co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Pejcha, O.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Grupe, D.; Morrell, N.; Thorstensen, J. R.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Davis, A. B.; Pojmański, G.; Skowron, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of ASASSN-13co, an unusually luminous Type II supernova and the first core-collapse supernova discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN). First detection of the supernova was on UT 2013 August 29 and the data presented span roughly 3.5 months after discovery. We use the recently developed model by Pejcha and Prieto to model the multi-band light curves of ASASSN-13co and derive the bolometric luminosity curve. We compare ASASSN-13co to other Type II supernovae to show that it was unusually luminous for a Type II supernova and that it exhibited an atypical light curve shape that does not cleanly match that of either a standard Type II-L or Type II-P supernova.

  14. Presupernova models and supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, D.; Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of theories of presupernova stellar evolution and the triggering mechanisms of supernova explosions are reviewed. The validity of the single-star approximation for stellar core evolution is considered, and the central density and temperature of the stellar core are discussed. Attention is then given to the results of numerical models of supernova explosions by carbon deflagration of an intermediate mass star, resulting in the total disruption of the star; the photodissociation of iron nuclei in a massive star, resulting in neutron star or black hole formation; and stellar core collapse triggered by electron capture in stars of mass ranging between those of the intermediate mass and massive stars, resulting in neutron star formation despite oxygen deflagration. Helium and carbon combustion and detonation in accreting white dwarfs and the gravitational collapse triggered by electron-pair creation in supermassive stars are also discussed, and problems requiring future investigation are indicated.

  15. On the nature of rapidly fading Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Pruzhinskaya, Maria V.; Ergon, Mattias; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Type II supernovae with rapidly fading light curves (a.k.a. Type IIL supernovae) are explosions of progenitors with low-mass hydrogen-rich envelopes which are of the order of 1 M⊙. We investigate light-curve properties of supernovae from such progenitors. We confirm that such progenitors lead to rapidly fading Type II supernovae. We find that the luminosity of supernovae from such progenitors with the canonical explosion energy of 1051 erg and 56Ni mass of 0.05 M⊙ can increase temporarily shortly before all the hydrogen in the envelope recombines. As a result, a bump appears in their light curves. The bump appears because the heating from the nuclear decay of 56Ni can keep the bottom of hydrogen-rich layers in the ejecta ionized, and thus the photosphere can stay there for a while. We find that the light-curve bump becomes less significant when we make explosion energy larger (≳2 × 1051 erg), 56Ni mass smaller (≲0.01 M⊙), 56Ni mixed in the ejecta, or the progenitor radius larger. Helium mixing in hydrogen-rich layers makes the light-curve decline rates large but does not help reducing the light-curve bump. Because the light-curve bump we found in our light-curve models has not been observed in rapidly fading Type II supernovae, they may be characterized by not only low-mass hydrogen-rich envelopes but also higher explosion energy, larger degrees of 56Ni mixing, and/or larger progenitor radii than slowly fading Type II supernovae, so that the light-curve bump does not become significant.

  16. Type II supernovae as probes of environment metallicity: observations of host H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Dessart, L.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Morrell, N. I.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Boffin, H. M. J.; de Jaeger, T.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Prieto, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Spectral modelling of type II supernova atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This dependence motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these supernovae can be used as environment metallicity indicators. Aims: To assess this accuracy we present a sample of type II supernova host H ii-region spectroscopy, from which environment oxygen abundances have been derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in supernova spectra. Methods: Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host H ii regions by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. These abundances are then compared to equivalent widths of Fe ii 5018 Å at various time and colour epochs. Results: Our distribution of inferred type II supernova host H ii-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of type II supernovae exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe ii 5018 Å at 50 days post-explosion shows a statistically significant correlation with host H ii-region oxygen abundance. The strength of this correlation increases if one excludes abundance measurements derived far from supernova explosion sites. The correlation significance also increases if we only analyse a "gold" IIP sample, and if a colour epoch is used in place of time. In addition, no evidence is found of a correlation between progenitor metallicity and supernova light-curve or spectral properties - except for that stated above with respect to Fe ii 5018 Å equivalent widths - suggesting progenitor metallicity is not a driving factor in producing the diversity that is observed in our sample. Conclusions: This study provides observational evidence of the usefulness of type II supernovae as metallicity indicators. We finish with a discussion of the

  17. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  18. Detection of a red supergiant progenitor star of a type II-plateau supernova.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Stephen J; Maund, Justyn R; Hendry, Margaret A; Tout, Christopher A; Gilmore, Gerard F; Mattila, Seppo; Benn, Chris R

    2004-01-23

    We present the discovery of a red supergiant star that exploded as supernova 2003gd in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Gemini Telescope imaged this galaxy 6 to 9 months before the supernova explosion, and subsequent HST images confirm the positional coincidence of the supernova with a single resolved star that is a red supergiant of 8(+4)(-2) solar masses. This confirms both stellar evolution models and supernova theories predicting that cool red supergiants are the immediate progenitor stars of type II-plateau supernovae.

  19. Detection of a red supergiant progenitor star of a type II-plateau supernova.

    PubMed

    Smartt, Stephen J; Maund, Justyn R; Hendry, Margaret A; Tout, Christopher A; Gilmore, Gerard F; Mattila, Seppo; Benn, Chris R

    2004-01-23

    We present the discovery of a red supergiant star that exploded as supernova 2003gd in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Gemini Telescope imaged this galaxy 6 to 9 months before the supernova explosion, and subsequent HST images confirm the positional coincidence of the supernova with a single resolved star that is a red supergiant of 8(+4)(-2) solar masses. This confirms both stellar evolution models and supernova theories predicting that cool red supergiants are the immediate progenitor stars of type II-plateau supernovae. PMID:14739452

  20. Grids of stellar models with rotation. II. WR populations and supernovae/GRB progenitors at Z = 0.014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, C.; Ekström, S.; Meynet, G.; Massey, P.; Levesque, E. M.; Hirschi, R.; Eggenberger, P.; Maeder, A.

    2012-06-01

    Context. In recent years, many very interesting observations have appeared concerning the positions of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD), the number ratios of WR stars, the nature of Type Ibc supernova (SN) progenitors, long and soft gamma ray bursts (LGRB), and the frequency of these various types of explosive events. These observations represent key constraints on massive star evolution. Aims: We study, in the framework of the single-star evolutionary scenario, how rotation modifies the evolution of a given initial mass star towards the WR phase and how it impacts the rates of Type Ibc SNe. We also discuss the initial conditions required to obtain collapsars and LGRB. Methods: We used a recent grid of stellar models computed with and without rotation to make predictions concerning the WR populations and the frequency of different types of core-collapse SNe. Current rotating models were checked to provide good fits to the following features: solar luminosity and radius at the solar age, main-sequence width, red-giant and red-supergiant (RSG) positions in the HRD, surface abundances, and rotational velocities. Results: Rotating stellar models predict that about half of the observed WR stars and at least half of the Type Ibc SNe may be produced through the single-star evolution channel. Rotation increases the duration of the WNL and WNC phases, while reducing those of the WNE and WC phases, as was already shown in previous works. Rotation increases the frequency of Type Ic SNe. The upper mass limit for Type II-P SNe is ~19.0 M⊙ for the non rotating models and ~16.8 M⊙ for the rotating ones. Both values agree with observations. Moreover, present rotating models provide a very good fit to the progenitor of SN 2008ax. We discuss future directions of research for further improving the agreement between the models and the observations. We conclude that the mass-loss rates in the WNL and RSG phases are probably underestimated at present

  1. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  2. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  3. Cosmology with Photometrically Classified Type Ia Supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Heather; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Nichol, Robert C.; Sako, Masao; Smith, Mathew; Lampeitl, Hubert; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Bassett, Bruce; Biswas, Rahul; Brown, Peter; Cinabro, David; Dawson, Kyle S.; Dilday, Ben; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kuhlmann, Steve; Kunz, Martin; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Richmond, Michael; Riess, Adam; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper; Taylor, Matt; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2013-02-01

    We present the cosmological analysis of 752 photometrically classified Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained from the full Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey, supplemented with host-galaxy spectroscopy from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our photometric-classification method is based on the SN classification technique of Sako et al., aided by host-galaxy redshifts (0.05 < z < 0.55). SuperNova ANAlysis simulations of our methodology estimate that we have an SN Ia classification efficiency of 70.8%, with only 3.9% contamination from core-collapse (non-Ia) SNe. We demonstrate that this level of contamination has no effect on our cosmological constraints. We quantify and correct for our selection effects (e.g., Malmquist bias) using simulations. When fitting to a flat ΛCDM cosmological model, we find that our photometric sample alone gives Ω m = 0.24+0.07 -0.05 (statistical errors only). If we relax the constraint on flatness, then our sample provides competitive joint statistical constraints on Ω m and ΩΛ, comparable to those derived from the spectroscopically confirmed Three-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3). Using only our data, the statistics-only result favors an accelerating universe at 99.96% confidence. Assuming a constant wCDM cosmological model, and combining with H 0, cosmic microwave background, and luminous red galaxy data, we obtain w = -0.96+0.10 -0.10, Ω m = 0.29+0.02 -0.02, and Ω k = 0.00+0.03 -0.02 (statistical errors only), which is competitive with similar spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia analyses. Overall this comparison is reassuring, considering the lower redshift leverage of the SDSS-II SN sample (z < 0.55) and the lack of spectroscopic confirmation used herein. These results demonstrate the potential of photometrically classified SN Ia samples in improving cosmological constraints.

  4. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  5. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. II. PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L. E-mail: jt@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-05-20

    Wide-field surveys will soon be discovering Type Ia supernovae (SNe) at rates of several thousand per year. Spectroscopic follow-up can only scratch the surface for such enormous samples, so these extensive data sets will only be useful to the extent that they can be characterized by the survey photometry alone. In a companion paper we introduced the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method for analyzing SNe using direct comparison to template light curves, and demonstrated its application for photometric SN classification. In this work we extend the SOFT method to derive estimates of redshift and luminosity distance for Type Ia SNe, using light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) as a validation set. Redshifts determined by SOFT using light curves alone are consistent with spectroscopic redshifts, showing an rms scatter in the residuals of rms{sub z} = 0.051. SOFT can also derive simultaneous redshift and distance estimates, yielding results that are consistent with the currently favored {Lambda}CDM cosmological model. When SOFT is given spectroscopic information for SN classification and redshift priors, the rms scatter in Hubble diagram residuals is 0.18 mag for the SDSS data and 0.28 mag for the SNLS objects. Without access to any spectroscopic information, and even without any redshift priors from host galaxy photometry, SOFT can still measure reliable redshifts and distances, with an increase in the Hubble residuals to 0.37 mag for the combined SDSS and SNLS data set. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we predict that SOFT will be able to improve constraints on time-variable dark energy models by a factor of 2-3 with each new generation of large-scale SN surveys.

  6. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  7. Modeling Type IIn Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter; Fryer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present near-by Type IIn supernovae observed with Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Based on the diversity of optical light curve properties, this Type II subclass is commonly referred to as heterogeneous. At the time of discovery, our IIn sample is ~ 2 magnitudes brighter at ultraviolet wavelengths than at optical wavelengths, and ultraviolet brightness decays faster than the optical brightness. We use a semi-analytical supernova (SN) model to better understand our IIn observations, and focus on matching specific observed light curves features, i.e peak luminosity and decay rate. The SN models are used to study the effects of initial SN conditions on early light curves, and to show the extent of the "uniqueness" problem in SN light curves. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions from members of the Swift UVOT team, the NASA astrophysics archival data analysis program, and the NASA Swift guest investigator program.

  8. Core Collapse Supernova Models and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-01-01

    After the Big Bang, production of heavy elements in the early Universe takes place in the first stars and their supernova explosions. The nature of the first supernovae, however, has not been well understood. The signature of nucleosynthesis yields of the first supernovae can be seen in the elemental abundance patterns observed in extremely metal-poor stars. Interestingly, those abundance patterns show some peculiarities relative to the solar abundance pattern, which should provide important clues to understanding the nature of early generations of supernovae. We review the recent results of the nucleosynthesis yields of massive stars. We examine how those yields are affected by some hydrodynamical effects during the supernova explosions, namely, explosion energies from those of hypernovae to faint supernovae, mixing and fallback of processed materials, asphericity, etc. Those parameters in the supernova nucleosynthesis models are constrained from observational data of supernovae and metal-poor stars.

  9. Red supergiants as type II supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Marco, Amparo

    2015-08-01

    Recent searches for supernova IIp progenitors in external galaxies have led to the identification of red objects with magnitudes and colours indicative of red supergiants, in most cases implying quite low luminosities and hence masses well below 10Msol. Stellar models, on the other hand, do not predict explosions from objects below 9 Msol. What does our knowledge of local red supergiants tells us about the expected properties of such objects?We have carried out a comprehensive spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of hundreds of red supergiants in the Milky Way and both Magellanic Clouds. We have explored correlations between different parameters and the position of stars in the HR diagrams of open clusters. At solar metallicty, there is strong evidence for a phase of very heavy mass loss at the end of the red supergiant phase, but the existence of such a phase is still not confirmed at SMC metallicities. Objects of ~ 7Msol, on the other hand, become very dusty in the SMC, and appear as very luminous Miras.Among Milky Way clusters, we find a surprising lack of objects readily identifiable as the expected 7 to 10 Msol red supergiants or AGB stars. We are carrying out an open cluster survey aimed at filling this region of the HR diagram with reliable data. Finally, we will discuss the implications of all this findings for the expected properties of supernova progenitors, as it looks unlikely that typical red supergiants may explode without undergoing further evolution.

  10. r-PROCESS Nucleosynthesis in Type-II Supernova Model with Neutron Star Mass ~ 1.4M⊙

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Mariko

    2002-09-01

    It is generally believed that the r-process occurs under explosive conditions at high neutron density, high temperature, and high entropy. It has been discussed, for sometime, that core-collapse supernovae could provide the most likely environment for such r-process nucleosynthesis. So far, the models of neutrino-driven winds from very massive (M≥ 1.7M⊙) and compact neutron star have proved to get successful r-process abundance pattern. A short expansion time is required to obtain a high neutron-to-seed ratio at moderate entropy. This expansion time is obtained by adopting a high neutron star gravitational mass, M~ 2M⊙, and a neutron star radius of R~ 10 km. However, such a large mass is sometimes criticized from observational viewpoints although several established EOSs for neutron star matter are known to stabilize massive core as far as M≤ 2.2M⊙. Nucleosynthesis in the r-process is strongly dependent on the gravitational mass of the proto-neutron star, and for this reason it is taken to be an adjustable parameter to give good r-process yields. In this paper, we study the effects of the outer boundary conditions of neutrino-driven winds on the r-process nucleosynthesis. We can get a reasonable agreement with the solar system r-process abundance pattern even by adopting the 'standard' 1.4M⊙ mass model for the proto-neutron star.

  11. Models for Type I supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.; Taam, R.E.

    1980-06-17

    Two rather disjoint scenarios for Type I supernovae are presented. One is based upon mass accretion by a white dwarf in a binary system. The second involves a star having some 8 to 10 times the mass of the sun which may or may not be a solitary star. Despite the apparent dissimilarities in the models it may be that each occurs to some extent in nature for they both share the possibility of producing substantial quantities of /sup 56/Ni and explosions in stars devoid of hydrogen envelopes. These are believed to be two properties that must be shared by any viable Type I model.

  12. The core collapse supernova rate from the SDSS-II supernova survey

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-09-10

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10{sup –4}((h/0.7){sup 3}/(yr Mpc{sup 3})) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  13. A study of low-energy type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2015-08-01

    All stars with an initial mass greater than 8Msun, but not massive enough to encounter the pair-production instability, eventually form a degenerate core and collapse to form a compact object, either a neutron star or a black hole.At the lower mass end, these massive stars die as red-supergiant stars and give rise to Type II supernovae (SNe). The diversity of observed properties of SNe II suggests a range of progenitor mass, radii, but also explosion energy.We have performed a large grid simulations designed to cover this range of progenitor and explosion properties. Using MESA STAR, we compute a set of massive star models (12-30Msun) from the main sequence until core collapse. We then generate explosions with V1D to produce ejecta with a range of explosion energies and yields. Finally, all ejecta are evolved with CMFGEN to generate multi-band light curves and spectra.In this poster, we focus our attention on the properties of low-energy explosions that give rise to low-luminosity Type II Plateau (II-P) SNe. In particular, we present a detailed study of SN 2008bk, but also include other notorious low-energy SNe II-P like 2005cs, emphasising their non-standard properties by comparing to models that match well events like SN 1999em. Such low-energy explosions, characterised by low ejecta expansion rates, are more suitable for reliable spectral line identifications.Based on our models, we discuss the distinct signatures of low-energy explosions in lower and higher mass models. One important goal is to identify whether there is a progenitor-mass bias leading to such events.

  14. A New Empirical Model for Type Ia Supernovae Using Spectrophotometry from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Clare; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2016-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are currently limited in their use for cosmology by dispersion in standardized magnitudes. A large part of this dispersion is due to the fact that the current lightcurve fitters do not describe the full range of Type Ia supernova diversity. I will present an empirical model of Type Ia supernovae that captures a wider range of supernova behavior and can improve magnitude standardization. This model is constructed using over 2000 spectrophotometric observations of Type Ia supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory. The true spectral time series for each supernova is modeled using Gaussian Processes. The supernova model predictions are used to calculate the principal components of the full set of supernova spectral time series. K-fold cross-validation is used to determine how many components correlate to absolute magnitude. Future work will test this method on independent photometric data sets.

  15. Nucleosynthesis in Early Supernova Winds II: The Role of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Hoffman, R; Woosley, S; Janka, H; Buras, R

    2005-11-04

    One of the outstanding unsolved riddles of nuclear astrophysics is the origin of the so called ''p-process'' nuclei from A = 92 to 126. Both the lighter and heavier p-process nuclei are adequately produced in the neon and oxygen shells of ordinary Type II supernovae, but the origin of these intermediate isotopes, especially {sup 92,94}Mo and {sup 96,98}Ru, has long been mysterious. Here we explore the production of these nuclei in the neutrino-driven wind from a young neutron star. We consider such early times that the wind still contains a proton excess because the rates for {nu}{sub e} and positron captures on neutrons are faster than those for the inverse captures on protons. Following a suggestion by Froehlich et al. (2005), they also include the possibility that, in addition to the protons, {alpha}-particles, and heavy seed, a small flux of neutrons is maintained by the reaction p({bar {nu}}{sub e}, e{sup +})n. This flux of neutrons is critical in bridging the long waiting points along the path of the rp-process by (n,p) and (n,{gamma}) reactions. Using the unmodified ejecta histories from a recent two-dimensional supernova model by Janka, Buras, and Rampp (2003), they find synthesis of p-rich nuclei up to {sup 102}Pd. However, if the entropy of these ejecta is increased by a factor of two, the synthesis extends to {sup 120}Te. Still larger increases in entropy, that might reflect the role of magnetic fields or vibrational energy input neglected in the hydrodynamical model, result in the production of numerous r-, s-, and p-process nuclei up to A {approx} 170, even in winds that are proton-rich.

  16. A Comprehensive Investigation Into Modeling Supernovae Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Desmond

    Supernovae are a rich source of information. By studying their light curves and spectra we gain insights into stellar evolution, the nature of the progenitor star, surface abundances at the time of the explosion, whether previous mass-loss episodes have occurred, the physics of the explosion including the amount and type of elements synthesized, and whether the explosion has produced significant mixing between shells of different chemical composition. To maximize the information that can be gleaned from observations of supernovae it is essential that we have the necessary spectroscopic tools. To this end, we are developing a code, CMFGEN, capable of modeling supernova light curves and spectra. The code is currently being used, to study core-collapse supernovae as well as those arising from the nuclear detonation of a White Dwarf star. We wish to extend CMFGEN's capabilities by developing a procedure to handle non-monotonic velocity flows so that we can treat shock breakout and the interaction of supernova ejecta with circumstellar material. We will also investigate magnetar-powered SNe, and explore the connection between Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae and those supernovae associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursters. Through detailed studies of individual supernova, and through the construction of model grids, we are able to infer deficiencies in our modeling, in our atomic data, and in the progenitor models, and hence make refinements so that we can improve our understanding of all SNe classes. Previous (IUE), current (HST, Chandra, GALEX), and future NASA missions (James Webb Telescope) do/will provide a wealth of data on supernovae. The proposed research is related to strategic subgoal 3D: "Discover the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the universe, and search for Earth-like planets." Supernovae are inherently coupled to the evolution of the universe and life: They can trigger star formation and they provide the raw materials (e.g., oxygen

  17. On the Intrinsic Diversity of Type II-Plateau Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen-rich Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe) exhibit correlations between the plateau luminosity {L}{pl}, the nickel mass {M}{Ni}, the explosion energy {E}{exp}, and the ejecta mass {M}{ej}. Using our global, self-consistent, multi-band model of nearby well-observed SNe, we find that the covariances of these quantities are strong and that the confidence ellipsoids are oriented in the direction of the correlations, which reduces their significance. By proper treatment of the covariance matrix of the model, we discover a significant intrinsic width to the correlations between {L}{pl}, {E}{exp} and {M}{Ni}, where the uncertainties due to the distance and the extinction dominate. For fixed {E}{exp}, the spread in {M}{Ni} is about 0.25 dex, which we attribute to the differences in the progenitor internal structure. We argue that the effects of incomplete γ-ray trapping are not important in our sample. Similarly, the physics of the Type II-Plateau SN light curves leads to inherently degenerate estimates of {E}{exp} and {M}{ej}, which makes their observed correlation weak. Ignoring the covariances of SN parameters or the intrinsic width of the correlations causes significant biases in the slopes of the fitted relations. Our results imply that Type II-Plateau SN explosions are not described by a single physical parameter or a simple one-dimensional trajectory through the parameter space, but instead reflect the diversity of the core and surface properties of their progenitors. We discuss the implications for the physics of the explosion mechanism and possible future observational constraints.

  18. An Unusual Presolar Silicon Carbide Grain from a Supernova: Implications for the Production of Silicon-29 in Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Leitner, Jan; Meyer, Bradley S.; The, Lih-Sin; Lugaro, Maria; Amari, Sachiko

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of a presolar SiC grain (KJB2-11-17-1) with unusual Si-isotopic composition. The grain has 29Si/28Si = 1.63 × solar, 30Si/28Si = 0.82 × solar, 12C/13C = 265 (= 3 × solar), and evidence for the presence of radiogenic 44Ca from the decay of 44Ti. A comparison of these isotopic signatures with stellar models suggests an origin in a 15 M sun Type II supernova. It is possible to achieve a very good match between the 30Si/28Si, 12C/13C, and inferred 44Ti/48Ti ratios in KJB2-11-17-1 and the model predictions if matter from different supernova zones is mixed in appropriate proportions. The 29Si/28Si ratio, however, cannot be reproduced and is clearly higher than predicted. It was suggested previously by Travaglio et al. that supernova models underestimate the 29Si yield in the C- and Ne-burning regions by about a factor of 2. Because of its very high 29Si/30Si of two times the solar ratio, grain KJB2-11-17-1 provides the opportunity to make a stringent test of this hypothesis. With a twofold enhanced 29Si yield in the C- and Ne-burning zones, we find a perfect match for 29Si/28Si between the model predictions and the grain. Nuclear network calculations show that a twofold increase in the 29Si yield in the C- and Ne-burning regions requires roughly a threefold higher 26Mg(α, n)29Si reaction rate, the most important reaction for the production of 29Si, in the temperature range 1-3 × 109 K than currently used in supernova models. This increase is qualitatively within current uncertainties of this reaction rate.

  19. TYPE II-P SUPERNOVAE FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY AND THE STANDARDIZED CANDLE METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; Sako, Masao; Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kessler, Richard; Holtzman, Jon; Konishi, Kohki; Yasuda, Naoki; Schneider, D. P.; Sollerman, Jesper; Wheeler, J. Craig; Cinabro, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Atlee, David W.; Bassett, Bruce; Castander, Francisco J.; Goobar, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    We apply the Standardized Candle Method (SCM) for Type II Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P), which relates the velocity of the ejecta of a SN to its luminosity during the plateau, to 15 SNe II-P discovered over the three season run of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. The redshifts of these SNe-0.027 < z < 0.144-cover a range hitherto sparsely sampled in the literature; in particular, our SNe II-P sample contains nearly as many SNe in the Hubble flow (z > 0.01) as all of the current literature on the SCM combined. We find that the SDSS SNe have a very small intrinsic I-band dispersion (0.22 mag), which can be attributed to selection effects. When the SCM is applied to the combined SDSS-plus-literature set of SNe II-P, the dispersion increases to 0.29 mag, larger than the scatter for either set of SNe separately. We show that the standardization cannot be further improved by eliminating SNe with positive plateau decline rates, as proposed in Poznanski et al. We thoroughly examine all potential systematic effects and conclude that for the SCM to be useful for cosmology, the methods currently used to determine the Fe II velocity at day 50 must be improved, and spectral templates able to encompass the intrinsic variations of Type II-P SNe will be needed.

  20. Atomic Data Applications for Supernova Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Christopher J.

    2013-06-01

    The modeling of supernovae (SNe) incorporates a variety of disciplines, including hydrodynamics, radiation transport, nuclear physics and atomic physics. These efforts require numerical simulation of the final stages of a star's life, the supernova explosion phase, and the radiation that is subsequently emitted by the supernova remnant, which can occur over a time span of tens of thousands of years. While there are several different types of SNe, they all emit radiation in some form. The measurement and interpretation of these spectra provide important information about the structure of the exploding star and the supernova engine. In this talk, the role of atomic data is highlighted as iit pertains to the modeling of supernova spectra. Recent applications [1,2] involve the Los Alamos OPLIB opacity database, which has been used to provide atomic opacities for modeling supernova plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. Ongoing work includes the application of atomic data generated by the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes under more complicated, non-LTE conditions [3]. As a specific, recent example, a portion of the x-ray spectrum produced by Tycho's supernova remnant (SN 1572) will be discussed [4]. [1] C.L. Fryer et al, Astrophys. J. 707, 193 (2009). [2] C.L. Fryer et al, Astrophys. J. 725, 296 (2009). [3] C.J. Fontes et al, Conference Proceedings for ICPEAC XXVII, J. of Phys: Conf. Series 388, 012022 (2012). [4] K.A. Eriksen et al, Presentation at the 2012 AAS Meeting (Austin, TX). (This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.)

  1. Methodological studies on the search for Gravitational Waves and Neutrinos from Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casentini, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Type II SNe, also called Core-collapse SuperNovae have a neutrino (v) emission, as confirmed by SN 1987A, and are also potential sources of gravitational waves. Neutrinos and gravitational waves from these sources reach Earth almost contemporaneously and without relevant interaction with stellar matter and interstellar medium. The upcoming advanced gravitational interferometers would be sensitive enough to detect gravitational waves signals from close galactic Core-collapse SuperNovae events. Nevertheless, significant uncertainties on theoretical models of emission remain. A joint search of coincident low energy neutrinos and gravitational waves events from these sources would bring valuable information from the inner core of the collapsing star and would enhance the detection of the so-called Silent SuperNovae. Recently a project for a joint search involving gravitational wave interferometers and neutrino detectors has started. We discuss the benefits of a joint search and the status of the search project.

  2. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solinger, A.; Buff, J.; Rappaport, S.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the 'adiabatic' assumption in supernova-remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast-wave model.

  3. SNLS: Empirical modeling of distant supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Rich, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taillet, R.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Lusset, V.; Mourao, A.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Tao, C.; SNLS Collaboration

    2005-12-01

    The SuperNova Legacy Survey provides us with a rich data set of supernovae multi-color light curves in the redshift range 0.1--1. Thanks to the "rolling search" operation mode, most of them contain photometric points well before the peak luminosity. In addition, the far-UV rest-frame light curves can be modeled from g and r-band observations of high-z SNe. In this poster, we present an update of the Spectral Adaptive Lightcurve Template model (SALT) adjusted on the SNLS data set.

  4. A sample of Type II-L supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faran, T.; Poznanski, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Leonard, D. C.; Li, W.; Modjaz, M.; Serduke, F. J. D.; Silverman, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    What are Type II-Linear supernovae (SNe II-L)? This class, which has been ill defined for decades, now receives significant attention - both theoretically, in order to understand what happens to stars in the ˜15-25 M⊙ range, and observationally, with two independent studies suggesting that they cannot be cleanly separated photometrically from the regular hydrogen-rich SNe II-P characterized by a marked plateau in their light curve. Here, we analyse the multiband light curves and extensive spectroscopic coverage of a sample of 35 SNe II and find that 11 of them could be SNe II-L. The spectra of these SNe are hydrogen deficient, typically have shallow Hα absorption, may show indirect signs of helium via strong O I λ7774 absorption, and have faster line velocities consistent with a thin hydrogen shell. The light curves can be mostly differentiated from those of the regular, hydrogen-rich SNe II-P by their steeper decline rates and higher luminosity, and we propose to define them based on their decline in the V band: SNe II-L decline by more than 0.5 mag from peak brightness by day 50 after explosion. Using our sample we provide template light curves for SNe II-L and II-P in four photometric bands.

  5. TURBULENCE IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. INTERMITTENCY AND THE DEFLAGRATION-TO-DETONATION TRANSITION PROBABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Roepke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2010-02-20

    The delayed detonation model describes the observational properties of the majority of Type Ia supernovae very well. Using numerical data from a three-dimensional deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae, the intermittency of the turbulent velocity field and its implications on the probability of a deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition are investigated. From structure functions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, we determine intermittency parameters based on the log-normal and the log-Poisson models. The bulk of turbulence in the ash regions appears to be less intermittent than predicted by the standard log-normal model and the She-Leveque model. On the other hand, the analysis of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame front by Roepke suggests a much higher probability of large velocity fluctuations on the grid scale in comparison to the log-normal intermittency model. Following Pan et al., we computed probability density functions for a DDT for the different distributions. The determination of the total number of regions at the flame surface, in which DDTs can be triggered, enables us to estimate the total number of events. Assuming that a DDT can occur in the stirred flame regime, as proposed by Woosley et al., the log-normal model would imply a delayed detonation between 0.7 and 0.8 s after the beginning of the deflagration phase for the multi-spot ignition scenario used in the simulation. However, the probability drops to virtually zero if a DDT is further constrained by the requirement that the turbulent velocity fluctuations reach about 500 km s{sup -1}. Under this condition, delayed detonations are only possible if the distribution of the velocity fluctuations is not log-normal. From our calculations follows that the distribution obtained by Roepke allow for multiple DDTs around 0.8 s after ignition at a transition density close to 1 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}.

  6. Unsupervised Clustering of Type II Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities come online, the astronomical community will be provided with extremely large data sets of well-sampled light curves (LCs) of transients. This motivates systematic studies of the LCs of supernovae (SNe) of all types, including the early rising phase. We performed unsupervised k-means clustering on a sample of 59 R-band SN II LCs and find that the rise to peak plays an important role in classifying LCs. Our sample can be divided into three classes: slowly rising (II-S), fast rise/slow decline (II-FS), and fast rise/fast decline (II-FF). We also identify three outliers based on the algorithm. The II-FF and II-FS classes are disjoint in their decline rates, while the II-S class is intermediate and “bridges the gap.” This may explain recent conflicting results regarding II-P/II-L populations. The II-FS class is also significantly less luminous than the other two classes. Performing clustering on the first two principal component analysis components gives equivalent results to using the full LC morphologies. This indicates that Type II LCs could possibly be reduced to two parameters. We present several important caveats to the technique, and find that the division into these classes is not fully robust. Moreover, these classes have some overlap, and are defined in the R band only. It is currently unclear if they represent distinct physical classes, and more data is needed to study these issues. However, we show that the outliers are actually composed of slowly evolving SN IIb, demonstrating the potential of such methods. The slowly evolving SNe IIb may arise from single massive progenitors.

  7. A comparative modeling of supernova 1993J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinnikov, Sergei; Eastman, Ron; Bartunov, Oleg; Popolitov, Vlad; Woosley, Stan

    1997-01-01

    The light curve of Supernova 1993J is calculated using two computational radiation transport approaches. The two approaches are represented by the computer codes STELLA and EDDINGTON. The emphasis is on the shock breakout and the photometry in the U, B and V bands during the first 120 days of the supernova. The STELLA model includes implicit hydrodynamics and is able to model early supernova evolution before the expansion is homologous. The STELLA model employs multi-group photonics and is able to follow the radiation as it decouples from the matter. The EDDINGTON code uses an algorithm for integrating the transport equation which assumes homologous expansion and uses a finer frequency resolution. The agreement between the two codes is considered to be satisfactory only in the case where compatible physical assumptions are made concerning the opacity. The assumptions are justified. The continuum spectrum for SN 1993J is predicted near the shock breakout to be superior to that predicted by standard single energy group hydrocodes. The uncertainties involved in current time dependent models of supernova light curves are discussed.

  8. The Standardized Candle Method for Type II-Plateau Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Felipe; Hamuy, Mario

    The determination of extragalactic distances allows us to constrain the cosmological parameters which drive the universe dynamics. The large luminosities of type II supernovae (SNe) (those with a hydrogen-rich envelope) make this class of objects as interesting distance indicators. Their luminosities can be standardized using the expansion velocity of the photosphere estimated from P-Cygni line profiles. However, one of the problems that hampers their use in distance determinations is the uncertainty in the host-galaxy extinction. The physics of the photosphere suggests the existence of a unique asymptotic color for all SNe toward the end of the optically thick phase (which corresponds to a period of constant luminosity of about 100 days called plateau). The purpose of this work is to examine the validity of this hypothesis and to contruct Hubble diagrams standardizing the luminosities of these objects. A usual problem with the measurement of such asymptotic color is that there is no obvious maximum during the plateau phase (unlike their cousins, the type Ia SNe), so it proves hard to bring all light curves to the same time scale. One way around this is to use the end of the plateau as an estimate of the time origin for each event. This time origin also serves as a uniform reference epoch to measure magnitudes and expansion velocities. Although simple in theory, in practice it is usually hard to measure magnitudes, colors and expansion velocities owing to the coarse sampling of the observations. Thus, our aims are 1) perform adequate fits to the light, color and velocity curves, 2) determine the asymptotic color, 3) explore the usefulness of such color as reddening indicator, 4) calibrate the relation between luminosity and expansion velocity, and 5) measure distances, which will lead us to the contruction a Hubble diagram. In this talk we present fits made by means of analytic function modeling. We discuss the usefulness of the (V-R) and (V-I) colors for the

  9. INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION SITES: CONSTRAINING THE MASS AND METALLICITY OF THE PROGENITORS. II. TYPE II-P AND II-L SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi; Doi, Mamoru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Hashiba, Yasuhito; Aldering, Greg; Arimoto, Nobuo; Pereira, Rui

    2013-08-01

    Thirteen explosion sites of Type II-P and II-L supernovae (SNe) in nearby galaxies have been observed using integral field spectroscopy, enabling both spatial and spectral study of the explosion sites. We used the properties of the parent stellar population of the coeval SN progenitor star to derive its metallicity and initial mass. The spectrum of the parent stellar population yields estimates of metallicity via the strong-line method and age via a comparison with simple stellar population models. These metallicity and age parameters are adopted for the progenitor star. Age, or lifetime of the star, was used to derive the initial (zero-age main sequence) mass of the star using comparisons with stellar evolution models. With this technique, we were able to determine the metallicities and initial masses of the SN progenitors in our sample. Our results indicate that some Type II SN progenitors may have been stars with masses comparable to those of SN Ib/c progenitors.

  10. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Brian T.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Kasen, Daniel; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble residuals in our

  11. Supernova 2014J at M82 - II. Direct analysis of a middle-class Type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallely, Patrick; Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Baron, E.; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Domínguez, I.; Galbany, Lluís; González Hernández, J. I.; Méndez, J.; Hamuy, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Catalán, S.; Cooke, E.; Fariña, C.; Génova-Santos, R.; Karjalainen, R.; Lietzen, H.; McCormac, J.; Riddick, F.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Skillen, I.; Tudor, V.; Vaduvescu, O.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse a time series of optical spectra of SN 2014J from almost two weeks prior to maximum to nearly four months after maximum. We perform our analysis using the SYNOW code, which is well suited to track the distribution of the ions with velocity in the ejecta. We show that almost all of the spectral features during the entire epoch can be identified with permitted transitions of the common ions found in normal supernovae (SNe) Ia in agreement with previous studies. We show that 2014J is a relatively normal SN Ia. At early times the spectral features are dominated by Si II, S II, Mg II, and Ca II. These ions persist to maximum light with the appearance of Na I and Mg I. At later times iron-group elements also appear, as expected in the stratified abundance model of the formation of normal Type Ia SNe. We do not find significant spectroscopic evidence for oxygen, until 100 d after maximum light. The +100 d identification of oxygen is tentative, and would imply significant mixing of unburned or only slight processed elements down to a velocity of 6000 kms-1. Our results are in relatively good agreement with other analyses in the infrared. We briefly compare SN 2011fe to SN 2014J and conclude that the differences could be due to different central densities at ignition or differences in the C/O ratio of the progenitors.

  12. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Nichol, Robert C.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  13. Type Ia and II Supernovae Contributions to Metal Enrichment in the Intracluster Medium Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kosuke; Tokoi, Kazuyo; Matsushita, Kyoko; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Ishida, Manabu; Ohashi, Takaya

    2007-09-01

    We studied the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM) in two clusters of galaxies (AWM 7 and Abell 1060) and two groups (HCG 62 and NGC 507) with the X-ray observatory Suzaku. Based on spatially resolved energy spectra, we measured for the first time precise cumulative ICM metal masses within 0.1 and ~0.3r180. Comparing our results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of Type II (SNe II) to Type Ia (SNe Ia) is estimated to be ~3.5, assuming the metal mass in the ICM is represented by the sum of products synthesized in SNe Ia and SNe II. Normalized by the K-band luminosities of present galaxies, and including the metals in stars, the integrated number of past SN II explosions is estimated to be close to or somewhat higher than the star formation rate determined from Hubble Deep Field observations.

  14. The peculiar type II supernova 1993J in M81: Transition to the nebular phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippenko, Alexei V.; Matheson, Thomas; Barth, Aaron J.

    1994-01-01

    We present optical spectra of the bright, peculiar Type II supernova 1993J in M81 spanning the first 14 months of its existence, revealing its transition to the nebular phase. Unlike the case in normal Type II supernovae, during the first 2-10 months the H-alpha emission line gradually becomes less prominent relative to other features such as (O I) lambda lambda 6300, 6364 and (Ca II) lambda lambda 7291, 7324, as we had predicted based on early-time (tau less than or approximately equal to 2 months) spectra. The nebular spectrum resembles those of the Type Ib/Ic supernovae 1985F and 1987M, although weak H-alpha emission is easily visible even at late times in SN 1993J. At tau = 8 months a close similarity is found with the spectrum of SN 1987K, the only other Type II supernova known to have undergone such a metamorphosis. The emission lines are considerably broader than those of normal Type II supernovae at comparable phases, consistent with the progenitor having lost a majority of its hydrogen envelope prior to exploding. Consequently, there is now little doubt that Type Ib, and probably Type Ic, supernovae result from core collapse in stripped, massive stars; models of the chemical evolution of galaxies in which these subtypes are ascribed to exploding white dwarfs must be appropriately modified. Although all of the emission lines in spectra of SN 1993J fade roughly exponentially for a considerable time, the fading of H-alpha begins to slow down at tau approximately = 8 months, and in the interval tau = 10-14 months its flux is constant, or even slightly rising in the wings of the line. This behavior, together with the box-like shape and great breadth (full width at half maximum (FWHM) approximately = 17 000 km/s) of the line profile, suggests that the H-alpha emission is being produced by the high-velocity outer layer of hydrogen ejecta interacting with circumstellar gas released by the progenitor prior to its explosion. A similar phenomenon has previously been

  15. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-06-25

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are the largest thermonuclearexplosions in the Universe. Their light output can be seen across greatstances and has led to the discovery that the expansion rate of theUniverse is accelerating. Despite the significance of SNe Ia, there arestill a large number of uncertainties in current theoretical models.Computational modeling offers the promise to help answer the outstandingquestions. However, even with today's supercomputers, such calculationsare extremely challenging because of the wide range of length and timescales. In this paper, we discuss several new algorithms for simulationsof SNe Ia and demonstrate some of their successes.

  16. A Precision Photometric Comparison between SDSS-II and CSP Type Ia Supernova Data

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Corlies, L.; Folatelli, G.; Frieman, J.; Holtzman, J.; Jha, S.W.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, J.; Phillips, M.M.; Stritzinger, M.; /Aarhus U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Bohr Inst. /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2012-06-01

    Consistency between Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) and SDSS-II Supernova Survey ugri measurements has been evaluated by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and CSP photometry for nine spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernova observed contemporaneously by both programs. The CSP data were transformed into the SDSS photometric system. Sources of systematic uncertainty have been identified, quantified, and shown to be at or below the 0.023 mag level in all bands. When all photometry for a given band is combined, we find average magnitude differences of equal to or less than 0.011 mag in ugri, with rms scatter ranging from 0.043 to 0.077 mag. The u-band agreement is promising, with the caveat that only four of the nine supernovae are well observed in u and these four exhibit an 0.038 mag supernova-to-supernova scatter in this filter.

  17. A PRECISION PHOTOMETRIC COMPARISON BETWEEN SDSS-II AND CSP TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Corlies, L.; Folatelli, G.; Frieman, J.; Kessler, R.; Holtzman, J.; Jha, S. W.; Marriner, J.; Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, N.; Stritzinger, M.; Schneider, D. P.

    2012-07-15

    Consistency between Carnegie Supernova Project (CSP) and SDSS-II Supernova Survey ugri measurements has been evaluated by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and CSP photometry for nine spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernova observed contemporaneously by both programs. The CSP data were transformed into the SDSS photometric system. Sources of systematic uncertainty have been identified, quantified, and shown to be at or below the 0.023 mag level in all bands. When all photometry for a given band is combined, we find average magnitude differences of equal to or less than 0.011 mag in ugri, with rms scatter ranging from 0.043 to 0.077 mag. The u-band agreement is promising, with the caveat that only four of the nine supernovae are well observed in u and these four exhibit an 0.038 mag supernova-to-supernova scatter in this filter.

  18. Galactic constraints on supernova progenitor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharova, I. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Mishurov, Yu. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: To estimate the mean masses of oxygen and iron ejected per each type of supernovae (SNe) event from observations of the elemental abundance patterns in the Galactic disk and constrain the relevant SNe progenitor models. Methods: We undertake a statistical analysis of the radial abundance distributions in the Galactic disk within a theoretical framework for Galactic chemical evolution which incorporates the influence of spiral arms. This framework has been shown to recover the non-linear behaviour in radial gradients, the mean masses of oxygen and iron ejected during SNe explosions to be estimated, and constraints to be placed on SNe progenitor models. Results: (i) The mean mass of oxygen ejected per core-collapse SNe (CC SNe) event (which are concentrated within spiral arms) is ~0.27 M⊙; (ii) the mean mass of iron ejected by tardy Type Ia SNe (SNeIa, whose progenitors are older/longer-lived stars with ages ≳100 Myr and up to several Gyr, which do not concentrate within spiral arms) is ~0.58 M⊙; (iii) the upper mass of iron ejected by prompt SNeIa (SNe whose progenitors are younger/shorter-lived stars with ages ≲100 Myr, which are concentrated within spiral arms) is ≤0.23 M⊙ per event; (iv) the corresponding mean mass of iron produced by CC SNe is ≤0.04 M⊙ per event; (v) short-lived SNe (core-collapse or prompt SNeIa) supply ~85% of the Galactic disk's iron. Conclusions: The inferred low mean mass of oxygen ejected per CC SNe event implies a low upper mass limit for the corresponding progenitors of ~23 M⊙, otherwise the Galactic disk would be overabundant in oxygen. This inference is the consequence of the non-linear dependence between the upper limit of the progenitor initial mass and the mean mass of oxygen ejected per CC SNe explosion. The low mean mass of iron ejected by prompt SNeIa, relative to the mass produced by tardy SNeIa (~2.5 times lower), prejudices the idea that both sub-populations of SNeIa have the same physical nature. We

  19. Radioactive models of type 1 supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurmann, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable progress has been made toward understanding Type I supernovae within the context of radioactive energy input. Much effort has gone into determining the peak magnitude of the supernovae, particularly in the B-band, and its relation to the Hubble constant. If the distances inferred for Type I events are at all accurate, and/or the Hubble constant has a value near 50 km per s per Mpc, it is clear that models must reach a peak magnitude approximately -20 in order to be consistent. The present investigation is concerned with models which achieve peak magnitudes near this value and contain 0.8 solar mass of Ni-56. The B-band light curve declines much more rapidly after peak than the bolometric light curve. The mass and velocity of Ni-56 (at least for the A models) are within the region defined by Axelrod (1980) for configurations which produce acceptable spectra at late times. The models are consistent with the absence of a neutron star after the explosion. There remain, however, many difficult problems.

  20. LATE-TIME LIGHT CURVES OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Meixner, Margaret; Panagia, Nino; Fabbri, Joanna; Barlow, Michael J.; Wesson, Roger; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Andrews, Jennifer E.; Gallagher, Joseph S.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Ercolano, Barbara; Welch, Douglas E-mail: otsuka@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw

    2012-01-01

    We present BVRIJHK-band photometry of six core-collapse supernovae, SNe 1999bw, 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, 2005cs, and 2006bc, measured at late epochs (>2 yr) based on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the Gemini North, and WIYN telescopes. We also show the JHK light curves of supernova impostor SN 2008S up to day 575 because it was serendipitously in our SN 2002hh field of view. Of our 43 HST observations in total, 36 observations are successful in detecting the light from the SNe alone and measuring magnitudes of all the targets. HST observations show a resolved scattered light echo around SN 2003gd at day 1520 and around SN 2002hh at day 1717. Our Gemini and WIYN observations detected SNe 2002hh and 2004et as well. Combining our data with previously published data, we show VRIJHK-band light curves and estimate decline magnitude rates at each band in four different phases. Our prior work on these light curves and other data indicate that dust is forming in our targets from days {approx}300 to 400, supporting SN dust formation theory. In this paper we focus on other physical properties derived from late-time light curves. We estimate {sup 56}Ni masses for our targets (0.5-14 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }) from the bolometric light curve of each of days {approx}150-300 using SN 1987A as a standard (7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M{sub Sun }). The flattening or sometimes increasing fluxes in the late-time light curves of SNe 2002hh, 2003gd, 2004et, and 2006bc indicate the presence of light echoes. We estimate the circumstellar hydrogen density of the material causing the light echo and find that SN 2002hh is surrounded by relatively dense materials (n(H) >400 cm{sup -3}) and SNe 2003gd and 2004et have densities more typical of the interstellar medium ({approx}1 cm{sup -3}). We analyze the sample as a whole in the context of physical properties derived in prior work. The {sup 56}Ni mass appears well correlated with progenitor mass with a slope of 0

  1. Matter Effects on Neutrino Oscillations in Different Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Hu, Li-Jun; Li, Rui-Cheng; Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, with the development of simulations about supernova explosion, we have a better understanding about the density profiles and the shock waves in supernovae than before. There might be a reverse shock wave, another sudden change of density except the forward shock wave, or even no shock wave, emerging in the supernova. Instead of using the expression of the crossing probability at the high resonance, PH, we have studied the matter effects on neutrino oscillations in different supernova models. In detail, we have calculated the survival probability of ve (Ps) and the conversion probability of vx (Pc) in the Schrödinger equation within a simplified two-flavor framework for a certain case, in which the neutrino transfers through the supernova matter from an initial flavor eigenstate located at the core of the supernova. Our calculations was based on the data of density in three different supernova models obtained from simulations. In our work, we do not steepen the density gradient around the border of the shock wave, which differs to what was done in most of the other simulations. It is found that the mass and the density distribution of the supernova do make a difference on the behavior of Ps and Pc. With the results of Ps and Pc, we can estimate the number of ve (and vx) remained in the beam after they go through the matter in the supernova. Supported by National Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11175020 and 11275025

  2. Shock Breakout and Early Light Curves of Type II-P Supernovae Observed with Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter M.; Tucker, Bradley E.; Rest, Armin; Shaya, Edward J.; Olling, Robert; Kasen, Daniel; Villar, Victoria; KEGS

    2016-01-01

    We discovered two transient events in the Kepler field with light curves that strongly suggest they are type II-P supernovae. Using the fast cadence of the Kepler observations we precisely estimate the rise time to maximum for KSN2011a and KSN2011d as 10.5±0.4 and 13.3±0.4 rest-frame days respectively. We find the progenitor radius of KSN2011a (280±20 R⊙) to be significantly smaller than that for KSN2011d (490±20 R⊙) but both have similar explosion energies of 2.0±0.3 ×1051 erg.The rising light curve of KSN2011d is an excellent match to that predicted by simple models of exploding red supergiants (RSG). However, the early rise of KSN2011a is faster than the models predict possibly due to the supernova shockwave moving into pre-existing wind or mass-loss from the RSG. A mass loss rate of 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 from the RSG can explain the fast rise without impacting the optical flux at maximum light or the shape of the post-maximum light curve.No shock breakout emission is seen in KSN2011a, but this is likely due to the circumstellar interaction suspected in the fast rising light curve. The early light curve of KSN2011d does show excess emission consistent with model predictions of a shock breakout. This is the first optical detection of a shock breakout from a type II-P supernova.

  3. FINDING THE FIRST COSMIC EXPLOSIONS. II. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Joggerst, Candace C.; Fryer, Chris L.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Heger, Alexander; Holz, Daniel E.

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the properties of Population III (Pop III) stars is prerequisite to elucidating the nature of primeval galaxies, the chemical enrichment and reionization of the early intergalactic medium, and the origin of supermassive black holes. While the primordial initial mass function (IMF) remains unknown, recent evidence from numerical simulations and stellar archaeology suggests that some Pop III stars may have had lower masses than previously thought, 15-50 M{sub Sun} in addition to 50-500 M{sub Sun }. The detection of Pop III supernovae (SNe) by JWST, WFIRST, or the TMT could directly probe the primordial IMF for the first time. We present numerical simulations of 15-40 M{sub Sun} Pop III core-collapse SNe performed with the Los Alamos radiation hydrodynamics code RAGE. We find that they will be visible in the earliest galaxies out to z {approx} 10-15, tracing their star formation rates and in some cases revealing their positions on the sky. Since the central engines of Pop III and solar-metallicity core-collapse SNe are quite similar, future detection of any Type II SNe by next-generation NIR instruments will in general be limited to this epoch.

  4. Neutrinos from type II supernovae - The first 100 milliseconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myra, Eric S.; Burrows, Adam

    1990-01-01

    The collapse of a 1.17 solar mass iron core is numerically followed through infall to 100 ms past core bounce, and the emergent neutrino spectra during each phase are highlighted. It is found that, even with fairly optimistic conditions for producing a strong, sustained core-bounce shock wave, the prompt shock stalls within 9 ms of core bounce at a radius of less than 250 km. It appears that a radical change in the character of the progenitor core or in our understanding of the relevant physics of stellar collapse is needed before the direct mechanism for type II supernovae can become viable. Expanding the number of neutrino types from one to six magnifies the debilitating effect of neutrino loss on shock propagation. At shock breakout, prompt bursts of all neutrino types are observed. The luminosities of the nonelectron types show a sudden turn-on in luminosity while that of the electron neutrinos steadily increases throughout infall as a result of accelerating electron capture.

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II: Photometry and Supernova Ia Light Curves from the 2005 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Marriner, John; Kessler, Richard; Sako, Masao; Dilday, Ben; Frieman, Joshua A.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; /KICP, Chicago /Portsmouth U., ICG /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Portsmouth U., ICG /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U. /Tokyo U., ICRR /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-26

    We present ugriz light curves for 146 spectroscopically confirmed or spectroscopically probable Type Ia supernovae from the 2005 season of the SDSS-II Supernova survey. The light curves have been constructed using a photometric technique that we call scene modeling, which is described in detail here; the major feature is that supernova brightnesses are extracted from a stack of images without spatial resampling or convolution of the image data. This procedure produces accurate photometry along with accurate estimates of the statistical uncertainty, and can be used to derive photometry taken with multiple telescopes. We discuss various tests of this technique that demonstrate its capabilities. We also describe the methodology used for the calibration of the photometry, and present calibrated magnitudes and fluxes for all of the spectroscopic SNe Ia from the 2005 season.

  6. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Smith, Mathew; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: UBVRIz light curves of 51 Type II supernovae (Galbany+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Phillips, M. M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Maza, J.; de Jaeger, T.; Moraga, T.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Krisciunas, K.; Morrell, N. I.; Thomas-Osip, J.; Krzeminski, W.; Gonzalez, L.; Antezana, R.; Wishnjewski, M.; McCarthy, P.; Anderson, J. P.; Gutierrez, C. P.; Stritzinger, M.; Folatelli, G.; Anguita, C.; Galaz, G.; Green, E. M.; Impey, C.; Kim, Y.-C.; Kirhakos, S.; Malkan, M. A.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Phillips, A. C.; Pizzella, A.; Prosser, C. F.; Schmidt, B. P.; Schommer, R. A.; Sherry, W.; Strolger, L.-G.; Wells, L. A.; Williger, G. M.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a sample of multi-band, visual-wavelength light curves of 51 type II supernovae (SNe II) observed from 1986 to 2003 in the course of four different surveys: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernovae Survey (CATS). Near-infrared photometry and optical spectroscopy of this set of SNe II will be published in two companion papers. A list of the SNe II used in this study is presented in Table1. The first object in our list is SN 1986L and it is the only SN observed with photoelectric techniques (by M.M.P and S.K., using the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9m equipped with a photometer and B and V filters). The remaining SNe were observed using a variety of telescopes equipped with CCD detectors and UBV(RI)KCz filters (see Table5). The magnitudes for the photometric sequences of the 51 SNe II are listed in Table4. In every case, these sequences were derived from observations of Landolt standards (see Appendix D in Hamuy et al. 2001ApJ...558..615H for the definition of the z band and Stritzinger et al. 2002AJ....124.2100S for the description of the z-band standards). Table5 lists the resulting UBVRIz magnitudes for the 51 SNe. (3 data files).

  8. Supernova Search at Intermediate-redshift. II. Host Galaxy Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Altavilla, G.; Balastegui, A.; Irwin, M.; Schamanache, K.; Balland, C.; Pain, R.; Walton, N.

    2005-12-01

    We discuss the host galaxy morphology of the 8 supernovae (SNe) discovered as a part of the International Time Programme (ITP) project ``Ω and Λ from Supernovae, and the physics of Supernovae Explosions'' at the European Northern Observatory (ENO). Identification of the SN host galaxies was performed exploiting both imaging and spectroscopic facilities at the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes (ING) which comprises the 4.2m William Hershel Telescope (WHT), the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) and the 1.0m Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope (JKT). Also the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and the 2.5m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) were used for the optical photometric follow-up of the supernovae. Spectroscopic observation were carried out using the Intermediate dispersion Spectrograph and Imaging System (ISIS) mounted at the WHT. All spectra were reduced following standard IRAF http://iraf.noao.edu/

  9. Models of Interacting Supernovae: Understanding the Physics and Probing the Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Edward

    "Interacting supernovae" are poorly understood astronomical events with great potential for expanding our understanding of how stars evolve and die, and could provide important clues about the early formation of large-scale structures such as galaxies in the universe. Interacting supernovae occur when a star explodes within a dense cloud of material shed from the star in the course of its evolution. The resulting violent interaction between the expanding supernova explosion and the cloud of circumstellar material can lead to an enormously bright visual display --- indeed, many of the brightest supernovae ever recorded are thought to arise from circumstellar interaction. In order to understand the properties of the progenitor star and the details of the circumstellar interaction, there is a need for theoretical models of interacting supernovae. These simulated computer spectra can be directly compared to the spectra observed by telescopes. These models allow us to probe the physical circumstances that underlie the observations. The spectra of interacting supernovae are dominated by strong, narrow emission lines of light elements such as hydrogen and helium. These narrow lines give Type IIn supernovae their designation. Similarly, objects of Type Ian, Ibn, Icn, and IIn are somewhat distinct, but are all defined by the narrow emission lines that result from the interaction of their expanding envelopes with their surroundings. The photosphere in these supernovae is formed in the material accreted during the coasting phase, and most of the luminosity has its origin from the conversion of kinetic explosion energy into luminosity. Both thermonuclear (Type Ia) and core-collapse (Types Ib/Ic and II) supernovae may be the inner engine. In fact, several Type IIn supernovae at early times have later been classified as Type Ia, Type Ib/c, or Type II as their spectra reveal more details about the nature of the central explosion. As a result of the dominance of the interaction

  10. Improved cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of the SDSS-II and SNLS supernova samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betoule, M.; Kessler, R.; Guy, J.; Mosher, J.; Hardin, D.; Biswas, R.; Astier, P.; El-Hage, P.; Konig, M.; Kuhlmann, S.; Marriner, J.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Balland, C.; Bassett, B. A.; Brown, P. J.; Campbell, H.; Carlberg, R. G.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Cinabro, D.; Conley, A.; D'Andrea, C. B.; DePoy, D. L.; Doi, M.; Ellis, R. S.; Fabbro, S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J. A.; Fouchez, D.; Galbany, L.; Goobar, A.; Gupta, R. R.; Hill, G. J.; Hlozek, R.; Hogan, C. J.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Jha, S. W.; Le Guillou, L.; Leloudas, G.; Lidman, C.; Marshall, J. L.; Möller, A.; Mourão, A. M.; Neveu, J.; Nichol, R.; Olmstead, M. D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, J. L.; Pritchet, C. J.; Richmond, M.; Riess, A. G.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Sako, M.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schneider, D. P.; Smith, M.; Sollerman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Walton, N. A.; Wheeler, C. J.

