Science.gov

Sample records for ii transient response

  1. Model refinement using transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating uncertain or unknown parameters in a mathematical model using measurements of transient response. The method is based on a least squares formulation in which the differences between the model and test-based responses are minimized. An application of the method is presented for a nonlinear structural dynamic system. The method is also applied to a model of the Department of Energy armored tractor trailer. For the subject problem, the transient response was generated by driving the vehicle over a bump of prescribed shape and size. Results from the analysis and inspection of the test data revealed that a linear model of the vehicle`s suspension is not adequate to accurately predict the response caused by the bump.

  2. Transient Response in LMFBR System.

    1999-04-26

    SSC-L (the Super System Code) calculates the thermohydraulic response of loop-type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) systems during operational, incidental, and accidental transients, especially natural circulation events. Modules simulated and parameters calculated include: core flow rates and temperatures, loop flow rates and temperatures, pump performance, and heat exchanger operation. Additionally, SSC-L accounts for all plant protection and plant control systems. Although the primary emphasis is on transients for safety analysis, SSC-L can be usedmore » for many other applications, such as scoping analysis for plant design and specification of various components. Any number of user-specified loops, pipes, and nodes are permitted. Both single- and two-phase thermal-hydraulics are used in a multi-channel core representation. Inter-assembly flow redistribution is accounted for using a detailed fuel pin model. The heat transport system geometry is user-specified. SSC-L provides steady-state and transient options and a restart capability. Input is free format in a modular structure that makes use of abstract data management techniques.« less

  3. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  4. Role of type II pneumocytes in pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis: dose response of radiation-induced lung changes in the transient high vascular permeability period.

    PubMed

    Osterreicher, Jan; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Skopek, Jirí; Mokrỳ, Jaroslav; Vilasová, Zdena; Psutka, Jan; Vávrová, Jirina; Mazurová, Yvona

    2004-12-01

    We studied the dose response of pulmonary changes at 3 weeks after 1-25 Gy irradiation and we investigated the effects of an anti-inflammatory drug. Wistar rats were given a single dose of 1-25Gy irradiation to the thorax. Group one was treated with saline only, while group two was administered subcutaneously a combination of pentoxifylline (35 mg/kg) and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) twice per week. Lungs were examined histochemically and number of neutrophile granulocytes, alveolar septal thickness, air/tissue ratio, number of alveoli per field, number of type II pneumocytes per alveolus, and occludin 1 expression were measured. A significant dose-dependent depletion of type II pneumocytes was found after irradiation with a dose of 1 Gy and higher. Alveolar neutrophils increased after 1 Gy with a dose dependency noted after 10-25Gy and alveolar septa thickening followed 5-25 Gy. A lower occludin 1 expression was observed in animals irradiated with the doses of 5 20 Gy, indicating an effect on vascular permeability. Anti-inflammatory therapy partially inhibited the increase of neutrophils at all radiation doses and the depletion of type II pneumocytes after doses of 1, 10, and 15 Gy. Occludin 1 did not decrease in the lungs of rats treated with the anti-inflammatory drugs as it did in most rats treated only with saline. Our results suggest that pneumocytes depletion is a major factor responsible for radiation pneumonitis development and that these changes may be compensated for provided radiation doses are below the threshold.

  5. A transient overpower experiment in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, J.P.; Tsai, H.; Dean, E.M.; Aoyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    1994-03-01

    The TOPI-IE test was a transient overpower test on irradiate mixed-oxide fuel pins in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The test, the fifth in a series, was part of a cooperative program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan to conduct operational transient testing on mixed-oxide fuel pins in the metal-fueled EBR-II. The principle objective of the TOPI-1E test was to assess breaching margins for irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins over the Plant Protection System (PPS) thresholds during a slow, extended overpower transient. This paper describes the effect of the TOPI-1E experiment on reactor components and the impact of the experiment on the long-term operability of the reactor. The paper discusses the role that SASSYS played in the pre-test safety analysis of the experiment. The ability of SASSYS to model transient overpower events is detailed by comparisons of data from the experiment with computed reactor variables from a SASSYS post-test simulation of the experiment.

  6. Transient thermal response of ablating bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arai, N.; Karashima, K.-I.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical study of transient thermal response of a blunt-nosed axisymmetric body made of Teflon is presented using a two-layer thermal model. It is shown that phase change and transverse heat conduction have a considerable effect on the internal temperature field. Comparison of the numerical results with experimental data shows that the single-layer thermal model does not predict the real feature of the thermal field, whereas the results of the two-layer thermal model agree reasonably well with the experiment.

  7. Transverse heat transfer coefficient in the dual channel ITER TF CICCs Part II. Analysis of transient temperature responses observed during a heat slug propagation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Monika; Herzog, Robert; Malinowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    A heat slug propagation experiment in the final design dual channel ITER TF CICC was performed in the SULTAN test facility at EPFL-CRPP in Villigen PSI. We analyzed the data resulting from this experiment to determine the equivalent transverse heat transfer coefficient hBC between the bundle and the central channel of this cable. In the data analysis we used methods based on the analytical solutions of a problem of transient heat transfer in a dual-channel cable, similar to Renard et al. (2006) and Bottura et al. (2006). The observed experimental and other limits related to these methods are identified and possible modifications proposed. One result from our analysis is that the hBC values obtained with different methods differ by up to a factor of 2. We have also observed that the uncertainties of hBC in both methods considered are much larger than those reported earlier.

  8. Role of initial quantum correlation in transient linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiyama, Chikako; Aihara, Masaki

    2010-10-15

    The linear transient response of a two-level system coupled with an environmental system is studied under correlated and factorized initial conditions. We find that the transient responses in these cases differ significantly from each other, especially for strong system-environment interaction at intermediate temperatures. This means that it is necessary to pay attention to the initial conditions chosen when analyzing experiments on transient linear response, because the conventional factorized initial condition results in an incorrect response, in which the quantum correlation between the relevant system and the environmental system is disregarded.

  9. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  11. Response of dairy cattle to transient voltages and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reinemann, D.J.; Laughlin, N.K.; Stetson, L.E.

    1995-07-01

    Stray voltages in dairy facilities have been studied since the 1970`s. Previous research using steady-state ac and dc voltages has defined cow-contact voltage levels which may cause behavior and associated production problems. This research was designed to address concerns over possible effects of transient voltages and magnetic fields on dairy cows. Dairy cows response to transient voltages and magnetic fields was measured. The waveforms of the transient voltages applied were: 5 cycles of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 83 ms, 1 cycle of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 16 ms, and 1 cycle of an ac square wave (spiking positive and negative) of 2-ms duration. Alternating magnetic fields were produced by passing 60-Hz ac fundamental frequency with 2nd and 3rd harmonic and random noise components in metal structures around the cows. The maximum magnetic field associated with this current flow was in excess of 4 G. A wide range of sensitivity to transient voltages was observed among cows. Response levels from 24 cows to each transient exposure were normally distributed. No responses to magnetic fields were observed.

  12. Transient response of lattice structures based on exact member theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melvin S.

    1989-01-01

    The computer program BUNVIS-RG, which treats vibration and buckling of lattice structures using exact member stiffness matrices, has been extended to calculate the exact modal mass and stiffness quantities that can be used in a conventional transient response analysis based on modes. The exact nature of the development allows inclusion of local member response without introduction of any interior member nodes. Results are given for several problems in which significant interaction between local and global response occurs.

  13. Laboratory Experiment for the Transient Response of a Stirred Vessel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, R. D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Provides background information, apparatus needed, and procedures for an experiment to measure transient response of a stirred vessel. The inexpensive apparatus can be used for two different experiments, reducing cost per experiment. Both experiments use salt dilution as the method of demonstration. (Author/JN)

  14. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Conductive Cylindrical Rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Fangwei; Bowler, J. R.

    2007-03-01

    Transient eddy current test systems have been developed for the inspection of aircraft structures and for oil and gas pipelines. This work is supported by theoretical developments in which transient fields and time domain signals are determined for the geometry of interest. However most of the models to date have been aimed at structures that are planar, relatively little attention being paid to the corresponding problems in cylindrical geometries. In order to rectify this deficiency, we have examined theoretically the transient probe signal response due to a cylindrical conductive rod excited by an encircling coil. The transient fields can be calculated from a Fourier transform of the frequency domain solutions for infinite rods or tubes but, as with planar structures, we have found that it is better to use series solutions in the time domain since these provide more accurate and flexible representations of transient fields. Two types of series are used; one which converges faster at short times and one which converges faster at longer times. Calculations using these series show that they are in mutual agreement and agree with results computed using the fast Fourier transform.

  15. Reducing Conservatism of Analytic Transient Response Bounds via Shaping Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Aiyueh; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Jan, Jiann-Woei; Grigoriadis, Karolos; Hua, Tuyen (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Recent results show that the peak transient response of a linear system to bounded energy inputs can be computed using the energy-to-peak gain of the system. However, analytically computed peak response bound can be conservative for a class of class bounded energy signals, specifically pulse trains generated from jet firings encountered in space vehicles. In this paper, shaping filters are proposed as a Methodology to reduce the conservatism of peak response analytic bounds. This Methodology was applied to a realistic Space Station assembly operation subject to jet firings. The results indicate that shaping filters indeed reduce the predicted peak response bounds.

  16. Transient and sustained neural responses to death-related linguistic cues.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhao; Han, Shihui

    2013-06-01

    Recent research showed that perception of death-related vs death-unrelated linguistic cues produced increased frontoparietal activity but decreased insular activity. This study investigated (i) whether the increased frontoparietal and decreased insular activities are, respectively, associated with transient trial-specific processes of death-related linguistic cues and sustained death-related thought during death-relevance judgments on linguistic cues and (ii) whether the neural activity underlying death-related thought can predict individuals' dispositional death anxiety. Participants were presented with death-related/unrelated words, life-related/unrelated words, and negative-valence/neutral words in separate sessions. Participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing death-relevance, life-relevance, and valence judgments on the words, respectively. The contrast of death-related vs death-unrelated words during death-relevance judgments revealed transient increased activity in the left inferior parietal lobule, the right frontal eye field, and the right superior parietal lobule. The contrast of death-relevance judgments vs life-relevance/valence judgments showed decreased activity in the bilateral insula. The sustained insular activity was correlated with dispositional death anxiety, but only in those with weak transient frontoparietal responses to death-related words. Our results dissociate the transient and sustained neural responses to death-related linguistic cues and suggest that the combination of the transient and sustained neural activities can predict dispositional death anxiety.

  17. Laboratory studies of spacecraft response to transient discharge pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanevicz, J. E.; Adamo, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The in-orbit measurement of spacecraft discharge properties was investigated. The experiments include design and fabrication of appropriate sensors and effects of spacecraft electromagnetic responses on the interpretation of the discharge data. Electric field sensors especially designed to response to high-speed transient signals were installed on a mock-up of a satellite. The simple mock-up was basically a sheet of aluminum rolled to form a cylinder. A movable spark-discharge noise source designed to be electromagnetically isolated from its power supply system was used to induce transient signals at various locations on the spacecraft's outer surface. The measurements and their implications are described. It is concluded that practical orbital measurements to define discharge noise source properties should be possible, and that simple mock-ups of the type described below are useful in sensor system design and data interpretation.

  18. Transient hot-film sensor response in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.

    1989-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed to determine the response of a hot-film sensor, mounted flush on the side wall of a shock tube, to unsteady flow behind a normal shock wave. The present experiments attempt to isolate the response of the anemometer due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface. The experiments, performed at low supersonic shock speeds in air, are described along with the data acquisition procedure. The change in convective heat transfer is deduced from the data and the results are compared with those from transient boundary layer theory and another set of experimental results. Finally, a transient local heat transfer coefficient is formulated for use as the forcing function in a hot-film sensor instrument model simulation.

  19. The transient thermal response of a tubular solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1976-01-01

    A special analytical solution is provided for the timewise response of the circulating fluid temperatures when a sudden step change of the input solar radiation is imposed and remains constant thereafter. An example which demonstrates the transient temperatures at the exit section of a single collector with two different flow patterns is presented. This study is used to supplement some numerical solutions to provide a fairly complete coverage for this type of solar collector.

  20. Transient cardio-respiratory responses to visually induced tilt illusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Ramsdell, C. D.; Mullen, T. J.; Oman, C. M.; Harm, D. L.; Paloski, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    Although the orthostatic cardio-respiratory response is primarily mediated by the baroreflex, studies have shown that vestibular cues also contribute in both humans and animals. We have demonstrated a visually mediated response to illusory tilt in some human subjects. Blood pressure, heart and respiration rate, and lung volume were monitored in 16 supine human subjects during two types of visual stimulation, and compared with responses to real passive whole body tilt from supine to head 80 degrees upright. Visual tilt stimuli consisted of either a static scene from an overhead mirror or constant velocity scene motion along different body axes generated by an ultra-wide dome projection system. Visual vertical cues were initially aligned with the longitudinal body axis. Subjective tilt and self-motion were reported verbally. Although significant changes in cardio-respiratory parameters to illusory tilts could not be demonstrated for the entire group, several subjects showed significant transient decreases in mean blood pressure resembling their initial response to passive head-up tilt. Changes in pulse pressure and a slight elevation in heart rate were noted. These transient responses are consistent with the hypothesis that visual-vestibular input contributes to the initial cardiovascular adjustment to a change in posture in humans. On average the static scene elicited perceived tilt without rotation. Dome scene pitch and yaw elicited perceived tilt and rotation, and dome roll motion elicited perceived rotation without tilt. A significant correlation between the magnitude of physiological and subjective reports could not be demonstrated.

  1. Modeling rate sensitivity of exercise transient responses to limb motion.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Stanley M; Kato, Takahide

    2014-10-01

    Transient responses of ventilation (V̇e) to limb motion can exhibit predictive characteristics. In response to a change in limb motion, a rapid change in V̇e is commonly observed with characteristics different than during a change in workload. This rapid change has been attributed to a feed-forward or adaptive response. Rate sensitivity was explored as a specific hypothesis to explain predictive V̇e responses to limb motion. A simple model assuming an additive feed-forward summation of V̇e proportional to the rate of change of limb motion was studied. This model was able to successfully account for the adaptive phase correction observed during human sinusoidal changes in limb motion. Adaptation of rate sensitivity might also explain the reduction of the fast component of V̇e responses previously reported following sudden exercise termination. Adaptation of the fast component of V̇e response could occur by reduction of rate sensitivity. Rate sensitivity of limb motion was predicted by the model to reduce the phase delay between limb motion and V̇e response without changing the steady-state response to exercise load. In this way, V̇e can respond more quickly to an exercise change without interfering with overall feedback control. The asymmetry between responses to an incremental and decremental ramp change in exercise can also be accounted for by the proposed model. Rate sensitivity leads to predicted behavior, which resembles responses observed in exercise tied to expiratory reserve volume.

  2. Large-signal transient response of a switching regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Nabeshima, T.

    Analytical and experimental considerations on the large-signal transient-responses of the buck-type switching regulator are described. The behaviour under the large-signal operation is different from the case of small signal because of the saturation characteristics of the PWM feedback controller. The effect of this nonlinearity is analyzed by dividing its operation into three modes. As a result, the maximum peak values of the inrush current and output voltage are obtained analytically both for the start-up and for the step change of the load current.

  3. Ventilatory response to transient hypoxia in O2 divers.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Y; Kerem, D

    1988-05-01

    This study addresses the question of whether repeated acute exposure to hyperbaric oxygen, such as encountered in O2 diving, affects the peripheral oxygen chemosensors. Groups of nondivers, active O2 divers, and ex-O2 divers, as well as active air scuba divers, were given 1 or both of 2 tests that measure the ventilatory response to transient hypoxia. Results showed that all groups of divers have a mean response similar to or higher than that of nondivers as well as that of normal subjects, as reported in the literature. A repeat test on 10 diving candidates before and after 200 h of accrued O2 diving also did not show an impairment in the hypoxic ventilatory response. Oxygen diving within the established depth and time limits does not seem to cause cumulative damage to the peripheral O2 chemosensors.

  4. Transient response of severe thunderstorm forcing to elevated greenhouse gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, Robert J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; Gluhovsky, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the transient response of severe-thunderstorm forcing to the time-varying greenhouse gas concentrations associated with the A1B emissions scenario. Using a five-member ensemble of global climate model experiments, we find a positive trend in such forcing within the United States, over the period 1950-2099. The rate of increase varies by geographic region, depending on (i) low-level water vapor availability and transport, and (ii) the frequency of synoptic-scale cyclones during the warm season. Our results indicate that deceleration of the greenhouse gas emissions trajectory would likely result in slower increases in severe thunderstorm forcing.

  5. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    SciTech Connect

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (∼10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (∼10{sup −3} Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (∼1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N{sub 2} gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N{sub 2}, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  6. Ionosphere Transient Response To Solar Flares: Hf Radio Monitoring Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.-P.; Telljohann, U.; Witasse, O.; Sanderson, T. R.

    We use a simple and low cost method to monitor the ionospheric reflection of commer- cial HF radio transmissions. It only requires a standard HF radio receiver with Single Side Band capability, a computer with a sound card, and appropriate audio signal spectral analysis software. We tune the radio receiver such that the carrier frequency of the transmission appears as a ~ 1kHz tone at the output of the radio receiver. The output signal of the radio receiver is processed with appropriate software that allows real time recording of high frequency resolution dynamic spectrograms of the audio spectrum in the 0-5 kHz range. Voice modulation is also present in the audio spectrum and appears as both upper and lower side bands but it is not considered in this study. HF radio signals reach the receiving station after being reflected by ionospheric layers. Any change in the ionospheric layers that affects HF wave reflection is detectable. In this paper, we particularly discuss our observations related to the transient response of the ionosphere to solar flare ionizing radiation. Enhanced ionization due to EUV and soft X-rays may produce a transient perturbation of the ionosphere which lasts typically one to few minutes. The signature of the transient response depends upon local time, solar flare intensity and the rise time of the solar flare ionizing radiation. We discuss both a few typical examples and a preliminary analysis of our 1-year sta- tistical analysis of observed events at 17.640 MHz. The method is easily accessible to amateur scientists. Possible use of the method for spaceweather-related research and outreach and educational activities is discussed.

  7. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field.

    PubMed

    Sadeq, Zaheen S; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal "toy" model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  8. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeq, Zaheen S.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal “toy” model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  9. Angular response calibration of the burst and transient source experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1988-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory includes four experiments designed to observe the gamma-ray universe. Laboratory measurements to test the response the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) modules to gamma-ray sources that are non-axial were recently completed. The results of these observations are necessary for the correct interpretation of BATSE data obtained after it is put in Earth orbit. The launch is planned for March, 1900. Preliminary analyses of these test data show the presence of a radial dependence to the detector's light collection efficiency. It is proposed to evaluate the importance of this radial response, analyze future experimental data to derive the actual functional dependence on radius, and calculate the net effect on the output spectrum as a function of the angle of incidence.

  10. Rapid Response to transient events at the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comeron, Fernando

    2011-03-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) has been offering for the last eight years a Rapid Response Mode that allows authorized users to automatically trigger follow-up observations of transient phenomena. The delay between the reception of the trigger and the beginning of the science exposure is no more than a few minutes, similar to that of robotic telescopes. However, the sheer size of the VLT Unit Telescopes and the variety of its instrumentation have opened up new scientific fields where the Rapid Response capability has made a decisive difference. The mechanics of the Rapid Response Mode will be described, as well as some perspectives for its future implementation at the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). Operational possibilities to be enabled by a new large bandwidth link between the observatory and Europe, currently undergoing commissioning, will allow in the future near-real time interactivity between the facility and observers located in another continent, leading to the full exploitation of the Rapid Response Mode.

  11. The Multiscale Material Point Method for Simulating Transient Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Su, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Hetao; Jiang, Shan; Sewell, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    To effectively simulate multiscale transient responses such as impact and penetration without invoking master/slave treatment, the multiscale material point method (Multi-MPM) is being developed in which molecular dynamics at nanoscale and dissipative particle dynamics at mesoscale might be concurrently handled within the framework of the original MPM at microscale (continuum level). The proposed numerical scheme for concurrently linking different scales is described in this paper with simple examples for demonstration. It is shown from the preliminary study that the mapping and re-mapping procedure used in the original MPM could coarse-grain the information at fine scale and that the proposed interfacial scheme could provide a smooth link between different scales. Since the original MPM is an extension from computational fluid dynamics to solid dynamics, the proposed Multi-MPM might also become robust for dealing with multiphase interactions involving failure evolution. This work is supported in part by DTRA and NSFC.

  12. Nonlinear transient response of unanchored liquid storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Haroun, M.A.; El-Zeiny, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    Commonly used seismic analysis methods for unanchored liquid storage tanks have repeatedly demonstrated inconsistencies in predicting the actual behavior of these structures. Most methods incorporate a pseudo-dynamic analysis in lieu of the full time-dependent seismic analysis. Further, the estimation of liquid-exerted overturning moments lacks explicit consideration of the support effects. These overturning moments tend to lift the shell off its foundation which may cause buckling of the shell on one side and a separation of the base plate from the shell on the other. A finite element program capable of handling the complexities associated with the nonlinear transient response of unanchored tanks was developed. It was observed that the overturning moment exerted on an unanchored tank may be smaller than that exerted on a similar anchored tank, yet the stresses at the shell bottom of an unanchored tank shell are generally much larger than those of an anchored tank subjected to same ground motion.

  13. Culturally and linguistically responsive teaching: part II.

    PubMed

    Billings, Diane M

    2015-03-01

    This part II of a two-part article about culturally and linguistically responsive teaching provides suggestions for evaluating learners who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) and are often under-represented in nursing education settings.

  14. Transient response of Salix cuttings to changing water level regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, L.; Signarbieux, C.; Turberg, P.; Buttler, A.; Perona, P.

    2015-03-01

    Sustainable water management requires an understanding of the effects of flow regulation on riparian ecomorphological processes. We investigated the transient response of Salix viminalis by examining the effect of water-level regimes on its above-ground and below-ground biomass. Four sets of Salix cuttings, three juveniles (in the first growing season) and one mature (1 year old), were planted and initially grown under the same water-level regime for 1 month. We imposed three different water-level regime treatments representing natural variability, a seasonal trend with no peaks, and minimal flow (characteristic of hydropower) consisting of a constant water level and natural flood peaks. We measured sap flux, stem water potential, photosynthesis, growth parameters, and final root architecture. The mature cuttings were not affected by water table dynamics, but the juveniles displayed causal relationships between the changing water regime, plant growth, and root distribution during a 2 month transient period. For example, a 50% drop in mean sap flux corresponded with a -1.5 Mpa decrease in leaf water potential during the first day after the water regime was changed. In agreement with published field observations, the cuttings concentrated their roots close to the mean water table of the corresponding treatment, allowing survival under altered conditions and resilience to successive stress events. Juvenile development was strongly impacted by the minimum flow regime, leading to more than 60% reduction of both above-ground and below-ground biomass, with respect to the other treatments. Hence, we suggest avoiding minimum flow regimes where Salix restoration is prioritized.

  15. Spinal mechanisms underlying potentiation of hindpaw responses observed after transient hindpaw ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Mika; Komagata, Seiji; Tsukano, Hiroaki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Kohno, Tatsuro; Baba, Hiroshi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemia produces postischemic tingling sensation. Ischemia also produces nerve conduction block that may modulate spinal neural circuits. In the present study, reduced mechanical thresholds for hindpaw-withdrawal reflex were found in mice after transient hindpaw ischemia, which was produced by a high pressure applied around the hindpaw for 30 min. The reduction in the threshold was blocked by spinal application of LY354740, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Neural activities in the spinal cord and the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) were investigated using activity-dependent changes in endogenous fluorescence derived from mitochondrial flavoproteins. Ischemic treatment induced potentiation of the ipsilateral spinal and contralateral S1 responses to hindpaw stimulation. Both types of potentiation were blocked by spinal application of LY354740. The contralateral S1 responses, abolished by lesioning the ipsilateral dorsal column, reappeared after ischemic treatment, indicating that postischemic tingling sensation reflects a sensory modality shift from tactile sensation to nociception in the spinal cord. Changes in neural responses were investigated during ischemic treatment in the contralateral spinal cord and the ipsilateral S1. Potentiation already appeared during ischemic treatment for 30 min. The present findings suggest that the postischemic potentiation shares spinal mechanisms, at least in part, with neuropathic pain. PMID:26165560

  16. Unstable transient response of gyroscopic systems with stable eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, O.

    2016-06-01

    Gyroscopic conservative dynamical systems may exhibit flutter instability that leads to a pair of complex conjugate eigenvalues, one of which has a positive real part and thus leads to a divergent free response of the system. When dealing with non-conservative systems, the pitch fork bifurcation shifts toward the negative real part of the root locus, presenting a pair of eigenvalues with equal imaginary parts, while the real parts may or may not be negative. Several works study the stability of these systems for relevant engineering applications such as the flutter in airplane wings or suspended bridges, brake squeal, etc. and a common approach to detect the stability is the complex eigenvalue analysis that considers systems with all negative real part eigenvalues as stable systems. This paper studies analytically and numerically the cases where the free response of these systems exhibits a transient divergent time history even if all the eigenvalues have negative real part thus usually considered as stable, and relates such a behaviour to the non orthogonality of the eigenvectors. Finally, a numerical method to evaluate the presence of such instability is proposed.

  17. Validation of the transient Structural Response of a Threaded Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, S. W.; Hemez, F. M.; Schultze, J. F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will demonstrate the application of model validation techniques to a transient structural dynamics problem. The problem of interest is the propagation of an explosive shock through a complex threaded joint that is a surrogate model of a system assembly. The objective is to validate the computational modeling of the key mechanical phenomena in the assembly, so that the component can be represented with adequate fidelity in the system-level model. A set of experiments was conducted on the threaded assembly where the acceleration and strain responses to an explosive load were measured on mass-simulators representing payloads. A significantly detailed computational model of the threaded assembly was also created. Numerical features that represent the important characteristics of the response were defined and calculated for both the experimental and computational data. Each step of the model validation process will be described as applied to this problem. Fundamental issues regarding the nature of model validation and the role of model validation in the engineering analysis process will also be discussed.

  18. Radial response of the burst and transient source experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1989-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) includes four experiments designed for observe the gamma-ray universe, one of which is the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). During the first summer with the BATSE team in 1988, laboratory measurements were completed which test the response of the BATSE modules to gamma-ray sources that are non-axial. The results of these observations are necessary for the correct interpretation of BATSE data obtained after it is put in earth orbit. Subsequent analysis of the data revealed a shift in the centroids of the full-energy photopeaks for angles of incidence between about 70 and 110 degrees. This effect was diagnosed as being due to a radial dependence of the light collecting efficiency of the large-area detector (LAD). Energy-depositing events that occur near the perimeter of the 10-inch radius NaI disc are not as efficiently collected as those events that occur near the disc's center. This radial response is analyzed and in so doing the non-Gaussian shape of the photopeaks seen in the spectra taken at all angles is explained.

  19. Retrieving reflection responses by crosscorrelating transmission responses from deterministic transient sources: application to ultrasonic data.

    PubMed

    Draganov, Deyan; Wapenaar, Kees; Thorbecke, Jan; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2007-11-01

    By crosscorrelating transmission recordings of acoustic or elastic wave fields at two points, one can retrieve the reflection response between these two points. This technique has previously been applied to measured elastic data using diffuse wave-field recordings. These recordings should be relatively very long. The retrieval can also be achieved by using deterministic transient sources with the advantage of using short recordings, but with the necessity of using many P-wave and S-wave sources. Here, it is shown how reflections were retrieved from the cross correlation of transient ultrasonic transmission data measured on a heterogeneous granite sample.

  20. A framework to understand the transient climate response to emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard G.; Goodwin, Philip; Roussenov, Vassil M.; Bopp, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Global surface warming projections have been empirically connected to carbon emissions via a climate index defined as the transient climate response to emissions (TCRE), revealing that surface warming is nearly proportional to carbon emissions. Here, we provide a theoretical framework to understand the TCRE including the effects of all radiative forcing in terms of the product of three terms: the dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing, the fractional radiative forcing contribution from atmospheric CO2 and the dependence of radiative forcing from atmospheric CO2 on cumulative carbon emissions. This framework is used to interpret the climate response over the next century for two Earth System Models of differing complexity, both containing a representation of the carbon cycle: an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity, configured as an idealised coupled atmosphere and ocean, and an Earth System Model, based on an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model and including non-CO2 radiative forcing and a land carbon cycle. Both Earth System Models simulate only a slight decrease in the TCRE over 2005-2100. This limited change in the TCRE is due to the ocean and terrestrial system acting to sequester both heat and carbon: carbon uptake acts to decrease the dependence of radiative forcing from CO2 on carbon emissions, which is partly compensated by changes in ocean heat uptake acting to increase the dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing. On decadal timescales, there are larger changes in the TCRE due to changes in ocean heat uptake and changes in non-CO2 radiative forcing, as represented by decadal changes in the dependences of surface warming on radiative forcing and the fractional radiative forcing contribution from atmospheric CO2. Our framework may be used to interpret the response of different climate models and used to provide traceability between climate models of differing complexity.

  1. A theory of post-stall transients in axial compression systems. II - Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greitzer, E. M.; Moore, F. K.

    1985-01-01

    Using the theory developed in Part I, calculations have been carried out to show the evolution of the mass flow, pressure rise, and rotating-stall cell amplitude during compression system post-stall transients. In particular, it is shown that the unsteady growth or decay of the stall cell can have a significant effect on the instantaneous compressor pumping characteristic and hence on the overall system behavior. A limited parametric study is carried out to illustrate the impact of different system features on transient behavior. It is shown, for example, that the ultimate mode of system response, surge or stable rotating stall, depends not only on the B parameter, but also on the compressor length-to-radius ratio. Small values of this latter quantity tend to favor the occurrence of surge, as do large values of B. Based on the analytical and numerical results, several specific topics are suggested for future research on post-stall transients.

  2. Methodology to estimate the transient evoked responses for the generation of steady state responses.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez, Jorge; Ozdamar, Ozcan; Açikgöz, Nuri; Yavuz, Erdem

    2007-01-01

    A method to acquire transient evoked responses at high rates, corresponding to traditional steady state responses (SSR) is developed. Continuous Loop Averaging Deconvolution (CLAD) method is used in conjunction with tailored, low-jitter stimulation sequences. A physiological brain convolution model for SSR generation is adapted and mathematically analyzed. A SSR synthesis method from acquired transient evoked potentials is proposed and implemented. The mathematical models are used to guide the stimulation sequence design method. Visual evoked potentials (VEP) at 10 Hz and auditory evoked responses (AER) at 40 Hz and 80 Hz are acquired using the specially designed and the traditional SSR sequences. Acquired and synthetically generated SSRs are then compared in time and frequency domains to asses the method consistency. The experimental results show an excellent agreement between the acquired and synthetic SSR in all three modalities.

  3. An approximate method for analyzing transient condensation on spray in HYLIFE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, R.Y.; Schrock, V.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The HYLIFE-II conceptual design calls for analysis of highly transient condensation on droplets to achieve a rapidly decaying pressure field. Drops exposed to the required transient vapor pressure field are first heated by condensation but later begin to reevaporate after the vapor temperature falls below the drop surface temperature. An approximate method of analysis has been developed based on the assumption that the thermal resistance is concentrated in the liquid. The time dependent boundary condition is treated via the Duhamel integral for the pure conduction model. The resulting Nusselt number is enhanced to account for convection within the drop and then used to predict the drop mean temperature history. Many histories are considered to determine the spray rate necessary to achieve the required complete condensation.

  4. Transient response of a thermal buffer: a study for ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider. W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Operation of the superconducting magnets in ISABELLE may necessitate rapid cooldown and warmup from ambient (300K) to liquid helium temperature (3K) to meet the requirements of the experimental program. Similarly, unprogrammed temperature excursions can also occur due to operator error or equipment malfunction. The coal bore tube of the magnets has a small mass relative to the more massive iron laminations and the stainless steel support tube. In addition the magnet coil, in thermal contact with the cold bore tube, has excellent heat transfer to the helium flowing through it compared to the iron mass. These two factors, mass and heat transfer, dictate that the cold bore tube will follow the temperature of the coolant more closely than the iron and hence substantial temperature gradients can exist. If the temperature difference between the coolant and the iron in the magnet exceeds 44K stress failure may occur to either the cold bore tube or the magnet dewar end cap. To preclude such failures from occuring at least two options are available. One method is to modify the magnet design by introducing flexibility between the bore tube and the end plate. Another is to introduce an insensitive thermal mass or buffer as has been suggested by Shutt, at the inlet of a sextant ahead of the first magnets. This paper describes the latter method, the design and transient response of a buffer during cooldown.

  5. Transient elastic impact response of slender graphite rods

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, I.

    2007-12-15

    Graphite rods are manufactured by extruding the mixture of calcined petroleum coke and coal tar pitch into the desired shape and baking the cooled specimens at about 800{sup o}C. Cracking can occur in rods during the manufacturing process. It is useful to be able to detect the presence of such cracks in the rods prior to their being machined and put into use as electrodes or cathodes or thermal insulator. In an effort to develop a nondestructive testing approach to evaluation of the rods, transient elastic impact was determined for slender rods. Theory for solid, slender rods provided an important starting point for this work. Subsequently, numerical models were developed and simulation was used to determine the response of rods containing cracks. Experiments on graphite rods with and without cracks were conducted and the internal condition determined from the recorded signals. The rods were then cut lengthwise to reveal the internal condition and verify the predicted results. In all cases the knowledge gained from simulation allowed for the presence of cracks to be detected.

  6. Sensor Webs: Autonomous Rapid Response to Monitor Transient Science Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Grosvenor, Sandra; Frye, Stu; Sherwood, Robert; Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Cichy, Ben; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix

    2005-01-01

    To better understand how physical phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions, evolve over time, multiple sensor observations over the duration of the event are required. Using sensor web approaches that integrate original detections by in-situ sensors and global-coverage, lower-resolution, on-orbit assets with automated rapid response observations from high resolution sensors, more observations of significant events can be made with increased temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution. This paper describes experiments using Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) along with other space and ground assets to implement progressive mission autonomy to identify, locate and image with high resolution instruments phenomena such as wildfires, volcanoes, floods and ice breakup. The software that plans, schedules and controls the various satellite assets are used to form ad hoc constellations which enable collaborative autonomous image collections triggered by transient phenomena. This software is both flight and ground based and works in concert to run all of the required assets cohesively and includes software that is model-based, artificial intelligence software.