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We present cosmological constraints from a joint analysis of type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations obtained by the SDSS-II and SNLS collaborations. The dataset includes several low-redshift samples (z< 0.1), all three seasons from the SDSS-II (0.05 supernovae with high-quality light curves. Methods: We followed the methods and assumptions of the SNLS three-year data analysis except for the following important improvements: 1) the addition of the full SDSS-II spectroscopically-confirmed SN Ia sample in both the training of the SALT2 light-curve model and in the Hubble diagram analysis (374 SNe); 2) intercalibration of the SNLS and SDSS surveys and reduced systematic uncertainties in the photometric calibration, performed blindly with respect to the cosmology analysis; and 3) a thorough investigation of systematic errors associated with the SALT2 modeling of SN Ia light curves. Results: We produce recalibrated SN Ia light curves and associated distances for the SDSS-II and SNLS samples. The large SDSS-II sample provides an effective, independent, low-z anchor for the Hubble diagram and reduces the systematic error from calibration systematics in the low-z SN sample. For a flat ΛCDM cosmology, we find Ωm =0.295 ± 0.034 (stat+sys), a value consistent with the most recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement from the Planck and WMAP experiments. Our result is 1.8σ (stat+sys) different than the previously published result of SNLS three-year data. The change is due primarily to improvements in the SNLS photometric calibration. When combined with CMB constraints, we measure a constant dark-energy equation of state parameter w =-1.018 ± 0.057 (stat+sys) for a flat universe. Adding baryon acoustic oscillation distance measurements gives similar constraints: w =-1.027 ± 0.055. Our supernova measurements provide the most stringent constraints to date on

  11. The diversity of Type II supernova versus the similarity in their progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Graham, M. L.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Arcavi, I.; Bildsten, L.; Jerkstrand, A.; McCully, C.; Pastorello, A.; Piro, A. L.; Sand, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Terreran, G.; Baltay, C.; Benetti, S.; Brown, P.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fraser, M.; Rabinowitz, D.; Sullivan, M.; Yuan, F.

    2016-07-01

    High-quality collections of Type II supernova (SN) light curves are scarce because they evolve for hundreds of days, making follow-up observations time consuming and often extending over multiple observing seasons. In light of these difficulties, the diversity of SNe II is not fully understood. Here we present ultraviolet and optical photometry of 12 SNe II monitored by the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network during 2013 to 2014, and compare them with previously studied SNe having well-sampled light curves. We explore SN II diversity by searching for correlations between the slope of the linear light-curve decay after maximum light (historically used to divide SNe II into IIL and IIP) and other measured physical properties. While SNe IIL are found to be on average more luminous than SNe IIP, SNe IIL do not appear to synthesize more 56Ni than SNe IIP. Finally, optical nebular spectra obtained for several SNe in our sample are found to be consistent with models of red supergiant progenitors in the 12-16 M⊙ range. Consequently, SNe IIL appear not to account for the deficit of massive red supergiants as SN II progenitors.

  12. Supernova Driving. II. Compressive Ratio in Molecular-cloud Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2016-07-01

    The compressibility of molecular cloud (MC) turbulence plays a crucial role in star formation models, because it controls the amplitude and distribution of density fluctuations. The relation between the compressive ratio (the ratio of powers in compressive and solenoidal motions) and the statistics of turbulence has been previously studied systematically only in idealized simulations with random external forces. In this work, we analyze a simulation of large-scale turbulence (250 pc) driven by supernova (SN) explosions that has been shown to yield realistic MC properties. We demonstrate that SN driving results in MC turbulence with a broad lognormal distribution of the compressive ratio, with a mean value ≈0.3, lower than the equilibrium value of ≈0.5 found in the inertial range of isothermal simulations with random solenoidal driving. We also find that the compressibility of the turbulence is not noticeably affected by gravity, nor are the mean cloud radial (expansion or contraction) and solid-body rotation velocities. Furthermore, the clouds follow a general relation between the rms density and the rms Mach number similar to that of supersonic isothermal turbulence, though with a large scatter, and their average gas density probability density function is described well by a lognormal distribution, with the addition of a high-density power-law tail when self-gravity is included.

  13. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A. II. Dust sputtering and diagnosis of supernova dust survival in remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate further sputtering in the inter-clump medium gas once the clumps have been disrupted by the reverse shock. The dust evolution in the dense ejecta clumps of Type II-P supernovae and their remnants is also explored. We study oxygen-rich clumps that describe the oxygen core of the ejecta, and carbon-rich clumps that correspond to the outermost carbon-rich ejecta zone. We consider the various dust components that form in the supernova, several reverse shock velocities and inter-clump gas temperatures, and derive grain-size distributions and masses for the dust as a function of time. Both non-thermal sputtering within clumps and thermal sputtering in the inter-clump medium gas are studied. We find that non-thermal sputtering in the clumps is important for all supernova types and accounts for reducing the grain population by ~ 40% to 80% in mass, depending on the clump gas over-density, the grain type and size, and the shock velocity in the clump. A Type II-b SN forms small grains that are sputtered within the clumps and in the inter-clump medium. For Cas A, silicate grains do not survive thermal sputtering in the inter-clump medium, while alumina, silicon carbide, and carbon dust may survive in the remnant. Our derived masses of currently processed silicate, alumina and carbon grains agree well with the values derived from the observations of warm dust, and seem to indicate that the dust is currently being processed within clumps by non-thermal sputtering. Out of the ~ 0.03M⊙ of dust formed in the ejecta, between 30% and 60% of this mass is present today in Cas A, and only 6% to 11% of the initial mass will survive the remnant phase. Grains formed in Type II-P supernovae are

  14. Models for Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, Stan

    Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are the brightest stellar mass explosions in the universe. As such, they serve as cosmic beacons for probing cosmic structure and diagnosing the properties of stars and the universe when it was young. They also produce black holes and neutron stars, interesting in themselves as laboratories where exotic physics comes into play, and they make the elements from which life arises. Consequently, supernovae and gamma-ray bursts are subject to intense study by many NASA missions. We propose focused studies in five areas of supernova research that are directly relevant to NASA's missions, especially SWIFT, HST, JWST, and planning for WFIRST. Our specific topics are a) models for Type Ia supernovae; b) extreme supernovae and first supernovae; c) magnetar-powered supernovae; d) ultra-long duration gamma-ray bursts; and e) shock breakout in supernovae. These phenomena all have in common their importance to NASA missions and the fact that they can be studied using similar tools - computer codes that do radiation hydrodynamics. Our two principal codes, KEPLER (one-dimension) and CASTRO (one to three dimensions), have been honed to the task by years of supernova modeling, and have some unique capabilities. Type Ia supernovae have long been of interest to NASA, but their importance has increased lately because of their utility in determining cosmic distances and because a string of recent observational breakthroughs has severely limited their progenitors. Responding to these developments, we propose to focus on a class of model we have previously neglected, the merger of two white dwarfs. The mergers will be studied with KEPLER and CASTRO in one and two dimensions, and the spectra and light curves determined. The library of model results will be useful in interpreting the results of present NASA missions and planning new ones. A second important area of investigation will be the study of first generation stars and the supernovae that they produce

  15. First-Year Spectroscopy for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Chen; Romani, Roger W.; Sako, Masao; Marriner, John; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Fritz; Depoy, Darren L.; Dilday, Ben; Doi, Mamoru; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Kessler, Richard; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert

    2008-03-25

    This paper presents spectroscopy of supernovae discovered in the first season of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey. This program searches for and measures multi-band light curves of supernovae in the redshift range z = 0.05-0.4, complementing existing surveys at lower and higher redshifts. Our goal is to better characterize the supernova population, with a particular focus on SNe Ia, improving their utility as cosmological distance indicators and as probes of dark energy. Our supernova spectroscopy program features rapid-response observations using telescopes of a range of apertures, and provides confirmation of the supernova and host-galaxy types as well as precise redshifts. We describe here the target identification and prioritization, data reduction, redshift measurement, and classification of 129 SNe Ia, 16 spectroscopically probable SNe Ia, 7 SNe Ib/c, and 11 SNe II from the first season. We also describe our efforts to measure and remove the substantial host galaxy contamination existing in the majority of our SN spectra.

  16. Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    We live in a Universe that is getting bigger faster. This astonishing discovery of Universal acceleration was made in the late 1990s by two teams who made observations of a special type of exploded star known as a `Supernova Type Ia'. (SNeIa) Since the discovery of the accelerating Universe, one of the biggest questions in modern cosmology has been to determine the cause of that acceleration - the answer to this question will have far reaching implications for our theories of cosmology and fundamental physics more broadly. The two main competing explanations for this apparent late time acceleration of the Universe are modified gravity and dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) has been designed and commissioned to find to find answers to these questions about the nature of dark energy and modified gravity. The new 570 megapixel Dark Energy Camera is currently operating with the Cerro-Tololo Inter American Observatory's 4m Blanco teleccope, carrying out a systematic search for SNeIa, and mapping out the large scale structure of the Universe by making observations of galaxies. The DES science program program which saw first light in September 2013 will run for five years in total. DES SNeIa data in combination with the other DES observations of large scale structure will enable us to put increasingly accurate constraints on the expansion history of the Universe and will help us distinguish between competing theories of dark energy and modified gravity. As we draw to the close of the first observing season of DES in March 2014, we will report on the current status of the DES supernova survey, presenting first year supernovae data, preliminary results, survey strategy, discovery pipeline, spectroscopic target selection and data quality. This talk will give the first glimpse of the DES SN first year data and initial results as we begin our five year survey in search of dark energy. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  17. Nucleosynthesis Modes in the High-Entropy-Wind Scenario of Type II Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Cowan, J. J.; Mashonkina, L. I.; Pfeiffer, B.; Sneden, C.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Truran, J. W.

    2008-03-11

    In an attempt to constrain the astrophysical conditions for the nucleosynthesis of the classical r-process elements beyond Fe, we have performed large-scale dynamical network calculations within the model of an adiabatically expanding high- entropy wind (HEW) of type II supernovae (SN II). A superposition of several entropy-components (S) with model-inherent weightings results in an excellent reproduction of the overall Solar System (SS) isotopic r-process residuals (N{sub r,{center_dot}}), as well as the more recent observations of elemental abundances of metal-poor, r-process rich halo stars in the early Galaxy. For the heavy r-process elements beyond Sn, our HEW model predicts a robust abundance pattern up to the Th, U r-chronometer region. For the lighter neutron-capture region, an S-dependent superposition of (i) a normal {alpha}-component directly producing stable nuclei, including s-only isotopes, and (ii) a component from a neutron-rich {alpha}-freezeout followed by the rapid recapture of {beta}-delayed neutrons ({beta}dnrpar; emitted from the far-unstable seed nuclei is indicated. In agreement with several recent halo-star observations in the 60model confirms a Z-dependent non-correlation, respectively partial correlation with the heavier 'main' r-process elements.

  18. Long-rising Type II supernovae from Palomar Transient Factory and Caltech Core-Collapse Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Fremling, C.; Migotto, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Armen, S.; Duggan, G.; Ergon, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fransson, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R. R.; Leloudas, G.; Leonard, D. C.; Lunnan, R.; Masci, F. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Silverman, J. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar hydrogen-rich event with a long-rising (~84 d) light curve, stemming from the explosion of a compact blue supergiant star. Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature in recent decades. Aims: We present new data for a sample of six long-rising Type II SNe (SNe II), three of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge this small family of long-rising SNe II, characterizing their differences in terms of progenitor and explosion parameters. We also study the metallicity of their environments. Methods: Optical light curves, spectra, and host-galaxy properties of these SNe are presented and analyzed. Detailed comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events in the literature are shown, with particular emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and host-galaxy metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband light curves. By modeling the early-time emission with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these transients. The modeling of the bolometric light curves also allows us to estimate other progenitor and explosion parameters, such as the ejected 56Ni mass, the explosion energy, and the ejecta mass. Results: We present PTF12kso, a long-rising SN II that is estimated to have the largest amount of ejected 56Ni mass measured for this class. PTF09gpn and PTF12kso are found at the lowest host metallicities observed for this SN group. The variety of early light-curve luminosities depends on the wide range of progenitor radii of these SNe, from a few tens of R⊙ (SN 2005ci) up to thousands (SN 2004ek) with some intermediate cases between 100 R⊙ (PTF09gpn) and 300 R⊙ (SN 2004em). Conclusions: We confirm that long-rising SNe II with light-curve shapes closely

  19. Amplification of magnetic fields in a primordial H II region and supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Daegene; Wise, John H.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic fields permeate the Universe on all scales and play a key role during star formation. We study the evolution of magnetic fields around a massive metal-free (Population III) star at z ˜ 15 during the growth of its H II region and subsequent supernova explosion by conducting three cosmological magnetohydrodynamics simulations with radiation transport. Given the theoretical uncertainty and weak observational constraints of magnetic fields in the early universe, we initialize the simulations with identical initial conditions only varying the seed field strength. We find that magnetic fields grow as ρ2/3 during the gravitational collapse preceding star formation, as expected from ideal spherical collapse models. Massive Population III stars can expel a majority of the gas from the host halo through radiative feedback, and we find that the magnetic fields are not amplified above the spherical collapse scaling relation during this phase. However, afterwards when its supernova remnant can radiatively cool and fragment, the turbulent velocity field in and around the shell causes the magnetic field to be significantly amplified on average by ˜100 in the shell and up to 6 orders of magnitude behind the reverse shock. Within the shell, field strengths are on the order of a few nG at a number density of 1 cm-3. We show that this growth is primarily caused by small-scale dynamo action in the remnant. These strengthened fields will propagate into the first generations of galaxies, possibly affecting the nature of their star formation.

  20. H{sub α} SPECTRAL DIVERSITY OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: CORRELATIONS WITH PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Hamuy, Mario; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Anderson, Joseph P.; Folatelli, Gastón; Morrell, Nidia I.; Phillips, Mark M.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; McCarthy, Patrick; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2014-05-10

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of the H{sub α} profiles of hydrogen-rich Type II supernovae. A total of 52 Type II supernovae having well-sampled optical light curves and spectral sequences were analyzed. Concentrating on the H{sub α} P-Cygni profile we measure its velocity from the FWHM of the emission and the ratio of absorption to emission (a/e) at a common epoch at the start of the recombination phase, and search for correlations between these spectral parameters and photometric properties of the V-band light curves. Testing the strength of various correlations we find that a/e appears to be the dominant spectral parameter in terms of describing the diversity in our measured supernova properties. It is found that supernovae with smaller a/e have higher H{sub α} velocities, more rapidly declining light curves from maximum during the plateau and radioactive tail phase, are brighter at maximum light, and have shorter optically thick phase durations. We discuss possible explanations of these results in terms of physical properties of Type II supernovae, speculating that the most likely parameters that influence the morphologies of H{sub α} profiles are the mass and density profile of the hydrogen envelope, together with additional emission components due to circumstellar interaction.

  1. Non-LTE time-dependent spectroscopic modelling of Type II-plateau supernovae from the photospheric to the nebular phase: case study for 15 and 25 M⊙ progenitor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John

    2011-01-01

    We present the first non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations of supernovae (SNe) II-Plateau (II-P) covering both the photospheric and nebular phases, from ˜10 to ≳1000 d after the explosion, and based on 1.2 B piston-driven ejecta produced from a 15 M⊙ and a 25 M⊙ non-rotating solar-metallicity star. The radial expansion of the gradually cooling photosphere gives rise to a near-constant luminosity up to ≳100 d after the explosion. The photosphere remains in the outer 0.5 M⊙ of the ejecta for up to ˜50 d after the explosion. As the photosphere reaches the edge of the helium core, the SN luminosity drops by an amount mitigated by the progenitor radius and the 56Ni mass. Synthetic light curves exhibit a bell-shaped morphology, evolving faster for more compact progenitors, and with an earlier peak and narrower width in bluer filters. UV and U-band fluxes are very sensitive to line blanketing, the metallicity and the adopted model atoms. During the recombination epoch synthetic spectra are dominated by H I and metal lines, and are largely insensitive to the differing H/He/C/N/O composition of our two progenitor stars. In contrast, synthetic nebular-phase spectra reveal a broader/stronger O I doublet line in the higher-mass progenitor model, reflecting the larger masses of oxygen and nickel that are ejected. Our simulations overestimate the typical luminosity and the visual rise time of standard SNe II-P, most likely a consequence of our progenitor stars being too big and/or too hydrogen rich. Comparison of our simulations with photospheric-phase observations of SN1999em of the same colour is satisfactory. Our neglect of non-thermal excitation/ionization leads to a fast disappearance of continuum radiation and Balmer-line emission at the end of the plateau phase. With the exception of H I lines, our nebular spectra show a striking similarity to contemporaneous observations of SN1999em.

  2. Shock waves and nucleosynthesis in type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aufderheide, M. B.; Baron, E.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of nucleosynthesis in type II SN, shock waves are initiated artificially, since collapse calculations do not, as yet, give self-consistent shock waves strong enough to produce the SN explosion. The two initiation methods currently used by light-curve modelers are studied, with a focus on the peak temperatures and the nucleosynthetic yields in each method. The various parameters involved in artificially initiating a shock wave and the effects of varying these parameters are discussed.

  3. Type Ia Supernova Models and Progenitor Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Kamiya, Yasuomi; Nakasato, Naohito

    2013-01-01

    We review some recent developments in theoretical studies on the connection between the progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the explosion mechanisms. (1) DD-subCh: In the merging of double C+O white dwarfs (DD scenario), if the carbon detonation is induced near the white dwarf (WD) surface in the early dynamical phase, it could result in the (effectively) sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosion. (2) DD-Ch: If no surface C-detonation is ignited, the WD could grow until the Chandrasekhar mass is reached, but the outcome depends on whether the quiescent carbon shell burning is ignited and burns C+O into O+Ne+Mg. (3) SD-subCh: In the single degenerate (SD) scenario, if the He shell-flashes grow strong to induce a He detonation, it leads to the sub-Chandra explosion. (4) SD-Ch: If the He-shell flashes are not strong enough, they still produce interesting amounts of Si and S near the surface of the C+O WD before the explosion. In the Chandra mass explosion, the central density is high enough to produce electron capture elements, e.g., stable 58Ni. Observations of the emission lines of Ni in the nebular spectra provides useful diagnostics of the sub-Chandra vs. Chandra issue. The recent observations of relatively low velocity carbon near the surface of SNe Ia provide also an interesting constraint on the explosion models.

  4. SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR MASS MODELS FOR SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S. E.; Kasen, Daniel

    2011-06-10

    For carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting hydrogen or helium at rates in the range {approx}(1-10) x 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, a variety of explosive outcomes is possible well before the star reaches the Chandrasekhar mass. These outcomes are surveyed for a range of white dwarf masses (0.7-1.1 M{sub sun}), accretion rates ((1-7) x 10{sup -8} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}), and initial white dwarf temperatures (0.01 and 1 L{sub sun}). The results are particularly sensitive to the convection that goes on during the last few minutes before the explosion. Unless this convection maintains a shallow temperature gradient and unless the density is sufficiently high, the accreted helium does not detonate. Below a critical helium ignition density, which we estimate to be (5-10) x 10{sup 5} g cm{sup -3}, either helium novae or helium deflagrations result. The hydrodynamics, nucleosynthesis, light curves, and spectra of a representative sample of detonating and deflagrating models are explored. Some can be quite faint indeed, powered at peak for a few days by the decay of {sup 48}Cr and {sup 48}V. Only the hottest, most massive white dwarfs considered with the smallest helium layers, show reasonable agreement with the light curves and spectra of common Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). For the other models, especially those involving lighter white dwarfs, the helium shell mass exceeds 0.05 M{sub sun} and the mass of the {sup 56}Ni that is synthesized exceeds 0.01 M{sub sun}. These explosions do not look like ordinary SNe Ia or any other frequently observed transient.

  5. Feedback in Clouds II: UV Photoionisation and the first supernova in a massive cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geen, Sam; Hennebelle, Patrick; Tremblin, Pascal; Rosdahl, Joakim

    2016-09-01

    Molecular cloud structure is regulated by stellar feedback in various forms. Two of the most important feedback processes are UV photoionisation and supernovae from massive stars. However, the precise response of the cloud to these processes, and the interaction between them, remains an open question. In particular, we wish to know under which conditions the cloud can be dispersed by feedback, which in turn can give us hints as to how feedback regulates the star formation inside the cloud. We perform a suite of radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a 105 solar mass cloud with embedded sources of ionising radiation and supernovae, including multiple supernovae and a hypernova model. A UV source corresponding to 10% of the mass of the cloud is required to disperse the cloud, suggesting that the star formation efficiency should be on the order of 10%. A single supernova is unable to significantly affect the evolution of the cloud. However, energetic hypernovae and multiple supernovae are able to add significant quantities of momentum to the cloud, approximately 1043 g cm/s of momentum per 1051 ergs of supernova energy. We argue that supernovae alone are unable to regulate star formation in molecular clouds. We stress the importance of ram pressure from turbulence in regulating feedback in molecular clouds.

  6. Experimental challenge to nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae - Very early epoch of type II SNe -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kahl, D. M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Chen, A.; Cherubini, S.; Choi, S. H.; Hahn, I. S.; He, J. J.; Khiem, Le H.; Lee, C. S.; Kwon, Y. K.; Wanajo, S.; Janka, H.-T.

    2013-05-01

    Nucleosynthesis is one of the keys in studying the mechanism of core-collapse supernovae, which is an interesting challenge for modern science. The νp-process, which is similar to an explosive hydrogen burning process, has been proposed as the most probable process in the very early epoch of type II supernovae. Here, we discuss our experimental efforts for the νp-process, the first extensive direct measurements of the (α,p) reactions on bottle-neck proto-rich nuclei in light mass regions. Other challenges for the νp-process study are also discussed.

  7. Atomic Data and the Modeling of Supernova Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Christopher

    2012-06-01

    The modeling of supernovae (SNe) incorporates a variety of disciplines, including hydrodynamics, radiation transport, nuclear physics and atomic physics. These efforts require numerical simulation of the final stages of a star's life, the supernova explosion phase, and the radiation that is subsequently emitted by the supernova remnant, which can occur over a time span of tens of thousands of years. While there are several different types of SNe, they all emit radiation in some form. The measurement and interpretation of these spectra provide important information about the structure of the exploding star and the supernova engine. In this talk, the role of atomic data is highlighted as it pertains to the modeling of supernova spectra. Recent applications [1,2] involve the Los Alamos OPLIB opacity database, which has been used to provide atomic opacities for modeling supernova plasmas under local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions. Ongoing work includes the application of atomic data generated by the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes under more complicated, non-LTE conditions [3]. As a specific, recent example, a portion of the x-ray spectrum produced by Tycho's supernova remnant (SN 1572) will be discussed [4].[4pt] [1] C.L. Fryer et al., Astrophys. J. 707, 193 (2009).[0pt] [2] C.L. Fryer et al., Astrophys. J. 725, 296 (2009).[0pt] [3] C.J. Fontes et al., Conference Proceedings for ICPEAC XXVII (Belfast, Northern Ireland), in press, (2011).[0pt] [4] K.A. Eriksen et al., Presentation at the 2012 AAS Meeting (Austin, TX).

  8. The multifaceted Type II-L supernova 2014G from pre-maximum to nebular phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terreran, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Benetti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Ochner, P.; Tomasella, L.; Howell, D. A.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Kankare, E.; Arcavi, I.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kangas, T.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Wiggins, P.; Yuan, F.

    2016-10-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionization species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich circumstellar material (CSM) probably due to pre-explosion mass-loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the 56Co decay if γ-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue side of H α after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H α and the [O I] doublet. This may be due to interaction of the ejecta with a strongly asymmetric, and possibly bipolar CSM. Finally, we report two deep spectra at ˜190 and 340 d after explosion, the latter being arguably one of the latest spectra for a Type II-L SN. By modelling the spectral region around the [Ca II], we find a supersolar Ni/Fe production. The strength of the [O I] λλ6300,6363 doublet, compared with synthetic nebular spectra, suggests a progenitor with a zero-age main-sequence mass between 15 and 19 M⊙.

  9. Characterizing the V-band Light-curves of Hydrogen-rich Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Olivares E., Felipe; Phillips, Mark M.; Schulze, Steve; Antezana, Roberto; Bolt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Contreras, Carlos; de Jaeger, Thomas; Folatelli, Gastón; Förster, Francisco; Freedman, Wendy L.; González, Luis; Hsiao, Eric; Krzemiński, Wojtek; Krisciunas, Kevin; Maza, José; McCarthy, Patrick; Morrell, Nidia I.; Persson, Sven E.; Roth, Miguel; Salgado, Francisco; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the "plateau" phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the "plateau" stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply "SN II" with an "s 2" value giving the decline rate during the "plateau" phase, indicating its morphological type. Based on observations obtained with the du-Pont and Swope telescopes at LCO, and the Steward Observatory's CTIO60, SO90 and CTIO36 telescopes.

  10. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos; Olivares E, Felipe; Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric; Schulze, Steve; Bolt, Luis; Folatelli, Gastón; Freedman, Wendy L.; Krzemiński, Wojtek; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  11. SN 2009N: Another supernova between the normal and subluminous Type II-P SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takáts, K.

    2014-10-01

    We collected ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry together with optical and near-infrared spectra of SN 2009N. The optical spectra had narrow features with low velocities, typical of subluminous SNe II-P. The bolometric luminosity during the plateau phase was in between those of the subluminous and normal SNe II-P. The NIR spectra of SN 2009N contain features typical of SNe II-P, with the exception of the appearance of a feature at ˜ 1.055 μ m +48 days after the explosion. Via spectral modeling we found that this line is probably due to high-velocity He i λ 10830 The presence of this line, together with a HV component of Hα, can be an indicator of weak interaction of the ejecta with circumstellar material. We estimated the distance to SN 2009N using multiple versions of both the expanding photosphere method and the standardized candle method as D=21.6 ± 1.1 Mpc (μ=31.67 ± 0.11). The produced nickel mass was estimated to be 0.020 ± 0.004 M_sun. We determined the physical properties of the progenitor at the explosion via hydrodynamical modeling. The total explosion energy (˜ 0.48 {foe}) is in between the values typical of subluminous and normal SNe II-P. The pre-supernova mass (˜ 13-13.5 M_{sun}) is consistent with that of red supergiant stars, while the relatively small estimated radius at the time of the explosion (R_{ini}≍ 287 R_{sun}) can point to a yellow supergiant star.

  12. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program - II. Initial analysis of spectra obtained near maximum brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Kong, Jason J.; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2012-09-01

    In this second paper in a series, we present measurements of spectral features of 432 low-redshift (z < 0.1) optical spectra of 261 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) within 20 d of maximum brightness. The data were obtained from 1989 to the end of 2008 as part of the Berkeley Supernova Ia Program (BSNIP) and are presented in BSNIP I by Silverman et al. We describe in detail our method of automated, robust spectral feature definition and measurement which expands upon similar previous studies. Using this procedure, we attempt to measure expansion velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths (pEWs), spectral feature depths and fluxes at the centre and endpoints of each of nine major spectral feature complexes. We investigate how velocity and pEW evolve with time and how they correlate with each other. Various spectral classification schemes are employed and quantitative spectral differences among the subclasses are investigated. Several ratios of pEW values are calculated and studied. The so-called Si II ratio, often used as a luminosity indicator, is found to be well correlated with the so-called SiFe ratio and anticorrelated with the analogous 'SSi ratio', confirming the results of previous studies. Furthermore, SNe Ia that show strong evidence for interaction with circumstellar material or an aspherical explosion are found to have the largest near-maximum expansion velocities and pEWs, possibly linking extreme values of spectral observables with specific progenitor or explosion scenarios. We find that purely spectroscopic classification schemes are useful in identifying the most peculiar SNe Ia. However, in almost all spectral parameters investigated, the full sample of objects spans a nearly continuous range of values. Comparisons to previously published theoretical models of SNe Ia are made and we conclude with a brief discussion of how the measurements performed herein and the possible correlations presented will be important for future SN surveys.

  13. Predicting polarization signatures for double-detonation and delayed-detonation models of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Kromer, M.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Fink, M.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.; Pakmor, R.; Ruiter, A. J.; Taubenberger, S.

    2016-10-01

    Calculations of synthetic spectropolarimetry are one means to test multidimensional explosion models for Type Ia supernovae. In a recent paper, we demonstrated that the violent merger of a 1.1 and 0.9 M⊙ white dwarf binary system is too asymmetric to explain the low polarization levels commonly observed in normal Type Ia supernovae. Here, we present polarization simulations for two alternative scenarios: the sub-Chandrasekhar mass double-detonation and the Chandrasekhar mass delayed-detonation model. Specifically, we study a 2D double-detonation model and a 3D delayed-detonation model, and calculate polarization spectra for multiple observer orientations in both cases. We find modest polarization levels (<1 per cent) for both explosion models. Polarization in the continuum peaks at ˜0.1-0.3 per cent and decreases after maximum light, in excellent agreement with spectropolarimetric data of normal Type Ia supernovae. Higher degrees of polarization are found across individual spectral lines. In particular, the synthetic Si II λ6355 profiles are polarized at levels that match remarkably well the values observed in normal Type Ia supernovae, while the low degrees of polarization predicted across the O I λ7774 region are consistent with the non-detection of this feature in current data. We conclude that our models can reproduce many of the characteristics of both flux and polarization spectra for well-studied Type Ia supernovae, such as SN 2001el and SN 2012fr. However, the two models considered here cannot account for the unusually high level of polarization observed in extreme cases such as SN 2004dt.

  14. Physics of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-12-13

    Presupernova models of massive stars are presented and their explosion by ''delayed neutrino transport'' examined. A new form of long duration Type II supernova model is also explored based upon repeated encounter with the electron-positron pair instability in stars heavier than about 60 Msub solar. Carbon deflagration in white dwarfs is discussed as the probable explanation of Type I supernovae and special attention is paid to the physical processes whereby a nuclear flame propagates through degenerate carbon. 89 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Can pair-instability supernova models match the observations of superluminous supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Blinnikov, S.

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of so-called superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are discovered. It is believed that at least some of them with slowly fading light curves originate in stellar explosions induced by the pair instability mechanism. Recent stellar evolution models naturally predict pair instability supernovae (PISNe) from very massive stars at wide range of metallicities (up to Z = 0.006, Yusof et al.). In the scope of this study, we analyse whether PISN models can match the observational properties of SLSNe with various light-curve shapes. Specifically, we explore the influence of different degrees of macroscopic chemical mixing in PISN explosive products on the resulting observational properties. We artificially apply mixing to the 250 M⊙ PISN evolutionary model from Kozyreva et al. and explore its supernova evolution with the one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. The greatest success in matching SLSN observations is achieved in the case of an extreme macroscopic mixing, where all radioactive material is ejected into the hydrogen-helium outer layer. Such an extreme macroscopic redistribution of chemicals produces events with faster light curves with high photospheric temperatures and high photospheric velocities. These properties fit a wider range of SLSNe than non-mixed PISN model. Our mixed models match the light curves, colour temperature, and photospheric velocity evolution of two well-observed SLSNe PTF12dam and LSQ12dlf. However, these models' extreme chemical redistribution may be hard to realize in massive PISNe. Therefore, alternative models such as the magnetar mechanism or wind-interaction may still to be favourable to interpret rapidly rising SLSNe.

  16. Condensation of dust in the ejecta of Type II-P supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2015-03-01

    Aims: We study the production of dust in Type II-P supernova ejecta by coupling the gas-phase chemistry to the dust nucleation and condensation phases. We consider two supernova progenitor masses with homogeneous and clumpy ejecta to assess the chemical type and quantity of dust that forms. Grain size distributions are derived for all dust components as a function of post-explosion time. Methods: The chemistry of the gas phase and the simultaneous formation of dust clusters are described by a chemical network that includes all possible processes that are efficient at high gas temperatures and densities. The formation of key bimolecular species (e.g., CO, SiO) and dust clusters of silicates, alumina, silica, metal carbides, metal sulphides, pure metals, and amorphous carbon is considered. A set of stiff, coupled, ordinary, differential equations is solved for the gas conditions pertaining to supernova explosions. These master equations are coupled to a dust condensation formalism based on Brownian coagulation. Results: We find that Type II-P supernovae produce dust grains of various chemical compositions and size distributions as a function of post-explosion time. The grain size distributions gain in complexity with time, are slewed towards large grains, and differ from the usual Mathis, Rumpl, & Nordsieck power-law distribution characterising interstellar dust. Gas density enhancements in the form of ejecta clumps strongly affect the chemical composition of dust and the grain size distributions. Some dust type, such as forsterite and pure metallic grains, are highly dependent on clumpiness. Specifically, a clumpy ejecta produces large grains over 0.1 μm, and the final dust mass for the 19 M⊙ progenitor reaches 0.14 M⊙. Clumps also favour the formation of specific molecules, such as CO2, in the oxygen-rich zones. Conversely, the carbon and alumina dust masses are primarily controlled by the mass yields of alumina and carbon in the ejecta zones where the dust is

  17. Supernova hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1981-11-01

    The physics as well as astrophysics of the supernova (SN) phenomenon are illustrated with the appropriate numbers. The explosion of a star, a supernova, occurs at the end of its evolution when the nuclear fuel in its core is almost, or completely, consumed. The star may explode due to a small residual thermonuclear detonation, type I SN, or it may collapse, type I and type II SN, leaving a neutron star remnant. The type I progenitor is thought to be an old accreting white dwarf, 1.4 interior mass, with a close companion star. A type II SN is thought to be a massive young star, 6 to 10 interior mass. The mechanism of explosion is still a challenge to model, being the most extreme conditions of matter and hydrodynamics that occur presently and excessively in the universe.

  18. Swift/UVOT Observations of the Type II Supernova PTF10gva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenko, S. B.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Nugent, P. E.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-05-01

    We triggered our Swift program ("Unveiling New Classes of Transients with the Palomar Transient Factory; PI Kulkarni) to obtain target of opportunity observations of the type II supernova PTF10gva (ATEL #2603). Observations were obtained with the on-board Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope in the V, B, U, UW1, UM2, and UW2 filters beginning at May 7.19 2010 UT. PTF10gva is clearly detected in all filters.

  19. A search for supernova remnants in NGC 6946 using the [Fe II] 1.64 μm line

    SciTech Connect

    Bruursema, Justice; Meixner, Margaret; Long, Knox S.; Otsuka, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    Shock models indicate and observations show that in the infrared (IR), supernova remnants (SNRs) emit strongly in [Fe II] at 1.64 μm. Here, we report the results of a search for SNRs in NGC 6946 relying on [Fe II] 1.64 μm line emission, where we employed an adjacent [Fe II]{sub Off} filter to accurately assess the local continuum levels. For this study, we used the WIYN High Resolution Infrared Camera on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope to image NGC 6946 in broadbands J and H and narrowbands [Fe II], [Fe II]{sub Off}, Paβ, and Paβ{sub Off}. From our search, we have identified 48 SNR candidates (SNRcs), 6 of which are coincident with sources found in prior radio, optical, and/or X-ray studies. The measured [Fe II] fluxes of our SNRcs range from 1.5 × 10{sup –16} to 4.2 × 10{sup –15} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} and are among the highest of previously published extragalactic SNR [Fe II] fluxes. All of the candidates now need to be confirmed spectroscopically. However, the fact that we detect as many objects as we did suggests that [Fe II] can be used as an effective search tool to find extragalactic SNRs.

  20. Modelling the interaction of thermonuclear supernova remnants with circumstellar structures: the case of Tycho's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.; Kaastra, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    The well-established Type Ia remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572) reveals discrepant ambient medium-density estimates based on either the measured dynamics or the X-ray emission properties. This discrepancy can potentially be solved by assuming that the supernova remnant (SNR) shock initially moved through a stellar wind bubble, but is currently evolving in the uniform interstellar medium with a relatively low density. We investigate this scenario by combining hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-loss phase and the SNR evolution with a coupled X-ray emission model, which includes non-equilibrium ionization. For the explosion models we use the well-known W7 deflagration model and the delayed detonation model that was previously shown to provide good fits to the X-ray emission of Tycho's SNR. Our simulations confirm that a uniform ambient density cannot simultaneously reproduce the dynamical and X-ray emission properties of Tycho. In contrast, models that considered that the remnant was evolving in a dense, but small, wind bubble reproduce reasonably well both the measured X-ray emission spectrum and the expansion parameter of Tycho's SNR. Finally, we discuss possible mass-loss scenarios in the context of single- and double-degenerate models which possibly could form such a small dense wind bubble.

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Choi, Changsu; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Don Frederic; Depoy, Darren L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Hogan, Craig J.; Holtzman, Jon; Im, Myungshin; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Marshall, Jennifer L.; McGinnis, David; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Portsmouth U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Fermilab /Ohio State U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fermilab /Bristol U. /Apache Point Observ. /Liverpool John Moores U., ARI /Columbia U., CBA /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Durham U. /Portsmouth U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Naval Academy, Annapolis /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /New Mexico State U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Jefferson Lab /Apache Point Observ. /Gottingen U. /Chicago U. /San Francisco State U. /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Fermilab /Apache Point Observ. /Durham U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Barcelona U. /Stockholm U. /Apache Point Observ. /Lick Observ. /Sussex U. /Barcelona U. /Apache Point Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Fermilab /DARK Cosmology Ctr. /Chicago U. /Fermilab /South African Astron. Observ. /Ohio State U. /Apache Point Observ. /Texas U., McDonald Observ. /Fermilab

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  2. Neutrino event counts from Type Ia supernova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Gautam; Scholberg, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) are widely known to be among the universe's primary neutrino factories, releasing ˜99% of their energy, or ˜1053 ergs, in the form of the tiny leptons. On the other hand, less than 4% of the energy of Type Ia SNe is released via neutrinos, hence making Ia SNe impossible to detect (through neutrino observations) at typical supernova distances. For this reason, neutrino signatures from these explosions have very rarely been modeled. We ran time-sliced fluences from non-oscillation pure deflagration and delayed detonation (DDT) Ia models by Odrzywolek and Plewa (2011) through SNOwGLoBES, a software that calculates event rates and other observed quantities of supernova neutrinos in various detectors. We determined Ia neutrino event rates in Hyper-K, a proposed water Cherenkov detector, JUNO, a scintillator detector under construction, and DUNE, a proposed argon detector, and identified criteria to distinguish between the two models (pure deflagration and DDT) based on data from a real supernova (statistically represented by a Poisson distribution around the expected result). We found that up to distances of 8.00, 1.54, and 2.37 kpc (subject to change based on oscillation effects and modified detector efficiencies), we can discern the explosion mechanism with ≥90% confidence in Hyper-K, JUNO, and DUNE, respectively, thus learning more about Ia progenitors.

  3. Photometric and polarimetric observations of fast declining Type II supernovae 2013hj and 2014G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subhash; Kumar, Brijesh; Misra, Kuntal; Matsumoto, Katsura; Kumar, Brajesh; Singh, Mridweeka; Fukushima, Daiki; Kawabata, Miho

    2016-01-01

    We present broad-band photometric and polarimetric observations of two Type II supernovae (SNe) 2013hj and 2014G. SN 2014G is a spectroscopically classified Type IIL event, which we also confirm photometrically because its light curve shows characteristic features - a plateau slope of 2.55 mag (100 d)-1 in the V band and a duration of ˜77 d - of a generic Type IIL SN. However, SN 2013hj also shows a high plateau decline rate of 1.5 mag (100 d)-1 in the V band, similar to SNe IIL, but marginally lower than SNe IIL template light curves. Our high cadence photometric observations of SNe 2013hj and 2014G enables us to cover all characteristic phases up to the radioactive tail of optical light curves. Broad-band polarimetric observations reveal some polarization in SN 2013hj with subtle enhancement as the SN evolves towards the plateau end. However, the polarization angle remains constant throughout the evolution. This characteristic is consistent with the idea that the evolving SN with recombining hydrogen envelope is slowly revealing a more asymmetric central region of explosion. Modelling of the bolometric light curve yields a progenitor mass of ˜11 M⊙ with a radius of ˜700 R⊙ for SN 2013hj, while for the SN 2014G model estimated progenitor mass is ˜9 M⊙ with a radius of ˜630 R⊙, both having a typical energy budget of ˜2 × 1051 erg.

  4. Line Identifications of Type I Supernovae: On the Detection of Si II for These Hydrogen-poor Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrent, J. T.; Milisavljevic, D.; Soderberg, A. M.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2016-03-01

    Here we revisit line identifications of type I supernovae (SNe I) and highlight trace amounts of unburned hydrogen as an important free parameter for the composition of the progenitor. Most one-dimensional stripped-envelope models of supernovae indicate that observed features near 6000-6400 Å in type I spectra are due to more than Si ii λ6355. However, while an interpretation of conspicuous Si ii λ6355 can approximate 6150 Å absorption features for all SNe Ia during the first month of free expansion, similar identifications applied to 6250 Å features of SNe Ib and Ic have not been as successful. When the corresponding synthetic spectra are compared with high-quality timeseries observations, the computed spectra are frequently too blue in wavelength. Some improvement can be achieved with Fe ii lines that contribute redward of 6150 Å however, the computed spectra either remain too blue or the spectrum only reaches a fair agreement when the rise-time to peak brightness of the model conflicts with observations by a factor of two. This degree of disagreement brings into question the proposed explosion scenario. Similarly, a detection of strong Si ii λ6355 in the spectra of broadlined Ic and super-luminous events of type I/R is less convincing despite numerous model spectra used to show otherwise. Alternatively, we suggest 6000-6400 Å features are possibly influenced by either trace amounts of hydrogen or blueshifted absorption and emission in Hα, the latter being an effect which is frequently observed in the spectra of hydrogen-rich, SNe II.

  5. White dwarf models for type 1 supernovae and quiet supernovae, and presupernova evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    Supernova mechanisms in accreting white dwarfs are considered with emphasis on deflagration as a plausible mechanism for producing Type I supernovae and electron captures to form quiet supernovae leaving neutron stars. These outcomes depend on accretion rate of helium, initial mass and composition of the white dwarf. The various types of hydrogen shell burning in the presupernova stage are also discussed.

  6. ANALYTICAL LIGHT CURVE MODELS OF SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE: {chi}{sup 2}-MINIMIZATION OF PARAMETER FITS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Vinko, J.; Horvath, Z. L.; Nagy, A.

    2013-08-10

    We present fits of generalized semi-analytic supernova (SN) light curve (LC) models for a variety of power inputs including {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}Co radioactive decay, magnetar spin-down, and forward and reverse shock heating due to supernova ejecta-circumstellar matter (CSM) interaction. We apply our models to the observed LCs of the H-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSN-II) SN 2006gy, SN 2006tf, SN 2008am, SN 2008es, CSS100217, the H-poor SLSN-I SN 2005ap, SCP06F6, SN 2007bi, SN 2010gx, and SN 2010kd, as well as to the interacting SN 2008iy and PTF 09uj. Our goal is to determine the dominant mechanism that powers the LCs of these extraordinary events and the physical conditions involved in each case. We also present a comparison of our semi-analytical results with recent results from numerical radiation hydrodynamics calculations in the particular case of SN 2006gy in order to explore the strengths and weaknesses of our models. We find that CS shock heating produced by ejecta-CSM interaction provides a better fit to the LCs of most of the events we examine. We discuss the possibility that collision of supernova ejecta with hydrogen-deficient CSM accounts for some of the hydrogen-deficient SLSNe (SLSN-I) and may be a plausible explanation for the explosion mechanism of SN 2007bi, the pair-instability supernova candidate. We characterize and discuss issues of parameter degeneracy.

  7. Early-time light curves of Type Ib/c supernovae from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Leloudas, G.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Valenti, S.; Galbany, L.; Kessler, R.; Schneider, D. P.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2015-02-01

    Context. Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) have been investigated in several single-object studies; however, there is still a paucity of works concerning larger, homogeneous samples of these hydrogen-poor transients, in particular regarding the premaximum phase of their light curves. Aims: In this paper we present and analyze the early-time optical light curves (LCs, ugriz) of 20 SNe Ib/c from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) SN survey II, aiming to study their observational and physical properties, as well as to derive their progenitor parameters. Methods: High-cadence, multiband LCs are fitted with a functional model and the best-fit parameters are compared among the SN types. Bolometric LCs (BLCs) are constructed for the entire sample. We also computed the black-body (BB) temperature (TBB) and photospheric radius (Rph) evolution for each SN via BB fits on the spectral energy distributions. In addition, the bolometric properties are compared to both hydrodynamical and analytical model expectations. Results: Complementing our sample with literature data, we find that SNe Ic and Ic-BL (broad-line) have shorter rise times than those of SNe Ib and IIb. The decline rate parameter, Δm15, is similar among the different subtypes. SNe Ic appear brighter and bluer than SNe Ib, but this difference vanishes if we consider host galaxy extinction corrections based on colors. Templates for SN Ib/c LCs are presented. Our SNe have typical TBB of ~10 000 K at the peak and Rph of ~1015 cm. Analysis of the BLCs of SNe Ib and Ic gives typical ejecta masses Mej≈ 3.6-5.7 M⊙, energies EK≈ 1.5-1.7×1051 erg, and M(56Ni) ≈ 0.3 M⊙. Higher values for EK and M(56Ni) are estimated for SNe Ic-BL (Mej≈ 5.4 M⊙, EK≈ 10.7×1051 erg, M(56Ni) ≈ 1.1 M⊙). For the majority of SNe Ic and Ic-BL, we can put strong limits (<2-4 days) on the duration of the expected early-time plateau. Less stringent limits can be placed on the duration of the plateau for the sample of SNe Ib. In the

  8. Szekeres Swiss-cheese model and supernova observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Celerier, Marie-Noeelle

    2010-11-15

    We use different particular classes of axially symmetric Szekeres Swiss-cheese models for the study of the apparent dimming of the supernovae of type Ia. We compare the results with those obtained in the corresponding Lemaitre-Tolman Swiss-cheese models. Although the quantitative picture is different the qualitative results are comparable, i.e., one cannot fully explain the dimming of the supernovae using small-scale ({approx}50 Mpc) inhomogeneities. To fit successfully the data we need structures of order of 500 Mpc size or larger. However, this result might be an artifact due to the use of axial light rays in axially symmetric models. Anyhow, this work is a first step in trying to use Szekeres Swiss-cheese models in cosmology and it will be followed by the study of more physical models with still less symmetry.

  9. Szekeres Swiss-cheese model and supernova observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof; Célérier, Marie-Noëlle

    2010-11-01

    We use different particular classes of axially symmetric Szekeres Swiss-cheese models for the study of the apparent dimming of the supernovae of type Ia. We compare the results with those obtained in the corresponding Lemaître-Tolman Swiss-cheese models. Although the quantitative picture is different the qualitative results are comparable, i.e., one cannot fully explain the dimming of the supernovae using small-scale (˜50Mpc) inhomogeneities. To fit successfully the data we need structures of order of 500 Mpc size or larger. However, this result might be an artifact due to the use of axial light rays in axially symmetric models. Anyhow, this work is a first step in trying to use Szekeres Swiss-cheese models in cosmology and it will be followed by the study of more physical models with still less symmetry.

  10. Nuclear structure and the fate of core collapse (Type II) supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Moshe

    2014-08-01

    For a long time Gerry Brown and his collaborator Hans Bethe considered the question of the final fate of a core collapse (Type II) supernova. Recalling ideas from nuclear structure on Kaon condensate and a soft equation of state of the dense nuclear matter they concluded that progenitor stars with mass as low as 17-18M⊙ (including supernova 1987A) could collapse to a small mass black hole with a mass just beyond 1.5M⊙, the upper bound they derive for a neutron star. We discuss another nuclear structure effect that determines the carbon to oxygen ratio (C/O) at the end of helium burning. This ratio also determines the fate of a Type II supernova with a carbon rich progenitor star producing a neutron star and oxygen rich collapsing to a black hole. While the C/O ratio is one of the most important nuclear inputs to stellar evolution it is still not known with sufficient accuracy. We discuss future efforts to measure with gamma-beam and TPC detector of the C12(α,γ)O16 reaction that determines the C/O ratio in stellar helium burning.

  11. Type II Supernova Matter in a Silicon Carbide Grain from the Murchison Meteorite

    PubMed

    Hoppe; Strebel; Eberhardt; Amari; Lewis

    1996-05-31

    The circumstellar silicon carbide (SiC) grain X57 from the Murchison meteorite contains large amounts of radiogenic calcium-44 (20 times its solar system abundance) and has an anomalous silicon isotopic composition, different from other circumstellar SiC grains. Its inferred initial 44Ti/Si and 44Ti/48Ti ratios are 1.6 x 10(-4) and 0.37. In addition, it contains radiogenic magnesium-26; the inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratio is 0.11. The isotopic and elemental data of X57 can be explained by selective mixing of matter from different zones of a typical type II supernova of 25 solar masses during its explosion. The high 44Ti/Si ratio requires contributions from the innermost nickel zone of the supernova to the SiC condensation site, as similarly suggested by astronomical observations.

  12. SN 2009ib: a Type II-P supernova with an unusually long plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takáts, K.; Pignata, G.; Pumo, M. L.; Paillas, E.; Zampieri, L.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Benetti, S.; Bufano, F.; Cappellaro, E.; Ergon, M.; Fraser, M.; Hamuy, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Smartt, S. J.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.; Moore, J. P.; Reichart, D.

    2015-07-01

    We present optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of SN 2009ib, a Type II-P supernova in NGC 1559. This object has moderate brightness, similar to those of the intermediate-luminosity SNe 2008in and 2009N. Its plateau phase is unusually long, lasting for about 130 d after explosion. The spectra are similar to those of the subluminous SN 2002gd, with moderate expansion velocities. We estimate the 56Ni mass produced as 0.046 ± 0.015 M⊙. We determine the distance to SN 2009ib using both the expanding photosphere method (EPM) and the standard candle method. We also apply EPM to SN 1986L, a Type II-P SN that exploded in the same galaxy. Combining the results of different methods, we conclude the distance to NGC 1559 as D = 19.8 ± 3.0 Mpc. We examine archival, pre-explosion images of the field taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, and find a faint source at the position of the SN, which has a yellow colour [(V - I)0 = 0.85 mag]. Assuming it is a single star, we estimate its initial mass as MZAMS = 20 M⊙. We also examine the possibility, that instead of the yellow source the progenitor of SN 2009ib is a red supergiant star too faint to be detected. In this case, we estimate the upper limit for the initial zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass of the progenitor to be ˜14-17 M⊙. In addition, we infer the physical properties of the progenitor at the explosion via hydrodynamical modelling of the observables, and estimate the total energy as ˜0.55 × 1051 erg, the pre-explosion radius as ˜400 R⊙, and the ejected envelope mass as ˜15 M⊙, which implies that the mass of the progenitor before explosion was ˜16.5-17 M⊙.

  13. Cosmological Galaxy Evolution with Superbubble Feedback II: The Limits of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, B. W.; Wadsley, J.; Couchman, H. M. P.

    2016-08-01

    We explore when supernovae can (and cannot) regulate the star formation and bulge growth in galaxies based on a sample of 18 simulated galaxies. The simulations are the first to model feedback superbubbles including evaporation and conduction. These processes determine the mass loadings and wind speeds of galactic outflows. We show that for galaxies with virial masses >1012 M⊙, supernovae alone cannot prevent excessive star formation. This occurs due to a shutdown of galactic winds, with wind mass loadings falling from η ˜ 10 to η < 1. In more massive systems, the ejection of baryons to the circumgalactic medium falters earlier on and the galaxies diverge significantly from observed galaxy scaling relations and morphologies. The decreasing efficiency is due to a deepening potential well preventing gas escape, and is unavoidable if mass-loaded outlflows regulate star formation on galactic scales. This implies that non-supernova feedback mechanisms must become dominant for galaxies with stellar masses greater than ˜4 × 1010 M⊙. The runaway growth of the central stellar bulge, strongly linked to black hole growth, suggests that feedback from active galactic nuclei is the likely mechanism. Below this mass, supernovae alone are able to produce a realistic stellar mass fraction, star formation history and disc morphology.

  14. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    1999-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO (Collaboration of Australia and Nippon Gamma Ray Observatory at Outback) experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  15. Modelling Hard Gamma-Ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2000-01-01

    The observation by the CANGAROO experiment of TeV emission from SN 1006, in conjunction with several instances of non-thermal X-ray emission from supernova remnants, has led to inferences of super-TeV electrons in these extended sources. While this is sufficient to propel the theoretical community in their modelling of particle acceleration and associated radiation, the anticipated emergence in the next decade of a number of new experiments probing the TeV and sub-TeV bands provides further substantial motivation for modellers. In particular, the quest for obtaining unambiguous gamma-ray signatures of cosmic ray ion acceleration defines a "Holy Grail" for observers and theorists alike. This review summarizes theoretical developments in the prediction of MeV-TeV gamma-rays from supernova remnants over the last five years, focusing on how global properties of models can impact, and be impacted by, hard gamma-ray observational programs, thereby probing the supernova remnant environment. Properties of central consideration include the maximum energy of accelerated particles, the density of the unshocked interstellar medium, the ambient magnetic field, and the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. Criteria for determining good candidate remnants for observability in the TeV band are identified.

  16. Evaluating nuclear physics inputs in core-collapse supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Hix, William Raphael; Baird, Mark L; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova models depend on the details of the nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs just as they depend on the details of the macroscopic physics (transport, hydrodynamics, etc.), numerical methods, and progenitors. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We present the results of our ongoing comparison studies of nuclear and weak interaction physics inputs to core collapse supernova models using the spherically-symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-Boltztran. We focus on comparisons of the effects of the nuclear EoS and the effects of improving the opacities, particularly neutrino--nucleon interactions. We also investigate the feedback between different EoSs and opacities in the context of different progenitors.

  17. A 3D numerical model for Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Roy, J. C.; Esquivel, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Reynoso, E. M.

    2014-07-01

    We present new 3D numerical simulations for Kepler's supernova remnant. In this work we revisit the possibility that the asymmetric shape of the remnant in X-rays is the product of a Type Ia supernova explosion which occurs inside the wind bubble previously created by an AGB companion star. Due to the large peculiar velocity of the system, the interaction of the strong AGB wind with the interstellar medium results in a bow shock structure. In this new model we propose that the AGB wind is anisotropic, with properties such as mass-loss rate and density having a latitude dependence, and that the orientation of the polar axis of the AGB star is not aligned with the direction of motion. The ejecta from the Type Ia supernova explosion is modelled using a power-law density profile, and we let the remnant evolve for 400 yr. We computed synthetic X-ray maps from the numerical results. We find that the estimated size and peculiar X-ray morphology of Kepler's supernova remnant are well reproduced by considering an AGB mass-loss rate of 10-5 M⊙ yr-1, a wind terminal velocity of 10 km s-1, an ambient medium density of 10-3 cm-3 and an explosion energy of 7 × 1050 erg. The obtained total X-ray luminosity of the remnant in this model reaches 6 × 1050 erg, which is within a factor of 2 of the observed value, and the time evolution of the luminosity shows a rate of decrease in recent decades of ˜2.4 per cent yr-1 that is consistent with the observations.

  18. Constraining the role of Type IA and Type II supernovae in galaxy groups by spatially resolved analysis of ROSAT and ASCA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finoguenov, A.; Ponman, T. J.

    1999-04-01

    We present the results of modelling the distribution of gas properties in the galaxy groups HCG 51, HCG 62 and NGC 5044, and in the poor cluster AWM 7, using both ASCA SIS and ROSAT data. The spectral quality of the ASCA data allows the radial distribution in the abundances of several elements to be resolved. In all systems apart from HCG 51, we see both central cooling flows and a general decline in metal abundances with radius. The ratio of iron to alpha-element abundances varies significantly, and, in comparison with theoretical supernova yields, indicates a significant contribution to the metal abundance of the intergalactic medium from Type Ia supernovae. This is seen both within the groups and throughout much of the cluster AWM 7. The total energy input into the IGM from supernovae can be calculated from our results, and is typically 20-40 per cent of the thermal energy of the gas, mostly from Type II supernovae. Our results support the idea that the SN II ejecta have been more widely distributed in the IGM, probably owing to the action of galaxy winds, and the lower iron mass-to-light ratio in groups suggests that some of this enriched gas has been lost altogether from the shallower potential wells of the smaller systems.

  19. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV - implications for magnitude-limited surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poznanski, D.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Blagorodnova, N.

    2015-05-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well-sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that two or three of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, and spectra consistent with other SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70 d, unlike the 100 d typically found in nearby galaxies. The OGLE SNe are also brighter, and show that magnitude-limited surveys find SNe that are different than usually found in nearby galaxies. We discuss this sample in the context of understanding Type II SNe as a class and their suggested use as standard candles.

  20. PSN J08070669-2803101 is a young Type II supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, D.; Fesen, R.; Pickering, T.; Kniazev, A.; Parrent, J.; Soderberg, Alicia; Margutti, Raffaella

    2013-03-01

    Low-dispersion spectra (range 350-880 nm), obtained on March 10.9 UT with the 10-m SALT telescope (+ RSS), show PSN J08070669-2803101 to be a young type-II supernova not long after outburst. Fitting with the SYN++ software (Thomas et al. 2011, PASP, 123, 237) suggests that the broad P-Cyg features seen on a fairly blue continuum are associated with H_alpha, Na I, Ca II, and He I. Using a redshift of z = 0.0037 measured from narrow emission lines associated with a coincident H II region in the host galaxy ESO 430-020, we estimate the velocity of the H_alpha absorption feature to be approximately -18500 km/s.

  1. White dwarf models of supernovae and cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, K.; Hashimoto, M.

    1986-01-01

    If the accreting white dwarf increases its mass to the Chandrasekhar mass, it will either explode as a Type I supernova or collapse to form a neutron star. In fact, there is a good agreement between the exploding white dwarf model for Type I supernovae and observations. We describe various types of evolution of accreting white dwarfs as a function of binary parameters (i.e,. composition, mass, and age of the white dwarf, its companion star, and mass accretion rate), and discuss the conditions for the precursors of exploding or collapsing white dwarfs, and their relevance to cataclysmic variables. Particular attention is given to helium star cataclysmics which might be the precursors of some Type I supernovae or ultrashort period x-ray binaries. Finally we present new evolutionary calculations using the updated nuclear reaction rates for the formation of O+Ne+Mg white dwarfs, and discuss the composition structure and their relevance to the model for neon novae. 61 refs., 14 figs.

  2. Photometric type Ia supernova candidates from the three-year SDSS-II SN survey data

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Connolly, Brian; Dilday, Benjamin; Cambell, Heather; Frieman, Joshua A.; Gladney, Larry; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; /Barcelona, IFAE /ICREA, Barcelona /Portsmouth U., ICG

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the three-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova (SN) Survey data and identify a sample of 1070 photometric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) candidates based on their multiband light curve data. This sample consists of SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, with a subset of 210 candidates having spectroscopic redshifts of their host galaxies measured while the remaining 860 candidates are purely photometric in their identification. We describe a method for estimating the efficiency and purity of photometric SN Ia classification when spectroscopic confirmation of only a limited sample is available, and demonstrate that SN Ia candidates from SDSS-II can be identified photometrically with {approx}91% efficiency and with a contamination of {approx}6%. Although this is the largest uniform sample of SN candidates to date for studying photometric identification, we find that a larger spectroscopic sample of contaminating sources is required to obtain a better characterization of the background events. A Hubble diagram using SN candidates with no spectroscopic confirmation, but with host galaxy spectroscopic redshifts, yields a distance modulus dispersion that is only {approx}20%-40% larger than that of the spectroscopically confirmed SN Ia sample alone with no significant bias. A Hubble diagram with purely photometric classification and redshift-distance measurements, however, exhibits biases that require further investigation for precision cosmology.

  3. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluis; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  4. A MEASUREMENT OF THE RATE OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN GALAXY CLUSTERS FROM THE SDSS-II SUPERNOVA SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dilday, Benjamin; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Castander, Francisco; Cinabro, David; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, LluIs; Miquel, Ramon; Garnavich, Peter; Goobar, Ariel; Ihara, Yutaka; Kessler, Richard; Lampeitl, Hubert; Nichol, Robert C.; Marriner, John; Molla, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {<=} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {<=} z {<=} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sup +0.17+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.55{sup +0.13+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12} L {sup -1} {sub xsun} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sup +0.18+0.01} {sub -0.12-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.49{sup +0.15+0.02} {sub -0.11-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sup +1.99+0.07} {sub -1.11-0.04}) SNur h {sup 2} and (0.36{sup +0.84+0.01} {sub -0.30-0.01}) SNur h {sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sup +1.31+0.043} {sub -0.91-0.015} and 3.02{sup +1.31+0.062} {sub -1.03-0.048}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sup +0.15} {sub -0.14})+(0.91{sup +0.85} {sub -0.81}) x z] SNuB h {sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most three hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe

  5. 3D Simulations of Supernova Remnants from Type Ia Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Heather; Reynolds, S. P.; Frohlich, C.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) originate from thermonuclear explosions of white dwarfs. A great deal is still unknown about the explosion mechanisms, particularly the degree of asymmetry. However, Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) can bear the imprint of asymmetry long after the explosion. A SNR of interest is G1.9+0.3, the youngest Galactic SNR, which demonstrates an unusual spatial distribution of elements in the ejecta. While its X-ray spectrum is dominated by synchrotron emission, spectral lines of highly ionized Si, S, and Fe are seen in a few locations, with Fe near the edge of the remnant and with strongly varying Fe/Si ratios. An asymmetric explosion within the white dwarf progenitor may be necessary to explain these unusual features of G1.9+0.3, in particular the shocked Fe at large radii. We use the VH-1 hydrodynamics code to evolve initial Type Ia explosion models in 1, 2, and 3 dimensions at an age of 100 seconds provided by other researchers to study asymmetry, the ignition properties, and the nucleosynthesis resulting from these explosions. We follow the evolution of these models interacting with a uniform external medium to a few hundred years in age. We find the abundance and location of ejecta elements from our models to be inconsistent with the observations of G1.9+0.3; while our models show asymmetric element distributions, we find no tendency for iron-group elements to be found beyond intermediate-mass elements, or for significant iron to be reverse-shocked at all at the age of G1.9+0.3. We compare the amounts of shocked iron-group and intermediate-mass elements as a function of time in the different models. Some new kind of explosion asymmetry may be required to explain G1.9+0.3. This work was performed as part of NC State University's Undergraduate Research in Computational Astrophysics (URCA) program, an REU program supported by the National Science Foundation through award AST-1032736.

  6. Detonating Failed Deflagration Model of Thermonuclear Supernovae. I. Explosion Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, Tomasz

    2007-03-01

    We present a detonating failed deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae. In this model, the thermonuclear explosion of a massive white dwarf follows an off-center deflagration. We conduct a survey of asymmetric ignition configurations initiated at various distances from the stellar center. In all cases studied, we find that only a small amount of stellar fuel is consumed during deflagration phase, no explosion is obtained, and the released energy is mostly wasted on expanding the progenitor. Products of the failed deflagration quickly reach the stellar surface, polluting and strongly disturbing it. These disturbances eventually evolve into small and isolated shock-dominated regions that are rich in fuel. We consider these regions as seeds capable of forming self-sustained detonations that, ultimately, result in the thermonuclear supernova explosion. Preliminary nucleosynthesis results indicate that the model supernova ejecta are typically composed of about 0.1-0.25 Msolar of silicon group elements and 0.9-1.2 Msolar of iron group elements and are essentially carbon-free. The ejecta have a composite morphology, are chemically stratified, and display a modest amount of intrinsic asymmetry. The innermost layers are slightly egg shaped with the axis ratio ~1.2-1.3 and dominated by the products of silicon burning. This central region is surrounded by a shell of silicon group elements. The outermost layers of ejecta are highly inhomogeneous and contain products of incomplete oxygen burning with only small admixture of unburned stellar material. The explosion energies are ~(1.3-1.5)×1051 ergs.

  7. Photospheric Magnitude Diagrams for Type II Supernovae: A Promising Tool to Compute Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Ósmar; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Hamuy, Mario

    2014-12-01

    We develop an empirical color-based standardization for Type II supernovae (SNe II), equivalent to the classical surface brightness method given in Wesselink. We calibrate this standardization using SNe II with host galaxy distances measured using Cepheids, and a well-constrained shock breakout epoch and extinction due to the host galaxy. We estimate the reddening with an analysis of the B - V versus V - I color-color curves, similar to that of Natali et al. With four SNe II meeting the above requirements, we build a photospheric magnitude versus color diagram (similar to an H-R diagram) with a dispersion of 0.29 mag. We also show that when using time since shock breakout instead of color as the independent variable, the same standardization gives a dispersion of 0.09 mag. Moreover, we show that the above time-based standardization corresponds to the generalization of the standardized candle method of Hamuy & Pinto for various epochs throughout the photospheric phase. To test the new tool, we construct Hubble diagrams for different subsamples of 50 low-redshift (cz < 104 km s-1) SNe II. For 13 SNe within the Hubble flow (cz CMB > 3000 km s-1) and with a well-constrained shock breakout epoch we obtain values of 68-69 km s-1 Mpc-1 for the Hubble constant and a mean intrinsic scatter of 0.12 mag or 6% in relative distances.

  8. Constraining f (T ,T ) gravity models using type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez-Gómez, Diego; Carvalho, C. Sofia; Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Tereno, Ismael

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of an f (T ,T ) extension of the Teleparallel Equivalent of General Relativity, where T denotes the torsion and T denotes the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. This extension includes nonminimal couplings between torsion and matter. In particular, we construct two specific models that recover the usual continuity equation, namely, f (T ,T )=T +g (T ) and f (T ,T )=T ×g (T ). We then constrain the parameters of each model by fitting the predicted distance modulus to that measured from type Ia supernovae and find that both models can reproduce the late-time cosmic acceleration. We also observe that one of the models satisfies well the observational constraints and yields a goodness-of-fit similar to the Λ CDM model, thus demonstrating that f (T ,T ) gravity theory encompasses viable models that can be an alternative to Λ CDM .

  9. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H. E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), Hδ{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (∼0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  10. FLOYDS Classification of PSN J11104841-3727022 as a Type II Supernova with Possible High Velocity H-alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Valenti, Stefano; Howell, D. Andrew; McCully, Curtis

    2014-12-01

    We obtained spectra of PSN J11104841-3727022 (discovered by Stu Parker; BOSS) on 2014 November 9.71 and 12.71 (UT) with the robotic FLOYDS instrument mounted on the Faulkes Telescope South and find it to be a Type II supernova at the redshift of the host galaxy (0.008152; via NED).

  11. A HUBBLE DIAGRAM FROM TYPE II SUPERNOVAE BASED SOLELY ON PHOTOMETRY: THE PHOTOMETRIC COLOR METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    De Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Morrell, N.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Contreras, C.; Bolt, L.; Burns, C. R.; Folatelli, G.; Krisciunas, K.; Krzeminski, W.; and others

    2015-12-20

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V − i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.

  12. Modeling Asymmetric Forbidden Line Emission Profiles in Supernovae with Clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, Jessica; Ignace, R.; Hole, K. T.

    2010-01-01

    There are some supernovae that display emission line profiles that are asymmetric in shape. One cause for asymmetry could be an in-homogeneous density distribution, or "clumps". We explore the effects of clumps on the emission line profiles of forbidden lines. Our model assumes the ejecta shell is spherically symmetric in velocity, with a central cavity. The model assigns density perturbations to conical sections in the ejecta. To model the emission profile for a forbidden line, we use Sobolev theory. Our model gives asymmetric profiles when the clumping is introduced. The amount of asymmetry varies with the range of density perturbations allowed, and the relative asymmetry evolves in time. This project was funded by a partnership between the National Science Foundation (NSF AST-0552798), Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU), and the Department of Defense (DoD) ASSURE (Awards to Stimulate and Support Undergraduate Research Experiences) programs.

  13. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  14. PTF discovers and follows-up nearby, young, Type II supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Green, Y.; Walker, E.; Mazzali, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Poznanski, D.; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, B.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    On UT 2010 Sep 15.243, the Palomar Transient Factory discovered an optical transient, PTF10vdl at RA(J2000) = 23:05:49.001 and DEC(J2000)=03:31:20.50 near NGC 7483. We obtained Target Of Opportunity spectra with Gemini-S/GMOS (PI Kasliwal) on Sep 16.29. The spectrum was extremely blue (f_nu proportional to nu^4.5) and nearly featureless. We further obtained a spectrum with the TNG/DOLORES (PI Walker) on Sep 17.40 and P-Cygni profiles of four Balmer lines were clearly visible, consistent with the redshift of NGC 7483, suggesting this is a Type II supernova.

  15. Envelope dynamics of iron-core supernova models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkat, Z.; Wheeler, J. C.; Buchler, J.-R.; Rakavy, G.

    1974-01-01

    Wilson (1971) has found that the neutrino transport mechanism is unable to generate a supernova explosion in stars with collapsing iron cores. The present work uses Wilson's analysis to investigate the behavior of the overlying potentially explosive layers which Wilson omitted. The outer boundary of the core of Wilson's models moves in such a manner as to deliver a shock to the base of the envelope. We have numerically followed the progress of such shocks into the envelope of a realistic model obtained from evolutionary calculations. We find that only shocks so strong as to be inconsistent with our treatment are capable of ejecting material. For reasonable shocks the nuclear burning does not proceed rapidly at densities below 1,000 kg/cu cm, and the nuclear energy released is less than the shock energy in all models that come near to ejecting matter.

  16. SDSS-II Supernova Survey: An Analysis of the Largest Sample of Type Ia Supernovae and Correlations with Host-galaxy Spectral Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Rachel C.; D'Andrea, Chris B.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Fischer, John A.; Kessler, Rick; Jha, Saurabh W.; March, Marisa C.; Scolnic, Daniel M.; Fischer, Johanna-Laina; Campbell, Heather; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2016-04-01

    Using the largest single-survey sample of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to date, we study the relationship between properties of SNe Ia and those of their host galaxies, focusing primarily on correlations with Hubble residuals (HRs). Our sample consists of 345 photometrically classified or spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia discovered as part of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-SNS). This analysis utilizes host-galaxy spectroscopy obtained during the SDSS-I/II spectroscopic survey and from an ancillary program on the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey that obtained spectra for nearly all host galaxies of SDSS-II SN candidates. In addition, we use photometric host-galaxy properties from the SDSS-SNS data release such as host stellar mass and star formation rate. We confirm the well-known relation between HR and host-galaxy mass and find a 3.6σ significance of a nonzero linear slope. We also recover correlations between HR and host-galaxy gas-phase metallicity and specific star formation rate as they are reported in the literature. With our large data set, we examine correlations between HR and multiple host-galaxy properties simultaneously and find no evidence of a significant correlation. We also independently analyze our spectroscopically confirmed and photometrically classified SNe Ia and comment on the significance of similar combined data sets for future surveys.

  17. Aspherical supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-05-21

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And

  18. Aspherical supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must be undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new breakthroughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi- dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And

  19. Lensed Type Ia supernovae as probes of cluster mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, J.; Rubin, D.; Richard, J.; Rykoff, E.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Atek, H.; Barbary, K.; Deustua, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goobar, A.; Hook, I.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Huang, X.; Kneib, J.-P.; Lidman, C.; Meyers, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Saunders, C.; Spadafora, A. L.; Suzuki, N.; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2014-05-01

    Using three magnified Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) detected behind CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernovae with Hubble) clusters, we perform a first pilot study to see whether standardizable candles can be used to calibrate cluster mass maps created from strong lensing observations. Such calibrations will be crucial when next-generation Hubble Space Telescope cluster surveys (e.g. Frontier) provide magnification maps that will, in turn, form the basis for the exploration of the high-redshift Universe. We classify SNe using combined photometric and spectroscopic observations, finding two of the three to be clearly of Type Ia and the third probable. The SNe exhibit significant amplification, up to a factor of 1.7 at ˜5σ significance (SN-L2). We conducted this as a blind study to avoid fine-tuning of parameters, finding a mean amplification difference between SNe and the cluster lensing models of 0.09 ± 0.09stat ± 0.05sys mag. This impressive agreement suggests no tension between cluster mass models and high-redshift-standardized SNe Ia. However, the measured statistical dispersion of σμ = 0.21 mag appeared large compared to the dispersion expected based on statistical uncertainties (0.14). Further work with the SN and cluster lensing models, post-unblinding, reduced the measured dispersion to σμ = 0.12. An explicit choice should thus be made as to whether SNe are used unblinded to improve the model, or blinded to test the model. As the lensed SN samples grow larger, this technique will allow improved constraints on assumptions regarding e.g. the structure of the dark matter halo.

  20. On the nature of the progenitors of three Type II-P supernovae: 2004et, 2006my and 2006ov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, R. M.; Smartt, S. J.; Pastorello, A.; Eldridge, J. J.; Stephens, A. W.; Maund, J. R.; Mattila, S.

    2011-02-01

    The pre-explosion observations of the Type II-P supernovae 2006my, 2006ov and 2004et are re-analysed. In the cases of supernovae 2006my and 2006ov we argue that the published candidate progenitors are not coincident with their respective supernova sites in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope observations. We therefore derive upper luminosity and mass limits for the unseen progenitors of both these supernovae, assuming they are red supergiants: 2006my (log L/L⊙= 4.51; m < 13 M⊙) and 2006ov (log L/L⊙= 4.29; m < 10 M⊙). In the case of supernova 2004et we show that the yellow supergiant progenitor candidate, originally identified in Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope images, is still visible ˜3 yr post-explosion in observations from the William Herschel Telescope. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope and Gemini (North) adaptive optics late-time imagery reveal that this source is not a single yellow supergiant star, but rather is resolved into at least three distinct sources. We report the discovery of the unresolved progenitor as an excess of flux in pre-explosion Isaac Newton Telescope i'-band imaging. Accounting for the late-time contribution of the supernova using published optical spectra, we calculate the progenitor photometry as the difference between the pre- and post-explosion, ground-based observations. We find the progenitor was most likely a late K to late M-type supergiant of 8+5-1 M⊙. In all cases we conclude that future, high-resolution observations of the supernova sites will be required to confirm these results.

  1. Gamma-ray constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual supernova explosions via short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring current global Galactic supernova nucleosynthesis with longer-lived radioactivity. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both Co-56 and Co-57 were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions and nucleosynthesis. Live Al-26 in the Galaxy might come from Type II supernovae, and if it is eventually shown to be so, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, and the Galactic Type II supernova rate. Type Ia supernovae, thought to be thermonuclear explosions, have not yet been detected in gamma-rays. This is somewhat surprising given current models and recent Co-56 detection attempts. Ultimately, gamma-ray measurements can confirm their thermonuclear nature, probe the nuclear burning conditions, and help evaluate their contributions to Galactic nucleosynthesis. Type Ib/c supernovae are poorly understood. Whether they are core collapse or thermonuclear events might be ultimately settled by gamma-ray observations. Depending on details of the nuclear processing, any of these supernova types might contribute to a detectable diffuse glow of Fe-60 gamma-ray lines. Previous attempts at detection have come very close to expected emission levels. Remnants of any type of age less that a few centuries might be detectable as individual spots of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission. It is in fact quite surprising that previous surveys have not discovered such spots, and the constraints on the combination of nucleosynthesis yields and supernova rates are very interesting. All of these interesting limits and possibilities mean that the next mission, International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), if it has sufficient sensitivity, is very likely to lead to the realization of much of the great potential

  2. Supernova remnant revolution in an inhomogeneous medium. I - Numerical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Mckee, C. F.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The first numerical simulations of supernova remnant evolution in an inhomogeneous gas are presented. Evolution in the lowest density substrate (the intercloud) is assumed to be spherically symmetric with a large intercloud filling factor and many dense regions (clouds) within the remnant; however, mass momentum and energy transfer between cloud and intercloud are included and the position and morphology of individual clouds tracked. Evolution is considered in several different models of the interstellar medium, both those in which the intercloud gas is diffuse (0.001 to 0.01/cu cm) and those in which it is relatively dense (n approximately 0.3/cu cm) under a variety of assumptions about the efficiency of thermal evaporation from the clouds into the intercloud medium.

  3. LSQ13fn: A type II-Plateau supernova with a possibly low metallicity progenitor that breaks the standardised candle relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polshaw, J.; Kotak, R.; Dessart, L.; Fraser, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Inserra, C.; Sim, S. A.; Smartt, S. J.; Sollerman, J.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Benetti, S.; Botticella, M. T.; Campbell, H.; Chen, T.-W.; Galbany, L.; McKinnon, R.; Nicholl, M.; Smith, K. W.; Sullivan, M.; Takáts, K.; Valenti, S.; Young, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    We present optical imaging and spectroscopy of supernova (SN) LSQ13fn, a type II supernova with several hitherto-unseen properties. Although it initially showed strong symmetric spectral emission features attributable to He ii, N iii, and C iii, reminiscent of some interacting SNe, it transitioned into an object that would fall more naturally under a type II-Plateau (IIP) classification. However, its spectral evolution revealed several unusual properties: metal lines appeared later than expected, were weak, and some species were conspicuous by their absence. Furthermore, the line velocities were found to be lower than expected given the plateau brightness, breaking the SN IIP standardised candle method for distance estimates. We found that, in combination with a short phase of early-time ejecta-circumstellar material interaction, metal-poor ejecta, and a large progenitor radius could reasonably account for the observed behaviour. Comparisons with synthetic model spectra of SNe IIP of a given progenitor mass would imply a progenitor star metallicity as low as 0.1 Z⊙. LSQ13fn highlights the diversity of SNe II and the many competing physical effects that come into play towards the final stages of massive star evolution immediately preceding core-collapse. The reduced spectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A1

  4. A Hubble Diagram from Type II Supernovae Based Solely on Photometry: The Photometric Color Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Anderson, J. P.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bolt, L.; Burns, C. R.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, G.; Freedman, W. L.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Krisciunas, K.; Krzeminski, W.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Morrell, N.; Olivares E., F.; Persson, S. E.; Suntzeff, N.

    2015-12-01

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V - i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  5. Persistent C II absorption in the normal type Ia supernova 2002fk

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, Régis; Zelaya, Paula; Hamuy, Mario; Maza, José; González, Luis; Huerta, Leonor; Pignata, Giuliano; Förster, Francisco; Folatelli, Gaston; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia; Contreras, Carlos; Roth, Miguel; González, Sergio; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Coppi, Paolo; Koviak, Kathleen

    2014-07-01

    We present well-sampled UBVRIJHK photometry of SN 2002fk starting 12 days before maximum light through 122 days after peak brightness, along with a series of 15 optical spectra from –4 to +95 days since maximum. Our observations show the presence of C II lines in the early-time spectra of SN 2002fk, expanding at 11,000 km s{sup –1} and persisting until 8 days past maximum light with a velocity of ∼9000 km s{sup –1}. SN 2002fk is characterized by a small velocity gradient of v-dot {sub Si} {sub II}=26 km s{sup –1} day{sup –1}, possibly caused by an off-center explosion with the ignition region oriented toward the observer. The connection between the viewing angle of an off-center explosion and the presence of C II in the early-time spectrum suggests that the observation of C II could be also due to a viewing angle effect. Adopting the Cepheid distance to NGC 1309 we provide the first H {sub 0} value based on near-infrared (near-IR) measurements of a Type Ia supernova (SN) between 63.0 ± 0.8 (±3.4 systematic) and 66.7 ± 1.0 (±3.5 systematic) km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}, depending on the absolute magnitude/decline rate relationship adopted. It appears that the near-IR yields somewhat lower (6%-9%) H {sub 0} values than the optical. It is essential to further examine this issue by (1) expanding the sample of high-quality near-IR light curves of SNe in the Hubble flow, and (2) increasing the number of nearby SNe with near-IR SN light curves and precise Cepheid distances, which affords the promise to deliver a more precise determination of H {sub 0}.

  6. SDSS-II: Determination of shape and color parameter coefficients for SALT-II fit model

    SciTech Connect

    Dojcsak, L.; Marriner, J.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    In this study we look at the SALT-II model of Type IA supernova analysis, which determines the distance moduli based on the known absolute standard candle magnitude of the Type IA supernovae. We take a look at the determination of the shape and color parameter coefficients, {alpha} and {beta} respectively, in the SALT-II model with the intrinsic error that is determined from the data. Using the SNANA software package provided for the analysis of Type IA supernovae, we use a standard Monte Carlo simulation to generate data with known parameters to use as a tool for analyzing the trends in the model based on certain assumptions about the intrinsic error. In order to find the best standard candle model, we try to minimize the residuals on the Hubble diagram by calculating the correct shape and color parameter coefficients. We can estimate the magnitude of the intrinsic errors required to obtain results with {chi}{sup 2}/degree of freedom = 1. We can use the simulation to estimate the amount of color smearing as indicated by the data for our model. We find that the color smearing model works as a general estimate of the color smearing, and that we are able to use the RMS distribution in the variables as one method of estimating the correct intrinsic errors needed by the data to obtain the correct results for {alpha} and {beta}. We then apply the resultant intrinsic error matrix to the real data and show our results.

  7. Low Mach Number Modeling of Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Zingale,Michael

    2005-08-05

    We introduce a low Mach number equation set for the large-scale numerical simulation of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs experiencing a thermonuclear deflagration. Since most of the interesting physics in a Type Ia supernova transpires at Mach numbers from 0.01 to 0.1, such an approach enables both a considerable increase in accuracy and savings in computer time compared with frequently used compressible codes. Our equation set is derived from the fully compressible equations using low Mach number asymptotics, but without any restriction on the size of perturbations in density or temperature. Comparisons with simulations that use the fully compressible equations validate the low Mach number model in regimes where both are applicable. Comparisons to simulations based on the more traditional an elastic approximation also demonstrate the agreement of these models in the regime for which the anelastic approximation is valid. For low Mach number flows with potentially finite amplitude variations in density and temperature, the low Mach number model overcomes the limitations of each of the more traditional models and can serve as the basis for an accurate and efficient simulation tool.

  8. The Birth Environment of the Solar System Inferred from a "Mixing-Fallback" Supernova Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, J.; Takigawa, A.; Tachibana, S.; Huss, G. R.

    2007-03-01

    The birth environment of the solar system was evaluated from abundances of short-lived radionuclides and a mixing-fallback supernova model. The solar system may have formed within several parsec from a massive star with >20 solar mass.

  9. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  10. The explosion models and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Zongwei; Chen, Li

    2003-03-01

    Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are more significant as standard candles in the extragalactic distance measurement - and hence in the determination of the expansion rate of the universe. SNe Ia are enigmatic objects in many aspects, and their progenitors and explosion mechanisms have not been understood well. At present the observations are not strong enough to provide precise constraints on the theoretical models, but we believe that most SNe Ia are formed by the explosion due to the thermonuclear fusion of carbon and oxygen in white dwarfs that have mass close to the Chandrasekhar mass (≍1.39 Msolar). The mechanism, which is used to explain the explosion, especially how the hydrodynamical process occurs, is still an open question. However, recent results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of thermonuclear deflagration would show that it was not necessary to include the detonation in the late phase of the burning. On the other hand, although the progenitor model of a white dwarf with a main sequence (or red giant) companion seems to be more reasonable, the model of merge of two white dwarfs cannot be ruled out as the latter might account for some preculiar SNe Ia.

  11. CARBON DEFLAGRATION IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA. I. CENTRALLY IGNITED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Woosley, S. E.; Malone, C. M.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.

    2013-07-01

    A leading model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) begins with a white dwarf near the Chandrasekhar mass that ignites a degenerate thermonuclear runaway close to its center and explodes. In a series of papers, we shall explore the consequences of ignition at several locations within such dwarfs. Here we assume central ignition, which has been explored before, but is worth revisiting, if only to validate those previous studies and to further elucidate the relevant physics for future work. A perturbed sphere of hot iron ash with a radius of {approx}100 km is initialized at the middle of the star. The subsequent explosion is followed in several simulations using a thickened flame model in which the flame speed is either fixed-within the range expected from turbulent combustion-or based on the local turbulent intensity. Global results, including the explosion energy and bulk nucleosynthesis (e.g., {sup 56}Ni of 0.48-0.56 M{sub Sun }) turn out to be insensitive to this speed. In all completed runs, the energy released by the nuclear burning is adequate to unbind the star, but not enough to give the energy and brightness of typical SNe Ia. As found previously, the chemical stratification observed in typical events is not reproduced. These models produce a large amount of unburned carbon and oxygen in central low velocity regions, which is inconsistent with spectroscopic observations, and the intermediate mass elements and iron group elements are strongly mixed during the explosion.

  12. Light curves for off-centre ignition models of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, S. A.; Sauer, D. N.; Röpke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2007-06-01

    Motivated by recent models involving off-centre ignition of Type Ia supernova explosions, we undertake three-dimensional time-dependent radiation transport simulations to investigate the range of bolometric light-curve properties that could be observed from supernovae in which there is a lop-sided distribution of the products from nuclear burning. We consider both a grid of artificial toy models which illustrate the conceivable range of effects and a recent three-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion model. We find that observationally significant viewing angle effects are likely to arise in such supernovae and that these may have important ramifications for the interpretation of the observed diversity of Type Ia supernova and the systematic uncertainties which relate to their use as standard candles in contemporary cosmology.

  13. Automatic Method of Supernovae Classification by Modeling Human Procedure of Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Módolo, Marcelo; Rosa, Reinaldo; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F.

    2016-07-01

    The classification of a recently discovered supernova must be done as quickly as possible in order to define what information will be captured and analyzed in the following days. This classification is not trivial and only a few experts astronomers are able to perform it. This paper proposes an automatic method that models the human procedure of classification. It uses Multilayer Perceptron Neural Networks to analyze the supernovae spectra. Experiments were performed using different pre-processing and multiple neural network configurations to identify the classic types of supernovae. Significant results were obtained indicating the viability of using this method in places that have no specialist or that require an automatic analysis.

  14. Suzaku spectra of a Type-II supernova remnant, Kes 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tamotsu; Koyama, Katsuji; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on results of a Suzaku observation of the supernova remnant (SNR) Kes 79 (G33.6+0.1). The X-ray spectrum is best fitted by a two-temperature model: a non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) plasma and a collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) plasma. The NEI plasma is spatially confined within the inner radio shell with kT ˜ 0.8 keV, while the CIE plasma is found in more spatially extended regions associated with the outer radio shell with kT ˜0.2 keV and solar abundance. Therefore, the NEI plasma is attributable to the SN ejecta, and the CIE plasma is the forward shocked interstellar medium. In the NEI plasma, we discovered K-shell lines of Al, Ar, and Ca for the first time. The abundance pattern and estimated mass of the ejecta are consistent with a core-collapse supernova explosion of a ˜30-40M⊙ progenitor star. An Fe line with a center energy of ˜6.4 keV is also found in the southeast (SE) portion of the SNR, a close peripheral region around dense molecular clouds. One possibility is that the line is associated with the ejecta. However, the centroid energy of ˜6.4 keV and the spatial distribution of enhancement near the SE peripheral do not favor this scenario. Since the ˜6.4 keV emitting region coincides with the molecular clouds, we propose another possibility, that the Fe line is due to K-shell ionization of neutral Fe by the interaction of locally accelerated protons (LECRp) with the surrounding molecular cloud. Both of these possibilities, heated ejecta or LECRp origin, are discussed based on the observational facts.

  15. Type Ia supernova explosion models: Homogeneity versus diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Niemeyer, Jens C.; Reinecke, Martin

    2000-06-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are generally believed to be the result of the thermonuclear disruption of Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, mainly because such thermonuclear explosions can account for the right amount of 56Ni, which is needed to explain the light curves and the late-time spectra, and the abundances of intermediate-mass nuclei which dominate the spectra near maximum light. Because of their enormous brightness and apparent homogeneity SN Ia have become an important tool to measure cosmological parameters. In this article the present understanding of the physics of thermonuclear explosions is reviewed. In particular, we focus our attention on subsonic (``deflagration'') fronts, i.e. we investigate fronts propagating by heat diffusion and convection rather than by compression. Models based upon this mode of nuclear burning have been applied very successfully to the SN Ia problem, and are able to reproduce many of their observed features remarkably well. However, the models also indicate that SN Ia may differ considerably from each other, which is of importance if they are to be used as standard candles. .

  16. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: Evolution, explosion, light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  17. Modeling of shocks in young and old supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patnaude, Daniel James

    We present results from a modeling effort of simple shock phenomena in the Cygnus Loop and Cassiopeia A. Using multi-epoch MDM observations of a small, isolated cloud in the southwest region of the Cygnus Loop, we measure the velocity of the Balmer-dominated shock filaments as well as the velocity of the internal cloud shock. These results are used to constrain the primary parameter for interstellar clouds: the density contrast between the cloud and the interstellar medium. These results are used to present models for a strong shock interacting with a lumpy, but diffuse cloud. This model represents a refinement over previous shock-cloud models. Using multi-epoch X-ray observations of the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, we investigate a small bow shock which protrudes north of the identified forward shock front. Proper motion estimates for this object, combined with a spectral analysis suggest that the object is a bullet of ejecta, similar to those found in Vela. Model results are presented which show the evolution of an ejecta bullet across the SNR. These simulations suggest that bullet ejecta could arise in Cas A, and that the bullet material could survive the turbulent journey through shocked ejecta. Finally, preliminary results from a study of the reverse shock structure in Cas A are presented. We present regions which show decaying fluxes over a four year period, but also show an increase in X-ray line emission, suggesting that the gas in these regions is approaching ionization equilibrium. Models for reverse shock formation and the reverse shock-ejecta interaction are discussed.

  18. The region of the supernova remnant MSH 15-52 revisited - A new thermal H II region, H II G 320.5-1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lortet, M.-C.; Georgelin, Y. P.; Georgelin, Y. M.

    1987-06-01

    The authors revisited the stellar and nebular content in the direction of MSH 15-52. This search was initiated by the discovery of a new Hα thermal region H II G 320.5-1.4 with velocity VLSR = -43 km s-1, extending over an area similar to MSH 15-52, and clearly distinct from the foreground H II region BBW 28802. From a rediscussion of the reddening and distances of hot stars with available spectra in the direction l = 320°, it is found that they constitute a single stellar association (Cir OB1) at a distance about 4 kpc, probably not much more extended than 80×80 pc. This association contains the cluster Pis 20, four WR stars and a number of stars with ages in the range 4 - 10×106yr. It is the excitation source of H II G 320.5-1.4. In such an association, bubbles may have formed previously to the explosion of supernovae; also, several supernovae may have exploded recently. Thus it is not unlikely that MSH 15-52 originated from the same SN explosion as PSR 1509-58 and expanded freely into a bubble; on the other hand, it would not be surprising that two different supernovae exploded close in time and space.

  19. An Accelerated Radioactive Decay (ARD) Model for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Bert W.; Leventhal, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 255, 690-692] presented a radioactive decay model 56N i --> 56Co --> 56Fe for the post-peak luminosity decay of Type I supernovae light curves, in which the two decay rates are both accelerated by a common factor. In 1976, Rust, Leventhal and McCall [Nature, 262, 118-120] used sums of exponentials fitting to confirm the acceleration hypothesis, but their result was nevertheless rejected by the astronomical community. Here, we model Type Ia light curves with a system of ODEs (describing the nuclear decays) forced by a Ni-deposition pulse modelled by a 3-parameter Weibull pdf, with all of this occuring in the center of a pre-existing, optically thick, spherical shell which thermalizes the emitted gamma rays. Fitting this model to observed light curves routinely gives fits which account for 99.9+% of the total variance in the observed record. The accelerated decay rates are so stable, for such a long time, that they must occur in an almost unchanging environment -- not it a turbulent expanding atmosphere. The amplitude of the Ni-deposition pulse indicates that its source is the fusion of hydrogen. Carbon and oxygen could not supply the large energy/nucleon that is observed. The secondary peak in the infrared light curve can be easily modelled as a light echo from dust in the back side of the pre-existing shell, and the separation between the peaks indicates a radius of ≈15 light days for the shell. The long-term stability of the acceleration suggests that it is a kinematic effect arising because the nuclear reactions occur either on the surface of a very rapidly rotating condensed object, or in a very tight orbit around such an object, like the fusion pulse in a tokomak reactor.

  20. PTF discovery of PTF10abyy, a young Type II Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Sternberg, A.; Green, Y.; Xu, D.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, H. Ebeling P.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Law, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/) reports the discovery of a new supernova, PTF10abyy. The supernova was discovered by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, on December 8 UT at RA(J2000) = 05:16:40.52 and DEC(J2000) = +06:47:53.8 at a magnitude of 18.7 in R-band (calibrated with respect to the USNOB1 catalog). The supernova was not detected down to mag 21 in previous PTF images taken during Dec.

  1. Setting the stage for circumstellar interaction in core-collapse supernovae. II. Wave-driven mass loss in supernova progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Shiode, Joshua H.; Quataert, Eliot E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2014-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) powered by interaction with circumstellar material provide evidence for intense stellar mass loss during the final years before core collapse. We have argued that during and after core neon burning, internal gravity waves excited by core convection can tap into the core fusion power and transport a super-Eddington energy flux out to the stellar envelope, potentially unbinding ∼1 solar mass of material. In this work, we explore the internal conditions of SN progenitors using the MESA one-dimensional stellar evolution code in search of those most susceptible to wave-driven mass loss. We focus on simple, order of magnitude considerations applicable to a wide range of progenitors. Wave-driven mass loss during core neon and oxygen fusion happens preferentially in either lower mass (∼20 solar mass zero-age main sequence) stars or massive, sub-solar metallicity stars. Roughly 20% of the SN progenitors we survey can excite 10{sup 46-48} erg of energy in waves that can potentially drive mass loss within a few months to a decade of core collapse. This energy can generate circumstellar environments with 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses reaching 100 AU before explosion. We predict a correlation between the energy associated with pre-SN mass ejection and the time to core collapse, with the most intense mass loss preferentially occurring closer to core collapse. During silicon burning, wave energy may inflate 10{sup –3}-1 solar masses of the envelope to 10-100 s of solar radii. This suggests that some nominally compact SN progenitors (Type Ibc progenitors) will have a significantly different SN shock breakout signature than traditionally assumed.

  2. SPIN-UP/SPIN-DOWN MODELS FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefano, R. Di; Voss, R.

    2011-09-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf (WD) must gain a significant amount of matter from a companion star. Because the accreted mass carries angular momentum, the WD is likely to achieve fast spin periods, which can increase the critical mass, M{sub crit}, needed for explosion. When M{sub crit} is higher than the maximum mass achieved by the WD, the central regions of the WD must spin down before it can explode. This introduces super-Chandrasekhar single-degenerate explosions, and a delay between the completion of mass gain and the time of the explosion. Matter ejected from the binary during mass transfer therefore has a chance to become diffuse, and the explosion occurs in a medium with a density similar to that of typical regions of the interstellar medium. Also, either by the end of the WD's mass increase or else by the time of explosion, the donor may exhaust its stellar envelope and become a WD. This alters, generally diminishing, explosion signatures related to the donor star. Nevertheless, the spin-up/spin-down model is highly predictive. Prior to explosion, progenitors can be super-M{sub Ch} WDs in either wide binaries with WD companions or cataclysmic variables. These systems can be discovered and studied through wide-field surveys. Post-explosion, the spin-up/spin-down model predicts a population of fast-moving WDs, low-mass stars, and even brown dwarfs. In addition, the spin-up/spin-down model provides a paradigm which may be able to explain both the similarities and the diversity observed among SNe Ia.

  3. Effects of neutrino oscillations on nucleosynthesis and neutrino signals for an 18 M⊙ supernova model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Ru; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Fischer, Tobias; Huther, Lutz

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the effects of neutrino flavor oscillations on supernova nucleosynthesis and on the neutrino signals. Our study is based on detailed information about the neutrino spectra and their time evolution from a spherically symmetric supernova model for an 18 M⊙ progenitor. We find that collective neutrino oscillations are not only sensitive to the detailed neutrino energy and angular distributions at emission, but also to the time evolution of both the neutrino spectra and the electron density profile. We apply the results of neutrino oscillations to study the impact on supernova nucleosynthesis and on the neutrino signals from a Galactic supernova. We show that in our supernova model, collective neutrino oscillations enhance the production of rare isotopes 138La and 180Ta but have little impact on the ν p -process nucleosynthesis. In addition, the adiabatic Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein flavor transformation, which occurs in the C /O and He shells of the supernova, may affect the production of light nuclei such as 7Li and 11B. For the neutrino signals, we calculate the rate of neutrino events in the Super-Kamiokande detector and in a hypothetical liquid argon detector. Our results suggest the possibility of using the time profiles of the events in both detectors, along with the spectral information of the detected neutrinos, to infer the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  4. WIDE INTEGRAL-FIELD INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BRIGHT [Fe II] SHELL IN THE YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANT G11.2-0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ho-Gyu; Onaka, Takashi; Moon, Dae-Sik; Rahman, Mubdi; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Chun, Won-Seok; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Gruel, Nicolas; Raines, S. Nicholas; Guzman, Rafael; Raymond, John E-mail: onaka@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp E-mail: koo@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: mubdi@pha.jhu.edu E-mail: raines@astro.ufl.edu

    2013-06-20

    We present the results of wide integral-field near-infrared (1.0-1.8 {mu}m) spectroscopic observations of the southeastern shell of the young core-collapse supernova remnant (SNR) G11.2-0.3. We first construct [Fe II] 1.644 {mu}m line images of three bright clumps from the obtained spectral image cubes and compare them with those of other transitions such as [Fe II] 1.257, [Fe II] 1.534, and He I 1.083 {mu}m line images. This allows us to estimate the electron density ({approx}4700-9400 cm{sup -3}) and extinction (A{sub V} {approx} 16-20 mag) of the shell, including a detailed two-dimensional distribution of the properties in the brightest clump, as well as the discovery of a faint high-velocity ({approx} - 440 km s{sup -1}) component in the clump. Our SNR shock model calculations estimate the pre-shock number density of {approx}250-500 cm{sup -3} and shock speed of {approx}80-250 km s{sup -1} in the [Fe II]-emitting region of the SNR. The comparison between the observed and modeled radial profiles of the line intensities and their ratios reveals that the shell is composed of multiple thin filaments which have been likely formed in episodic mass-loss processes of a progenitor star. The discovery of the faint high-velocity component supports the interpretation that the southeastern shell of G11.2-0.3 is mainly composed of circumstellar material with contamination by supernova ejecta and also that its ejected material was expelled primarily in the southeast-northwest direction.

  5. Models of interacting supernovae and their spectral diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Audit, Edouard; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni

    2016-05-01

    Using radiation hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simulations, we explore the origin of the spectral diversity of interacting supernovae (SNe) of Type IIn. We revisit SN 1994W and investigate the dynamical configurations that can give rise to spectra with narrow lines at all times. We find that a standard ˜10 M⊙ 1051 erg SN ejecta ramming into a 0.4 M⊙ dense circumstellar material is inadequate for SN 1994W, as it leads to the appearance of broad lines at late times. This structure, however, generates spectra that exhibit the key morphological changes seen in SN 1998S. For SN 1994W, we consider a completely different configuration, which involves the interaction at a large radius of a low-mass inner shell with a high-mass outer shell. Such a structure may arise in an 8-12 M⊙ star from a nuclear flash (e.g. of Ne) followed within a few years by core collapse. Our simulations show that the large mass of the outer shell leads to the complete braking of the inner shell material, the formation of a slow dense shell, and the powering of a luminous SN IIn, even for a low inner shell energy. Early on, our model line profiles are typical of SNe IIn, exhibiting narrow cores and broad electron-scattering wings. As observed in SN 1994W, they also remain narrow at late times. Our SN 1994W model invokes two low-energy ejections, both atypical of observed massive stars, and illustrates the diversity of configurations leading to SNe IIn. These results also highlight the importance of spectra to constrain the dynamical properties and understand the origin of SNe IIn.

  6. Spectral luminosity indicators in Type Ia supernovae. Understanding the (SiII) line-strength ratio and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachinger, Stephan; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Tanaka, Masaomi; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Benetti, Stefano

    2008-09-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are good distance indicators because the shape of their light curves, which can be measured independently of distance, varies smoothly with luminosity. This suggests that SNe Ia are a single family of events. Similar correlations are observed between luminosity and spectral properties. In particular, the ratio of the strengths of the SiII λ5972 and λ6355 lines, known as (SiII), was suggested as a potential luminosity indicator. Here, the physical reasons for the observed correlation are investigated. A Monte Carlo code is used to construct a sequence of synthetic spectra resembling those of SNe with different luminosities near B maximum. The influence of abundances and of ionization and excitation conditions on the synthetic spectral features is investigated. The ratio (SiII) depends essentially on the strength of SiII λ5972, because SiII λ6355 is saturated. In less luminous objects, SiII λ5972 is stronger because of a rapidly increasing SiII/SiIII ratio. Thus, the correlation between (SiII) and luminosity is the effect of ionization balance. The SiII λ5972 line itself may be the best spectroscopic luminosity indicator for SNe Ia, but all indicators discussed show scatter which may be related to abundance distributions.

  7. Probing dark energy inhomogeneities with supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Blomqvist, Michael; Moertsell, Edvard; Nobili, Serena E-mail: edvard@physto.se

    2008-06-15

    We discuss the possibility of identifying anisotropic and/or inhomogeneous cosmological models using type Ia supernova data. A search for correlations in current type Ia peak magnitudes over a large range of angular scales yields a null result. However, the same analysis limited to supernovae at low redshift shows a feeble anticorrelation at the 2{sigma} level at angular scales {theta} Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign . Upcoming data from, e.g., the SNLS (Supernova Legacy Survey) and the SDSS-II (SDSS: Sloan Digital Sky Survey) supernova searches will improve our limits on the size of-or possibly detect-possible correlations also at high redshift at the per cent level in the near future. With data from the proposed SNAP (SuperNova Acceleration Probe) satellite, we will be able to detect the induced correlations from gravitational lensing on type Ia peak magnitudes on scales less than a degree.

  8. The Chemically Controlled Synthesis of Dust in Type II-P Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2013-10-01

    We study the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejecta of solar metallicity, Type II-P supernovae (SNe) using a chemical kinetic approach. We follow the evolution of molecules and small dust cluster masses from day 100 to day 1500 after explosion. We consider stellar progenitors with initial masses of 12, 15, 19, and 25 M ⊙ that explode as SNe with stratified ejecta. The molecular precursors to dust grains comprise molecular chains, rings and small clusters of silica, silicates, metal oxides, sulfides and carbides, pure metals, and carbon, where the nucleation of silicate clusters is described by a two-step process of metal and oxygen addition. We study the impact of the 56Ni mass on the type and amount of synthesized dust. We predict that large masses of molecules including CO, SiO, SiS, O2, and SO form in the ejecta. We show that the discrepancy between the small dust masses detected at infrared wavelengths some 500 days post-explosion and the larger amounts of dust recently detected with Herschel in SN remnants can be explained by the non-equilibrium chemistry linked to the formation of molecules and dust clusters in the ejected material. Dust gradually builds up from small (~10-5 M ⊙) to large masses (~5 × 10-2 M ⊙) over a 5 yr period after explosion. Subsequent dust formation and/or growth is hampered by the shortage of chemical agents participating in the dust nucleation and the long timescale for accretion. The results highlight the dependence of the dust chemical composition and mass on the amount of 56Ni synthesized during the explosion. This dependence may partly explain the diversity of epochs at which dust forms in SNe. More generally, our results indicate that Type II-P SNe are efficient but moderate dust producers with an upper limit on the mass of synthesized dust ranging from ~0.03 to 0.09 M ⊙. Other dust sources must then operate at high redshift to explain the large quantities of dust present in young galaxies in the early

  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Don Frederic; Depoy, D.L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Craig, Hogan, J.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Apache Point Observ. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  10. TESTING NONSTANDARD COSMOLOGICAL MODELS WITH SNLS3 SUPERNOVA DATA AND OTHER COSMOLOGICAL PROBES

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengxiang; Yu Hongwei; Wu Puxun

    2012-01-10

    We investigate the implications for some nonstandard cosmological models using data from the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS3), assuming a spatially flat universe. A comparison between the constraints from the SNLS3 and those from other SN Ia samples, such as the ESSENCE, Union2, SDSS-II, and Constitution samples, is given and the effects of different light-curve fitters are considered. We find that analyzing SNe Ia with SALT2 or SALT or SiFTO can give consistent results and the tensions between different data sets and different light-curve fitters are obvious for fewer-free-parameters models. At the same time, we also study the constraints from SNLS3 along with data from the cosmic microwave background and the baryonic acoustic oscillations (CMB/BAO), and the latest Hubble parameter versus redshift (H(z)). Using model selection criteria such as {chi}{sup 2}/dof, goodness of fit, Akaike information criterion, and Bayesian information criterion, we find that, among all the cosmological models considered here ({Lambda}CDM, constant w, varying w, Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP), modified polytropic Cardassian, and the generalized Chaplygin gas), the flat DGP is favored by SNLS3 alone. However, when additional CMB/BAO or H(z) constraints are included, this is no longer the case, and the flat {Lambda}CDM becomes preferred.

  11. Modeling Type IIn Supernovae: Understanding How Shock Development Effects Light Curves Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie

    2016-06-01

    Type IIn supernovae are produced when massive stars experience dramatic mass loss phases caused by opacity edges or violent explosions. Violent mass ejections occur quite often just prior to the collapse of the star. If the final episode happens just before collapse, the outward ejecta is sufficiently dense to alter the supernova light-curve, both by absorbing the initial supernova light and producing emission when the supernova shock hits the ejecta. Initially, the ejecta is driven by shock progating through the interior of the star, and eventually expands through the circumstellar medium, forming a cold dense shell. As the shock wave approaches the shell, there is an increase in UV and optical radiation at the location of the shock breakout. We have developed a suite of simple semi-analytical models in order to understand the relationship between our observations and the properties of the expanding SN ejecta. When we compare Type IIn observations to a set of modeled SNe, we begin to see the influence of initial explosion conditions on early UV light curve properties such as peak luminosities and decay rate.The fast rise and decay corresponds to the models representing a photosphere moving through the envelope, while the modeled light curves with a slower rise and decay rate are powered by 56Ni decay. However, in both of these cases, models that matched the luminosity were unable to match the low radii from the blackbody models. The effect of shock heating as the supernova material blasts through the circumstellar material can drastically alter the temperature and position of the photosphere. The new set of models redefine the initial modeling conditions to incorporate an outer shell-like structure, and include late-time shock heating from shocks produced as the supernova ejecta travels through the inhomogeneous circumstellar medium.

  12. Fast time variations of supernova neutrino signals from 3-dimensional models

    DOE PAGES

    Lund, Tina; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Janka, Hans -Thomas; Muller, Ewald; Raffelt, Georg

    2012-11-19

    Here, we study supernova neutrino flux variations in the IceCube detector, using 3D models based on a simplified neutrino transport scheme. The hemispherically integrated neutrino emission shows significantly smaller variations compared with our previous study of 2D models, largely because of the reduced activity of the standing accretion shock instability in this set of 3D models which we interpret as a pessimistic extreme. For the studied cases, intrinsic flux variations up to about 100 Hz frequencies could still be detected in a supernova closer than about 2 kpc.

  13. THE PROGENITORS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. ARE THEY DOUBLE-DEGENERATE BINARIES? THE SYMBIOTIC CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Di Stefano, R.

    2010-08-10

    In order for a white dwarf (WD) to achieve the Chandrasekhar mass, M{sub C} , and explode as a Type Ia supernova (SNIa), it must interact with another star, either accreting matter from or merging with it. The failure to identify the class or classes of binaries which produce SNeIa is the long-standing 'progenitor problem'. Its solution is required if we are to utilize the full potential of SNeIa to elucidate basic cosmological and physical principles. In single-degenerate models, a WD accretes and burns matter at high rates. Nuclear-burning white dwarfs (NBWDs) with mass close to M{sub C} are hot and luminous, potentially detectable as supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs). In previous work, we showed that >90%-99% of the required number of progenitors do not appear as SSSs during most of the crucial phase of mass increase. The obvious implication might be that double-degenerate binaries form the main class of progenitors. We show in this paper, however, that many binaries that later become double degenerates must pass through a long-lived NBWD phase during which they are potentially detectable as SSSs. The paucity of SSSs is therefore not a strong argument in favor of double-degenerate models. Those NBWDs that are the progenitors of double-degenerate binaries are likely to appear as symbiotic binaries for intervals >10{sup 6} years. In fact, symbiotic pre-double-degenerates should be common, whether or not the WDs eventually produce SNeIa. The key to solving the Type Ia progenitor problem lies in understanding the appearance of NBWDs. Most of them do not appear as SSSs most of the time. We therefore consider the evolution of NBWDs to address the question of what their appearance may be and how we can hope to detect them.

  14. The p-Process in the Carbon Deflagration Model for Type Ia Supernovae and Chronology of the Solar System Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2006-07-12

    We study nucleosynthesis of p-nuclei in the carbon deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by assuming that seed nuclei are produced by the s-process in accreting layers on a carbon-oxygen white dwarf during mass accretion from a binary companion. We find that about 50 % of the p-nuclides are synthesized in proportion to the solar abundance and that p-isotopes of Mo and Ru which are significantly underproduced in Type II supernovae (SNe II) are produced up to a level close to other p-nuclei. Comparing the yields of iron and p-nuclei in SNe Ia we find that SNe Ia can contribute to the galactic evolution of the p-nuclei. Next, we consider nucleochronology of the solar system formation by using four radioactive nuclides and apply the result of the p-process nucleosynthesis to simple galactic chemical evolution models. We find that when assumed three phases of interstellar medium are mixed by the interdiffusion with the timescale of about 40 Myr 53Mn/55Mn value in the early solar system is consistent with a meteoritic value. In addition, we put constraints to a scenario that SNe Ia induce the core collapse of the molecular cloud, which leads to the formation of the solar system.

  15. The locations of recent supernovae near the Sun from modelling (60)Fe transport.

    PubMed

    Breitschwerdt, D; Feige, J; Schulreich, M M; de Avillez, M A; Dettbarn, C; Fuchs, B

    2016-04-01

    The signature of (60)Fe in deep-sea crusts indicates that one or more supernovae exploded in the solar neighbourhood about 2.2 million years ago. Recent isotopic analysis is consistent with a core-collapse or electron-capture supernova that occurred 60 to 130 parsecs from the Sun. Moreover, peculiarities in the cosmic ray spectrum point to a nearby supernova about two million years ago. The Local Bubble of hot, diffuse plasma, in which the Solar System is embedded, originated from 14 to 20 supernovae within a moving group, whose surviving members are now in the Scorpius-Centaurus stellar association. Here we report calculations of the most probable trajectories and masses of the supernova progenitors, and hence their explosion times and sites. The (60)Fe signal arises from two supernovae at distances between 90 and 100 parsecs. The closest occurred 2.3 million years ago at present-day galactic coordinates l = 327°, b = 11°, and the second-closest exploded about 1.5 million years ago at l = 343°, b = 25°, with masses of 9.2 and 8.8 times the solar mass, respectively. The remaining supernovae, which formed the Local Bubble, contribute to a smaller extent because they happened at larger distances and longer ago ((60)Fe has a half-life of 2.6 million years). There are uncertainties relating to the nucleosynthesis yields and the loss of (60)Fe during transport, but they do not influence the relative distribution of (60)Fe in the crust layers, and therefore our model reproduces the measured relative abundances very well.

  16. The locations of recent supernovae near the Sun from modelling 60Fe transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschwerdt, D.; Feige, J.; Schulreich, M. M.; Avillez, M. A. De.; Dettbarn, C.; Fuchs, B.

    2016-04-01

    The signature of 60Fe in deep-sea crusts indicates that one or more supernovae exploded in the solar neighbourhood about 2.2 million years ago. Recent isotopic analysis is consistent with a core-collapse or electron-capture supernova that occurred 60 to 130 parsecs from the Sun. Moreover, peculiarities in the cosmic ray spectrum point to a nearby supernova about two million years ago. The Local Bubble of hot, diffuse plasma, in which the Solar System is embedded, originated from 14 to 20 supernovae within a moving group, whose surviving members are now in the Scorpius-Centaurus stellar association. Here we report calculations of the most probable trajectories and masses of the supernova progenitors, and hence their explosion times and sites. The 60Fe signal arises from two supernovae at distances between 90 and 100 parsecs. The closest occurred 2.3 million years ago at present-day galactic coordinates l = 327°, b = 11°, and the second-closest exploded about 1.5 million years ago at l = 343°, b = 25°, with masses of 9.2 and 8.8 times the solar mass, respectively. The remaining supernovae, which formed the Local Bubble, contribute to a smaller extent because they happened at larger distances and longer ago (60Fe has a half-life of 2.6 million years). There are uncertainties relating to the nucleosynthesis yields and the loss of 60Fe during transport, but they do not influence the relative distribution of 60Fe in the crust layers, and therefore our model reproduces the measured relative abundances very well.