  7. Type II bursts, shock waves, and coronal transients - The event of 1980 June 29, 0233 UT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, D. E.; Dulk, G. A.; House, L.; Illing, R.; Sawyer, C.; Wagner, W. J.; Mclean, D. J.; Hildner, E.

    1984-01-01

    The metric Type-II solar burst event of June 29, 1980, is characterized on the basis of spatially resolved radioheliograph observations obtained at Culgoora, Australia, and visible-light observations obtained with the coronograph/polarimeter of the SMM satellite. The data are presented in images, diagrams, and graphs and discussed in detail. The Type-II emission is found to arise in the dense moving material behind the transient loops, which have sky-plane width 0.5 solar radius and line-of-sight depth 0.1-0.4 solar radius. A faint arc observed moving ahead of the transient loops at about 900 km/sec and not associated with the Type-II burst is attributed to a shock front, and the compression ratio and Alfven Mach number of the enhanced-density region are estimated as n2/n1 = 1.3-3 and M(A) = 1.2-3. The ambient material at 3 solar radii is determined to have Alfven speed 250-625 km/sec and magnetic-field strength 50-120 mG. The total mass of the event is calculated as 700 Tg; the total magnetic energy of the loops is (1.5-15) x 10 to the 29th ergs.

  8. Transient Response of Different Highly Conductive PCM Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Alhamdo, Mohammed H.; Bdaiwi, Bashar A.; Hasan, Ali H.

    In this work, the thermal conductivity of paraffin wax has been enhanced by employing four different high conductivity additives infiltrated within the PCM. These include the use of Graphite Powder (GP), Copper Particles (CP), Aluminum oxide Particles (AP), and Copper Network (CN). Four different types of pure waxes were selected, tested and compared. Twelve samples of wax/additives composites were prepared by adding different mass ratios of 3, 6 and 9 % of additives by weight in each type of wax. The storage system contains spherical capsules filled with composite PCMs that are packed in an insulated cylindrical storage. Transient temperature based governing equations have been developed and solved numerically by both ANSYS FLUENT 14 code and by numerical implicit time marching model. With progress of time, results showed that the numerical predictions of ANSYS software start to deviate from the experimental observations. The grade-B paraffin was found to be the best one. Results indicate that all the enhancement methods have significant effect on the thermal response of the system. However, the utilization of 6 % additives by weight has been found to provide the best enhancement effect. The developed new-sort CN composite is found to produce the best thermal response due to its good homogeneity with wax and its high conductivity. Results showed that for CN composite with 6 % additives, the charging and discharging time decreased by 26.4 and 30.3 % respectively than that of pure wax and the thermal conductivity enhanced by 2.57 times that of pure wax.

  9. Transient CNS responses to repeated binge ethanol treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Natalie M; Rohlfing, Torsten; Mayer, Dirk; Luong, Richard; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive changes occur in response to repeated exposure to drugs. Although ethanol (EtOH) is known to induce pharmacokinetic tolerance, the effects of EtOH on in vivo, magnetic resonance (MR)-detectable brain measures across repeated exposures have not previously been reported. Of 28 rats weighing 341±22g at baseline, 15 were assigned to the EtOH group and 13 to the control (Ctrl) group. EtOH animals were exposed to 5 cycles of 4-days of EtOH treatment followed by 10 days of recovery. Rats in both groups had structural MR imaging (MRI) scans and whole brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) at baseline, immediately following each binge period, and after each recovery period (total=11 MR scans per rat). Average blood alcohol levels (BALs) across each of the 5, 4-day binge periods were 298, 300, 301, 312, 318 mg/dL. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes of the lateral ventricles and cisterns showed enlargement with each binge EtOH exposure but recovery with each abstinence period. Similarly, changes to MRS metabolites were transient: levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) decreased, while those of choline-containing compounds (Cho) and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) increased with each binge EtOH exposure cycle, but also recovered during each abstinence period. The directionality of changes in response to EtOH were in expected directions based on previous, single-binge EtOH exposure experiments, but the current results do not provide support for accruing pathology with repeated binge EtOH exposure. PMID:26283309

  10. Effects of Activation Energy to Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Ohtani, Tatsuki

    The smell classifiable gas sensor will be desired for many applications such as gas detection alarms, process controls for food production and so on. We have tried to realize the sensor using transient responses of semiconductor gas sensor consisting of tin dioxide and pointed out that the sensor gave us different transient responses for kinds of gas. Results of model calculation showed the activation energy of chemical reaction on the sensor surface strongly depended on the transient response. We tried to estimate the activation energies by molecular orbital calculation with SnO2 Cluster. The results show that there is a liner relationship between the gradient of the transient responses and activation energies for carboxylic and alcoholic gases. Transient response will be predicted from activation energy in the same kind of gas and the smell discrimination by single semiconductor gas sensor will be realized by this relationship.

  11. Numerical Analyses on Transient Thermal Process of Gas - Cooled Current Leads in BEPC II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Yao, Z. L.; Wang, L.; Jia, L. X.

    2004-06-01

    A pair of high current leads will be used for the superconducting detector solenoid magnet and six pairs of low current leads will be used for the superconducting interaction quadruple magnets in the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPC II). This paper reports the numerical analyses on the thermal processes in the current leads, including the power charging process and overloaded current case as well as the transient characteristic of the leads once the helium cooling is interrupted. The design parameters of the current leads are studied for the stable and unstable conditions.

  12. The unique sound of the uni-vibe pedal: Part II. Transient behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius F.; Rothe, Hendrik

    2013-09-01

    The Uni-Vibe is an effect pedal mostly used by electric guitar players. It is based on an opto-electronically controlled all-pass chain. In last year's paper on the subject an idealized system model was derived, which lead to deeper discussion of the musical consequences of the effect in terms of harmonic analysis of single tones and chords in clean and distorted mode. As a direct continuation the present paper deals with the transient behaviour of the device. The transient response is essential for understanding the special sound character, the reaction on picking techniques and the interaction with certain instruments. Therefore the system model is expanded and the pulse response of the idealized time invariant system is derived.

  13. Study on transient beam loading compensation for China ADS proton linac injector II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; He, Yuan; Wang, Xian-Wu; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Rui-Feng; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; Chen, Qi; Powers, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Significant transient beam loading effects were observed during beam commissioning tests of prototype II of the injector for the accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, which took place at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, between October and December 2014. During these tests experiments were performed with continuous wave (CW) operation of the cavities with pulsed beam current, and the system was configured to make use of a prototype digital low level radio frequency (LLRF) controller. The system was originally operated in pulsed mode with a simple proportional plus integral and deviation (PID) feedback control algorithm, which was not able to maintain the desired gradient regulation during pulsed 10 mA beam operations. A unique simple transient beam loading compensation method which made use of a combination of proportional and integral (PI) feedback and feedforward control algorithm was implemented in order to significantly reduce the beam induced transient effect in the cavity gradients. The superconducting cavity field variation was reduced to less than 1.7% after turning on this control algorithm. The design and experimental results of this system are presented in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91426303, 11525523)

  14. Long-rising Type II supernovae from Palomar Transient Factory and Caltech Core-Collapse Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Fremling, C.; Migotto, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Armen, S.; Duggan, G.; Ergon, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fransson, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R. R.; Leloudas, G.; Leonard, D. C.; Lunnan, R.; Masci, F. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Silverman, J. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar hydrogen-rich event with a long-rising (~84 d) light curve, stemming from the explosion of a compact blue supergiant star. Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature in recent decades. Aims: We present new data for a sample of six long-rising Type II SNe (SNe II), three of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge this small family of long-rising SNe II, characterizing their differences in terms of progenitor and explosion parameters. We also study the metallicity of their environments. Methods: Optical light curves, spectra, and host-galaxy properties of these SNe are presented and analyzed. Detailed comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events in the literature are shown, with particular emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and host-galaxy metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband light curves. By modeling the early-time emission with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these transients. The modeling of the bolometric light curves also allows us to estimate other progenitor and explosion parameters, such as the ejected 56Ni mass, the explosion energy, and the ejecta mass. Results: We present PTF12kso, a long-rising SN II that is estimated to have the largest amount of ejected 56Ni mass measured for this class. PTF09gpn and PTF12kso are found at the lowest host metallicities observed for this SN group. The variety of early light-curve luminosities depends on the wide range of progenitor radii of these SNe, from a few tens of R⊙ (SN 2005ci) up to thousands (SN 2004ek) with some intermediate cases between 100 R⊙ (PTF09gpn) and 300 R⊙ (SN 2004em). Conclusions: We confirm that long-rising SNe II with light-curve shapes closely

  15. Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

    2011-07-01

    Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in Voc were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of ~1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in Voc after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale.

  16. Transient response of high temperature PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J.; Shin, J. Y.; Song, T. W.

    A transient three-dimensional, single-phase and non-isothermal numerical model of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell with high operating temperature has been developed and implemented in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for transient convective and diffusive transport, and allows prediction of species concentration. Electrochemical charge double-layer effect is considered. Heat generation according to electrochemical reaction and ohmic loss are involved. Water transportation across membrane is ignored due to low water electro-osmosis drag force of polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The prediction shows transient in current density which overshoots (undershoots) the stabilized state value when cell voltage is abruptly decreased (increased). The result shows that the peak of overshoot (undershoot) is related with cathode air stoichiometric mass flow rate instead of anode hydrogen stoichiometric mass flow rate. Current is moved smoothly and there are no overshoot or undershoot with the influence of charge double-layer effect. The maximum temperature is located in cathode catalyst layer and both fuel cell average temperature and temperature deviation are increased with increasing of current load.

  17. A transient laboratory method for determining the hydraulic properties of 'tight' rocks-II. Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.; Cooley, C.; Silliman, S.E.; Bredehoeft, J.D.; Hsieh, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    In Part I a general analytical solution for the transient pulse test was presented. Part II presents a graphical method for analyzing data from a test to obtain the hydraulic properties of the sample. The general solution depends on both hydraulic conductivity and specific storage and, in theory, analysis of the data can provide values for both of these hydraulic properties. However, in practice, one of two limiting cases may apply in which case it is possible to calculate only hydraulic conductivity or the product of hydraulic conductivity times specific storage. In this paper we examine the conditions when both hydraulic parameters can be calculated. The analyses of data from two tests are presented. In Appendix I the general solution presented in Part I is compared with an earlier analysis, in which compressive storage in the sample is assumed negligible, and the error in calculated hydraulic conductivity due to this simplifying assumption is examined. ?? 1981.

  18. The Coda of the Transient Response in a Sensitive Cochlea: A Computational Modeling Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2016-07-01

    In a sensitive cochlea, the basilar membrane response to transient excitation of any kind-normal acoustic or artificial intracochlear excitation-consists of not only a primary impulse but also a coda of delayed secondary responses with varying amplitudes but similar spectral content around the characteristic frequency of the measurement location. The coda, sometimes referred to as echoes or ringing, has been described as a form of local, short term memory which may influence the ability of the auditory system to detect gaps in an acoustic stimulus such as speech. Depending on the individual cochlea, the temporal gap between the primary impulse and the following coda ranges from once to thrice the group delay of the primary impulse (the group delay of the primary impulse is on the order of a few hundred microseconds). The coda is physiologically vulnerable, disappearing when the cochlea is compromised even slightly. The multicomponent sensitive response is not yet completely understood. We use a physiologically-based, mathematical model to investigate (i) the generation of the primary impulse response and the dependence of the group delay on the various stimulation methods, (ii) the effect of spatial perturbations in the properties of mechanically sensitive ion channels on the generation and separation of delayed secondary responses. The model suggests that the presence of the secondary responses depends on the wavenumber content of a perturbation and the activity level of the cochlea. In addition, the model shows that the varying temporal gaps between adjacent coda seen in experiments depend on the individual profiles of perturbations. Implications for non-invasive cochlear diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:27380177

  19. The Coda of the Transient Response in a Sensitive Cochlea: A Computational Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In a sensitive cochlea, the basilar membrane response to transient excitation of any kind–normal acoustic or artificial intracochlear excitation–consists of not only a primary impulse but also a coda of delayed secondary responses with varying amplitudes but similar spectral content around the characteristic frequency of the measurement location. The coda, sometimes referred to as echoes or ringing, has been described as a form of local, short term memory which may influence the ability of the auditory system to detect gaps in an acoustic stimulus such as speech. Depending on the individual cochlea, the temporal gap between the primary impulse and the following coda ranges from once to thrice the group delay of the primary impulse (the group delay of the primary impulse is on the order of a few hundred microseconds). The coda is physiologically vulnerable, disappearing when the cochlea is compromised even slightly. The multicomponent sensitive response is not yet completely understood. We use a physiologically-based, mathematical model to investigate (i) the generation of the primary impulse response and the dependence of the group delay on the various stimulation methods, (ii) the effect of spatial perturbations in the properties of mechanically sensitive ion channels on the generation and separation of delayed secondary responses. The model suggests that the presence of the secondary responses depends on the wavenumber content of a perturbation and the activity level of the cochlea. In addition, the model shows that the varying temporal gaps between adjacent coda seen in experiments depend on the individual profiles of perturbations. Implications for non-invasive cochlear diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:27380177

  20. REAL-TIME DETECTION AND RAPID MULTIWAVELENGTH FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGHLY SUBLUMINOUS TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Green, Yoav; Yaron, Ofer; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Xu Dong; Sternberg, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Walters, Richard; Nugent, Peter E.; Poznanski, Dovi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Emma S.

    2011-08-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is an optical wide-field variability survey carried out using a camera with a 7.8 deg{sup 2} field of view mounted on the 48 inch Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory. One of the key goals of this survey is to conduct high-cadence monitoring of the sky in order to detect optical transient sources shortly after they occur. Here, we describe the real-time capabilities of the PTF and our related rapid multiwavelength follow-up programs, extending from the radio to the {gamma}-ray bands. We present as a case study observations of the optical transient PTF10vdl (SN 2010id), revealed to be a very young core-collapse (Type II-P) supernova having a remarkably low luminosity. Our results demonstrate that the PTF now provides for optical transients the real-time discovery and rapid-response follow-up capabilities previously reserved only for high-energy transients like gamma-ray bursts.

  1. Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; Del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

    2011-01-01

    Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in V{sub oc} were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of {approx}1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in V{sub oc} after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale. Multiple methods of measuring {beta}V{sub oc} resulted in a range of values on the same CdTe PV module between -0.25%/C and -0.4%/C, possibly due to concurrent light-induced V{sub oc} transients and temperature changes. This paper highlights the need for rapid performance measurement of PV samples following light exposure and the possibility of incorrect results when using outdoor light exposure to collect values of {beta}V{sub oc} for CdTe modules.

  2. Distinct Features of Auditory Steady-State Responses as Compared to Transient Event-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Weiwei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Hu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Transient event-related potentials (ERPs) and steady-state responses (SSRs) have been popularly employed to investigate the function of the human brain, but their relationship still remains a matter of debate. Some researchers believed that SSRs could be explained by the linear summation of successive transient ERPs (superposition hypothesis), while others believed that SSRs were the result of the entrainment of a neural rhythm driven by the periodic repetition of a sensory stimulus (oscillatory entrainment hypothesis). In the present study, taking auditory modality as an example, we aimed to clarify the distinct features of SSRs, evoked by the 40-Hz and 60-Hz periodic auditory stimulation, as compared to transient ERPs, evoked by a single click. We observed that (1) SSRs were mainly generated by phase synchronization, while late latency responses (LLRs) in transient ERPs were mainly generated by power enhancement; (2) scalp topographies of LLRs in transient ERPs were markedly different from those of SSRs; (3) the powers of both 40-Hz and 60-Hz SSRs were significantly correlated, while they were not significantly correlated with the N1 power in transient ERPs; (4) whereas SSRs were dominantly modulated by stimulus intensity, middle latency responses (MLRs) were not significantly modulated by both stimulus intensity and subjective loudness judgment, and LLRs were significantly modulated by subjective loudness judgment even within the same stimulus intensity. All these findings indicated that high-frequency SSRs were different from both MLRs and LLRs in transient ERPs, thus supporting the possibility of oscillatory entrainment hypothesis to the generation of SSRs. Therefore, SSRs could be used to explore distinct neural responses as compared to transient ERPs, and help us reveal novel and reliable neural mechanisms of the human brain. PMID:23874901

  3. Comparison of pressure transient response in intensely and sparsely fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, R.T.

    1989-04-01

    A comprehensive analytical model is presented to study the pressure transient behavior of a naturally fractured reservoir with a continuous matrix block size distribution. Geologically realistic probability density functions of matrix block size are used to represent reservoirs of varying fracture intensity and uniformity. Transient interporosity flow is assumed and interporosity skin is incorporated. Drawdown and interference pressure transient tests are investigated. The results show distinctions in the pressure response from intensely and sparsely fractured reservoirs in the absence of interporosity skin. Also, uniformly and nonuniformly fractured reservoirs exhibit distinct responses, irrespective of the degree of fracture intensity. The pressure response in a nonuniformly fractured reservoir with large block size variability, approaches a nonfractured (homogeneous) reservoir response. Type curves are developed to estimate matrix block size variability and the degree of fracture intensity from drawdown and interference well tests.

  4. Transient response of sand bedforms to changes in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Lowland rivers commonly experience discharge variability spanning more than an order of magnitude, producing correspondingly large changes in bed morphology. However, field and lab studies indicate that bedform geometries lag changes in flow, producing hysteretic relationships between bed morphology, roughness, and water discharge. The ability of bedforms to maintain equilibrium with hydrodynamic flow variability thus depends on the timescale of transient bedform adjustment to flow. Here, we present results of flume experiments carried out at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, in which we continuously tracked adjustment of sand bedform morphologies to abrupt changes in water discharge. We show how the timescale of bedform adjustment is driven by three primary factors: 1. directionality of adjustment, 2. preexisting bedform geometry, and 3. sediment flux. Directionality of adjustment (rising versus falling water discharge) determines whether bedforms grow quickly by irreversible merger (rising flows) or shrink slowly through secondary bedform cannibalization of relict larger bedforms (falling flows). Preexisting bedform geometry (height and length) determines the amount of bed deformation required for adjustment to new equilibrium, and sediment flux determines the rate at which this change is affected. These three factors all favor faster adjustment of bedforms to rising flows. We experimentally demonstrate this bedform adjustment hysteresis through a variety of increasing and decreasing discharge changes, across both sand ripple and dune regimes. Finally, we propose and validate a simple conceptual model for estimating the adjustment timescale based on sediment flux and equilibrium bedform geometry.

  5. Numerical Analysis of Transient Temperature Response of Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Seiichi; Tatesaku, Akihiro; Dantsuka, Yuki; Fujiwara, Seiji; Kunimine, Kanji

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of thermophysical properties of thin liquid films are important to understand interfacial phenomena due to film structures composed of amphiphilic molecules in soap film, phospholipid bilayer of biological cell and emulsion. A transient hot-wire technique for liquid films less than 1 \\upmu m thick such as soap film has been proposed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity simultaneously. Two-dimensional heat conduction equations for a solid cylinder with a liquid film have been solved numerically. The temperature of a thin wire with liquid film increases steeply with its own heat generation. The feasibility of this technique is verified through numerical experiments for various thermal conductivities, diffusivities, and film thicknesses. Calculated results indicate that the increase in the volumetric average temperature of the thin wire sufficiently varies with the change of thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the soap film. Therefore, the temperature characteristics could be utilized to evaluate both the thermal conductivity and diffusivity using the Gauss-Newton method.

  6. The effect of hydrogen ion on the steady-state multiplicity of substrate-inhibited enzymatic reactions. II. Transient behavior.

    PubMed

    Elnashaie, S S; Elrifaie, M A; Ibrahim, G; Badra, G

    1983-12-01

    In this paper we concentrate our attention on the stability and transient behavior of the isothermal system (CSTR) with a substrate-inhibited enzyme reaction producing hydrogen ions. Our investigation covers the region of multiple steady states uncovered previously (1) (ordinary hysteresis and isola). We investigate the local stability characteristics of the different steady states, the effect of the initial condition on the transient behavior and the response of the system to feed disturbances of various magnitudes and durations.

  7. Minimizing the transient vibroacoustic response of a window to sonic booms by using stiffeners.

    PubMed

    Ou, Dayi; Ming Mak, Cheuk

    2014-04-01

    A stiffened-window strategy is proposed for reducing the window's transient responses to sonic booms. Additional movable and controllable stiffeners are used, which can improve the window's transient vibration and noise isolation performance without significantly reducing transparency. A simple prediction model is proposed as a design tool for implementing the stiffened-window structure, which allows for the computation of a plate with arbitrary elastic boundary conditions and arbitrarily located stiffeners. The predicted results agree well with experimental data. Also, the feasibility and validity of the stiffened-window strategy for improving the window's performance in response to sonic booms is demonstrated by parametric studies. PMID:25234966

  8. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a main feedwater turbopump trip transient in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-12-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos (ANV) have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); a load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); a load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); and, a feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the feedwater turbopump trip transient simulation. This transient actually occurred in the plant on June 19, 1989.

  9. A numerical and experimental investigation of premixed methane-air flame transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Habib N. Najm; Phillip H. Paul; Omar M. Knio; Andrew McIlroy

    2000-01-06

    The authors report the results of a numerical and experimental investigation of the response of premixed methane-air flames to transient strain-rate disturbances induced by a two-dimensional counter-rotating vortex-pair. The numerical and experimental time histories of flow and flame evolution are matched over a 10 ms interaction time. Measurements and computations of CH and OH peak data evolution are reported, and found to indicate mis-prediction of the flame time scales in the numerical model. Qualitative transient features of OH at rich conditions are not predicted in the computations. On the other hand, evolution of computed and measured normalized HCO fractions are in agreement. The computed CH{sub 3}O response exhibits a strong transient driven by changes to internal flame structure, namely temperature profile steepening, induced by the flow field. Steady state experimental PLIF CH{sub 3}O data is reported, but experimental transient CH{sub 3}O data is not available. The present analysis indicates that the flame responds at time scales that are quite distinct from ``propagation'' time scale derived from flame thickness and burning speed. Evidently, these propagation time scales are not adequate for characterizing the transient flame response.

  10. Distinguishing cells by their first-order transient motion response under an optically induced dielectrophoretic force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuliang; Liang, Wenfeng; Zhang, Guanglie; Mai, John D.; Liu, Lianqing; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Li, Wen J.

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports our characterization of the transient motion of cells under an optically induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP) force field. Different types of human cells repeatably undergo a first-order transient motion response when subjected to a specific ODEP force field. A kernel function is derived to describe this transient motion. This function can be generally matched to experimental data for Raji cells and red blood cells by measuring two parameters: the initial velocity and the transient time-constant. They are uniquely different for Raji cells and RBCs. Support vector machine is used to distinguish between them based on their transient response characteristics.

  11. Transient response of tapping scanning force microscopy in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J. |; Oden, P.I.; Thundat, T.

    1996-03-01

    Tapping-mode scanning force microscopy in liquids is usually accomplished by acoustic excitation of the cantilever because of the strong viscous damping. Contact of the tip with the sample surface results in a damping of the cantilever amplitude with an anharmonic response. This interaction is modeled as a viscous-damped, one-dimensional harmonic oscillator periodically perturbed by an exponential surface potential. Experimental results verify the validity of the model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  12. On Solutions for the Transient Response of Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Robert W.

    1959-01-01

    Williams type modal solutions of the elementary and Timoshenko beam equations are presented for the response of several uniform beams to a general applied load. Example computations are shown for a free-free beam subject to various concentrated loads at its center. Discussion includes factors influencing the convergence of modal solutions and factors to be considered in a choice of beam theory. Results obtained by two numerical procedures, the traveling-wave method and Houbolt's method, are also presented and discussed.

  13. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 Regulates Myocardial Response to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Naticchioni, Mindi; Karani, Rajiv; Smith, Margaret A.; Onusko, Evan; Robbins, Nathan; Jiang, Min; Radzyukevich, Tatiana; Fulford, Logan; Gao, Xu; Apel, Ryan; Heiny, Judith; Rubinstein, Jack; Koch, Sheryl E.

    2015-01-01

    The myocardial response to exercise is an adaptive mechanism that permits the heart to maintain cardiac output via improved cardiac function and development of hypertrophy. There are many overlapping mechanisms via which this occurs with calcium handling being a crucial component of this process. Our laboratory has previously found that the stretch sensitive TRPV2 channels are active regulators of calcium handling and cardiac function under baseline conditions based on our observations that TRPV2-KO mice have impaired cardiac function at baseline. The focus of this study was to determine the cardiac function of TRPV2-KO mice under exercise conditions. We measured skeletal muscle at baseline in WT and TRPV2-KO mice and subjected them to various exercise protocols and measured the cardiac response using echocardiography and molecular markers. Our results demonstrate that the TRPV2-KO mouse did not tolerate forced exercise although they became increasingly exercise tolerant with voluntary exercise. This occurs as the cardiac function deteriorates further with exercise. Thus, our conclusion is that TRPV2-KO mice have impaired cardiac functional response to exercise. PMID:26356305

  14. Estimation of a transient response from steady-state responses by deconvolution with built-in constraints.

    PubMed

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the steady-state response (SSR) elicited by a periodic train of auditory stimuli can largely be understood as a superposition of transient responses. This study is devoted to the problem of how to estimate that transient response from measured SSRs. The proposed method differs from previous approaches in that the solution can be constrained to be consistent with physiology-based prior knowledge or educated guesses. To achieve this goal, the transient response is not represented by a time series, but by a linear combination of auxiliary functions, called components. Constraints are introduced by assigning certain properties to the components. Only few parameters are required for that purpose, because the individual components are derived from a suitably designed mother component. After adjusting the components to the problem at hand, the component amplitudes are determined by optimizing the match between predicted and measured SSRs. This requires solving a linear inverse problem. A model simulation as well as an analysis of exemplary experimental data (auditory SSRs elicited by periodically presented clicks) prove the workability of the method. Since part of the theory is quite general, it would be relatively easy to refine and extend the method. Not only could responses other than SSRs be dealt with, it could also be realized that certain key parameters of the transient response, such as amplitude and delay, depend on stimulus repetition rate.

  15. Estimation of a transient response from steady-state responses by deconvolution with built-in constraints.

    PubMed

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the steady-state response (SSR) elicited by a periodic train of auditory stimuli can largely be understood as a superposition of transient responses. This study is devoted to the problem of how to estimate that transient response from measured SSRs. The proposed method differs from previous approaches in that the solution can be constrained to be consistent with physiology-based prior knowledge or educated guesses. To achieve this goal, the transient response is not represented by a time series, but by a linear combination of auxiliary functions, called components. Constraints are introduced by assigning certain properties to the components. Only few parameters are required for that purpose, because the individual components are derived from a suitably designed mother component. After adjusting the components to the problem at hand, the component amplitudes are determined by optimizing the match between predicted and measured SSRs. This requires solving a linear inverse problem. A model simulation as well as an analysis of exemplary experimental data (auditory SSRs elicited by periodically presented clicks) prove the workability of the method. Since part of the theory is quite general, it would be relatively easy to refine and extend the method. Not only could responses other than SSRs be dealt with, it could also be realized that certain key parameters of the transient response, such as amplitude and delay, depend on stimulus repetition rate. PMID:27234643

  16. Transient growth responses of the primary roots of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    List, A

    1969-03-01

    1. The technique of streak photography was modified to use seven parallel cameras, each focused on an individual root in a guide holding flowing nutrient. Streak photographs representing displacement of points on the longitudinal axis of the root were projected on the table of an image plane digitizer. The displacement data are collected on cards by an IBM 526 key punch and processed by an IBM 360-65 computer. All graphic data were plotted by an EAI line plotter having a resolution of 600 lines per inch. 2. Roots of corn held at a temperature of 25°, a pH of 5.6, with constant oxygen concentration and basic nutrient composition, were subjected to step changes in oxygen and auxin (3-indoleacetic acid, IAA) concentrations. When O2 was lowered the response of the root consisted of a large reduction in growth rate followed by a series of oscillations with a period of about 30-50 min. Step changes in IAA from 0-10(-8)M (or less) resulted in heavily dampened oscillatory responses as well as reduction in growth rate. 10(-7) M IAA, however, elicited the initial inhibition followed by full recovery of growth rate after a few hours. PMID:24504710

  17. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  18. Transient responses of nitrogenase to acetylene and oxygen in actinorhizal nodules and cultured Frania

    SciTech Connect

    Silvester, W.B.; Winship, L.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Nitrogenase activity in root nodules of four species of actinorhizal plants showed varying declines in response to exposure to acetylene (10% v/v). Gymnostoma papuanum (S.Moore) L. Johnson. and Casuarina equisetifolia L. nodules showed a small decline (5-15%) with little or no recovery over 15 minutes. Myrica gale L. nodules showed a sharp decline followed by a rapid return to peak activity. Alnus incana ssp. rugosa (Du Roi) Clausen. nodules usually showed varying degrees of decline followed by a slower return to peak or near-peak activity. We call these effects acetylene-induced transients. Rapid increases in oxygen tension also caused dramatic transient decreases in nitrogenase activity in all species. The magnitude of the transient decrease was related to the size of the O{sub 2} partial pressure (pO{sub 2}) rise, to the proximity of the starting and ending oxygen tensions to the pO{sub 2} optimum, and to the time for which the plant was exposed to the lower pO{sub 2}. Oxygen-induced transients, induced both by step jumps in pO{sub 2} and by O{sub 2} pulses, were also observed in cultures of Frankia. The effects seen in nodules are purely a response by the bacterium and not a nodule effect per se. Oxygen-induced nitrogenase transients in actinorhizal nodules from the plant genera tested here do not appear to be a result of changes in nodule diffusion resistance.

  19. Ritz method for transient response in systems having unsymmetric stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1989-01-01

    The DMAP coding was automated to such an extent by using the device of bubble vectors, that it is useable for analyses in its present form. This feasibility study demonstrates that the Ritz Method is so compelling as to warrant coding its modules in FORTRAN and organizing the resulting coding into a new Rigid Format. Even though this Ritz technique was developed for unsymmetric stiffness matrices, it offers advantages to problems with symmetric stiffnesses. If used for the symmetric case the solution would be simplified to one set of modes, because the adjoint would be the same as the primary. Its advantage in either type of symmetry over a classical eigenvalue modal expansion is that information density per Ritz mode is far richer than per eigenvalue mode; thus far fewer modes would be needed for the same accuracy and every mode would actively participate in the response. Considerable economy can be realized in adapting Ritz vectors for modal solutions. This new Ritz capability now makes NASTRAN even more powerful than before.

  20. Transient visual evoked neuromagnetic responses: Identification of multiple sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.; George, J.; Medvick, P.; Flynn, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.; Supek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Neuromagnetic measurements and associated modeling procedures must be able to resolve multiple sources in order to localize and accurately characterize the generators of visual evoked neuromagnetic activity. Workers have identified at least 11 areas in the macaque, throughout occipital, parietal, and temporal cortex, which are primarily or entirely visual in function. The surface area of the human occipital lobe is estimated to be 150--250cm. Primary visual cortex covers approximately 26cm/sup 2/ while secondary visual areas comprise the remaining area. For evoked response amplitudes typical of human MEG data, one report estimates that a two-dipole field may be statistically distinguishable from that of a single dipole when the separation is greater than 1--2 cm. Given the estimated expanse of cortex devoted to visual processes, along with this estimate of resolution limits it is likely that MEG can resolve sources associated with activity in multiple visual areas. Researchers have noted evidence for the existence of multiple sources when presenting visual stimuli in a half field; however, they did not attempt to localize them. We have examined numerous human MEG field patterns resulting from different visual field placements of a small sinusoidal grating which suggest the existence of multiple sources. The analyses we have utilized for resolving multiple sources in these studies differ depending on whether there was evidence of (1) synchronous activation of two spatially discrete sources or (2) two discrete asynchronous sources. In some cases we have observed field patterns which appear to be adequately explained by a single source changing its orientation and location across time. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Transient thermal hydraulics, heat transfer, and coupled vessel and piping responses. PVP-Volume 311

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Chang, F.C.; Madarame, H.; Moody, F.J.; Katze, D.

    1995-12-01

    This symposium addresses subjects involving transient fluid dynamics and heat transfer, their effects on structural responses, and fluid-structure interactions. The papers presented in this symposium discuss fluid transients, shock pressures, fluid forces giving rise to structural vibrations, chaotic system of two-phase flows, heat transfer, and other related subjects. Periodic or oscillating flows leading to steady as well as unstable vibrations are discussed. Analytical methods, including simple models suitable for conservative safety analyses, are presented. In addition, papers discussing experimental as well as numerical results are presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this conference.

  2. Identification of laser generated acoustic waves in the two-dimensional transient response of cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Rossignol, C.; Audoin, B.

    2005-06-01

    The published model [Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 4379-4381 (2003)] for the two-dimensional transient wave propagation in a cylinder is modified to avoid the inherited integration of the numerical inverse scheme. The Fourier series expansion is introduced for one spatial coordinate to resolve the transient response problem: theoretical radial displacements in either the ablation or the thermoelastic regime are obtained with little numerical noise and short computation time. The normal mode expansion method fails to deliver results with the same accuracy. Acoustic waves are fully identified by the ray trajectory analysis. These identified waves are further verified on the experimental results observed with the laser ultrasonic technique. .