  17. The locations of recent supernovae near the Sun from modelling (60)Fe transport.

    PubMed

    Breitschwerdt, D; Feige, J; Schulreich, M M; de Avillez, M A; Dettbarn, C; Fuchs, B

    2016-04-01

    The signature of (60)Fe in deep-sea crusts indicates that one or more supernovae exploded in the solar neighbourhood about 2.2 million years ago. Recent isotopic analysis is consistent with a core-collapse or electron-capture supernova that occurred 60 to 130 parsecs from the Sun. Moreover, peculiarities in the cosmic ray spectrum point to a nearby supernova about two million years ago. The Local Bubble of hot, diffuse plasma, in which the Solar System is embedded, originated from 14 to 20 supernovae within a moving group, whose surviving members are now in the Scorpius-Centaurus stellar association. Here we report calculations of the most probable trajectories and masses of the supernova progenitors, and hence their explosion times and sites. The (60)Fe signal arises from two supernovae at distances between 90 and 100 parsecs. The closest occurred 2.3 million years ago at present-day galactic coordinates l = 327°, b = 11°, and the second-closest exploded about 1.5 million years ago at l = 343°, b = 25°, with masses of 9.2 and 8.8 times the solar mass, respectively. The remaining supernovae, which formed the Local Bubble, contribute to a smaller extent because they happened at larger distances and longer ago ((60)Fe has a half-life of 2.6 million years). There are uncertainties relating to the nucleosynthesis yields and the loss of (60)Fe during transport, but they do not influence the relative distribution of (60)Fe in the crust layers, and therefore our model reproduces the measured relative abundances very well. PMID:27078566

  18. Full Bayesian hierarchical light curve modeling of core-collapse supernova populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nathan; Betancourt, Michael; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita

    2016-06-01

    While wide field surveys have yielded remarkable quantities of photometry of transient objects, including supernovae, light curves reconstructed from this data suffer from several characteristic problems. Because most transients are discovered near the detection limit, signal to noise is generally poor; because coverage is limited to the observing season, light curves are often incomplete; and because temporal sampling can be uneven across filters, these problems can be exacerbated at any one wavelength. While the prevailing approach of modeling individual light curves independently is successful at recovering inferences for the objects with the highest quality observations, it typically neglects a substantial portion of the data and can introduce systematic biases. Joint modeling of the light curves of transient populations enables direct inference on population-level characteristics as well as superior measurements for individual objects. We present a new hierarchical Bayesian model for supernova light curves, where information inferred from observations of every individual light curve in a sample is partially pooled across objects to constrain population-level hyperparameters. Using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling technique, the model posterior can be explored to enable marginalization over weakly-identified hyperparameters through full Bayesian inference. We demonstrate our technique on the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Type IIP supernova light curve sample published by Sanders et al. (2015), consisting of nearly 20,000 individual photometric observations of more than 70 supernovae in five photometric filters. We discuss the Stan probabilistic programming language used to implement the model, computational challenges, and prospects for future work including generalization to multiple supernova types. We also discuss scientific results from the PS1 dataset including a new relation between the peak magnitude and decline rate of SNe IIP, a new perspective on the

  19. Spallation model for the titanium-rich supernova remnant cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-01

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to (56)Ni destruction and (44)Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of ∼5  days reproduces the observed abundance of (44)Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of (56)Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae.

  20. Spallation model for the titanium-rich supernova remnant cassiopeia A.

    PubMed

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-01

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to (56)Ni destruction and (44)Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of ∼5  days reproduces the observed abundance of (44)Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of (56)Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae. PMID:22107282

  1. Spallation Model for the Titanium-Rich Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Ouyed, Amir; Jaikumar, Prashanth

    2011-10-07

    Titanium-rich subluminous supernovae are rare and challenge current SN nucleosynthesis models. We present a model in which ejecta from a standard supernova is impacted by a second explosion of the neutron star (a quark nova), resulting in spallation reactions that lead to {sup 56}Ni destruction and {sup 44}Ti creation under the right conditions. Basic calculations of the spallation products shows that a delay between the two explosions of {approx}5 days reproduces the observed abundance of {sup 44}Ti in Cas A and explains its low luminosity as a result of the destruction of {sup 56}Ni. Our results could have important implications for light curves of subluminous as well as superluminous supernovae.

  2. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2016fnb (=PTSS-16mxs) as a Type II-P Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Wenxiong; Yang, Zesheng; Li, Bin; Xu, Zhijian; Wang, Lifan; Zhao, Haibin; Jia, Junjun; Zhang, Tianmeng

    2016-08-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 380-860 nm) of SN 2016fnb (= PTSS-16mxs), discovered by PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS; http://119.78.210.3/ptss2/), on UT Aug.30.75 2016 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  3. PRODUCTION OF THE p-PROCESS NUCLEI IN THE CARBON-DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi E-mail: iwamoto.nobuyuki@jaea.go.jp

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the nucleosynthesis of proton-rich isotopes in the carbon-deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The seed abundances are obtained by calculating the s-process nucleosynthesis that is expected to occur in the repeating helium shell flashes on the carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarf (WD) during mass accretion from a binary companion. When the deflagration wave passes through the outer layer of the CO WD, p-nuclei are produced by photodisintegration reactions on s-nuclei in a region where the peak temperature ranges from 1.9 to 3.6 x 10{sup 9} K. We confirm the sensitivity of the p-process on the initial distribution of s-nuclei. We show that the initial C/O ratio in the WD does not affect much the yield of p-nuclei. On the other hand, the abundance of {sup 22}Ne left after s-processing has a large influence on the p-process via the {sup 22}Ne({alpha},n) reaction. We find that about 50% of p-nuclides are co-produced when normalized to their solar abundances in all adopted cases of seed distribution. Mo and Ru, which are largely underproduced in Type II supernovae (SNe II), are produced more than in SNe II although they are underproduced with respect to the yield levels of other p-nuclides. The ratios between p-nuclei and iron in the ejecta are larger than the solar ratios by a factor of 1.2. We also compare the yields of oxygen, iron, and p-nuclides in SNe Ia and SNe II and suggest that SNe Ia could make a larger contribution than SNe II to the solar system content of p-nuclei.

  4. Feedback from winds and supernovae in massive stellar clusters - II. X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, H.; Pittard, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray emission from a simulated massive stellar cluster is investigated. The emission is calculated from a 3D hydrodynamical model which incorporates the mechanical feedback from the stellar winds of three O stars embedded in a giant molecular cloud (GMC) clump containing 3240 M⊙ of molecular material within a 4 pc radius. A simple prescription for the evolution of the stars is used, with the first supernova (SN) explosion at t = 4.4 Myr. We find that the presence of the GMC clump causes short-lived attenuation effects on the X-ray emission of the cluster. However, once most of the material has been ablated away by the winds, the remaining dense clumps do not have a noticeable effect on the attenuation compared with the assumed interstellar medium (ISM) column. We determine the evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity, LX, and spectra, and generate synthetic images. The intrinsic X-ray luminosity drops from nearly 1034 erg s-1 while the winds are `bottled up', to a near-constant value of 1.7 × 1032 erg s-1 between t = 1 and 4 Myr. LX reduces slightly during each star's red supergiant stage due to the depressurization of the hot gas. However, LX increases to ≈1034 erg s-1 during each star's Wolf-Rayet stage. The X-ray luminosity is enhanced by two to three orders of magnitude to ˜1037 erg s-1 for at least 4600 yr after each SN explosion, at which time the blast wave leaves the grid and the X-ray luminosity drops. The X-ray luminosity of our simulation is generally considerably fainter than predicted from spherically symmetric bubble models, due to the leakage of hot gas material through gaps in the outer shell. This process reduces the pressure within our simulation and thus the X-ray emission. However, the X-ray luminosities and temperatures which we obtain are comparable to similarly powerful massive young clusters.

  5. A new statistical model for Population III supernova rates: discriminating between ΛCDM and WDM cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magg, Mattis; Hartwig, Tilman; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2016-11-01

    With new observational facilities becoming available soon, discovering and characterizing supernovae from the first stars will open up alternative observational windows to the end of the cosmic dark ages. Based on a semi-analytical merger tree model of early star formation, we constrain Population III supernova rates. We find that our method reproduces the Population III supernova rates of large-scale cosmological simulations very well. Our computationally efficient model allows us to survey a large parameter space and to explore a wide range of different scenarios for Population III star formation. Our calculations show that observations of the first supernovae can be used to differentiate between cold and warm dark matter models and to constrain the corresponding particle mass of the latter. Our predictions can also be used to optimize survey strategies with the goal to maximize supernova detection rates.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Berkeley supernova Ia program. II. (Silverman+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, J. M.; Kong, J. J.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    In this second paper in a series, we present measurements of spectral features of 432 low-redshift (z<0.1) optical spectra of 261 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) within 20d of maximum brightness. The data were obtained from 1989 to the end of 2008 as part of the Berkeley Supernova Ia Program (BSNIP) and are presented in BSNIP I by Silverman et al. (J/MNRAS/425/1789). We describe in detail our method of automated, robust spectral feature definition and measurement which expands upon similar previous studies. Using this procedure, we attempt to measure expansion velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths (pEWs), spectral feature depths and fluxes at the centre and endpoints of each of nine major spectral feature complexes. (10 data files).

  7. Critical study of type II supernovae: equations of state and general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Kahana, S.

    1986-01-01

    The relevance of relativistic gravitation and of the properties of nuclear matter at high density to supernova explosions is examined in detail. The existing empirical knowledge on the nuclear equation of state at densities greater than saturation, extracted from analysis of heavy ion collisions and from the breathing mode in heavy nuclei, is also considered. Particulars of the prompt explosions recently obtained theoretically by Baron, Cooperstein, and Kahana are presented. 40 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Optical Observations of the Nearby Galaxy IC342 With Narrow Band [S II] and Hα Filters. II - Detection of 16 Optically-Identified Supernova Remnant Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vučetić, M. M.; Ćiprijanović, A.; Pavlović, M. Z.; Pannuti, T. G.; Petrov, N.; Göker, Ü. D.; Ercan, E. N.

    2015-12-01

    We present the detection of 16 optical supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in the nearby spiral galaxy IC342. The candidates were detected by applying [S II]/Hα ratio criterion on observations made with the 2 m RCC telescope at Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory in Bulgaria. In this paper, we report the coordinates, diameters, Hα and [S II] fluxes for 16 SNRs detected in two fields of view in the IC342 galaxy. Also, we estimate that the contamination of total Hα flux from SNRs in the observed portion of IC342 is 1.4 percent. This would represent the fractional error when the star formation rate (SFR) for this galaxy is derived from the total galaxy's Hα emission.

  9. Time-dependence Effects in Photospheric-Phase Type II Supernova Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John

    2007-08-01

    We have incorporated time-dependent terms into the statistical and radiative equilibrium calculations of the non-LTE line-blanketed radiative transfer code CMFGEN. To illustrate the significant improvements in spectral fitting achieved for photospheric phase Type II SN, and to document the effects associated with time dependence, we model the outer 6.1 Msolar of ejecta of a BSG/RSG progenitor star. Hopping by 3-day increments, we compute the UV to near-IR spectral evolution for both continuum and lines, from the fully ionized conditions at one week to the partially recombined conditions at 6 weeks after the explosion. We confirm the importance of allowing for time-dependence in the modeling of Type-II SN, as recently discussed by Utrobin & Chugai for SN1987A. However unlike Utrobin & Chugai, who treated the radiation field in a core-halo approximation and assumed the Sobolev approximation for line formation, we allow for the full interaction between the radiation field and level populations, and study the effects on the full spectrum. At the hydrogen-recombination epoch, HI lines and NaD are considerably stronger and broader than in equivalent steady-state models, while CaII is weakened. Former successes of steady-state CMFGEN models are unaffected, while former discrepancies are cured. Time dependence affects all lines, while the continuum, from the UV to the optical, changes only moderately. We identify two key effects: First, time dependence together with the energy gain through changes in ionization and excitation lead to an over-ionization in the vicinity of the photosphere, dramatically affecting line optical depths and profiles. Second, the ionization is frozen-in at large radii/velocities. This stems solely from the time-scale contrast between recombination and expansion and will occur, modulo non-thermal excitation effects, in all SN types. The importance of this effect on spectral analyses, across SN types and epochs, remains to be determined.

  10. Superheavy Elements and its Theoretical Perspective During Explosion of Supernova Type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Rulee

    2015-08-01

    Stars in the mass range 10-30 M⊙ evolve to form iron cores of 1.3 to 1.6 M⊙. These iron cores collapse according to well known instabilities, photodisintegration and electron capture. During collapse an outward bound shock wave forms in the matter falling onto the nearly stationary core. The conditions behind the shock at 100 to 200 km are suitable for neutrino heating . This neutrino heating blows a hot bubble above the protoneutron star and is the most important source of energy for Supernova Explosion . At this stage, we try to attain the r-process (rapid neutron capture process) path responsible for the production of heavy elements beyond iron , which are otherwise not possible to be formed by fusion reactions . The particular model we have used is the delayed explosion of massive stars powered by neutrino energy deposition in a hot-bubble.We have studied the r-process path corresponding to temperatures ranging from 1.0x109 K to 3.0x109 K . Another astrophysical parameter needed for our analysis is neutron number density which we take to be greater than 1020 cm-3 and upto 1030 cm-3. In the later expansion stages after SN explosion where the neutron density supposedly falls, the r-process nucleosynthesis produces the heavy elements which subsequently beta decays and the r-process path forms. Along the path , the experimental data of observed elements matches our calculated ones. We note that the element 98Cf 254 shown by the SN light curves is found in our classical astrophysical condition of T = 1.9× 109 K and nn = 1020 cm-3. We investigate the superheavy elements' (Z > 105) formation along the r-process path and note that with the increase in temperature the SHE element formation is highly favored. Also we note an element of mass 273 corresponding to atomic number 115, at temperature 3.0 × 109 K and neutron density 1020 cm-3.

  11. Variable selection for modeling the absolute magnitude at maximum of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, Koji S.; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2015-06-01

    We discuss what is an appropriate set of explanatory variables in order to predict the absolute magnitude at the maximum of Type Ia supernovae. In order to have a good prediction, the error for future data, which is called the "generalization error," should be small. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and a LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. This approach can be used even in the case that the number of samples is smaller than the number of candidate variables. We studied the Berkeley supernova database with our approach. Candidates for the explanatory variables include normalized spectral data, variables about lines, and previously proposed flux ratios, as well as the color and light-curve widths. As a result, we confirmed the past understanding about Type Ia supernovae: (i) The absolute magnitude at maximum depends on the color and light-curve width. (ii) The light-curve width depends on the strength of Si II. Recent studies have suggested adding more variables in order to explain the absolute magnitude. However, our analysis does not support adding any other variables in order to have a better generalization error.

  12. SN1987A-Neutrino emission from Supernova': in Dynamic universe model of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    SN1987A-Neutrino emission from supernova before the star bursts' is an important discovery, when viewed from `Dynamic universe model of cosmology' point of view. In OMEG05, we have successfully presented the reasons for calculation error called `missing mass' in an inhomoge-neous, anisotropic and multi-body Dynamic universe Model, where this error is not occurring. But there are some new voices that say about generation of some flavors of neutrinos during Bigbang. We find from SN1987A Neutrino generation covers all flavors. Remaining flavors of Neutrinos are generated from sun and stars. This covers the whole spectrum. This paper covers all these aspects. And other earlier results by Dynamic Universe Model 1. Offers Singularity free solutions 2. Non-collapsing Galaxy structures 3. Solving Missing mass in Galaxies, and it finds reason for Galaxy circular velocity curves. . . . 4. Blue shifted and red shifted Galaxies co-existence. . . 5. Explains the force behind expansion of universe. 6. Explains the large voids and non-uniform matter densities. 7. Explains the Pioneer anomaly 8. Predicts the trajectory of New Horizons satellite. 9 Jeans swindle test 10. Existence of large number of blue shifted Galaxies `SITA Simulations' software was developed about 18 years back for Dynamic Universe Model of Cosmology. It is based on Newtonian physics. It is Classical singularity free N-body tensor solution to the old problem announced by King Oscar II and tried by Poincare in year AD1888 for 133 masses, tested extensively for so many years. This was developed on 486 based PC of those days; the same software was used repeatedly for so many years for solving different Physical problems on Different PCs and Laptops. It is based on Dynamic Universe Model's mathematical back ground.

  13. Properties of Deflagration Fronts and Models for Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, I.; Höflich, P.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed models of the explosion of a white dwarf that include self-consistent calculations of the light curve and spectra provide a link between observational quantities and the underlying explosion model. These calculations assume spherical geometry and are based on parameterized descriptions of the burning front. Recently, the first multidimensional calculations for nuclear burning fronts have been performed. Although a fully consistent treatment of the burning fronts is beyond the current state of the art, these calculations provide a new and better understanding of the physics. Several new descriptions for flame propagation have been proposed by Khokhlov et al. and Niemeyer et al. Using various descriptions for the propagation of a nuclear deflagration front, we have studied the influence on the results of previous analyses of Type Ia supernovae, namely, the nucleosynthesis and structure of the expanding envelope. Our calculations are based on a set of delayed detonation models with parameters that give a good account of the optical and infrared light curves and of the spectral evolution. In this scenario, the burning front first propagates in a deflagration mode and subsequently turns into a detonation. The explosions and light curves are calculated using a one-dimensional Lagrangian radiation-hydro code including a detailed nuclear network. We find that the results of the explosion are rather insensitive to details of the description of the deflagration front, even if its speed and the time from the transition to detonation differ almost by a factor of 2. For a given white dwarf (WD) and a fixed transition density, the total production of elements changes by less than 10%, and the distribution in the velocity space changes by less than 7%. Qualitatively, this insensitivity of the final outcome of the explosion to the details of the flame propagation during the (slow) deflagration phase can be understood as follows: for plausible variations in the speed of

  14. The Status of Multi-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.

    2016-09-01

    Models of neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova explosions have matured considerably in recent years. Explosions of low-mass progenitors can routinely be simulated in 1D, 2D, and 3D. Nucleosynthesis calculations indicate that these supernovae could be contributors of some lighter neutron-rich elements beyond iron. The explosion mechanism of more massive stars remains under investigation, although first 3D models of neutrino-driven explosions employing multi-group neutrino transport have become available. Together with earlier 2D models and more simplified 3D simulations, these have elucidated the interplay between neutrino heating and hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region that is essential for shock revival. However, some physical ingredients may still need to be added/improved before simulations can robustly explain supernova explosions over a wide range of progenitors. Solutions recently suggested in the literature include uncertainties in the neutrino rates, rotation, and seed perturbations from convective shell burning. We review the implications of 3D simulations of shell burning in supernova progenitors for the `perturbations-aided neutrino-driven mechanism,' whose efficacy is illustrated by the first successful multi-group neutrino hydrodynamics simulation of an 18 solar mass progenitor with 3D initial conditions. We conclude with speculations about the impact of 3D effects on the structure of massive stars through convective boundary mixing.

  15. Ejection of Supernova-Enriched Gas From Dwarf Disk Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Fragile, P C; Murray, S D; Lin, D C

    2004-06-15

    We examine the efficiency with which supernova-enriched gas may be ejected from dwarf disk galaxies, using a methodology previously employed to study the self-enrichment efficiency of dwarf spheroidal systems. Unlike previous studies that focused on highly concentrated starbursts, in the current work we consider discrete supernova events spread throughout various fractions of the disk. We model disk systems having gas masses of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} with supernova rates of 30, 300, and 3000 Myr{sup -1}. The supernova events are confined to the midplane of the disk, but distributed over radii of 0, 30, and 80% of the disk radius, consistent with expectations for Type II supernovae. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that the enriched material from supernovae is largely lost when the supernovae are concentrated near the nucleus, as expected for a starburst event. In contrast, we find the loss of enriched material to be much less efficient (as low as 21%) when the supernovae occur over even a relatively small fraction of the disk. The difference is due to the ability of the system to relax following supernova events that occur over more extended regions. Larger physical separations also reduce the likelihood of supernovae going off within low-density ''chimneys'' swept out by previous supernovae. We also find that, for the most distributed systems, significant metal loss is more likely to be accompanied by significant mass loss. A comparison with theoretical predications indicates that, when undergoing self-regulated star formation, galaxies in the mass range considered shall efficiently retain the products of Type II supernovae.

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA DUST DESTRUCTION. II. METAL-ENRICHED EJECTA KNOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia, Devin W.; Smith, Britton D.; Shull, J. Michael E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu

    2012-03-20

    Following our previous work, we investigate through hydrodynamic simulations the destruction of newly formed dust grains by sputtering in the reverse shocks of supernova remnants. Using an idealized setup of a planar shock impacting a dense, spherical clump, we implant a population of Lagrangian particles into the clump to represent a distribution of dust grains in size and composition. We vary the relative velocity between the reverse shock and ejecta clump to explore the effects of shock heating and cloud compression. Because supernova ejecta will be metal-enriched, we consider gas metallicities from Z/Z{sub Sun} = 1 to 100 and their influence on the cooling properties of the cloud and the thermal sputtering rates of embedded dust grains. We post-process the simulation output to calculate grain sputtering for a variety of species and size distributions. In the metallicity regime considered in this paper, the balance between increased radiative cooling and increased grain erosion depends on the impact velocity of the reverse shock. For slow shocks (v{sub shock} {<=} 3000 km s{sup -1}), the amount of dust destruction is comparable across metallicities or in some cases is decreased with increased metallicity. For higher shock velocities (v{sub shock} {>=} 5000 km s{sup -1}), an increase in metallicity from Z/Z{sub Sun} = 10 to 100 can lead to an additional 24% destruction of the initial dust mass. While the total dust destruction varies widely across grain species and simulation parameters, our most extreme cases result in complete destruction for some grain species and only 44% dust mass survival for the most robust species. These survival rates are important in understanding how early supernovae contribute to the observed dust masses in high-redshift galaxies.

  17. Supernovae and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbergh, S.

    1994-01-01

    Shklovsky and others have suggested that some of the major extinctions in the geological record might have been triggered by explosions of nearby supernovae. The frequency of such extinction events will depend on the galactic supernova frequency and on the distance up to which a supernova explosion will produce lethal effects upon terrestrial life. In the present note it will be assumed that a killer supernova has to occur so close to Earth that it will be embedded in a young, active, supernova remnant. Such young remnants typically have radii approximately less than 3 pc (1 x 10(exp 19) cm). Larger (more pessimistic?) killer radii have been adopted by Ruderman, Romig, and by Ellis and Schramm. From observations of historical supernovae, van den Bergh finds that core-collapse (types Ib and II) supernovae occur within 4 kpc of the Sun at a rate of 0.2 plus or minus 0.1 per century. Adopting a layer thickness of 0.3 kpc for the galacitc disk, this corresponds to a rate of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). Including supernovae of type Ia will increase the total supernovae rate to approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). For a lethal radius of R pc the rate of killer events will therefore be 1.7 (R/3)(exp 3) x 10(exp -2) supernovae per g.y. However, a frequency of a few extinctions per g.y. is required to account for the extinctions observed during the phanerozoic. With R (extinction) approximately 3 pc, the galactic supernova frequency is therefore too low by 2 orders of magnitude to account for the major extinctions in the geological record.

  18. Swift X-Ray Telescope Observations of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kae Batara Olaes, Melanie; Quimby, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) are a part of an emerging class of exceptionally bright supernovae with peak luminosities 10 times brighter than typical Type Ia supernovae. Similar to supernovae, SLSNe are divided into two subclasses: hydrogen poor SLSN-I and hydrogen rich SLSN-II. However, the luminosity of these events is far too high to be explained by the models for normal supernovae. New models developed to explain SLSNe predict high luminosity X-ray emission at late times. A consistent analysis of incoming SLSNe is essential in order to place constraints on the mechanisms behind these events. Here we present the results of X-ray analysis on SLSNe using a Bayesian method of statistical inference for low count rate events.

  19. Extreme Supernova Models for the Super-luminous Transient ASASSN-15lh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Vinko, J.; Nagy, A. P.; Wiggins, B. K.; Even, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    The recent discovery of the unprecedentedly super-luminous transient ASASSN-15lh (or SN 2015L) with its UV-bright secondary peak challenges all the power-input models that have been proposed for super-luminous supernovae. Here we examine some of the few viable interpretations of ASASSN-15lh in the context of a stellar explosion, involving combinations of one or more power inputs. We model the light curve of ASASSN-15lh with a hybrid model that includes contributions from magnetar spin-down energy and hydrogen-poor circumstellar interaction. We also investigate models of pure circumstellar interaction with a massive hydrogen-deficient shell and discuss the lack of interaction features in the observed spectra. We find that, as a supernova, ASASSN-15lh can be best modeled by the energetic core-collapse of an ∼40 M ⊙ star interacting with a hydrogen-poor shell of ∼20 M ⊙. The circumstellar shell and progenitor mass are consistent with a rapidly rotating pulsational pair-instability supernova progenitor as required for strong interaction following the final supernova explosion. Additional energy injection by a magnetar with an initial period of 1–2 ms and magnetic field of 0.1–1 × 1014 G may supply the excess luminosity required to overcome the deficit in single-component models, but this requires more fine-tuning and extreme parameters for the magnetar, as well as the assumption of efficient conversion of magnetar energy into radiation. We thus favor a single-input model where the reverse shock formed in a strong SN ejecta–circumstellar matter interaction following a very powerful core-collapse SN explosion can supply the luminosity needed to reproduce the late-time UV-bright plateau.

  20. Extreme Supernova Models for the Super-luminous Transient ASASSN-15lh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. C.; Vinko, J.; Nagy, A. P.; Wiggins, B. K.; Even, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    The recent discovery of the unprecedentedly super-luminous transient ASASSN-15lh (or SN 2015L) with its UV-bright secondary peak challenges all the power-input models that have been proposed for super-luminous supernovae. Here we examine some of the few viable interpretations of ASASSN-15lh in the context of a stellar explosion, involving combinations of one or more power inputs. We model the light curve of ASASSN-15lh with a hybrid model that includes contributions from magnetar spin-down energy and hydrogen-poor circumstellar interaction. We also investigate models of pure circumstellar interaction with a massive hydrogen-deficient shell and discuss the lack of interaction features in the observed spectra. We find that, as a supernova, ASASSN-15lh can be best modeled by the energetic core-collapse of an ˜40 M ⊙ star interacting with a hydrogen-poor shell of ˜20 M ⊙. The circumstellar shell and progenitor mass are consistent with a rapidly rotating pulsational pair-instability supernova progenitor as required for strong interaction following the final supernova explosion. Additional energy injection by a magnetar with an initial period of 1-2 ms and magnetic field of 0.1-1 × 1014 G may supply the excess luminosity required to overcome the deficit in single-component models, but this requires more fine-tuning and extreme parameters for the magnetar, as well as the assumption of efficient conversion of magnetar energy into radiation. We thus favor a single-input model where the reverse shock formed in a strong SN ejecta-circumstellar matter interaction following a very powerful core-collapse SN explosion can supply the luminosity needed to reproduce the late-time UV-bright plateau.

  1. Type Ia supernovae: Pulsating delayed detonation models, IR light curves, and the formation of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflich, Peter; Khokhlov, A.; Wheeler, C.

    1995-01-01

    We computed optical and infrared light curves of the pulsating class of delayed detonation models for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). It is demonstrated that observations of the IR light curves can be used to identify subluminous SNe Ia by testing whether secondary maxima occur in the IR. Our pulsating delayed detonation models are in agreement with current observations both for subluminous and normal bright SN Ia, namely SN1991bg, SN1992bo, and SN1992bc. Observations of molecular bands provide a test to distinguish whether strongly subluminous supernovae are a consequence of the pulsating mechanism occurring in a high-mass white dwarf (WD) or, alternatively, are formed by the helium detonation in a low-mass WD as was suggested by Woosley. In the latter case, no carbon is left after the explosion of low-mass WDs whereas a log of C/O-rich material is present in pulsating delayed detonation models.

  2. A Triple-energy-source Model for Superluminous Supernova iPTF13ehe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Q.; Liu, L. D.; Dai, Z. G.; Wang, L. J.; Wu, X. F.

    2016-09-01

    Almost all superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) whose peak magnitudes are ≲ -21 mag can be explained by the 56Ni-powered model, the magnetar-powered (highly magnetized pulsar) model, or the ejecta-circumstellar medium (CSM) interaction model. Recently, iPTF13ehe challenged these energy-source models, because the spectral analysis shows that ∼ 2.5{M}ȯ of 56Ni have been synthesized, but are inadequate to power the peak bolometric emission of iPTF13ehe, while the rebrightening of the late-time light curve (LC) and the Hα emission lines indicate that the ejecta-CSM interaction must play a key role in powering the late-time LC. Here we propose a triple-energy-source model, in which a magnetar together with some amount (≲ 2.5{M}ȯ ) of 56Ni may power the early LC of iPTF13ehe, while the late-time rebrightening can be quantitatively explained by an ejecta-CSM interaction. Furthermore, we suggest that iPTF13ehe is a genuine core-collapse supernova rather than a pulsational pair-instability supernova candidate. Further studies on similar SLSNe in the future would eventually shed light on their explosion and energy-source mechanisms.

  3. A Triple-energy-source Model for Superluminous Supernova iPTF13ehe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Q.; Liu, L. D.; Dai, Z. G.; Wang, L. J.; Wu, X. F.

    2016-09-01

    Almost all superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) whose peak magnitudes are ≲ -21 mag can be explained by the 56Ni-powered model, the magnetar-powered (highly magnetized pulsar) model, or the ejecta-circumstellar medium (CSM) interaction model. Recently, iPTF13ehe challenged these energy-source models, because the spectral analysis shows that ˜ 2.5{M}⊙ of 56Ni have been synthesized, but are inadequate to power the peak bolometric emission of iPTF13ehe, while the rebrightening of the late-time light curve (LC) and the Hα emission lines indicate that the ejecta-CSM interaction must play a key role in powering the late-time LC. Here we propose a triple-energy-source model, in which a magnetar together with some amount (≲ 2.5{M}⊙ ) of 56Ni may power the early LC of iPTF13ehe, while the late-time rebrightening can be quantitatively explained by an ejecta-CSM interaction. Furthermore, we suggest that iPTF13ehe is a genuine core-collapse supernova rather than a pulsational pair-instability supernova candidate. Further studies on similar SLSNe in the future would eventually shed light on their explosion and energy-source mechanisms.

  4. On the cosmic ray spectrum from type II Supernovae expanding in their red giant presupernova wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardillo, Martina

    2015-12-01

    While from the energetic point of view SNRs are viable sources of Galactic CRs, the issue of whether they can accelerate protons up to PeV remains unsolved. Here we discuss particle acceleration at the forward shock of SN and discuss the possibility that the escaping particle current may excite a non-resonant instability that in turn leads to the formation of resonant modes confining particles close to the shock and increasing the maximum energy. This mechanism works throughout the expansion of the SN explosion, from the ejecta dominated (ED) to the Sedov-Taylor (ST) phase. Because of their higher explosion rate,we focus on type II SNae expanding in the slow, dense red supergiant wind. When the explosion occurs in such winds, the transition between the ED and the ST phase is likely to take place within a few tens of years. As a result, the spectrum of accelerated particles shows a break in the slope, at the maximum energy (EM) achieved at the beginning of the ST phase. Above this energy, the spectrum becomes steeper but remains a power law than developing an exponential cutoff. We show that for type II SNae typical parameters, proton EM can easily reach PeV energies, confirming that type II SNRs are the best candidate sources for CRs at the knee. We have tried to fit KASCADE-Grande, ARGO -YBJ and YAC1-Tibet Array data with our model but we could not find any parameter combination that could explain all data sets. Indeed the recent measurement of the proton and helium spectra in the knee region, with the ARGO-YBJ and YAC1-Tibet Array, has made the situation very confused. These measurements suggest that the knee in the light component is at 650 TeV, appreciably below the overall spectrum knee. This finding would resolve the problem of reaching very high energies in SNae, but, on the other hand, it would open a critical issue in the transition region between Galactic and extragalactic CRs.

  5. r-process in Type II supernovae and the role of direct capture

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuki, K.; Burrows, A.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Typel, S.; Langanke, K.; Matos, M.

    2010-06-01

    We have calculated r-process nucleosynthesis based on acoustic wave driven supernova simulation. The environment includes extremely high entropy cases which has not been studied in previous studies. Plenty of actinide and third peak elements are formed in an averaged abundance, while elements around the first and second peaks are overproduced. We also studied the effect of direct capture in r-process. The direct capture furthers r-process and make freeze out earlier. It will change the final abundance drastically. We recalculated r-process nucleosynthesis of the simulation considering the direct capture reaction. While we could not see a significant difference in averaged abundances, significant differences appeared in several individual yields.

  6. A Hubble Diagram from Type II Supernovae Based Solely on Photometry: The Photometric Color Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Anderson, J. P.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bolt, L.; Burns, C. R.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, G.; Freedman, W. L.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Krisciunas, K.; Krzeminski, W.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Morrell, N.; Olivares E., F.; Persson, S. E.; Suntzeff, N.

    2015-12-01

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V ‑ i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  7. Comparison of Electron Capture and Beta Decay Rates in High Temperature Environment in Explosion of Supernova Type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Rulee

    2015-08-01

    It is generally acknowledged that Type II supernova result from the collapse of iron core of a massive star which , at least in some cases, produces a neutron star. At this stage, the neutrinos are produced by neutronization which speeds up as collapse continues. During collapse an outward bound shock wave forms in the matter falling onto the nearly stationary core which shows reflectivity of matter . The conditions behind the shock at 100 to 200 km are suitable for neutrino heating . This neutrino heating blows a hot bubble above the protoneutron star and is the most important source of energy for Supernova explosion . At this stage , we try to attain the r-process path responsible for the production of heavy elements beyond iron , which are otherwise not possible to be formed by fusion reactions . The most interesting evolution occurs as temperature falls from 1010 K to 109 K . At these high temperature conditions , the near critical fluids after fusion reactions are forbidden and transform into the respective atoms by r-process path which on beta decaying produce the ultimate elements of the periodic chart . Another astrophysical parameter needed for our analysis is neutron number density which we take to be greater than 1020 cm-3 . With these , at different entropy environments , we assign the neutron binding energy that represents the r-process path in the chart of nuclides . Along the path , the experimental data of observed elements matches our calculated one . It is found that the dynamical timescale of the final collapse is dominated by electron capture on nuclei and not on free protons. It is also found that the beta decay rates are much higher than the corresponding electron capture rates at the same classical condition.

  8. Comparison of electron capture and beta decay rates in high temperature environment in explosion of supernova type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Rulee

    It is generally acknowledged that Type II supernova results from the collapse of iron core of a massive star which, at least in some cases, produces a neutron star. At this stage, the neutrinos are produced by neutronization which speeds up as collapse continues. During collapse an outward bound shock wave forms in the matter falling onto the nearly stationary core. The conditions behind the shock at 100 to 200 km are suitable for neutrino heating. This neutrino heating blows a hot bubble above the protoneutron star and is the most important source of energy for Supernova explosion. At this stage, we try to attain the r-process (rapid neutron capture process) path responsible for the production of heavy elements beyond iron, which are otherwise not possible to be formed by fusion reactions. The most interesting evolution occurs as temperature falls from 1010 K to 109 K. At these high temperature conditions, the near critical fluids after fusion reactions transform into the respective atoms by r-process path which on beta decaying produce the ultimate elements of the periodic chart. Another astrophysical parameter needed for our analysis is neutron number density which we take to be greater than 1020 cm^{-3}. With these, at different entropy environments, we assign the neutron binding energy that represents the r-process path in the chart of nuclides. Along the path, the experimental data of observed elements matches our calculated one. It is found that the dynamical timescale of the final collapse is dominated by electron capture on nuclei and not on free protons. It is also found that the beta decay rates are much higher than the corresponding electron capture rates at the same classical condition.

  9. CONSTRAINING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA MODELS: SN 2011fe AS A TEST CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Roepke, F. K.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Kromer, M.; Taubenberger, S.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Hillebrandt, W.; Benitez-Herrera, S.; Pakmor, R.; Sim, S. A.; Aldering, G.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon; Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne; CNRS and others

    2012-05-01

    The nearby supernova SN 2011fe can be observed in unprecedented detail. Therefore, it is an important test case for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) models, which may bring us closer to understanding the physical nature of these objects. Here, we explore how available and expected future observations of SN 2011fe can be used to constrain SN Ia explosion scenarios. We base our discussion on three-dimensional simulations of a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf and of a violent merger of two white dwarfs (WDs)-realizations of explosion models appropriate for two of the most widely discussed progenitor channels that may give rise to SNe Ia. Although both models have their shortcomings in reproducing details of the early and near-maximum spectra of SN 2011fe obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory), the overall match with the observations is reasonable. The level of agreement is slightly better for the merger, in particular around maximum, but a clear preference for one model over the other is still not justified. Observations at late epochs, however, hold promise for discriminating the explosion scenarios in a straightforward way, as a nucleosynthesis effect leads to differences in the {sup 55}Co production. SN 2011fe is close enough to be followed sufficiently long to study this effect.

  10. First supernova companion star found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    ). These two mighty galaxies in the Plough (Ursa Major) belong to some of the most famous and beloved galaxies known to amateur astronomers. This may be one of the reasons that Supernova 1993J was discovered by the Spanish amateur astronomer Francisco Garcia Diaz and not a professional astronomer. The violent star-forming activity in the neighbouring Messier 82 gives rise to a strong galactic wind that is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas (seen in red) out of its centre. Supernovae are some of the most significant sources of chemical elements in the Universe, and they are at the heart of our understanding of the evolution of galaxies. Supernovae are some of the most violent events in the Universe. For many years astronomers have thought that they occur in either solitary massive stars (Type II supernovae) or in a binary system where the companion star plays an important role (Type I supernovae). However no one has been able to observe any such companion star. It has even been speculated that the companion stars might not survive the actual explosion... The second brightest supernova discovered in modern times, SN 1993J, was found in the beautiful spiral galaxy M81 on 28 March 1993. From archival images of this galaxy taken before the explosion, a red supergiant was identified as the mother star in 1993 - only the second time astronomers have actually seen the progenitor of a supernova explosion (the first was SN 1987A, the supernova that exploded in 1987 in our neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud). Initially rather ordinary, SN 1993J began to puzzle astronomers as its ejecta seemed too rich in the chemical element helium and instead of fading normally it showed a bizarre sharp increase in brightness. The astronomers realised that a normal red supergiant alone could not have given rise to such a weird supernova. It was suggested that the red supergiant orbited a companion star that had shredded its outer layers just before the explosion. Ten

  11. TURBULENCE IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL DEFLAGRATION MODEL FOR TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. I. SCALING PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Schmidt, W.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Roepke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2009-05-10

    We analyze the statistical properties of the turbulent velocity field in the deflagration model for Type Ia supernovae. In particular, we consider the question of whether turbulence is isotropic and consistent with the Kolmogorov theory at small length scales. Using numerical data from a high-resolution simulation of a thermonuclear supernova explosion, spectra of the turbulence energy and velocity structure functions are computed. We show that the turbulent velocity field is isotropic at small length scales and follows a scaling law that is consistent with the Kolmogorov theory until most of the nuclear fuel is burned. At length scales greater than a certain characteristic scale that agrees with the prediction of Niemeyer and Woosley, turbulence becomes anisotropic. Here, the radial velocity fluctuations follow the scaling law of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, whereas the angular component still obeys the Kolmogorov scaling. In the late phase of the explosion, this characteristic scale drops below the numerical resolution of the simulation. The analysis confirms that a subgrid-scale model for the unresolved turbulence energy is required for the consistent calculation of the flame speed in deflagration models of Type Ia supernovae, and that the assumption of isotropy on these scales is appropriate.

  12. Near-Infrared [Fe II] and H2 Line Observations of the Supernova Remnant 3C 396: Probing the Presupernova Circumstellar Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Gyu; Moon, Dae-Sik; Koo, Bon-Chul; Lee, Jae-Joon; Matthews, Keith

    2009-02-01

    We present the results of near-infrared [Fe II] and H2 line imaging and spectroscopic observations of the supernova remnant 3C 396 using the Palomar 5 m Hale telescope. We detect long, filamentary [Fe II] emission delineating the inner edge of the radio emission in the western boundary of the remnant in imaging observations, together with a bright [Fe II] emission clump close to the remnant center. There appears to be faint, diffuse [Fe II] emission between the central clump and the western filamentary emission. The spectroscopic observations determine the expansion velocity of the central clump to be ~56 km s-1. This is far smaller than the expansion velocity of 3C 396 obtained from X-ray observations, implying the inhomogeneity of the ambient medium. The electron number density of the [Fe II] emission gas is <= 2000 cm-3. The H2 line emission, on the other hand, lies slightly outside the filamentary [Fe II] emission in the western boundary, and forms a rather straight filament. We suggest that the [Fe II] emission represents dense clumps in the wind material from the red supergiant phase of a Type IIL/b progenitor of 3C 396, which have been swept up by the supernova remnant shocks. The H2 emission may represent either the boundary of a wind bubble produced during the main-sequence phase of the progenitor or molecular clumps left over inside the bubble. We propose that the near-infrared [Fe II] and H2 emission observed in several supernova remnants of Type IIL/b SNe likely have the same origin.

  13. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  14. On the Requirements for Realistic Modeling of Neutrino Transport in Simulations of Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically-symmetric, general-relativistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general-relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using older weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus up-to-date weak interactions; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has non-negligible effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Finally, we discuss the impact these results have for current, and future, multidimensional models.

  15. A Spherical Chandrasekhar-Mass Delayed-Detonation Model for a Normal Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, Stéphane; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John

    2015-06-01

    The most widely-accepted model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is the thermonuclear disruption of a White Dwarf (WD) star in a binary system, although there is ongoing discussion about the combustion mode, the progenitor mass, and the nature of the binary companion. Observational evidence for diversity in the SN Ia population seems to require multiple progenitor channels or explosion mechanisms. In the standard single-degenerate (SD) scenario, the WD grows in mass through accretion of H-rich or He-rich material from a non-degenerate donor (e.g., a main-sequence star, a subgiant, a He star, or a red giant). When the WD is sufficiently close to the Chandrasekhar limit (˜1.4 M⊙), a subsonic deflagration front forms near the WD center which eventually transitions to a supersonic detonation (the so-called “delayed-detonation” model) and unbinds the star. The efficiency of the WD growth in mass remains uncertain, as repeated nova outbursts during the accretion process result in mass ejection from the WD surface. Moreover, the lack of observational signatures of the binary companion has cast some doubts on the SD scenario, and recent hydrodynamical simulations have put forward WD-WD mergers and collisions as viable alternatives. However, as shown here, the standard Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation model remains adequate to explain many normal SNe Ia, in particular those displaying broad Si II 6355 Å lines. We present non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer simulations performed with CMFGEN of a spherically-symmetric delayed-detonation model from a Chandrasekhar-mass WD progenitor with 0.51 M⊙ of 56Ni (Fig. 1 and Table 1), and confront our results to the observed light curves and spectra of the normal Type Ia SN 2002bo over the first 100 days of its evolution. With no fine tuning, the model reproduces well the bolometric (Fig. 2) and multi-band light curves, the secondary near-infrared maxima (Fig. 3), and the spectroscopic

  16. Flash Spectroscopy: Emission Lines from the Ionized Circumstellar Material Around <10-Day-Old Type II Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Khazov, Daniel; Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Manulis, I.; Rubin, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Cao, Y.; et al

    2016-02-02

    Supernovae (SNe) embedded in dense circumstellar material (CSM) may show prominent emission lines in their early-time spectra (≤10 days after the explosion), owing to recombination of the CSM ionized by the shock-breakout flash. From such spectra ("flash spectroscopy"), we can measure various physical properties of the CSM, as well as the mass-loss rate of the progenitor during the year prior to its explosion. In this paper, by searching through the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and iPTF) SN spectroscopy databases from 2009 through 2014, we found 12 SNe II showing flash-ionized (FI) signatures in their first spectra. All are younger thanmore » 10 days. These events constitute 14% of all 84 SNe in our sample having a spectrum within 10 days from explosion, and 18% of SNe II observed at ages <5 days, thereby setting lower limits on the fraction of FI events. We classified as "blue/featureless" (BF) those events having a first spectrum that is similar to that of a blackbody, without any emission or absorption signatures. It is possible that some BF events had FI signatures at an earlier phase than observed, or that they lack dense CSM around the progenitor. Within 2 days after explosion, 8 out of 11 SNe in our sample are either BF events or show FI signatures. Finally and interestingly, we found that 19 out of 21 SNe brighter than an absolute magnitude MR = -18.2 belong to the FI or BF groups, and that all FI events peaked above MR = -17.6 mag, significantly brighter than average SNe II.« less

  17. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2004-01-12

    A Type Ia supernova explosion likely begins as a nuclear runaway near the center of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The outward propagating flame is unstable to the Landau-Darrieus, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which serve to accelerate it to a large fraction of the speed of sound. We investigate the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flame at the transition from the flamelet regime to the distributed-burning regime, around densities of 10e7 gm/cc, through detailed, fully resolved simulations. A low Mach number, adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code is used to achieve the necessary resolution and long time scales. As the density is varied, we see a fundamental change in the character of the burning--at the low end of the density range the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates the burning, whereas at the high end the burning suppresses the instability. In all cases, significant acceleration of the flame is observed, limited only by the size of the domain we are able to study. We discuss the implications of these results on the potential for a deflagration to detonation transition.

  18. The nature of supernovae 2010O and 2010P in Arp 299 - II. Radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Cañizales, C.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A.; Kankare, E.; Bauer, F. E.; Ryder, S. D.; Mattila, S.; Conway, J. E.; Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.

    2014-05-01

    We report radio observations of two stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe), 2010O and 2010P, which exploded within a few days of each other in the luminous infrared galaxy Arp 299. Whilst SN 2010O remains undetected at radio frequencies, SN 2010P was detected (with an astrometric accuracy better than 1 milli arcsec in position) in its optically thin phase in epochs ranging from ˜1 to ˜3 yr after its explosion date, indicating a very slow radio evolution and a strong interaction of the SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium. Our late-time radio observations towards SN 2010P probe the dense circumstellar envelope of this SN, and imply dot{M} [ {M_{⊙} yr^{-1}}] / v_{wind} [10 km s^{-1}] =(3.0-5.1) × 10-5, with a 5 GHz peak luminosity of ˜1.2 × 1027 erg s- 1 Hz- 1 on day ˜464 after explosion. This is consistent with a Type IIb classification for SN 2010P, making it the most distant and most slowly evolving Type IIb radio SN detected to date.

  19. Two bi-stability jumps in theoretical wind models for massive stars and the implications for luminous blue variable supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Blagovest; Vink, Jorick S.; Gräfener, Götz

    2016-05-01

    Luminous blue variables (LBVs) have been suggested to be the direct progenitors of supernova Types IIb and IIn, with enhanced mass loss prior to explosion. However, the mechanism of this mass loss is not yet known. Here, we investigate the qualitative behaviour of theoretical stellar wind mass loss as a function of Teff across two bi-stability jumps in blue supergiant regime and also in proximity to the Eddington limit, relevant for LBVs. To investigate the physical ingredients that play a role in the radiative acceleration we calculate blue supergiant wind models with the CMFGEN non-local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmosphere code over an effective temperature range between 30 000 and 8800 K. Although our aim is not to provide new mass-loss rates for BA supergiants, we study and confirm the existence of two bi-stability jumps in mass-loss rates predicted by Vink et al. However, they are found to occur at somewhat lower Teff (20 000 and 9000 K, respectively) than found previously, which would imply that stars may evolve towards lower Teff before strong mass loss is induced by the bi-stability jumps. When the combined effects of the second bi-stability jump and the proximity to Eddington limit are accounted for, we find a dramatic increase in the mass-loss rate by up to a factor of 30. Further investigation of both bi-stability jumps is expected to lead to a better understanding of discrepancies between empirical modelling and theoretical mass-loss rates reported in the literature, and to provide key inputs for the evolution of both normal AB supergiants and LBVs, as well as their subsequent supernova Type II explosions.

  20. The Expanding Photosphere Method (EPM): Distance Calculations to Type II-P Supernovae and a Comparison with the Standard Candle Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio Enriquez, J.; Leonard, D. C.; Poznanski, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Li, W.; Silverman, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of independent methods to calculate extragalactic distances is important to help constrain cosmological parameters and to provide mutual checks on the external accuracy of other distance measuring techniques. In this work we present EPM distance estimates to a group of nearby (≤150 Mpc) Type II-Plateau Supernovae (SN-IIP) that are drawn from a sample for which distances have previously been determined by Poznanski et al. (2009) using the Standardized Candle Method (SCM), an independent distance-measuring technique for SNe II-P. We use the same photometric and spectral data as was used by Poznanski et al. (2009), which enables a direct comparison between the two techniques. To calculate our EPM distances we use the dilution factors of Jones et al. (2009), which were derived from the atmosphere models of Dessart & Hillier (2005b), and employ the filter subsets {BV}, {BVI}, and {VI}. Our “best” EPM distance estimates are derived as the mean of the three individual distances. We compare the EPM and SCM distance measurements and speculate on potential causes of any discrepancies found between our study and a parallel one carried out by Olivares et al. (2010) using a different dataset (which found a 40% difference between EPM and SCM distances, in the sense that EPM distances were systematically larger). Finally, we use our sample of EPM distances to SNe II-P to estimate the Hubble constant. We are grateful for the financial support of NSF grant AST-0908886, the TABASGO Foundation, and (for DP) an Einstein Fellowship.

  1. Accreting white dwarf models for type 1 supernovae. 1: Presupernova evolution and triggering mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1981-01-01

    As a plausible explosion model for a Type I supernova, the evolution of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting helium in binary systems was investigated from the onset of accretion up to the point at which a thermonuclear explosion occurs. The relationship between the conditions in the binary system and the triggering mechanism for the supernova explosion is discussed, especially for the cases with relatively slow accretion rate. It is found that the growth of a helium zone on the carbon-oxygen core leads to a supernova explosion which is triggered either by the off-center helium detonation for slow and intermediate accretion rates or by the carbon deflagration for slow and rapid accretion rates. Both helium detonation and carbon deflagration are possible for the case of slow accretion, since in this case the initial mass of the white dwarf is an important parameter for determining the mode of ignition. Finally, various modes of building up the helium zone on the white dwarf, namely, direct transfer of helium from the companion star and the various types and strength of the hydrogen shell flashes are discussed in some detail.

  2. A Model-independent Photometric Redshift Estimator for Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun

    2007-01-01

    The use of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as cosmological standard candles is fundamental in modern observational cosmology. In this Letter, we derive a simple empirical photometric redshift estimator for SNe Ia using a training set of SNe Ia with multiband (griz) light curves and spectroscopic redshifts obtained by the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). This estimator is analytical and model-independent it does not use spectral templates. We use all the available SNe Ia from SNLS with near-maximum photometry in griz (a total of 40 SNe Ia) to train and test our photometric redshift estimator. The difference between the estimated redshifts zphot and the spectroscopic redshifts zspec, (zphot-zspec)/(1+zspec), has rms dispersions of 0.031 for 20 SNe Ia used in the training set, and 0.050 for 20 SNe Ia not used in the training set. The dispersion is of the same order of magnitude as the flux uncertainties at peak brightness for the SNe Ia. There are no outliers. This photometric redshift estimator should significantly enhance the ability of observers to accurately target high-redshift SNe Ia for spectroscopy in ongoing surveys. It will also dramatically boost the cosmological impact of very large future supernova surveys, such as those planned for the Advanced Liquid-mirror Probe for Astrophysics, Cosmology, and Asteroids (ALPACA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).

  3. Stellar Forensics II: A post-explosion view of the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maund, Justyn

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies have used high spatial resolution HST observations of supernova {SN} sites to directly identify the progenitors of core-collapse SNe on pre-explosion images. These studies have set constraints about the nature of massive stars and their evolution just prior to their explosion as SNe. Now, at late-times when the SNe have faded sufficiently, it is possible to return to the sites of these core-collapse SNe to search for clues about the nature of their progenitors.We request time to conduct deep, late-time, high-resolution imaging with WFC3/UVIS+IR and ACS/WFC of the sites of three core-collapse SNe 2008ax, 2008bk and 2008cn. We aim to: 1} Confirm our original identifications, made in pre-explosion images, by confirming that the progenitors are now missing; 2} Apply image subtraction techniques for this late-time imaging with our pre-explosion images to determine accurate photometry of the progenitors to constrain their temperatures and luminosities; and 3} study the stellar populations in the immediate vicinities of these SNe, previously obscured by the progenitor and the SN, to provide a measure of the progenitor's age, as well. For SN 2008ax we aim to determine the possible presence of a binary companion, as a persistent source at the SN location once the SN has faded and the progenitor has disappeared. HST provides the unique combination of high-resolution optical/IR imaging at very faint magnitudes that will facilitate this study.

  4. CALTECH CORE-COLLAPSE PROJECT (CCCP) OBSERVATIONS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE: EVIDENCE FOR THREE DISTINCT PHOTOMETRIC SUBTYPES

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Cenko, S. Bradley; Becker, Adam B.; Fox, Derek B.; Leonard, Douglas C.; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sand, David J.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Kiewe, Michael; Scheps, Raphael; Birenbaum, Gali; Chamudot, Daniel; Zhou, Jonathan

    2012-09-10

    We present R-band light curves of Type II supernovae (SNe) from the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). With the exception of interacting (Type IIn) SNe and rare events with long rise times, we find that most light curve shapes belong to one of three apparently distinct classes: plateau, slowly declining, and rapidly declining events. The last class is composed solely of Type IIb SNe which present similar light curve shapes to those of SNe Ib, suggesting, perhaps, similar progenitor channels. We do not find any intermediate light curves, implying that these subclasses are unlikely to reflect variance of continuous parameters, but rather might result from physically distinct progenitor systems, strengthening the suggestion of a binary origin for at least some stripped SNe. We find a large plateau luminosity range for SNe IIP, while the plateau lengths seem rather uniform at approximately 100 days. As analysis of additional CCCP data goes on and larger samples are collected, demographic studies of core-collapse SNe will likely continue to provide new constraints on progenitor scenarios.

  5. Supernova tests of the timescape cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smale, Peter R.; Wiltshire, David L.

    2011-05-01

    The timescape cosmology has been proposed as a viable alternative to homogeneous cosmologies with dark energy. It realizes cosmic acceleration as an apparent effect that arises in calibrating average cosmological parameters in the presence of spatial curvature and gravitational energy gradients that grow large with the growth of inhomogeneities at late epochs. Recently Kwan, Francis and Lewis have claimed that the timescape model provides a relatively poor fit to the Union and Constitution supernovae compilations, as compared to the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. We show this conclusion is a result of systematic issues in supernova light-curve fitting, and of failing to exclude data below the scale of statistical homogeneity, z≲ 0.033. Using all currently available supernova data sets (Gold07, Union, Constitution, MLCS17, MLCS31, SDSS-II, CSP, Union2), and making cuts at the statistical homogeneity scale, we show that data reduced by the SALT/SALT-II (Spectral Adaptive Light curve Template) fitters provide Bayesian evidence that favours the spatially flat ΛCDM model over the timescape model, whereas data reduced with MLCS2k2 fitters give Bayesian evidence which favours the timescape model over the ΛCDM model. We discuss the questions of extinction and reddening by dust, and of intrinsic colour variations in supernovae which do not correlate with the decay time, and the likely impact these systematics would have in a scenario consistent with the timescape model.

  6. The Importance of 56Ni in Shaping the Light Curves of Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakar, Ehud; Poznanski, Dovi; Katz, Boaz

    2016-06-01

    What intrinsic properties shape the light curves of SNe II? To address this question we derive observational measures that are robust (i.e., insensitive to detailed radiative transfer) and constrain the contribution from 56Ni as well as a combination of the envelope mass, progenitor radius, and explosion energy. By applying our methods to a sample of SNe II from the literature, we find that a 56Ni contribution is often significant. In our sample, its contribution to the time-weighted integrated luminosity during the photospheric phase ranges between 8% and 72% with a typical value of 30%. We find that the 56Ni relative contribution is anti-correlated with the luminosity decline rate. When added to other clues, this in turn suggests that the flat plateaus often observed in SNe II are not a generic feature of the cooling envelope emission, and that without 56Ni many of the SNe that are classified as II-P would have shown a decline rate that is steeper by up to 1 mag/100 days. Nevertheless, we find that the cooling envelope emission, and not 56Ni contribution, is the main driver behind the observed range of decline rates. Furthermore, contrary to previous suggestions, our findings indicate that fast decline rates are not driven by lower envelope masses. We therefore suggest that the difference in observed decline rates is mainly a result of different density profiles of the progenitors.

  7. Optical and ultraviolet observations of a low-velocity type II plateau supernova 2013am in M65

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jujia; Bai, Jinming; Fan, Yufeng; Wang, Jianguo; Yi, Weimin; Wang, Chuanjun; Xin, Yuxin; Liangchang; Zhang, Xiliang; Lun, Baoli; Wang, Xueli; He, Shousheng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Fang; Mo, Jun; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Bersier, David; Zhang, Tianmeng; Walker, Emma S. E-mail: baijinming@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-12-10

    Optical and ultraviolet observations for the nearby type II plateau supernova (SN IIP) 2013am in the nearby spiral galaxy M65 are presented in this paper. The early spectra are characterized by relatively narrow P-Cygni features, with ejecta velocities much lower than observed in normal SNe IIP (i.e., ∼2000 km s{sup –1} versus ∼5000 km {sup –1} in the middle of the plateau phase). Moreover, prominent Ca II absorptions are also detected in SN 2013am at relatively early phases. These spectral features are reminiscent of those seen in the low-velocity and low-luminosity SN IIP 2005cs. However, SN 2013am exhibits different photometric properties, having shorter plateau phases and brighter light curve tails if compared to SN 2005cs. Adopting R{sub V} = 3.1 and a mean value of total reddening derived from the photometric and spectroscopic methods (i.e., E(B – V) = 0.55 ± 0.19 mag), we find that SN 2013am may have reached an absolute V-band peak magnitude of –15.83 ± 0.71 mag and produced an {sup 56}Ni mass of 0.016{sub −0.006}{sup +0.010} M {sub ☉} in the explosion. These parameters are close to those derived for SN 2008in and SN 2009N, which have been regarded as 'gap-filler' objects linking the faint SNe IIP to the normal ones. This indicates that some low-velocity SNe IIP may not necessarily result from the low-energetic explosions. The low expansion velocities could be due to a lower metallicity of the progenitor stars, a larger envelope mass ejected in the explosion, or the effect of viewing angle where these SNe were observed at an angle away from the polar direction.