  3. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a large, collaborative, multi-agency program to simulate and understand ecosystem dynamics for the continental U.S. The project involved the development of common data sets for model input including a high-resolution topographically-adjusted climate history of the U.S. from 1895-1993 on a 0.5? grid, with soils and vegetation cover. The vegetation cover data set includes a detailed agricultural data base based on USDA statistics and remote sensing, as well as natural vegetation (also derived from satellite imagery). Two principal model experiments were run. First, a series of ecosystem models were run from 1895 to 1993 to simulate current ecosystem biogeochemistry. Second, these same models were integrated forward using the output from two climate system models (CCC (Canadian Climate Centre) and Hadley Centre models) using climate results translated into the VEMAP grid and re-adjusted for high-resolution topography for the simulated period 1994-2100.[Quoted from http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/findings.html] The VEMAP Data Portal is a central collection of files maintained and serviced by the NCAR Data Group. These files (the VEMAP Community Datasets) represent a complete and current collection of VEMAP data files. All data files available through the Data Portal have undergone extensive quality assurance.[Taken from http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html] Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  4. Transient response of a high-capacity heat pipe for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, J. H.; Holmes, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    High-capacity heat pipe radiator panels have been proposed as the primary means of heat rejection for Space Station Freedom. In this system, the heat pipe would interface with the thermal bus condensers. Changes in system heat load can produce large temperature and heat load variations in individual heat pipes. Heat pipes could be required to start from an initially cold state, with heat loads temporarily exceeding their low-temperature transport capacity. The present research was motivated by the need for accurate prediction of such transient operating conditions. In this work, the cold startup of a 6.7-meter long high-capacity heat pipe is investigated experimentally and analytically. A transient thermohydraulic model of the heat pipe was developed which allows simulation of partially-primed operation. The results of cold startup tests using both constant temperature and constant heat flux evaporator boundary conditions are shown to be in good agreement with predicted transient response.

  5. Metallothionein-II Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation and Improves Functional Recovery after Transient Brain Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Vacio-Adame, Patricia; Monroy-Noyola, Antonio; Méndez-Armenta, Marisela; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    After transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), damaging mechanisms, such as excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, lead to irreversible neurological deficits. The induction of metallothionein-II (MT-II) protein is an endogenous mechanism after I/R. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of MT-II after I/R in rats. Male Wistar rats were transiently occluded at the middle cerebral artery for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Rats received either MT (10 μg per rat i.p.) or vehicle after ischemia. Lipid peroxidation (LP) was measured 22 h after reperfusion in frontal cortex and hippocampus; also, neurological deficit was evaluated after ischemia, using the Longa scoring scale. Infarction area was analyzed 72 hours after ischemia. Results showed increased LP in frontal cortex (30.7%) and hippocampus (26.4%), as compared to control group; this effect was fully reversed by MT treatment. Likewise, we also observed a diminished neurological deficit assessed by the Longa scale in those animals treated with MT compared to control group values. The MT-treated group showed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction of 39.9% in the infarction area, only at the level of hippocampus, as compared to control group. Results suggest that MT-II may be a novel neuroprotective treatment to prevent ischemia injury. PMID:24719677

  6. Computer experiments on periodic systems identification using rotor blade transient flapping-torsion responses at high advance ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Prelewicz, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Systems identification methods have recently been applied to rotorcraft to estimate stability derivatives from transient flight control response data. While these applications assumed a linear constant coefficient representation of the rotorcraft, the computer experiments described in this paper used transient responses in flap-bending and torsion of a rotor blade at high advance ratio which is a rapidly time varying periodic system.

  7. Transient electromagnetic response of a loop source over a rough geological medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Mark E.

    2009-05-01

    The theory of the transient controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) response of a loop source over a rough geological medium is developed in this paper. The governing fractional diffusion equation in the Laplace domain is solved semi-analytically, and the Gaver-Stehfest algorithm is then used to to numerically invert the associated Laplace transform. The geological medium is characterized by a spatially uniform roughness parameter β, which provides a more realistic description of subsurface geoelectrical structure than does a traditional piecewise smooth representation. Practitioners of the transient EM method can detect the presence of rough geology via observing a departure from the classical γ = -5.2 value of the late-time response slope along with a power-law behaviour of the zero-crossing time τH(L) as a function of transmitter-receiver separation. Field studies have indicated that rough geology can explain certain controlled-source EM responses with an economy of model parameters.

  8. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Subsurface Crack in a Conductive Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Fangwei

    2006-01-01

    Eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is usually carried out by exciting a time harmonic field using an inductive probe. However, a viable alternative is to use transient eddy current NDE in which a current pulse in a driver coil produces a transient .eld in a conductor that decays at a rate dependent on the conductivity and the permeability of the material and the coil configuration. By using transient eddy current, it is possible to estimate the properties of the conductive medium and to locate and size potential .aws from the measured probe response. The fundamental study described in this dissertation seeks to establish a theoretical understanding of the transient eddy current NDE. Compared with the Fourier transform method, the derived analytical formulations are more convenient when the transient eddy current response within a narrow time range is evaluated. The theoretical analysis provides a valuable tool to study the effect of layer thickness, location of defect, crack opening as well as the optimization of probe design. Analytical expressions have been developed to evaluate the transient response due to eddy currents in a conductive plate based on two asymptotic series. One series converges rapidly for a short time regime and the other for a long time regime and both of them agree with the results calculated by fast Fourier transform over all the times considered. The idea of asymptotic expansion is further applied to determine the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a pick-up coil due to eddy currents in a cylindrical rod. Starting from frequency domain representation, a quasi-static time domain dyadic Green's function for an electric source in a conductive plate has been derived. The resulting expression has three parts; a free space term, multiple image terms and partial reflection terms. The dyadic Green's function serves as the kernel of an electric field integral equation which defines the interaction of an ideal crack with the transient

  9. Response of standard and high-capacity HEPA filters to simulated tornado and explosive transients

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, W.S.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-03-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the response of standard and high-capacity high-efficiency particulate air filters to simulated tornado and explosive transients. Most of the tests were directed toward evaluating the structural response of high-capacity filters to explosive transients. Selected tests were performed to evaluate the effects of particulate loading on filtration efficiencies. Also, several of the high-capacity filters were subjected to simulated toronado transients. The results indicate that the upper structural limits of high-capacity filters for explosive loading is 6.89-kPa (1-psi) peak pressure and 100-kPa-ms (14.51-psi-ms) impulse. These limits are below the approximately 13.78-kPa (2-psi) peak pressure loadings found for standard HEPA filters. Tests of high-capacity filters preloaded with aerosol indicated that the structural limits were further degraded by approximately 40%. The filtration efficiencies were degraded to approximately 70% when the filters were subjected to aerosol entrained within the shock pulse. The effect of simulated tornado transients on high-capacity filters resulted in an upper structural limit of 11.02 kPa (1.6 psi) for peak pressure.

  10. The TOPAZ II space reactor response under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, S.S.

    1993-12-31

    The TOPAZ II is a single-cell thermionic space reactor power system developed by the Russians during the period of time from {approximately}1969 to 1989. The TOPAZ II has never been flight demonstrated, but the system was extensively tested on the ground. As part of the development and test program, the response of the TOPAZ II under accident conditions was analyzed and characterized. The US TOPAZ II team has been working closely with the Russian specialists to understand the TOPAZ II system, its operational characteristics, and its response under potential accident conditions. The purpose of the technical exchange is to enable a potential launch of a TOPAZ II by the US. The information is required to integrate the system with a US spacecraft and to support the safety review process. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the system and its response under actual and postulated accident conditions.

  11. Angiotensin II induces membrane trafficking of natively expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels in hypothalamic 4B cells.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashwini; Bachelor, Martha; Park, Yong H; Carreno, Flavia R; Nedungadi, T Prashant; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid family type 4 (TRPV4) channels are expressed in central neuroendocrine neurons and have been shown to be polymodal in other systems. We previously reported that in the rodent, a model of dilutional hyponatremia associated with hepatic cirrhosis, TRPV4 expression is increased in lipid rafts from the hypothalamus and that this effect may be angiotensin dependent. In this study, we utilized the immortalized neuroendocrine rat hypothalamic 4B cell line to more directly test the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) on TRPV4 expression and function. Our results demonstrate the expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) transcripts, for sex-determining region Y (SRY) (male genotype), arginine vasopressin (AVP), TRPV4, and ANG II type 1a and 1b receptor in 4B cells. After a 1-h incubation in ANG II (100 nM), 4B cells showed increased TRPV4 abundance in the plasma membrane fraction, and this effect was prevented by the ANG II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan (1 μM) and by a Src kinase inhibitor PP2 (10 μM). Ratiometric calcium imaging experiments demonstrated that ANG II incubation potentiated TRPV4 agonist (GSK 1016790A, 20 nM)-induced calcium influx (control 18.4 ± 2.8% n = 5 and ANG II 80.5 ± 2.4% n = 5). This ANG II-induced increase in calcium influx was also blocked by 1 μM losartan and 10 μM PP2 (losartan 26.4 ± 3.8% n = 5 and PP2 19.7 ± 3.9% n = 5). Our data suggests that ANG II can increase TRPV4 channel membrane expression in 4B cells through its action on AT1R involving a Src kinase pathway. PMID:25080500

  12. Transient responses of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and computerized study of the steady state and transient response of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system was completed. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of the PAFC system's operation were accomplished. Four non-linear dynamic models of the fuel cell stack, reformer, shift converters, and heat exchangers were developed based on nonhomogeneous non-linear partial differential equations, which include the material, component, energy balance, and electrochemical kinetic features. Due to a lack of experimental data for the dynamic response of the components only the steady state results were compared with data from other sources, indicating reasonably good agreement. A steady state simulation of the entire system was developed using, nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The finite difference method and trial-and-error procedures were used to obtain a solution. Using the model, a PAFC system, that was developed under NASA Grant, NCC3-17, was improved through the optimization of the heat exchanger network. Three types of cooling configurations for cell plates were evaluated to obtain the best current density and temperature distributions. The steady state solutions were used as the initial conditions in the dynamic model. The transient response of a simplified PAFC system, which included all of the major components, subjected to a load change was obtained. Due to the length of the computation time for the transient response calculations, analysis on a real-time computer was not possible. A simulation of the real-time calculations was developed on a batch type computer. The transient response characteristics are needed for the optimization of the design and control of the whole PAFC system. All of the models, procedures and simulations were programmed in Fortran and run on IBM 370 computers at Cleveland State University and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  13. Atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and climate: Importance of the transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.H.; Thompson, S.L.

    1981-04-20

    Preliminary studies suggest that the thermal inertia of the upper layers of the oceans, combined with vertical mixing of deeper oceanic waters, could delay the response of the globally averaged surface temperature to an increasing atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration by a decade or so relative to equilibrium calculations. This study extends the global analysis of the transient response to zonal averages, using a hierarchy of simple energy balance models and vertical mixing assumptions for water exchange between upper and deeper oceanic layers. It is found that because of the latitudinal dependence of both thermal inertia and radiative and dynamic energy exchange mechanisms, the approach toward equilibrium of the surface temperature of various regions of the earth will be significantly different from the global average approach. This suggests that the actual time evolution of the horizontal surface temperature gradients--and any associated regional climatic anomalies-may well be significantly different from that suggested by equilibrium climatic modeling simulations (or those computed with a highly unrealistic geographic distribution of ocean thermal capacity). Also, the transient response as a function of latitude is significantly different between globally equivalent CO/sub 2/ and solar constant focusing runs. It is suggested that the nature of the transient response is a major uncertainty in characterizing the CO/sub 2/ problem and that study of this topic should become a major priority for future research. An appendix puts this issue in the context of the overall CO/sub 2/ problem.

  14. Spatial variation in transient water table responses: Differences between an upper and lower hillslope zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haught, D.R.W.; Van Meerveld, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand storage-runoff dynamics, transient groundwater responses were examined in one of the steep watersheds in British Columbia's coastal mountains. Streamflow and piezometric data were collected for 1year to determine the spatial and temporal relations between transient groundwater levels and discharge. Correlations between piezometer responses and lag-time analysis were used to identify and better understand runoff generation mechanisms in this watershed. Results showed a large spatial and temporal variation in transient water table dynamics and indicated that two distinct zones existed: a lower hillslope zone and an upslope zone. Each zone was characterized by very different water table responses. The upper hillslope was disconnected from the stream for the majority of time, suggesting that during most events, it does not directly contribute to streamflow. Piezometers in the lower hillslope zone showed hydrologically limited responses, suggesting rapid subsurface flow, likely through the many macropores and soil pipes. The lag time between peak streamflow and peak groundwater level decreased with increasing antecedent moisture conditions and was more variable for piezometers further away from the stream than for piezometers close to the stream. The study results indicate that a single storage-runoff model is not appropriate for this steep watershed and that a two- or three-compartment model would be more suitable. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Permeability-thickness determination from transient production response at the southeast geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Faulder, D.D.

    1996-08-01

    The Fetkovich production decline curve analysis method was extended for application to vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs for the purpose of estimating the permeability-thickness product (kh) from the transient production response. The analytic dimensionless terms for pressure, production rate, decline rate, and decline time were derived for saturated steam using the real gas potential and customary geothermal production units of pounds-mass per hour. The derived terms were numerically validating using ``Geysers-line`` reservoir properties at initial water saturation of 0 and at permeabilities of 1, 10, and 100 mD. The production data for 48 wells in the Southeast Geysers were analyzed and the permeability-thickness products determined from the transient production response using the Fetkovich production decline type curve. The kh results were in very good agreement with the published range at the Southeast Geysers and show regions of high permeability-thickness.

  16. Liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems: A method for determining frequency response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.; Englund, D. R., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    An equation is given and experimentally verified for computing the resonant frequency of liquid-filled transient pressure measuring systems. Resonant frequencies of 100 to 1000 Hz are typical of those systems tested. The effect of noncondensable gas bubbles on system response is described. A method for determining transducer volumetric compliance is presented. An example system is described and analyzed to demonstrate the use of the theory.

  17. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using time-resolved digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as one of the biophysical methods by which to permeabilize plasma membranes of cells. In particular, high pressure transient hydrodynamic flows created by laser-induced cavitation have been shown to lead to the uptake of fluorophores and plasmid DNA. While the mechanism and dynamics of cavitation have been extensively studied using a variety of time-resolved imaging techniques, the cellular response to the cavitation bubble and cavitation induced transient hydrodynamic flows has never been shown in detail. We use time-resolved quantitative phase microscopy to study cellular response to laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped polystyrene nanoparticle (500nm in diameter) irradiated with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532nm creates transient shear stress to surrounding cells without causing cell lysis. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to laser-induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle offers localized cavitation (70 μm in diameter), which interacts with a single cell.

  18. Mars atmospheric dynamics as simulated by the NASA AMES General Circulation Model. II - Transient baroclinic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.; Leovy, C. B.; Zurek, R. W.; Lee, H.; Schaeffer, J.

    1993-02-01

    A large set of experiments performed with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model is analyzed to determine the properties, structure, and dynamics of the simulated transient baroclinic eddies. There is strong transient baroclinic eddy activity in the extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere during the northern autumn, winter, and spring seasons. The eddy activity remains strong for very large dust loadings, though it shifts northward. The eastward propagating eddies are characterized by zonal wavenumbers of 1-4 and periods of about 2-10 days. The properties of the GCM baroclinic eddies in the northern extratropics are compared in detail with analogous properties inferred from Viking Lander meteorology observations.

  19. Transient response of an electrorheological fluid under square-wave electric field excitation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Li, Cuihong; Zhang, Minliang; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu

    2005-08-01

    The transient process of an electrorheological (ER) fluid based on zeolite and silicone oil sheared between two parallel plates to which a square-wave electric field is applied has been experimentally studied. The transient shear stress response to the strain or time is tested. The characteristic constants of time under different applied electric fields and shear rates have been determined. The response time is found to be proportional to shear rate with an exponent of about -0.75 in the tested shear rate range, which agrees with the theoretical predictions made by others. But it only shows a small dependence on the strength of the applied electric field. The results show that the transient process of ER fluids is related to the structure formation in the shearing. When the required shear strain is reached, the shear stress rises to a stable value under constant electric field. Although the electric field strength greatly affects the yield strength, it shows little effect on the stress response time. Also, experiments showed the electric field-induced shear stress decreased with an increase of shear rate. PMID:15927589

  20. Estimation of the transient response of a tuned, fractionally damped elastomeric isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredette, Luke; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-11-01

    This article addresses the frequency dependent properties of elastomeric vibration isolators in the context of lumped parameter models with fractional damping elements. A mass is placed between two fractional calculus Kelvin-Voigt elements to develop a minimal order system for the example case of a conventional elastomeric bushing typical of automotive suspension systems. Model parameters are acquired from measured dynamic stiffness spectra and a finite element model. The minimal order system model accurately predicts dynamic stiffness in both broadband resonant behavior as well as the lower-frequency regime that is controlled by damping. For transient response analysis, an inverse Laplace transform of the dynamic stiffness spectrum is taken via the Residue Theorem. Since the fractional calculus based solution is given in terms of problematic integrals, a new time-frequency domain estimation technique is proposed which approximates time-domain responses for a class of transient excitation functions. The approximation error is quantified and found to be reasonably small, and tractable closed-form transient response functions are provided along with a discussion of numerical issues.

  1. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part II: Transient and Modulated Flow Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Fautrelle, Yves; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Baltaretu, Florin

    2016-08-01

    The present study considers the transient and modulated flow behaviors of liquid metal driven by a helical permanent magnetic field. The transient process, in which the fluid at rest experiences an increase in the angular velocity, is observed both in secondary and global axial flow with duration time less than 1 second. The flow fields are measured quantitatively to reveal the evolution of the transient flow, and the transient process is due to the variation of the electromagnetic force. Besides, the modulated flow behaviors of global axial flow, which is significantly different from that of secondary flow, is expected to avoid flow-induced macrosegregation in solidification process if the modulated time is suitable because its direction reversed periodically with the modulated helical stirrer. In addition, an optimal modulation frequency, under which the magnetic field could efficiently stir the solute at the solidification front, exists both in secondary and global axial flow (0.1 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively). Future investigations will focus on additional metallic alloy solidification experiments.

  2. ORIENTATION CLASSES FOR IN-MIGRANT TRANSIENT CHILDREN. A FIRST REPORT, PART II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PONDER, EDDIE G.; AND OTHERS

    A 3-YEAR STUDY OF THE ORIENTATION OF IMMIGRANT TRANSIENT CHILDREN WAS INITIATED IN SEPTEMBER, 1960. PART ONE GIVES AN OVERVIEW OF THE PROJECT FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1961-61. IT REVIEWS THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ORIENTATION CLASSES, THE INSERVICE PROGRAM, COMMUNITY ORIENTATION, AND REPORTS OF SPECIAL SERVICES GIVEN TO THE PROJECT CLASSES. PART TWO…

  3. Improved infrared cell reactor for use in transient response studies: the catalytic oxidation of CO reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, M.; Lucietto, L.L.; Li, Y.; Gonzalez, R.D.

    1986-10-01

    Recent advances in rapid scan infrared spectroscopy have revived an interest in in situ transient response studies in catalysis. However, the requirement of combining a small dead space cell volume reactor essential for transient response studies with single-pass differential flow capabilities has not yet been met. In order to meet these requirements, an infrared cell-reactor should conform to the following: (1) the residence time in the infrared cell-reactor should be less than the time required for scanning the spectrum; (2) the reactant gases should preferably be forced through the sample disk with little or no leakage around the edges: (3) the outlet from the infrared cell-reactor should be properly interfaced with a gas chromatograph or another suitable analytical measuring device such as a quadrupole mass spectrometer; and (4) the cell should be constructed to handle adequate heating schedules. In this paper the authors report on a new design which combines the features. The authors also consider the catalytic oxidation of CO over Pt/SiO/sub 2/ to illustrate the transient capabilities of the infrared cell-reactor. 11 references.

  4. The transient decline in hippocampal theta power during response inhibition in a positive patterning task.

    PubMed

    Sakimoto, Yuya; Sakata, Shogo

    2015-09-30

    It is believed that a transient decline in hippocampal theta power is induced by behavioral inhibition during a go/no-go stimulus discrimination task. In a previously reported positive patterning (PP) task, rats learn to lever press when a compound stimulus, both tone and light, is presented and inhibit their lever press when a single stimulus, tone or light, is presented. In this task, rats were required to inhibit their response to the single stimulus in a task where both compound and single stimuli were presented with an overlapping element. Thus, we hypothesized that there would be a transient decline in hippocampal theta power induced by behavioral inhibition to the presence of a single stimuli in the PP task. The result of this study showed that a decline in hippocampal theta power occurred during response inhibition to the presence of a single tone stimulus in the PP task, supporting our hypothesis. However, we did not observe any decline in hippocampal theta power during response inhibition to the presence of a single light stimulus. We found that the error response rate for the tone stimulus was slightly lower than that for light stimulus in the PP task. Thus, we proposed that the decline in hippocampal theta power related to more accurate response inhibition to the stimulus that had an overlapping element.

  5. Evidence of the peripheral inflammatory response in patients with transient ischemic attack.

    PubMed

    Ross, Amy Miner; Hurn, Patricia; Perrin, Nancy; Wood, Lisa; Carlini, Walter; Potempa, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    The peripheral inflammatory response, as a proxy for the acute-phase response (a known mechanism for ischemic preconditioning), and non-damage-producing transient ischemia must exist together in humans if this candidate mechanism confers ischemic tolerance. The present study was aimed at determining whether the peripheral inflammatory response (ie, elevated white blood cell, neutrophil, and monocyte counts) exists in transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke patients at the time of emergency room admission. The null hypothesis was tested for the variables of the peripheral inflammatory response between the mean of the laboratory normal population versus stroke and TIA patients. A retrospective review of 1041 medical records yielded 12 first-time TIA patients and 34 first-time stroke patients with no confounding evidence of other inflammatory processes. In both groups, neutrophil and monocyte percentages were significantly higher than the laboratory means (in TIA cases: neutrophils, 67.9% [12.67%], P = .001; monocytes, 8.2% [2.7%], P = .020; in stroke cases: neutrophils, 64.9% [9.1%], monocytes, 7.7% [1.6%]; both P < .001). Absolute neutrophil count was significantly higher than the laboratory mean for the stroke cases (5.13 [1.88] K/UL; P = .022). Lymphocyte percentages and absolute lymphocyte count in both groups were significantly and abnormally lower than the laboratory mean (in TIA cases, 21.7% [10.5%] and 1.4 [0.6] K/UL, respectively; in stroke cases, 24.7% [8.4%] and 1.9 [0.7] K/UL, respectively; all P response exists in transient ischemia, which hypothetically does not damage brain tissue, as well as in stroke (or permanent ischemia), which is known to produce brain tissue damage.

  6. Response-coefficient method for heat-conduction transients with time-dependent inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceylan, Tamer

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical overview of the response coefficient method for heat conduction transients with time-dependent input forcing functions is presented with a number of illustrative applications. The method may be the most convenient and economical if the same problem is to be solved many times with different input-time histories or if the solution time is relatively long. The method is applicable to a wide variety of problems, including irregular geometries, position-dependent boundary conditions, position-dependent physical properties, and nonperiodic irregular input histories. Nonuniform internal energy generation rates within the structure can also be handled by the method. The area of interest is long-time solutions, in which initial condition is unimportant, and not the early transient period. The method can be applied to one dimensional problems in cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates as well as to two dimensional problems in cartesian and cylindrical coordinates.

  7. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  8. Transient hyperprolactinemia has no effect on endocrine response and outcome in in vitro fertilization (IVF).

    PubMed

    Pattinson, H A; Taylor, P J; Fleetham, J A; Servis, S A

    1990-04-01

    Transient rises in plasma prolactin levels can be observed during the late follicular phases of both natural and stimulated cycles. It has been suggested that such a phenomenon might adversely affect the success of in vitro fertilization. This prospective study was designed to assess the effect of transient rises in prolactin levels on the endocrine response to ovarian stimulation and the outcome of in vitro fertilization treatment. A total of 90 treatment cycles in 87 couples was studied. Prolactin was measured in the mid and late follicular phases of the cycles. During the study period, 24 pregnancies occurred. There were no differences in those cycles in which pregnancy did or did not occur in either mid or late follicular prolactin levels. Neither the initial level nor the percentage rise in prolactin during the stimulation had any effect on the peak estradiol level achieved, the numbers of follicles seen, the number of eggs retrieved, or the incidence or outcome of pregnancy. It was concluded that transient hyperprolactinemia is of no significance in ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization.

  9. Modeling of the transient responses of the vocal fold lamina propria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W

    2009-01-01

    The human voice is produced by flow-induced self-sustained oscillation of the vocal fold lamina propria. The mechanical properties of vocal fold tissues are important for understanding phonation, including the time-dependent and transient changes in fundamental frequency (F(0)). Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on a group of specimens of the vocal fold lamina propria, including the superficial layer (vocal fold cover) (5 male, 5 female) and the deeper layers (vocal ligament) (6 male, 6 female). Results showed that the vocal fold lamina propria, like many other soft tissues, exhibits both elastic and viscous behavior. Specifically, the transient mechanical responses of cyclic stress relaxation and creep were observed. A three-network constitutive model composed of a hyperelastic equilibrium network in parallel with two viscoplastic time-dependent networks proves effective in characterizing the cyclic stress relaxation and creep behavior. For male vocal folds at a stretch of 1.4, significantly higher peak stress was found in the vocal ligament than in the vocal fold cover. Also, the male vocal ligament was significantly stiffer than the female vocal ligament. Our findings may help explain the mechanisms of some widely observed transient phenomena in F(0) regulation during phonation, such as the global declination in F(0) during the production of declarative sentences, and local F(0) changes such as overshoot and undershoot.

  10. Transient response of nonlinear magneto-optic rotation in a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeen, M. Ummal; Rangarajan, G.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-01-01

    We study resonant nonlinear magneto-optic rotation (NMOR) in a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell as the magnetic field is swept. At low sweep rates, the nonlinear rotation appears as a narrow resonance signal with a linewidth of about “300 μG” (2π×420 Hz). At high sweep rates, the signal shows transient response with an oscillatory decay. The decay time constant is of order 100 ms. The behavior is different for transitions starting from the lower or the upper hyperfine level of the ground state because of optical pumping effects.

  11. One-dimensional numerical analysis of the transient thermal response of multilayer insulative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, C. M.; Brinkley, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical analysis of the transient thermal response of multilayer insulative systems has been developed. The analysis can determine the temperature distribution through a system consisting of from one to four layers, one of which can be an air gap. Concentrated heat sinks at any interface can be included. The computer program based on the analysis will determine the thickness of a specified layer that will satisfy a temperature limit criterion at any point in the insulative system. The program will also automatically calculate the thickness at several points on a vehicle and determine total system mass.

  12. Abnormal autonomic cardiac response to transient hypoxia in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sangkatumvong, S; Coates, T D; Khoo, M C K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to non-invasively assess cardiac autonomic control in subjects with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by tracking the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) that occur following brief exposure to a hypoxic stimulus. Five African–American SCA patients and seven healthy control subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Each subject was exposed to a controlled hypoxic stimulus consisting of five breaths of nitrogen. Time-varying spectral analysis of HRV was applied to estimate the cardiac autonomic response to the transient episode of hypoxia. The confounding effects of changes in respiration on the HRV spectral indices were reduced by using a computational model. A significant decrease in the parameters related to parasympathetic control was detected in the post-hypoxic responses of the SCA subjects relative to normal controls. The spectral index related to sympathetic activity, on the other hand, showed a tendency to increase the following hypoxic stimulation, but the change was not significant. This study suggests that there is some degree of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in SCA that is revealed by the response to transient hypoxia. PMID:18460753

  13. Transient Response of Shells of Revolution by Direct Integration and Modal Superposition Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, W. B.; Adelman, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an analytical effort to obtain and evaluate transient response data for a cylindrical and a conical shell by use of two different approaches: direct integration and modal superposition are described. The inclusion of nonlinear terms is more important than the inclusion of secondary linear effects (transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia) although there are thin-shell structures where these secondary effects are important. The advantages of the direct integration approach are that geometric nonlinear and secondary effects are easy to include and high-frequency response may be calculated. In comparison to the modal superposition technique the computer storage requirements are smaller. The advantages of the modal superposition approach are that the solution is independent of the previous time history and that once the modal data are obtained, the response for repeated cases may be efficiently computed. Also, any admissible set of initial conditions can be applied.

  14. The Transient Dermal Exposure II: Post-Exposure Absorption and Evaporation of Volatile Compounds

    PubMed Central

    FRASCH, H. FREDERICK; BUNGE, ANNETTE L.

    2016-01-01

    The transient dermal exposure is one where the skin is exposed to chemical for a finite duration, after which the chemical is removed and no residue remains on the skin’s surface. Chemical within the skin at the end of the exposure period can still enter the systemic circulation. If it has some volatility, a portion of it will evaporate from the surface before it has a chance to be absorbed by the body. The fate of this post-exposure “skin depot” is the focus of this theoretical study. Laplace domain solutions for concentration distribution, flux, and cumulative mass absorption and evaporation are presented, and time domain results are obtained through numerical inversion. The Final Value Theorem is applied to obtain the analytical solutions for the total fractional absorption by the body and evaporation from skin at infinite time following a transient exposure. The solutions depend on two dimensionless variables: χ, the ratio of evaporation rate to steady-state dermal permeation rate; and the ratio of exposure time to membrane lag time. Simple closed form algebraic equations are presented that closely approximate the complete analytical solutions. Applications of the theory to the dermal risk assessment of pharmaceutical, occupational, and environmental exposures are presented for four example chemicals. PMID:25611182

  15. Mechanism of Formation of Copper(II) Chloro Complexes Revealed by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT/TDDFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Karabaeva, Kanykey E; Panov, Maxim S; Wilson, R Marshall; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Tveryanovich, Yury S; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2015-07-16

    Copper(II) complexes are extremely labile with typical ligand exchange rate constants on the order of 10(6)-10(9) M(-1) s(-1). As a result, it is often difficult to identify the actual formation mechanism of these complexes. In this work, using UV-vis transient absorption when probing in a broad time range (20 ps to 8 μs) in conjunction with DFT/TDDFT calculations, we studied the dynamics and underlying reaction mechanisms of the formation of extremely labile copper(II) CuCl4(2-) chloro complexes from copper(II) CuCl3(-) trichloro complexes and chloride ions. These two species, produced via photochemical dissociation of CuCl4(2-) upon 420 nm excitation into the ligand-to-metal-charge-transfer electronic state, are found to recombine into parent complexes with bimolecular rate constants of (9.0 ± 0.1) × 10(7) and (5.3 ± 0.4) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile and dichloromethane, respectively. In dichloromethane, recombination occurs via a simple one-step addition. In acetonitrile, where [CuCl3](-) reacts with the solvent to form a [CuCl3CH3CN](-) complex in less than 20 ps, recombination takes place via ligand exchange described by the associative interchange mechanism that involves a [CuCl4CH3CN](2-) intermediate. In both solvents, the recombination reaction is potential energy controlled. PMID:26079181

  16. Active landsliding and landscape denudation in response to transient tectonic uplift, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. L.; Roering, J. J.; Miller, S. R.; Kirby, E.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Californian Coast ranges present a unique area to study landscape response to transient tectonic uplift. Studies have shown that an increase in uplift may be balanced by the rate of landsliding in settings of steady uplift. However, the landsliding response to transient tectonic uplift remains to be elucidated. The Californian Coast ranges are shaped by the northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ), which geodynamic modeling suggests produces a transient double-humped uplift field. A major research question is whether we can detect a signature of this transient tectonic uplift in landslide activity and document how the channel network communicates this signal to hillslopes. Using air photos and Worldview imagery, we manually mapped more than 2000 earthflows and debris slides in the Eel and surrounding catchments that span the ~400 km-long region. The velocities of active earthflows were estimated by visually tracking features between images spanning 1993 to 2013. We mapped channel steepness from 10m NED DEMs in Topotoolbox 2 and developed a new tool to automatically define knickpoints along the channel network. Earthflows occur almost exclusively in a band of Franciscan mélange oriented along the MTJ transect whilst debris slides are more evenly distributed by lithology. Both earthflows and debris slides are clustered in the Eel catchment around the proposed uplift peaks and are largely absent outside of these zones. Within these areas of high landslide densities, we observe peaks in active earthflows adjacent to peaks in dormant earthflows to the south, suggesting that the signature of earthflow activity remains for a period of time once the uplift peak has passed. Landslide density, mean landslide area, and earthflow velocity all increase rapidly above threshold values of channel steepness and local relief. In the Eel catchment, where the zone of rapid uplift is commencing, landslides, particularly earth flows, are concentrated

  17. Comparison of Ring Current and Radiation Belt Responses during Transient Solar Wind Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, T. L.; Roeder, J. L.; Lemon, C.; Fennell, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of radiation belt dynamics provides insight into the physical mechanisms of trapping, energization, and loss of energetic particles in the magnetosphere. It is well known that the storm-time ring current response to solar wind drivers changes the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere, which modifies radiation belt particle trajectories as well as the magnetopause and geomagnetic cutoff locations. What is not well known is the detailed space-time structure of solar wind transient features that drive the dynamics of the ring-current and radiation belt response. We compare observed responses of the ring current and radiation belts during two geomagnetic storms of similar intensity on 15 November 2012 and 29 June 2013. Using the self-consistent ring current model RCM-Equilibrium (RCM-E), which ensures a force-balanced ring-current response at each time step, we generate a simulated ring current in response to the changing conditions as the storm evolves on a timescale of hours. Observations of the plasma sheet particles, fields, and solar wind parameters are used to specify the dynamic boundary conditions as the storm evolves. This allows more realistic magnetospheric field and plasma dynamics during solar wind transients than can be obtained from existing empirical models. Using a spatial mapping algorithm developed by Mulligan et al., (2012) we create two-dimensional contour maps of the solar wind bulk plasma parameters using ACE, Wind, Geotail, and THEMIS data to quantitatively follow upstream spatial variations in the radial and azimuthal dimensions driving the storm. We perform a comparison of how the structure and impact angle of the solar wind transients affect the intensity and duration of energization of the ring current and radiation belt at various energies. We also investigate how the varying geomagnetic conditions determined by the solar wind affect dominant loss mechanisms such as magnetopause shadowing. Comparison of energetic particle

  18. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-08-27

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  19. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  20. Microflowmeter-tension disc infiltrometer: Part II - Hydraulic properties estimation from transient infiltration rate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret-Fernández, David; Latorre, Borja; González-Cebollada, César

    2012-10-01

    SummaryMeasurements of soil sorptivity (S0) and hydraulic conductivity (K0) are of paramount importance for many soil-related studies involving disciplines such as agriculture, forestry and hydrology. In the last two decades, the disc infiltrometer has become a very popular instrument for estimations of soil hydraulic properties. The previous paper in this series presented a new design of disc infiltrometer that directly estimates the transient flow of infiltration rate curves. The objective of this paper is to present a simple procedure for estimating K0 and S0 from the linearisation of the transient infiltration rate curve with respect to the inverse of the square root of time (IRC). The technique was tested in the laboratory on 1D sand columns and 1D and 3D 2-mm sieved loam soil columns and validated under field conditions on three different soil surfaces. The estimated K0 and S0 were subsequently compared to the corresponding values calculated with the Vandervaere et al. (2000) technique, which calculates the soil hydraulic parameters from the linearisation of the differential cumulative infiltration curve with respect to the square root of time (DCI). The results showed that the IRC method, with more significant linearised models and higher values of the coefficient of determination, allows more accurate estimation of K0 and S0 than the DCI technique. Field experiments demonstrate that the IRC procedure also makes it possible to detect and eliminate the effect of the sand contact layer commonly used in the disc infiltrometry technique. Comparison between the measured and the modelled cumulative infiltration curves for the K0 and S0 values estimated by the DCI and IRC methods in all the 1D and 3D laboratory experiments and field measurements shows that the IRC technique allowed better fittings between measured and modelled cumulative infiltration curves, which indicates better estimations of the soil hydraulic properties.