  8. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.; Voelk, H. J.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium.

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James

    2008-06-24

    The three year plan for this project is to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (both Direct Numerical Simulation and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We will model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar interfaces. We will compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we will develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. We will conduct analytic studies of mix, in support of these objectives. Advanced issues, including multiple layers and reshock, will be considered.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    James Glimm

    2009-06-04

    The three year plan for this project was to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Large Eddy Simulations (LES), full two fluid simulations and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar or circular interfaces. We compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. Multiple layers and reshock are considered here.

  11. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVE INFERENCE: HIERARCHICAL MODELS IN THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Narayan, Gautham; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2011-04-20

    We have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves spanning optical through near-infrared (NIR) data. A hierarchical framework coherently models multiple random and uncertain effects, including intrinsic supernova (SN) light curve covariances, dust extinction and reddening, and distances. An improved BAYESN Markov Chain Monte Carlo code computes probabilistic inferences for the hierarchical model by sampling the global probability density of parameters describing individual SNe and the population. We have applied this hierarchical model to optical and NIR data of 127 SNe Ia from PAIRITEL, CfA3, Carnegie Supernova Project, and the literature. We find an apparent population correlation between the host galaxy extinction A{sub V} and the ratio of total-to-selective dust absorption R{sub V} . For SNe with low dust extinction, A{sub V} {approx}< 0.4, we find R{sub V} {approx} 2.5-2.9, while at high extinctions, A{sub V} {approx}> 1, low values of R{sub V} < 2 are favored. The NIR luminosities are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction. They exhibit low correlation with optical peak luminosities, and thus provide independent information on distances. The combination of NIR and optical data constrains the dust extinction and improves the predictive precision of individual SN Ia distances by about 60%. Using cross-validation, we estimate an rms distance modulus prediction error of 0.11 mag for SNe with optical and NIR data versus 0.15 mag for SNe with optical data alone. Continued study of SNe Ia in the NIR is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  12. DOUBLE-DETONATION SUB-CHANDRASEKHAR SUPERNOVAE: SYNTHETIC OBSERVABLES FOR MINIMUM HELIUM SHELL MASS MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Kromer, M.; Sim, S. A.; Fink, M.; Roepke, F. K.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2010-08-20

    In the double-detonation scenario for Type Ia supernovae, it is suggested that a detonation initiates in a shell of helium-rich material accreted from a companion star by a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf. This shell detonation drives a shock front into the carbon-oxygen white dwarf that triggers a secondary detonation in the core. The core detonation results in a complete disruption of the white dwarf. Earlier studies concluded that this scenario has difficulties in accounting for the observed properties of Type Ia supernovae since the explosion ejecta are surrounded by the products of explosive helium burning in the shell. Recently, however, it was proposed that detonations might be possible for much less massive helium shells than previously assumed (Bildsten et al.). Moreover, it was shown that even detonations of these minimum helium shell masses robustly trigger detonations of the carbon-oxygen core (Fink et al.). Therefore, it is possible that the impact of the helium layer on observables is less than previously thought. Here, we present time-dependent multi-wavelength radiative transfer calculations for models with minimum helium shell mass and derive synthetic observables for both the optical and {gamma}-ray spectral regions. These differ strongly from those found in earlier simulations of sub-Chandrasekhar-mass explosions in which more massive helium shells were considered. Our models predict light curves that cover both the range of brightnesses and the rise and decline times of observed Type Ia supernovae. However, their colors and spectra do not match the observations. In particular, their B - V colors are generally too red. We show that this discrepancy is mainly due to the composition of the burning products of the helium shell of the Fink et al. models which contain significant amounts of titanium and chromium. Using a toy model, we also show that the burning products of the helium shell depend crucially on its initial composition. This leads us

  13. The Cusp/Core problem: supernovae feedback versus the baryonic clumps and dynamical friction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.; Pace, F.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we compare the predictions of two well known mechanisms considered able to solve the cusp/core problem (a. supernova feedback; b. baryonic clumps-DM interaction) by comparing their theoretical predictions to recent observations of the inner slopes of galaxies with masses ranging from dSphs to normal spirals. We compare the α-V_{rot} and the α-M_{ast} relationships, predicted by the two models with high resolution data coming from Adams et al. (Astrophys. J. 789, 63, 2014), Simon et al. (Astrophys. J. 621, 757, 2005), LITTLE THINGS (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), THINGS dwarves (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 141, 193, 2011a; Oh et al. in Astron. J. 142, 224, 2011b), THINGS spirals (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), Sculptor, Fornax and the Milky Way. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the complete set of data shows that the two models perform similarly, while when we restrict the analysis to a smaller subsample of higher quality, we show that the method presented in this paper (baryonic clumps-DM interaction) performs better than the one based on supernova feedback. We also show that, contrarily to the first model prediction, dSphs of small mass could have cored profiles. This means that observations of cored inner profiles in dSphs having a stellar mass <106 M_{⊙} not necessarily imply problems for the ΛCDM model.

  14. Numerical Modeling of the Early Light Curves of Type IIP Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Piro, Anthony L.; Renzo, Mathieu; Ott, Christian D.

    2016-10-01

    The early rise of Type IIP supernovae (SN IIP) provides important information for constraining the properties of their progenitors. This can, in turn, be compared to pre-explosion imaging constraints and stellar models to develop a more complete picture of how massive stars evolve and end their lives. Using the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC), we model the first 40 days of SNe IIP to better understand what constraints can be derived from their early light curves. We use two sets of red supergiant (RSG) progenitor models with zero-age main sequence masses in the range between 9 {M}⊙ and 20 {M}⊙ . We find that the early properties of the light curve depend most sensitively on the radius of the progenitor, and thus provide a relation between the g-band rise time and the radius at the time of explosion. This relation will be useful for deriving constraints on progenitors from future observations, especially in cases where detailed modeling of the entire rise is not practical. When comparing to observed rise times, the radii we find are a factor of a few larger than previous semi-analytic derivations and are generally in better agreement with what is found with current stellar evolution calculations as well as direct observations of RSGs.

  15. Chandra Observations and Models of the Mixed Morphology Supernova Remnant W44: Global Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, R. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Petre, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the Chandra observations of the archetypical mixed morphology (or thermal composite) supernova remnant, W44. As with other mixed morphology remnants, W44's projected center is bright in thermal X-rays. It has an obvious radio shell, but no discernable X-ray shell. In addition, X-ray bright knots dot W44's image. The spectral analysis of the Chandra data show that the remnant s hot, bright projected center is metal-rich and that the bright knots are regions of comparatively elevated elemental abundances. Neon is among the affected elements, suggesting that ejecta contributes to the abundance trends. Furthermore, some of the emitting iron atoms appear to be underionized with respect to the other ions, providing the first potential X-ray evidence for dust destruction in a supernova remnant. We use the Chandra data to test the following explanations for W44's X-ray bright center: 1.) entropy mixing due to bulk mixing or thermal conduction, 2.) evaporation of swept up clouds, and 3.) a metallicity gradient, possibly due to dust destruction and ejecta enrichment. In these tests, we assume that the remnant has evolved beyond the adiabatic evolutionary stage, which explains the X-ray dimness of the shell. The entropy mixed model spectrum was tested against the Chandra spectrum for the remnant's projected center and found to be a good match. The evaporating clouds model was constrained by the finding that the ionization parameters of the bright knots are similar to those of the surrounding regions. While both the entropy mixed and the evaporating clouds models are known to predict centrally bright X-ray morphologies, their predictions fall short of the observed brightness gradient. The resulting brightness gap can be largely filled in by emission from the extra metals in and near the remnant's projected center. The preponderance of evidence (including that drawn from other studies) suggests that W44's remarkable morphology can be attributed to dust destruction

  16. SN 2013ej IN M74: A LUMINOUS AND FAST-DECLINING TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Juncheng; Mo, Jun; Zhao, Xulin; Zhang, Jujia; Brown, Peter J.; Zampieri, Luca; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zhang, Tianmeng E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2015-07-01

    We present extensive ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of the Type IIP supernova (SN IIP) 2013ej in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The multicolor light curves, spanning from ∼8–185 days after explosion, show that it has a higher peak luminosity (i.e., M{sub V} ∼ −17.83 mag at maximum light), a faster post-peak decline, and a shorter plateau phase (i.e., ∼50 days) compared to the normal Type IIP SN 1999em. The mass of {sup 56}Ni is estimated as 0.02 ± 0.01 M{sub ⊙} from the radioactive tail of the bolometric light curve. The spectral evolution of SN 2013ej is similar to that of SN 2004et and SN 2007od, but shows a larger expansion velocity (i.e., v{sub Fe} {sub ii} ∼ 4600 km s{sup −1} at t ∼ 50 days) and broader line profiles. In the nebular phase, the emission of the Hα line displays a double-peak structure, perhaps due to the asymmetric distribution of {sup 56}Ni produced in the explosion. With the constraints from the main observables such as bolometric light curve, expansion velocity, and photospheric temperature of SN 2013ej, we performed hydrodynamical simulations of the explosion parameters, yielding the total explosion energy as ∼0.7× 10{sup 51} erg, the radius of the progenitor as ∼600 R{sub ⊙}, and the ejected mass as ∼10.6 M{sub ⊙}. These results suggest that SN 2013ej likely arose from a red supergiant with a mass of 12–13 M{sub ⊙} immediately before the explosion.

  17. Late time optical spectra from the /sup 56/Ni model for Type I supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1980-07-01

    The hypothesis that the optical luminosity of Type I supernovae results from the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni synthesized and ejected by the explosion has been investigated by numerical simulation of the optical spectrum resulting from a homologously expanding shell composed initially of pure /sup 56/Ni core. This model, which neglects the effects of material external to the /sup 56/Ni core, is expected to provide a reasonable representation of the supernova at late times when the star is nearly transparent to optical photons. The numerical simulation determines the temperature, ionization state, and non-LTE level populations which result from energy deposition by the radioactive decay products of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co. The optical spectrum includes the effects of both allowed and forbidden lines. The optical spectra resulting from the simulation are found to be sensitive to the mass and ejection velocity of the /sup 56/Ni shell. A range of these parameters has been found which results in good agreement with the observed spectra of SN1972e over a considerable range of time. In particular, evidence for the expected decaying abundance of /sup 56/Co has been found in the spectra of SN1972e. These results are used to assess the validity of the /sup 56/Ni model and set limits on the mass and explosion mechanism of the Type I progenitor. The possibilities for improvement of the numerical model are discussed and future atomic data requirements defined.

  18. Supernova experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-12-02

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in [l]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. New analysis of the bubble velocity is presented, as well as a study of 2D vs. 3D difference in growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  19. Supernova Experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R. P.; Fryxell, B. A.

    2000-04-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported by Kane et al. in a recent paper. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few times 10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. We also present new analysis of the bubble velocity, a study of two-dimensional versus three-dimensional difference in growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A, and designs for two-dimensional versus three-dimensional hydro experiments. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  20. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Remington, B A; Arnett, D; Fryxell, B A; Drake, R P

    1998-11-10

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, they are attempting to rigorously scale the physics of the laboratory in supernova. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to hydrodynamics on the SN-size scales is presented and requirements established. Initial results were reported in [1]. Next the appropriate conditions are generated on the NOVA laser. 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates is generated. This scales the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D vs. 3D difference in growth at the He-H interface of Sn 1987A.

  1. Constraints on the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati Model from Recent Supernova Observations and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zong-Kuan; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Alcaniz, J. S.; Zhang, Yuan-Zhong

    2006-07-01

    Although there is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our universe is undergoing a late-time acceleration, the mechanism for this acceleration is yet unknown. In the so-called Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) model this phenomenon is attributed to gravitational ``leakage'' into extra dimensions. In this work, we mainly focus our attention on the constraints on the model from the ``gold sample'' of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the first-year data from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). At 99.73% confidence level, the combination of the three databases provides Ωm=0.270+0.018-0.017 and Ωrc=0.216+0.012-0.013 (hence, a spatially closed universe with Ωk=-0.350+0.080-0.083), which seems to be in contradiction with the most recent WMAP results indicating a flat universe. Based on this result, we also estimated the transition redshift (at which the universe switches from deceleration to acceleration) to be 0.70

  2. Applying the expanding photosphere and standardized candle methods to Type II-Plateau supernovae at cosmologically significant redshifts . The distance to SN 2013eq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, E. E. E.; Kotak, R.; Leibundgut, B.; Taubenberger, S.; Hillebrandt, W.; Kromer, M.

    2016-08-01

    Based on optical imaging and spectroscopy of the Type II-Plateau SN 2013eq, we present a comparative study of commonly used distance determination methods based on Type II supernovae. The occurrence of SN 2013eq in the Hubble flow (z = 0.041 ± 0.001) prompted us to investigate the implications of the difference between "angular" and "luminosity" distances within the framework of the expanding photosphere method (EPM) that relies upon a relation between flux and angular size to yield a distance. Following a re-derivation of the basic equations of the EPM for SNe at non-negligible redshifts, we conclude that the EPM results in an angular distance. The observed flux should be converted into the SN rest frame and the angular size, θ, has to be corrected by a factor of (1 + z)2. Alternatively, the EPM angular distance can be converted to a luminosity distance by implementing a modification of the angular size. For SN 2013eq, we find EPM luminosity distances of DL = 151 ± 18 Mpc and DL = 164 ± 20 Mpc by making use of different sets of dilution factors taken from the literature. Application of the standardized candle method for Type II-P SNe results in an independent luminosity distance estimate (DL = 168 ± 16 Mpc) that is consistent with the EPM estimate. Spectra of SN 2013eq are available in the Weizmann Interactive Supernova data REPository (WISeREP): http://wiserep.weizmann.ac.il

  3. Swift/BAT Detection of Hard X-Rays from Tycho's Supernova Remnant: Evidence for Titanium-44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, E.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Hartmann, D.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.

    2014-12-01

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10σ) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  4. The delayed-detonation model of Type Ia supernovae. 2: The detonation phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, David; Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    The investigation, by use of two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations, of the 'delayed detonation' mechanism of Khokhlov for the explosion of Type Ia supernovae is continued. Previously we found that the deflagration is insufficient to unbind the star. Expansion shuts off the flame; much of this small production of iron group nuclei occurs at lower densities, which reduces the electron-capture problem. Because the degenerate star has an adiabatic exponent only slightly above 4/3, the energy released by deflagration drives a pulsation of large amplitude. During the first expansion phase, adiabatic cooling shuts off the burning, and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability then gives mixing of high-entropy ashes with low-entropy fuel. During the first contraction phase, compressional heating reignites the material. The burning was allowed to develop into a detonation in these nonspherical models. The detonation grows toward spherical symmetry at late times. At these densities (rho approx. 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) g cm(exp -3)), either Ni-56 or nuclei of the Si-Ca group are the dominant products of the burning. The bulk yields are sensitive to the density of the star when the transition to detonation occurs. The relevance of the abundances, velocities, mixing, and total energy release to the theory and interpretation of Type Ia supernovae is discussed.

  5. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Bruenn, Stephen W. E-mail: mezzacappaa@ornl.gov

    2012-03-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  6. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Claudia, Travaglio; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  7. FORMATION OF C{sub n} MOLECULES IN OXYGEN-RICH INTERIORS OF TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Tianhong; Meyer, Bradley S.; Clayton, Donald D.

    2013-05-20

    Two reaction-rate-based kinetic models for condensation of carbon dust via the growth of precursor linear carbon chains are currently under debate: the first involves the formation of C{sub 2} molecules via radiative association of free C atoms, and the second forms C{sub 2} molecules by the endoergic reaction CO + C {yields} C{sub 2} + O. Both are followed by C captures until the linear chain eventually makes an isomeric transition to ringed carbon on which rapid growth of graphite may occur. These two approaches give vastly different results. Because of the high importance of condensable carbon for current problems in astronomy, we study these competing claims with an intentionally limited reaction rate network which clearly shows that initiation by C + C {yields} C{sub 2} + {gamma} is the dominant pathway to carbon rings. We propose an explanation for why the second pathway is not nearly as effective as its proponents calculated it to be.

  8. Black hole evolution - II. Spinning black holes in a supernova-driven turbulent interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Volonteri, Marta; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2014-05-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) accrete gas from their surroundings and coalesce with companions during galaxy mergers, and both processes change the BH mass and spin. By means of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies, either idealized or embedded within the cosmic web, we explore the effects of interstellar gas dynamics and external perturbations on BH spin evolution. All these physical quantities were evolved on the fly in a self-consistent manner. We use a `maximal' model to describe the turbulence induced by stellar feedback to highlight its impact on the angular momentum of the gas accreted by the BH. Periods of intense star formation are followed by phases where stellar feedback drives large-scale outflows and hot bubbles. We find that BH accretion is synchronized with star formation, as only when gas is cold and dense do both processes take place. During such periods, gas motion is dominated by consistent rotation. On the other hand, when stellar feedback becomes substantial, turbulent motion randomizes gas angular momentum. However, BH accretion is strongly suppressed in that case, as cold and dense gas is lacking. In our cosmological simulation, at very early times (z > 6), the galactic disc has not yet settled and no preferred direction exists for the angular momentum of the accreted gas, so the BH spin remains low. As the gas settles into a disc (6 > z > 3), the BH spin then rapidly reaches its maximal value. At lower redshifts (z < 3), even when galaxy mergers flip the direction of the angular momentum of the accreted gas, causing it to counter-rotate, the BH spin magnitude only decreases modestly and temporarily. Should this be a typical evolution scenario for BH, it potentially has dramatic consequences regarding their origin and assembly, as accretion on maximally spinning BH embedded in thin Shakura-Sunyaev disc is significantly reduced.

  9. Neutrino Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshio; Chiba, Satoshi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Keiichi; Takamura, Akira; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    2009-05-04

    Neutrino nucleosynthesis is an important synthesis process for light elements in supernovae. One important physics input of neutrino nucleosynthesis is cross sections of neutrino-nucleus reactions. The cross sections of neutrino-{sup 12}C and {sup 4}He reactions are derived using new shell model Hamiltonians. With the new cross sections, light element synthesis of a supernova is investigated. The appropriate range of the neutrino temperature for supernovae is constrained to be between 4.3 MeV and 6.5 MeV from the {sup 11}B abundance in Galactic chemical evolution. Effects by neutrino oscillations are also discussed.

  10. Neutrino and gravitational wave signal of a delayed-detonation model of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Herzog, Matthias; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Marquardt, Kai; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.

    2015-12-01

    The progenitor system(s) and the explosion mechanism(s) of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still under debate. Nonelectromagnetic observables, in particular, gravitational waves and neutrino emission, of thermoclear supernovae are a complementary window to light curves and spectra for studying these enigmatic objects. A leading model for SNe Ia is the thermonuclear incineration of a near-Chandrasekhar mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf star in a "delayed detonation." We calculate a three-dimensional hydrodynamic explosion for the N100 delayed-detonation model extensively discussed in the literature, taking the dynamical effects of neutrino emission from all important contributing source terms into account. Although neutrinos carry away 2 ×1049 erg of energy, we confirm the common view that neutrino energy losses are dynamically not very important, resulting in only a modest reduction of final kinetic energy by 2%. We then calculate the gravitational wave signal from the time evolution of the quadrupole moment. Our model radiates 7 ×1039 erg in gravitational waves and the spectrum has a pronounced peak around 0.4 Hz. Depending on viewing angle and polarization, we find that the future space-based gravitational wave missions DECIGO and BBO would be able to detect our source to a distance of ˜1.3 Mpc . We predict a clear signature of the deflagration-to-detonation transition in the neutrino and the gravitational wave signals. If observed, such a feature would be a strong indicator of the realization of delayed detonations in near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs.

  11. A dynamical model of supernova feedback: gas outflows from the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Lacey, Cedric G.; Baugh, Carlton M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a dynamical model of supernova feedback which follows the evolution of pressurized bubbles driven by supernovae in a multiphase interstellar medium (ISM). The bubbles are followed until the point of break-out into the halo, starting from an initial adiabatic phase to a radiative phase. We show that a key property which sets the fate of bubbles in the ISM is the gas surface density, through the work done by the expansion of bubbles and its role in setting the gas scaleheight. The multiphase description of the ISM is essential, and neglecting it leads to order-of-magnitude differences in the predicted outflow rates. We compare our predicted mass loading and outflow velocities to observations of local and high-redshift galaxies and find good agreement over a wide range of stellar masses and velocities. With the aim of analysing the dependence of the mass loading of the outflow, β (i.e. the ratio between the outflow and star formation rates), on galaxy properties, we embed our model in the galaxy formation simulation, GALFORM, set in the Λ cold dark matter framework. We find that a dependence of β solely on the circular velocity, as is widely assumed in the literature, is actually a poor description of the outflow rate, as large variations with redshift and galaxy properties are obtained. Moreover, we find that below a circular velocity of ≈80 km s-1, the mass loading saturates. A more fundamental relation is that between β and the gas scaleheight of the disc, hg, and the gas fraction, fgas, as β ∝ h^{1.1}_g f^{0.4}_gas, or the gas surface density, Σg, and the gas fraction, as β ∝ Σ ^{-0.6}_g f^{0.8}_gas. We find that using the new mass loading model leads to a shallower faint-end slope in the predicted optical and near-IR galaxy luminosity functions.

  12. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE AS SITES OF THE p-PROCESS: TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS COUPLED TO NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Roepke, F. K.; Hillebrandt, W. E-mail: claudia.travaglio@b2fh.org

    2011-10-01

    Beyond Fe, there is a class of 35 proton-rich nuclides, between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg, called p-nuclei. They are bypassed by the s and r neutron capture processes and are typically 10-1000 times less abundant than the s- and/or r-isotopes in the solar system. The bulk of p-isotopes is created in the 'gamma processes' by sequences of photodisintegrations and beta decays in explosive conditions in both core collapse supernovae (SNe II) and in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). SNe II contribute to the production of p-nuclei through explosive neon and oxygen burning. However, the major problem in SN II ejecta is a general underproduction of the light p-nuclei for A < 120. We explore SNe Ia as p-process sites in the framework of a two-dimensional SN Ia delayed detonation model as well as pure deflagration models. The white dwarf precursor is assumed to have reached the Chandrasekhar mass in a binary system by mass accretion from a giant/main-sequence companion. We use enhanced s-seed distributions, with seeds directly obtained from a sequence of thermal pulse instabilities both in the asymptotic giant branch phase and in the accreted material. We apply the tracer-particle method to reconstruct the nucleosynthesis by the thermal histories of Lagrangian particles, passively advected in the hydrodynamic calculations. For each particle, we follow the explosive nucleosynthesis with a detailed nuclear reaction network for all isotopes up to {sup 209}Bi. We select tracers within the typical temperature range for p-process production, (1.5-3.7) x 10{sup 9} K, and analyze in detail their behavior, exploring the influence of different s-process distributions on the p-process nucleosynthesis. In addition, we discuss the sensitivity of p-process production to parameters of the explosion mechanism, taking into account the consequences on Fe and alpha elements. We find that SNe Ia can produce a large amount of p-nuclei, both the light p-nuclei below A = 120 and the heavy-p nuclei, at

  13. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.S.

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of {approximately} 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for {gamma}-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of {approximately} 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches {approximately} 60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  14. Identification campaign of supernova remnant candidates in the Milky Way. II. X-ray studies of G38.7-1.4

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R. H. H.; Wu, J. H. K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Hui, C. Y.; Seo, K. A.; Trepl, L.

    2014-04-20

    We report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the Galactic supernova remnant candidate G38.7-1.4, together with complementary radio, infrared, and γ-ray data. An approximately elliptical X-ray structure is found to be well correlated with a radio shell as seen by the Very Large Array. The X-ray spectrum of G38.7-1.4 can be well described by an absorbed collisional ionization equilibrium plasma model, which suggests the plasma is shock heated. Based on the morphology and the spectral behavior, we suggest that G38.7-1.4 is indeed a supernova remnant belonging to a mix-morphology category.

  15. Two-temperature models of old supernova remnants with ion and electron thermal conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Wei; Cox, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the potential effects thermal conduction may have on the evolution of old supernova remnants, we present the results of 1D (spherically symmetric) numerical simulations of a remnant in a homogeneous interstellar medium for four different cases: (1) without thermal conduction; (2) with both electron and ion thermal conduction assuming equal temperatures; (3) with electron thermal conduction only, following electron and ion temperatures separately; and (4) with both electron and ion thermal conduction following separate temperatures. We followed the entire evolution until the completion of the remnant bubble collapse. Our most significant result is that in remnant evolution studies concerned principally with either the shell or bubble evolution at late times, reasonable results are obtained with single-temperature models. When the electron and ion temperatures are followed separately, however, ion thermal conduction cannot safely be ignored.

  16. Observing Supernovae and Supernova Remnants with JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonneborn, George; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable near- and mid-infrared studies of supernovae (SN) and supernova remnants (SNR) in the Milky Way and galaxies throughout the local universe and to high redshift. JWST's instrumentation provides imaging, coronography, and spectroscopy (R<3000) over the wavelength range 1-29 microns. The unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution will enable spectroscopic study of new and recent supernovae, including molecule and dust formation, in galaxies at least out to 30 Mpc, and imaging to much greater distances. The Target of Opportunity response time can be as short as 48 hours, enabling quick follow-up observations of important SN events. JWST will be ideal for the study of Galactic and Magellanic Clouds supernova remnants, particularly young remnants with hot dust. Its high angular resolution (0.07" at 2 microns, 0.7" at 20 microns) will allow direct comparison between the IR, optical, and X-ray morphologies, identifying sites of dust emission in both the ejecta and the shocked ISM unresolved by previous IR telescopes. There is a rich spectrum of atomic lines (H, He I, [Si I], [Fe II], [Ni I-III], [Co II-III], [S III-IV], [Ar II-III], [Ne II, III, V], [O IV]) and molecules (CO, SiO, H2) of importance for SN and SNR studies. JWST is a large aperture (6.5m), cryogenic, infrared-optimized space observatory under construction by NASA, ESA, and CSA for launch in 2018. The JWST observatory will be placed in an Earth-Sun L2 orbit by an Ariane 5 launch vehicle provided by ESA. The observatory is designed for a 5-year prime science mission, with consumables for 10 years of science operations. The first call for proposals for JWST observations will be released in 2017.

  17. FLOYDS Classification of ASASSN-15oz as a Young Type II Supernova and ASASSN-15os as a Few-Week-Old Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh, G.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; McCully, C.; Howell, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    We obtained a spectrum of ASASSN-15oz (ATel #7989) on 2015 September 4.5 UT with the robotic FLOYDS instrument mounted on the Faulkes Telescope South. Using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024), we find a good fit to the Type II SN 1999gi one week after explosion at the redshift of the proposed host galaxy (z=0.007; Meyer et al.

  18. Neutrinos in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1986-10-01

    The role of neutrinos in Type II supernovae is discussed. An overall view of the neutrino luminosity as expected theoretically is presented. The different weak interactions involved are assessed from the standpoint of how they exchange energy, momentum, and lepton number. Particular attention is paid to entropy generation and the path to thermal and chemical equilibration, and to the phenomenon of trapping. Various methods used to calculate the neutrino flows are considered. These include trapping and leakage schemes, distribution-averaged transfer, and multi-energy group methods. The information obtained from the neutrinos caught from Supernova 1987a is briefly evaluated. 55 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Low radio frequency observations and spectral modelling of the remnant of Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Zanardo, G.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Hancock, P. J.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M. E.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A.; For, B.-Q.; Lenc, E.; McKinley, B.; Morgan, J.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Wayth, R. B.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2016-10-01

    We present Murchison Widefield Array observations of the supernova remnant (SNR) 1987A between 72 and 230 MHz, representing the lowest frequency observations of the source to date. This large lever arm in frequency space constrains the properties of the circumstellar medium created by the progenitor of SNR 1987A when it was in its red supergiant phase. As of late 2013, the radio spectrum of SNR 1987A between 72 MHz and 8.64 GHz does not show any deviation from a non-thermal power law with a spectral index of -0.74 ± 0.02. This spectral index is consistent with that derived at higher frequencies, beneath 100 GHz, and with a shock in its adiabatic phase. A spectral turnover due to free-free absorption by the circumstellar medium has to occur below 72 MHz, which places upper limits on the optical depth of ≤0.1 at a reference frequency of 72 MHz, emission measure of ≲13 000 cm-6 pc, and an electron density of ≲110 cm-3. This upper limit on the electron density is consistent with the detection of prompt radio emission and models of the X-ray emission from the supernova. The electron density upper limit implies that some hydrodynamic simulations derived a red supergiant mass-loss rate that is too high, or a wind velocity that is too low. The mass-loss rate of ˜5 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1 and wind velocity of 10 km s-1 obtained from optical observations are consistent with our upper limits, predicting a current turnover frequency due to free-free absorption between 5 and 60 MHz.

  20. SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES POWERED BY FALLBACK ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, Jason; Kasen, Daniel

    2013-07-20

    Some fraction of the material ejected in a core collapse supernova explosion may remain bound to the compact remnant, and eventually turn around and fall back. We show that the late time ({approx}>days) power potentially associated with the accretion of this 'fallback' material could significantly affect the optical light curve, in some cases producing super-luminous or otherwise peculiar supernovae. We use spherically symmetric hydrodynamical models to estimate the accretion rate at late times for a range of progenitor masses and radii and explosion energies. The accretion rate onto the proto-neutron star or black hole decreases as M-dot {proportional_to}t{sup -5/3} at late times, but its normalization can be significantly enhanced at low explosion energies, in very massive stars, or if a strong reverse shock wave forms at the helium/hydrogen interface in the progenitor. If the resulting super-Eddington accretion drives an outflow which thermalizes in the outgoing ejecta, the supernova debris will be re-energized at a time when photons can diffuse out efficiently. The resulting light curves are different and more diverse than previous fallback supernova models which ignored the input of accretion power and produced short-lived, dim transients. The possible outcomes when fallback accretion power is significant include super-luminous ({approx}> 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) Type II events of both short and long durations, as well as luminous Type I events from compact stars that may have experienced significant mass loss. Accretion power may unbind the remaining infalling material, causing a sudden decrease in the brightness of some long duration Type II events. This scenario may be relevant for explaining some of the recently discovered classes of peculiar and rare supernovae.

  1. Gamma-ray diagnostics of Type Ia supernovae. Predictions of observables from three-dimensional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summa, A.; Ulyanov, A.; Kromer, M.; Boyer, S.; Röpke, F. K.; Sim, S. A.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Fink, M.; Mannheim, K.; Pakmor, R.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F.; Diehl, R.; Maeda, K.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Although the question of progenitor systems and detailed explosion mechanisms still remains a matter of discussion, it is commonly believed that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are production sites of large amounts of radioactive nuclei. Even though the gamma-ray emission due to radioactive decays is responsible for powering the light curves of SNe Ia, gamma rays themselves are of particular interest as a diagnostic tool because they directly lead to deeper insight into the nucleosynthesis and the kinematics of these explosion events. Aims: We study the evolution of gamma-ray line and continuum emission of SNe Ia with the objective of analyzing the relevance of observations in this energy range. We seek to investigate the chances for the success of future MeV missions regarding their capabilities for constraining the intrinsic properties and the physical processes of SNe Ia. Methods: Focusing on two of the most broadly discussed SN Ia progenitor scenarios - a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) and a violent merger of two WDs - we used three-dimensional explosion models and performed radiative transfer simulations to obtain synthetic gamma-ray spectra. Both chosen models produce the same mass of 56Ni and have similar optical properties that are in reasonable agreement with the recently observed supernova SN 2011fe. We examine the gamma-ray spectra with respect to their distinct features and draw connections to certain characteristics of the explosion models. Applying diagnostics, such as line and hardness ratios, the detection prospects for future gamma-ray missions with higher sensitivities in the MeV energy range are discussed. Results: In contrast to the optical regime, the gamma-ray emission of our two chosen models proves to be quite different. The almost direct connection of the emission of gamma rays to fundamental physical processes occurring in SNe Ia permits additional constraints concerning several explosion model properties

  2. Three-dimensional pure deflagration models with nucleosynthesis and synthetic observables for Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Michael; Kromer, Markus; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, Franco; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Sim, Stuart A.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

    2014-02-01

    We investigate whether pure deflagration models of Chandrasekhar-mass carbon-oxygen white dwarf stars can account for one or more subclass of the observed population of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions. We compute a set of 3D full-star hydrodynamic explosion models, in which the deflagration strength is parametrized using the multispot ignition approach. For each model, we calculate detailed nucleosynthesis yields in a post-processing step with a 384 nuclide nuclear network. We also compute synthetic observables with our 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code for comparison with observations. For weak and intermediate deflagration strengths (energy release Enuc ≲ 1.1 × 1051 erg), we find that the explosion leaves behind a bound remnant enriched with 3 to 10 per cent (by mass) of deflagration ashes. However, we do not obtain the large kick velocities recently reported in the literature. We find that weak deflagrations with Enuc ˜ 0.5 × 1051 erg fit well both the light curves and spectra of 2002cx-like SNe Ia, and models with even lower explosion energies could explain some of the fainter members of this subclass. By comparing our synthetic observables with the properties of SNe Ia, we can exclude the brightest, most vigorously ignited models as candidates for any observed class of SN Ia: their B - V colours deviate significantly from both normal and 2002cx-like SNe Ia and they are too bright to be candidates for other subclasses.

  3. A GENERALIZED MODEL OF NONLINEAR DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION COUPLED TO AN EVOLVING SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ellison, Donald C. E-mail: nagataki@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2012-05-10

    To better model the efficient production of cosmic rays (CRs) in supernova remnants (SNRs) with the associated coupling between CR production and SNR dynamics, we have generalized an existing cr-hydro-NEI code to include the following processes: (1) an explicit calculation of the upstream precursor structure including the position-dependent flow speed, density, temperature, and magnetic field strength; (2) a momentum- and space-dependent CR diffusion coefficient; (3) an explicit calculation of magnetic field amplification; (4) calculation of the maximum CR momentum using the amplified magnetic field; (5) a finite Alfven speed for the particle scattering centers; and (6) the ability to accelerate a superthermal seed population of CRs, as well as the ambient thermal plasma. While a great deal of work has been done modeling SNRs, most work has concentrated on either the continuum emission from relativistic electrons or ions or the thermal emission from the shock heated plasma. Our generalized code combines these elements and describes the interplay between CR production and SNR evolution, including the nonlinear coupling of efficient diffusive shock acceleration, based mainly on the work of P. Blasi and coworkers, and a non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) calculation of thermal X-ray line emission. We believe that our generalized model will provide a consistent modeling platform for SNRs, including those interacting with molecular clouds, and improve the interpretation of current and future observations, including the high-quality spectra expected from Astro-H. SNR RX J1713.7-3946 is modeled as an example.

  4. A Computational Analysis of the Expanding Photosphere Method and the Distances to Type II-P Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert C.; Didier, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of research into the Expanding Photosphere Method (EPM) and its use in determining the distance to a supernova and the epoch in which the explosion occurred. This research was part of a six-week summer program pairing faculty with undergraduate students, computationally determining the distance and explosion epoch through the EPM's assumption of blackbody luminosity with empirically-derived correction factors. This method was applied to a sampling of supernovae with data sets covering different post-explosion time periods. We compare our distance and explosion epoch calculations to those determined by other means, demonstrate which types of data sets can be more reliably applied to the EPM, and describe the uncertainties involved. Although it is inconclusive for now as to how effective the EPM is as an indicator of the explosion epoch, this research provides further evidence of its effectiveness as an indicator of distance, provided the data set is large enough and covers earlier post-explosion phases of the supernova.

  5. Supernova Flashback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    The Cassiopeia A supernova's first flash of radiation makes six clumps of dust (circled in annotated version) unusually hot. The supernova remnant is the large white ball in the center. This infrared picture was taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  6. Spectropolarimetric diagnostics of thermonuclear supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifan; Baade, Dietrich; Patat, Ferdinando

    2007-01-12

    Even at extragalactic distances, the shape of supernova ejecta can be effectively diagnosed by spectropolarimetry. We present results for 17 type Ia supernovae that allow a statistical study of the correlation among the geometric structures and other observable parameters of type Ia supernovae. These observations suggest that type Ia supernova ejecta typically consist of a smooth, central, iron-rich core and an outer layer with chemical asymmetries. The degree of this peripheral asphericity is correlated with the light-curve decline rate of type Ia supernovae. These results lend strong support to delayed-detonation models of type Ia supernovae.

  7. Ages, chemistry, and type 1A supernovae: Clues to the formation of the galactic stellar halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    We endeavor to resolve two conflicting constraints on the duration of the formation of the Galactic stellar halo - 2-3 Gyr age differences in halo stars, and the time scale inferred from the observed constant values of chemical element abundance ratios characteristic of enrichment by Type II supernovae - by investigating the time scale for the onset of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in the currently favored progenitor model - mergers of carbon and oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs).

  8. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  9. The Most Luminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Recent observations have revealed a stunning diversity of extremely luminous supernovae, seemingly increasing in radiant energy without bound. We consider simple approximate limits for what existing models can provide for the peak luminosity and total radiated energy for non-relativistic, isotropic stellar explosions. The brightest possible supernova is a Type I explosion powered by a sub-millisecond magnetar with field strength B ∼ few × {10}13 G. In extreme cases, such models might reach a peak luminosity of 2× {10}46 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 and radiate a total energy of up to 4× {10}52 {erg}. Other less luminous models are also explored, including prompt hyper-energetic explosions in red supergiants, pulsational-pair instability supernovae, pair-instability supernovae, and colliding shells. Approximate analytic expressions and limits are given for each case. Excluding magnetars, the peak luminosity is near 3× {10}44 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 for the brightest models and the corresponding limit on total radiated energy is 3× {10}51 {erg}. Barring new physics, supernovae with a light output over 3× {10}51 erg must be rotationally powered, either during the explosion itself or after, the most obvious candidate being a rapidly rotating magnetar. A magnetar-based model for the recent transient event, ASASSN-15lh is presented that strains, but does not exceed the limits of what the model can provide.

  10. AN ATTEMPT AT A UNIFIED MODEL FOR THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Qiang; Bi Xiaojun; Liu Siming

    2012-12-20

    Shocks of supernova remnants (SNRs) are important (and perhaps the dominant) agents for the production of the Galactic cosmic rays. Recent {gamma}-ray observations of several SNRs have made this case more compelling. However, these broadband high-energy measurements also reveal a variety of spectral shapes demanding more comprehensive modeling of emissions from SNRs. According to the locally observed fluxes of cosmic-ray protons and electrons, the electron-to-proton number ratio is known to be about 1%. Assuming such a ratio is universal for all SNRs and identical spectral shape for all kinds of accelerated particles, we propose a unified model that ascribes the distinct {gamma}-ray spectra of different SNRs to variations of the medium density and the spectral difference between cosmic-ray electrons and protons observed from Earth to transport effects. For low-density environments, the {gamma}-ray emission is inverse-Compton dominated. For high-density environments like systems of high-energy particles interacting with molecular clouds, the {gamma}-ray emission is {pi}{sup 0}-decay dominated. The model predicts a hadronic origin of {gamma}-ray emission from very old remnants interacting mostly with molecular clouds and a leptonic origin for intermediate-age remnants whose shocks propagate in a low-density environment created by their progenitors via, e.g., strong stellar winds. These results can be regarded as evidence in support of the SNR origin of Galactic cosmic rays.

  11. Three-dimensional delayed-detonation models with nucleosynthesis for Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, Franco; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Fink, Michael; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang; Kromer, Markus; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Sim, Stuart A.; Taubenberger, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    We present results for a suite of 14 three-dimensional, high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of delayed-detonation models of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions. This model suite comprises the first set of three-dimensional SN Ia simulations with detailed isotopic yield information. As such, it may serve as a data base for Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation model nucleosynthetic yields and for deriving synthetic observables such as spectra and light curves. We employ a physically motivated, stochastic model based on turbulent velocity fluctuations and fuel density to calculate in situ the deflagration-to-detonation transition probabilities. To obtain different strengths of the deflagration phase and thereby different degrees of pre-expansion, we have chosen a sequence of initial models with 1, 3, 5, 10, 20, 40, 100, 150, 200, 300 and 1600 (two different realizations) ignition kernels in a hydrostatic white dwarf with a central density of 2.9 × 109 g cm-3, as well as one high central density (5.5 × 109 g cm-3) and one low central density (1.0 × 109 g cm-3) rendition of the 100 ignition kernel configuration. For each simulation, we determined detailed nucleosynthetic yields by post-processing 106 tracer particles with a 384 nuclide reaction network. All delayed-detonation models result in explosions unbinding the white dwarf, producing a range of 56Ni masses from 0.32 to 1.11 M⊙. As a general trend, the models predict that the stable neutron-rich iron-group isotopes are not found at the lowest velocities, but rather at intermediate velocities (˜3000-10 000 km s-1) in a shell surrounding a 56Ni-rich core. The models further predict relatively low-velocity oxygen and carbon, with typical minimum velocities around 4000 and 10 000 km s-1, respectively.

  12. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA CARBON FOOTPRINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Loken, S.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Paech, K.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present convincing evidence of unburned carbon at photospheric velocities in new observations of five Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained by the Nearby Supernova Factory. These SNe are identified by examining 346 spectra from 124 SNe obtained before +2.5 days relative to maximum. Detections are based on the presence of relatively strong C II {lambda}6580 absorption 'notches' in multiple spectra of each SN, aided by automated fitting with the SYNAPPS code. Four of the five SNe in question are otherwise spectroscopically unremarkable, with ions and ejection velocities typical of SNe Ia, but spectra of the fifth exhibit high-velocity (v > 20, 000 km s{sup -1}) Si II and Ca II features. On the other hand, the light curve properties are preferentially grouped, strongly suggesting a connection between carbon-positivity and broadband light curve/color behavior: three of the five have relatively narrow light curves but also blue colors and a fourth may be a dust-reddened member of this family. Accounting for signal to noise and phase, we estimate that 22{sup +10}{sub -6%} of SNe Ia exhibit spectroscopic C II signatures as late as -5 days with respect to maximum. We place these new objects in the context of previously recognized carbon-positive SNe Ia and consider reasonable scenarios seeking to explain a physical connection between light curve properties and the presence of photospheric carbon. We also examine the detailed evolution of the detected carbon signatures and the surrounding wavelength regions to shed light on the distribution of carbon in the ejecta. Our ability to reconstruct the C II {lambda}6580 feature in detail under the assumption of purely spherical symmetry casts doubt on a 'carbon blobs' hypothesis, but does not rule out all asymmetric models. A low volume filling factor for carbon, combined with line-of-sight effects, seems unlikely to explain the scarcity of detected carbon in SNe Ia by itself.

  13. The X-ray spectra of the Vela and Puppis supernova remnants and the shock-wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Tucker, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The structure and spectrum of the Vela and Puppis supernova remnants (SNRs) were observed in soft (0.1 to 1.5 keV) X rays from a rocket. The spectral data of both objects below 1.5 keV are consistent with thermal radiation from a hot plasma and are not consistent with a simple power-law function. Fitting the data to a Tucker-Koren model results in values of T = (4.3 plus or minus 0.3) x 1,000,000 K for Vela and T = (7 plus or minus 1) x 1,000,000 K for Puppis. The present data, earlier data from the Cygnus Loop, and results on Cas A and Tycho reported by others are considered within the context of a simple model in which X rays are thermally produced as a result of a shock wave expanding into the interstellar medium. X-ray data on the temperature, intrinsic diameter, and intrinsic luminosity of the five SNRs are used to compute the age, energy release, and initial interstellar density for each one. From measurements of X-ray absorption along the line of sight, and also from shock-wave model interpretations of temperature-diameter-luminosity relations, it is concluded that the average density of interstellar material is about 0.1 per cu cm between the sun and the nearest X-ray emitting SNR, Vela.

  14. Late-time spectra and type Ia supernova models: New clues from the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Kirshner, R. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Challis, P. M.; Schmidt, B. P.; Filippenko, A. V.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Calculated late-time spectra of two classical hydrodynamical models for Type Ia supernovae (deflagration model W7 of Nomoto, Thielemann, & Yokoi, and delayed detonation model DD4 of Woosley & Weaver) are compared with observations of SN 1992A and other spectroscopically normal SNe Ia. An important new piece of information is provided by observations done with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) which cover the ultraviolet range at the nebular phase of a SN Ia: SN 1992A in NGC 1380. For the first time a picture of SN Ia emission from the ultraviolet through the optical is obtained at these phases. Predictions of the classical model (W7 and DD4) are compared with the observed spectrum of SN 1992A and with the optical spectra of SN 1989M in NGC 4579 and SN 1990N in NGC 4639 at similar epochs. The absolute B and V magnitudes of the models are also estimated at these late phases. Taken at face value the nebular spectra of these 'classical' models are more consistent with the long extragalactic distance scale, pointing to distances to NGC 4579 around 21 +/- 3 Mpc and a slightly larger distance, 22 +/- 3 Mpc, to NGC 4639, on the back side of the Virgo Cluster. However, the calculated Fe(+3) luminosity as predicted from the models exceeds the observed limit from the HST data of SN 1992A. Other differences in the ratios of the line intensities between calculated and observed spectra, show some disagreement with the observed spectra at the nebular phases. They may not be the best choice for spectroscopically normal SNe Ia, and their use as an independent calibration of the extragalactic distance scale should be viewed with caution.

  15. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  16. The Detonation Mechanism of the Pulsationally Assisted Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, G. C., IV; Graziani, C.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Weide, K.; Reid, L. B.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the "pulsationally assisted" gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and 56Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the "classical" GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  17. Theoretical cosmic Type Ia supernova rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiante, R.; Matteucci, F.; Recchi, S.; Calura, F.

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this work is the computation of the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates, namely the frequency of Type Ia supernovae per unit time in a unitary volume of the Universe. Our main goal in this work is to predict the Type Ia supernova rates at very high redshifts and to check whether it is possible to select the best delay time distribution model, on the basis of the available observations of Type Ia supernovae. We compute the cosmic Type Ia supernova rates in different scenarios for galaxy formation and predict the expected number of explosions at high redshift ( z⩾2). Moreover, we adopt various progenitor models in order to compute the Type Ia supernova rate in typical elliptical galaxies of initial luminous masses of 1010M⊙,1011M⊙ and 1012M⊙, and compute the total amount of iron produced by Type Ia supernovae in each case. In this analysis we assume that Type Ia supernovae are caused by thermonuclear explosions of C-O white dwarfs in binary systems and we consider the most popular frameworks: the single degenerate and the double degenerate scenarios. The two competing schemes for the galaxy formation, namely the monolithic collapse and the hierarchical clustering, are also taken into account, by considering the histories of star formation increasing and decreasing with redshift, respectively. We calculate the Type Ia supernova rates through an analytical formulation which rests upon the definition of the SN Ia rate following an instantaneous burst of star formation as a function of the time elapsed from the birth of the progenitor system to its explosion as a Type Ia supernova (i.e. the delay time). What emerges from this work is that: (i) we confirm the result of previous papers that it is not easy to select the best delay time distribution scenario from the observational data and this is because the cosmic star formation rate dominates over the distribution function of the delay times; (ii) the monolithic collapse scenario for galaxy formation

  18. Physical Dust Models for the Extinction toward Supernova 2014J in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Li, Jun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are powerful cosmological “standardizable candles” and the most precise distance indicators. However, a limiting factor in their use for precision cosmology rests on our ability to correct for the dust extinction toward them. SN 2014J in the starburst galaxy M82, the closest detected SN Ia in three decades, provides unparalleled opportunities to study the dust extinction toward an SN Ia. In order to derive the extinction as a function of wavelength, we model the color excesses toward SN 2014J, which are observationally derived over a wide wavelength range, in terms of dust models consisting of a mixture of silicate and graphite. The resulting extinction laws steeply, rise toward the far-ultraviolet, even steeper than that of the SMC. We infer a visual extinction of {A}V≈ 1.9 {mag}, a reddening of E(B-V)≈ 1.1 {mag}, and a total-to-selective extinction ratio of RV ≈ 1.7, consistent with that previously derived from photometric, spectroscopic, and polarimetric observations. The size distributions of the dust in the interstellar medium toward SN 2014J are skewed toward substantially smaller grains than that of the Milky Way and the SMC.

  19. STOCHASTICITY AND EFFICIENCY IN SIMPLIFIED MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D. E-mail: reubendb@utk.edu

    2015-11-01

    We present an initial report on 160 simulations of a highly simplified model of the post-bounce core-collapse supernova environment in three spatial dimensions (3D). We set different values of a parameter characterizing the impact of nuclear dissociation at the stalled shock in order to regulate the post-shock fluid velocity, thereby determining the relative importance of convection and the stationary accretion shock instability (SASI). While our convection-dominated runs comport with the paradigmatic notion of a “critical neutrino luminosity” for explosion at a given mass accretion rate (albeit with a nontrivial spread in explosion times just above threshold), the outcomes of our SASI-dominated runs are much more stochastic: a sharp threshold critical luminosity is “smeared out” into a rising probability of explosion over a ∼20% range of luminosity. We also find that the SASI-dominated models are able to explode with 3–4 times less efficient neutrino heating, indicating that progenitor properties, and fluid and neutrino microphysics, conducive to the SASI would make the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism more robust.

  20. Turbulence patterns and neutrino flavor transitions in high-resolution supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Borriello, Enrico; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Chakraborty, Sovan; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Lisi, Eligio E-mail: sovan@mppmu.mpg.de E-mail: eligio.lisi@ba.infn.it

    2014-11-01

    During the shock-wave propagation in a core-collapse supernova (SN), matter turbulence may affect neutrino flavor conversion probabilities. Such effects have been usually studied by adding parametrized small-scale random fluctuations (with arbitrary amplitude) on top of coarse, spherically symmetric matter density profiles. Recently, however, two-dimensional (2D) SN models have reached a space resolution high enough to directly trace anisotropic density profiles, down to scales smaller than the typical neutrino oscillation length. In this context, we analyze the statistical properties of a large set of SN matter density profiles obtained in a high-resolution 2D simulation, focusing on a post-bounce time (2 s) suited to study shock-wave effects on neutrino propagation on scales as small as O(100) km and possibly below. We clearly find the imprint of a broken (Kolmogorov-Kraichnan) power-law structure, as generically expected in 2D turbulence spectra. We then compute the flavor evolution of SN neutrinos along representative realizations of the turbulent matter density profiles, and observe no or modest damping of the neutrino crossing probabilities on their way through the shock wave. In order to check the effect of possibly unresolved fluctuations at scales below O(100) km, we also apply a randomization procedure anchored to the power spectrum calculated from the simulation, and find consistent results within ± 1σ fluctuations. These results show the importance of anchoring turbulence effects on SN neutrinos to realistic, fine-grained SN models.

  1. The Deflagration Stage of Chandrasekhar Mass Models for Type Ia Supernovae. I. Early Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, C. M.; Nonaka, A.; Woosley, S. E.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Dong, S.; Zingale, M.

    2014-02-01

    We present high-resolution, full-star simulations of the post-ignition phase of Type Ia supernovae using the compressible hydrodynamics code Castro. Initial conditions, including the turbulent velocity field and ignition site, are imported directly from a simulation of the last few hours of presupernova convection using a low Mach number code, Maestro. Adaptive mesh refinement allows the initial burning front to be modeled with an effective resolution of 36,8643 zones (136 m zone-1). The initial rise and expansion of the deflagration front are tracked until burning reaches the star's edge and the role of the background turbulence on the flame is investigated. The effect of artificially moving the ignition location closer to the star's center is explored. The degree to which turbulence affects the burning front decreases with increasing ignition radius since the buoyancy force is stronger at larger radii. Even central ignition—in the presence of a background convective flow field—is rapidly carried off-center as the flame is carried by the flow field. We compare our results to analytic models for burning thermals, and find that they reproduce the general trends of the bubble's size and mass, but underpredict the amount of buoyant acceleration due to simplifying assumptions of the bubble's properties. Overall, we find that the amount of mass that burns prior to flame break out is small, consistent with a "gravitationally confined detonation" occurring at a later epoch, but additional burning will occur following breakout that may modify this conclusion.

  2. AN OLD SUPERNOVA REMNANT WITHIN AN H II COMPLEX AT l Almost-Equal-To 173 Degree-Sign : FVW 172.8+1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Ji-hyun; Salter, Chris; Koo, Bon-Chul E-mail: csalter@naic.edu

    2012-03-15

    We present the results of H I 21 cm line observations to explore the nature of the high-velocity (HV) H I gas at l {approx} 173 Degree-Sign . In low-resolution H I surveys this HV gas appears as faint, wing-like, H I emission that extends to velocities beyond those allowed by Galactic rotation. We designate this feature as Forbidden Velocity Wing (FVW) 172.8+1.5. Our high-resolution (3.'4) Arecibo H I observations show that FVW 172.8+1.5 is composed of knots, filaments, and ring-like structures distributed over an area of a few degrees in extent. These HV H I emission features are confined within the limits of the H II complex G173+1.5, which is composed of five Sharpless H II regions distributed along a radio continuum loop of size 4.{sup 0}4 Multiplication-Sign 3.{sup 0}4, or {approx}138 pc Multiplication-Sign 107 pc, at a distance of 1.8 kpc. G173+1.5 is one of the largest star-forming regions in the outer Galaxy. We demonstrate that the HV H I gas is well correlated with the radio continuum loop and that the two seem to trace an expanding shell. The expansion velocity of the shell is large (55 km s{sup -1}), suggesting that it represents a supernova remnant (SNR). We derive physical parameters for the shell and show these to be consistent with the object being an SNR. We also detect hot X-ray-emitting gas inside the H II complex by analyzing the ROSAT all-sky X-ray background survey data. This also supports the SNR interpretation. We conclude that the HV H I gas and the X-rays are most likely the products of a supernova explosion(s) within the H II complex, possibly in a cluster that triggered the formation of these H II regions.

  3. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL DELAYED DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, K.; Roepke, F.K.; Fink, M.; Hillebrandt, W.; Travaglio, C.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2010-03-20

    For the explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), different scenarios have been suggested. In these, the propagation of the burning front through the exploding white dwarf (WD) star proceeds in different modes, and consequently imprints of the explosion model on the nucleosynthetic yields can be expected. The nucleosynthetic characteristics of various explosion mechanisms are explored based on three two-dimensional explosion simulations representing extreme cases: a pure turbulent deflagration, a delayed detonation following an approximately spherical ignition of the initial deflagration, and a delayed detonation arising from a highly asymmetric deflagration ignition. Apart from this initial condition, the deflagration stage is treated in a parameter-free approach. The detonation is initiated when the turbulent burning enters the distributed burning regime. This occurs at densities around 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}-relatively low as compared to existing nucleosynthesis studies for one-dimensional spherically symmetric models. The burning in these multidimensional models is different from that in one-dimensional simulations as the detonation wave propagates both into unburned material in the high-density region near the center of a WD and into the low-density region near the surface. Thus, the resulting yield is a mixture of different explosive burning products, from carbon-burning products at low densities to complete silicon-burning products at the highest densities, as well as electron-capture products synthesized at the deflagration stage. Detailed calculations of the nucleosynthesis in all three models are presented. In contrast to the deflagration model, the delayed detonations produce a characteristic layered structure and the yields largely satisfy constraints from Galactic chemical evolution. In the asymmetric delayed detonation model, the region filled with electron capture species (e.g., {sup 58}Ni, {sup 54}Fe) is within a shell, showing a large off

  4. The past, present and future supernova threat to Earth's biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Martin

    2011-12-01

    A brief review of the threat posed to Earth's biosphere via near-by supernova detonations is presented. The expected radiation dosage, cosmic ray flux and expanding blast wave collision effects are considered, and it is argued that a typical supernova must be closer than ˜10-pc before any appreciable and potentially harmful atmosphere/biosphere effects are likely to occur. In contrast, the critical distance for Gamma-ray bursts is of order 1-kpc. In spite of the high energy effects potentially involved, the geological record provides no clear-cut evidence for any historic supernova induced mass extinctions and/or strong climate change episodes. This, however, is mostly a reflection of their being numerous possible (terrestrial and astronomical) forcing mechanisms acting upon the biosphere and the difficulty of distinguishing between competing scenarios. Key to resolving this situation, it is suggested, is the development of supernova specific extinction and climate change linked ecological models. Moving to the future, we estimate that over the remaining lifetime of the biosphere (˜2 Gyr) the Earth might experience 1 GRB and 20 supernova detonations within their respective harmful threat ranges. There are currently at least 12 potential pre-supernova systems within 1-kpc of the Sun. Of these systems IK Pegasi is the closest Type Ia pre-supernova candidate and Betelgeuse is the closest potential Type II supernova candidate. We review in some detail the past, present and future behavior of these two systems. Developing a detailed evolutionary model we find that IK Pegasi will likely not detonate until some 1.9 billion years hence, and that it affords absolutely no threat to Earth's biosphere. Betelgeuse is the closest, reasonably well understood, pre-supernova candidate to the Sun at the present epoch, and may undergo detonation any time within the next several million years. The stand-off distance of Betelgeuse at the time of its detonation is estimated to fall

  5. Theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2015-07-15

    The theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos is reviewed, with focus on the most recent advancements on the neutrino flux predicted by supernova numerical models, on neutrino oscillations inside the star and in the Earth, and on the physics of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. Future directions of research are briefly summarized.

  6. Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Models with Multi-dimensional Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun

    2015-02-01

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant {O}(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate {O}(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying "ray-by-ray" approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that "ray-by-ray" calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion.

  7. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MODELS WITH MULTI-DIMENSIONAL TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam; Zhang, Weiqun E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu

    2015-02-10

    We present new two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric neutrino radiation/hydrodynamic models of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) cores. We use the CASTRO code, which incorporates truly multi-dimensional, multi-group, flux-limited diffusion (MGFLD) neutrino transport, including all relevant O(v/c) terms. Our main motivation for carrying out this study is to compare with recent 2D models produced by other groups who have obtained explosions for some progenitor stars and with recent 2D VULCAN results that did not incorporate O(v/c) terms. We follow the evolution of 12, 15, 20, and 25 solar-mass progenitors to approximately 600 ms after bounce and do not obtain an explosion in any of these models. Though the reason for the qualitative disagreement among the groups engaged in CCSN modeling remains unclear, we speculate that the simplifying ''ray-by-ray'' approach employed by all other groups may be compromising their results. We show that ''ray-by-ray'' calculations greatly exaggerate the angular and temporal variations of the neutrino fluxes, which we argue are better captured by our multi-dimensional MGFLD approach. On the other hand, our 2D models also make approximations, making it difficult to draw definitive conclusions concerning the root of the differences between groups. We discuss some of the diagnostics often employed in the analyses of CCSN simulations and highlight the intimate relationship between the various explosion conditions that have been proposed. Finally, we explore the ingredients that may be missing in current calculations that may be important in reproducing the properties of the average CCSNe, should the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism be the correct mechanism of explosion.

  8. Supernova Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knödlseder, J.

    This lecture gives an introduction to the topic of supernova nucleosynthesis which is at the origin of almost all nuclear species that we encounter in the Universe. It starts with an overview over the relevant nuclear physics, with some emphasise on nuclear stability and nuclear reactions. The central part of the lecture is devoted to the synthesis of new elements in the interiors of stars, either during their quiescent live or during their violent explosion as supernova. The different types of supernova explosions are exposed and their key nucleosynthesis products are summarised. The lecture closes with an overview over gamma-ray line diagnostics which provides a modern tool to study supernova nucleosynthesis by the measurement of freshly produced radioactive isotopes.

  9. Scaling supernova hydrodynamics to the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Bazan, G.; Drake, R.P.; Fryxell, B.A.; Teyssier, R.

    1999-05-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. Initial results were reported in J. Kane {ital et al.} [Astrophys. J. {bold 478}, L75 (1997) and B. A. Remington {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 4}, 1994 (1997)]. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface of a two-layer planar target, which triggers perturbation growth due to the Richtmyer{endash}Meshkov instability, and to the Rayleigh{endash}Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. The scaling of hydrodynamics on microscopic laser scales to the SN-size scales is presented. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamics codes HYADES [J. T. Larson and S. M. Lane, J. Quant. Spect. Rad. Trans. {bold 51}, 179 (1994)] and CALE [R. T. Barton, {ital Numerical Astrophysics} (Jones and Bartlett, Boston, 1985), pp. 482{endash}497], and the supernova code PROMETHEUS [P. R. Woodward and P. Collela, J. Comp. Phys. {bold 54}, 115 (1984)]. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented. Analysis of the spike-and-bubble velocities using potential flow theory and Ott thin-shell theory is presented, as well as a study of 2D versus 3D differences in perturbation growth at the He-H interface of SN 1987A.

  10. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  11. Semi-supervised learning for photometric supernova classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Homrighausen, Darren; Freeman, Peter E.; Schafer, Chad M.; Poznanski, Dovi

    2012-01-01

    We present a semi-supervised method for photometric supernova typing. Our approach is to first use the non-linear dimension reduction technique diffusion map to detect structure in a data base of supernova light curves and subsequently employ random forest classification on a spectroscopically confirmed training set to learn a model that can predict the type of each newly observed supernova. We demonstrate that this is an effective method for supernova typing. As supernova numbers increase, our semi-supervised method efficiently utilizes this information to improve classification, a property not enjoyed by template-based methods. Applied to supernova data simulated by Kessler et al. to mimic those of the Dark Energy Survey, our methods achieve (cross-validated) 95 per cent Type Ia purity and 87 per cent Type Ia efficiency on the spectroscopic sample, but only 50 per cent Type Ia purity and 50 per cent efficiency on the photometric sample due to their spectroscopic follow-up strategy. To improve the performance on the photometric sample, we search for better spectroscopic follow-up procedures by studying the sensitivity of our machine-learned supernova classification on the specific strategy used to obtain training sets. With a fixed amount of spectroscopic follow-up time, we find that, despite collecting data on a smaller number of supernovae, deeper magnitude-limited spectroscopic surveys are better for producing training sets. For supernova Ia (II-P) typing, we obtain a 44 per cent (1 per cent) increase in purity to 72 per cent (87 per cent) and 30 per cent (162 per cent) increase in efficiency to 65 per cent (84 per cent) of the sample using a 25th (24.5th) magnitude-limited survey instead of the shallower spectroscopic sample used in the original simulations. When redshift information is available, we incorporate it into our analysis using a novel method of altering the diffusion map representation of the supernovae. Incorporating host redshifts leads to a 5

  12. Nonthermal ionization and excitation in Type IIb supernova 1993J.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.

    1996-02-01

    A non-LTE study of Type IIb supernova 1993J in the galaxy M 81 accounting for nonthermal ionization and line blocking effects is carried out. Hydrodynamical models and theoretical spectra clearly show that nonthermal ionization and excitation dominate after the second maximum, at day ~30, and play a decisive role in reproducing both a smooth tail of the light curve and an emergence of helium lines in the spectrum similar to those observed. Based on our model of supernova 1993J, we predict that the light curves of Type IIb supernovae should be subject to nonthermal ionization and excitation at earlier times than even that of supernova 1993J. To fit the bolometric and visual light curves of supernova 1993J, an outer layer of ~1Msun_ has to be helium-rich hydrogen shell with a hydrogen mass fraction of ~0.1. In this shell there is no nearly pure helium mantle as contrasted to most of the evolutionary models at the time of explosion. The fact that such a distribution of hydrogen results in a characteristic maximum of hydrogen number density at velocity of ~8600km/s in the expelled envelope is well consistent with late time observations of Hα emission at epochs of 0.5-1 year after the explosion. An emergence of helium lines between day 24 and day 30 illustrated by the evolution of calculated profile of the He I line λ6678A completely fits the spectral observations of supernova 1993J. The bolometric and visual light curves and the spectral evolution of helium lines are consistent with a mass of the ejected envelope of ~2.4Msun_ including a hydrogen mass of ~0.12Msun_, an explosion energy of ~1.6x10^51^ergs, and a mass of radioactive ^56^Ni of ~0.078Msun_. It is found that the bulk of the radioactive material should be confined to layers of the ejected envelope expanding with velocities less than ~3800km/s. In our model, the outburst of supernova 1993J is interpreted as the explosion of a ~4Msun_ red supergiant undergoing core collapse and leaving a neutron star in a

  13. Supernova Legacy Survey: using spectral signatures to improve Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, E. S.; Hook, I. M.; Sullivan, M.; Howell, D. A.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Bronder, T. J.; Carlberg, R.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Aldering, G.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Kronborg, T.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Zhang, T.

    2011-01-01

    Optical long-slit spectroscopy at the Gemini-North telescope using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) was used to classify targets from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) from 2005 July and 2006 May-2008 May. During this time, 95 objects were observed. Where possible, the objects' redshifts (z) were measured from narrow emission or absorption features in the host galaxy spectrum, otherwise they were measured from the broader supernova features. We present spectra of 68 confirmed or probable SNe Ia from SNLS with redshifts in the range 0.17 ≤z≤ 1.02. In combination with earlier SNLS Gemini and VLT spectra, we used these new observations to measure pseudo-equivalent widths (EWs) of three spectral features - Ca II H&K, Si II and Mg II- in 144 objects and compared them to the EWs of low-redshift SNe Ia from a sample drawn from the literature. No signs of changes with z are seen for the Ca II H&K and Mg II features. Systematically lower EW Si II is seen at high redshift, but this can be explained by a change in demographics of the SNe Ia population within a two-component model combined with an observed correlation between EW Si II and photometric light-curve stretch.

  14. Systematic features of axisymmetric neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova models in multiple progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ko; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei

    2015-12-01

    We present an overview of two-dimensional (2D) core-collapse supernova simulations employing a neutrino transport scheme by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. We study 101 solar-metallicity, 247 ultra metal-poor, and 30 zero-metal progenitors covering zero-age main sequence mass from 10.8 M⊙ to 75.0 M⊙. Using the 378 progenitors in total, we systematically investigate how the differences in the structures of these multiple progenitors impact the hydrodynamics evolution. By following a long-term evolution over 1.0 s after bounce, most of the computed models exhibit neutrino-driven revival of the stalled bounce shock at ˜200-800 ms postbounce, leading to the possibility of explosion. Pushing the boundaries of expectations in previous one-dimensional studies, our results confirm that the compactness parameter ξ that characterizes the structure of the progenitors is also a key in 2D to diagnosing the properties of neutrino-driven explosions. Models with high ξ undergo high ram pressure from the accreting matter onto the stalled shock, which affects the subsequent evolution of the shock expansion and the mass of the protoneutron star under the influence of neutrino-driven convection and the standing accretion-shock instability. We show that the accretion luminosity becomes higher for models with high ξ, which makes the growth rate of the diagnostic explosion energy higher and the synthesized nickel mass bigger. We find that these explosion characteristics tend to show a monotonic increase as a function of the compactness parameter ξ.

  15. Initiation of the Detonation in the Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Meakin, Casey A.; Lamb, Don Q.; Truran, James W.

    2009-07-01

    We study the initiation of the detonation in the gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). In this model, ignition occurs at one or several off-center points, resulting in a burning bubble of hot ash that rises rapidly, breaks through the surface of the star, and collides at a point on the stellar surface opposite the breakout, producing a high-velocity inwardly directed flow. Initiation of the detonation occurs spontaneously in a region where the length scale of the temperature gradient extending from the flow (in which carbon burning is already occurring) into unburned fuel is commensurate to the range of critical length scales which have been derived from one-dimensional simulations that resolve the initiation of a detonation. By increasing the maximum resolution in a truncated cone that encompasses this region, beginning somewhat before initiation of the detonation occurs, we successfully simulate in situ the first gradient-initiated detonation in a whole-star simulation. The detonation emerges when a compression wave overruns a pocket of fuel situated in a Kelvin-Helmholtz cusp at the leading edge of the inwardly directed jet of burning carbon. The compression wave preconditions the temperature in the fuel in such a way that the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism can operate and a detonation ensues. We explore the dependence of the length scale of the temperature gradient on spatial resolution and discuss the implications for the robustness of this detonation mechanism. We find that the time and the location at which initiation of the detonation occurs varies with resolution. In particular, initiation of a detonation had not yet occurred in our highest resolution simulation by the time we ended the simulation because of the computational demand it required. However, it may detonate later. We suggest that the turbulent shear layer surrounding the inwardly directed jet provides the most favorable physical conditions, and

  16. Designing of Aspherically-Diverging, Multi-Interface Experiments to Model Rayleigh-Taylor Growth in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Hansen, J. F.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Arnett, D.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2010-05-01

    One branch of work in the laboratory astrophysics community has been focused on developing the understanding of hydrodynamic mixing in supernovae. Current experiments have been limited to studying these processes in planar systems due in large part to limitations of drive energy. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is now capable of providing experiments with far more than ten times the energy than has been previously available on laser facilities, enabling supernova-relevant hydrodynamics experiments in which hydrodynamic instabilities develop from a blast-wave driven through multiple, coupled interfaces in a diverging system. This presentation discusses the design of such target designs, both spherical and aspheric, in which the relative masses of the layers are scaled to those within the star. It reports scaling simulations with CALE to model the global dynamics of such experiments. The simulations investigate the diagnosability and experimental value of different designs using a variety of materials. Simulation results exploring whether an experiment investigating aspheric supernova is a feasible extension from the current design and what observable dynamics would be able to be expected will also be reported, including multiple drive and experimental geometries. This research was sponsored by LLNL through contract LLNL B56128 and by the NNSA through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-04NA00064.

  17. Properties of unusually luminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Tony Shih Arng

    This thesis is a theoretical study of the progenitors, event rates, and observational properties of unusually luminous supernova (SN), and aims to identify promising directions for future observations. In Chapter 2, we present model light curves and spectra of pair-instability supernovae (PISNe) over a range of progenitor masses and envelope structures for Pop III stars. We calculate the rates and detectability of PISNe, core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and Type Ia SNe at the Epoch of Reionization with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which can be used to determine the contribution of Pop III versus Pop II stars toward ionizing the universe. Although CCSNe are the least intrinsically luminous supernovae, Chapter 5 shows that a JWST survey targeting known galaxy clusters with Einstein radii > 35" should discover gravitationally lensed CCSNe at redshifts exceeding z = 7--8. In Chapter 3, we explain the Pop II/I progenitors of observed PISNe in the local universe can be created via mergers in runaway collisions in young, dense star clusters, despite copious mass loss via line-driven winds. The PISN rate from this mechanism is consistent with the observed volumetric rate, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope could discover ~102 such PISNe per year. In Chapter 4, we identify 10 star clusters which may host PISN progenitors with masses up to 600 solar masses formed via runaway collisions. We estimate the probabilities of these very massive stars being in eclipsing binaries to be ≳ 30%, and find that their transits can be detected even under the contamination of the background cluster light, due to mean transit depths of ~10 6 solar luminosities. In Chapter 6, we show that there could be X-ray analogues of optically super-luminous SNe that are powered by the conversion of the kinetic energy of SN ejecta into radiation upon its collision with a dense but optically-thin circumstellar shell. We find shell configurations that can convert a large fraction of the SN

  18. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    SciTech Connect

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  19. Galaxy clustering, CMB and supernova data constraints on ϕCDM model with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a scalar field dark energy model (i.e., ϕCDM model) with massive neutrinos, where the scalar field possesses an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V (ϕ) ∝ϕ-α (α > 0). We find that the sum of neutrino masses Σmν has significant impacts on the CMB temperature power spectrum and on the matter power spectrum. In addition, the parameter α also has slight impacts on the spectra. A joint sample, including CMB data from Planck 2013 and WMAP9, galaxy clustering data from WiggleZ and BOSS DR11, and JLA compilation of Type Ia supernova observations, is adopted to confine the parameters. Within the context of the ϕCDM model under consideration, the joint sample determines the cosmological parameters to high precision: the angular size of the sound horizon at recombination, the Thomson scattering optical depth due to reionization, the physical densities of baryons and cold dark matter, and the scalar spectral index are estimated to be θ* = (1.0415-0.0011+0.0012) ×10-2, τ =0.0914-0.0242+0.0266, Ωbh2 = 0.0222 ± 0.0005, Ωch2 = 0.1177 ± 0.0036, and ns =0.9644-0.0119+0.0118, respectively, at 95% confidence level (CL). It turns out that α < 4.995 at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model. And yet, the ΛCDM scenario corresponding to α = 0 is not ruled out at 95% CL. Moreover, we get Σmν < 0.262 eV at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model, while the corresponding one for the ΛCDM model is Σmν < 0.293 eV. The allowed scale of Σmν in the ϕCDM model is a bit smaller than that in the ΛCDM model. It is consistent with the qualitative analysis, which reveals that the increases of α and Σmν both can result in the suppression of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, when α is larger, in order to avoid suppressing the matter power spectrum too much, the value of Σmν should be smaller.

  20. Three-dimensional Simulations of Pure Deflagration Models for Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Min; Jordan, George C., IV; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Diemer, Benedikt; Graziani, Carlo; Kessler, Richard; Meyer, Bradley; Rich, Paul; Lamb, Don Q.

    2014-07-01

    We present a systematic study of the pure deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using three-dimensional, high-resolution, full-star hydrodynamical simulations, nucleosynthetic yields calculated using Lagrangian tracer particles, and light curves calculated using radiation transport. We evaluate the simulations by comparing their predicted light curves with many observed SNe Ia using the SALT2 data-driven model and find that the simulations may correspond to under-luminous SNe Iax. We explore the effects of the initial conditions on our results by varying the number of randomly selected ignition points from 63 to 3500, and the radius of the centered sphere they are confined in from 128 to 384 km. We find that the rate of nuclear burning depends on the number of ignition points at early times, the density of ignition points at intermediate times, and the radius of the confining sphere at late times. The results depend primarily on the number of ignition points, but we do not expect this to be the case in general. The simulations with few ignition points release more nuclear energy E nuc, have larger kinetic energies E K, and produce more 56Ni than those with many ignition points, and differ in the distribution of 56Ni, Si, and C/O in the ejecta. For these reasons, the simulations with few ignition points exhibit higher peak B-band absolute magnitudes M B and light curves that rise and decline more quickly; their M B and light curves resemble those of under-luminous SNe Iax, while those for simulations with many ignition points are not.

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of pure deflagration models for thermonuclear supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Min; Jordan, George C. IV; Van Rossum, Daniel R.; Diemer, Benedikt; Graziani, Carlo; Kessler, Richard; Rich, Paul; Lamb, Don Q.; Meyer, Bradley

    2014-07-10

    We present a systematic study of the pure deflagration model of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using three-dimensional, high-resolution, full-star hydrodynamical simulations, nucleosynthetic yields calculated using Lagrangian tracer particles, and light curves calculated using radiation transport. We evaluate the simulations by comparing their predicted light curves with many observed SNe Ia using the SALT2 data-driven model and find that the simulations may correspond to under-luminous SNe Iax. We explore the effects of the initial conditions on our results by varying the number of randomly selected ignition points from 63 to 3500, and the radius of the centered sphere they are confined in from 128 to 384 km. We find that the rate of nuclear burning depends on the number of ignition points at early times, the density of ignition points at intermediate times, and the radius of the confining sphere at late times. The results depend primarily on the number of ignition points, but we do not expect this to be the case in general. The simulations with few ignition points release more nuclear energy E{sub nuc}, have larger kinetic energies E{sub K}, and produce more {sup 56}Ni than those with many ignition points, and differ in the distribution of {sup 56}Ni, Si, and C/O in the ejecta. For these reasons, the simulations with few ignition points exhibit higher peak B-band absolute magnitudes M{sub B} and light curves that rise and decline more quickly; their M{sub B} and light curves resemble those of under-luminous SNe Iax, while those for simulations with many ignition points are not.

  2. Coherent network analysis of gravitational waves from three-dimensional core-collapse supernova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayama, Kazuhiro; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2015-12-01

    Using predictions from three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), we present a coherent network analysis for the detection, reconstruction, and source localization of the gravitational-wave (GW) signals. We use the RIDGE pipeline for the analysis, in which the network of LIGO Hanford, LIGO Livingston, VIRGO, and KAGRA is considered. By combining with a GW spectrogram analysis, we show that several important hydrodynamics features in the original waveforms persist in the waveforms of the reconstructed signals. The characteristic excess in the spectrograms originates not only from the rotating core collapse, bounce, and subsequent ringdown of the proto-neutron star (PNS) as previously identified, but also from the formation of magnetohydrodynamics jets and nonaxisymmetric instabilities in the vicinity of the PNS. Regarding the GW signals emitted near the rotating core bounce, the horizon distance extends up to ˜18 kpc for the most rapidly rotating 3D model in this work. Following the rotating core bounce, the dominant source of the GW emission shifts to the nonaxisymmetric instabilities. The horizon distances extend maximally up to ˜40 kpc seen from the spin axis. With an increasing number of 3D models trending towards explosion recently, our results suggest that in addition to the best-studied GW signals due to rotating core collapse and bounce, the time is ripe to consider how we can do science from GWs of CCSNe much more seriously than before. In particular, the quasiperiodic signals due to the nonaxisymmetric instabilities and the detectability deserves further investigation to elucidate the inner workings of the rapidly rotating CCSNe.

  3. Gravitational waves within the magnetar model of superluminous supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2016-11-01

    The light curve of many supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be explained by a sustained injection of extra energy from its possible central engine, a rapidly rotating strongly magnetic neutron star (i.e. magnetar). The magnetic dipole radiation power that the magnetar supplies comes at the expense of the star's rotational energy. However, radiation by gravitational waves (GWs) can be more efficient than magnetic dipole radiation because of its stronger dependence on neutron star spin rate Ω, i.e. Ω6 (for a static `mountain') or Ω8 (for an r-mode fluid oscillation) versus Ω4 for magnetic dipole radiation. Here, we use the magnetic field B and initial spin period P0 inferred from SN and GRB observations to obtain simple constraints on the dimensionless amplitude of the mountain of ε < 0.01 and r-mode oscillation of α < 1, the former being similar to that obtained by recent works. We then include GW emission within the magnetar model. We show that when ε > 10-4(B/1014 G)(P0/1 ms) or α > 0.01(B/1014 G)(P0/1 ms)2, light curves are strongly affected, with significant decrease in peak luminosity and increase in time to peak luminosity. Thus, the GW effects studied here are more pronounced for low B and short P0 but are unlikely to be important in modelling SN and GRB light curves since the amplitudes needed for noticeable changes are quite large.

  4. The deflagration stage of Chandrasekhar mass models for type Ia supernovae. I. Early evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, C. M.; Woosley, S. E.; Dong, S.; Nonaka, A.; Almgren, A. S.; Bell, J. B.; Zingale, M.

    2014-02-10

    We present high-resolution, full-star simulations of the post-ignition phase of Type Ia supernovae using the compressible hydrodynamics code Castro. Initial conditions, including the turbulent velocity field and ignition site, are imported directly from a simulation of the last few hours of presupernova convection using a low Mach number code, Maestro. Adaptive mesh refinement allows the initial burning front to be modeled with an effective resolution of 36,864{sup 3} zones (136 m zone{sup –1}). The initial rise and expansion of the deflagration front are tracked until burning reaches the star's edge and the role of the background turbulence on the flame is investigated. The effect of artificially moving the ignition location closer to the star's center is explored. The degree to which turbulence affects the burning front decreases with increasing ignition radius since the buoyancy force is stronger at larger radii. Even central ignition—in the presence of a background convective flow field—is rapidly carried off-center as the flame is carried by the flow field. We compare our results to analytic models for burning thermals, and find that they reproduce the general trends of the bubble's size and mass, but underpredict the amount of buoyant acceleration due to simplifying assumptions of the bubble's properties. Overall, we find that the amount of mass that burns prior to flame break out is small, consistent with a gravitationally confined detonation' occurring at a later epoch, but additional burning will occur following breakout that may modify this conclusion.

  5. Gravitational waves within the magnetar model of superluminous supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2016-08-01

    The light curve of many supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be explained by a sustained injection of extra energy from its possible central engine, a rapidly rotating strongly magnetic neutron star (i.e., magnetar). The magnetic dipole radiation power that the magnetar supplies comes at the expense of the star's rotational energy. However radiation by gravitational waves (GWs) can be more efficient than magnetic dipole radiation because of its stronger dependence on neutron star spin rate Ω, i.e., Ω6 (for a static "mountain") or Ω8 (for a r-mode fluid oscillation) versus Ω4 for magnetic dipole radiation. Here we use the magnetic field B and initial spin period P0 inferred from SN and GRB observations to obtain simple constraints on the dimensionless amplitude of the mountain of ε < 0.01 and r-mode oscillation of α < 1, the former being similar to that obtained by recent works. We then include GW emission within the magnetar model. We show that when ε > 10-4(B/1014G)(P0/1ms) or α > 0.01(B/1014G)(P0/1ms)2, light curves are strongly affected, with significant decrease in peak luminosity and increase in time to peak luminosity. Thus the GW effects studied here are more pronounced for low B and short P0 but are unlikely to be important in modeling SN and GRB light curves since the amplitudes needed for noticeable changes are quite large.

  6. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  7. Supernovae constraints on cosmological constant and scalar field dominated cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podariu, Silviu

    Predictions of a spatially-flat cosmological model dominated by a scalar field with potential V (φ) ~ φ-α , which behaves like a time-variable cosmological constant, are compared to recent Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) apparent magnitude versus redshift data. A large region of model parameter space is consistent with current observations. We extend tree method to include constraints from recent measurements of the Hubble constant H0 and of the age of the universe to in the constant and time- variable cosmological constant models. A non-informative prior for the non-relativistic matter density parameter is also considered. We develop median statistics that provide powerful alternatives to χ 2 likelihood methods and require fewer assumptions about the data. Applying median statistics to Huchra's compilation of nearly all estimates of H0, we find a median value H0 = 67 km/s/Mpc. The 95% range of purely statistical errors is +/-2 km/s/Mpc. The statistical precision of this result leads us to analyze the range of possible systematic errors in the median, which we estimate to be roughly +/-5 km/s/Mpc (95% limits), dominating over the statistical errors. A Bayesian median statistics treatment of high-redshift SN Ia apparent magnitude versus redshift data from Riess et al. yields a posterior probability that the cosmological constant A > 0 of 70 or 89%, depending on the prior information used. The posterior probability of an open universe is about 47%. Median statistics analyses of the SN Ia data do not rule out a time-variable A model, and may even favor it over a time-independent Λ and a Λ = 0 open model. We examine the constraints that satellite-acquired SN Ia apparent magnitude versus redshift data will place on cosmological model parameters in models with and without a constant or time-variable Λ. High-quality data which could be acquired in the near future will result in tight constraints on these parameters.

  8. FIRST LABORATORY OBSERVATION OF SILICA GRAINS FROM CORE COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Haenecour, Pierre; Floss, Christine; Zinner, Ernst; Zhao Xuchao; Lin Yangting

    2013-05-01

    We report the discovery of two supernova silica (SiO{sub 2}) grains in the primitive carbonaceous chondrites LaPaZ 031117 and Grove Mountains 021710. Only five presolar silica grains have been previously reported from laboratory measurements but they all exhibit enrichments in {sup 17}O relative to solar, indicating origins in the envelopes of asymptotic giant branch stars. The two SiO{sub 2} grains identified in this study are characterized by moderate enrichments in {sup 18}O relative to solar, indicating that they originated in Type II supernova ejecta. If compared to theoretical models, the oxygen isotopic compositions of these grains can be reproduced by mixing of different supernova zones. While both theoretical models of grain condensation and recent NASA Spitzer Space Telescope observations have suggested the presence of silica in supernova ejecta, no such grains had been identified, until now, in meteorites. The discovery of these two silica grains provides definitive evidence of the condensation of silica dust in supernova ejecta.

  9. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; wallace, R.; Mangan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-18

    Supernova 1987A focused attention on the critical role of hydrodynamic instabilities in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. The target consists of two-layer planar package composed on 85 micron Cu backed by 500 micron CH2, having a single mode sinusoidal perturbation at the interface, with gamma = 200 microns, nuo + 20 microns. The Nova laser is used to generate a 10-15 Mbar (10- 15x10{sup 12} dynes/cm2) shock at the interface, which triggers perturbation growth, due to the Richtmyer-Meshov instability followed by the Raleigh-Taylor instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at the intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. The experiment is modeled using the hydrodynamic codes HYADES and CALE, and the supernova code PROMETHEUS. We are designing experiments to test the differences in the growth of 2D vs 3D single mode perturbations; such differences may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. Results of the experiments and simulations are presented.

  10. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. III. GRAVITATIONAL WAVE SIGNALS FROM SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-20

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of the gravitational wave (GW) signal of the post-bounce evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SNe), employing for the first time relativistic, two-dimensional explosion models with multi-group, three-flavor neutrino transport based on the ray-by-ray-plus approximation. The waveforms reflect the accelerated mass motions associated with the characteristic evolutionary stages that were also identified in previous works: a quasi-periodic modulation by prompt post-shock convection is followed by a phase of relative quiescence before growing amplitudes signal violent hydrodynamical activity due to convection and the standing accretion shock instability during the accretion period of the stalled shock. Finally, a high-frequency, low-amplitude variation from proto-neutron star (PNS) convection below the neutrinosphere appears superimposed on the low-frequency trend associated with the aspherical expansion of the SN shock after the onset of the explosion. Relativistic effects in combination with detailed neutrino transport are shown to be essential for quantitative predictions of the GW frequency evolution and energy spectrum, because they determine the structure of the PNS surface layer and its characteristic g-mode frequency. Burst-like high-frequency activity phases, correlated with sudden luminosity increase and spectral hardening of electron (anti-)neutrino emission for some 10 ms, are discovered as new features after the onset of the explosion. They correspond to intermittent episodes of anisotropic accretion by the PNS in the case of fallback SNe. We find stronger signals for more massive progenitors with large accretion rates. The typical frequencies are higher for massive PNSs, though the time-integrated spectrum also strongly depends on the model dynamics.

  11. Supernova olivine from cometary dust.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-07-29

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  12. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  13. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. I. DETONATION IGNITION

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Eduardo; GarcIa-Senz, Domingo E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu

    2009-04-20

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). Although several scenarios have been proposed and explored by means of one, two, and three-dimensional simulations, the key point still is the understanding of the conditions under which a stable detonation can form in a destabilized WD. One of the possibilities that have been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to the pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock around a carbon-oxygen rich core. The accretion shock confines the core and transforms kinetic energy from the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work we explore the robustness of the detonation ignition for different PRD models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M {sub defl}. The evolution of the WD up to the formation of the accretion shock has been followed with a three-dimensional hydrodynamical code with nuclear reactions turned off. We found that detonation conditions are achieved for a wide range of M {sub defl}. However, if the nuclear energy released during the deflagration phase is close to the WD binding energy ({approx}0.46 x 10{sup 51} erg {yields} M {sub defl} {approx} 0.30 M {sub sun}) the accretion shock cannot heat and confine the core efficiently and detonation conditions are not robustly achieved.

  14. Supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decourchelle, A.

    2016-06-01

    Supernova remnants result from the explosion of a star and keep trace, in their young ejecta-dominated phase, both of the explosion mechanism and to a lesser extent of the nature of the progenitor. They inject a large amount of energy into their surroundings, which impacts significantly the interstellar medium and to a larger extent the working of the galaxy by distributing heavy elements, heating to tens of million degrees large fractions of gas, accelerating high-energy particles, generating turbulence and amplification of the magnetic field. I will review the observational results on supernova remnants and their related scientific issues before suggesting directions for future ambitious XMM-Newton observations.

  15. Gravitational lensing statistics of amplified supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Wagoner, Robert V.; Schneider, P.

    1988-01-01

    Amplification statistics of gravitationally lensed supernovae can provide a valuable probe of the lensing matter in the universe. A general probability distribution for amplification by compact objects is derived which allows calculation of the lensed fraction of supernovae at or greater than an amplification A and at or less than an apparent magnitude. Comparison of the computed fractions with future results from ongoing supernova searches can lead to determination of the mass density of compact dark matter components with masses greater than about 0.001 solar mass, while the time-dependent amplification (and polarization) of the expanding supernovae constrain the individual masses. Type II supernovae are found to give the largest fraction for deep surveys, and the optimum flux-limited search is found to be at approximately 23d magnitude, if evolution of the supernova rate is neglected.

  16. Oblique shock breakout in supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. II. Numerical solutions for non-relativistic pattern speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Salbi, Pegah; Matzner, Christopher D.; Ro, Stephen; Levin, Yuri

    2014-07-20

    Non-spherical explosions develop non-radial flows as the pattern of shock emergence progresses across the stellar surface. In supernovae, these flows can limit ejecta speeds, stifle shock breakout emission, and cause collisions outside the star. Similar phenomena occur in stellar and planetary collisions, tidal disruption events, accretion-induced collapses, and propagating detonations. We present two-dimensional, nested-grid Athena simulations of non-radial shock emergence in a frame comoving with the breakout pattern, focusing on the adiabatic, non-relativistic limit in a plane stratified envelope. We set boundary conditions using a known self-similar solution and explore the role of box size and resolution on the result. The shock front curves toward the stellar surface, and exhibits a kink from which weak discontinuities originate. Flow around the point of shock emergence is neither perfectly steady nor self-similar. Waves and vortices, which are not predominantly due to grid effects, emanate from this region. The post-shock flow is deflected along the stellar surface and its pressure disturbs the stellar atmosphere upstream of the emerging shock. We use the numerical results and their analytical limits to predict the effects of radiation transfer and gravity, which are not included in our simulations.

  17. Gravitational wave signatures of ab initio two-dimensional core collapse supernova explosion models for 12 -25 M⊙ stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Konstantin N.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Marronetti, Pedro; Yoshida, Shin'ichirou; Bruenn, Stephen W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Bronson Messer, O. E.; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, John M.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.

    2015-10-01

    We present the gravitational waveforms computed in ab initio two-dimensional core collapse supernova models evolved with the chimera code for progenitor masses between 12 and 25 M⊙ . All models employ multifrequency neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray approximation, state-of-the-art weak interaction physics, relativistic transport corrections such as the gravitational redshift of neutrinos, two-dimensional hydrodynamics with the commensurate relativistic corrections, Newtonian self-gravity with a general-relativistic monopole correction, and the Lattimer-Swesty equation of state with 220 MeV compressibility, and begin with the most recent Woosley-Heger nonrotating progenitors in this mass range. All of our models exhibit robust explosions. Therefore, our waveforms capture all stages of supernova development: 1) a relatively short and weak prompt signal, 2) a quiescent stage, 3) a strong signal due to convection and standing accretion shock instability activity, 4) termination of active accretion onto the proto-neutron star, and 5) a slowly increasing tail that reaches a saturation value. Fourier decomposition shows that the gravitational wave signals we predict should be observable by AdvLIGO for Galactic events across the range of progenitors considered here. The fundamental limitation of these models is in their imposition of axisymmetry. Further progress will require counterpart three-dimensional models, which are underway.

  18. Curvas de luz de supernovas ricas en hidrógeno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas Kaufmann, M. L.; Bersten, M.

    2016-08-01

    Type II supernovae (SNe II) are the most common type of explosions in the Universe. There is a small and peculiar subgroup of those objects that show light curves similar to the famous SN 1987A. In this work we present an analysis of how the variation of certain physical parameters such as the mass and radius of the progenitor star, the energy of the explosion and the amount of radioactive material impact on the light curve of these objects, based on models that simulate the stellar explosions. In particular, we analyze the case of SN 2009mw, one of the few supernovae with similar characteristics to the SN 1987A.

  19. On the diversity of compact objects within supernova remnants - I. A parametric model for magnetic field evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2016-04-01

    A wealth of X-ray and radio observations has revealed in the past decade a growing diversity of neutron stars (NSs) with properties spanning orders of magnitude in magnetic field strength and ages, and with emission processes explained by a range of mechanisms dictating their radiation properties. However, serious difficulties exist with the magneto-dipole model of isolated NS fields and their inferred ages, such as a large range of observed braking indices (n, with values often <3) and a mismatch between the NS and associated supernova remnant (SNR) ages. This problem arises primarily from the assumptions of a constant magnetic field with n = 3, and an initial spin period that is much smaller than the observed current period. It has been suggested that a solution to this problem involves magnetic field evolution, with some NSs having magnetic fields buried within the crust by accretion of fall-back supernova material following their birth. In this work, we explore a parametric phenomenological model for magnetic field growth that generalizes previous suggested field evolution functions, and apply it to a variety of NSs with both secure SNR associations and known ages. We explore the flexibility of the model by recovering the results of previous work on buried magnetic fields in young NSs. Our model fits suggest that apparently disparate classes of NSs may be related to one another through the time evolution of the magnetic field.

  20. Multi-epoch very long baseline interferometric observations of the nuclear starburst region of NGC 253: Improved modeling of the supernova and star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rampadarath, H.; Morgan, J. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Lenc, E.

    2014-01-01

    The results of multi-epoch observations of the southern starburst galaxy, NGC 253, with the Australian Long Baseline Array at 2.3 GHz are presented. As with previous radio interferometric observations of this galaxy, no new sources were discovered. By combining the results of this survey with Very Large Array observations at higher frequencies from the literature, spectra were derived and a free-free absorption model was fitted of 20 known sources in NGC 253. The results were found to be consistent with previous studies. The supernova remnant, 5.48-43.3, was imaged with the highest sensitivity and resolution to date, revealing a two-lobed morphology. Comparisons with previous observations of similar resolution give an upper limit of 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1} for the expansion speed of this remnant. We derive a supernova rate of <0.2 yr{sup –1} for the inner 300 pc using a model that improves on previous methods by incorporating an improved radio supernova peak luminosity distribution and by making use of multi-wavelength radio data spanning 21 yr. A star formation rate of SFR(M ≥ 5 M {sub ☉}) < 4.9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} was also estimated using the standard relation between supernova and star formation rates. Our improved estimates of supernova and star formation rates are consistent with studies at other wavelengths. The results of our study point to the possible existence of a small population of undetected supernova remnants, suggesting a low rate of radio supernova production in NGC 253.

  1. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  2. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more than 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  3. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more that 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  4. SUPERNOVA 1986J VERY LONG BASELINE INTERFEROMETRY. II. THE EVOLUTION OF THE SHELL AND THE CENTRAL SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bietenholz, M. F.; Bartel, N.; Rupen, M. P.

    2010-04-01

    We present new Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) images of supernova (SN) 1986J, taken at 5, 8.4, and 22 GHz between t = 22 and 25 yr after the explosion. The shell expands {proportional_to}{proportional_to}t {sup 0.69+}-{sup 0.03}. We estimate the progenitor's mass-loss rate at (4-10) x 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (for v{sub w} = 10 km s{sup -1}). Two bright spots are seen in the images. The first, in the northeast, is now fading. The second, very near the center of the projected shell and unique to SN 1986J, is still brightening relative to the shell, and now dominates the VLBI images. It is marginally resolved at 22 GHz (diameter {approx}0.3 mas; {approx}5 x 10{sup 16} cm at 10 Mpc). The integrated VLA spectrum of SN 1986J shows an inversion point and a high-frequency turnover, both progressing downward in frequency and due to the central bright spot. The optically thin spectral index of the central bright spot is indistinguishable from that of the shell. The small proper motion of 1500 +- 1500 km s{sup -1} of the central bright spot is consistent with our previous interpretation of it as being associated with the expected black-hole or neutron-star remnant. Now, an alternate scenario seems also plausible, where the central bright spot, like the northeast one, results when the shock front impacts on a condensation within the circumstellar medium (CSM). The condensation would have to be so dense as to be opaque at cm wavelengths ({approx}10{sup 3}x denser than the average corresponding CSM) and fortuitously close to the center of the projected shell. We include a movie of the evolution of SN 1986J at 5 GHz from t = 0 to 25 yr.

  5. Supernovae, young remnants, and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshner, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Chemical abundance data from extragalactic supernovae and from supernova remnants (SNR) less than 1000 yrs old are employed to show that nuclear burning beyond helium synthesis actually occurs. Supernova (SN) are classified into types I or II, having no hydrogen lines or featuring hydrogen lines, respectively. The SN I's have been observed as having a preponderance of Fe lines, and emitting from a source at around 12,000 K with a center continuum of approximately 10 AU. Decay chains which could account for detected luminosities and spectra are presented, noting a good fit of Fe II spectrum with observed SN spectra. SNR pass through younger and older stages, going from the outpouring of material to diffusion in the interstellar medium. Expanding flocculi from young SNR show oxygen abundances as well as lines from sulfur, calcium, and argon, with a corresponding necessity of an explosive source of 15 solar masses.

  6. Astronomical Resources: Supernovae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Contains a partially annotated, nontechnical bibliography of recent materials about supernovae, including some about the discovery of a supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Includes citations of general books and articles about supernovae, articles about Supernova 1987A, and a few science fiction stories using supernovae. (TW)

  7. The infrared echo of a type II supernova with a circumstellar dust shell - Applications to SN 1979c and SN 1980k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    1983-01-01

    Merrill (1980) and Telesco et al. (1981) have reported observations according to which supernovae developed a thermal infrared excess about 7-9 months after visual maximum. The two supernovae involved are SN 1979c in NGC 4321 and SN 1980k in NGC 6946. The infrared behavior of these supernovae is almost identical to that observed in several novae. The present investigation is concerned with the question whether the thermal infrared radiation from SN 1979c and SN 1980k could have been emitted by dust particles which were present in a circumstellar shell prior to the supernova event. The obtained results confirm the suggestion of Bode and Evans (1980) that the thermal emission from SN 1979c may have originated from preexisting dust present in a circumstellar shell and heated up by the UV-visual output of the supernova. The thermal infrared emission from SN 1980k may have a similar origin.

  8. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The analysis is confined to the test particle approximation and adiabatic losses are oversimplified, but unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum are included. Monoenergetic protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  9. Probing the Expansion History of the Universe by Model-independent Reconstruction from Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Burst Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    To probe the late evolution history of the universe, we adopt two kinds of optimal basis systems. One of them is constructed by performing the principle component analysis, and the other is built by taking the multidimensional scaling approach. Cosmological observables such as the luminosity distance can be decomposed into these basis systems. These basis systems are optimized for different kinds of cosmological models that are based on different physical assumptions, even for a mixture model of them. Therefore, the so-called feature space that is projected from the basis systems is cosmological model independent, and it provides a parameterization for studying and reconstructing the Hubble expansion rate from the supernova luminosity distance and even gamma-ray burst (GRB) data with self-calibration. The circular problem when using GRBs as cosmological candles is naturally eliminated in this procedure. By using the Levenberg–Marquardt technique and the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform an observational constraint on this kind of parameterization. The data we used include the “joint light-curve analysis” data set that consists of 740 Type Ia supernovae and 109 long GRBs with the well-known Amati relation.

  10. A KINEMATIC DISTANCE STUDY OF THE PLANETARY NEBULAE-SUPERNOVA REMNANT-H II REGION COMPLEX AT G35.6–0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Tian, W. W.; Su, H. Q.; Torres, D. F.; Pedaletti, G. E-mail: tww@bao.ac.cn

    2013-10-01

    Two possible planetary nebulae (PN G035.5–00.4 and IRAS 18551+0159), one newly re-identified supernova remnant (SNR G35.6–0.4), and one H II region (G35.6–0.5) form a line-of-sight-overlapping complex known as G35.6–0.5. We analyze 21 cm H I absorption spectra toward the complex to constrain the kinematic distances of these objects. PN G035.5–00.4 has a distance from 3.8 ± 0.4 kpc to 5.4 ± 0.7 kpc. IRAS 18551+0159 is at 4.3 ± 0.5 kpc. We discuss the distance for SNR 35.6–0.4, for which the previous estimate was 10.5 kpc, and find a plausible distance of 3.6 ± 0.4 kpc. The new distance of SNR G35.6–0.4 and the derived mass for the ∼55 km s{sup –1} CO molecular cloud can accommodate an association with HESS J1858+020. We also conclude that SNR G35.6–0.4 is unlikely to be associated with PSR J1857+0210 or PSR J1857+0212, which are projected onto the SNR area.

  11. REAL-TIME DETECTION AND RAPID MULTIWAVELENGTH FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGHLY SUBLUMINOUS TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Green, Yoav; Yaron, Ofer; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Xu Dong; Sternberg, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Walters, Richard; Nugent, Peter E.; Poznanski, Dovi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Emma S.

    2011-08-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is an optical wide-field variability survey carried out using a camera with a 7.8 deg{sup 2} field of view mounted on the 48 inch Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory. One of the key goals of this survey is to conduct high-cadence monitoring of the sky in order to detect optical transient sources shortly after they occur. Here, we describe the real-time capabilities of the PTF and our related rapid multiwavelength follow-up programs, extending from the radio to the {gamma}-ray bands. We present as a case study observations of the optical transient PTF10vdl (SN 2010id), revealed to be a very young core-collapse (Type II-P) supernova having a remarkably low luminosity. Our results demonstrate that the PTF now provides for optical transients the real-time discovery and rapid-response follow-up capabilities previously reserved only for high-energy transients like gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Dependence of the Observed Properties of Type Ia Supernovae on the Mass of the Progenitor White Dwarf in the Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Don Q.; Jordan, George C; Wuyts, Eva; Jumper, Kevin A.; Fisher, Robert

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the dependence of the observed properties of Type Ia supernovae on the mass MWD of the white dwarf star in the single degenerate model. We find that, within the gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model and the treatment we use for buoyancy-driven turbulent nuclear burning, the outcome of the explosion is highly sensitive to MWD. Specifically, we find that the nuclear energy released during the deflagration phase, and therefore the amount by which the white dwarf expands prior to initiation of the detonation wave, increase rapidly as MWD increases. Consequently, the amount of radioactive nickel produced, and thus the peak luminosity of the supernova, decrease rapidly as MWD increases. We find that, as a result, ignition at a single point (which is favored by simulations of the prior smoldering phase) and a variation in MWD of as little as ~ 2% can produce the observed range of peak luminosities of normal Type Ia supernovae.

  13. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  14. A Probabilistic Approach to Classifying Supernovae UsingPhotometric Information

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; Connolly, Brian M.

    2006-12-14

    This paper presents a novel method for determining the probability that a supernova candidate belongs to a known supernova type (such as Ia, Ibc, IIL, etc.), using its photometric information alone. It is validated with Monte Carlo, and both space- and ground-based data. We examine the application of the method to well-sampled as well as poorly sampled supernova light curves and investigate to what extent the best currently available supernova models can be used for typing supernova candidates. Central to the method is the assumption that a supernova candidate belongs to a group of objects that can be modeled; we therefore discuss possible ways of removing anomalous or less well understood events from the sample. This method is particularly advantageous for analyses where the purity of the supernova sample is of the essence, or for those where it is important to know the number of the supernova candidates of a certain type (e.g., in supernova rate studies).

  15. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a separate White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties leads to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. With early R&D funding, we have achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction. Pre-JDEM AO R&D support will further reduce technical and cost risk. Specific details on the SNAP mission can be found in Aldering et al. (2004, 2005). The primary goal of the SNAP supernova program is to provide a dataset which gives tight constraints on parameters which characterize the dark-energy, e.g. w{sub 0} and w{sub a} where w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a}(1-a). SNAP data can also be used to directly test and discriminate among specific dark energy models. We will do so by building the Hubble diagram of high-redshift supernovae, the same methodology used in the original discovery of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe that established the existence of dark energy (Perlmutter et al. 1998; Garnavich et al. 1998; Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999). The SNAP SN Ia program focuses on minimizing the systematic floor of the supernova method through the use of characterized supernovae that can be sorted into subsets based on subtle signatures of heterogeneity. Subsets may be defined based on host-galaxy morphology, spectral-feature strength and velocity, early-time behavior, inter alia. Independent cosmological analysis of each subset of ''like'' supernovae can be

  16. MIXING OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA INTO MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Liubin; Desch, Steven J.; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X.

    2012-09-01

    Several lines of evidence, from isotopic analyses of meteorites to studies of the Sun's elemental and isotopic composition, indicate that the solar system was contaminated early in its evolution by ejecta from a nearby supernova. Previous models have invoked supernova material being injected into an extant protoplanetary disk, or isotropically expanding ejecta sweeping over a distant (>10 pc) cloud core, simultaneously enriching it and triggering its collapse. Here, we consider a new astrophysical setting: the injection of clumpy supernova ejecta, as observed in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, into the molecular gas at the periphery of an H II region created by the supernova's progenitor star. To track these interactions, we have conducted a suite of high-resolution (1500{sup 3} effective) three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations that follow the evolution of individual clumps as they move into molecular gas. Even at these high resolutions, our simulations do not quite achieve numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving the small-scale mixing of ejecta and molecular gas, although they do allow some robust conclusions to be drawn. Isotropically exploding ejecta do not penetrate into the molecular cloud or mix with it, but, if cooling is properly accounted for, clumpy ejecta penetrate to distances {approx}10{sup 18} cm and mix effectively with large regions of star-forming molecular gas. In fact, the {approx}2 M{sub Sun} of high-metallicity ejecta from a single core-collapse supernova is likely to mix with {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} of molecular gas material as it is collapsing. Thus, all stars forming late ( Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr) in the evolution of an H II region may be contaminated by supernova ejecta at the level {approx}10{sup -4}. This level of contamination is consistent with the abundances of short-lived radionuclides and possibly some stable isotopic shifts in the early solar system and is

  17. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  18. A one-dimensional Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation model for the broad-lined Type Ia supernova 2002bo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, Stéphane; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John

    2015-04-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer simulations of a Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation model which synthesizes 0.51 M⊙ of 56Ni, and confront our results to the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2002bo over the first 100 d of its evolution. Assuming only homologous expansion, this same model reproduces the bolometric and multiband light curves, the secondary near-infrared (NIR) maxima, and the optical and NIR spectra. The chemical stratification of our model qualitatively agrees with previous inferences by Stehle et al., but reveals significant quantitative differences for both iron-group and intermediate-mass elements. We show that ±0.1 M⊙ (i.e. ±20 per cent) variations in 56Ni mass have a modest impact on the bolometric and colour evolution of our model. One notable exception is the U band, where a larger abundance of iron-group elements results in less opaque ejecta through ionization effects, our model with more 56Ni displaying a higher near-ultraviolet flux level. In the NIR range, such variations in 56Ni mass affect the timing of the secondary maxima but not their magnitude, in agreement with observational results. Moreover, the variation in the I, J, and Ks magnitudes is less than 0.1 mag within ˜10 d from bolometric maximum, confirming the potential of NIR photometry of SNe Ia for cosmology. Overall, the delayed-detonation mechanism in single Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf progenitors seems well suited for SN 2002bo and similar SNe Ia displaying a broad Si II 6355 Å line. Whatever multidimensional processes are at play during the explosion leading to these events, they must conspire to produce an ejecta comparable to our spherically symmetric model.

  19. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: III. Emission Line Diagnostics of Ensembles of H II Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R S; Kewley, L J; Leitherer, C; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; van Breugel, W; Groves, B A

    2006-05-10

    We have built, as far as possible, fully self-consistent models of H II regions around aging clusters of stars. These produce strong emission line diagnostics applicable to either individual H II regions in galaxies, or to the integrated emission line spectra of disk or starburst galaxies. The models assume that the expansion and internal pressure of individual H II regions is driven by the net input of mechanical energy from the central cluster, be it through winds or supernova events. This eliminates the ionization parameter as a free variable, replacing it with a parameter which depends on the ratio of the cluster mass to the pressure in the surrounding interstellar medium. These models explain why H II regions with low abundances have high excitation, and demonstrate that at least part of the warm ionized medium is the result of overlapping faint, old, large, and low pressure H II regions. We present a number of line ratios (at both optical and IR wavelengths) that provide reliable abundance diagnostics for either single H II regions or for integrated galaxy spectra, and others that are sensitive to the age of the cluster stars exciting individual H II regions.

  20. A self-consistent analytical magnetar model: the luminosity of γ-ray burst supernovae is powered by radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Zach; Johansson Andreas, K. G.; Maeda, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    We present an analytical model that considers energy arising from a magnetar central engine. The results of fitting this model to the optical and X-ray light curves of five long-duration γ-ray bursts (LGRBs) and two ultralong GRBs (ULGRBs), including their associated supernovae (SNe), show that emission from a magnetar central engine cannot be solely responsible for powering an LGRB-SN. While the early afterglow (AG)-dominated phase can be well described with our model, the predicted SN luminosity is underluminous by a factor of 3-17. We use this as compelling evidence that additional sources of heating must be present to power an LGRB-SN, which we argue must be radioactive heating. Our self-consistent modelling approach was able to successfully describe all phases of ULGRB 111209A/SN 2011kl, from the early AG to the later SN, where we determined for the magnetar central engine a magnetic field strength of 1.1-1.3 × 1015 G, an initial spin period of 11.5-13.0 ms, a spin-down time of 4.8-6.5 d, and an initial energy of 1.2-1.6 × 1050 erg. These values are entirely consistent with those determined by other authors. The luminosity of a magnetar-powered SN is directly related to how long the central engine is active, where central engines with longer durations give rise to brighter SNe. The spin-down time-scales of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are of order months to years, which provides a natural explanation as to why SN 2011kl was less luminous than SLSNe that are also powered by emission from magnetar central engines.

  1. Type Ia Supernova Properties as a Function of the Distance to the Host Galaxy in the SDSS-II SN Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; et al.

    2012-08-20

    We use type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star-formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light-curves using both MLCS2k2 and SALT2, and determine color (AV, c) and light-curve shape (delta, x1) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4-sigma level) finding is that the average fitted AV from MLCS2k2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that SNe in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light-curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  2. Magnetares como fuentes para potenciar supernovas superluminosas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersten, M. C.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetars have been proposed as one of the possible sources to power the light curve of super-luminous supernovae. We have included the energy deposited by a hypothetical magnetar in our one-dimensional hydrodynamical code, and analyzed the dynamical effect on the supernova ejecta. In particular, we present a model for SN 2011kl, the first object associated with a ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst. Finally, we show its effect on the light curves of hydrogen rich supernovae.

  3. La supernova galattica è in ritardo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2005-06-01

    After 400 years we are still waiting to see a galactic supernova. A simple galactic model based upon interstellar absorption is shown in order to explain the rate of observed galactic supernovae. The history of variable stars observations in modern epoch is sketched and the hypothesis for Bethlehem Star made by Kepler in occasion of the last galactic supernova, exploded in Ophiuchus on 9 October 1604, is also presented.

  4. Supernovae and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-09-01

    Nucleosynthesis by rapid neutron capture (the r-process) could be an important diagnostic of the explosive deep interiors of supernovae. The early appearance of r-process elements in the Galaxy, along with energetic requirements, strongly argues in favor of a supernova origin for r-process isotopes. However there is a current conundrum as to the relative contributions from various supernovae environments, e.g. MHD jets or neutrino energized winds. There are also possible contributions from failed supernovae (collapsars) leading to a black hole (BH), or the ejection of material during the mergers of neutron stars in binary systems, i.e. NS+NS or NS+BH systems. In this talk we will review the theoretical underpinnings of each possibility in the quest to deduce the relative contribution of each process. In particular, each model for r-process nucleosynthesis invariably leads to systematic discrepancies with the observed solar-system r-process abundances. For example, although the location of the abundance peaks near nuclear mass numbers A = 130 and 195 identify an environment of rapid neutron capture near closed nuclear shells, the abundances of elements just above and below those peaks are often underproduced by more than an order of magnitude in model calculations. Similarly, most recent neutrino-driven wind simulations produce only the lighter r-process elements, while neutron-star mergers may miss the r-process peaks due to fission recycling. In this talk we demonstrate that the underproduction of elements above and below the r-process peaks can be supplemented via fission fragment distributions from the recycling of material synthesized during neutron star mergers, while the abundance peaks themselves are well reproduced in MHD jets in supernovae and collapsars. Moreover, we show that the relative contributions to the solar-system r-process yields from core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers required by this proposal are consistent with estimates of the

  5. Infrared studies of molecular shocks in the supernova remnant HB 21: II. Thermal admixture of shocked H2 gas in the south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Koo, Bon-Chul; Burton, Michael; Lee, Ho-Gyu; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2010-02-01

    We present near- and mid-infrared observations on the shock-cloud interaction region in the southern part of the supernova remnant HB 21, performed with the InfraRed Camera (IRC) aboard AKARI satellite and the Wide InfraRed Camera (WIRC) at the Palomar 5 m telescope. The IRC 4 μm (N4), 7 μm (S7), and 11 μm (S11) band images and the WIRC Hυ=1→0S(1) 2.12 μm image show similar diffuse features, around a shocked CO cloud. We analyzed the emission through comparison with the H2 line emission of several shock models. The IRC colors are well explained by the thermal admixture model of H2 gas - whose infinitesimal H2 column density has a power-law relation with the temperature T, dN˜T-dT - with n(H)˜3.9×104cm-3,b˜4.2, and N(H;T>100K)˜2.8×1021cm-2. We interpreted these parameters with several different pictures of the shock-cloud interactions - multiple planar C-shocks, bow shocks, and shocked clumps - and discussed their weaknesses and strengths. The observed Hυ=1→0S(1) intensity is four times greater than the prediction from the power-law admixture model, the same tendency as found in the northern part of HB 21 (Paper I). We also explored the limitation of the thermal admixture model with respect to the derived model parameters.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: R-band light curves of type II supernovae (Rubin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A.; Gal-Yam, A.; De Cia, A.; Horesh, A.; Khazov, D.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Arcavi, I.; Manulis, I.; Yaron, O.; Vreeswijk, P.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Ben-Ami, S.; Perley, D. A.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Wozniak, P. R.; Filippenko, A. V.; Clubb, K. I.; Nugent, P. E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Badenes, C.; Howell, D. A.; Valenti, S.; Sand, D.; Sollerman, J.; Johansson, J.; Leonard, D. C.; Horst, J. C.; Armen, S. F.; Fedrow, J. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Mazzali, P.; Pian, E.; Sternberg, A.; Matheson, T.; Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Lazarevic, S.