  1. Transient response of a unit proton-exchange membrane fuel cell under various operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Junhyun; Kim, Han-Sang; Min, Kyoungdoug

    The transient response of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is an important criterion in their application to automotive systems. Nevertheless, few papers have attempted to study experimentally this dynamic behaviour and its causes. Using a large-effective-area (330 cm 2) unit PEMFC and a transparent unit PEMFC (25 cm 2), systematic transient response and cathode flooding during load changes are investigated. The cell voltage is acquired according to the current density change under a variety of stoichiometry, temperature and humidity conditions, as well as different flooding intensities. In the case of the transparent fuel cell, the cathode gas channel images are obtained simultaneously with a CCD imaging system. The different levels of undershoot occur at the moment of load change under different cathode stoichiometry, both cathode and anode side humidity and flooding intensity conditions. It is shown that undershoot behaviour consists of two stages with different time delays: one is of the order of 1 s and the other is of the order of 10 s. It takes about 1 s for the product water to come up on to the flow channel surface so that oxygen supply is temporarily blocked, which causes voltage loss in that "undershoot". The correlation of dynamic behaviour with stoichiometry and cathode flooding is analyzed from the results of these experiments.

  2. ONE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT THERMAL RESPONSE OF MULTILAYER INSULATIVE SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a one-dimensional numerical analysis of the transient thermal response of multi-layer insulative systems. The analysis can determine the temperature distribution through a system consisting of from one to four layers, one of which can be an air gap. Concentrated heat sinks at any interface can be included. The computer program based on the analysis will determine the thickness of a specified layer that will satisfy a temperature limit criterion at any point in the insulative system. The program will also automatically calculate the thickness at several points on a system and determine the total system mass. This program was developed as a tool for designing thermal protection systems for high-speed aerospace vehicles but could be adapted to many areas of industry involved in thermal insulation systems. In this package, the equations describing the transient thermal response of a system are developed. The governing differential equation for each layer and boundary condition are put in finite-difference form using a Taylor's series expansion. These equations yield an essentially tridiagonal matrix of unknown temperatures. A procedure based on Gauss' elimination method is used to solve the matrix. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for the CDC RUN compiler and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series machine operating under SCOPE 3.0. This program requires a minimum of 44K (octal) of 60 bit words of memory.

  3. The KIVA-II computer program for transient multidimensional chemically reactive flows with sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Since its public release in 1985, the KIVA computer program has been utilized for the time dependent analysis of chemically reacting flows with sprays in two and three space dimensions. This paper describes some of the improvements to the original version that have been made since that time. The new code called KIVA-II is planned for public release in early 1988. KIVA-II improves the earlier version in the accuracy and efficiency of the computational procedure, the accuracy of the physics submodels, and in versatility and ease of use. Numerical improvements include the use of the ICE solution procedure in place of the acoustic subcycling method and the implementation of a quasi-second-order-accurate convection scheme. Major extensions to the physical submodels include the inclusion of an optional k-epsilon turbulence model, and several additions to the spray model. We illustrate some of the new capabilities by means of example solutions. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Transient response of a vertical electric dipole (VED) on a two-layer medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, S. Y.; Kong, J. A.

    The transient electromagnetic radiation by a vertical electric dipole on a two-layer medium is analyzed using the double deformation technique, which is a modal technique based on identification of singularities in the complex frequency and wavenumber planes. Previous application of the double deformation technique to the solution of this problem is incomplete in the early time response. In this paper it is shown that the existence of a pole locus on the negative imaginary frequency axis, which dominates the early time response, proves crucial in obtaining the solution for all times. A variety of combinations of parameters are used to illustrate the double deformation technique, and results will be compared with those obtained via explicit inversion, and a single deformation method.

  5. Thermomechanical Response of a Gas to Spatially Resolved Power Deposition Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassoy, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) instability is characterized by growing pressure oscillations that affect the integrity and performance of the system. Modeling and prediction have been topics of intense interest to designers for more than 60 years. LPRE combustion provides a wonderful opportunity to employ thermomechanical concepts and mathematical methodologies to quantify the response of combustion chamber gases to spatially distributed, transient thermal energy deposition. Nondimensional Euler equations, including a power deposition term in the energy equation are used to identify crucial parameters, time and length scales, as well as levels of energy deposition, relevant to LPRE performance. The objective is to provide first principles explanations of physical phenomena responsible for mechanical disturbances observed in operating LPRE's.

  6. An Analytical Solution for Transient Thermal Response of an Insulated Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical solution was derived for the transient response of an insulated aerospace vehicle structure subjected to a simplified heat pulse. This simplified problem approximates the thermal response of a thermal protection system of an atmospheric entry vehicle. The exact analytical solution is solely a function of two non-dimensional parameters. A simpler function of these two parameters was developed to approximate the maximum structural temperature over a wide range of parameter values. Techniques were developed to choose constant, effective properties to represent the relevant temperature and pressure-dependent properties for the insulator and structure. A technique was also developed to map a time-varying surface temperature history to an equivalent square heat pulse. Using these techniques, the maximum structural temperature rise was calculated using the analytical solutions and shown to typically agree with finite element simulations within 10 to 20 percent over the relevant range of parameters studied.

  7. Analysis of the Transient Response of a Dual-Fed RC Transmission Line

    PubMed Central

    Dorraki, Mohsen; Cambrell, Gregory K.; Abbott, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The transient analysis of a uniform transmission line of finite length is considered in this paper. For the first time this paper provides an analytical expression for the time-domain response of an RC transmission line, which is stimulated by a step function that is fed into both ends of the transmission line. In particular, we find an analytical expression for the step response at the center of the transmission line, in order to determine the worst-case rise time. This is of interest, for example, in large charge-coupled device (CCD) arrays, where long polysilicon lines are dual-fed in order to mitigate degradation in rise time. The analytical expressions for the RC transmission line are supported by computer-simulated lumped RC models. PMID:25679379

  8. Two Analyte Calibration From The Transient Response Of Potentiometric Sensors Employed With The SIA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cartas, Raul; Mimendia, Aitor; Valle, Manel del; Legin, Andrey

    2009-05-23

    Calibration models for multi-analyte electronic tongues have been commonly built using a set of sensors, at least one per analyte under study. Complex signals recorded with these systems are formed by the sensors' responses to the analytes of interest plus interferents, from which a multivariate response model is then developed. This work describes a data treatment method for the simultaneous quantification of two species in solution employing the signal from a single sensor. The approach used here takes advantage of the complex information recorded with one electrode's transient after insertion of sample for building the calibration models for both analytes. The departure information from the electrode was firstly processed by discrete wavelet for transforming the signals to extract useful information and reduce its length, and then by artificial neural networks for fitting a model. Two different potentiometric sensors were used as study case for simultaneously corroborating the effectiveness of the approach.

  9. Intracranial recordings reveal transient response dynamics during information maintenance in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Noy, Niv; Bickel, Stephan; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Harel, Michal; Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Schevon, Catherine A; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Despite an extensive body of work, it is still not clear how short term maintenance of information is implemented in the human brain. Most prior research has focused on "working memory"-typically involving the storage of a number of items, requiring the use of a phonological loop and focused attention during the delay period between encoding and retrieval. These studies largely support a model of enhanced activity in the delay interval as the central mechanism underlying working memory. However, multi-item working memory constitutes only a subset of storage phenomena that may occur during daily life. A common task in naturalistic situations is short term memory of a single item-for example, blindly reaching to a previously placed cup of coffee. Little is known about such single-item, effortless, storage in the human brain. Here, we examined the dynamics of brain responses during a single-item maintenance task, using intracranial recordings implanted for clinical purpose in patients (ECoG). Our results reveal that active electrodes were dominated by transient short latency visual and motor responses, reflected in broadband high frequency power increases in occipito-temporal, frontal, and parietal cortex. Only a very small set of electrodes showed activity during the early part of the delay period. Interestingly, no cortical site displayed a significant activation lasting to the response time. These results suggest that single item encoding is characterized by transient high frequency ECoG responses, while the maintenance of information during the delay period may be mediated by mechanisms necessitating only low-levels of neuronal activations.

  10. Intracranial recordings reveal transient response dynamics during information maintenance in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Noy, Niv; Bickel, Stephan; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Harel, Michal; Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Schevon, Catherine A; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Despite an extensive body of work, it is still not clear how short term maintenance of information is implemented in the human brain. Most prior research has focused on "working memory"-typically involving the storage of a number of items, requiring the use of a phonological loop and focused attention during the delay period between encoding and retrieval. These studies largely support a model of enhanced activity in the delay interval as the central mechanism underlying working memory. However, multi-item working memory constitutes only a subset of storage phenomena that may occur during daily life. A common task in naturalistic situations is short term memory of a single item-for example, blindly reaching to a previously placed cup of coffee. Little is known about such single-item, effortless, storage in the human brain. Here, we examined the dynamics of brain responses during a single-item maintenance task, using intracranial recordings implanted for clinical purpose in patients (ECoG). Our results reveal that active electrodes were dominated by transient short latency visual and motor responses, reflected in broadband high frequency power increases in occipito-temporal, frontal, and parietal cortex. Only a very small set of electrodes showed activity during the early part of the delay period. Interestingly, no cortical site displayed a significant activation lasting to the response time. These results suggest that single item encoding is characterized by transient high frequency ECoG responses, while the maintenance of information during the delay period may be mediated by mechanisms necessitating only low-levels of neuronal activations. PMID:26147431

  11. Characterizing the transient geomorphic response to base level fall in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhang, P.; Kirby, E.; Pitlick, J.; Anderson, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Analyses of hillslope gradient, landscape relief, and channel steepness in the Daxiahe drainage basin along the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau provides evidence of a transient geomorphic response to base level fall along the main stem Yellow River. The upper portions of the watershed are characterized by low-gradient channels and gentle hillslopes and are separated from a steeper, high relief landscape by a series of convex knickzones along channel profiles. Downstream projection of the upper channel profiles implies ~500-600 m of incision, consistent with terrace records of post ~1.7 Ma incision in the Linxia basin. We characterize erosion rates across this transient landscape using both optically-stimulated dating of fluvial terraces and catchment-averaged 10Be concentrations in modern sediment. Both data sets are consistent and suggest erosion/incision rates of ~300 m/Myr below knickpoints and ~50-100 m/Myr above. Field measurements of channel width (n=48) and bankfull discharge (n=9) allow us to determine local scaling relations among channel hydraulic geometry, discharge, and contributing area that we employ to estimate basal shear stress, unit stream power and bedload transport along the main stem of the Daxiahe River. We find a clear downstream increase of incision potential across this transient landscape, consistent with topographic observations and erosion rates. In contrast to recent studies, we find no evidence for adjustment of channel width across the transition from slowly eroding to rapidly eroding portions of the watershed. We hypothesize that this behavior is consistent with detachment-limited models of fluvial incision, despite the presence of significant sediment in channel bed and banks. Our results imply that the controls on hydraulic geometry along actively incising rivers remain incompletely understood.

  12. Small-signal transient response and turn-on delay of polariton laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butté, Raphaël

    2016-03-01

    We present a theoretical description of the small-signal transient response of polariton laser diodes (pol-LDs) based on simplified coupled rate equations describing the exciton reservoir and the ground-state polariton populations. The analytic expressions derived for two pumping geometries, which are valid for all inorganic semiconductors suitable for the realization of pol-LDs, are compared to exact numerical calculations performed for the specific case of GaN-based devices. The two approaches show excellent agreement provided the current step transient remains within the small-signal limit. We report that the temporal attenuation of the envelopes of the oscillations matches half the value of the damping factor ({γ }{{d}}) of the pol-LDs, which is proportional to the square of the oscillation relaxation resonance frequency. An explicit expression for the dependence of {γ }{{d}} on both the exciton-photon detuning and the driving current (equivalently the optical pump power) is also obtained. In a further step, we derive the expression for the turn-on delay (t d) associated with the build-up of the exciton reservoir population up to its threshold value before coherent light emission occurs. We show that t d has the same functional form for the two pumping geometries. It is equal to the effective exciton lifetime ({τ }{x{eff}}) weighted by a logarithmic dependence on the initial and final driving currents. In addition, {τ }{x{eff}} is shown to be approximately equal to the exciton lifetime, which proves to be the main parameter governing the build-up of polariton lasing/condensation. Beyond electrically driven polariton lasers, we highlight that the temporal shape of the transients could also be easily tested by monitoring the time dependence of the output power of optically pumped polariton lasers subjected to a sudden increase in the continuous wave pump power within the small-signal limit.

  13. Shock Wave and EUV Transient During a Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Sato, J.; Pick, Monique

    2000-01-01

    A metric type II burst and a 'brow' type enhancement in EUV were observed during the hard X-ray flare of 1997 April 15 from a newly emerging region, AR 8032. The position of the type II burst obtained from the Nancay radioheliograph coincided with the EUV transient. The type II burst and the EUV transient were in the equatorial streamer region to the north of the flaring region. This observation suggests that the EUV transient may be the manifestation of the MHD shock responsible for the type II burst.

  14. ENERGETIC PARTICLE ANISOTROPIES AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARY. II. TRANSIENT FEATURES AND RIGIDITY DEPENDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Roux, J. A. le; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2015-04-10

    In the preceding paper, we showed that large second-order anisotropies of heliospheric ions measured by the Voyager 1 space probe during the August 2012 boundary crossing event could be explained by a magnetic shear across the heliopause preventing particles streaming along the magnetic field from escaping the inner heliosheath. According to Stone et al., the penetration distance of heliospheric ions into the outer heliosheath had a strong dependence on the particle’s Larmor radius. By comparing hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions with the same energy per nucleon, these authors argued that this effect must be attributed to larger cyclotron radii of heavier species rather than differences in velocity. We propose that gradient drift in a nonuniform magnetic field was the cause of both the large second-order anisotropies and the spatial differentiation based on the ion’s rigidity. A latitudinal gradient of magnetic field strength of about 10% per AU between 2012.7 and 2012.9 could have provided drift motion sufficient to match both LECP and CRS Voyager 1 observations. We explain the transient intensity dropout observed prior to the heliocliff using flux tube structures embedded in the heliosheath and magnetically connected to interstellar space. Finally, this paper reports a new indirect measurement of the plasma radial velocity at the heliopause on the basis of the time difference between two cosmic-ray telescopes measuring the same intensity dropout.

  15. The analysis of complex patterns of longitudinal binary response: an example of transient dysphagia following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beacon, H J; Thompson, S G; England, P D

    1998-11-30

    In many clinical trials, treatment is given in phases and the prevalence of symptoms is recorded longitudinally. As a result, complex non-linear response patterns may be observed as the prevalence of symptoms changes as a consequence of treatment. In such cases, although profiles of the marginal response over time give an informative description of the data, they do not allow a formal treatment comparison or adjustment for covariates of interest. Here we analyse previously reported data on transient dysphagia in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy. We use a generalized estimating equation approach for repeated measurement binary response to give robust standard errors taking account of the dependence of observations taken on the same subject, alongside a natural cubic spline to represent the complex shape of the marginal response. This provides a reasonable model for the marginal response and allows unbiased estimation of an apparent treatment difference. The effect of different choices for the working correlation matrix is discussed, as is the modelling of treatment group differences that vary over time. We conclude that these models provide a powerful tool for the analysis of such data that can now be applied using generally accessible software.

  16. Regional estimates of the transient climate response to cumulative CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Martin; Matthews, H. Damon; de Elía, Ramón

    2016-05-01

    The Transient Climate Response to cumulative carbon Emissions (TCRE) measures the response of global temperatures to cumulative CO2 emissions. Although the TCRE is a global quantity, climate impacts manifest predominantly in response to local climate changes. Here we quantify the link between CO2 emissions and regional temperature change, showing that regional temperatures also respond approximately linearly to cumulative CO2 emissions. Using an ensemble of twelve Earth system models, we present a novel application of pattern scaling to define the regional pattern of temperature change per emission of CO2. Ensemble mean regional TCRE values range from less than 1 °C per TtC for some ocean regions, to more than 5 °C per TtC in the Arctic, with a pattern of higher values over land and at high northern latitudes. We find also that high-latitude ocean regions deviate more strongly from linearity as compared to land and lower-latitude oceans. This suggests that ice-albedo and ocean circulation feedbacks are important contributors to the overall negative deviation from linearity of the global temperature response to high levels of cumulative emissions. The strong linearity of the regional climate response over most land regions provides a robust way to quantitatively link anthropogenic CO2 emissions to local-scale climate impacts.

  17. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Dunham, J P; Leith, J L; Lumb, B M; Donaldson, L F

    2010-02-17

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive-cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  18. Modeling the reversible, diffusive sink effect in response to transient contaminant sources.

    PubMed

    Zhao, D; Little, J C; Hodgson, A T

    2002-09-01

    A physically based diffusion model is used to evaluate the sink effect of diffusion-controlled indoor materials and to predict the transient contaminant concentration in indoor air in response to several time-varying contaminant sources. For simplicity, it is assumed the predominant indoor material is a homogeneous slab, initially free of contaminant, and the air within the room is well mixed. The model enables transient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations to be predicted based on the material/air partition coefficient (K) and the material-phase diffusion coefficient (D) of the sink. Model predictions are made for three scenarios, each mimicking a realistic situation in a building. Styrene, phenol, and naphthalene are used as representative VOCs. A styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) backed carpet, vinyl flooring (VF), and a polyurethane foam (PUF) carpet cushion are considered as typical indoor sinks. In scenarios involving a sinusoidal VOC input and a double exponential decaying input, the model predicts the sink has a modest impact for SBR/styrene, but the effect increases for VF/phenol and PUF/naphthalene. In contrast, for an episodic chemical spill, SBR is predicted to reduce the peak styrene concentration considerably. A parametric study reveals for systems involving a large equilibrium constant (K), the kinetic constant (D) will govern the shape of the resulting gasphase concentration profile. On the other hand, for systems with a relaxed mass transfer resistance, K will dominate the profile. PMID:12244748

  19. Modeling the reversible sink effect in response to transient contaminant sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Dongye; Little, John C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.

    2001-02-01

    A physically based diffusion model is used to evaluate the sink effect of diffusion-controlled indoor materials and to predict the transient contaminant concentration in indoor air in response to several time-varying contaminant sources. For simplicity, it is assumed the predominant indoor material is a homogeneous slab, initially free of contaminant, and the air within the room is well mixed. The model enables transient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations to be predicted based on the material/air partition coefficient (K) and the material-phase diffusion coefficient (D) of the sink. Model predictions are made for three scenarios, each mimicking a realistic situation in a building. Styrene, phenol, and naphthalene are used as representative VOCs. A styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) backed carpet, vinyl flooring (VF), and a polyurethane foam (PUF) carpet cushion are considered as typical indoor sinks. In scenarios involving a sinusoidal VOC input and a double exponential decaying input, the model predicts the sink has a modest impact for SBR/styrene, but the effect increases for VF/phenol and PUF/naphthalene. In contrast, for an episodic chemical spill, SBR is predicted to reduce the peak styrene concentration considerably. A parametric study reveals for systems involving a large equilibrium constant (K), the kinetic constant (D) will govern the shape of the resulting gas-phase concentration profile. On the other hand, for systems with a relaxed mass transfer resistance, K will dominate the profile.

  20. Source impedance, transient response, and noise characterization of the TOPAZ 2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnierkiewicz, D.Y.

    1995-01-20

    Electrical measurements have been performed on the TOPAZ 2 V-71 and Ya-21 Reactors, in order to characterize the source impedance as a function of DC operating point and frequency. The response of the reactor to step changes in load current, as well as the frequency content of the electrical noise generated by the reactor have also been measured. These parameters are important to know in order to design power regulation circuitry which maintains a constant load on the reactor during spacecraft operations for any flight application of the TOPAZ 2 reactors. Voltage spikes at the reactor interface induced by load transients must be limited; the power regulation circuitry must have adequate bandwidth to compensate for spacecraft load dynamics. The methods used to make these measurements will be discussed. Results of the measurements on the Ya-21 reactor indicate the source impedance is dominated by a series resistance and inductance. The equivalent DC leakage resistance from the reactor output to structure was also measured. The self generated noise of the reactor is benign; load induced transients will be sufficiently controlled with capacitive filtering and active regulation circuitry external to the reactor/power distribution system. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  1. Experimental study of frost heaving force based on transient shock response using piezoceramic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruolin; Peng, Tongxiao; Wang, Ming L.

    2016-04-01

    In seasonally frozen soil regions, the frost heaving problem made it difficult to monitor or evaluate the pile safety for long term. So far, no mature tool can be utilized to monitor the frost heaving force, which was unevenly distributed along the pile. In this paper, a piezoceramic sensing based transient excitation response approach was proposed to monitor the frost heaving force in real time. Freeze-thaw cycles can result in great changes of soil engineering properties, including the frost heaving force. So, the freeze-thaw cycle was repeated fourth to study its effect. In the experiment, transient horizontal shock on the top of the pile will be detected by the 6 PZT sensors glued on the pile. The signal data received by the 6 PZT sensors can be used to illustrate the frost heaving force distribution along the pile. Moisture content effect is also one of the important reasons that cause the variation of soil mechanical properties. So three different moisture content (6%, 12%, 18%) testing soil were used in this experiment to detect the variance of the frost heaving force. An energy indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the frost heaving force applied on the pile. The experimental results showed that the proposed method was effective in monitoring the uneven distribution of frost heaving force along the pile.

  2. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a 10% load rejection transient from 75% steady state in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); A load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); A load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); A feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the load rejection from 75% to 65% transient simulation. This transient was one of the tests carried out in Vandellos II NPP during the startup tests.

  3. LLUVIA-II: A program for two-dimensional, transient flow through partially saturated porous media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.R.; Hopkins, P.L.

    1992-08-01

    LLUVIA-II is a program designed for the efficient solution of two- dimensional transient flow of liquid water through partially saturated, porous media. The code solves Richards equation using the method-of-lines procedure. This document describes the solution procedure employed, input data structure, output, and code verification.

  4. Orbit Response Matrix Analysis Applied at PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Wolski, A.; Ecklund, S.; Safranek, J.A.; Tenenbaum, P.; Terebilo, A.; Turner, J.L.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-17

    The analysis of orbit response matrices has been used very successfully to measure and correct the gradient and skew gradient distribution in many accelerators. It allows determination of an accurately calibrated model of the coupled machine lattice, which then can be used to calculate the corrections necessary to improve coupling, dynamic aperture and ultimately luminosity. At PEP-II, the Matlab version of LOCO has been used to analyze coupled response matrices for both the LER and the HER. The large number of elements in PEP-II and the very complicated interaction region present unique challenges to the data analysis. All necessary tools to make the analysis method useable at PEP-II have been implemented and LOCO can now be used as a routine tool for lattice diagnostic.

  5. Transient Response of Rotor on Rolling-Element Bearings with Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Murphy, Brian T.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2006-01-01

    Internal clearance in rolling element bearings is usually present to allow for radial and axial growth of the rotor-bearing system and to accommodate bearing fit-up. The presence of this clearance also introduces a "dead band" into the load-deflection behavior of the bearing. Previous studies demonstrated that the presence of dead band clearance might have a significant effect on synchronous rotor response. In this work, the authors investigate transient response of a rotor supported on rolling element bearings with internal clearance. In addition, the stiffness of the bearings varies nonlinearly with bearing deflection and with speed. Bearing properties were accurately calculated with a state of the art rolling bearing analysis code. The subsequent rotordynamics analysis shows that for rapid acceleration rates the maximum response amplitude may be less than predicted by steady-state analysis. The presence of clearance may shift the critical speed location to lower speed values. The rotor vibration response exhibits subharmonic components which are more prominent with bearing clearance.

  6. Transient autonomic responses during sustained attention in high and low fit young adults

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Casado, Antonio; Perakakis, Pandelis; Ciria, Luis F.; Sanabria, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining vigilance over long periods of time is especially critical in performing fundamental everyday activities and highly responsible professional tasks (e.g., driving, performing surgery or piloting). Here, we investigated the role of aerobic fitness as a crucial factor related to the vigilance capacity. To this end, two groups of young adult participants (high-fit and low-fit) were compared in terms of reaction time (RT) performance and event-related heart rate responses in a 60′ version of the psychomotor vigilance task. The results showed shorter RTs in high-fit participants, but only during the first 24′ of the task. Crucially, this period of improved performance was accompanied by a decelerative cardiac response pattern present only in the high-fit group that also disappeared after the first 24′. In conclusion, high aerobic fitness was related to a pattern of transient autonomic responses suggestive of an attentive preparatory state that coincided with improved behavioural performance, and that was sustained for 24′. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the role of the autonomic nervous system reactivity in the relationship between fitness and cognition in general, and sustained attention in particular. PMID:27271980

  7. Development of advanced modal methods for calculating transient thermal and structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    Higher-order modal methods for predicting thermal and structural response are evaluated. More accurate methods or ones which can significantly reduce the size of complex, transient thermal and structural problems are desirable for analysis and are required for synthesis of real structures subjected to thermal and mechanical loading. A unified method is presented for deriving successively higher-order modal solutions related to previously-developed, lower-order methods such as the mode displacement and mode-acceleration methods. A new method, called the force-derivative method, is used to obtain higher-order modal solutions for both uncoupled (proportionally-damped) structural problems as well as thermal problems and coupled (non-proportionally damped) structural problems. The new method is called the force-derivative method because, analogous to the mode-acceleration method, it produces a term that depends on the forcing function and additional terms that depend on the time derivatives of the forcing function.

  8. The $10 trillion value of better information about the transient climate response.

    PubMed

    Hope, Chris

    2015-11-13

    How much is better information about climate change worth? Here, I use PAGE09, a probabilistic integrated assessment model, to find the optimal paths of CO(2) emissions over time and to calculate the value of better information about one aspect of climate change, the transient climate response (TCR). Approximately halving the uncertainty range for TCR has a net present value of about $10.3 trillion (year 2005 US$) if accomplished in time for emissions to be adjusted in 2020, falling to $9.7 trillion if accomplished by 2030. Probabilistic integrated assessment modelling is the only method we have for making estimates like these for the value of better information about the science and impacts of climate change.

  9. Betting strategies on fluctuations in the transient response of greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Risbey, James S; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Hunter, John R; Monselesan, Didier P

    2015-11-28

    We examine a series of betting strategies on the transient response of greenhouse warming, expressed by changes in 15-year mean global surface temperature from one 15-year period to the next. Over the last century, these bets are increasingly dominated by positive changes (warming), reflecting increasing greenhouse forcing and its rising contribution to temperature changes on this time scale. The greenhouse contribution to 15-year trends is now of a similar magnitude to typical naturally occurring 15-year trends. Negative 15-year changes (decreases) have not occurred since about 1970, and are still possible, but now rely on large, and therefore infrequent, natural variations. Model projections for even intermediate warming scenarios show very low likelihoods of obtaining negative 15-year changes over the coming century. Betting against greenhouse warming, even on these short time scales, is no longer a rational proposition.

  10. Response of a confined gas to volumetric heating in the absence of gravity. I - Slow transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herczynski, A.; Kassoy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    A one-dimensional model for bulk motion induced by a transient volumetric heat source in a confined gas at zero gravity is considered. Rational approximation methods are used to derive a quantitative theory for the gas response to a spatiallly distributed, time-dependent internal power deposition. The resulting low Mach number compressible flow equations are solved by using perturbation methods. Solutions are given for a conduction-free core and thin conductive boundary layers adjacent to the end walls. It is found that may any spatially nonuniform power deposition will cause fluid motion. Net mass transport in the closed container will occur for certain spatially distributed heating. The model mimics the thermal effects of an exothermic gas phase reaction in vapor transport experiments conducted in space. The solutions demonstrate that thermally induced mass transport can be as large as diffusive mass transport in a typical experiment.

  11. Theoretical Evaluation of the Transient Response of Constant Head and Constant Flow-Rate Permeability Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, M.; Takahashi, M.; Morin, R.H.; Esaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented that compares the response characteristics of the constant head and the constant flowrate (flow pump) laboratory techniques for quantifying the hydraulic properties of geologic materials having permeabilities less than 10-10 m/s. Rigorous analytical solutions that describe the transient distributions of hydraulic gradient within a specimen are developed, and equations are derived for each method. Expressions simulating the inflow and outflow rates across the specimen boundaries during a constant-head permeability test are also presented. These solutions illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each method, including insights into measurement accuracy and the validity of using Darcy's law under certain conditions. The resulting observations offer practical considerations in the selection of an appropriate laboratory test method for the reliable measurement of permeability in low-permeability geologic materials.

  12. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 – Frequency Response and Transient Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N. W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2014-12-01

    Power system operators and utilities worldwide have concerns about the impact of high-penetration wind and solar generation on electric grid reliability (EirGrid 2011b, Hydro-Quebec 2006, ERCOT 2010). The stability of North American grids under these conditions is a particular concern and possible impediment to reaching future renewable energy goals. Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) considers a 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration level that results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system, including different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior of wind and solar generation. WWSIS-3 evaluates two specific aspects of fundamental frequency system stability: frequency response and transient stability.

  13. Transient response of multidegree-of-freedom linear systems to forcing functions with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to analyze the transient response of discrete linear systems to forcing functions with unknown time dependence but having known bounds. Particular attention is given to forcing functions which include: (1) maximum displacement of any given mass element, (2) maximum relative displacement of any two adjacent masses, and (3) maximum acceleration of a given mass. Linear mechanical systems with an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom and only one forcing function acting are considered. In the general case, the desired forcing function is found to be a function that switches from the upper-to-lower bound and vice-versa at certain moments of time. A general procedure for finding such switching times is set forth.

  14. Effects of background noise on the response of rat and cat motoneurones to excitatory current transients.

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, A V; Powers, R K; Sawczuk, A; Binder, M D

    1996-01-01

    1. We studied the responses of rat hypoglossal motoneurones to excitatory current transients (ECTs) using a brainstem slice preparation. Steady, repetitive discharge at rates of 12-25 impulses s-1 was elicited from the motoneurones by injecting long (40 s) steps of constant current. Poisson trains of the ECTs were superimposed on these steps. The effects of additional synaptic noise was simulated by adding a zero-mean random process to the stimuli. 2. We measured the effects of the ECTs on motoneurone discharge probability by compiling peristimulus time histograms (PSTHs) between the times of occurrence of the ECTs and the motoneurone spikes. The ECTs produced modulation of motoneurone discharge similar to that produced by excitatory postsynaptic currents. 3. The addition of noise altered the pattern of the motoneurone response to the current transients: both the amplitude and the area of the PSTH peaks decreased as the power of the superimposed noise was increased. Noise tended to reduce the efficacy of the ECTs, particularly when the motoneurones were firing at lower frequencies. Although noise also increased the firing frequency of the motoneurones slightly, the effects of noise on ECT efficacy did not simply result from noise-induced changes in mean firing rate. 4. A modified version of the experimental protocol was performed in lumbar motoneurones of intact, pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats. These recordings yielded results similar to those obtained in rat hypoglossal motoneurones in vitro. 5. Our results suggest that the presence of concurrent synaptic inputs reduces the efficacy of any one input. The implications of this change in efficacy and the possible underlying mechanisms are discussed. PMID:8866358

  15. Simulations of the transient climate response to climate engineering in the form of cirrus cloud seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, Trude; Boos, William R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a global modeling study of a so far understudied climate engineering mechanism (CEM), namely the seeding of cirrus clouds to reduce their lifetimes in the upper troposphere, and hence their greenhouse effect. Different from most CEMs, the intention of cirrus seeding is not to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. This particular CEM rather targets the greenhouse effect, by reducing the trapping of infrared radiation by high clouds. This avoids some of the caveats that have been identified for solar radiation management, for example the delayed recovery of stratospheric ozone or drastic changes to Earth's hydrological cycle. Here, we contrast transient simulations of the 21st century, using a modified version of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We simulate three future scenarios: (i) A simulation with the conventional high emission scenario RCP8.5, (ii) A simulation in which climate engineering in the form of high-latitude cirrus seeding is introduced in the middle of the century without any accompanying emission reductions, and (iii) The same as (ii), but with emissions that are reduced by 50% over the period 2050 to 2100. We consider the last scenario to be one in which climate engineering is used to buy time for mitigation efforts to become effective, while scenario (iii) is one in which high emissions are allowed to continue due to the naïve belief that climate engineering can be used to prevent global warming in perpetuity. Our analysis focuses on the contrasts between the regional and global climates of year 2100 produced by the three scenarios.