    2016-05-01

    Our sample consists of 57 SNe from the PTF (Law et al. 2009PASP..121.1395L; Rau et al. 2009PASP..121.1334R) and the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF; Kulkarni 2013ATel.4807....1K) surveys. Data were routinely collected by the Palomar 48-inch survey telescope in the Mould R-band. Follow-up observations were conducted mainly with the robotic 60-inch telescope using an SDSS r-band filter, with additional telescopes providing supplementary photometry and spectroscopy (see Gal-Yam et al. 2011, J/ApJ/736/159). The full list of SNe, their coordinates, and classification spectra are presented in Table 1. Most of the spectra were obtained with the Double Spectrograph on the 5m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory, the Kast spectrograph on the Shane 3m telescope at Lick Observatory, the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I 10m telescope, and the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) on the Keck II 10m telescope. (2 data files).

  7. Effects of Mg II and Ca II ionization on ab-initio solar chromosphere models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammacher, W.; Cuntz, M.

    1991-01-01

    Acoustically heated solar chromosphere models are computed considering radiation damping by (non-LTE) emission from H(-) and by Mg II and Ca II emission lines. The radiative transfer equations for the Mg II k and Ca II K emission lines are solved using the core-saturation method with complete redistribution. The Mg II k and Ca II K cooling rates are compared with the VAL model C. Several substantial improvements over the work of Ulmschneider et al. (1987) are included. It is found that the rapid temperature rises caused by the ionization of Mg II are not formed in the middle chromosphere, but occur at larger atmospheric heights. These models represent the temperature structure of the 'real' solar chromosphere much better. This result is a major precondition for the study of ab-initio models for solar flux tubes based on MHD wave propagation and also for ab-initio models for the solar transition layer.

  8. One-loop correction effects on supernova neutrino fluxes: a new possible probe for Beyond Standard Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gava, J.

    2010-05-01

    We present the consequences of a large radiative correction term coming from Supersymmetry (SUSY) upon the electron neutrino fluxes streaming off a core-collapse supernova using a 3-flavour neutrino-neutrino interaction code. We explore the interplay between the neutrino-neutrino interaction and the effects of the resonance associated with the μ−τ neutrino index of refraction. We find that sizeable effects may be visible in the flux on Earth and, consequently, on the number of events upon the energy signal of electron neutrinos in a liquid argon detector. Such effects could lead to a probe for Beyond Standard Model (BSM) physics and, ideally, to constraints in the SUSY parameter space.

  9. The soft X-ray background as a supernova blast wave viewed from inside: Solar abundance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the soft X-ray background is presented in which the Sun is assumed to be inside an active supernova blast wave. The blast wave evolves in a preexisting cavity. The broad band surface brightnesses is explained by such a blast wave with an explosion energy of E sub approx. 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs and radius 80 to 100 pc, using solar abundances. An approach to treating the problem of large anisotropies in the ambient medium is also explored, accommodating the observed anticorrelation between the soft X-ray surface brightness and the 21 cm column density. It is found that only for post shock temperatures below 10 6 K a shock propagating into a density enhancement will be dimmer than a similar shock in a lower density region.

  10. The soft X-ray background as a supernova blast wave viewed from inside - Solar abundance models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    A model of the soft X-ray background is presented in which the sun is assumed to be inside an active supernova blast wave. The blast wave evolves in a preexisting cavity. The broad band surface brightnesses is explained by such a blast wave with an explosion energy of E sub approximately 5 x 10 to the 50th power ergs and radius 80 to 100 pc, using solar abundances. An approach to treating the problem of large anisotropies in the ambient medium is also explored, accommodating the observed anticorrelation between the soft X-ray surface brightness and the 21 cm column density. It is found that only for post shock temperatures below 10 to the 6 power K a shock propagating into a density enhancement will be dimmer than a similar shock in a lower density region.

  11. Reverse and Forward Shock X-Ray Emission in an Evolutionary Model of Supernova Remnants Undergoing Efficient Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Ellison, Donald C.; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O.

    2014-08-01

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  12. Reverse and forward shock X-ray emission in an evolutionary model of supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O.; Ellison, Donald C.; Nagataki, Shigehiro E-mail: shiu-hang.lee@riken.jp E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu

    2014-08-20

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  13. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B. A.; Glendinning, S. G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A.; Fryxell, B. A.

    1997-04-15

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10-15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200 {mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20 {mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few x10{sup 3} s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50% faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations.

  14. Supernova-relevant hydrodynamic instability experiments on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J.; Arnett, D.; Remington, B.A.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.; Managan, R.; Rubenchik, A. Rubenchik, A. Fryxell, B.A.

    1997-04-01

    Observations of Supernova 1987A suggest that hydrodynamic instabilities play a critical role in the evolution of supernovae. To test the modeling of these instabilities, and to study instability issues which are difficult to model, we are developing laboratory experiments of hydrodynamic mixing under conditions relevant to supernovae. We use the Nova laser to generate a 10{endash}15 Mbar shock at the interface between an 85 {mu}m thick layer of Cu and a 500 {mu}m layer of CH{sub 2}; our first target is planar. We impose a single mode sinusoidal material perturbation at the interface with {lambda}=200{mu}m, {eta}{sub 0}=20{mu}m, causing perturbation growth by the RM instability as the shock accelerates the interface, and by RT instability as the interface decelerates. This resembles the hydrodynamics of the He-H interface of a Type II supernova at intermediate times, up to a few {times}10{sup 3}s. We use the supernova code PROMETHEUS and the hydrodynamics codes HYADES and CALE to model the experiment. We are designing further experiments to compare results for 2D vs. 3D single mode perturbations; high resolution 3D modeling requires prohibitive time and computing resources, but we can perform and study 3D experiments as easily as 2D experiments. Low resolution simulations suggest that the perturbations grow 50{percent} faster in 3D than in 2D; such a difference may help explain the high observed velocities of radioactive core material in SN1987A. We present the results of the experiments and simulations. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  16. A CR-hydro-NEI model of the structure and broadband emission from Tycho's supernova remnant

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, P.; Patnaude, D. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Nagataki, S.; Ellison, D. C.; Hughes, J. P.; Eriksen, K. A.; Castro, D. E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: shigehiro.nagataki@riken.jp E-mail: jph@physics.rutgers.edu E-mail: castro@mit.edu

    2014-03-01

    Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is well-established as a source of particle acceleration to very high energies. Constraints from numerous studies indicate that the observed γ-ray emission results primarily from hadronic processes, providing direct evidence of highly relativistic ions that have been accelerated by the SNR. Here we present an investigation of the dynamical and spectral evolution of Tycho's SNR by carrying out hydrodynamical simulations that include diffusive shock acceleration of particles in the amplified magnetic field at the forward shock of the SNR. Our simulations provide a consistent view of the shock positions, the nonthermal emission, the thermal X-ray emission from the forward shock, and the brightness profiles of the radio and X-ray emission. We compare these with the observed properties of Tycho to determine the density of the ambient material, the particle acceleration efficiency and maximum energy, the accelerated electron-to-proton ratio, and the properties of the shocked gas downstream of the expanding SNR shell. We find that evolution of a typical Type Ia supernova in a low ambient density (n {sub 0} ∼ 0.3 cm{sup –3}), with an upstream magnetic field of ∼5 μG, and with ∼16% of the SNR kinetic energy being converted into relativistic electrons and ions through diffusive shock acceleration, reproduces the observed properties of Tycho. Under such a scenario, the bulk of observed γ-ray emission at high energies is produced by π{sup 0}-decay resulting from the collisions of energetic hadrons, while inverse-Compton emission is significant at lower energies, comprising roughly half of the flux between 1 and 10 GeV.

  17. SWIFT/BAT DETECTION OF HARD X-RAYS FROM TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT: EVIDENCE FOR TITANIUM-44

    SciTech Connect

    Troja, E.; Baumgartner, W.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Segreto, A.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; Hartmann, D.

    2014-12-10

    We report Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey observations of the Tycho's supernova remnant, performed over a period of 104 months since the mission's launch. The remnant is detected with high significance (>10σ) below 50 keV. We detect significant hard X-ray emission in the 60-85 keV band, above the continuum level predicted by a simple synchrotron model. The location of the observed excess is consistent with line emission from radioactive titanium-44, so far reported only for Type II supernova explosions. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of the galactic supernova rate, and nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernova.

  18. Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2014-05-01

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass MMs ˜ 7 - 9.5M⊙. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 × 1050 erg and the small 56Ni mass of 2.5 × 10-3 M⊙, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ˜ 2 × 1044 erg s-1 and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ˜ 1017 cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ˜ 1042 erg s-1 and t ˜ 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ˜ 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ˜ 1048 erg.

  19. Electron-capture supernovae of super-asymptotic giant branch stars and the Crab supernova 1054

    SciTech Connect

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2014-05-02

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub Ms} ∼ 7 - 9.5M{sub ⊙}. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 × 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 × 10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙}, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of L ∼ 2 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R ∼ 10{sup 17} cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L ∼ 10{sup 42} erg s{sup −1} and {sup t} ∼ 60 - 100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by ∼ 4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires a ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E ∼ 10{sup 48} erg.

  20. Radio emission from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, K. W.; Panagia, N.; Sramek, R. A.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Stockdale, C. J.; Williams, C. L.

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 30 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85 - 110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements. 2) At a time ˜3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+beta ) beta ˜ -0.7 to beta ˜ -2.7 without change in the spectral index (nu +alpha ; alpha ˜ -0.81). This decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay with an e-folding time of ˜ 1100 days. 3) The best overall fit to all of the data is a model including both non-thermal synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) and a thermal free-free absorbing (FFA) components at early times, evolving to a constant spectral index, optically thin decline rate, until a break in that decline rate at day ˜3100, as mentioned above.

  1. Evidence for Accelerated Radioactive Decay (ARD) Models of Type I Supernova Lightcurves in the Low Redshift Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Bert W.; Leventhal, Marvin

    2014-06-01

    Forty years ago Van Hise [ApJ 192 (1974) 657-659] observed that the post peak light curve for the Type I supernova SN1937C is well represented by a sum of two exponentials with half lives which are ~ 0.75 of the terrestrial half lives of 56Ni and 56Co in the beta decay chain 56Ni → 56Co → 56Fe. Thirty nine years ago Leventhal and McCall [Nature 255 (1975) 690-692] proposed a fully convective, radioactive white dwarf model to account for the observed accelerated decay. Thirty eight years ago ARD models were tested by Rust, et al. [Nature 262 (1976) 118-120] on the data from the 15 fragmentary light curves available at that time. The results offered significant but not overwhelming support for ARD models. In this paper we present a new mathematical model for Type I lightcurves and fit that model, using only 6 free parameters, to an extensive collection of higher quality lightcurves that have been measured over the last 38 years. The fits all capture more than 99% of the total variance in the measured data, thus establishing the reality of an ARD lightcurve model. These new results provide a much improved Phillips relation for calibrating the extragalactic distance scale and testing other cosmological relations.

  2. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What causes the tremendous explosions of superluminous supernovae? New observations reveal the geometry of one such explosion, SN 2015bn, providing clues as to its source.A New Class of ExplosionsImage of a type Ia supernova in the galaxy NGC 4526. [NASA/ESA]Supernovae are powerful explosions that can briefly outshine the galaxies that host them. There are several different classifications of supernovae, each with a different physical source such as thermonuclear instability in a white dwarf, caused by accretion of too much mass, or the exhaustion of fuel in the core of a massive star, leading to the cores collapse and expulsion of its outer layers.In recent years, however, weve detected another type of supernovae, referred to as superluminous supernovae. These particularly energetic explosions last longer months instead of weeks and are brighter at their peaks than normal supernovae by factors of tens to hundreds.The physical cause of these unusual explosions is still a topic of debate. Recently, however, a team of scientists led by Cosimo Inserra (Queens University Belfast) has obtained new observations of a superluminous supernova that might help address this question.The flux and the polarization level (black lines) along the dominant axis of SN 2015bn, 24 days before peak flux (left) and 28 days after peak flux (right). Blue lines show the authors best-fitting model. [Inserra et al. 2016]Probing GeometryInserra and collaborators obtained two sets of observations of SN 2015bn one roughly a month before and one a month after the superluminous supernovas peak brightness using a spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope in Chile. These observations mark the first spectropolarimetric data for a superluminous supernova.Spectropolarimetry is the practice of obtaining information about the polarization of radiation from an objects spectrum. Polarization carries information about broken spatial symmetries in the object: only if the object is perfectly symmetric can it

  3. Ejection of heavy elements from the stellar core to the periphery of the cloud of ejecta during a supernova explosion: A possible model of the processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmitrenko, N. V.; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A.; Belyaev, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    The possibility of simulating the processes during supernova explosions in laboratory conditions using powerful lasers (laboratory astrophysics) is investigated. The Chandra observations of ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant are analyzed. Based on the DIANA and NUTCY numerical codes, we have performed 1D and 2D hydrodynamic simulations of the ejecta expansion dynamics for a supernova with a mass of ˜5-15 solar masses within several hundred seconds after its explosion, including an initial asymmetry. We propose a model for the explosion and expansion of ejecta that illustrates strong inhomogeneities in the distribution of material to the extent that the Fe, Si, and S material from the stellar center turns out to be ejected to the periphery, the "star turns inside out," in agreement with observations. Based on hydrodynamic similarity criteria, we consider possible supernova-simulating laser targets that will allow one to reproduce the physical processes that take place during the explosion of an astrophysical object, such as the shock propagation through the material, the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities at the boundaries of envelopes with different densities, etc.

  4. Radio emission from Supernovae and High Precision Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Torres, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    corrections, agree well within one standard deviation. In summary, our astrometric results demonstrate the feasibility of using phase-delay difference techniques (single-frequency or dual-frequency) for sources separated by as far as 15(deg) on the sky. This opens the avenue for the extension of the technique on a global scale with the aim of building up a quasi-inertial reference frame (of submilliarcsecond accuracy) based on extragalactic radio sources. The second part of this thesis is devoted to the study of the radio emission of the Type II supernova SN 1993J, whose relative proximity (it exploded in the Galaxy M81, at a distance of 10 million of light-years) has allowed us to observe it with VLBI at different radio frequency bands since June 1993. This radio supernova is the best studied one so far and thus a perfect laboratory to test supernova radio emission models. Early VLBI observations of this supernova by our group allowed us to discover the shell structure of SN 1993J--likely common to all supernovae--the youngest ever discovered in a supernova. Subsequently, our VLBI observations showed SN 1993J to be self-similarly expanding and, more recently, we used our VLBI observations at 3.6 and 6 cm in the period 6 through 42 months after explosion to show that the supernova expansion is decelerating, its size following a power-law with time (R t^m; m=0.86 +- 0.02). Our measurement of the expansion index yields estimates of the density of both supernova ejecta and circumstellar material in standard supernova explosion models. In particular, the density of the circumstellar material seems to be following a power-law less steep than usual (rhocs r^{-s}, with s approx. 1.66 instead of the standard s=2). Our VLBI observations also showed that the supernova radio emission comes from a shell of width 30% of the outer radius. In this thesis, we describe a numerical code that simulates synchrotron radio emission from a supernova. We assume that the supernova is self

  5. The first ten years of Swift supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Milne, Peter A.

    2015-09-01

    The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer has proven to be an incredible platform for studying the multiwavelength properties of supernova explosions. In its first ten years, Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae. The ultraviolet observations reveal a complex diversity of behavior across supernova types and classes. Even amongst the standard candle type Ia supernovae, ultraviolet observations reveal distinct groups. When the UVOT data is combined with higher redshift optical data, the relative populations of these groups appear to change with redshift. Among core-collapse supernovae, Swift discovered the shock breakout of two supernovae and the Swift data show a diversity in the cooling phase of the shock breakout of supernovae discovered from the ground and promptly followed up with Swift. Swift observations have resulted in an incredible dataset of UV and X-ray data for comparison with high-redshift supernova observations and theoretical models. Swift's supernova program has the potential to dramatically improve our understanding of stellar life and death as well as the history of our universe.

  6. Dust production in supernovae and AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, the role of supernovae on dust has changed; it has been long proposed that supernovae are dust destroyers, but now recent observations show that core-collapse supernovae can become dust factories. Theoretical models of dust evolution in galaxies have predicted that core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in galaxies, if these supernovae can form a significant mass of dust (0.1-1 solar masses). The Herschel Space Observatory and ALMA detected dust in the ejecta of Supernova 1987A. They revealed an estimated 0.5 solar masses of dust. Herschel also found nearly 0.1 solar masses of dust in historical supernovae remnants, namely Cassiopeia A and the Crab Nebula. If dust grains can survive future interaction with the supernova winds and ambient interstellar medium, core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in the interstellar media of galaxies. We further discuss the total dust mass injected by AGB stars and SNe into the interstellar medium of the Magellanic Clouds.

  7. Estudio de Evolución de los Núcleos Activos de Galaxias y QSOs: II. Búsqueda de Supernovas en Galaxias Pr'oximas con AGNs y Starburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, D.; Lípari, S.; Moyano, M.

    Several lines of observational evidences suggesting that supernovae and hypernovae events play a main role in evolution of galaxies, AGNs and QSOs. In order to search more detailed information, we have started a study and detection of supernovae and hypernovae in the nuclei of nearby active galaxies obtaining high-resolution spectra and images in the standard UBVRI filters mainly from CASLEO, Bosque Alegre and data from archive of HST, ESO and La Palma observatories. In this paper we present the first preliminary results obtained in this program. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  8. Ultraviolet observations of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, Tyler Anthony

    Ultraviolet observations of Core Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) have traditionally lagged behind observations in the optical and near-infrared. With the launch of Swift in 2004 this began to change. The systematic study of UV emission from these objects provides information about supernovae temperature, radius, metallicity and luminosity that may be difficult to obtain from the ground - especially at early times where upwards of 80% of the SNe bolometric flux may come from the UV region. We begin with the examination of an extraordinary Type IIn supernova SN 2007pk, which was at the time the earliest observed Type IIn SNe in the UV, and characterize the explosion properties while examining how the early observed UV emission compares with other observed CCSNe at early times. Building upon this we assemble the largest sample of CCSNe in the UV and examine the UV and bolometric characteristics of CCSNe by subtype. Using these bolometric light curves we go on to calculate empirically based bolometric corrections and UV- ux corrections for use by observers when observing filters are limited or UV observations are unable to be obtained. We improve upon this by identifying a small subsample of Type II Plateau SNe which have simultaneous ground based optical - near infrared data, and improve our bolometric light curve calculation method to more accurately determine bolometric light curve, corrections and UV corrections. Finally, we use recent hydrodynamical models to examine the accuracy of current modeling techniques to reproduce Type IIP SNe, the implications of progenitor properties on the light curves of the SNe, and possibility of future diagnostics for progenitor metalicity, radius, and explosion energies from Type IIP light curves and models.

  9. Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    1992-01-01

    Spectral calculations show that a model based on the thermonuclear explosion of a degenerate carbon/oxygen white dwarf provides excellent agreement with observations of Type Ia supernovae. Identification of suitable evolutionary progenitors remains a severe problem. General problems with estimation of supernova rates are outlined and the origin of Type Ia supernovae from double degenerate systems are discussed in the context of new rates of explosion per H band luminosity, the lack of observed candidates, and the likely presence of H in the vicinity of some SN Ia events. Re-examination of the problems of triggering Type Ia by accretion of hydrogen from a companion shows that there may be an avenue involving cataclysmic variables, especially if extreme hibernation occurs. Novae may channel accreting white dwarfs to a unique locus in accretion rate/mass space. Systems that undergo secular evolution to higher mass transfer rates could lead to just the conditions necessary for a Type Ia explosion. Tests involving fluorescence or absorption in a surrounding circumstellar medium and the detection of hydrogen stripped from a companion, which should appear at low velocity inside the white dwarf ejecta, are suggested. Possible observational confirmation of the former is described.

  10. Gamma line radiation from supernovae. [nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Recent calculations of core collapse or massive stars result in explosive ejection of the mantle by a reflected shock. These hydrodynamic results are important for predictions of explosive nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission from supernovae. Previous estimates, based on simple parameterized models or the nucleosynthesis in an average supernova, are compared with these latest results.

  11. The delayed-detonation model of a type Ia supernovae. 1: The deflagration phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, David; Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    The nature of the 'delayed detonation' mechanism of Khokhlov for the explosion of Type Ia supernovae is investigated by using two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics simulations. A new algorithm is used to treat the deflagration front. Assuming that it propagates locally at the laminar flame speed, the deflagration is insufficient to unbind the star. Expansion shuts of the flame; much of this small production of iron group nuclei occurs at lower densities, which reduces the electron-capture problem. The burning front does become wrinkled, but the wavelength of the instability is much larger than the computational grid size and is resolved; this is consistent with previous analysis. Because the degenerate star has an adiabatic exponent only slightly above 4/3, the energy released by deflagration drives a pulsation of large amplitude. During the first expansion phase, adiabatic cooling shuts off the burning, and a Rayleigh-Taylor instability then gives mixing of high-entropy ashes with low-entropy fuel. During the first contraction phase, compressional heating reignites the material. This paper deals with the deflagration phase, from the onset of burning, through expansion and quenching of the flame, to the first contraction.

  12. An unusually fast brightness decline in optical of young type II supernova SN 2016gkg from ASAS-SN follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Brown, J. S.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shields, J.; Shappee, B. J.; Bersier, D.; Brimacombe, J.; Nicholls, B.

    2016-09-01

    The All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") collaboration reports an unusually fast brightness decline in optical for SN 2016gkg at an averaged rate of ~1 mag/d in V-band between UT 2016-09-21.7 (JD 2457653.2) and UT 2016-09-22.4 (JD 2457653.9).

  13. Modeling Topaz-II system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

  14. Supernova neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, K.

    2015-07-15

    In this presentation I summarize the main detection channels for neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae, and describe current status of and future prospects for supernova-neutrino-sensitive detectors worldwide.

  15. Systematic Studies of Shock Revival and the Subsequent Evolutions in Core-collapse Supernovae with Parametric Progenitor Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    We conducted one-dimensional and two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of post-shock revival evolutions in core-collapse supernovae, employing the simple neutrino light bulb approximation to produce explosions rather easily. In order to estimate the explosion energy, we took into proper account nuclear recombinations and fusions consistently with the equation of state for matter not in statistical equilibrium in general. The methodology is similar to our previous work, but is somehow improved. In this paper, we studied the influence of the progenitor structure on the dynamics systematically. In order to expedite our understanding of the systematics, we constructed six parametric progenitor models, which are different in masses of Fe iron core and Si+S layer, instead of employing realistic models provided by stellar evolution calculations, which are sometimes of stochastic nature as a function of stellar mass on the main sequence. We found that the explosion energy is tightly correlated with the mass accretion rate at shock revival irrespective of dimension and the progenitors with light iron cores but with rather high entropies, which have yet to be produced by realistic stellar evolution calculations, may reproduce the canonical values of explosion energy and nickel mass. The mass of the Si+S layer is also important in the mass accretion history after bounce, on the other hand; the higher mass accretion rates and resultant heavier cores tend to hamper strong explosions.

  16. The Effects of Collective Neutrino Oscillations on Supernova Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seadrow, Shaquann; Frohlich, C.; Duan, H.; Friedland, A.; McLaughlin, G.; Keohane, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    A core-collapse supernova originates from the implosion of the electron degenerate core inside a massive star. Runaway electron capture produces on the order of 1057 neutrinos containing about 1053 erg of energy in total. While the vast majority of neutrinos are eventually released, during the first few seconds these neutrinos drive both the dynamics, and likewise the nucleosynthesis, inside the supernova. Recently, our understanding of oscillations among the different flavors of neutrinos (electron, muon, and tau) has significantly improved, allowing us to ask if neutrino flavor change has a significant effect on nucleosynthesis in a core-collapse supernova. To investigate the effects of collective neutrino flavor oscillations, we use the hydrodynamic conditions from a spherically-symmetrical model of the implosion, bounce, and explosion of the 1.4 solar mass core that is inside an 8.8 solar mass star (Huedepohl et al. 2009). We select 20 mass tracers in the ejecta, varying in initial radii, and follow these trajectories for the first 9 seconds following bounce. We include these trajectories into a nuclear reaction network in order to calculate the detailed nucleosynthesis. We use three sets of neutrino reaction rates, all of which are calculated consistently with the conditions in the supernova model: (i) no collective flavor oscillations, (ii) collective oscillations for normal neutrino mass hierarchy, and (iii) collective oscillations for inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We calculate the detailed nucleosynthesis for each trajectory for all three sets of neutrino rates. We find that the inclusion of collective oscillations (ii or iii) significantly increases the free neutron abundance; however, we obtain similar results regardless of which hierarchy is used. The increase in free neutrons also increases the subsequent rate of neutron capture, but has only a small effect on the predicted final abundances. This work was performed as part of North Carolina State

  17. Supernova shock breakout from a red supergiant.

    PubMed

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Röser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma S; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-07-11

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve confirm that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitor stars.

  18. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  19. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  20. Near-infrared line identification in type Ia supernovae during the transitional phase

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Brian; Baron, E.; Wisniewski, John P.; Miller, Timothy R.; Parrent, Jerod T.; Thomas, R. C.; Marion, G. H.

    2014-09-10

    We present near-infrared synthetic spectra of a delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model and compare them to observed spectra of four normal Type Ia supernovae ranging from day +56.5 to day +85. This is the epoch during which supernovae are believed to be undergoing the transition from the photospheric phase, where spectra are characterized by line scattering above an optically thick photosphere, to the nebular phase, where spectra consist of optically thin emission from forbidden lines. We find that most spectral features in the near-infrared can be accounted for by permitted lines of Fe II and Co II. In addition, we find that [Ni II] fits the emission feature near 1.98 μm, suggesting that a substantial mass of {sup 58}Ni exists near the center of the ejecta in these objects, arising from nuclear burning at high density.

  1. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial 7Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and 7Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like 7Li, 11B, 92Nb, 138La and 180Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ13 with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio 11B/7Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  2. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  3. The type IIP supernova 2012aw in M95: Hydrodynamical modeling of the photospheric phase from accurate spectrophotometric monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Ora, M.; Botticella, M. T.; Della Valle, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Pignata, G.; Bufano, F.; Bayless, A. J.; Pritchard, T. A.; Taubenberger, S.; Benitez, S.; Kotak, R.; Inserra, C.; Fraser, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Haislip, J. B.; Harutyunyan, A.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present an extensive optical and near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic campaign of the Type IIP supernova SN 2012aw. The data set densely covers the evolution of SN 2012aw shortly after the explosion through the end of the photospheric phase, with two additional photometric observations collected during the nebular phase, to fit the radioactive tail and estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass. Also included in our analysis is the previously published Swift UV data, therefore providing a complete view of the ultraviolet-optical-infrared evolution of the photospheric phase. On the basis of our data set, we estimate all the relevant physical parameters of SN 2012aw with our radiation-hydrodynamics code: envelope mass M {sub env} ∼ 20 M {sub ☉}, progenitor radius R ∼ 3 × 10{sup 13} cm (∼430 R {sub ☉}), explosion energy E ∼ 1.5 foe, and initial {sup 56}Ni mass ∼0.06 M {sub ☉}. These mass and radius values are reasonably well supported by independent evolutionary models of the progenitor, and may suggest a progenitor mass higher than the observational limit of 16.5 ± 1.5 M {sub ☉} of the Type IIP events.

  4. Expansion of the supernova remnant 3C 10 /Tycho/ and its implications for models of young remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, R. G.; Goss, W. M.; Shaver, P. A.

    1982-08-01

    The remnant of Tycho Brahe's supernova (3C 10) was observed with the Westerbork telescope at 21 cm in 1971 and 1979, and these measurements have been used to determine the radial expansion rate. The average value obtained is within 0.026 of 0.256 arcsec/yg, with the individual radio and optical data points agreeing well within the errors. The apparent discrepancy in average values is primarily the result of a low expansion speed at the position of the most prominent nebulosity, and this is attributed to deceleration caused by the higher density of material. While the expansion speed only marginally exceeds that predicted by the Sedov solution, the confirmation lent by the optical data suggests a possible real effect. Either the remnant is not yet fully in the adiabatic phase, or the dynamics are being modified by the evaporation of neutral material behind the shock front. It is clear that swept-up material now dominates the dynamics of 3C 10. No significant change in flux density was detected at a level which favors models where particle acceleration/field amplification are occurring over that of simple adiabatic expansion.

  5. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Williams, Christopher L.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2007-10-01

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect clumpiness of the circumstellar material. Along with reviewing these general properties of the radio emission from supernovae, we present our extensive observations of the radio emission from supernova (SN) 1993J in M 81 (NGC 3031) made with the Very Large Array and other radio telescopes. The SN 1993J radio emission evolves regularly in both time and frequency, and the usual interpretation in terms of shock interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) formed by a pre-supernova stellar wind describes the observations rather well considering the complexity of the phenomenon. However: 1) The highest frequency measurements at 85-110 GHz at early times (<40 days) are not well fitted by the parameterization which describes the cm wavelength measurements rather well. 2) At mid-cm wavelengths there is often deviation from the fitted radio light curves, particularly near the peak flux density, and considerable shorter term deviations in the declining portion when the emission has become optically thin. 3) At a time ~3100 days after shock breakout, the decline rate of the radio emission steepens from (t+β)β~-0.7 to β~-2.7 without change in the spectral index (ν+αα~-0.81). However, this decline is best described not as a power-law, but as an exponential decay starting at day ~3100 with an e-folding time of ~1100 days. 4) The best overall fit to all of the data is

  6. Climate Model Datasets on Earth System Grid II (ESG II)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Earth System Grid (ESG) is a project that combines the power and capacity of supercomputers, sophisticated analysis servers, and datasets on the scale of petabytes. The goal is to provide a seamless distributed environment that allows scientists in many locations to work with large-scale data, perform climate change modeling and simulation,and share results in innovative ways. Though ESG is more about the computing environment than the data, still there are several catalogs of data available at the web site that can be browsed or search. Most of the datasets are restricted to registered users, but several are open to any access.

  7. Supernovae as seen by off-center observers in a local void

    SciTech Connect

    Blomqvist, Michael; Mörtsell, Edvard E-mail: edvard@fysik.su.se

    2010-05-01

    Inhomogeneous universe models have been proposed as an alternative explanation for the apparent acceleration of the cosmic expansion that does not require dark energy. In the simplest class of inhomogeneous models, we live within a large, spherically symmetric void. Several studies have shown that such a model can be made consistent with many observations, in particular the redshift-luminosity distance relation for type Ia supernovae, provided that the void is of Gpc size and that we live close to the center. Such a scenario challenges the Copernican principle that we do not occupy a special place in the universe. We use the first-year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II supernova search data set as well as the Constitution supernova data set to put constraints on the observer position in void models, using the fact that off-center observers will observe an anisotropic universe. We first show that a spherically symmetric void can give good fits to the supernova data for an on-center observer, but that the two data sets prefer very different voids. We then continue to show that the observer can be displaced at least fifteen percent of the void scale radius from the center and still give an acceptable fit to the supernova data. When combined with the observed dipole anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background however, we find that the data compells the observer to be located within about one percent of the void scale radius. Based on these results, we conclude that considerable fine-tuning of our position within the void is needed to fit the supernova data, strongly disfavouring the model from a Copernican principle point of view.

  8. The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J.

    PubMed

    Maund, Justyn R; Smartt, Stephen J; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Gilmore, Gerard F

    2004-01-01

    The massive star that underwent a collapse of its core to produce supernova (SN)1993J was subsequently identified as a non-variable red supergiant star in images of the galaxy M81 taken before explosion. It showed an excess in ultraviolet and B-band colours, suggesting either the presence of a hot, massive companion star or that it was embedded in an unresolved young stellar association. The spectra of SN1993J underwent a remarkable transformation from the signature of a hydrogen-rich type II supernova to one of a helium-rich (hydrogen-deficient) type Ib. The spectral and photometric peculiarities were best explained by models in which the 13-20 solar mass supergiant had lost almost its entire hydrogen envelope to a close binary companion, producing a 'type IIb' supernova, but the hypothetical massive companion stars for this class of supernovae have so far eluded discovery. Here we report photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN1993J ten years after the explosion. At the position of the fading supernova we detect the unambiguous signature of a massive star: the binary companion to the progenitor. PMID:14712269

  9. The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J.

    PubMed

    Maund, Justyn R; Smartt, Stephen J; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Gilmore, Gerard F

    2004-01-01

    The massive star that underwent a collapse of its core to produce supernova (SN)1993J was subsequently identified as a non-variable red supergiant star in images of the galaxy M81 taken before explosion. It showed an excess in ultraviolet and B-band colours, suggesting either the presence of a hot, massive companion star or that it was embedded in an unresolved young stellar association. The spectra of SN1993J underwent a remarkable transformation from the signature of a hydrogen-rich type II supernova to one of a helium-rich (hydrogen-deficient) type Ib. The spectral and photometric peculiarities were best explained by models in which the 13-20 solar mass supergiant had lost almost its entire hydrogen envelope to a close binary companion, producing a 'type IIb' supernova, but the hypothetical massive companion stars for this class of supernovae have so far eluded discovery. Here we report photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN1993J ten years after the explosion. At the position of the fading supernova we detect the unambiguous signature of a massive star: the binary companion to the progenitor.

  10. Supernova 2009ig Has Brightened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2009-09-01

    The Type-Ia Supernova 2009ig in NGC 1015 has brightened from its discovery magnitude of 17.5 on Aug. 20.48 UT (I. Kleiser, S. B. Cenko, W. Li, and A. V. Filippenko, University of California; LOSS discovery on unfiltered KAIT images) to unfiltered CCD magnitude 14.0 on Sep. 20.646 UT (Yoshiteru Matsuura, Nada-ku, Kobe, Japan). H. Navasardyan, E. Cappellaro, and S. Benetti, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, report that a spectrogram obtained on Aug. 21.08 UT with the Asiago 1.82-m telescope indicates that the object is a type-Ia supernova caught soon after explosion. They note some similarity to early spectra of SN 2002bo (Benetti et al. 2004, MNRAS 348, 261), although Si II 597.2-nm and S II 564.0-nm are not yet present. Instructions for CCD observing are given in accordance with AAVSO policy on the observation of Type-Ia supernovae brighter than magnitude 15.0. Data should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database; FITS images should be uploaded to ftp.aavso.org.

  11. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; Rank, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short times. Many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extintion is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in the active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micron emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and a half after the explosion. Since dust extintion is much less at 6.63 pm than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the NiII line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micron using ISOCAM to search for the NiII emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any NiII line emission brighter than a 5sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled to the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a NiII with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a NiII line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  12. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, J. D.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.

    2000-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short enough times that many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extinction is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micrometer emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and half after th explosion. Since dust extinction is much less at 6.63 micrometers than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the [NiII] line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micrometers using ISOCAM to search for the [NiII] emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any [NiII] line emission brighter than a 5-sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled ot the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a [NiII] line with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a [NiII] line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  13. Three supernova shells around a young M33 star cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps-Fariña, A.; Beckman, J. E.; Font, J.; Borlaff, A.; Zaragoza-Cardiel, J.; Amram, P.

    2016-09-01

    Using a specialized technique sensitive to the presence of expanding ionized gas, we have detected a set of three concentric expanding shells in an H II region in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. After mapping the kinematics in Hα with Fabry-Perot spectroscopy, we used slit spectra to measure the intensities of the [S II] doublet at λλ671.9, 673.1 nm and the [N II] doublet at λλ645.8, 658.3 nm to corroborate the kinematics and apply diagnostic tests using line ratios. These showed that the expanding shells are shock dominated as would be the case if they had originated with supernova explosions. Estimating their kinetic energies, we find fairly low values, indicating a fairly advanced stage of evolution. We obtain density, mass and parent star mass estimates, which, along with the kinetic energies, are inconsistent with the simplest models of shock-interstellar medium interaction. We propose that the presence and properties of an inhomogeneous medium offer a scenario which can account for these observations, and discuss the implications. Comparing our results with data from the literature supports the combined presence of an H II region and supernova remnant material at the observed position.

  14. Inferring supernova IIb/Ib/Ic ejecta properties from light curves and spectra: correlations from radiative-transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Woosley, Stan; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Langer, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for a large grid of supernovae (SNe) IIb/Ib/Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Our sample covers ejecta masses Me of 1.7-5.2 M⊙, kinetic energies Ekin of 0.6-5.0 × 1051 erg, and 56Ni masses of 0.05-0.30 M⊙. We find a strong correlation between the 56Ni mass and the photometric properties at maximum, and between the rise time to bolometric maximum and the post-maximum decline rate. We confirm the small scatter in (V - R) at 10 d past R-band maximum. The quantity V_m ≡ √{2E_kin/M_e} is comparable to the Doppler velocity measured from He I 5875 Å at maximum in SNe IIb/Ib, although some scatter arises from the uncertain level of chemical mixing. The O I 7772 Å line may be used for SNe Ic, but the correspondence deteriorates with higher ejecta mass/energy. We identify a temporal reversal of the Doppler velocity at maximum absorption in the ˜1.05 μm feature in all models. The reversal is due to He I alone and could serve as a test for the presence of helium in SNe Ic. Because of variations in composition and ionization, the ejecta opacity shows substantial variations with both velocity and time. This is in part the origin of the offset between our model light curves and the predictions from the Arnett model.

  15. Blue supergiant model for ultra-long gamma-ray burst with superluminous-supernova-like bump

    SciTech Connect

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Suwa, Yudai

    2013-11-20

    Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) have a typical duration of ∼30 s, and some of them are associated with hypernovae, such as Type Ic SN 1998bw. Wolf-Rayet stars are the most plausible LGRB progenitors, since the free fall time of the envelope is consistent with the duration, and the natural outcome of the progenitor is a Type Ic SN. While a new population of ultra-long GRBs (ULGRBs), GRB 111209A, GRB 101225A, and GRB 121027A, has a duration of ∼10{sup 4} s, two of them are accompanied by superluminous-supernova-like (SLSN-like) bumps, which are ≲ 10 times brighter than typical hypernovae. Wolf-Rayet progenitors cannot explain ULGRBs because of durations that are too long and SN-like bumps that are too bright. A blue supergiant (BSG) progenitor model, however, can explain the duration of ULGRBs. Moreover, SLSN-like bumps can be attributed to the so-called cocoon fireball photospheric emissions (CFPEs). Since a large cocoon is inevitably produced during the relativistic jet piercing though the BSG envelope, this component can be smoking gun evidence of the BSG model for ULGRBs. In this paper, we examine u-, g-, r-, i-, and J-band light curves of three ULGRBs and demonstrate that they can be fitted quite well by our BSG model with the appropriate choices of the jet opening angle and the number density of the ambient gas. In addition, we predict that for 121027A, SLSN-like bump could have been observed for ∼20-80 days after the burst. We also propose that some SLSNe might be CFPEs of off-axis ULGRBs without visible prompt emissions.

  16. Radio studies of extragalactic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Weiler, K W; Sramek, R A; Panagia, N

    1986-03-14

    Some exploding stars (supernovae) are powerful emitters of centimeter radio radiation. Detailed observations have shown that these supernovae quickly become detectable in the radio range, first at shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) and later at progressively longer and longer wavelengths (lower frequencies). This part of the phenomenon appears to be well explained by a monotonic decrease in the amount of ionized material surrounding the radio-emitting regions as the shock from the explosion travels outward. The radio emission itself is of a nonthermal, synchrotron origin, as is the case in most bright cosmic radio sources. Once the absorption effects become negligible, the radio intensity declines with time until reaching the detection limit of the telescope. Models suggest that the absorbing material originates in a dense wind of matter lost by the supernova progenitor star, or by its companion if it is in a binary system, in the last stages of evolution before the explosion. The synchrotron radio emission can be generated either externally by the shock wave from the explosion propagating through this same high density stellar wind or internally by a rapidly rotating neutron star, which is the collapsed core of the exploded star. Present results appear to favor the former model for at least the first several years after the supernova explosion, although the latter model remains viable.

  17. Probing post-bounce supernova density profile from neutrino signals

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.; Palmisano, V.

    2008-07-15

    Supernovae of Type II is a phenomenon that occurs at the end of the evolution of massive stars when the iron core of the star exceeds a mass limit. After the collapse of the core under gravity the shockwave alone does not succeed in expelling the mass of the star and in this sense the role of neutrinos is the most important mechanism to do so. During the emission of neutrinos flavor conversion is possible, related the phenomenon of oscillations, which however depends directly on the particular density profile of the medium. In this paper we present results of numerical simulations of neutrino flavor conversion in supernovae after bounce. The probabilities of survival for a given flavor in a complete three-flavors framework is estimated through an algorithm which conserves unitarity to a high degree of accuracy. The sensitivity of the results to the different adopted models for the supernova structure is examined in detail demonstrating how the neutrino signal could be used to check the validity of models.

  18. On Rapidly Rotating Magnetic Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J R; Mathews, G J; Dalhed, H E

    2004-12-20

    The authors have analyzed magnetic effects which may occur in rapidly rotating core collapse supernovae. They consider effects from both magnetic turbulence and the formation of magnetic bubbles. For magnetic turbulence they have made a perturbative analysis for the spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model that incorporates the build up of magnetic field energy in the matter accreting onto the proto-neutron star shortly after collapse and bounce. This significantly modifies the pressure profile and increases the heating of the material above the proto-neutron star resulting in an explosion even in rotating stars which would not explode otherwise. Regarding magnetic bubbles it is shown that a model with an initial uniform magnetic field ({approx} 10{sup 8}) gauss and uniform angular velocity of ({approx} 0.1 rad sec{sup -1}) can form magnetic bubbles due to the very non homologous nature of the collapse. It is estimated that the buoyancy of the bubbles causes matter in the proto-neutron star to rise, carrying neutrino-rich material to the neutron-star surface. This increases the neutrino luminosity sufficiently at early times to achieve a successful neutrino-driven explosion. Both magnetic mechanisms thus provide new means for initiating a Type II core-collapse supernova.

  19. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  20. Models for the evolution of close binaries with He-star and white dwarf components towards Type Ia supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neunteufel, P.; Yoon, S.-C.; Langer, N.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been an important tool for astronomy for quite some time; however, the nature of their progenitors remains somewhat mysterious. Recent theoretical studies indicated the possibility of producing thermonuclear detonations of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs (CO WDs) at masses less than the Chandrasekhar mass through accretion of helium-rich matter, which would, depending on mass accretion rate, mass, and initial temperature of the WD, spectrally resemble either a normal SN Ia or a peculiar one. Aims: This study aims to further resolve the state of binary systems comprised of a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass CO WD and a helium star at the point where an accretion-induced detonation occurs and constrains the part of the initial parameter space where this kind of phenomenon is possible. Methods: Preexisting data obtained through simulations of single, constantly accreting CO WDs is used as an indicator for the behavior of new binary models in which the WD is treated as a point mass and which include the non-degenerate partner as a fully resolved stellar model. We parameterize the ignition of the accumulated helium layer, changes in the WD temperature, and changes in the CO core mass depending on the mass transfer rate. Results: The initial conditions allowing for detonation do not form a single contiguous area in the parameter space, whose shape is profoundly influenced by the behavior of the donor star. Mass loss due to Nova outbursts acts in favor of detonation. According to our criteria, about 10% of the detonations in this study can be expected to show spectra consistent with ordinary SNe Ia; the rest exhibit peculiar features.

  1. Energetic Supernovae from the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2013-04-01

    We present the results from our 3D supernova simulations by using CASTRO, a new radiation-hydrodynamics code. The first generation of stars in the universe ended the cosmic dark age by shining the first light. But what was the fate of these stars? Based on the stellar evolution models, the fate of stars depends on their masses. Modern cosmological simulations suggest that the first stars could be very massive, with a typical mass scale over 50 solar masses. We look for the possible supernovae from the death of the first stars with masses over 50 solar masses. Besides the iron-core collapse supernovae, we find energetic thermonuclear supernovae, including two types of pair-instability supernovae and one type of general-relativity instability supernovae. Our models capture all explosive burning and follow the explosion until the shock breaks out from the stellar surface. We will discuss the energetics, nucleosynthesis, and possible observational signatures for these primordial supernovae that will be the prime targets for future large telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

  2. SPECTROSCOPY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE BY THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Folatelli, Gaston; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hsiao, Eric; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Castellon, Sergio; Roth, Miguel; Hamuy, Mario; Anderson, Joseph P.; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Burns, Christopher R.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Murphy, David; Persson, S. E.; Prieto, Jose L.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Krisciunas, Kevin; and others

    2013-08-10

    This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature, we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely, SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2 (Si II 4130) and pW6 (Si II 5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of Almost-Equal-To 0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a Almost-Equal-To 2{sigma}-3{sigma} correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.

  3. HELIUM-IGNITED VIOLENT MERGERS AS A UNIFIED MODEL FOR NORMAL AND RAPIDLY DECLINING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pakmor, R.; Springel, V.; Kromer, M.; Taubenberger, S.

    2013-06-10

    The progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are still unknown, despite significant progress during the past several years in theory and observations. Violent mergers of two carbon-oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs) are a candidate scenario suggested to be responsible for at least a significant fraction of normal SNe Ia. Here, we simulate the merger of two CO WDs using a moving-mesh code that allows for the inclusion of thin helium (He) shells (0.01 M{sub Sun }) on top of the WDs at an unprecedented numerical resolution. The accretion of He onto the primary WD leads to the formation of a detonation in its He shell. This detonation propagates around the CO WD and sends a converging shock wave into its core, known to robustly trigger a second detonation, as in the well-known double-detonation scenario for He-accreting CO WDs. However, in contrast to that scenario where a massive He shell is required to form a detonation through thermal instability, here the He detonation is ignited dynamically. Accordingly the required He-shell mass is significantly smaller, and hence its burning products are unlikely to affect the optical display of the explosion. We show that this scenario, which works for CO primary WDs with CO- as well as He-WD companions, has the potential to explain the different brightness distributions, delay times, and relative rates of normal and fast declining SNe Ia. Finally, we discuss extensions to our unified merger model needed to obtain a comprehensive picture of the full observed diversity of SNe Ia.

  4. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  5. What do the remnants of superluminous supernovae look like?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloudas, G.

    2016-06-01

    The remnants of core-collapse supernovae often present significant asymmetries while those of thermonuclear supernovae are, more or less, spherically symmetric. As superluminous supernovae (SLSN) do not occur in Milky Way-type galaxies (they prefer metal-poor starburst dwarfs), our chances of studying directly a SLSN remnant are very limited, except perhaps in the Magellanic clouds. Therefore, the only way of probing the SLSN geometry, and thus identifying potential SLSN remnant candidates, is through polarimetry of the explosions themselves. I will present the first polarimetric observations of SLSNe obtained through a dedicated ToO program at the VLT. LSQ14mo is a SLSN-I that showed only a very limited degree of polarisation (P = 0.52%), which corresponds to an upper limit of 10% in the photosphere asphericity. In addition, this signal can be entirely due to interstellar polarisation in the host galaxy. This is perhaps surprising as the leading models for H-poor SLSNe involve a magnetar or CSM interaction, i.e. configurations that are not expected to be spherically symmetric. Observations of a SLSN-II yielded a more significant degree of polarisation, while preliminary analysis for a SLSN-R reveals similarly low levels of asphericity as for LSQ14mo.

  6. NEW TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS BY THE NEUTRINO-HEATING MECHANISM: EVIDENCE FOR DIFFERENT INSTABILITY REGIMES IN COLLAPSING STELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Heger, Alexander E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-12-10

    The neutrino-driven explosion mechanism for core-collapse supernovae in its modern flavor relies on the additional support of hydrodynamical instabilities in achieving shock revival. Two possible candidates, convection and the so-called standing accretion shock instability (SASI), have been proposed for this role. In this paper, we discuss new successful simulations of supernova explosions that shed light on the relative importance of these two instabilities. While convection has so far been observed to grow first in self-consistent hydrodynamical models with multi-group neutrino transport, we here present the first such simulation in which the SASI grows faster while the development of convection is initially inhibited. We illustrate the features of this SASI-dominated regime using an explosion model of a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, which is contrasted with a convectively dominated model of an 8.1 M{sub Sun} progenitor with subsolar metallicity, whose early post-bounce behavior is more in line with previous 11.2 M{sub Sun} and 15 M{sub Sun} explosion models. We analyze the conditions discriminating between the two different regimes, showing that a high mass-accretion rate and a short advection timescale are conducive for strong SASI activity. We also briefly discuss some important factors for capturing the SASI-driven regime, such as general relativity, the progenitor structure, a nuclear equation of state leading to a compact proto-neutron star, and the neutrino treatment. Finally, we evaluate possible implications of our findings for two-dimensional and three-dimensional supernova simulations.

  7. Berkeley Supernova Ia Program - III. Spectra near maximum brightness improve the accuracy of derived distances to Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2012-09-01

    In this third paper in a series we compare spectral feature measurements to photometric properties of 108 low-redshift (z < 0.1, ≈ 0.023) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) for which we have optical spectra within 5 d of maximum brightness. The spectral data were obtained from 1989 to the end of 2008 as part of the Berkeley Supernova Ia Program (BSNIP) and are presented in BSNIP I by Silverman et al., and the photometric data come mainly from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search and are published by Ganeshalingam et al. The spectral measurements are presented and discussed in BSNIP II by Silverman, Kong & Filippenko, and the light-curve fits and photometric parameters can be found in Ganeshalingam et al. (in preparation). A variety of previously proposed correlations between spectral and photometric parameters are investigated using the large and self-consistent BSNIP data set. We find the pseudo-equivalent width (pEW) of the Si II λ4000 line to be a good indicator of light-curve width, and the pEWs of the Mg II and Fe II complexes are relatively good proxies for SN colour. We also employ a combination of light-curve parameters (specifically the Spectral Adaptive Light-curve Template 2 stretch and colour parameters x1 and c, respectively) and spectral measurements to calculate distance moduli. The residuals from these models are then compared to the standard model which uses only light-curve stretch and colour. Our investigations show that a distance model that uses x1, c and the velocity of the Si II λ6355 feature does not lead to a decrease in the Hubble residuals. We also find that distance models with flux ratios alone or in conjunction with light-curve information rarely perform better than the standard (x1, c) model. However, when adopting a distance model which combines the ratio of fluxes near ˜3750 and 4550 Å with both x1 and c, the Hubble residuals are decreased by ˜10 per cent, which is found to be significant at about the 2σ level. The weighted

  8. Time-Dependent Collective Neutrino Oscillations in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbar, Sajad; Duan, Huaiyu

    2015-10-01

    Neutrinos can experience self-induced flavor conversion in core-collapse supernovae due to neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. Previously a stationary supernova model, the so called ``neutrino bulb model,'' was used exclusively to study collective neutrino oscillations in the core-collapse supernova. We show that even a small time-dependent perturbation in neutrino fluxes on the surface of the proto-neutron star can lead to fast varying collective oscillations at large radii. This result calls for time-dependent supernova models for the study of collective neutrino oscillations. This work was supported by DOE EPSCoR Grant DE-SC0008142 at UNM.

  9. The Union3 Supernova Ia Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Bruce, Adam; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Dawson, Kyle S.; Deustua, Susana E.; Doi, Mamoru; Fakhouri, Hannah; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gibbons, Rachel A.; Goobar, Ariel; Hsiao, Eric; Huang, Xiaosheng; Ihara, Yutaka; Kim, Alex G.; Knop, Robert A.; Kowalski, Marek; Krechmer, Evan; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Meyers, Joshua; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Ripoche, Pascal; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Rykoff, Eli S.; Saunders, Clare; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Suzuki, Nao; Takanashi, Naohiro; Yasuda, Naoki; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift supernovae observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are crucial for constraining any time variation in dark energy. In a forthcoming paper (Rubin+, in prep), we will present a cosmological analysis incorporating existing supernovae with improved calibrations, and new HST-observed supernovae (six above z=1). We combine these data with current literature data, and fit them using SALT2-4 to create the Union3 Supernova compilation. We build on the Unified Inference for Type Ia cosmologY (UNITY) framework (Rubin+ 2015b), incorporating non-linear light-curve width and color relations, a model for unexplained dispersion, an outlier model, and a redshift-dependent host-mass correction.

  10. Physical processes in collapse driven supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Mayle, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    A model of the supernova explosion is discussed. The method of neutrino transport is discussed, since the explosive mechanism depends on neutrino heating of the material behind the accretion shock. The core region of these exploding stars becomes unstable to convective motions during the supernova evolution. Convective mixing allows more neutrinos to escape from under the neutrinosphere, and thus increases the amount of heating by neutrinos. An approximate method of incorporating convection is described, and some results of including convection in a computer model is presented. Another phenomena is seen in computer simulations of supernova, oscillations in the neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate onto the protoneutron star. The last topic discussed in this thesis describes the attempt to understand this oscillation by perturbation of the steady state solution to equations approximating the complex physical processes occurring in the late time supernova. 42 refs., 31 figs.

  11. Gravitational wave signatures of ab initio two-dimensional core collapse supernova explosion models for 12–25M⊙ stars

    DOE PAGES

    Yakunin, Konstantin N.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Marronetti, Pedro; Yoshida, Shin’ichirou; Bruenn, Stephen W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Bronson Messer, O. E.; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; et al

    2015-10-19

    Here, we present the gravitational waveforms computed in ab initio two-dimensional core collapse supernova models evolved with the chimera code for progenitor masses between 12 and 25 M. For all models employ multifrequency neutrino transport in the ray-by-ray approximation, state-of-the-art weak interaction physics, relativistic transport corrections such as the gravitational redshift of neutrinos, two-dimensional hydrodynamics with the commensurate relativistic corrections, Newtonian self-gravity with a general-relativistic monopole correction, and the Lattimer-Swesty equation of state with 220 MeV compressibility, and begin with the most recent Woosley-Heger nonrotating progenitors in this mass range. All of our models exhibit robust explosions. Moreover, our waveformsmore » capture all stages of supernova development: 1) a relatively short and weak prompt signal, 2) a quiescent stage, 3) a strong signal due to convection and standing accretion shock instability activity, 4) termination of active accretion onto the proto-neutron star, and 5) a slowly increasing tail that reaches a saturation value. Fourier decomposition shows that the gravitational wave signals we predict should be observable by AdvLIGO for Galactic events across the range of progenitors considered here. The fundamental limitation of these models is in their imposition of axisymmetry. Further progress will require counterpart three-dimensional models, which are underway.« less

  12. Mapping the Kinematic Structure of Radioactive Ejecta in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardy, Christopher L.; Parrent, Jerod; Fesen, Robert A.; Hoflich, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Late-time (t ~ 300 d) observation of near-infrared (NIR) [Fe II] lines has proven to be a very powerful tool for probing the physics of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosions. The few available examples have revealed that at least some SNe Ia exhibit a layered ejecta structure which persists down to the innermost regions of the SN envelope, in contradiction to all of the currently popular models of SNe Ia which predict that the innermost regions (at least) should exhibit large-scale turbulent mixing. Thus a key piece of physics is missing from our understanding of these events. NIR spectroscopy of Type Ia supernovae at these epochs tests the limits of 8 m class telescopes for even the brightest SNe Ia, and so these phenomena remain poorly observed. However, it may be possible to use the strong [Fe II] emission line at 7155 Ato similar effect. Unfortunately this line is usually partly blended with [Ca II] emission which complicates the extraction of the true [Fe II] line profile. We propose to use concurrent NIR and optical spectra of two recent nearby Type Ia supernovae, both to increase the still anemic data set of late- time SN Ia spectra, and to act as a pilot study to test whether the dramatic success obtained at great effort in the NIR can be reproduced much more cheaply through optical spectroscopy.

  13. Model of the Expansion of H II Region RCW 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnobaev, K. V.; Tagirova, R. R.; Kotova, G. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    This paper aims to resolve the problem of formation of young objects observed in the RCW 82 H II region. In the framework of a classical trigger model the estimated time of fragmentation is larger than the estimated age of the H II region. Thus the young objects could not have formed during the dynamical evolution of the H II region. We propose a new model that helps resolve this problem. This model suggests that the H II region RCW 82 is embedded in a cloud of limited size that is denser than the surrounding interstellar medium. According to this model, when the ionization-shock front leaves the cloud it causes the formation of an accelerating dense gas shell. In the accelerated shell, the effects of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability dominate and the characteristic time of the growth of perturbations with the observed magnitude of about 3 pc is 0.14 Myr, which is less than the estimated age of the H II region. The total time t ∑, which is the sum of the expansion time of the H II region to the edge of the cloud, the time of the R-T instability growth, and the free fall time, is estimated as 0.44 < t ∑ < 0.78 Myr. We conclude that the young objects in the H II region RCW 82 could be formed as a result of the R-T instability with subsequent fragmentation into large-scale condensations.

  14. Modeling the Arm II core in MicroCap IV

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, A.C.

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports on how an electrical model for the core of the Arm II machine was created and how to use this model. We wanted to get a model for the electrical characteristics of the ARM II core, in order to simulate this machine and to assist in the design of a future machine. We wanted this model to be able to simulate saturation, variable loss, and reset. Using the Hodgdon model and the circuit analysis program MicroCap IV, this was accomplished. This paper is written in such a way as to allow someone not familiar with the project to understand it.

  15. Shell Model Analysis of the ^45V(p,γ) thermonuclear reaction rate relevant to ^44Ti production in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, M.; Jora, R.; Zelevinsky, V.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Boyd, R. N.