  16. Molecular and Cellular Responses to Interleukin-4 Treatment in a Rat Model of Transient Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lively, Starlee; Hutchings, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Within hours after stroke, potentially cytotoxic pro-inflammatory mediators are elevated within the brain; thus, one potential therapeutic strategy is to reduce them and skew the brain toward an anti-inflammatory state. Because interleukin-4 (IL-4) treatment induces an anti-inflammatory, “alternative-activation” state in microglia and macrophages in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that early supplementation of the brain with IL-4 can shift it toward an anti-inflammatory state and reduce damage after transient focal ischemia. Adult male rat striata were injected with endothelin-1, with or without co-injection of IL-4. Inflammation, glial responses and damage to neurons and white matter were quantified from 1 to 7 days later. At 1 day, IL-4 treatment increased striatal expression of several anti-inflammatory markers (ARG1, CCL22, CD163, PPARγ), increased phagocytic (Iba1-positive, CD68-positive) microglia/macrophages, and increased VEGF-A-positive infiltrating neutrophils in the infarcts. At 7 days, there was evidence of sustained, propagating responses. IL-4 increased CD206, CD200R1, IL-4Rα, STAT6, PPARγ, CD11b, and TLR2 expression and increased microglia/macrophages in the infarct and astrogliosis outside the infarct. Neurodegeneration and myelin damage were not reduced, however. The sustained immune and glial responses when resolution and repair processes have begun warrant further studies of IL-4 treatment regimens and long-term outcomes. PMID:27634961

  17. Element-specific characterization of transient electronic structure of solvated Fe(II) complexes with time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kiryong; Cho, Hana; Schoenlein, Robert W; Kim, Tae Kyu; Huse, Nils

    2015-11-17

    Polypyridyl transition-metal complexes are an intriguing class of compounds due to the relatively facile chemical designs and variations in ligand-field strengths that allow for spin-state changes and hence electronic configurations in response to external perturbations such as pressure and light. Light-activated spin-conversion complexes have possible applications in a variety of molecular-based devices, and ultrafast excited-state evolution in these complexes is of fundamental interest for understanding of the origins of spin-state conversion in metal complexes. Knowledge of the interplay of structure and valence charge distributions is important to understand which degrees of freedom drive spin-conversion and which respond in a favorable (or unfavorable) manner. To track the response of the constituent components, various types of time-resolved X-ray probe methods have been utilized for a broad range of chemical and biological systems relevant to catalysis, solar energy conversions, and functional molecular devices. In particular, transient soft X-ray spectroscopy of solvated molecules can offer complementary information on the detailed electronic structures and valence charge distributions of photoinduced intermediate species: First-row transition-metal L-edges consist of 2p-3d transitions, which directly probe the unoccupied valence density of states and feature lifetime broadening in the range of 100 meV, making them sensitive spectral probes of metal-ligand interactions. In this Account, we present some of our recent progress in employing picosecond and femtosecond soft X-ray pulses from synchrotron sources to investigate element specific valence charge distributions and spin-state evolutions in Fe(II) polypyridyl complexes via core-level transitions. Our results on transient L-edge spectroscopy of Fe(II) complexes clearly show that the reduction in σ-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of π-backbonding upon spin-crossover. This underscores

  18. Rapid chlorophyll a fluorescence transient of Lemna gibba leaf as an indication of light and hydroxylamine effect on photosystem II activity.

    PubMed

    Dewez, David; Ali, Nadia Ait; Perreault, François; Popovic, Radovan

    2007-05-01

    Rapid chlorophyll fluorescence transient induced by saturating flash (3000 micromol of photons m-2 s-1) was investigated when Lemna gibba had been exposed to light (100 micromol of photons m-2 s-1) causing the Kautsky effect or in low light intensity unable to trigger PSII photochemistry. Measurements were made by using, simultaneously, a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer and plant efficiency analyzer system, either on non-treated L. gibba leaf or those treated with different concentrations of hydroxylamine (1-50 mM) causing gradual inhibition of the water splitting system. When any leaf was exposed to continuous light during the Kautsky effect, a rapid fluorescence transient may reflect current activity of photosystem II within the photosystem II complex. Under those conditions, a variation of transition steps appearing over time was related to a drastic change to the photosystem II functional properties. This value indicated that the energy dissipation through non-photochemical pathways was undergoing extreme change. The change of rapid fluorescence transient, induced under continuous light, when compared to those obtained under very low light intensity, confirmed the ability of photosystem II to be capable to undergo rapid adaptation lasting about two minutes. When the water splitting system was inhibited and electron donation partially substituted by hydroxylamine, the adaptation ability of photosystem II to different light conditions was lost. In this study, the change of rapid fluorescence kinetic and transient appearing over time was shown to be a good indication for the change of the functional properties of photosystem II induced either by light or by hydroxylamine. PMID:17487305

  19. Transcriptomics Modeling of the Late-Gestation Fetal Pituitary Response to Transient Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Charles E.; Chang, Eileen I.; Richards, Elaine M.; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background The late-gestation fetal sheep responds to hypoxia with physiological, neuroendocrine, and cellular responses that aid in fetal survival. The response of the fetus to hypoxia represents a coordinated effort to maximize oxygen transfer from the mother and minimize wasteful oxygen consumption by the fetus. While there have been many studies aimed at investigating the coordinated physiological and endocrine responses to hypoxia, and while immunohistochemical or in situ hybridization studies have revealed pathways supporting the endocrine function of the pituitary, there is little known about the coordinated cellular response of the pituitary to the hypoxia. Results Thirty min hypoxia (from 17.0±1.7 to 8.0±0.8 mm Hg, followed by 30 min normoxia) upregulated 595 and downregulated 790 genes in fetal pituitary (123–132 days’ gestation; term = 147 days). Network inference of up- and down- regulated genes revealed a high degree of functional relatedness amongst the gene sets. Gene ontology analysis revealed upregulation of cellular metabolic processes (e.g., RNA synthesis, response to estrogens) and downregulation of protein phosphorylation, protein metabolism, and mitosis. Genes found to be at the center of the network of upregulated genes included genes important for purine binding and signaling. At the center of the downregulated network were genes involved in mRNA processing, DNA repair, sumoylation, and vesicular trafficking. Transcription factor analysis revealed that both up- and down-regulated gene sets are enriched for control by several transcription factors (e.g., SP1, MAZ, LEF1, NRF1, ELK1, NFAT, E12, PAX4) but not for HIF-1, which is known to be an important controller of genomic responses to hypoxia. Conclusions The multiple analytical approaches used in this study suggests that the acute response to 30 min of transient hypoxia in the late-gestation fetus results in reduced cellular metabolism and a pattern of gene expression that is

  20. Transient magnetorheological response of magnetoactive elastomers to step and pyramid excitations.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Inna A; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Stepanov, Gennady V; Sorokin, Vladislav V; Stadler, Dominik; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-03-21

    Transient rheological response of magnetoactive elastomers is experimentally studied using dynamic torsion at a fixed oscillation frequency in temporally stepwise changing magnetic fields and oscillation amplitudes. For step magnetic-field excitations, at least three exponential functions are required to reasonably describe the time behavior of the storage shear modulus over long time scales (>10(3) s). The deduced characteristic time constants of the corresponding rearrangement processes of the filler network differ approximately by one order of magnitude: τ1 ≲ 10(1) s, τ2 ∼ 10(2) s, and τ3 ∼ 10(3) s. The sudden imposition of the external magnetic field activates a very fast rearrangement process with the characteristic time under 10 s, which cannot be determined more precisely due to the measurement conditions. Even more peculiar transient behavior has been observed during pyramid excitations, when either the external magnetic field was first stepwise increased and then decreased in a staircase manner at a fixed strain amplitude γ or the strain amplitude γ was first stepwise increased and then decreased in a staircase manner at a fixed magnetic field. In particular, the so-called "cross-over effect" has been identified in both dynamical loading programs. This cross-over effect seems to be promoted by the application of the external magnetic field. The experimental results are discussed in the context of the specific rearrangement of the magnetic filler network under the simultaneous action of the external magnetic field and shear deformation. Striking similarities of the observed phenomena to the structural relaxation processes in glassy materials and to the jamming transition of granular materials are pointed out. The obtained results are important for fundamental understanding of material behavior in magnetic fields as well as for the development of devices on the basis of magnetoactive elastomeric materials.

  1. Transient magnetorheological response of magnetoactive elastomers to step and pyramid excitations.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Inna A; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Stepanov, Gennady V; Sorokin, Vladislav V; Stadler, Dominik; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-03-21

    Transient rheological response of magnetoactive elastomers is experimentally studied using dynamic torsion at a fixed oscillation frequency in temporally stepwise changing magnetic fields and oscillation amplitudes. For step magnetic-field excitations, at least three exponential functions are required to reasonably describe the time behavior of the storage shear modulus over long time scales (>10(3) s). The deduced characteristic time constants of the corresponding rearrangement processes of the filler network differ approximately by one order of magnitude: τ1 ≲ 10(1) s, τ2 ∼ 10(2) s, and τ3 ∼ 10(3) s. The sudden imposition of the external magnetic field activates a very fast rearrangement process with the characteristic time under 10 s, which cannot be determined more precisely due to the measurement conditions. Even more peculiar transient behavior has been observed during pyramid excitations, when either the external magnetic field was first stepwise increased and then decreased in a staircase manner at a fixed strain amplitude γ or the strain amplitude γ was first stepwise increased and then decreased in a staircase manner at a fixed magnetic field. In particular, the so-called "cross-over effect" has been identified in both dynamical loading programs. This cross-over effect seems to be promoted by the application of the external magnetic field. The experimental results are discussed in the context of the specific rearrangement of the magnetic filler network under the simultaneous action of the external magnetic field and shear deformation. Striking similarities of the observed phenomena to the structural relaxation processes in glassy materials and to the jamming transition of granular materials are pointed out. The obtained results are important for fundamental understanding of material behavior in magnetic fields as well as for the development of devices on the basis of magnetoactive elastomeric materials. PMID:26882044

  2. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection Under Conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert; Clark, Kara

    2014-11-13

    The addition of large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. This paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. The main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  3. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection under conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert

    2015-04-15

    Adding large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. Our paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. Moreover, the main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  4. Thermoregulatory responses to cold transients: effects of menstrual cycle in resting women.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R R; Blanchard, L A

    1998-08-01

    Effects of the menstrual cycle on heat loss and heat production (M) and core and skin temperature responses to cold were studied in six unacclimatized female nonsmokers (18-29 yr of age). Each woman, resting supine, was exposed to a cold transient (ambient temperature = mean radiant temperature = 20 to -5 degrees C at -0.32 degrees C/min, relative humidity = 50 +/- 2%, wind speed = 1 m/s) in the follicular (F) phase (days 2-6) and midluteal (L) phase (days 19-23) of her menstrual cycle. Clothed in each of two ensembles with different thermal resistances, women performed multiple experiments in the F and L phases. Thermal resistance was 0.2 and 0.4 m2 . K . W-1 for ensembles A and B, respectively. Esophageal temperature (Tes), mean weighted skin temperature (Tsk), finger temperature (Tfing), and area-weighted heat flux were recorded continuously. Rate of heat debt (-S) and integrated mean body temperature (Tb,i) were calculated by partitional calorimetry throughout the cold ramp. Extensive peripheral vasoconstriction in the F phase during early periods of the ramp elevated Tes above thermoneutral levels. Shivering thermogenesis (DeltaM = M - Mbasal, W /m2) was highly correlated with declines in Tsk and Tfing (P <0.0001). There was a reduced slope in M as a function of Tb,i in the L phase with ensembles A (P < 0.02) and B (P < 0.01). Heat flux was higher and -S was less in the L phases with ensemble A (P < 0.05). An analytic model revealed that Tsk and Tes contribute as additive inputs and Tfing has a multiplicative effect on the total control of DeltaM during cold transients (R2 = 0.9). Endogenous hormonal levels at each menstrual cycle phase, core temperature and Tsk inputs, vascular responses, and variations in body heat balance must be considered in quantifying thermoregulatory responses in women during cold stress. PMID:9688732

  5. Global electromagnetic induction in the moon and planets. [poloidal eddy current transient response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments and analyses concerning electromagnetic induction in the moon and other extraterrestrial bodies are summarized. The theory of classical electromagnetic induction in a sphere is first considered, and this treatment is extended to the case of the moon, where poloidal eddy-current response has been found experimentally to dominate other induction modes. Analysis of lunar poloidal induction yields lunar internal electrical conductivity and temperature profiles. Two poloidal-induction analytical techniques are discussed: a transient-response method applied to time-series magnetometer data, and a harmonic-analysis method applied to data numerically Fourier-transformed to the frequency domain, with emphasis on the former technique. Attention is given to complicating effects of the solar wind interaction with both induced poloidal fields and remanent steady fields. The static magnetization field induction mode is described, from which are calculated bulk magnetic permeability profiles. Magnetic field measurements obtained from the moon and from fly-bys of Venus and Mars are studied to determine the feasibility of extending theoretical and experimental induction techniques to other bodies in the solar system.

  6. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H.; Mougey, E.H.

    1995-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Evaluating the dynamic response of in-flight thrust calculation techniques during throttle transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    New flight test maneuvers and analysis techniques for evaluating the dynamic response of in-flight thrust models during throttle transients have been developed and validated. The approach is based on the aircraft and engine performance relationship between thrust and drag. Two flight test maneuvers, a throttle step and a throttle frequency sweep, were developed and used in the study. Graphical analysis techniques, including a frequency domain analysis method, were also developed and evaluated. They provide quantitative and qualitative results. Four thrust calculation methods were used to demonstrate and validate the test technique. Flight test applications on two high-performance aircraft confirmed the test methods as valid and accurate. These maneuvers and analysis techniques were easy to implement and use. Flight test results indicate the analysis techniques can identify the combined effects of model error and instrumentation response limitations on the calculated thrust value. The methods developed in this report provide an accurate approach for evaluating, validating, or comparing thrust calculation methods for dynamic flight applications.

  8. An evaluation of higher-order modal methods for calculating transient structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    The present study evaluates a higher-order modal method proposed by Leung for transient structural analysis entitled the force-derivative method. This method repeatedly integrates by parts with respect to time the convolution-integral form of the structural response to produce successively better approximations to the contribution of the higher modes which are neglected in the modal summation. Comparisons are made of the force-derivative, the mode-displacement, and the mode-acceleration methods for several numerical example problems for various times, levels of damping, and forcing functions. The example problems include a tip-loaded cantilevered beam and a simply-supported multispan beam. The force-derivative method is shown to converge to an accurate solution in fewer modes than either the mode-displacement or the mode-acceleration methods. In addition, for problems in which there are a large number of closely-spaced frequencies whose mode shapes have a negligible contribution to the response, the force derivative method is very effective in representing the effect of the important, but otherwise neglected, higher modes.

  9. An evaluation of higher-order model methods for calculating transient structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    A higher-order modal method proposed by Leung for transient structural analysis entitled the force-derivative method is evaluated. This method repeatedly integrates by parts with respect to time the convolution-integral form of the structural response to produce successively better approximations to the contribution of the higher modes which are neglected in the modal summation. Comparisons are made of the force-derivative, the mode-displacement, and the mode-acceleration methods for several numerical example problems for various times, levels of damping, and forcing functions. The example problems include a tip-loaded cantilevered beam and a simply-supported multispan beam. The force-derivative method is shown to converge to an accurate solution in fewer modes than either the mode-displacement or the mode-acceleration methods. In addition, for problems in which there are a large number of closely-spaced frequencies whose mode shapes have a negligible contribution to the response, the force-derivative method is very effective in representing the effect of the important, but otherwise neglected, higher modes.

  10. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  11. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    Hydraulic fracturing is a technique which is used to exploit geologic features and subsurface properties in an effort to increase production in low-permeability formations. The process of hydraulic fracturing provides a greater surface contact area between the producing formation and the wellbore and thus increases the amount of recoverable hydrocarbons from within the reservoir. The use of this stimulation technique has brought on massive applause from the industry due to its widespread success and effectiveness, however the dynamic processes that take part in the development of hydraulic fractures is a relatively new area of research with respect to the massive scale operations that are seen today. The process of hydraulic fracturing relies upon understanding and exploiting the in-situ stress distribution throughout the area of study. These in-situ stress conditions are responsible for directing fracture orientation and propagation paths throughout the period of injection. The relative magnitude of these principle stresses is key in developing a successful stimulation plan. In horizontal well plan development the interpretation of stress within the reservoir is required for determining the azimuth of the horizontal well path. These horizontal laterals are typically oriented in a manner such that the well path lies parallel to the minimum horizontal stress. This allows for vertical fractures to develop transversely to the wellbore, or normal to the least principle stress without the theoretical possibility of fractures overlapping, creating the most efficient use of the fluid energy during injection. The orientation and magnitude of these in-situ stress fields however can be dynamic, controlled by the subsequent fracture propagation and redistribution of the surrounding stresses. That is, that as the fracture propagates throughout the reservoir, the relative stress fields surrounding the fractures may see a shift and deviate from their original direction or

  12. Cannabinoid receptor 1 suppresses transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-induced inflammatory responses to corneal injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Yang, H.; Wang, Z.; Varadaraj, K.; Kumari, S.S.; Mergler, S.; Okada, Y.; Saika, S.; Kingsley, P.J.; Marnett, L.J.; Reinach, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-induced suppression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) activation provides a therapeutic option to reduce inflammation and pain in different animal disease models through mechanisms involving dampening of TRPV1 activation and signaling events. As we found in both mouse corneal epithelium and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) that there is CB1 and TRPV1 expression colocalization based on overlap of coimmunostaining, we determined in mouse corneal wound healing models and in human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) if they interact with one another to reduce TRPV1-induced inflammatory and scarring responses. Corneal epithelial debridement elicited in vivo a more rapid wound healing response in wildtype (WT) than in CB1−/− mice suggesting functional interaction between CB1 and TRPV1. CB1 activation by injury is tenable based on the identification in mouse corneas of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) with tandem LC–MS/MS, a selective endocannabinoid CB1 ligand. Suppression of corneal TRPV1 activation by CB1 is indicated since following alkali burning, CB1 activation with WIN55,212-2 (WIN) reduced immune cell stromal infiltration and scarring. Western blot analysis of coimmunoprecipitates identified protein–protein interaction between CB1 and TRPV1. Other immunocomplexes were also identified containing transforming growth factor kinase 1 (TAK1), TRPV1 and CB1. CB1 siRNA gene silencing prevented suppression by WIN of TRPV1-induced TAK1–JNK1 signaling. WIN reduced TRPV1-induced Ca2+ transients in fura2-loaded HCEC whereas pertussis toxin (PTX) preincubation obviated suppression by WIN of such rises caused by capsaicin (CAP). Whole cell patch clamp analysis of HCEC showed that WIN blocked subsequent CAP-induced increases in nonselective outward currents. Taken together, CB1 activation by injury-induced release of endocannabinoids such as 2-AG downregulates TRPV1 mediated inflammation and corneal opacification

  13. A model of northern treeline dynamics in response to transient changes in climate

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, C.F. III; Starfield, A.M. )

    1994-06-01

    In order to predict the future distribution of boreal vegetation, we developed what, to our knowledge, is the first model of ecosystem change in response to transient changes in climate and disturbance regime over the next 50-500 yr. The model develops scenarios of change in disturbance regime and ecosystem type in what is currently arctic tundra in response to GCM-based scenarios of climate change. Seed availability, tree growth rate, and probability of fire were the model parameters that most strongly influenced the balance between tundra and boreal forest during transitional climates. The rate of climatic warming strongly affected the time lag between climate change and the simulated ecosystem response but had less effect on the rate or pattern of ecosystem change. The model calculated that a ramped change of 3[degrees] in the next century (corresponding to average rate of warming predicted by GCMs) would lead to a 150 yr lag preceeding any change from tundra to forest, followed by rates of forestation of up to 6-12% per decade. The model predicted that tundra would first be invaded by conifer forests, but that the proportion of broad-leafed deciduous forest would increase as climate continued to warm due to increased fire frequency. The pattern of climatic warming had strong effects on simulated rates of conversion from tundra to forest. Rapid step changes in climate or increases in climatic variability both promoted more rapid ecosystem change than did ramped change in climate or climatic oscillations, particularly when oscillations were long relative to the time required for tree growth to reproductive maturity.

  14. The analysis of the transient pressure response of the shuttle EPS-ECS cryogenic tanks with external pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. E.; Patterson, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of transient pressures in externally pressurized cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen tanks was conducted and the effects of design variables on pressure response determined. The analysis was conducted with a computer program which solves the compressible viscous flow equations in two-dimensional regions representing the tank and external loop. The external loop volume, thermal mass, and heat leak were the dominant design variables affecting the system pressure response. No significant temperature stratification occurred in the fluid contained in the tank.

  15. Inferring the Mode of Selection from the Transient Response to Demographic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Daniel; Do, Ron; Reich, David; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2014-03-01

    Despite substantial recent progress in theoretical population genetics, most models work under the assumption of a constant population size. Deviations from fixed population sizes are ubiquitous in natural populations, many of which experience population bottlenecks and re-expansions. The non-equilibrium dynamics introduced by a large perturbation in population size are generally viewed as a confounding factor. In the present work, we take advantage of the transient response to a population bottleneck to infer features of the mode of selection and the distribution of selective effects. We develop an analytic framework and a corresponding statistical test that qualitatively differentiates between alleles under additive and those under recessive or more general epistatic selection. This statistic can be used to bound the joint distribution of selective effects and dominance effects in any diploid sexual organism. We apply this technique to human population genetic data, and severely restrict the space of allowed selective coefficients in humans. Additionally, one can test a set of functionally or medically relevant alleles for the primary mode of selection, or determine the local regional variation in dominance coefficients along the genome.

  16. The inconstancy of the transient climate response parameter under increasing CO2

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, J. M.; Andrews, T.; Good, P.

    2015-01-01

    In the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), the model-mean increase in global mean surface air temperature T under the 1pctCO2 scenario (atmospheric CO2 increasing at 1% yr−1) during the second doubling of CO2 is 40% larger than the transient climate response (TCR), i.e. the increase in T during the first doubling. We identify four possible contributory effects. First, the surface climate system loses heat less readily into the ocean beneath as the latter warms. The model spread in the thermal coupling between the upper and deep ocean largely explains the model spread in ocean heat uptake efficiency. Second, CO2 radiative forcing may rise more rapidly than logarithmically with CO2 concentration. Third, the climate feedback parameter may decline as the CO2 concentration rises. With CMIP5 data, we cannot distinguish the second and third possibilities. Fourth, the climate feedback parameter declines as time passes or T rises; in 1pctCO2, this effect is less important than the others. We find that T projected for the end of the twenty-first century correlates more highly with T at the time of quadrupled CO2 in 1pctCO2 than with the TCR, and we suggest that the TCR may be underestimated from observed climate change. PMID:26438279

  17. Temperature responsive hydrogels enable transient three-dimensional tumor cultures via rapid cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, John M; Overstreet, Derek J; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Le, Long D; Vernon, Brent L; Sirianni, Rachael W

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of live cells from three-dimensional (3D) culture would improve analysis of cell behaviors in tissue engineered microenvironments. In this work, we developed a temperature responsive hydrogel to enable transient 3D culture of human glioblastoma (GBM) cells. N-isopropylacrylamide was copolymerized with hydrophilic grafts and functionalized with the cell adhesion peptide RGD to yield the novel copolymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Jeffamine(®) M-1000 acrylamide-co-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-RGD), or PNJ-RGD. This copolymer reversibly gels in aqueous solutions when heated under normal cell culture conditions (37°C). Moreover, these gels redissolve within 70 s when cooled to room temperature without the addition of any agents to degrade the synthetic scaffold, thereby enabling rapid recollection of viable cells after 3D culture. We tested the efficiency of cell recovery following extended 3D culture and were able to recover more than 50% of viable GBM cells after up to 7 days in culture. These data demonstrate the utility of physically crosslinked PNJ-RGD hydrogels as a platform for culture and recollection of cells in 3D.

  18. Modeling the transient response of saline intrusion to rising sea-levels.

    PubMed

    Webb, Matt D; Howard, Ken W F

    2011-01-01

    Sea levels are expected to rise as a result of global temperature increases, one implication of which is the potential exacerbation of sea water intrusion into coastal aquifers. Given that approximately 70% of the world's population resides in coastal regions, it is imperative to understand the interaction between fresh groundwater and sea water intrusion in order to best manage available resources. For this study, controlled investigation has been carried out concerning the temporal variation in sea water intrusion as a result of rising sea levels. A series of fixed inland head two-dimensional sea water intrusion models were developed with SEAWAT in order to assess the impact of rising sea levels on the transient migration of saline intrusion in coastal aquifers under a range of hydrogeological property conditions. A wide range of responses were observed for typical hydrogeological parameter values. Systems with a high ratio of hydraulic conductivity to recharge and high effective porosity lagged behind the equilibrium sea water toe positions during sea-level rise, often by many hundreds of meters, and frequently taking several centuries to equilibrate following a cease in sea-level rise. Systems with a low ratio of hydraulic conductivity to recharge and low effective porosity did not develop such a large degree of disequilibrium and generally stabilized within decades following a cease in sea-level rise. This study provides qualitative initial estimates for the expected rate of intrusion and predicted degree of disequilibrium generated by sea-level rise for a range of hydrogeological parameter values.

  19. A multi-signature brain-computer interface: use of transient and steady-state responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severens, Marianne; Farquhar, Jason; Duysens, Jacques; Desain, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper was to increase the information transfer in brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Therefore, a multi-signature BCI was developed and investigated. Stimuli were designed to simultaneously evoke transient somatosensory event-related potentials (ERPs) and steady-state somatosensory potentials (SSSEPs) and the ERPs and SSSEPs in isolation. Approach. Twelve subjects participated in two sessions. In the first session, the single and combined stimulation conditions were compared on these somatosensory responses and on the classification performance. In the second session the on-line performance with the combined stimulation was evaluated while subjects received feedback. Furthermore, in both sessions, the performance based on ERP and SSSEP features was compared. Main results. No difference was found in the ERPs and SSSEPs between stimulation conditions. The combination of ERP and SSSEP features did not perform better than with ERP features only. In both sessions, the classification performances based on ERP and combined features were higher than the classification based on SSSEP features. Significance. Although the multi-signature BCI did not increase performance, it also did not negatively impact it. Therefore, such stimuli could be used and the best performing feature set could then be chosen individually.

  20. Estimating transient climate response using consistent temperature reconstruction methods in models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M.; Cowtan, K.; Hawkins, E.; Stolpe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observational temperature records such as HadCRUT4 typically have incomplete geographical coverage and blend air temperature over land with sea surface temperatures over ocean, in contrast to model output which is commonly reported as global air temperature. This complicates estimation of properties such as the transient climate response (TCR). Observation-based estimates of TCR have been made using energy-budget constraints applied to time series of historical radiative forcing and surface temperature changes, while model TCR is formally derived from simulations where CO2 increases at 1% per year. We perform a like-with-like comparison using three published energy-budget methods to derive modelled TCR from historical CMIP5 temperature series sampled in a manner consistent with HadCRUT4. Observation-based TCR estimates agree to within 0.12 K of the multi-model mean in each case and for 2 of the 3 energy-budget methods the observation-based TCR is higher than the multi-model mean. For one energy-budget method, using the HadCRUT4 blending method leads to a TCR underestimate of 0.3±0.1 K, relative to that estimated using global near-surface air temperatures.

  1. Prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced calcium transient in ovine large luteal cells: II. Modulation of the transient and resting cytosolic free calcium alters progesterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Wegner, J A; Martinez-Zaguilan, R; Gillies, R J; Hoyer, P B

    1991-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) stimulates a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels [( Ca2+]i) in ovine large luteal cells. In the present study, the magnitude of the PGF2 alpha (0.5 microM)-induced calcium transient in Hanks' medium (87 +/- 2 nM increase above resting levels) was reduced (P less than 0.05) but not completely eliminated in fura-2 loaded large luteal cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free or phosphate- and carbonate-free medium (10 +/- 1 nM, 32 +/- 6 nM, above resting levels; respectively). Preincubation for 2 min with 1 mM LaCl3 (calcium antagonist) eliminated the PGF2 alpha-induced calcium transient. The inhibitory effect of PGF2 alpha on secretion of progesterone was reduced in Ca2(+)-free medium or medium plus LaCl3. Resting [Ca2+]i levels and basal secretion of progesterone were both reduced (P less than 0.05) in large cells incubated in Ca2(+)-free medium (27 +/- 4 nM; 70 +/- 6% control, respectively) or with 5 microM 5,5'-dimethyl bis-(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (40 +/- 2 nM; 49 +/- 1% control; respectively). In addition, secretion of progesterone was inhibited (P less than 0.05) by conditions that increased (P less than 0.05) [Ca2+]i; that is LaCl3 ([Ca2+]i, 120 +/- 17 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 8% control) and PGF2 alpha ([Ca2+]i, 102 +/- 10 nM; progesterone, 82 +/- 3% control). In small luteal cells, resting [Ca2+]i levels and secretion of progesterone were reduced by incubation in Ca2(+)-free Hanks ([Ca2+]i, 28 +/- 2 nM; progesterone, 71 +/- 6% control), however, neither LaCl3 nor PGF2 alpha increased [Ca2+]i levels or inhibited secretion of progesterone. The findings presented here provide evidence that extracellular as well as intracellular calcium contribute to the PGF2 alpha-induced [Ca2+]i transient in large cells. Furthermore, whereas an adequate level of [Ca2+]i is required to support progesterone production in both small and large cells, optimal progesterone production in

  2. Incision Along the Red River, Yunnan Province, China: a Transient Response to Regional Surface Uplift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbohm, L. M.; Whipple, K. X.; Burchfiel, B. C.; Chen, L.

    2002-12-01

    On the basis of digital elevation data and field observations, we observe a low-relief relict landscape in the vicinity of the Red River, Yunnan Province, China, which correlates to a regional erosion surface preserved over the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (Clark et al. 2002). As with other major rivers of the eastern margin, the Red River has incised the relict landscape, creating a river valley system up to 2 km deep, which we refer to as the active landscape. Abandonment of the relict landscape and subsequent river incision is likely related to surface uplift from inflation of regions adjacent to the Tibetan Plateau by pressure-gradient driven flow of lower crust from beneath Tibet (Clark and Royden, 2000). The relict landscape is preserved as low-relief patches along the margins of the of the Red River basin; however, this is a transient state. If the new conditions (change in uplift rate) persist over a long enough timescale, full equilibration to the active landscape will occur and the relict landscape will be destroyed. We examine the expression of the transient condition in the Red River basin, using longitudinal river profiles for 102 tributaries to the Red River. Most profiles consist of an upper channel with low steepness and normal concavity, and a lower channel with high steepness and concavity, separated by a sharp knickpoint. The upper channel portions correspond to the relict landscape and have not yet felt the effect of river incision. Below the knickpoint the channels are incising rapidly. Extremely high concavities in the lower channel segments likely result from a complicated regional incision history. We argue that rapid regional surface uplift, followed by slower surface uplift and a correspondent decrease over time in uplift rate is responsible for the overall river incision pattern and in particular for the high concavities in the lower channel segments. However, this conclusion is complicated by the effects of changing erosion

  3. Reduced-order wavelet-Galerkin solution for the coupled, nonlinear stochastic response of slender buildings in transient winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thai-Hoa; Caracoglia, Luca

    2015-05-01

    A tall building is prone to wind-induced stochastic vibration, originating from complex fluid-structure interaction, dynamic coupling and nonlinear aerodynamic phenomena. The loading induced by extreme wind events, such as "downburst storms", hurricanes and tornadoes is naturally transient and nonstationary in comparison with the hypothesis of stationary wind loads, used in both structural engineering research and practice. Time-domain integration methods, widely applied for solving nonlinear differential equations, are hardly applicable to the analysis of coupled, nonlinear and stochastic response of tall buildings under transient winds. Therefore, the investigation of alternative and computationally-efficient simulation methods is important. This study employs the wavelet-Galerkin (WG) method to achieve this objective, by examining the stochastic dynamic response of two tall building models subject to stationary and transient wind loads. These are (1) a single-degree-of-freedom equivalent model of a tall structure and (2) a multi-degree-of-freedom reduced-order full building model. Compactly supported Daubechies wavelets are used as orthonormal basis functions in conjunction with the Galerkin projection scheme to decompose and transform the coupled, nonlinear differential equations of the two models into random algebraic equations in the wavelet domain. Methodology, feasibility and applicability of the WG method are investigated in some special cases of stiffness nonlinearity (Duffing type) and damping nonlinearity (Van-der-Pol type) for the single-degree-of-freedom model. For the reduced-order tall building model the WG method is used to solve for dynamic coupling, aerodynamics and transient wind load effects. Computation of "connection coefficients", effects of boundary conditions, wavelet resolution and wavelet order are examined in order to adequately replicate the dynamic response. Realizations of multivariate stationary and transient wind loads for the

  4. Ecological robustness of the gut microbiota in response to ingestion of transient food-borne microbes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenhong; Derrien, Muriel; Levenez, Florence; Brazeilles, Rémi; Ballal, Sonia A; Kim, Jason; Degivry, Marie-Christine; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T; Garrett, Wendy S; Doré, Joël; Veiga, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Resident gut microbes co-exist with transient bacteria to form the gut microbiota. Despite increasing evidence suggesting a role for transient microbes on gut microbiota function, the interplay between resident and transient members of this microbial community is poorly defined. We aimed to determine the extent to which a host's autochthonous gut microbiota influences niche permissivity to transient bacteria using a fermented milk product (FMP) as a vehicle for five food-borne bacterial strains. Using conventional and gnotobiotic rats and gut microbiome analyses (16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing and reverse transcription qPCR), we demonstrated that the clearance kinetics of one FMP bacterium, Lactococcus lactis CNCM I-1631, were dependent on the structure of the resident gut microbiota. Susceptibility of the resident gut microbiota to modulation by FMP intervention correlated with increased persistence of L. lactis. We also observed gut microbiome configurations that were associated with altered stability upon exposure to transient bacteria. Our study supports the concept that allochthonous bacteria have transient and subject-specific effects on the gut microbiome that can be leveraged to re-engineer the gut microbiome and improve dysbiosis-related diseases.

  5. Ecological robustness of the gut microbiota in response to ingestion of transient food-borne microbes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenhong; Derrien, Muriel; Levenez, Florence; Brazeilles, Rémi; Ballal, Sonia A; Kim, Jason; Degivry, Marie-Christine; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T; Garrett, Wendy S; Doré, Joël; Veiga, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Resident gut microbes co-exist with transient bacteria to form the gut microbiota. Despite increasing evidence suggesting a role for transient microbes on gut microbiota function, the interplay between resident and transient members of this microbial community is poorly defined. We aimed to determine the extent to which a host's autochthonous gut microbiota influences niche permissivity to transient bacteria using a fermented milk product (FMP) as a vehicle for five food-borne bacterial strains. Using conventional and gnotobiotic rats and gut microbiome analyses (16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing and reverse transcription qPCR), we demonstrated that the clearance kinetics of one FMP bacterium, Lactococcus lactis CNCM I-1631, were dependent on the structure of the resident gut microbiota. Susceptibility of the resident gut microbiota to modulation by FMP intervention correlated with increased persistence of L. lactis. We also observed gut microbiome configurations that were associated with altered stability upon exposure to transient bacteria. Our study supports the concept that allochthonous bacteria have transient and subject-specific effects on the gut microbiome that can be leveraged to re-engineer the gut microbiome and improve dysbiosis-related diseases. PMID:26953599

  6. Transient response in longitudinal grain size to reduced sediment supply in a large river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Bed material grain size is an important degree of freedom in fluvial systems as they adjust to system-wide perturbations such as sediment supply changes. However, little is known about processes and patterns of such adjustment in longitudinal grain size sorting in large rivers. This research uses unprecedented datasets collected in a large fluvial system to investigate transient response to recent supply changes associated with anthropogenic activities. Separate fining trends for gravel and fines, a protracted gravel-sand (G-S) transition, and bed patchiness identified in Singer (2008) were interrogated using output from a hydraulic model with grain size distributions (GSDs) extracted from ~125 cross sections spanning ~400 river kilometers of the Sacramento River, California. The analysis suggests that interactions between hydraulics, bed material sorting, and sediment flux explain these previously identified anomalies. Highest values of sorting occur in the G-S transition and represent the overlap of separate fining trends for gravel and fines, where the long profile is jagged with evidence of progressive incision. Much of the sediment in this poorly sorted zone is organized into patches, where transport apparently occurs as bedload sheets. Patchiness occurs over short length scales leading to strong differences in entrainment and flux, regardless of hydraulic conditions. A modified Shields stress is proposed that is scaled by GSD sorting to improve characterization of entrainment/disentrainment. Sediment flux calculations based on an equation sensitive bed material conditions (Singer and Dunne, 2004) reveal a strong relationship between fine sediment flux and d90, suggesting that the efficiency of fine patch flux controls bed material bed surface roughness. Results are in part consistent with Paola and Seal (1995) suggesting that patches are a result of overlapping pdfs of shear stress and sorting and with Ferguson (2003) in that the final end of the protracted G

  7. A numerical algorithm to evaluate the transient response for a synchronous scanning streak camera using a time-domain Baum-Liu-Tesche equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chengquan; Tian, Jinshou; Wu, Shengli; He, Jiai; Liu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The transient response is of great influence on the electromagnetic compatibility of synchronous scanning streak cameras (SSSCs). In this paper we propose a numerical method to evaluate the transient response of the scanning deflection plate (SDP). First, we created a simplified circuit model for the SDP used in an SSSC, and then derived the Baum-Liu-Tesche (BLT) equation in the frequency domain. From the frequency-domain BLT equation, its transient counterpart was derived. These parameters, together with the transient-BLT equation, were used to compute the transient load voltage and load current, and then a novel numerical method to fulfill the continuity equation was used. Several numerical simulations were conducted to verify this proposed method. The computed results were then compared with transient responses obtained by a frequency-domain/fast Fourier transform (FFT) method, and the accordance was excellent for highly conducting cables. The benefit of deriving the BLT equation in the time domain is that it may be used with slight modifications to calculate the transient response and the error can be controlled by a computer program. The result showed that the transient voltage was up to 1000 V and the transient current was approximately 10 A, so some protective measures should be taken to improve the electromagnetic compatibility.

  8. Analysis of the photosystem II by modelling the fluorescence yield transients during 10 seconds after a 10 ns pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Natalya E.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Riznichenko, Galina Yu.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the photosystem II (PS II) redox states is imitated over nine orders of magnitude in time. Our simulations focus on the information of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induced by a 10 ns laser flash. The PS II model analyzes differences in the PS II reaction between leaves (A. Thaliana, spinach) and thermophilic Chlorella cells.

  9. Transient Responses of Gravel Bars to Increases in Sediment Supply - Field & Flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, C.

    2010-12-01

    Bedforms in a gravel-bed river respond to a combination of water discharge, the rate and size of sediment supply, and valley-scale geometry. This study investigates bar response to an increase in sediment supply. In a large flume (2.75 m wide) with a plane bed of mixed sand and gravel (gravel D50 = 10 mm; 15% sand), alternate bars were formed by inducing a slight perturbation in the flow at the upstream end. After the bars and sediment flux reached a steady state, sediment supply was increased (from 45 kg/min to 70 kg/min). After the bed and sediment flux reached steady state, sediment supply was again increased (from 70 kg/min to 140 kg/min). Throughout the experiment high-frequency (1 Hz) measurements of the sediment flux, as well as moderate frequency (every 90 minutes) measurements of the bed topography were made. As the channel increased transport capacity to match the increased sediment supply, the initial bed adjustment was an increase in slope with near uniform deposition in the cross-stream direction. The bed then evolved to a steady-state configuration in which the locations and dimensions of the bars and pools were very similar to the pre-augmentation condition. During the adjustment process, the cross-stream relief initially decreased, the bar wavelengths decreased, and the bar celerity increased. The evolution from the lower-relief interim state to the post-augmentation steady state was reminiscent of initial bar development from a plane bed. A similar sequence of bed adjustment was observed on the Sandy River, Oregon, following a large increase in sediment flux due to the 2007 Marmot Dam removal. Measurements of bedform evolution immediately downstream of the dam show a transition from a long high-relief lateral bar along the right bank, to a lower-relief multiple short wavelength mid-channel bars, finally back to a long high-relief lateral bar along the right bank, albeit 4-5 meters higher than the original. Previous work on bedform response to

  10. Experiment on the Vernov satellite: Transient energetic processes in the Earth's atmosphere and magnetosphere. Part II. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Svertilov, S. I.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Garipov, G. K.; Barinova, V. O.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Veden'kin, N. N.; Golovanov, I. A.; Iyudin, A. F.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Klimov, P. A.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Kuznetsova, E. A.; Morozenko, V. S.; Morozov, O. V.; Myagkova, I. N.; Petrov, V. L.; Prokhorov, A. V.; Rozhkov, G. V.; Sigaeva, E. A.; Khrenov, B. A.; Yashin, I. V.; Klimov, S. I.; Vavilov, D. I.; Grushin, V. A.; Grechko, T. V.; Khartov, V. V.; Kudryashov, V. A.; Bortnikov, S. V.; Mzhel'skiy, P. V.; Papkov, A. P.; Krasnopeev, S. V.; Krug, V. V.; Korepanov, V. E.; Belyaev, S.; Demidov, A.; Ferenz, Ch.; Bodnar, L.; Szegedi, P.; Rotkel, H.; Moravskiy, M.; Park, Il; Jeon, Jin-A.; Kim, Ji-In; Lee, Jik

    2016-09-01

    We present the first experimental results on the observation of optical transients, gamma-ray bursts, relativistic electrons, and electromagnetic waves obtained during the experiment with the RELEC complex of scientific equipment on the Vernov satellite.

  11. Stability, Transient Response, Control, and Safety of a High-Power Electric Grid for Turboelectric Propulsion of Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Michael; Ross, Christine; Phillips, Danny; Blackwelder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This document contains the deliverables for the NASA Research and Technology for Aerospace Propulsion Systems (RTAPS) regarding the stability, transient response, control, and safety study for a high power cryogenic turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) system. The objective of this research effort is to enumerate, characterize, and evaluate the critical issues facing the development of the N3-X concept aircraft. This includes the proposal of electrical grid architecture concepts and an evaluation of any needs for energy storage.

  12. Transient temperature and sea level response of a two-dimensional ocean-climate model to greenhouse gas increases

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, L.D.D.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional dynamical ocean model is coupled to an energy balance climate model and used to investigate the transient surface temperature and sea level response to greenhouse gas increases. For most experiments a step function surface-troposphere heating perturbation of 6 W/sq m is applied. A transient reduction in the thermohaline overturning flux of 15-30% occurs in most experiments, although in some cases a near-total circulation collapse occurs within the first 100 years and lasts 700-1000 years. The transient circulation decrease is attributed to the greater rate of downward penetration of the heating anomaly in downwelling rather than in upwelling regions and is not a result of reduced convection. For experiments in which the steady state circulation is qualitatively unchanged after a heating perturbation, the surface temperature response is roughly uniform with latitude, in the absence of ice and snow. However, in some cases a heating perturbation induces the transition from a one-cell to a two-cell overturning circulation, or causes a complete reversal in the direction of overturning when a single cell spans both hemispheres, causing marked latitudinal variations in the surface temperature response.

  13. Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy in the Water Window: Elucidating Transient Valence Charge Distributions in an Aqueous Fe(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E; Cho, Hana; Hong, Kiryong; Khalil, Munira; Schoenlein, Robert W; Kim, Tae Kyu; Huse, Nils

    2016-02-01

    Time-resolved nitrogen-1s spectroscopy in the X-ray water window is presented as a novel probe of metal-ligand interactions and transient states in nitrogen-containing organic compounds. New information on iron(II) polypyridyl complexes via nitrogen core-level transitions yields insight into the charge density of the photoinduced high-spin state by comparing experimental results with time-dependent density functional theory. In the transient high-spin state, the 3d electrons of the metal center are more delocalized over the nearest-neighbor nitrogen atoms despite increased bond lengths. Our findings point to a strong coupling of electronic states with charge-transfer character, facilitating the ultrafast intersystem crossing cascade in these systems. The study also highlights the importance of local charge density measures to complement chemical interaction concepts of charge donation and back-bonding with molecular orbital descriptions of states. PMID:26727390

  14. Time-Resolved X-ray Spectroscopy in the Water Window: Elucidating Transient Valence Charge Distributions in an Aqueous Fe(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E; Cho, Hana; Hong, Kiryong; Khalil, Munira; Schoenlein, Robert W; Kim, Tae Kyu; Huse, Nils

    2016-02-01

    Time-resolved nitrogen-1s spectroscopy in the X-ray water window is presented as a novel probe of metal-ligand interactions and transient states in nitrogen-containing organic compounds. New information on iron(II) polypyridyl complexes via nitrogen core-level transitions yields insight into the charge density of the photoinduced high-spin state by comparing experimental results with time-dependent density functional theory. In the transient high-spin state, the 3d electrons of the metal center are more delocalized over the nearest-neighbor nitrogen atoms despite increased bond lengths. Our findings point to a strong coupling of electronic states with charge-transfer character, facilitating the ultrafast intersystem crossing cascade in these systems. The study also highlights the importance of local charge density measures to complement chemical interaction concepts of charge donation and back-bonding with molecular orbital descriptions of states.

  15. Response of denudation in the transient landscape of the Washington Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, S.; Chamberlain, C. P.; Blisniuk, K.; Levine, N. M.; Rood, D. H.; Hilley, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the response of denudation rates in the formerly glaciated landscape of the Washington Cascades to glacial recession after the Last Glacial Maximum. We determined the denudation rates from cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in thirteen detrital river sand samples collected along a transect across the Cascades, which feature a strong, persistent W-E precipitation gradient. Denudation rates covary strongly with precipitation, ranging from 0.08 mm/yr to 0.58 mm/yr, while modern precipitation rates vary between 950 mm/yr to 3150 mm/yr over the same area. Precipitation and denudation rates are linearly related and well correlated with one another (R2 = 0.852). In contrast, topographic attributes (as measured by catchment averaged channel steepness index [Ksn,], basin-averaged slope, mean local relief, elevation, basin area, and hypsometric integral) do not show strong correlations with denudation. The 10s of kyr time-scale denudation we measured is ~5 times larger than million-year timescale exhumation measured by (U-Th)/He system. We used topographic metrics to explore the role that different mass transport mechanisms may play in producing enhanced denudation across the Cascades. To quantify spatial changes in river incision, we computed the average channel steepness for points in the topography with basin areas > 3 km2, which likely isolates those portions of the channel network dominated by river. Channel steepness values at individual points were averaged for each basin to determine if those with high averaged channel steepness were associated with higher denudation. We found a poor correlation between these two factors, suggesting that the elevated denudation rates we observed are not dominantly derived from increased river incision. The second metric uses a version of the infinite slope approximation for failure of a cohesionless frictional material coupled with a steady-state hydrologic model to predict the relative stability of different

  16. The detector response matrices of the burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, William S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Tom M.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Horack, John M.; Lestrade, John Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The detector response matrices for the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are described, including their creation and operation in data analysis. These response matrices are a detailed abstract representation of the gamma-ray detectors' operating characteristics that are needed for data analysis. They are constructed from an extensive set of calibration data coupled with a complex geometry electromagnetic cascade Monte Carlo simulation code. The calibration tests and simulation algorithm optimization are described. The characteristics of the BATSE detectors in the spacecraft environment are also described.

  17. Transient response to three-phase faults on a wind turbine generator. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    In order to obtain a measure of its responses to short circuits a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator was modeled and its performance was simulated on a digital computer. Simulation of short circuit faults on the synchronous alternator of a wind turbine generator, without resort to the classical assumptions generally made for that analysis, indicates that maximum clearing times for the system tied to an infinite bus are longer than the typical clearing times for equivalent capacity conventional machines. Also, maximum clearing times are independent of tower shadow and wind shear. Variation of circuit conditions produce the modifications in the transient response predicted by analysis.

  18. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  19. Modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor short-term thermal response to flow and reactivity transients

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The research reported here has been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Regulatory Applications of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The short-term thermal response of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is analyzed for a range of flow and reactivity transients. These transients include loss of forced circulation without scram, spurious withdrawal of a control rod group, moisture ingress, control rod and control rod group ejections, and a rapid core cooling event. For each event analyzed, an event description, a discussion of the analysis approach and assumptions, and results are presented. When possible, results of these analyses are compared with those presented by the designers in the MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document and in the MHTGR Probabilistic Risk Assessment. The importance of inherent safety features is illustrated, and conclusions are presented regarding the safety performance of the MHTGR. Recommendations are made for a more in-depth examination of MHTGR response for some of the analyzed transients. The coupled heat transfer-neutron kinetics model is described in detail in Appendix A.

  20. Response of centrifugal blowers to simulated tornado transients, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, E S; Gregory, W S; Martin, R A; Littleton, P E

    1982-03-01

    During this quarter, quasi-steady and dynamic testing of the 24-in. centrifugal blower was completed using the blowdown facility located at New Mexico State University. The data were obtained using a new digital data-acquisition system. Software was developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to reduce the dynamic test data and create computer-generated movies showing the dynamic performance of the blower under simulated tornado transient pressure conditions relative to its quasi-steady-state performance. Currently, quadrant-four (outrunning flow) data have been reduced for the most severe and a less severe tornado pressure transient. The results indicate that both the quasi-steady and dynamic blower performance are very similar. Some hysteresis in the dynamic performance occurs because of rotational inertia effects in the blower rotor and drive system. Currently quadrant-two (backflow) data are being transferred to the LTSS computer system at Los Alamos and will be reduced shortly.

  1. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  2. Comparison of arterial pressure and plasma ANG II responses to three methods of subcutaneous ANG II administration

    PubMed Central

    Kuroki, Marcos T.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension is a commonly studied model of experimental hypertension, particularly in rodents, and is often generated by subcutaneous delivery of ANG II using Alzet osmotic minipumps chronically implanted under the skin. We have observed that, in a subset of animals subjected to this protocol, mean arterial pressure (MAP) begins to decline gradually starting the second week of ANG II infusion, resulting in a blunting of the slow pressor response and reduced final MAP. We hypothesized that this variability in the slow pressor response to ANG II was mainly due to factors unique to Alzet pumps. To test this, we compared the pressure profile and changes in plasma ANG II levels during subcutaneous ANG II administration (150 ng·kg−1·min−1) using either Alzet minipumps, iPrecio implantable pumps, or a Harvard external infusion pump. At the end of 14 days of ANG II, MAP was highest in the iPrecio group (156 ± 3 mmHg) followed by Harvard (140 ± 3 mmHg) and Alzet (122 ± 3 mmHg) groups. The rate of the slow pressor response, measured as daily increases in pressure averaged over days 2–14 of ANG II, was similar between iPrecio and Harvard groups (2.7 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.4 mmHg/day) but was significantly blunted in the Alzet group (0.4 ± 0.4 mmHg/day) due to a gradual decline in MAP in a subset of rats. We also found differences in the temporal profile of plasma ANG II between infusion groups. We conclude that the gradual decline in MAP observed in a subset of rats during ANG II infusion using Alzet pumps is mainly due to pump-dependent factors when applied in this particular context. PMID:24993045

  3. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  4. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons.

  5. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  6. Simulation on the Comparison of Steady-State Responses Synthesized by Transient Templates Based on Superposition Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiao-dan; Yu, Xue-fei; Lin, Lin; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The generation of auditory-evoked steady-state responses (SSRs) is associated with the linear superposition of transient auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) that cannot be directly observed. A straightforward way to justify the superposition hypothesis is the use of synthesized SSRs by a transient AEP under a predefined condition based on the forward process of this hypothesis. However, little is known about the inverse relation between the transient AEP and its synthetic SSR, which makes the interpretation of the latter less convincible because it may not necessarily underlie the true solution. In this study, we chose two pairs of AEPs from the conventional and deconvolution paradigms, which represent the homo-AEPs from a homogenous group and the hetero-AEPs from two heterogeneous groups. Both pairs of AEPs were used as templates to synthesize SSRs at rates of 20–120 Hz. The peak-peak amplitudes and the differences between the paired waves were measured. Although amplitude enhancement occurred at ~40 Hz, comparisons between the available waves demonstrated that the relative differences of the synthetic SSRs could be dramatically larger at other rates. Moreover, two virtually identical SSRs may come from clearly different AEPs. These results suggested inconsistent relationships between the AEPs and their corresponding SSRs over the tested rates. PMID:26600868

  7. Seismic analysis of the large 70-meter antenna, part 1: Earthquake response spectra versus full transient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiedron, K.; Chian, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    As a check on structure safety aspects, two approaches in seismic analysis for the large 70-m antennas are presented. The first approach, commonly used by civil engineers, utilizes known recommended design response spectra. The second approach, which is the full transient analysis, is versatile and applicable not only to earthquake loading but also to other dynamic forcing functions. The results obtained at the fundamental structural frequency show that the two approaches are in good agreement with each other and both approaches show a safe design. The results also confirm past 64-m antenna seismic studies done by the Caltech Seismology Staff.

  8. Rare and transient anti-D antibody response in D(-) liver transplant recipients transfused with D(+) red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Burin des Roziers, N; Ibanez, C; Samuel, D; Francoz, C; Idri, S; François, A; Mortelecque, R; Bierling, P; Pirenne, F

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted on 20 D(-) liver transplant (LT) recipients transfused with D(+) RBCs perioperatively and screened for RBC antibodies between 2 and 6 months later. None developed anti-D detectable by the indirect antiglobulin test. Two patients produced weak anti-D that reacted only with papain-treated RBCs at 10 and 11 days without any sign of immune haemolysis. Antibodies became quickly undetectable. These data suggest an unusual pattern of alloimmunization in LT recipients with rapid, weak and transient antibody response and support the safety of transfusing D(+) RBCs in most of D(-) patients during LT surgery. PMID:26918570

  9. The Cervico-Ocular Reflex of normal human subjects in response to transient and sinusoidal trunk rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Robert N., Jr.; Thurston, Stephen E.; Becker, Keith R.; Ackley, Charles V.; Seidman, Scott H.; Leigh, R. John

    1994-01-01

    We used the magnetic search coil technique to measure the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (COR) of 8 subjects in response to transient or sinusoidal (0.1-1.0 Hz) trunk rotations while their heads were firmly immobilized. Although we were able to resolve eye rotations of less than 0.05 deg, the COR was hardly measurable (gain was always less than 0.07). This finding, made with the most precise measurement technique used to date, suggests that the COR makes a negligible contribution to the stability of gaze in normal subjects during natural activities.

  10. Evaluation of transient response of spinning solar sail with flexible membrane by eigenfunction analysis and continuum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chujo, Toshihiro; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the transient response of large spinning membrane structures in space - especially spinning solar sails - by two different methods. A flexible sail membrane is easily deformed when a spacecraft changes its attitude, such as when using thrusters, and the control response including membrane vibration must be estimated in advance of operation. In order to estimate the motion of the membrane, numerical simulations using a multi-particle model (MPM) are conducted, where the membrane is modeled with masses, spring, and dampers. Usually, force propagation is calculated directly in this model and the position and velocity of each particle represent the membrane motion, which is referred to as a continuum analysis in this study. This method is useful for the analysis of membrane vibration because it replaces the complex dynamics with simple equations of motion. However, the computational cost is high and the calculations require a considerable amount of time. This study introduces an eigenfunction analysis to solve this problem. In this method, natural vibration modes and natural frequencies for the entire spacecraft are derived and used for dynamics computation, which reduces the computational cost dramatically compared to the conventional continuum analysis. In this study, the transient response of a spinning solar sail is analyzed using both methods, and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. It is shown that the eigenfunction analysis provides a suitable method for acquiring approximate solutions in a very low computation time.

  11. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  12. Ultrafast Photochemistry of Copper(II) Monochlorocomplexes in Methanol and Acetonitrile by Broadband Deep-UV-to-Near-IR Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Myasnikova, Olesya S; Panov, Maxim S; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Moroz, Pavel N; Zamkov, Mikhail; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2016-03-24

    Photochemistry of copper(II) monochlorocomplexes in methanol and acetonitrile solutions is studied by UV-pump/broadband deep-UV-to-near-IR probe femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Upon 255 and 266 nm excitation, the complexes in acetonitrile and methanol, respectively, are promoted to the excited ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) state, which has a short (sub-250 fs) lifetime. From the LMCT state, the complexes decay via internal conversion to lower-lying ligand field (LF) d-d excited states or the vibrationally hot ground electronic state. A minor fraction of the excited complexes relaxes to the LF electronic excited states, which are relatively long-lived with lifetimes >1 ns. Also, in methanol solutions, about 3% of the LMCT-excited copper(II) monochlorocomplexes dissociate forming copper(I) solvatocomplexes and chlorine atoms, which then further react forming long-lived photoproducts. In acetonitrile, about 50% of the LMCT-excited copper(II) monochlorocomplexes dissociate forming radical and ionic products in a ratio of 3:2. Another minor process observed following excitation only in methanol solutions is the re-equilibration between several forms of the copper(II) ground-state complexes present in solutions. This re-equilibration occurs on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to nanoseconds.

  13. Usage of the SYSCAP II circuit analysis program to determine semiconductor failure threshold levels caused by lightning/EMP transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusher, D. L.; Kleiner, C. T.

    1983-06-01

    An improved technique for calculating semiconductor junction heating resulting from arbitrary time-varying source terms is described. A FORTRAN subroutine is developed which permits solution of the convolution integral in the SYSCAP circuit analysis program which will simulate the thermal transient for each semiconductor of interest in a circuit subject to lightning/electromagnetic pulses disturbances. An example circuit is used to demonstrate the techniques; the results compare favorably with laboratory test data.

  14. Transient Response to Rapid Cooling of a Stainless Steel Sodium Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Houts, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Compact fission power systems are under consideration for use in long duration space exploration missions. Power demands on the order of 500 W, to 5 kW, will be required for up to 15 years of continuous service. One such small reactor design consists of a fast spectrum reactor cooled with an array of in-core alkali metal heat pipes coupled to thermoelectric or Stirling power conversion systems. Heat pipes advantageous attributes include a simplistic design, lack of moving parts, and well understood behavior. Concerns over reactor transients induced by heat pipe instability as a function of extreme thermal transients require experimental investigations. One particular concern is rapid cooling of the heat pipe condenser that would propagate to cool the evaporator. Rapid cooling of the reactor core beyond acceptable design limits could possibly induce unintended reactor control issues. This paper discusses a series of experimental demonstrations where a heat pipe operating at near prototypic conditions experienced rapid cooling of the condenser. The condenser section of a stainless steel sodium heat pipe was enclosed within a heat exchanger. The heat pipe - heat exchanger assembly was housed within a vacuum chamber held at a pressure of 50 Torr of helium. The heat pipe was brought to steady state operating conditions using graphite resistance heaters then cooled by a high flow of gaseous nitrogen through the heat exchanger. Subsequent thermal transient behavior was characterized by performing an energy balance using temperature, pressure and flow rate data obtained throughout the tests. Results indicate the degree of temperature change that results from a rapid cooling scenario will not significantly influence thermal stability of an operating heat pipe, even under extreme condenser cooling conditions.

  15. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  16. Transient CD4+ T Cell Depletion Results in Delayed Development of Functional Vaccine-Elicited Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Bricault, Christine A.; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Larocca, Rafael A.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Seaman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have recently demonstrated that CD4+ T cell help is required at the time of adenovirus (Ad) vector immunization for the development of functional CD8+ T cell responses, but the temporal requirement for CD4+ T cell help for the induction of antibody responses remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that induction of antibody responses in C57BL/6 mice can occur at a time displaced from the time of Ad vector immunization by depletion of CD4+ T cells. Transient depletion of CD4+ T cells at the time of immunization delays the development of antigen-specific antibody responses but does not permanently impair their development or induce tolerance against the transgene. Upon CD4+ T cell recovery, transgene-specific serum IgG antibody titers develop and reach a concentration equivalent to that in undepleted control animals. These delayed antibody responses exhibit no functional defects with regard to isotype, functional avidity, expansion after boosting immunization, or the capacity to neutralize a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Env-expressing pseudovirus. The development of this delayed transgene-specific antibody response is temporally linked to the expansion of de novo antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses, which develop after transient depletion of CD4+ T cells. These data demonstrate that functional vaccine-elicited antibody responses can be induced even if CD4+ T cell help is provided at a time markedly separated from the time of vaccination. IMPORTANCE CD4+ T cells have a critical role in providing positive help signals to B cells, which promote robust antibody responses. The paradigm is that helper signals must be provided immediately upon antigen exposure, and their absence results in tolerance against the antigen. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to the current model that the absence of CD4+ T cell help at priming results in long-term antibody nonresponsiveness, antibody responses can be induced by adenovirus vector immunization or alum

  17. Synthesis of Diversely Functionalized Oxindoles Enabled by Migratory Insertion of Isocyanide to a Transient σ-Alkylpalladium(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wangqing; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Jieping

    2016-08-01

    Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular carbopalladation of N-aryl acrylamides followed by migratory insertion of an isocyanide-coordinated C(sp(3) )-Pd intermediate afforded an alkylimidoyl-Pd(II) complex, which can be intercepted by a nucleophile, including heteroarenes. In addition to amides, the alkylimidoyl-Pd(II) complex was successfully converted into esters, ketones, and bis-heterocyclic compounds. An unprecedented palladium-catalyzed enantioselective domino process involving isocyanide was also documented. PMID:27356093

  18. Rapid transcriptome changes induced by cytosolic Ca2+ transients reveal ABRE-related sequences as Ca2+-responsive cis elements in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10(-13)) comprising two abscisic acid-specific cis elements: the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/G]) [corrected] Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca(2+) transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca(2+)-responsive cis elements. PMID:16980540

  19. Rapid transcriptome changes induced by cytosolic Ca2+ transients reveal ABRE-related sequences as Ca2+-responsive cis elements in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Boaz; Davydov, Olga; Knight, Heather; Galon, Yael; Knight, Marc R; Fluhr, Robert; Fromm, Hillel

    2006-10-01

    The regulation of gene expression by cellular calcium is crucial for plant defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the number of genes known to respond to specific transient calcium signals is limited, and as yet there is no definition of a calcium-responsive cis element in plants. Here, we generated specific cytosolic calcium transients in intact Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings and linked them to early transcriptome changes, followed by bioinformatic analysis of the responsive genes. A cytosolic calcium transient induced by calmodulin antagonists and blocked by lanthanides was characterized using aequorin-based luminometry and photon imaging. Analysis of transcriptome changes revealed 230 calcium-responsive genes, of which 162 were upregulated and 68 were downregulated. These include known early stress-responsive genes as well as genes of unknown function. Analysis of their upstream regions revealed, exclusively in the upregulated genes, a highly significant occurrence of a consensus sequence (P < 10(-13)) comprising two abscisic acid-specific cis elements: the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE; CACGTG[T/C/G]) and its coupling element ([C/A]ACGCG[T/C/G]) [corrected] Finally, we show that a tetramer of the ABRE cis element is sufficient to confer transcriptional activation in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. Thus, at least for some specific Ca(2+) transients and motif combinations, ABREs function as Ca(2+)-responsive cis elements.

  20. Method for determining the frequency-response characteristics of an element or system from the system transient output response to a known input function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curfman, Howard J; Gardiner, Robert A

    1950-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of the frequency-response characteristics of an element or system by utilizing the transient output response to a known but arbitrary input to the system. Since the application of special inputs, such as step functions or sinusoids, is often imperfect or impractical, a method for utilizing arbitrary inputs is desirable. Simple flight-test data may be reduced by this method to give the frequency response of an aircraft. Examples are given as determinations of aircraft frequency responses; however, the method can be applied to any type of dynamic system, such as automatic-control components, vibration-absorption equipment, and many types of instruments. The method requires that the arbitrary input function tend to a finite value after a finite time and that the system or element output be measured as a representative quantity having a static sensitivity. (author)

  1. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  2. Transient Earth system responses to cumulative carbon dioxide emissions: linearities, uncertainties, and probabilities in an observation-constrained model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2016-02-01

    Information on the relationship between cumulative fossil CO2 emissions and multiple climate targets is essential to design emission mitigation and climate adaptation strategies. In this study, the transient response of a climate or environmental variable per trillion tonnes of CO2 emissions, termed TRE, is quantified for a set of impact-relevant climate variables and from a large set of multi-forcing scenarios extended to year 2300 towards stabilization. An ˜ 1000-member ensemble of the Bern3D-LPJ carbon-climate model is applied and model outcomes are constrained by 26 physical and biogeochemical observational data sets in a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-type framework. Uncertainties in TRE estimates include both scenario uncertainty and model response uncertainty. Cumulative fossil emissions of 1000 Gt C result in a global mean surface air temperature change of 1.9 °C (68 % confidence interval (c.i.): 1.3 to 2.7 °C), a decrease in surface ocean pH of 0.19 (0.18 to 0.22), and a steric sea level rise of 20 cm (13 to 27 cm until 2300). Linearity between cumulative emissions and transient response is high for pH and reasonably high for surface air and sea surface temperatures, but less pronounced for changes in Atlantic meridional overturning, Southern Ocean and tropical surface water saturation with respect to biogenic structures of calcium carbonate, and carbon stocks in soils. The constrained model ensemble is also applied to determine the response to a pulse-like emission and in idealized CO2-only simulations. The transient climate response is constrained, primarily by long-term ocean heat observations, to 1.7 °C (68 % c.i.: 1.3 to 2.2 °C) and the equilibrium climate sensitivity to 2.9 °C (2.0 to 4.2 °C). This is consistent with results by CMIP5 models but inconsistent with recent studies that relied on short-term air temperature data affected by natural climate variability.

  3. Response of the hyporheic zone to transient groundwater fluctuations on the annual and storm event time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzone, Jonathan M.; Lowry, Christopher S.; Ward, Adam S.

    2016-07-01

    The volume of the water stored in and exchanged with the hyporheic zone is an important factor in stream metabolism and biogeochemical cycling. Previous studies have identified groundwater direction and magnitude as one key control on the volume of the hyporheic zone, suggesting that fluctuation in the riparian water table could induce large changes under certain seasonal conditions. In this study, we analyze the transient drivers that control the volume of the hyporheic zone by coupling the Brinkman-Darcy equation to the Navier-Stokes equations to simulate annual and storm induced groundwater fluctuations. The expansion and contraction of the hyporheic zone was quantified based on temporally dynamic scenarios simulating annual groundwater fluctuations in a humid temperate climate. The amplitude of the groundwater signal was varied between scenarios to represent a range of annual hydrologic forcing. Storm scenarios were then superimposed on the annual scenario to simulate the response to short-term storm signals. Simulations used two different groundwater storm responses; one in-phase with the surface water response and one 14 h out-of-phase with the surface water response to represent our observed site conditions. Results show that annual groundwater fluctuation is a dominant control on the volume of the hyporheic zone, where increasing groundwater fluctuation increases the amount of annual variation. Storm responses depended on the antecedent conditions determined by annual scenarios, where the time of year dictated the duration and magnitude of the storm induced response of the hyporheic zone.

  4. Combined dynamic stiffness matrix and precise time integration method for transient forced vibration response analysis of beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin

    2008-01-01

    A method has been developed for determining the transient response of a beam. The beam is divided into several continuous Timoshenko beam elements. The overall dynamic stiffness matrix is assembled in turn. Using Leung's equation, we derive the overall mass and stiffness matrices which are more suitable for response analysis than the overall dynamic stiffness matrix. The forced vibration of the beam is computed by the precise time integration method. Three illustrative beams are discussed to evaluate the performance of the current method. Solutions calculated by the finite element method and theoretical analysis are also enumerated for comparison. In these examples, we have found that the current method can solve the forced vibration of structures with a higher precision.

  5. Somatic mutational transients: models of response to acute and distributed doses of radiation applied to growing plants.