    2001-10-01

    A reliable estimate of the ^45V(p,γ) reaction rate is necessary in order to reduce a large uncertainty in the production of ^44Ti in core collapse supernovae. We performed a theoretical analysis of the astrophysical factors and reaction rates including resonances in ^46Cr associated with the analog states in ^46Ti. Full fp shell model calculations are performed to predict positive parity states in ^46Ti situated in the Gamow window, which have a significant proton spectroscopic factor. The uncertainty of the reaction rate associated with electric dipole gamma decays to the negative parity low-lying states is also discussed.

  16. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  17. An ''archaeological'' quest for galactic supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Volpe, Cristina E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu

    2009-04-15

    We explore the possibility to observe the effects of electron neutrinos from past galactic supernovae, through a geochemical measurement of the amount of Technetium 97 produced by neutrino-induced reactions in a Molybdenum ore. The calculations we present take into account the recent advances in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, of neutrino oscillations inside a supernova, of the solar neutrino flux at Earth and of possible failed supernovae. The predicted Technetium 97 abundance is of the order of 10{sup 7} atoms per 10 kilotons of ore, which is close to the current geochemical experimental sensitivity. Of this, {approx} 10-20% is from supernovae. Considering the comparable size of uncertainties, more precision in the modeling of neutrino fluxes as well as of neutrino cross sections is required for a meaningful measurement.

  18. SN 1054: A pulsar-powered supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei; Huang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The famous ancient supernova SN 1054 could have been too bright to be explained in the “standard” radioactive-powered supernova scenario. As an alternative attempt, we demonstrate that the spin-down of the newly born Crab pulsar could provide a sufficient energy supply to make SN 1054 visible at daytime for 23 days and at night for 653 days, where a one-zone semi-analytical model is employed. Our results indicate that SN 1054 could be a “normal” cousin of magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. Therefore, SN 1054-like supernovae could be a probe to uncover the properties of newly born neutron stars, which provide initial conditions for studies on neutron star evolutions.

  19. Supernova relic neutrinos and the supernova rate problem: Analysis of uncertainties and detectability of ONeMg and failed supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Grant J.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Jyutaro

    2014-08-01

    Direct measurements of the core collapse supernova rate (R{sub SN}) in the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 1 appear to be about a factor of two smaller than the rate inferred from the measured cosmic massive star formation rate (SFR). This discrepancy would imply that about one-half of the massive stars that have been born in the local observed comoving volume did not explode as luminous supernovae. In this work, we explore the possibility that one could clarify the source of this 'supernova rate problem' by detecting the energy spectrum of supernova relic neutrinos with a next generation 10{sup 6} ton water Čerenkov detector like Hyper-Kamiokande. First, we re-examine the supernova rate problem. We make a conservative alternative compilation of the measured SFR data over the redshift range 0 ≤z ≤ 7. We show that by only including published SFR data for which the dust obscuration has been directly determined, the ratio of the observed massive SFR to the observed supernova rate R{sub SN} has large uncertainties ∼1.8{sub −0.6}{sup +1.6} and is statistically consistent with no supernova rate problem. If we further consider that a significant fraction of massive stars will end their lives as faint ONeMg SNe or as failed SNe leading to a black hole remnant, then the ratio reduces to ∼1.1{sub −0.4}{sup +1.0} and the rate problem is essentially solved. We next examine the prospects for detecting this solution to the supernova rate problem. We first study the sources of uncertainty involved in the theoretical estimates of the neutrino detection rate and analyze whether the spectrum of relic neutrinos can be used to independently identify the existence of a supernova rate problem and its source. We consider an ensemble of published and unpublished core collapse supernova simulation models to estimate the uncertainties in the anticipated neutrino luminosities and temperatures. We illustrate how the spectrum of detector events might be used to establish the average

  20. Designing of Multi-Interface Diverging Experiments to Model Rayleigh-Taylor Growth in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Plewa, T.; Hearn, N.; Meakin, C.; Arnett, D.; Miles, A.; Robey, H.; Hansen, J.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M.

    2008-05-01

    In previous experiments on the Omega Laser, researchers studying blast-wave-driven instabilities have observed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities under conditions scaled to the He/H interface of SN1987A. Most of these experiments have been planar experiments, as the energy available proved unable to accelerate enough mass in a diverging geometry. With the advent of the NIF laser, which can deliver hundreds of kJ to an experiment, it is possible to produce 3D, blast-wave-driven, multiple-interface explosions and to study the mixing that develops. We report scaling simulations to model the interface dynamics of a multilayered, diverging Rayleigh-Taylor experiment for NIF using CALE, a hybrid adaptive Lagrangian-Eulerian code developed at LLNL. Specifically, we looked both qualitatively and quantitatively at the Rayleigh-Taylor growth and multi-interface interactions in mass-scaled, spherically divergent systems using different materials. The simulations will assist in the target design process and help choose diagnostics to maximize the information we receive in a particular shot. Simulations are critical for experimental planning, especially for experiments on large-scale facilities. *This research was sponsored by LLNL through contract LLNL B56128 and by the NNSA through DOE Research Grant DE-FG52-04NA00064.

  1. Weak-interaction processes in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Langanke, K.

    2015-02-24

    Weak interaction processes play an important role for the dynamics of a core-collapse supernova. Due to progress of nuclear modeling and constrained by data it has been possible to improve the rates of these processes for supernova conditions decisively. This manuscript describes the recent advances and the current status in deriving electron capture rates on nuclei and of inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering for applications in supernova simulations and briefly discusses their impact on such studies.

  2. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  3. The distant type Ia supernova rate

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R.S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S.E.; Fruchter, A.S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Irwin, M.J.; Kim, A.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Knop, R.A.; Lee, J.C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.A.

    2002-05-20

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample,which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  4. The Distant Type Ia Supernova Rate

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R. S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S. E.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Kim, A. G.; Kim, M. Y.; Knop, R. A.; Lee, J. C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N. A.

    2002-05-28

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample, which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  5. SULFUR MOLECULE CHEMISTRY IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA RECORDED BY SILICON CARBIDE STARDUST

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Peter; Fujiya, Wataru; Zinner, Ernst E-mail: fujiya@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-02-15

    We studied about 3400 presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains from the Murchison CM2 meteorite for C- and Si-isotopic compositions. Among these grains we identified 7 unusual or type C SiC (U/C) grains, characterized by isotopically heavy Si, and 36 supernova type X SiC grains, characterized by isotopically light Si. Selected U/C and X grains were also measured for S-, Mg-Al-, and Ca-Ti-isotopic compositions. We show that the U/C grains incorporated radioactive {sup 44}Ti, which is evidence that they formed in the ejecta of Type II supernova (SNII) explosions. Abundances of radioactive {sup 26}Al and {sup 44}Ti are compatible with those observed in X grains. U/C and X grains carry light S with enrichments in {sup 32}S of up to a factor of 2.7. The combination of heavy Si and light S observed in U/C grains is not consistent with abundance predictions of simple supernova models. The isotope data suggest preferential trapping of S from the innermost supernova zones, the production site of radioactive {sup 44}Ti, by the growing silicon carbide particles. A way to achieve this is by sulfur molecule chemistry in the still unmixed ejecta. This confirms model predictions of molecule formation in SNII ejecta and shows that sulfur molecule chemistry operates in the harsh and hot environments of stellar explosions.

  6. Sulfur Molecule Chemistry in Supernova Ejecta Recorded by Silicon Carbide Stardust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Peter; Fujiya, Wataru; Zinner, Ernst

    2012-02-01

    We studied about 3400 presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains from the Murchison CM2 meteorite for C- and Si-isotopic compositions. Among these grains we identified 7 unusual or type C SiC (U/C) grains, characterized by isotopically heavy Si, and 36 supernova type X SiC grains, characterized by isotopically light Si. Selected U/C and X grains were also measured for S-, Mg-Al-, and Ca-Ti-isotopic compositions. We show that the U/C grains incorporated radioactive 44Ti, which is evidence that they formed in the ejecta of Type II supernova (SNII) explosions. Abundances of radioactive 26Al and 44Ti are compatible with those observed in X grains. U/C and X grains carry light S with enrichments in 32S of up to a factor of 2.7. The combination of heavy Si and light S observed in U/C grains is not consistent with abundance predictions of simple supernova models. The isotope data suggest preferential trapping of S from the innermost supernova zones, the production site of radioactive 44Ti, by the growing silicon carbide particles. A way to achieve this is by sulfur molecule chemistry in the still unmixed ejecta. This confirms model predictions of molecule formation in SNII ejecta and shows that sulfur molecule chemistry operates in the harsh and hot environments of stellar explosions.

  7. Type IIP supernova progenitor properties from Pan-STARRS1 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nathan; Soderberg, A. M.; Pan-STARRS1 CfA Supernova Group

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a comprehensive and uniform analysis of the light curves of more than 100 spectroscopically-confirmed Type II supernovae discovered by the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. Our sample is drawn from more than 4 years of multi-band optical/NIR (grizy) imaging from the PS1 Medium-Deep Survey (MDS). We have developed and applied a Bayesian methodology for modeling the supernova light curves. This framework robustly models available data and produces constraints on the full, multiwavelength evolution of each object in the sample, even when observations are sparse or coverage is limited. We focus on the most common class of massive star explosion, Type IIP supernovae, with a typical redshift of z = 0.1 in our sample. Utilizing the deep imaging, high cadence (1-2 day), and long survey duration of the PS1 MDS, we test for variation in the rise time behavior, plateau duration, and temperature evolution of the supernovae. We discuss inferences on the distribution of progenitor star and explosion properties (mass, radius, and energy) permitted by these measurements, and their implications for our understanding of the death processes of massive stars in the local universe.

  8. STELLAR BINARY COMPANIONS TO SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2009-12-20

    For typical models of binary statistics, 50%-80% of core-collapse supernova (ccSN) progenitors are members of a stellar binary at the time of the explosion. Independent of any consequences of mass transfer, this has observational consequences that can be used to study the binary properties of massive stars. In particular, the secondary companion to the progenitor of a Type Ib/c SN is frequently (approx50%) the more optically luminous star since the high effective temperatures of the stripped progenitors make it relatively easy for a lower luminosity, cooler secondary to emit more optical light. Secondaries to the lower mass progenitors of Type II SN will frequently produce excess blue emission relative to the spectral energy distribution of the red primary. Available data constrain the models weakly. Any detected secondaries also provide an independent lower bound on the progenitor mass and, for historical SN, show that it was not a Type Ia event. Bright ccSN secondaries have an unambiguous, post-explosion observational signature-strong, blueshifted, relatively broad absorption lines created by the developing SN remnant (SNR). These can be used to locate historical SN with bright secondaries, confirm that a source is a secondary, and, potentially, measure abundances of ccSN ejecta. Luminous, hot secondaries will re-ionize the SNR on timescales of 100-1000 yr that are faster than re-ionization by the reverse shock, creating peculiar H II regions due to the high metallicity and velocities of the ejecta.

  9. Progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody

    Type Ia supernovae are important, but mysterious cosmological tools. Their standard brightnesses have enabled cosmologists to measure extreme distances and to discover dark energy. However, the nature of their progenitor mechanisms remains elusive, with many competing models offering only partial clues to their origins. Here, type Ia supernova delay times are explored using analytical models. Combined with a new observation technique, this model places new constraints on the characteristic time delay between the formation of stars and the first type Ia supernovae. This derived delay time (500 million years) implies low-mass companions for single degenerate progenitor scenarios. In the latter portions of this dissertation, two progenitor mechanisms are simulated in detail; white dwarf collisions and mergers. From the first of these simulations, it is evident that white dwarf collisions offer a viable and unique pathway to producing type Ia supernovae. Many of the combinations of masses simulated produce sufficient quantities of 56 Ni (up to 0.51 solar masses) to masquerade as normal type Ia supernovae. Other combinations of masses produce 56 Ni yields that span the entire range of supernova brightnesses, from the very dim and underluminous, with 0.14 solar masses, to the over-bright and superluminous, with up to 1.71 solar masses. The 56 Ni yield in the collision simulations depends non-linearly on total system mass, mass ratio, and impact parameter. Using the same numerical tools as in the collisions examination, white dwarf mergers are studied in detail. Nearly all of the simulations produce merger remnants consisting of a cold, degenerate core surrounded by a hot accretion disk. The properties of these disks have strong implications for various viscosity treatments that have attempted to pin down the accretion times. Some mass combinations produce super-Chandrasekhar cores on shorter time scales than viscosity driven accretion. A handful of simulations also

  10. Supernova Remnants in the Magellanic Clouds. VI. The DEM L316 Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. M.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2005-12-01

    The DEM L316 system contains two shells, both with the characteristic signatures of supernova remnants (SNRs). We analyze Chandra and XMM-Newton data for DEM L316, investigating its spatial and spectral X-ray features. Our Chandra observations resolve the structure of the northeastern SNR (shell A) as a bright inner ring and a set of ``arcs'' surrounded by fainter diffuse emission. The spectrum is well fit by a thermal plasma model with a temperature of ~1.4 keV; we do not find significant spectral differences for different regions of this SNR. The southwestern SNR (shell B) exhibits an irregular X-ray outline, with a brighter interior ring of emission including a bright knot of emission. Overall, the emission of the SNR is well described by a thermal plasma of temperature ~0.6 keV. The bright knot, however, is spectrally distinct from the rest of the SNR, requiring the addition of a high-energy spectral component consistent with a power-law spectrum of photon index 1.6-1.8. We confirm the findings of Nishiuchi and coworkers that the spectra of these shells are notably different, with shell A requiring a high iron abundance for a good spectral fit, implying a Type Ia origin. We further explicitly compare abundance ratios to model predictions for Type Ia and Type II supernovae. The low ratios for shell A (O/Fe of 1.5 and Ne/Fe of 0.2) and the high ratios for shell B (O/Fe of 30-130 and Ne/Fe of 8-16) are consistent with Type Ia and Type II origins, respectively. The difference between the SNR progenitor types casts some doubt on the suggestion that these SNRs are interacting with one another.

  11. Two Superluminous Supernovae from the Early Universe Discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D. A.; Kasen, D.; Lidman, C.; Sullivan, M.; Conley, A.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Carlberg, R. G.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hardin, D.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2013-12-01

    We present spectra and light curves of SNLS 06D4eu and SNLS 07D2bv, two hydrogen-free superluminous supernovae (SNe) discovered by the Supernova Legacy Survey. At z = 1.588, SNLS 06D4eu is the highest redshift superluminous SN with a spectrum, at MU = -22.7 it is one of the most luminous SNe ever observed, and it gives a rare glimpse into the rest-frame ultraviolet where these SNe put out their peak energy. SNLS 07D2bv does not have a host galaxy redshift, but on the basis of the SN spectrum, we estimate it to be at z ~ 1.5. Both SNe have similar observer-frame griz light curves, which map to rest-frame light curves in the U band and UV, rising in ~20 rest-frame days or longer and declining over a similar timescale. The light curves peak in the shortest wavelengths first, consistent with an expanding blackbody starting near 15,000 K and steadily declining in temperature. We compare the spectra with theoretical models, and we identify lines of C II, C III, Fe III, and Mg II in the spectra of SNLS 06D4eu and SCP 06F6 and find that they are consistent with an expanding explosion of only a few solar masses of carbon, oxygen, and other trace metals. Thus, the progenitors appear to be related to those suspected for SNe Ic. A high kinetic energy, 1052 erg, is also favored. Normal mechanisms of powering core-collapse or thermonuclear SNe do not seem to work for these SNe. We consider models powered by 56Ni decay and interaction with circumstellar material, but we find that the creation and spin-down of a magnetar with a period of 2 ms, a magnetic field of 2 × 1014 G, and a 3 M ⊙ progenitor provides the best fit to the data.

  12. News and Views: Herschel reveals a new swan in Cygnus-X; Two models of Type 1a supernovae are both right; Milky Way companions throw doubt on dark matter; Lightning can map volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-06-01

    It appears that both models for the formation of Type 1a supernovae are correct, in different cases. The significance of these supernovae in measurements of cosmic distances and the acceleration of the expansion of the universe mean that the distinction is significant. Careful mapping of the arrangement of galaxies around the Milky Way has revealed that they lie in a plane at right angles to the galactic disc. The results pose a challenge to models of dark matter distribution and galactic structure. An electromagnetic resonance established by lightning could be used to map volatile molecules on other planets, thanks to their effects on the electrical conductivity of planetary atmospheres.

  13. Rapidly Rising Transients in the Supernova—Superluminous Supernova Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Wolf, William M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Bildsten, Lars; Leloudas, Giorgos; Hardin, Delphine; Prajs, Szymon; Perley, Daniel A.; Svirski, Gilad; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Katz, Boaz; McCully, Curtis; Cenko, S. Bradley; Lidman, Chris; Sullivan, Mark; Valenti, Stefano; Astier, Pierre; Balland, Cristophe; Carlberg, Ray G.; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Pain, Reynald; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J.; Regnault, Nicolas; Rich, James; Ruhlmann-Kleider, Vanina

    2016-03-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (trise ≈ 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (Mpeak ≈ -20)—one discovered and followed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as an SN II due to broad Hα emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity Hα (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si ii (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a “Type 1.5 SN” scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.

  14. High Rate for Type IC Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; Marvin-Newberg, H.J.; Pennypacker, Carl R.; Perlmutter, S.; Sasseen, T.P.; Smith, C.K.

    1991-09-01

    Using an automated telescope we have detected 20 supernovae in carefully documented observations of nearby galaxies. The supernova rates for late spiral (Sbc, Sc, Scd, and Sd) galaxies, normalized to a blue luminosity of 10{sup 10} L{sub Bsun}, are 0.4 h{sup 2}, 1.6 h{sup 2}, and 1.1 h{sup 2} per 100 years for SNe type la, Ic, and II. The rate for type Ic supernovae is significantly higher than found in previous surveys. The rates are not corrected for detection inefficiencies, and do not take into account the indications that the Ic supernovae are fainter on the average than the previous estimates; therefore the true rates are probably higher. The rates are not strongly dependent on the galaxy inclination, in contradiction to previous compilations. If the Milky Way is a late spiral, then the rate of Galactic supernovae is greater than 1 per 30 {+-} 7 years, assuming h = 0.75. This high rate has encouraging consequences for future neutrino and gravitational wave observatories.

  15. Early and late time VLT spectroscopy of SN 2001el - progenitor constraints for a type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattila, S.; Lundqvist, P.; Sollerman, J.; Kozma, C.; Baron, E.; Fransson, C.; Leibundgut, B.; Nomoto, K.

    2005-11-01

    We present early time high-resolution (VLT/UVES) and late time low-resolution (VLT/FORS) optical spectra of the normal type Ia supernova, SN 2001el. The high-resolution spectra were obtained 9 and 2 days before (B-band) maximum light. This was in order to allow the detection of narrow hydrogen and/or helium emission lines from the circumstellar medium of the supernova. No such lines were detected in our data. We therefore use these spectra together with photoionisation models to derive upper limits of 9×10-6 {M}_⊙ yr-1 and 5×10-5 {M}_⊙ yr-1 for the mass loss rate from the progenitor system of SN 2001el assuming velocities of 10 km s-1 and 50 km s-1, respectively, for a wind extending to outside at least a few × 1015 cm away from the supernova explosion site. So far, these are the best Hα based upper limits obtained for a type Ia supernova, and exclude a symbiotic star in the upper mass loss rate regime (so called Mira type stars) from being the progenitor of SN 2001el. The low-resolution spectrum was obtained in the nebular phase of the supernova, 400 days after the maximum light, to search for any hydrogen rich gas originating from the supernova progenitor system. However, we see no signs of Balmer lines in our spectrum. Therefore, we model the late time spectra to derive an upper limit of 0.03 M⊙ for solar abundance material present at velocities lower than 1000 km s-1 within the supernova explosion site. According to numerical simulations of Marietta et al. (2000) this is less than the expected mass lost by a subgiant, red giant or a main-sequence secondary star at a small binary separation as a result of the SN explosion. Our data therefore exclude these scenarios as the progenitor of SN 2001el. Finally, we discuss the origin of high velocity Ca II lines previously observed in a few type Ia supernovae before the maximum light. We see both the Ca II IR triplet and the H&K lines in our earliest (-9 days) spectrum at a very high velocity of up to 34 000

  16. ON THE INJECTION OF SHORT-LIVED RADIONUCLIDES FROM A SUPERNOVA INTO THE SOLAR NEBULA: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE OXYGEN ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ming-Chang

    2014-02-01

    Injection of short-lived radionuclides from a nearby core-collapse Type II supernova into the already-formed solar protoplanetary disk was proposed to account for the former presence of {sup 26}Al, {sup 41}Ca, and {sup 60}Fe in the early solar system inferred from isotopic analysis of meteoritic samples. One potential corollary of this ''late-injection'' scenario is that the disk's initial (pre-injection) oxygen isotopic composition could be significantly altered, as supernova material that carried the short-lived radionuclides would also deliver oxygen components synthesized in that given star. Therefore, the change in the oxygen isotopic composition of the disk caused by injection could in principle be used to constrain the supernova injection models. Previous studies showed that although supernova oxygen could result in a wide range of shifts in {sup 17}O/{sup 16}O and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O of the disk, a couple of cases existed where the calculated oxygen changes in the disk would be compatible with the meteoritic and solar wind data. Recently, the initial abundances of {sup 41}Ca and {sup 60}Fe in the solar system were revised to lower values, and the feasibility of supernova injection as a source for the three radionuclides was called into question. In this study, supernova parameters needed for matching {sup 26}Al, {sup 41}Ca, and {sup 60}Fe to their early solar system abundances were reinvestigated and then were used to infer the pre-injection O-isotope composition of the disk. The result suggested that a supernova undergoing mixing fallback might be a viable source for the three radionuclides.

  17. On the Injection of Short-lived Radionuclides from a Supernova into the Solar Nebula: Constraints from the Oxygen Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming-Chang

    2014-02-01

    Injection of short-lived radionuclides from a nearby core-collapse Type II supernova into the already-formed solar protoplanetary disk was proposed to account for the former presence of 26Al, 41Ca, and 60Fe in the early solar system inferred from isotopic analysis of meteoritic samples. One potential corollary of this "late-injection" scenario is that the disk's initial (pre-injection) oxygen isotopic composition could be significantly altered, as supernova material that carried the short-lived radionuclides would also deliver oxygen components synthesized in that given star. Therefore, the change in the oxygen isotopic composition of the disk caused by injection could in principle be used to constrain the supernova injection models. Previous studies showed that although supernova oxygen could result in a wide range of shifts in 17O/16O and 18O/16O of the disk, a couple of cases existed where the calculated oxygen changes in the disk would be compatible with the meteoritic and solar wind data. Recently, the initial abundances of 41Ca and 60Fe in the solar system were revised to lower values, and the feasibility of supernova injection as a source for the three radionuclides was called into question. In this study, supernova parameters needed for matching 26Al, 41Ca, and 60Fe to their early solar system abundances were reinvestigated and then were used to infer the pre-injection O-isotope composition of the disk. The result suggested that a supernova undergoing mixing fallback might be a viable source for the three radionuclides.

  18. On The Modeling of Educational Systems: II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Robert T.

    1975-01-01

    A unified approach to model building is developed from the separate techniques of regression, simulation, and factorial design. The methodology is applied in the context of a suburban school district. (Author/LS)

  19. Nyala and Bushbuck II: A Harvesting Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Greeff, Johanna C.

    1999-01-01

    Adds a cropping or harvesting term to the animal overpopulation model developed in Part I of this article. Investigates various harvesting strategies that might suggest a solution to the overpopulation problem without actually culling any animals. (ASK)

  20. Predictive Models and Computational Toxicology (II IBAMTOX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ‘virtual embryo’ project is building an integrative systems biology framework for predictive models of developmental toxicity. One schema involves a knowledge-driven adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework utilizing information from public databases, standardized ontologies...

  1. Are 44Ti-producing supernovae exceptional?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The, L.-S.; Clayton, D. D.; Diehl, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Iyudin, A. F.; Leising, M. D.; Meyer, B. S.; Motizuki, Y.; Schönfelder, V.

    2006-05-01

    According to standard models supernovae produce radioactive 44Ti, which should be visible in gamma-rays following decay to 44Ca for a few centuries. 44Ti production is believed to be the source of cosmic 44Ca, whose abundance is well established. Yet, gamma-ray telescopes have not seen the expected young remnants of core collapse events. The 44Ti mean life of τ ≃ 89 y and the Galactic supernova rate of ≃3/100 y imply ≃several detectable 44Ti gamma-ray sources, but only one is clearly seen, the 340-year-old Cas A SNR. Furthermore, supernovae which produce much 44Ti are expected to occur primarily in the inner part of the Galaxy, where young massive stars are most abundant. Because the Galaxy is transparent to gamma-rays, this should be the dominant location of expected gamma-ray sources. Yet the Cas A SNR as the only one source is located far from the inner Galaxy (at longitude 112°). We evaluate the surprising absence of detectable supernovae from the past three centuries. We discuss whether our understanding of SN explosions, their 44Ti yields, their spatial distributions, and statistical arguments can be stretched so that this apparent disagreement may be accommodated within reasonable expectations, or if we have to revise some or all of the above aspects to bring expectations in agreement with the observations. We conclude that either core collapse supernovae have been improbably rare in the Galaxy during the past few centuries, or 44Ti-producing supernovae are atypical supernovae. We also present a new argument based on 44Ca/40Ca ratios in mainstream SiC stardust grains that may cast doubt on massive-He-cap type I supernovae as the source of most galactic 44Ca.

  2. HUBBLE PINPOINTS DISTANT SUPERNOVAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images pinpoint three distant supernovae, which exploded and died billions of years ago. Scientists are using these faraway light sources to estimate if the universe was expanding at a faster rate long ago and is now slowing down. Images of SN 1997cj are in the left hand column; SN 1997ce, in the middle; and SN 1997ck, on the right. All images were taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The top row of images are wider views of the supernovae. The supernovae were discovered in April 1997 in a ground-based survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Once the supernovae were discovered, the Hubble telescope was used to distinguish the supernovae from the light of their host galaxies. A series of Hubble telescope images were taken in May and June 1997 as the supernovae faded. Six Hubble telescope observations spanning five weeks were taken for each supernova. This time series enabled scientists to measure the brightness and create a light curve. Scientists then used the light curve to make an accurate estimate of the distances to the supernovae. Scientists combined the estimated distance with the measured velocity of the supernova's host galaxy to determine the expansion rate of the universe in the past (5 to 7 billion years ago) and compare it with the current rate. These supernovae belong to a class called Type Ia, which are considered reliable distance indicators. Looking at great distances also means looking back in time because of the finite velocity of light. SN 1997ck exploded when the universe was half its present age. It is the most distant supernova ever discovered (at a redshift of 0.97), erupting 7.7 billion years ago. The two other supernovae exploded about 5 billion years ago. SN 1997ce has a redshift of 0.44; SN 1997cj, 0.50. SN 1997ck is in the constellation Hercules, SN 1997ce is in Lynx, just north of Gemini; and SN 1997cj is in Ursa Major, near the Hubble Deep Field

  3. A Newly Recognized Very Young Supernova Remnant in M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Winkler, P. Frank; Long, Knox S.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Soria, Roberto; Kuntz, K. D.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Dopita, Michael A.; Stockdale, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at Halpha, [O I] 6300, and [O III] 5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was not observed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 M(sun), and the presence of broad Halpha in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 VLA radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise time since the explosion.We acknowledge STScI grants under the umbrella program ID GO-12513 to Johns Hopkins University, STScI, and Middlebury College. PFW acknowledges additional support from the National Science Foundation through grant AST-0908566.

  4. An Update on Radio Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Sramek, Richard A.; Weiler, Kurt W.; Montes, Marcos J.; Panagia, Nino

    The radio emission from supernovae (SNe) is nonthermal synchrotron radiation of high brightness temperature, with a ``turn-on'' delay at longer wavelengths, power-law decline after maximum with index beta, and spectral index alpha asymptotically decreasing with time to a final, optically thin value. Radio supernovae (RSNe) are best described by the Chevalier (1982) ``mini-shell'' model, with modifications by Weiler \\etal\\ (1990). RSNe observations provide a valuable probe of the SN circumstellar environment and constraints on progenitor masses. We present a progress report on a number of recent RSNe, as well as on new behavior from RSNe 1979C and 1980K, and on RSNe as potential distance indicators. In particular, we present updated radio light curves for SN 1993J in M81.

  5. Dark Energy and Termonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domíngez, I.; Bravo, E.; Piersanti, L.; Tornambé, A.; Straniero, O.; Höflich, P.

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays it is widely accepted that the current Universe is dominated by dark energy and exotic matter, the so called StandardModel of Cosmoloy or CDM model. All the available data (Thermonuclear Supernovae, Cosmic Microwave Background, Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, Large Scale Structure, etc.) are compatible with a flat Universe made by ~70% of dark energy. Up to now observations agree that dark energy may be the vacuum energy (or cosmological constant) although improvements are needed to constrain further its equation of state. In this context, the cosmic destiny of the Universe is no longer linked to its geometry but to the nature of dark energy; it may be flat and expand forever or collapse. To understand the nature of dark energy is probably the most fundamental problem in physics today; it may open new roads of knowledge and led to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions in nature. It is expected that astronomical data will continue to provide directions to theorists and experimental physicists. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have played a fundamental role, showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago, and up to now they are the only astronomical observations that provide a direct evidence of the acceleration. However, in order to determine the source of the dark energy term it is mandatory to improve the precision of supernovae as distance indicators on cosmological scale.

  6. Near-Infrared Spectra of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marion, G. H.; Hoeflich, P.; Vacca, W. D.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    We report near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of 12 'branch-normal' Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) that cover the wavelength region from 0.8 to 2.5 microns. Our sample more than doubles the number of SNe Ia with published NIR spectra within 3 weeks of maximum light. The epochs of observation range from 13 days before maximum light to 18 days after maximum light. A detailed model for a Type Ia supernovae is used to identify spectral features. The Doppler shifts of lines are measured to obtain the velocity and thus the radial distribution of elements. The NIR is an extremely useful tool to probe the chemical structure in the layers of SNe Ia ejecta. This wavelength region is optimal for examining certain products of the SNe Ia explosion that may be blended or obscured in other spectral regions. We identify spectral features from Mg II, Ca II, Si II, Fe II, Co II, Ni II, and possibly Mn II. We find no indications for hydrogen, helium, or carbon in the spectra. The spectral features reveal important clues about the physical characteristics of SNe Ia. We use the features to derive upper limits for the amount of unburned matter, to identify the transition regions from explosive carbon to oxygen burning and from partial to complete silicon burning, and to estimate the level of mixing during and after the explosion. Elements synthesized in the outer layers during the explosion appear to remain in distinct layers. That provides strong evidence for the presence of a detonation phase during the explosion as it occurs in delayed detonation or merger models. Mg II velocities are found to exceed 11,000 - 15,000 km/s, depending on the individual SNe Ia. That result suggests that burning during the explosion reaches the outermost layers of the progenitor and limits the amount of unburned material to less than 10% of the mass of the progenitor. Small residuals of unburned material are predicted by delayed detonation models but are inconsistent with pure deflagration or

  7. Probing the origins of neutrino mass with supernova data.

    PubMed

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Huber, Patrick

    2005-11-01

    We study type II supernova signatures of neutrino mass generation via symmetry breaking at a scale in the range from keV to MeV. The scalar responsible for symmetry breaking is thermalized in the supernova core and restores the symmetry. The neutrinos from scalar decays have about half the average energy of thermal neutrinos. The Bose-Einstein distribution of the scalars can be established with a megaton water Cerenkov detector. The discovery of the bimodal neutrino flux is, however, well within the reach of the Super-Kamiokande detector, without a detailed knowledge of the supernova parameters.

  8. Identifying Supernova Progenitors and Constraining the Explosion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.

    2012-09-01

    Connecting the endpoints of massive star evolution with the various types of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) is ultimately the fundamental puzzle to be explored and solved. We can assemble clues indirectly, e.g., from information about the environments in which stars explode and establish constraints on the evolutionary phases of these stars. However, this is best accomplished through direct identification of the actual star that has exploded in pre-supernova imaging, preferably in more than one photometric band, where color and luminosity for the star can be precisely measured. We can then interpret the star's properties in light of expectations from the latest massive stellar evolutionary models, to attempt to assign an initial mass to the progenitor. So far, this has been done most successfully for SNe II-P, for which we now know that red supergiants in a relatively limited initial mass range are responsible. More recently, we have limited examples of the progenitors of SNe II-L, IIn, and IIb. The progenitors of SNe Ib and Ic, however, have been elusive so far; I will discuss the current status of our knowledge of this particular channel.

  9. QUIJOTE Scientific Results. II. Polarisation Measurements of the Microwave Emission in the Galactic molecular complexes W43 and W47 and supernova remnant W44

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génova-Santos, R.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Peláez-Santos, A.; Poidevin, F.; Rebolo, R.; Vignaga, R.; Artal, E.; Harper, S.; Hoyland, R.; Lasenby, A.; Martínez-González, E.; Piccirillo, L.; Tramonte, D.; Watson, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present Q-U-I JOint TEnerife (QUIJOTE) intensity and polarisation maps at 10 - 20 GHz covering a region along the Galactic plane 24° ≲ l ≲ 45°, |b| ≲ 8°. These maps result from 210 h of data, have a sensitivity in polarisation of ≈40 μK beam-1 and an angular resolution of ≈1°. Our intensity data are crucial to confirm the presence of anomalous microwave emission (AME) towards the two molecular complexes W43 (22σ) and W47 (8σ). We also detect at high significance (6σ) AME associated with W44, the first clear detection of this emission towards a SNR. The new QUIJOTE polarisation data, in combination with WMAP, are essential to: i) Determine the spectral index of the synchrotron emission in W44, βsync = -0.62 ± 0.03, in good agreement with the value inferred from the intensity spectrum once a free-free component is included in the fit. ii) Trace the change in the polarisation angle associated with Faraday rotation in the direction of W44 with rotation measure -404 ± 49 rad m-2. And iii) set upper limits on the polarisation of W43 of ΠAME < 0.39 per cent (95 per cent C.L.) from QUIJOTE 17 GHz, and <0.22 per cent from WMAP 41 GHz data, which are the most stringent constraints ever obtained on the polarisation fraction of the AME. For typical physical conditions (grain temperature and magnetic field strengths), and in the case of perfect alignment between the grains and the magnetic field, the models of electric or magnetic dipole emissions predict higher polarisation fractions.

  10. Incentive theory: II. Models for choice.

    PubMed

    Killeen, P R

    1982-09-01

    Incentive theory is extended to account for concurrent chained schedules of reinforcement. The basic model consists of additive contributions from the primary and secondary effects of reinforcers, which serve to direct the behavior activated by reinforcement. The activation is proportional to the rate of reinforcement and interacts multiplicatively with the directive effects. The two free parameters are q, the slope of the delay of reinforcement gradient, whose value is constant across many experiments, and b, a bias parameter. The model is shown to provide an excellent description of all results from studies that have varied the terminal-link schedules, and of many of the results from studies that have varied initial-link schedules. The model is extended to diverse modifications of the terminal links, such as varied amount of reinforcement, varied signaling of the terminal-link schedules, and segmentation of the terminal-link schedules. It is demonstrated that incentive theory provides an accurate and integrated account of many of the phenomena of choice.

  11. PEP-II vacuum system pressure profile modeling using EXCEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.

    1994-06-01

    A generic, adaptable Microsoft EXCEL program to simulate molecular flow in beam line vacuum systems is introduced. Modeling using finite-element approximation of the governing differential equation is discussed, as well as error estimation and program capabilities. The ease of use and flexibility of the spreadsheet-based program is demonstrated. PEP-II vacuum system models are reviewed and compared with analytical models.

  12. Some Hamiltonian models of friction II

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Daniel; Gang Zhou

    2012-10-15

    In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in Froehlich et al. ['Some hamiltonian models of friction,' J. Math. Phys. 52(8), 083508 (2011)], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of Froehlich et al. ['Friction in a model of hamiltonian dynamics,' Commun. Math. Phys. 315(2), 401-444 (2012)]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

  13. The Local Supernova Rate from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaman, Jesse F.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A.; LOSS

    2009-05-01

    The robotic Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS), conducted with the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT), has been the world's most successful nearby supernova search engine over the past decade. For the over 1,000 supernovae (SNe) discovered in the LOSS sample galaxies until the end of the year 2008, we used an optimal subsample of 728 SNe to derive the SN rate in the local universe. The LOSS galaxy sample consists of about 14,000 fields, imaged with temporal frequencies that typically range from 2 to 10 days. Detailed logs of the observations and search parameters have allowed us to determine the most accurate nearby SN rates since the study of Cappellaro, Evans, & Turatto (1999, A&A, 351, 459). We first selected 140 SNe, discovered in a distance-limited sample, to construct the observed luminosity functions for various types of SNe. Photometry for each of these 140 SNe was collected, their peak magnitudes were measured, and their completeness in the survey was calculated. The resulting luminosity functions are the first of their kind, and provide significant improvement to Zwicky's well-known control-time calculation for the SN rates. We derived SN rates for various types of SNe, in galaxies of different Hubble types and B-K colors. Our rates agree well with previous measurements, but provide significant improvement in precision, more morphological and color bins, and fewer observational biases. We found that the SN rates, after linear normalization by the size of the galaxies, still have a significant correlation with the galaxy size, in the sense that smaller galaxies have a higher SN rate per unit luminosity or mass. The volumetric SN rates are as follows (in units of 10^-4 SN Mpc^-3 yr^-1): 0.28 +/- 0.03 for SNe Ia, 0.20 +/- 0.03 for SNe Ibc, and 0.40 +/- 0.05 for SNe II.

  14. Neutrinos from hell. [Detected from supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Schorn, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    The detection of neutrinos is studied. The use of the Kamiokande II detector, which is a cylindrical tank holding about 3000 tons of highly purified water, for neutrino detection is examined. The operation and capabilities of the Kamiokande II detector are described. The Kamiokande II and Irvine-Michigan-Brookhaven detector observed the neutrinos from SN 1987A. The relation between the supernova and the neutrinos is analyzed. Particular consideration is given to the shock wave and the energies of the neutrinos. Additional data provided by the neutrino observations are discussed.

  15. Multiwell experiment: reservoir modeling analysis, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, A.I.

    1985-05-01

    This report updates an ongoing analysis by reservoir modelers at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of well test data from the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Results of previous efforts were presented in a recent METC Technical Note (Horton 1985). Results included in this report pertain to the poststimulation well tests of Zones 3 and 4 of the Paludal Sandstone Interval and the prestimulation well tests of the Red and Yellow Zones of the Coastal Sandstone Interval. The following results were obtained by using a reservoir model and history matching procedures: (1) Post-minifracture analysis indicated that the minifracture stimulation of the Paludal Interval did not produce an induced fracture, and extreme formation damage did occur, since a 65% permeability reduction around the wellbore was estimated. The design for this minifracture was from 200 to 300 feet on each side of the wellbore; (2) Post full-scale stimulation analysis for the Paludal Interval also showed that extreme formation damage occurred during the stimulation as indicated by a 75% permeability reduction 20 feet on each side of the induced fracture. Also, an induced fracture half-length of 100 feet was determined to have occurred, as compared to a designed fracture half-length of 500 to 600 feet; and (3) Analysis of prestimulation well test data from the Coastal Interval agreed with previous well-to-well interference tests that showed extreme permeability anisotropy was not a factor for this zone. This lack of permeability anisotropy was also verified by a nitrogen injection test performed on the Coastal Red and Yellow Zones. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Deflagrations and detonations in thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S

    2004-05-28

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast with the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae. PMID:15245271

  17. Deflagrations and detonations in thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S

    2004-05-28

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast with the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

  18. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. I. CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L. E-mail: jt@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2009-12-20

    Modern supernova (SN) surveys are now uncovering stellar explosions at rates that far surpass what the world's spectroscopic resources can handle. In order to make full use of these SN data sets, it is necessary to use analysis methods that depend only on the survey photometry. This paper presents two methods for utilizing a set of SN light-curve templates to classify SN objects. In the first case, we present an updated version of the Bayesian Adaptive Template Matching program (BATM). To address some shortcomings of that strictly Bayesian approach, we introduce a method for Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT), which utilizes fuzzy set theory for the definition and combination of SN light-curve models. For well-sampled light curves with a modest signal-to-noise ratio (S/N >10), the SOFT method can correctly separate thermonuclear (Type Ia) SNe from core collapse SNe with >=98% accuracy. In addition, the SOFT method has the potential to classify SNe into sub-types, providing photometric identification of very rare or peculiar explosions. The accuracy and precision of the SOFT method are verified using Monte Carlo simulations as well as real SN light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SuperNova Legacy Survey. In a subsequent paper, the SOFT method is extended to address the problem of parameter estimation, providing estimates of redshift, distance, and host galaxy extinction without any spectroscopy.

  19. Supernova 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafatos, Minas; Michalitsianos, Andrew G.

    2006-11-01

    Foreword; Acknowledgements; Workshop participants; 1. Images and spectrograms of Sanduleak - 69º202, the SN 1987a progenitor N. R. Walborn; 2. The progenitor of SN 1987A G. Sonneborn; 3. Another supernova with a blue progenitor C. M. Gaskell and W. C. Keel; 4. Optical and infrared observations of SN 1987A from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory M. M. Phillips; 5. SN 1987A: observational results obtained at ESO I. J. Danziger, P. Bouchet, R. A. E. Fosbury, C. Gouiffes, L. B. Lucy, A. F. M. Moorwood, E. Oliva and F. Rufener; 6. Observations of SN 1987A at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) M. W. Feast; 7. Observations of SN 1987A at the Anglo-Australian Telescope W. J. Couch; 8. Linear polarimetric study of SN 1987A A. Clocchiatti, M. Méndez, O. Benvenuto, C. Feinstein, H. Marraco, B. García and N. Morrell; 9. Infrared spectroscopy of SN 1987A from the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory H. P. Larson, S. Drapatz, M. J. Mumma and H. A. Weaver; 10. Radio observations of SN 1987A N. Bartel et al.; 11. Ultraviolet observations of SN 1987A: clues to mass loss R. P. Kirshner; 12. On the energetics of SN 1987A N. Panagia; 13. On the nature and apparent uniqueness of SN 1987A A. V. Filippenko; 14. A comparison of the SN 1987A light curve with other type II supernovae, and the detectability of similar supernovae M. F. Schmitz and C. M. Gaskell; 15. P-Cygni features and photospheric velocities L. Bildsten and J. C. L. Wang; 16. The Neutrino burst from SN 1987A detected in the Mont Blanc LSD experiment M. Aglietta et al.; 17. Toward observational neutrino astrophysics M. Koshiba; 18. The discovery of neutrinos from SN 1987A with the IMB detector J. Matthews; 19. Peering into the abyss: the neutrinos from SN 1987A A. Burrows; 20. Phenomenological analysis of neutrino emission from SN 1987A J. N. Bahcall, D. N. Spergel and W. H. Press; 21. Mass determination of neutrinos H. Y. Chiu; 22. Neutrino transport in a type II supernova D. C. Ellison, P. M. Giovanoni

  20. Broadband Observations and Modeling of the Shell-Type Supernova Remnant G347.3-0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Slane, Patrick O.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2002-01-01

    The supernova remnant G347.3-0.5 emits a featureless power law in X-rays, thought to indicate shock acceleration of electrons to high energies. We here produce a broadband spectrum of the bright northwest limb of this source by combining radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), X-ray observations from the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), and TeV gamma-ray observations from the CANGAROO imaging Cerenkov telescope. We assume that this emission is produced by an electron population generated by diffusive shock acceleration at the remnant forward shock. The nonlinear aspects of the particle acceleration force a connection between the widely different wavelength bands and between the electrons and the unseen ions, presumably accelerated simultaneously with the electrons. This allows us to infer the relativistic proton spectrum and estimate ambient parameters such as the supernova explosion energy, magnetic field, matter density in the emission region, and efficiency of the shock acceleration process. We find convincing evidence that the shock acceleration is efficient, placing greater than 25% of the shock kinetic energy flux into relativistic ions. Despite this high efficiency, the maximum electron and proton energies, while depending somewhat on assumptions for the compression of the magnetic field in the shock, are well below the observed 'knee' at 10(exp 15) eV in the Galactic cosmic-ray spectrum.

  1. Type Ia supernovae within dense carbon-oxygen rich envelopes: a model for `Super-Chandrasekhar' explosions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noebauer, U. M.; Taubenberger, S.; Blinnikov, S.; Sorokina, E.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the consequences of fairly normal Type Ia supernovae being embedded in compact and dense envelopes of carbon and oxygen rich circumstellar material by means of detailed radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Our main focus rests on exploring the effects of the interaction between ejecta and circumstellar material on the ejecta evolution and the broad-band light curve. In our calculations, we find that a strong reverse shock efficiently decelerates and compresses the ejecta material. This leads to a significant broadening of the optical light curve, a longer rise to maximum and a slower decline in the tail phase. During the interaction, substantial radiative energy is generated, which mostly emerges in the extreme ultraviolet and X-ray regime. Only if reprocessing due to radiation-matter interactions is very efficient, a significant boost in the optical light curve is observed. We discuss these findings in particular in the context of the super-luminous event SN 2009dc. As our calculations are able to reproduce a number of its peculiar properties, we conclude that the flavour of the interaction scenario investigated in this work constitutes a promising candidate to explain such `Super-Chandrasekhar' supernovae.

  2. Competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on carbonaceous nanofibers: A spectroscopic and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangxue; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Sun, Yubing; Chen, Changlun; Wang, Xiangke; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-08-01

    The competitive sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the uniform carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated in binary/ternary-metal systems. The pH-dependent sorption of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs was independent of ionic strength, indicating that inner-sphere surface complexation dominated sorption Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs. The maximum sorption capacities of Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) on CNFs in single-metal systems at a pH 5.5±0.2 and 25±1°C were 3.84 (795.65mg/g), 3.21 (204.00mg/g) and 2.67 (156.70mg/g)mmol/g, respectively. In equimolar binary/ternary-metal systems, Pb(II) exhibited greater inhibition of the sorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II), demonstrating the stronger affinity of CNFs for Pb(II). The competitive sorption of heavy metals in ternary-metal systems was predicted quite well by surface complexation modeling derived from single-metal data. According to FTIR, XPS and EXAFS analyses, Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) were specifically adsorbed on CNFs via covalent bonding. These observations should provide an essential start in simultaneous removal of multiple heavy metals from aquatic environments by CNFs, and open the doorways for the application of CNFs. PMID:27108273

  3. Berkeley automated supernova search

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  4. Automated search for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  5. The Historical Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. H.; Stephenson, F. R.

    1982-11-01

    A survey was made of pretelescopic astronomical records from Europe, China, Korea, Japan, Babylon, and the Arab countries to search for historical evidence of supernovae. A Roman, Claudian, reported a new star in 393 AD, the same year that Chinese astronomers noted a new star, together with its location and duration. Most European records were made in monasteries after 1000 AD, and one supernova was sighted in 1006 AD. A similar sighting was made in the Arab world at the same time. A total of twenty candidate events were found in the nearly 2000 yr of Chinese records. An analysis of the recorded events characteristics indicates that in 185, 393, 1006, 1054, 1181, 1572, and 1604 AD supernovae were seen. The 1054 AD explosion was corroborated by Arab records, while all others (except for the 393 AD and 1006 AD supernovae) were confined to Oriental observations.

  6. SEARCHING FOR HYDROGEN IN TYPE Ib SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    James, Spencer; Baron, E.

    2010-08-01

    We present synthetic spectral fits of the typical Type Ib SN 1999dn and the hydrogen-rich Ib SN 2000H using the generalized non-local thermodynamic equilibrium stellar atmospheres code PHOENIX. We fit model spectra to five epochs of SN 1999dn ranging from 10 days pre-maximum light to 17 days post-maximum light and to the two earliest epochs of SN 2000H available, maximum light and six days post-maximum. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of hydrogen in Type Ib supernovae (SNe Ib), specifically a feature around 6200 A which has previously been attributed to high-velocity H{alpha}. In earlier work on SN 1999dn we found the most plausible alternative to H{alpha} to be a blend of Si II and Fe II lines which can be adjusted to fit by increasing the metallicity. Our models are simple; they assume a power-law density profile with radius, homologous expansion, and solar compositions. The helium core is produced by 'burning' 4H{yields}He in order to conserve the nucleon number. For models with hydrogen the outer skin of the model consists of a shell of solar composition. The hydrogen mass of the standard solar composition shell is M{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} in SN 1999dn and M{sub H} {approx}< 0.2 M{sub sun} for SN 2000H. Our models fit the observed spectra reasonably well, successfully reproducing most features including the characteristic He I absorptions. The hydrogen feature in SN 1999dn is clear, but much more pronounced in SN 2000H. We discuss a possible evolutionary scenario that accounts for the dichotomy in the hydrogen shell mass between these two SNe.

  7. Handbook of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athem Alsabti, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, few celestial phenomena have fascinated amateur and professional astronomers, and the public, more than supernovae - dying stars that explode spectacularly and, in so doing, may outshine a whole galaxy. Thousands of research papers, reviews, monographs and books have been published on this subject. These publications are often written either for a highly specific level of expertise or education, or with respect to a particular aspect of supernovae research. However, the study of supernovae is a very broad topic involving many integral yet connected aspects, including physics, mathematics, computation, history, theoretical studies and observation. More specifically, areas of study include historical supernovae, the different types and light curves, nucleosynthesis, explosion mechanisms, formation of black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Related questions include how supernovae remnants interact with interstellar matter nearby and how do these events affect the formation of new stars or planetary systems? Could they affect existing planetary systems? Closer to home, did any supernovae affect life on earth in the past or could they do so in the future? And on the larger scale, how did supernovae observations help measure the size and expansion of the universe? All these topics, and more, are to be covered in a new reference work, consisting of more than 100 articles and more than 1700 pages. It is intended to cover all the main facets of current supernovae research. It will be pitched at or above the level of a new postgraduate student, who will have successfully studied physics (or a similar scientific subject) to Bachelor degree level. It will be available in both print and electronic (updatable) formats, with the exception of the first section, which will consist of a review of all the topics of the handbook at a level that allows anyone with basic scientific knowledge to grasp the

  8. THE HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF THE COMETARY COMPACT H ii REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Feng-Yao; Zhu, Qing-Feng; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Zhang, Jiang-Shui E-mail: zhuqf@ustc.edu.cn E-mail: jzwang@shao.ac.cn

    2015-10-10

    We have developed a full numerical method to study the gas dynamics of cometary ultracompact H ii regions, and associated photodissociation regions (PDRs). The bow-shock and champagne-flow models with a 40.9/21.9 M{sub ⊙} star are simulated. In the bow-shock models, the massive star is assumed to move through dense (n = 8000 cm{sup −3}) molecular material with a stellar velocity of 15 km s{sup −1}. In the champagne-flow models, an exponential distribution of density with a scale height of 0.2 pc is assumed. The profiles of the [Ne ii] 12.81 μm and H{sub 2} S(2) lines from the ionized regions and PDRs are compared for two sets of models. In champagne-flow models, emission lines from the ionized gas clearly show the effect of acceleration along the direction toward the tail due to the density gradient. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell are mainly due to the expansion of the H ii region. However, in bow-shock models the ionized gas mainly moves in the same direction as the stellar motion. The kinematics of the molecular gas inside the dense shell simply reflects the motion of the dense shell with respect to the star. These differences can be used to distinguish two sets of models.

  9. iPTF discovery of iPTF15ayt, a young Type II Supernova showing flash-spectroscopy signatures, and an HST target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Sagiv, I.; Yaron, O.; Horesh, A.; Ofek, E.; Taddia, F.; Amanullah, R.; Petrushevska, T.; Ferretti, R.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kasliwal, M.; Cao, Y.; Perley, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Ben-Ami, S.; iPTF Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (ATel#4807) reports the discovery of iPTF15ayt, a young type II SN in a nearby galaxy (redshift z=0.045715, mean distance modulus DM=36.52, metric distance d~202 Mpc; NED).

  10. A CR-HYDRO-NEI MODEL OF MULTI-WAVELENGTH EMISSION FROM THE VELA JR. SUPERNOVA REMNANT (SNR RX J0852.0-4622)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Ellison, Donald C. E-mail: nagataki@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: dpatnaude@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-04-10

    Based largely on energy budget considerations and the observed cosmic-ray (CR) ionic composition, supernova remnant (SNR) blast waves are the most likely sources of CR ions with energies at least up to the 'knee' near 10{sup 15} eV. Shocks in young shell-type TeV-bright SNRs are surely producing TeV particles, but the emission could be dominated by ions producing {pi}{sup 0}-decay emission or electrons producing inverse Compton gamma rays. Unambiguously identifying the GeV-TeV emission process in a particular SNR will not only help pin down the origin of CRs, it will also add significantly to our understanding of the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism and improve our understanding of supernovae and the impact SNRs have on the circumstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the Vela Jr. SNR, an example of TeV-bright non-thermal SNRs. We perform hydrodynamic simulations coupled with nonlinear DSA and non-equilibrium ionization near the forward shock to confront currently available multi-wavelength data. We find, with an analysis similar to that used earlier for SNR RX J1713.7-3946, that self-consistently modeling the thermal X-ray line emission with the non-thermal continuum in our one-dimensional model strongly constrains the fitting parameters, and this leads convincingly to a leptonic origin for the GeV-TeV emission for Vela Jr. This conclusion is further supported by applying additional constraints from observation, including the radial brightness profiles of the SNR shell in TeV gamma rays, and the spatial variation of the X-ray synchrotron spectral index. We will discuss implications of our models on future observations by the next-generation telescopes.

  11. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  12. The SILCC (SImulating the LifeCycle of molecular Clouds) project - II. Dynamical evolution of the supernova-driven ISM and the launching of outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp; Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten; Gatto, Andrea; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Peters, Thomas; Derigs, Dominik; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The SILCC project (SImulating the Life-Cycle of molecular Clouds) aims at a more self-consistent understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales and its link to galaxy evolution. We present three-dimensional (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations of the ISM in a vertically stratified box including self-gravity, an external potential due to the stellar component of the galactic disc, and stellar feedback in the form of an interstellar radiation field and supernovae (SNe). The cooling of the gas is based on a chemical network that follows the abundances of H+, H, H2, C+, and CO and takes shielding into account consistently. We vary the SN feedback by comparing different SN rates, clustering and different positioning, in particular SNe in density peaks and at random positions, which has a major impact on the dynamics. Only for random SN positions the energy is injected in sufficiently low-density environments to reduce energy losses and enhance the effective kinetic coupling of the SNe with the gas. This leads to more realistic velocity dispersions (σ _H I≈ 0.8σ _{300{-}8000 K}˜ 10-20 km s^{-1}, σ _H α ≈ 0.6σ _{8000-3× 10^5 K}˜ 20-30 km s^{-1}), and strong outflows with mass loading factors (ratio of outflow to star formation rate) of up to 10 even for solar neighbourhood conditions. Clustered SNe abet the onset of outflows compared to individual SNe but do not influence the net outflow rate. The outflows do not contain any molecular gas and are mainly composed of atomic hydrogen. The bulk of the outflowing mass is dense (ρ ˜ 10-25-10-24 g cm-3) and slow (v ˜ 20-40 km s-1) but there is a high-velocity tail of up to v ˜ 500 km s-1 with ρ ˜ 10-28-10-27 g cm-3.

  13. Calculated late time spectra of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1987-10-30

    We consider here the nebular phase spectra of supernovae whose late time luminosity is provided by the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co synthesized in the explosion. A broad variety of supernovae are known or suspected to fall in this category. This includes all SNIa and SNIb, and at least some SNII, in particular SN1987a. At sufficiently late times the expanding supernova becomes basically nebular in character due to its decreasing optical depth. The spectra produced during this stage contain information on the density and abundance structure of the entire supernova, as opposed to spectra near maximum light which are affected only by the outermost layers. A numerical model for nebular spectrum formation is therefore potentially very valuable for answering currently outstanding questions about the post-explosion supernova structure. As an example, we can hope to determine the degree of mixing which occurs between the layers of the ''onion-skin'' abundance structure predicted by current one dimensional explosion calculations. In the sections which follow, such a numerical model is briefly described and then applied to SN1972e, a typical SNIa, SN1985f, an SNIb, and finally to SN1987a. In the case of SN1987a predicted spectra are presented for the wavelength range from 1 to 100 microns at a time 300 days after explosion. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Dark matter balls help supernovae to explode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-10-01

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova, the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat — of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating due to the dark matter balls would at first stop the collapse of the supernova progenitor. This opens up the possibility of there being two collapses giving two neutrino outbursts, as apparently seen in the supernova SN1987A — one in Mont Blanc and one 4 h 43 min later in both IMB and Kamiokande.

  15. Non-LTE models for synthetic spectra of type Ia supernovae. III. An accelerated lambda-iteration procedure for the mutual interaction of strong spectral lines in SN Ia models with and without energy deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauldrach, A. W. A.; Hoffmann, T. L.; Hultzsch, P. J. N.

    2014-09-01

    . Thus, hydrodynamic explosion models and realistic model atmospheres that take into account the strong deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) are necessary for the