    PubMed

    Sand, S A

    1972-08-01

    After limited exposures of whole plants to gamma radiation, the induced-mutation frequency, measured in somatic tissue of successively blooming flowers, is a transient function of time. Quantitative interpretation of the data is aided by construction of a cell-generation model. Seven theoretical models are designed to represent interaction between the cell-generation model and seven different modes of application of the radiation treatment. The models provide a structure for integration of the mutational contributions from different floral primordia. These different contributions are distributed over the array of mature flowers by the quantitative relationships of each model. A mathematical expression for the average response of a model can be equated to the average observed response and solved for the implied mutation rate per cell per roentgen.

  6. Vibration analysis and transient response of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Ye, Tiangui

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a unified solution for free and transient vibration analyses of a functionally graded piezoelectric curved beam with general boundary conditions within the framework of Timoshenko beam theory. The formulation is derived by means of the variational principle in conjunction with a modified Fourier series which consists of standard Fourier cosine series and supplemented functions. The mechanical and electrical properties of functionally graded piezoelectric materials (FGPMs) are assumed to vary continuously in the thickness direction and are estimated by Voigt’s rule of mixture. The convergence, accuracy and reliability of the present formulation are demonstrated by comparing the present solutions with those from the literature and finite element analysis. Numerous results for FGPM beams with different boundary conditions, geometrical parameters as well as material distributions are given. Moreover, forced vibration of the FGPM beams subjected to dynamic loads and general boundary conditions are also investigated.

  7. An analytical solution of temperature response in multilayered materials for transient methods

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, N.; Makino, A.; Ishiguro, T.; Mihara, J. )

    1992-05-01

    Transient methods, such as those with pulse- or stepwise heating, have often been used to measure thermal diffusivities of various materials including layered materials. The objective of the present study is to derive an analytical solution of the temperature rise in a multilayered material, the front surface of which is subjected to pulse- or stepwise heating. The Laplace transformation has been used to obtain the analytical solution. This solution will enable one to establish the appropriate measurement method for thermophysical properties of the multilayered material. It is also shown that the present solution can be extended to functionally gradient materials (FGM), in which thermophysical properties as well as compositions change continuously. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  8. A rapid, extensive, and transient transcriptional response to estrogen signaling in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hah, Nasun; Danko, Charles G; Core, Leighton; Waterfall, Joshua J; Siepel, Adam; Lis, John T; Kraus, W Lee

    2011-05-13

    We report the immediate effects of estrogen signaling on the transcriptome of breast cancer cells using global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq). The data were analyzed using a new bioinformatic approach that allowed us to identify transcripts directly from the GRO-seq data. We found that estrogen signaling directly regulates a strikingly large fraction of the transcriptome in a rapid, robust, and unexpectedly transient manner. In addition to protein-coding genes, estrogen regulates the distribution and activity of all three RNA polymerases and virtually every class of noncoding RNA that has been described to date. We also identified a large number of previously undetected estrogen-regulated intergenic transcripts, many of which are found proximal to estrogen receptor binding sites. Collectively, our results provide the most comprehensive measurement of the primary and immediate estrogen effects to date and a resource for understanding rapid signal-dependent transcription in other systems.

  9. Assessing the implications of human land-use change for the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, C. T.; Matthews, H. D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent research has shown evidence of a linear climate response to cumulative CO2 emissions, which implies that the source, timing, and amount of emissions does not significantly influence the climate response per unit emission. Furthermore, these analyses have generally assumed that the climate response to land-use CO2 emissions is equivalent to that of fossil fuels under the assumption that, once in the atmosphere, the radiative forcing induced by CO2 is not sensitive to the emissions source. However, land-cover change also affects surface albedo and the strength of terrestrial carbon sinks, both of which have an additional climate effect. In this study, we use a coupled climate-carbon cycle model to assess the climate response to historical and future cumulative land-use CO2 emissions, in order to compare it to the response to fossil fuel CO2. We find that when we isolate the CO2-induced (biogeochemical) temperature changes associated with land-use change, then the climate response to cumulative land-use emissions is equivalent to that of fossil fuel CO2. We show further that the globally-averaged albedo-induced biophysical cooling from land-use change is non-negligible and may be of comparable magnitude to the biogeochemical warming, with the result that the net climate response to land-use change is substantially different from a linear response to cumulative emissions. However, our new simulations suggest that the biophysical cooling from land-use change follows its own independent (negative) linear response to cumulative net land-use CO2 emissions, which may provide a useful scaling factor for certain applications when evaluating the full transient climate response to emissions.

  10. Stronger pharmacological cortisol suppression and anticipatory cortisol stress response in transient global amnesia.

    PubMed

    Griebe, Martin; Nees, Frauke; Gerber, Benjamin; Ebert, Anne; Flor, Herta; Wolf, Oliver T; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a disorder characterized by a sudden attack of severe anterograde memory disturbance that is frequently preceded by emotional or physical stress and resolves within 24 h. By using MRI following the acute episode in TGA patients, small lesions in the hippocampus have been observed. Hence, it has been hypothesized that the disorder is caused by a stress-related transient inhibition of memory formation in the hippocampus. To study the factors that may link stress and TGA, we measured the cortisol day-profile, the dexamethasone feedback inhibition and the effect of experimental exposure to stress on cortisol levels (using the socially evaluated cold pressor test and a control procedure) in 20 patients with a recent history of TGA and in 20 healthy controls. We used self-report scales of depression, anxiety and stress, and a detailed neuropsychological assessment to characterize our collective. We did not observe differences in mean cortisol levels in the cortisol day-profile between the two groups. After administration of low-dose dexamethasone, TGA patients showed significantly stronger cortisol suppression in the daytime profile compared to the control group (p = 0.027). The mean salivary cortisol level was significantly higher in the TGA group prior to and after the experimental stress exposure (p = 0.008 and 0.010 respectively), as well as prior to and after the control condition (p = 0.022 and 0.024, respectively). The TGA group had higher scores of depressive symptomatology (p = 0.021) and anxiety (p = 0.007), but the groups did not differ in the neuropsychological assessment. Our findings of a stronger pharmacological suppression and higher cortisol levels in anticipation of experimental stress in participants with a previous TGA indicate a hypersensitivity of the HPA axis. This suggests that an individual stress sensitivity might play a role in the pathophysiology of TGA. PMID:25805980

  11. Spontaneous hypothermia in human sepsis is a transient, self-limiting, and nonterminal response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Monique T; Rodrigues, Abner C; Cezar, Luana C; Fujita, Andre; Soriano, Francisco G; Steiner, Alexandre A

    2016-06-15

    Hypothermia in sepsis is generally perceived as something dysregulated and progressive although there has been no assessment on the natural course of this phenomenon in humans. This was the first study on the dynamics of hypothermia in septic patients not subjected to active rewarming, and the results were surprising. A sample of 50 subjects presenting with spontaneous hypothermia during sepsis was drawn from the 2005-2012 database of an academic hospital. Hypothermia was defined as body temperature below 36.0°C for longer than 2 h, with at least one reading of 35.5°C or less. The patients presented with 138 episodes of hypothermia, 21 at the time of the sepsis diagnosis and 117 with a later onset. However, hypothermia was uncommon in the final 12 h of life of the patients that succumbed. The majority (97.1%) of the hypothermic episodes were transient and self-limited; the median recovery time was 6 h; body temperature rarely fell below 34.0°C. Bidirectional oscillations in body temperature were evident in the course of hypothermia. Nearly half of the hypothermic episodes had onset in the absence of shock or respiratory distress, and the incidence of hypothermia was not increased during either of these conditions. Usage of antipyretic drugs, sedatives, neuroleptics, or other medications did not predict the onset of hypothermia. In conclusion, hypothermia appears to be a predominantly transient, self-limiting, and nonterminal phenomenon that is inherent to human sepsis. These characteristics resemble those of the regulated hypothermia shown to replace fever in animal models of severe systemic inflammation.

  12. Spontaneous hypothermia in human sepsis is a transient, self-limiting, and nonterminal response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Monique T; Rodrigues, Abner C; Cezar, Luana C; Fujita, Andre; Soriano, Francisco G; Steiner, Alexandre A

    2016-06-15

    Hypothermia in sepsis is generally perceived as something dysregulated and progressive although there has been no assessment on the natural course of this phenomenon in humans. This was the first study on the dynamics of hypothermia in septic patients not subjected to active rewarming, and the results were surprising. A sample of 50 subjects presenting with spontaneous hypothermia during sepsis was drawn from the 2005-2012 database of an academic hospital. Hypothermia was defined as body temperature below 36.0°C for longer than 2 h, with at least one reading of 35.5°C or less. The patients presented with 138 episodes of hypothermia, 21 at the time of the sepsis diagnosis and 117 with a later onset. However, hypothermia was uncommon in the final 12 h of life of the patients that succumbed. The majority (97.1%) of the hypothermic episodes were transient and self-limited; the median recovery time was 6 h; body temperature rarely fell below 34.0°C. Bidirectional oscillations in body temperature were evident in the course of hypothermia. Nearly half of the hypothermic episodes had onset in the absence of shock or respiratory distress, and the incidence of hypothermia was not increased during either of these conditions. Usage of antipyretic drugs, sedatives, neuroleptics, or other medications did not predict the onset of hypothermia. In conclusion, hypothermia appears to be a predominantly transient, self-limiting, and nonterminal phenomenon that is inherent to human sepsis. These characteristics resemble those of the regulated hypothermia shown to replace fever in animal models of severe systemic inflammation. PMID:26989218

  13. Stronger pharmacological cortisol suppression and anticipatory cortisol stress response in transient global amnesia.

    PubMed

    Griebe, Martin; Nees, Frauke; Gerber, Benjamin; Ebert, Anne; Flor, Herta; Wolf, Oliver T; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a disorder characterized by a sudden attack of severe anterograde memory disturbance that is frequently preceded by emotional or physical stress and resolves within 24 h. By using MRI following the acute episode in TGA patients, small lesions in the hippocampus have been observed. Hence, it has been hypothesized that the disorder is caused by a stress-related transient inhibition of memory formation in the hippocampus. To study the factors that may link stress and TGA, we measured the cortisol day-profile, the dexamethasone feedback inhibition and the effect of experimental exposure to stress on cortisol levels (using the socially evaluated cold pressor test and a control procedure) in 20 patients with a recent history of TGA and in 20 healthy controls. We used self-report scales of depression, anxiety and stress, and a detailed neuropsychological assessment to characterize our collective. We did not observe differences in mean cortisol levels in the cortisol day-profile between the two groups. After administration of low-dose dexamethasone, TGA patients showed significantly stronger cortisol suppression in the daytime profile compared to the control group (p = 0.027). The mean salivary cortisol level was significantly higher in the TGA group prior to and after the experimental stress exposure (p = 0.008 and 0.010 respectively), as well as prior to and after the control condition (p = 0.022 and 0.024, respectively). The TGA group had higher scores of depressive symptomatology (p = 0.021) and anxiety (p = 0.007), but the groups did not differ in the neuropsychological assessment. Our findings of a stronger pharmacological suppression and higher cortisol levels in anticipation of experimental stress in participants with a previous TGA indicate a hypersensitivity of the HPA axis. This suggests that an individual stress sensitivity might play a role in the pathophysiology of TGA.

  14. Atmospheric feedback uncertainty dominates ocean heat uptake uncertainty for the transient climate response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Andrew H.; Swart, Neil C.; Knutti, Reto

    2015-04-01

    By absorbing heat and carbon the world ocean acts to slow the transient rate of climate change and to a great extent determines the magnitude of warming given a fixed budget of carbon emissions. The projected magnitude of future ocean heat uptake (OHU) varies substantially between the climate model simulations stored in the CMIP5 archive. In this study analytical and statistical methods, in addition to climate model simulations with an intermediate complexity climate model are used to partition the uncertainty in future OHU in CMIP5 models into uncertainty in radiative forcing, the climate feedback parameter, ocean surface wind fields, and the structure of ocean models. We estimate that if only uncertainty in ocean model structure remained then the uncertainty in OHU would be reduced by 61%, and if only uncertainty in ocean surface wind field remained then OHU uncertainty would be reduced by 87%. The regression method used to simultaneously estimate radiative forcing and the climate feedback parameter from climate model output leaves these parameters with anti-correlated uncertainty. If only uncertainty in radiative forcing and the climate feedback parameter remain then the uncertainty in OHU would be reduced by 9%. These results suggest that most of the uncertainty in OHU seen in CMIP5 models originates in uncertainties in how the atmosphere will respond to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gas concentrations. Therefore, efforts to improve the representation of the ocean in climate models will have only a limited effect on reducing the uncertainty in the rate of transient climate change unless concurrent improvements are made in constraining atmospheric feedbacks.

  15. 3-D transient hydraulic tomography in unconfined aquifers with fast drainage response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, M.; Barrash, W.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate, through numerical experiments, the viability of three-dimensional transient hydraulic tomography (3DTHT) for identifying the spatial distribution of groundwater flow parameters (primarily, hydraulic conductivity K) in permeable, unconfined aquifers. To invert the large amount of transient data collected from 3DTHT surveys, we utilize an iterative geostatistical inversion strategy in which outer iterations progressively increase the number of data points fitted and inner iterations solve the quasi-linear geostatistical formulas of Kitanidis. In order to base our numerical experiments around realistic scenarios, we utilize pumping rates, geometries, and test lengths similar to those attainable during 3DTHT field campaigns performed at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). We also utilize hydrologic parameters that are similar to those observed at the BHRS and in other unconsolidated, unconfined fluvial aquifers. In addition to estimating K, we test the ability of 3DTHT to estimate both average storage values (specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy) as well as spatial variability in storage coefficients. The effects of model conceptualization errors during unconfined 3DTHT are investigated including: (1) assuming constant storage coefficients during inversion and (2) assuming stationary geostatistical parameter variability. Overall, our findings indicate that estimation of K is slightly degraded if storage parameters must be jointly estimated, but that this effect is quite small compared with the degradation of estimates due to violation of "structural" geostatistical assumptions. Practically, we find for our scenarios that assuming constant storage values during inversion does not appear to have a significant effect on K estimates or uncertainty bounds.

  16. Optical studies of the X-ray transient XTE J2123-058 - II. Phase-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, R. I.; Charles, P. A.; Haswell, C. A.; Casares, J.; Zurita, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2001-06-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the soft X-ray transient XTEJ2123-058 in outburst. A useful spectral coverage of 3700-6700Å was achieved spanning two orbits of the binary, with single-epoch coverage extending to ~9000Å. The optical spectrum approximates a steep blue power law, consistent with emission on the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot blackbody spectrum. The strongest spectral lines are Heii 4686Å and Ciii/Niii 4640Å (Bowen blend) in emission. Their relative strengths suggest that XTEJ2123-058 was formed in the Galactic plane, not in the halo. Other weak emission lines of Heii and Civ are present, and Balmer lines show a complex structure, blended with Heii. Heii 4686-Å profiles show a complex multiple S-wave structure, with the strongest component appearing at low velocities in the lower-left quadrant of a Doppler tomogram. Hα shows transient absorption between phases 0.35 and 0.55. Both of these effects appear to be analogous to similar behaviour in SW Sex type cataclysmic variables. We therefore consider whether the spectral line behaviour of XTEJ2123-058 can be explained by the same models invoked for those systems.

  17. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II. Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, F.

    1984-03-15

    In this paper, we have numerically investigated the transient perturbation of a fast (''high-speed'') model solar wind in a nonradial open field geometry, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. The transient behavior of the fast solar wind is treated between 1 and 8 solar radii, assuming that flare heating occurs in the lower corona. The results are compare with the radial case previously investigated in the first paper in this series. The unperturbed high-speed wind passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region, where it shows much larger increase in velocity and steeper decrease in density and pressure as compared with the radial case. It is assumed that flare-energy input ceases before the ascending shock reaches the inner critical point, and that the total flare energy per unit area on the surface of the Sun is the same as in the radial case, in spite of the difference in open field geometries.

  18. Finite-element nonlinear transient response computer programs PLATE 1 and CIVM-PLATE 1 for the analysis of panels subjected to impulse or impact loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, R. L.; Witmer, E. A.; French, S. E.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs are described for predicting the transient large deflection elastic viscoplastic responses of thin single layer, initially flat unstiffened or integrally stiffened, Kirchhoff-Lov ductile metal panels. The PLATE 1 program pertains to structural responses produced by prescribed externally applied transient loading or prescribed initial velocity distributions. The collision imparted velocity method PLATE 1 program concerns structural responses produced by impact of an idealized nondeformable fragment. Finite elements are used to represent the structure in both programs. Strain hardening and strain rate effects of initially isotropic material are considered.

  19. Apoplastic reactive oxygen species transiently decrease auxin signaling and cause stress-induced morphogenic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Blomster, Tiina; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Sipari, Nina; Brosché, Mikael; Ahlfors, Reetta; Keinänen, Markku; Overmyer, Kirk; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2011-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are ubiquitous signaling molecules in plant stress and development. To gain further insight into the plant transcriptional response to apoplastic ROS, the phytotoxic atmospheric pollutant ozone was used as a model ROS inducer in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and gene expression was analyzed with microarrays. In contrast to the increase in signaling via the stress hormones salicylic acid, abscisic acid, jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene, ROS treatment caused auxin signaling to be transiently suppressed, which was confirmed with a DR5-uidA auxin reporter construct. Transcriptomic data revealed that various aspects of auxin homeostasis and signaling were modified by apoplastic ROS. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of auxin signaling showed that transcripts of several auxin receptors and Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional repressors were reduced in response to apoplastic ROS. The ROS-derived changes in the expression of auxin signaling genes partially overlapped with abiotic stress, pathogen responses, and salicylic acid signaling. Several mechanisms known to suppress auxin signaling during biotic stress were excluded, indicating that ROS regulated auxin responses via a novel mechanism. Using mutants defective in various auxin (axr1, nit1, aux1, tir1 afb2, iaa28-1, iaa28-2) and JA (axr1, coi1-16) responses, ROS-induced cell death was found to be regulated by JA but not by auxin. Chronic ROS treatment resulted in altered leaf morphology, a stress response known as "stress-induced morphogenic response." Altered leaf shape of tir1 afb2 suggests that auxin was a negative regulator of stress-induced morphogenic response in the rosette.

  20. Transient α-helices in the disordered RPEL motifs of the serum response factor coactivator MKL1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Fuju, Takahiro; Obita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Tsuda, Masaaki; Tabuchi, Akiko

    2014-06-01

    The megakaryoblastic leukemia 1 (MKL1) protein functions as a transcriptional coactivator of the serum response factor. MKL1 has three RPEL motifs (RPEL1, RPEL2, and RPEL3) in its N-terminal region. MKL1 binds to monomeric G-actin through RPEL motifs, and the dissociation of MKL1 from G-actin promotes the translocation of MKL1 to the nucleus. Although structural data are available for RPEL motifs of MKL1 in complex with G-actin, the structural characteristics of RPEL motifs in the free state have been poorly defined. Here we characterized the structures of free RPEL motifs using NMR and CD spectroscopy. NMR and CD measurements showed that free RPEL motifs are largely unstructured in solution. However, NMR analysis identified transient α-helices in the regions where helices α1 and α2 are induced upon binding to G-actin. Proline mutagenesis showed that the transient α-helices are locally formed without helix-helix interactions. The helix content is higher in the order of RPEL1, RPEL2, and RPEL3. The amount of preformed structure may correlate with the binding affinity between the intrinsically disordered protein and its target molecule.

  1. Ultrafast electronic response of Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces: From early excitonic transients to saturated image potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silkin, V. M.; Lazić, P.; Došlić, N.; Petek, H.; Gumhalter, B.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of attosecond to femtosecond screening and emergent potentials that govern the dynamics and energetics of electrons and holes excited in the various stages of multiphoton photoemission processes and control the photoelectron yield in recently reported experiments [X. Cui, C. Wang, A. Argondizzo, S. Garrett-Roe, B. Gumhalter, and H. Petek, Nat. Phys. 10, 505 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2981]. The study is focused on the dynamical screening of holes created in preexistent quasi-two-dimensional Shockley state bands on Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces and of electrons excited to the intermediate and emerging screened states. Using the formalism of self-consistent electronic response, we analyze first the effects of screening on the dynamics of photoexcited electrons and holes and then of the Coulomb correlated photoexcited pair. Special attention is paid to the correlated primary electron-hole states, which commence as transient surface excitons and develop in the course of screening into uncorrelated electrons and holes propagating in the image potential and surface state bands, respectively. The obtained results enable to establish a consistent picture of transient electron dynamics at Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces that are becoming accessible by the time-, energy-, and momentum-resolved pump-probe multiphoton photoelectron spectroscopies.

  2. LUNAR OUTGASSING, TRANSIENT PHENOMENA, AND THE RETURN TO THE MOON. II. PREDICTIONS AND TESTS FOR OUTGASSING/REGOLITH INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.; Hummels, Cameron

    2009-12-20

    We follow Paper I with predictions of how gas leaking through the lunar surface could influence the regolith, as might be observed via optical transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) and related effects. We touch on several processes, but concentrate on low and high flow rate extremes, which are perhaps the most likely. We model explosive outgassing for the smallest gas overpressure at the regolith base that releases the regolith plug above it. This disturbance's timescale and affected area are consistent with observed TLPs; we also discuss other effects. For slow flow, escape through the regolith is prolonged by low diffusivity. Water, found recently in deep magma samples, is unique among candidate volatiles, capable of freezing between the regolith base and surface, especially near the lunar poles. For major outgassing sites, we consider the possible accumulation of water ice. Over geological time, ice accumulation can evolve downward through the regolith. Depending on gases additional to water, regolith diffusivity might be suppressed chemically, blocking seepage and forcing the ice zone to expand to larger areas, up to km{sup 2} scales, again, particularly at high latitudes. We propose an empirical path forward, wherein current and forthcoming technologies provide controlled, sensitive probes of outgassing. The optical transient/outgassing connection, addressed via Earth-based remote sensing, suggests imaging and/or spectroscopy, but aspects of lunar outgassing might be more covert, as indicated above. TLPs betray some outgassing, but does outgassing necessarily produce TLPs? We also suggest more intrusive techniques from radar to in situ probes. Understanding lunar volatiles seems promising in terms of resource exploitation for human exploration of the Moon and beyond, and offers interesting scientific goals in its own right. Many of these approaches should be practiced in a pristine lunar atmosphere, before significant confusing signals likely to be produced upon

  3. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-3 (TRPM3) Mediates Nociceptive-Like Responses in Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Scalici, Massimiliano; Lauro, Filomena; Russo, Valeria; Persichini, Tiziana; Salvemini, Daniela; Mollace, Vincenzo; Fini, Massimo; Raffaeli, William

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mammals to feel noxious stimuli lies in a heterogeneous group of primary somatosensory neurons termed nociceptors, which express specific membrane receptors, such as the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. Here, we show that one of the most important nociceptive-like pathways is conserved in the freshwater coelenterate Hydra vulgaris, the most primitive organism possessing a nervous system. In particular, we found that H. vulgaris expresses TRPM3, a nociceptor calcium channel involved in the detection of noxious heat in mammals. Furthermore, we detected that both heat shock and TRPM3 specific agonist (i.e., pregnenolone sulfate) induce the modulation of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), two genes activated by TRP-mediated heat painful stimuli in mammals. As expected, these effects are inhibited by a TRPM3 antagonist (i.e., mefenamic acid). Interestingly, the TRPM3 agonist and heat shock also induce the expression of nuclear transcription erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), known markers of oxidative stress; noteworthy gene expression was also inhibited by the TRPM3 antagonist. As a whole, our results demonstrate the presence of conserved molecular oxidative/nociceptive-like pathways at the primordial level of the animal kingdom. PMID:26974325

  4. Emergence of Hysteresis and Transient Ferroelectric Response in Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Sakai, Nobuya; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been rapid progress in the efficiency of perovskite-based solar cells, hysteresis in the current-voltage performance is not yet completely understood. Owing to its complex structure, it is not easy to attribute the hysteretic behavior to any one of different components, such as the bulk of the perovskite or different heterojunction interfaces. Among organo-lead halide perovskites, methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) is known to have a ferroelectric property. The present investigation reveals a strong correlation between transient ferroelectric polarization of CH3NH3PbI3 induced by an external bias in the dark and hysteresis enhancement in photovoltaic characteristics. Our results demonstrate that the reverse bias poling (-0.3 to -1.1 V) of CH3NH3PbI3 photovoltaic layers prior to the photocurrent-voltage measurement generates stronger hysteresis whose extent changes significantly by the cell architecture. The phenomenon is interpreted as the effect of remanent polarization in the perovskite film on the photocurrent, which is most enhanced in planar perovskite structures without mesoporous scaffolds.

  5. Low Stretch Solid-Fuel Flame Transient Response to a Step Change in Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. B.; Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a step change in gravity level on the stability of low stretch diffusion flames over a solid fuel is studied both numerically and experimentally. Drop tower experiments have been conducted in NASA Glenn Research Center's 5.2 Zero Gravity Facility. In the experiments burning PMMA cylinders, a dynamic transition is observed when the steadily burning 1g flame is dropped and becomes a 0g flame. To understand the physics behind this dynamic transition, a transient stagnation point model has been developed which includes gas-phase radiation and solid phase coupling to describe this dynamic process. In this paper, the experimental results are compared with the model predictions. Both model and experiment show that the interior of the solid phase does not have time to change significantly in the few seconds of drop time, so the experimental results are pseudo-steady in the gas-phase, but the solid is inherently unsteady over long time scales. The model is also used to examine the importance of fractional heat losses on extinction, which clearly demonstrates that as the feedback from the flame decreases, the importance of the ongoing heat losses becomes greater, and extinction is observed when these losses represent 80% or more of the flame feedback.

  6. Murine and rat cavernosal responses to endothelin-1 and urotensin-II Vasoactive Peptide Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Fernando S.; Carneiro, Zidonia N; Giachini, Fernanda R.C.; Lima, Victor V; Nogueira, Edson; Rainey, William E; Tostes, Rita C.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2008-01-01

    Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and urotensin-II (U-II) are the most potent constrictors of human vessels. Although the cavernosal tissue is higly responsive to ET-1, no information exists on the effects of U-II on cavernosal function. The aim of this study was to characterize ET-1 and U-II responses in corpora cavernosa from rats and mice. Methods and Results Male Wistar rats and C57/BL6 mice were used at 13 weeks. Cumulative concentration-response curves to ET-1, U-II and IRL-1620, an ETB agonist, were performed. ET-1 increased force generation in cavernosal strips from mice and rats, but no response to U-II was observed in the presence or absence of L-NAME, or in strips pre-stimulated with 20mM KCl. IRL-1620 did not induce cavernosal contraction even in presence of L-NAME, but induced a cavernosal relaxation which was greater in rats than mice. No relaxation responses to U-II were observed in cavernosal strips pre-contracted with phenylephrine. mRNA expression of ET-1, ETA, ETB and U-II receptors, but not U-II was observed in cavernosal strips. Conclusion ET-1, via ETA receptors activation, causes contractile responses in cavernosal strips from rats and mice whereas ETB receptor activation produces relaxation. Although the cavernosal tissue expresses U-II receptors, U-II does not induce contractile responses in corpora cavernosa from mice or rats. PMID:19884966

  7. Design oriented identification of critical times in transient response. [due to dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Watson, L. T.; Grandhi, R. V.

    1984-01-01

    Two techniques are presented for reducing the computational effort in identifying the critical time points. One approach is an adaptive search technique, well suited for the case where the response is exactly known. The other technique, useful for noisy response, is based on a least-squares spline approximation of the response. The possibility of grouping several closely spaced local peaks to identify a single super peak from each group is also investigated. The computational efficiency of the techniques proposed here is illustrated by two examples.

  8. A femtosecond visible/visible and visible/mid-infrared transient absorption study of the light harvesting complex II.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Andreas D; Di Donato, Mariangela; van Stokkum, Ivo; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-12-16

    Light harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the most abundant protein in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. LHCII acts to collect solar radiation, transferring this energy mainly toward photosystem II, with a smaller amount going to photosystem I; it is then converted into a chemical, storable form. We performed time-resolved femtosecond visible pump/mid-infrared probe and visible pump/visible probe absorption difference spectroscopy on purified LHCII to gain insight into the energy transfer in this complex occurring in the femto-picosecond time regime. We find that information derived from mid-infrared spectra, together with structural and modeling information, provides a unique visualization of the flow of energy via the bottleneck pigment chlorophyll a604.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the transient response of solvation structure during the translational diffusion of solute.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Matsuoka, T; Koda, S

    2005-01-01

    The transient response function of the density profile of the solvent around a solute during the translational diffusion of the solute is formulated based on the generalized Langevin formalism. The resultant theory is applied to both neat Lennard-Jones fluids and cations in liquid water, and the response functions are obtained from the analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations. In the case of the self-diffusion of Lennard-Jones fluids, the responses of the solvation structures are in harmony with conventional pictures based on the mode-coupling theory, that is, the binary collision in the low-density fluids, the backflow effect from medium to high density fluids, and the backscatter effect in the liquids near the triple point. In the case of cations in water, the qualitative behavior is strongly dependent on the size of cations. The pictures similar to simple dense liquids are obtained for the large ion and the neutral molecule, while the solvent waters within the first solvation shell of small ions show an oscillatory response in the short-time region. In particular, the oscillation is remarkably underdumped for lithium ion. The origin of the oscillation is discussed in relation to the theoretical treatment of the translational diffusion of ions in water. PMID:15638679

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the transient response of solvation structure during the translational diffusion of solute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Koda, S.

    2005-01-01

    The transient response function of the density profile of the solvent around a solute during the translational diffusion of the solute is formulated based on the generalized Langevin formalism. The resultant theory is applied to both neat Lennard-Jones fluids and cations in liquid water, and the response functions are obtained from the analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations. In the case of the self-diffusion of Lennard-Jones fluids, the responses of the solvation structures are in harmony with conventional pictures based on the mode-coupling theory, that is, the binary collision in the low-density fluids, the backflow effect from medium to high density fluids, and the backscatter effect in the liquids near the triple point. In the case of cations in water, the qualitative behavior is strongly dependent on the size of cations. The pictures similar to simple dense liquids are obtained for the large ion and the neutral molecule, while the solvent waters within the first solvation shell of small ions show an oscillatory response in the short-time region. In particular, the oscillation is remarkably underdumped for lithium ion. The origin of the oscillation is discussed in relation to the theoretical treatment of the translational diffusion of ions in water.

  11. Two analyte calibrations from the transient response of a single potentiometric sensor employed with the SIA technique.

    PubMed

    Cartas, Raul; Mimendia, Aitor; Legin, Andrey; Del Valle, Manel

    2010-01-15

    Simultaneous quantification of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) in solution has been correctly targeted using the kinetic information from a single non-specific potentiometric sensor. Dual quantification was accomplished from the complex information in the transient response of an electrode used in a Sequential Injection Analysis (SIA) system and recorded after step injection of sample. Data was firstly preprocessed with the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) to extract significant features and then fed into an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for building the calibration model. DWT stage was optimized regarding the wavelet function and decomposition level, while the ANN stage was optimized on its structure. To simultaneously corroborate the effectiveness of the approach, two different potentiometric sensors were used as study case, one using a glass selective to Cd(2+) and another a PVC membrane selective to Pb(2+).

  12. Finite-strain large-deflection elastic-viscoplastic finite-element transient response analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodal, J. J. A.; Witmer, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of analysis for thin structures that incorporates finite strain, elastic-plastic, strain hardening, time dependent material behavior implemented with respect to a fixed configuration and is consistently valid for finite strains and finite rotations is developed. The theory is formulated systematically in a body fixed system of convected coordinates with materially embedded vectors that deform in common with continuum. Tensors are considered as linear vector functions and use is made of the dyadic representation. The kinematics of a deformable continuum is treated in detail, carefully defining precisely all quantities necessary for the analysis. The finite strain theory developed gives much better predictions and agreement with experiment than does the traditional small strain theory, and at practically no additional cost. This represents a very significant advance in the capability for the reliable prediction of nonlinear transient structural responses, including the reliable prediction of strains large enough to produce ductile metal rupture.

  13. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Transient Thermal Response of Lightweight Cementitious Composites Made with Polyurethane Foam Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kismi, M.; Poullain, P.; Mounanga, P.

    2012-07-01

    The development of low-cost lightweight aggregate (LWA) mortars and concretes presents many advantages, especially in terms of lightness and thermal insulation performances of structures. Low-cost LWA mainly comes from the recovery of vegetal or plastic wastes. This article focuses on the characterization of the thermal conductivity of innovative lightweight cementitious composites made with fine particles of rigid polyurethane (PU) foam waste. Five mortars were prepared with various mass substitution rates of cement with PU-foam particles. Their thermal conductivity was measured with two transient methods: the heating-film method and the hot-disk method. The incorporation of PU-foam particles causes a reduction of up to 18 % of the mortar density, accompanied by a significant improvement of the thermal insulating performance. The effect of segregation on the thermal properties of LWA mortars due to the differences of density among the cementitious matrix, sand, and LWA has also been quantified. The application of the hot-disk method reveals a gradient of thermal conductivity along the thickness of the specimens, which could be explained by a non-uniform repartition of fine PU-foam particles and mineral aggregates within the mortars. The results show a spatial variation of the thermal conductivity of the LWA mortars, ranging from 9 % to 19 %. However, this variation remains close to or even lower than that observed on a normal weight aggregate mortar. Finally, a self-consistent approach is proposed to estimate the thermal conductivity of PU-foam cement-based composites.

  15. Mechanisms underlying the cerebral microvascular responses to angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vital, Shantel A; Terao, Satoshi; Nagai, Mutsumi; Granger, D Neil

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) and AngII type-1 receptors (AT1r) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and ischemic stroke. The objectives of this study was to determine if/how chronic AngII administration affects blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and blood cell adhesion in the cerebral microvasculature. AngII-loaded osmotic pumps were implanted in wild type (WT) and mutant mice. Leukocyte and platelet adhesion were monitored in cerebral venules by intravital microscopy and BBB permeability detected by Evans blue leakage. AngII (two week) infusion increased blood pressure in WT mice. This was accompanied by an increased BBB permeability and a high density of adherent leukocytes and platelets. AT1r (on the vessel wall, but not on blood cells) was largely responsible for the microvascular responses to AngII. Immunodeficient (Rag-1(-/-) ) mice exhibited blunted blood cell recruitment responses without a change in BBB permeability. A similar protection pattern was noted in RANTES(-/-) and P-selectin(-/-) mice, with bone marrow chimeras (blood cell deficiency only) yielding responses comparable to the respective knockouts. These findings implicate AT1r in the microvascular dysfunction associated with AngII-induced hypertension and suggest that immune cells and blood cell-associated RANTES and P-selectin contribute to the blood cell recruitment, but not the BBB failure, elicited by AngII. PMID:21044218

  16. The impact of transient combination antiretroviral treatment in early HIV infection on viral suppression and immunologic response in later treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Nikos; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Olson, Ashley; Costagliola, Dominique; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Lutsar, Irja; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Fisher, Martin; Moreno, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Effects of transient combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) initiated during early HIV infection (EHI) remain unclear. We investigate whether this intervention affects viral suppression and CD4+ cell count increase following its reinitiation in chronic infection (CHI). Design: Longitudinal observational study. Methods: We identified adult patients from Concerted Action of Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe who seroconverted after 1/1/2000, had a 12 months or less HIV test interval and initiated cART from naive. We classified individuals as ‘pretreated in EHI’ if treated within 6 months of seroconversion, interrupted for at least 12 weeks, and reinitiated during CHI. Statistical analysis was performed using survival analysis methods and mixed models. Results: Pretreated and initiated in CHI groups comprised 202 and 4263 individuals, with median follow-up after CHI treatment 4.5 and 3 years, respectively. Both groups had similar virologic response and relapse rates (P = 0.585 and P = 0.206) but pretreated individuals restarted treatment with higher baseline CD4+ cell count (∼80 cells/μl; P < 0.001) and retained significantly higher CD4+ cell count for more than 3 years after treatment (re)initiation. Assuming common baseline CD4+ cell count, differences in CD4+ cell count slopes were nonsignificant. Immunovirologic response to CHI treatment was not associated with timing or duration of the transient treatment. Conclusion: Although treatment interruptions are not recommended, stopping cART initiated in EHI does not seem to reduce the chance of a successful outcome of treatment in CHI. PMID:26636925

  17. Analysis of Critical Reactor Response for TOPAZ-II Water Immersion Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N.; Glushkov, Yevgeny S.; Yermoshin, Mikhail Y.; Skorlygin, Vladimir V.

    1994-07-01

    The unmodified TOPAZ-II water immersion event leading to surrounding the reactor with water and filling with water all internal core cavities (including TFE NaK channels) may hypothetically result in criticality. This paper presents results of preliminary studies of such an accident. Possible scenarios have been analyzed as well as reactivity effects involving the water presence in internal core cavities. A preliminary coupled model has been developed to describe accident transients in the reactor and TFE. The model is based on assumptions that result in overestimating possible consequences. The numerical simulations results point at the TOPAZ-II reactor capability to quench effectively possible power bursts and predict stable periodic oscillations as a final system state, wherein steaming and then refilling up some internal core cavities occurs. That may be considered to be demonstration of the TOPAZ-II reactor self-control capability if its criticality involves water immersion event.

  18. Time-domain solution for transient dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuanming; Liu, Hanlong; Chu, Jian; Cheng, Ke

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of stress waves in a large-diameter pipe pile for low strain dynamic testing cannot be explained properly by traditional 1D wave theories. A new computational model is established to obtain a wave equation that can describe the dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile to a transient point load during a low strain integrity test. An analytical solution in the time domain is deduced using the separation of variables and variation of constant methods. The validity of this new solution is verified by an existing analytical solution under free boundary conditions. The results of this time domain solution are also compared with the results of a frequency domain solution and field test data. The comparisons indicate that the new solution agrees well with the results of previous solutions. Parametric studies using the new solution with reference to a case study are also carried out. The results show that the mode number affects the accuracy of the dynamic response. A mode number greater than 10 is required to enable the calculated dynamic responses to be independent of the mode number. The dynamic response is also greatly affected by soil properties. The larger the side resistance, the smaller the displacement response and the smaller the reflected velocity wave crest. The displacement increases as the stress waves propagate along the pile when the pile shaft is free. The incident waves of displacement and velocity responses of the pile are not the same among different points in the circumferential direction on the pile top. However, the arrival time and peak value of the pile tip reflected waves are almost the same among different points on the pile top.

  19. Partial Transient Liquid-Phase Bonding, Part II: A Filtering Routine for Determining All Possible Interlayer Combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Grant O.; Sorensen, Carl D.

    2013-12-01

    Partial transient liquid-phase (PTLP) bonding is currently an esoteric joining process with limited applications. However, it has preferable advantages compared with typical joining techniques and is the best joining technique for certain applications. Specifically, it can bond hard-to-join materials as well as dissimilar material types, and bonding is performed at comparatively low temperatures. Part of the difficulty in applying PTLP bonding is finding suitable interlayer combinations (ICs). A novel interlayer selection procedure has been developed to facilitate the identification of ICs that will create successful PTLP bonds and is explained in a companion article. An integral part of the selection procedure is a filtering routine that identifies all possible ICs for a given application. This routine utilizes a set of customizable parameters that are based on key characteristics of PTLP bonding. These parameters include important design considerations such as bonding temperature, target remelting temperature, bond solid type, and interlayer thicknesses. The output from this routine provides a detailed view of each candidate IC along with a broad view of the entire candidate set, greatly facilitating the selection of ideal ICs. This routine provides a new perspective on the PTLP bonding process. In addition, the use of this routine, by way of the accompanying selection procedure, will expand PTLP bonding as a viable joining process.

  20. Complete multiwavelength evolution of galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. II. Compact jets and X-ray variability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dinçer, T.; Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the relation between compact jet emission and X-ray variability properties of all black hole transients with multiwavelength coverage during their outburst decays. We studied the evolution of all power spectral components (including low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations; QPOs), and related this evolution to changes in jet properties tracked by radio and infrared observations. We grouped sources according to their tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation and show that the standards show stronger broadband X-ray variability than outliers at a given X-ray luminosity when the compact jet turns on. This trend is consistent with the internal shock model and can be important for the understanding of the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation. We also observed that the total and the QPO rms amplitudes increase together during the earlier part of the outburst decay, but after the compact jet turns, either the QPO disappears or its rms amplitude decreases significantly while the total rms amplitudes remain high. We discuss these results with a scenario including a variable corona and a non-variable disk with a mechanism for the QPO separate from the mechanism that creates broad components. Finally, we evaluated the timing predictions of the magnetically dominated accretion flow model that can explain the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation.

  1. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1-mediated calcium responses are inhibited by the alkylamine antihistamines dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Campi, Barbara; Trevisani, Marcello; Compton, Steven J; Morice, Alyn H

    2008-12-01

    American guidelines, unlike European guidelines, support the use of antihistamines as a first line of treatment for some causes of chronic cough. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel activated by the tussive agents capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and protons. It is predominantly expressed by C-fiber and some Adelta -fiber sensory neurons and is thought to be a cough receptor. By measuring increases in intracellular calcium as an indicator of TRPV1 activation, the authors sought to determine whether antihistamines could antagonise TRPV1 permanently expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells and TRPV1 endogenously expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons. In human TRPV1-expressing HEK cells (hTRPV1-HEK), diphenhydramine and fexofenadine failed to inhibit capsaicin-triggered calcium responses. However, both dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine significantly inhibited capsaicin-evoked responses in hTRPV1-HEK. Dexbrompheniramine also inhibited activation of rat TRPV1 expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells, without interfering with TRPA1 and proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) activation. Finally, in rat dorsal root ganglia neuron preparations, dexbrompheniramine dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-evoked calcium responses. Thus, the inhibition of TRPV1 activation by dexbrompheniramine may provide one potential mechanism whereby this antihistamine exerts its therapeutic effect in chronic cough.

  2. Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fred J. Molz, III

    2010-05-28

    To better understand longer-term vadose zone transport in southeastern soils, field lysimeter experiments were conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC, in the 1980s. Each of the three lysimeters analyzed herein contained a filter paper spiked with different Pu solutions, and they were left exposed to natural environmental conditions (including the growth of annual weed grasses) for 11 years. The resulting Pu activity measurements from each lysimeter core showed anomalous activity distributions below the source, with significant migration of Pu above the source. Such results are not explainable by adsorption phenomena alone. A transient variably saturated flow model with root water uptake was developed and coupled to a soil reactive transport model. Somewhat surprisingly, the fully transient analysis showed results nearly identical to those of a much simpler steady flow analysis performed previously. However, all phenomena studied were unable to produce the upward Pu transport observed in the data. This result suggests another transport mechanism such as Pu uptake by roots and upward transport due to transpiration. Thus, the variably saturated flow and reactive transport model was extended to include uptake and transport of Pu within the root xylem, along with computational methodology and results. In the extended model, flow velocity in the soil was driven by precipitation input along with transpiration and drainage. Water uptake by the roots determined the flow velocity in the root xylem, and this along with uptake of Pu in the transpiration stream drove advection and dispersion of the two Pu species in the xylem. During wet periods with high potential evapotranspiration, maximum flow velocities through the xylem would approached 600 cm/hr, orders of magnitude larger that flow velocities in the soil. Values for parameters and the correct conceptual viewpoint for Pu transport in plant xylem was uncertain. This motivated further experiments devoted

  3. Time-Critical Studies: Rapid response to Transient Dynamic Mid-Ocean Ridge Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, J. P.; Baker, E. T.; Dziak, R. P.; Lilley, M. M.

    2003-12-01

    The Time-Critical Studies (TCS) Theme of Ridge 2000 focuses on observations of the immediate geochemical and geobiological consequences of magmatic and tectonic events along the global mid-ocean ridge system. To date funding has centered on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges which are within the range of the U.S. Navy's Northeast Pacific Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS). NOAA's T-Phase Monitoring Program has accessed SOSUS in real-time since 1993, providing the TCS community with detection of seismicity associated with eruptive or tectonic activity along these two ridges. This remote detection of earthquake swarms along the N.E. Pacific mid-ocean ridge coupled to NSF funding for pre-event staging equipment and supplies has allowed directed and increasingly well-organized field responses to the event site. Major rapid and follow-up response cruises have been successfully mounted to 1993 CoAxial, 1996 and 2001 Gorda Ridge, the 1998 Axial Volcano, and 2001 Middle Valley magmatic episodes. The logistical approach required to study these events has been greatly facilitated by the RIDGE/Ridge 2000 programs and collaboration between university, NOAA and Canadian investigators. Not only have our studies of these events significantly impacted our ideas on the nature of crustal accretion, but they also have led to the discovery and preliminary documentation of a previously unrecognized biomass reservoir that lives below the seafloor and is swept out during these cataclysmic events, and to increased appreciation of the formation and thermal, chemical and biogeochemical implications of the 'Event Plumes' commonly associated with sea floor magmatic events. Rapid shore-to-event site response is an important aspect of TCS. Proposals to enhance the event detection and response effort are welcome at any Ridge 2000 target date. The Ridge 2000 program recognizes that even the most rapid ship response will miss the earliest subsurface and water column expressions of magmatic events

  4. Influence of electric-double-layer structure on the transient response of nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-05-01

    A fundamental Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes model is presented for the impedance response of a long nanochannel under zero bias, capturing the effects of surface conduction and the coupling between transverse momentum and axial ion distribution in a manner reminiscent of Taylor dispersion. This is shown to result in a shift of the impedance frequency spectrum with bulk concentration similar to previous experimental observation [Schiffbauer, Liel, and Yossifon, Phys. Rev. E 89, 033017 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.033017]. It further predicts an additional downward shift in frequency with increasing viscosity. Finally, the introduction of a phenomenological model for the impedance response of a dynamic Stern layer in parallel with the diffuse layer transport model is shown to yield good agreement between theory and experiment. As a result, we are able to obtain an equivalent circuit model based on the fundamental model and proposed corrections.

  5. Transient temperature response of functionally gradient material subjected to partial stepwise heating

    SciTech Connect

    Makino, Atsushi; Araki, Nobuyuki; Kitajima, Hidetoshi; Ohashi, Kentaro

    1996-01-01

    Functionally gradient materials (FGMs) with distributed properties have attracted special interests as advanced heat-shielding/structural materials in future space applications. The objective of the present study is to derive an analytical solution of the temperature response in a multilayer-type FGM, the front surface of which is subjected to partial, stepwise heating. Heat losses from the front, rear, and side surfaces are also considered. The Laplace transform has been used to obtain the analytical solution. This solution is expected to elucidate the dependence of the temperature response on the various parameters, such as thermophysical properties and heat losses. It is also expected to reduce the calculation time to obtain thermal stress and/or strain in large-scale numerical calculations. Appropriateness of this solution has also been demonstrated by comparing the present results and the experimental results obtained by the National Aerospace Laboratory, Japan.

  6. The transient electromagnetic response of a resistive sheet: an extension to three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swidinsky, Andrei; Edwards, R. Nigel

    2010-08-01

    Controlled-source electromagnetic prospecting systems which produce vertical current flow in the Earth are sensitive to horizontal, electrically resistive structures such as hydrocarbon deposits and fresh water lenses. The electromagnetic response of such 3-D targets can sometimes be approximated by the fields produced by an arrangement of thin resistive sheets buried in a conductive host medium. We have previously shown, through simplified 2-D modelling, that the resistive sheet problem is more subtle than the conductive case commonly used in mineral exploration. Not only does the resistive sheet require the continuity of the normal current density as opposed to the continuity of the tangential electric field, interaction terms within the coupling matrix must also be calculated in full rather than approximated by point dipole sources representing each element. The purpose of this paper is to extend these results to the more realistic and practical situation of a 3-D resistive sheet buried in a multilayered earth. The algorithm is validated against 1-D calculations for a very large sheet and 3-D finite difference modelling for a smaller sheet. A current deflection number characterizes the effect of a resistive sheet's transverse impedance and governs its response in the same way that the current channelling number does for a conductive target. The sheet can be represented to first order by a single point dipole located at its centre; at most receiver locations, arrival times are nearly identical to those found from the full solution although amplitudes show some deviation near the target. As an example of the use of the algorithm, the marine controlled-source electromagnetic response of a simple anticlinal hydrocarbon reservoir underlying near surface resistors such as shallow gas or gas hydrate deposits is modelled. Results show that such near surface anomalies, even those with low deflection numbers, significantly affect the response of the deeper target and must

  7. Transient response of GaAs microwave power FET to X-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armendariz, M. G.; Castle, J. G., Jr.

    The dependence of the time to recover normal microwave output and of the peak photocurrents in state of the art GaAsFETs on the incident flux of X-rays and on circuit loading are measured. The observed device responses for the medium power GaAsFET AT8150 operated in different test circuits at X-ray intensities up to 9E10 rads(Si)/s are compared.

  8. Transient and Prolonged Response of Chicken Cecum Mucosa to Colonization with Different Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Volf, Jiri; Polansky, Ondrej; Varmuzova, Karolina; Gerzova, Lenka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Faldynova, Marcela; Babak, Vladimir; Medvecky, Matej; Smith, Adrian L.; Kaspers, Bernd; Velge, Philippe; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we determined protein and gene expression in the caeca of newly hatched chickens inoculated with cecal contents sourced from hens of different ages. Over 250 proteins exhibited modified expression levels in response to microbiota inoculation. The most significant inductions were observed for ISG12-2, OASL, ES1, LYG2, DMBT1-L, CDD, ANGPTL6, B2M, CUZD1, IgM and Ig lambda chain. Of these, ISG12-2, ES1 and both immunoglobulins were expressed at lower levels in germ-free chickens compared to conventional chickens. In contrast, CELA2A, BRT-2, ALDH1A1, ADH1C, AKR1B1L, HEXB, ALDH2, ALDOB, CALB1 and TTR were expressed at lower levels following inoculation of microbiota. When chicks were given microbiota preparations from different age donors, the recipients mounted differential responses to the inoculation which also differed from the response profile in naturally colonised birds. For example, B2M, CUZD1 and CELA2A responded differently to the inoculation with microbiota of 4- or 40-week-old hens. The increased or decreased gene expression could be recorded 6 weeks after the inoculation of newly hatched chickens. To characterise the proteins that may directly interact with the microbiota we characterised chicken proteins that co-purified with the microbiota and identified a range of host proteins including CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda. We propose that induction of ISG12-2 results in reduced apoptosis of host cells exposed to the colonizing commensal microbiota and that CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda reduce contact of luminal microbiota with the gut epithelium thereby reducing the inflammatory response. PMID:27685470

  9. Atmospheric Response to Zonal Variations in Midlatitude SST: Transient and Stationary Eddies and Their Feedback(.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatsu, Masaru; Mukougawa, Hitoshi; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2003-10-01

    Midwinter storm track response to zonal variations in midlatitude sea surface temperatures (SSTs) has been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model under aquaplanet and perpetual-January conditions. Zonal wavenumber-1 SST variations with a meridionally confined structure are placed at various latitudes. Having these SST variations centered at 30°N leads to a zonally localized storm track, while the storm track becomes nearly zonally uniform when the same SST forcing is moved farther north at 40° and 50°N. Large (small) baroclinic energy conversion north of the warm (cold) SST anomaly near the axis of the storm track (near 40°N) is responsible for the large (small) storm growth. The equatorward transfer of eddy kinetic energy by the ageostrophic motion and the mechanical damping are important to diminish the storm track activity in the zonal direction.Significant stationary eddies form in the upper troposphere, with a ridge (trough) northeast of the warm (cold) SST anomaly at 30°N. Heat and vorticity budget analyses indicate that zonally localized condensational heating in the storm track is the major cause for these stationary eddies, which in turn exert a positive feedback to maintain the localized storm track by strengthening the vertical shear near the surface. These results indicate an active role of synoptic eddies in inducing deep, tropospheric-scale response to midlatitude SST variations. Finally, the application of the model results to the real atmosphere is discussed.

  10. Gas-cap effects in pressure-transient response of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Bemani, A.S.; Ershaghi, I.

    1997-03-01

    During the primary production life of an oil reservoir, segregation of oil and gas within the fissures before reaching the producing wells could create a secondary gas cap if no original gas cap were present, or will join the expanding original gas-cap gas. This paper presents a theoretical framework of gas-cap effects in naturally fractured reservoirs. General pressure solutions are derived for both pseudosteady-state and unsteady-state matrix-fracture interporosity flow. Deviation from the fracture or fracture-matrix response occurs as the gas-cap effect is felt. Anomalous slope changes during the transition period depend entirely on the contrast between the fracture anisotropy parameter, {lambda}{sub l}, and matrix-fracture interporosity parameter, {lambda}, and between the total gas-cap storage capacitance (1 {minus} {omega}{sub 1}) and oil-zone matrix storage (1 {minus} {omega}). A composite double-porosity response is observed for {omega}{sub 1} {le} {omega}{sub 1c} and 1.0 {le} {lambda}{sub 1}/{lambda} {le} 1,000. A triple-porosity response is observed for {omega}{sub 1} {ge} {omega}{sub k} and 140 < {omega}{lambda}{sub 1}/{lambda} < 1.0E05.

  11. The electrical response of bilayers to the bee venom toxin melittin: Evidence for transient bilayer permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Wiedman, Gregory; Herman, Katherine; Searson, Peter; Wimley, William C.; Hristova, Kalina

    2014-01-01

    Melittin is a 26-residue bee venom peptide that folds into amphipathic α-helix and causes membrane permeabilization via a mechanism that is still disputed. While an equilibrium transmembrane pore model has been a central part of the mechanistic dialogue for decades, there is growing evidence that a transmembrane pore is not required for melittin’s activity. In part, the controversy is due to limited experimental tools to probe the bilayer’s response to melittin. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a technique that can reveal details of molecular mechanism of peptide activity, as it yields direct, real-time measurements of membrane resistance and capacitance of supported bilayers. In this work, EIS was used in conjunction with vesicle leakage studies to characterize the response of bilayers of different lipid compositions to melittin. Experiments were carried out at low peptide to lipid ratios between 1:5000 and 1:100. The results directly demonstrate that the response of the bilayer to melittin at these concentrations cannot be explained by an equilibrium transmembrane pore model. PMID:23384418

  12. Response of an old-growth tropical rainforest to transient high temperature and drought.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos E; Kellner, James R; Clark, David B; Clark, Deborah A

    2013-11-01

    Tropical rainforests have experienced episodes of severe heat and drought in recent decades, and climate models project a warmer and potentially drier tropical climate over this century. However, likely responses of tropical rainforests are poorly understood due to a lack of frequent long-term measurements of forest structure and dynamics. We analyzed a 12-year record (1999-2010) of 47 817 annual measurements of canopy height to characterize the response of an old-growth Neotropical rainforest to the severe heat and drought associated with the 1997-1998 El Niño. Well-drained soils on slopes and plateaus experienced a threefold increase in the fraction of the landscape in gaps (≤2 m) and a reduction in the fraction in high canopy (>15 m) causing distributions of canopy height to depart from equilibrium for a period of 2-3 years. In contrast, forests on low-lying alluvial terraces remained in equilibrium and were nearly half as likely to experience upper canopy (>15 m) disturbance over the 12 years of observation. Variation in forest response across topographic positions suggests that tropical rainforests are more sensitive to moisture deficits than high temperature and that topography likely structures landscape-level variation in the severity of drought impacts.

  13. Transient inhibition of primary motor cortex suppresses hand muscle responses during a reactive reach to grasp.

    PubMed

    Bolton, David A E; Patel, Rupesh; Staines, W Richard; McIlroy, William E

    2011-10-24

    Rapid balance reactions such as compensatory reach to grasp represent important response strategies following unexpected loss of balance. While it has been assumed that early corrective actions arise from subcortical networks, recent research has prompted speculation about the potential role of cortical involvement. With reach to grasp reactions there is evidence of parallels in the control of perturbation-evoked reaching versus rapid voluntary reaching. However, the potential role of cortical involvement in such rapid balance reactions remains speculative. To test if cortical motor regions are involved we used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to temporarily suppress the hand area of primary motor cortex (M1) in participants involved in two reaching conditions: (1) rapid compensatory perturbation-evoked reach to grasp and (2) voluntary reach to grasp in response to an auditory cue. We hypothesized that following cTBS to the left M1 hand area we would find diminished EMG responses in the reaching (right) hand for both compensatory and voluntary movements. To isolate balance reactions to the upper limb participants were seated in an elevated tilt-chair with a stable handle positioned in front of their right shoulder. The chair was held vertical by a magnet and triggered to fall backward randomly. To regain balance, participants were instructed to reach for the handle as quickly as possible with the right hand upon chair release. Intermixed with perturbation trials, participants were also required to reach for the same handle but in response to an auditory tone. Muscle activity was recorded from several muscles of the right arm/hand using electromyography. As expected, movement time and muscle onsets were much faster following perturbation versus auditory-cued reaching. The novel finding from our study was the reduced amplitude of hand muscle activity post-cTBS for both perturbation-cued and auditory-cued reaches. Moreover, this reduction was specific to the

  14. Evidence from simultaneous intracellular- and surface-pH transients that carbonic anhydrase II enhances CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F

    2014-11-01

    The α-carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3 (-). Here, we focus on human CA II (CA II), a ubiquitous cytoplasmic enzyme. In the second paper in this series, we examine CA IV at the extracellular surface. After microinjecting recombinant CA II in a Tris solution (or just Tris) into oocytes, we expose oocytes to 1.5% CO2/10 mM HCO3 (-)/pH 7.50 while using microelectrodes to monitor intracellular pH (pHi) and surface pH (pHS). CO2 influx causes the familiar sustained pHi fall as well as a transient pHS rise; CO2 efflux does the opposite. Both during CO2 addition and removal, CA II increases the magnitudes of the maximal rate of pHi change, (dpHi/dt)max, and the maximal change in pHS, ΔpHS. Preincubating oocytes with the inhibitor ethoxzolamide eliminates the effects of CA II. Compared with pHS, pHi begins to change only after a delay of ~9 s and its relaxation has a larger (i.e., slower) time constant (τpHi > τpHS ). Simultaneous measurements with two pHi electrodes, one superficial and one deep, suggest that impalement depth contributes to pHi delay and higher τpHi . Using higher CO2/HCO3 (-) levels, i.e., 5%/33 mM HCO3 (-) or 10%/66 mM HCO3 (-), increases (dpHi/dt)max and ΔpHS, though not in proportion to the increase in [CO2]. A reaction-diffusion mathematical model (described in the third paper in this series) accounts for the above general features and supports the conclusion that cytosolic CA-consuming entering CO2 or replenishing exiting CO2-increases CO2 fluxes across the cell membrane.

  15. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  16. Structural response of transient heat loading on a molybdenum surface exposed to low-energy helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, G.; Tripathi, J. K.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-03-01

    The advancement of fusion reactor engineering is currently inhibited by the lack of knowledge surrounding the stability of plasma facing components (PFCs) in a tokamak environment. During normal operation, events of high heat loading occur periodically where large amounts of energy are imparted onto the PFC surface. Concurrently, irradiation by low-energy helium ions present in the fusion plasma can result in the synthesis of a fibre form nanostructure on the PFC surface, called ‘fuzz’. In order to understand how this heterogeneous structure evolves and deforms in response to transient heat loading, a pulsed Nd:YAG millisecond laser is used to simulate these events on a fuzz form molybdenum (Mo) surface. Performance was analysed by three metrics: nanostructure evolution, particle emission, and improvement in optical properties. Experiments performed at the upper end of the expected range for type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs) found that the helium-induced nanostructure completely disappears after 200 pulses of the laser at 1.5 MJ m-2. In situ mass loss measurements found that the amount of particles leaving the surface increases as energy density increases and the rate of emission increases with pulse count. Finally, optical properties assisted in providing a qualitative indication of fuzz density on the Mo surface; after 400 pulses at 1.5 MJ m-2, the optical reflectivity of the damaged surface is ~90% of that of a mirror polished Mo sample. These findings provide different results than previous studies done with tungsten (W), and further help illustrate the complicated nature of how transient events of high heat loading in a tokamak environment might impact the performance and lifetime of PFCs in ITER and future DEMO devices (Ueda et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 901-6).

  17. Transient responses of the CSIRO climate model to two different rates of CO2 increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Gordon, H. B.

    The responses of the CSIRO coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice model to two greenhouse gas induced warming scenarios are described and compared to a control run with the current CO2 level. In one scenario, denoted IS92a, the atmospheric CO2 increases such that it reaches doubling after 128 years. In the other, the CO2 increases at 1% per year compounding (doubling after 70 y). As the CO2 increases in both scenarios, the top-of-atmosphere outgoing longwave radiation increases giving enhanced cooling of the coupled system, while the outgoing short wave radiation decreases contributing to a warming of the system. The latter overcompensates the former leading to a global mean net radiative heat gain. The distribution of this heat gain produces the well-known interhemispheric asymmetry in warming, despite a decrease in the sea ice around Antarctica in this model. It is found that the volume mean temperature response over the southern ocean is greater than that over the northern hemispheric oceans, and a maximum warming takes place at the subsurface rather at the surface of the ocean in the southern mid-to-high latitude region. The enhanced high-latitude freshening associated with the strengthened hydrological cycle significantly affects the latitudinal distribution of warming and other responses. It enhances the warming immediately equatorward of the deep water formation regions while produces a reduced warming, even a cooling, in these regions. In both runs, there is a decrease in the large-scale oceanic currents which have a significant thermohaline-driven component. The reduction in these currents reduces the poleward transport of salt out of the tropical and subtropical regions of these oceans. This and the enhanced evaporation contribute to considerable increases in surface salinity in the tropical and subtropical regions. In IS92a, the warming rate before doubling is smaller than that in 1% scenario, but the cumulative effects of the two experiments at the time of

  18. Transient stability and control of renewable generators based on Hamiltonian surface shaping and power flow control. Part II, analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Wilson, David Gerald

    2010-11-01

    The swing equations for renewable generators connected to the grid are developed and a wind turbine is used as an example. The swing equations for the renewable generators are formulated as a natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. A two-step process referred to as Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) is used to analyze and design feedback controllers for the renewable generators system. This formulation extends previous results on the analytical verification of the Potential Energy Boundary Surface (PEBS) method to nonlinear control analysis and design and justifies the decomposition of the system into conservative and non-conservative systems to enable a two-step, serial analysis and design procedure. The first step is to analyze the system as a conservative natural Hamiltonian system with no externally applied non-conservative forces. The Hamiltonian surface of the swing equations is related to the Equal-Area Criterion and the PEBS method to formulate the nonlinear transient stability problem. This formulation demonstrates the effectiveness of proportional feedback control to expand the stability region. The second step is to analyze the system as natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. The time derivative of the Hamiltonian produces the work/rate (power flow) equation which is used to ensure balanced power flows from the renewable generators to the loads. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is applied to the power flow equations to determine the stability boundaries (limit cycles) of the renewable generators system and enable design of feedback controllers that meet stability requirements while maximizing the power generation and flow to the load. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of renewable generators systems are determined based on the concepts of Hamiltonian systems, power flow, exergy (the maximum work that can be extracted from an energy flow) rate

  19. Partitioning of cortical and deep cytoskeleton responses from transient magnetic bead twisting.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Valérie M; Fodil, Redouane; Cañadas, Patrick; Féréol, Sophie; Louis, Bruno; Planus, Emmanuelle; Isabey, Daniel

    2003-11-01

    We attempted to estimate in living adherent epithelial alveolar cells, the degree of structural and mechanical heterogeneity by considering two individualized cytoskeleton components, i.e., a submembranous "cortical" cytoskeleton and a "deep" cytoskeleton (CSK). F-actin structure characterizing each CSK component was visualized from spatial reconstructions at low and high density, respectively, especially in a 10-microm-cubic neighborhood including the bead. Specific mechanical properties (Young elastic and viscous modulus E and n) were revealed after partitioning the magnetic twisting cytometry response using a double viscoelastic "solid" model with asymmetric plastic relaxation. Results show that the cortical CSK response is a faster (tau1 < or = 0.7 s), softer (E1: 63-109 Pa), moderately viscous (n1: 7- 18 Pas), slightly tensed, and easily damaged structure compared to the deep CSK structure which appears slower (tau2 approximately 1/2 min), stiffer (E2: 95-204 Pa), highly viscous (n2: 760-1967 Pa s), more tensed, and fully elastic, while exhibiting a larger stress hardening behavior. Adding drug depolymerizing actin filaments decreased predominantly the deep CSK stiffness. By contrast, an agent altering cell-matrix interactions affected essentially the cortical CSK stiffness. We concluded that partitioning the CSK within cortical and deep structures is largely consistent with their respective functional activities.

  20. Transient Response of a Separated Flow over a Two-Dimensional Wing to a Short Duration Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David; Albrecht, Thomas; Weier, Tom; Gerbeth, G.

    2012-11-01

    A Lorentz force actuator located at the leading edge of a two-dimensional wing at 16 degrees angle of attack was used to introduce short-duration disturbances into a separated flow. The transient response of the separated region at Re = 10,000 was documented using time-resolved PIV measurements. The direction of the Lorentz force was changed between downstream and upstream directed disturbances, and details of the resulting flow field structures and lift measurements were studied. Saturation of the peak lift amplitude occurs as the actuation amplitude is increased from 0.0054 < C μ < 0.21 percent with the pulse duration fixed at 0.1 convective time. The effect of the pulse duration time on the lift response was examined using a fixed pulse amplitude, which showed that saturation occurred when pulse durations exceed 0.5 convective times. Differences in the coherent structures resulting from the upstream/downstream directed actuation were identified using the FTLE method. The initial development of the disturbed shear layer was strongly dependent on the direction of actuation, but the larger-scale separation did not show much difference. The relaxation of the separated region to the original flow state was essentially independent of the direction of actuation. Support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft SFB 609 and AFOSR Grant FA9550-09-1-0189 is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. A Study on Response of a Contoured Composite Panel with Co-cured Stiffeners Under Transient Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Shahnaaz; Jain, Prakash Chand; Venkatesh, Siddu

    2016-07-01

    Composite materials are emerging to be the best applied materials for aerospace applications. With rapid improvement in computational facilities, it is now possible to design the best composite lay up for a particular kind of application. This paper presents the development of a Finite Element model of a contoured composite panel with co-cured stiffeners using Finite Element Simulation. Commercial package ANSYS 15.0 is used for this study. Such half contoured panels find wide application in Aerospace industry. The panel is hinged at one of the ends and dynamically loaded at the other end over a relatively small surface area by transverse load. The response of the panel is observed for variation in stresses, deflections and failure criteria. The panel is expected to rotate about the hinge point by 4° from the initial point. The transient response of the composite panel has been observed for expected load and two test load cases and results reported in this paper. Analysis has become useful input for the design of panel.

  2. Transient response of elastic bodies connected by a thin stiff viscoelastic layer with evanescent mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, Christian; Orankitjaroen, Somsak; Ould Khaoua, Ahmed; Weller, Thibaut

    2016-10-01

    We extend the study [1] devoted to the dynamic response of a structure made up of two linearly elastic bodies connected by a thin soft adhesive layer made of a Kelvin-Voigt-type nonlinear viscoelastic material to the cases of stiff and very stiff adhesives whose mass vanishes. We use a nonlinear extension of Trotter's theory of convergence of semi-groups of operators acting on variable spaces to identify the asymptotic behavior of the mechanical state of the system, when some geometrical and mechanical parameters tend to their natural limits. The models we obtain describe the behavior of a structure consisting of two linearly elastic adherents perfectly bonded to a material deformable flat surface whose behavior is of the same kind as that of the genuine adhesive. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to an Open Subsurface Crack In a Conductive Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Fangwei; Bowler, J. R.

    2006-03-01

    Calculations have been carried out to evaluate pulsed eddy current interactions with a planar subsurface crack in a conductive plate. In eddy current nondestructive evaluation, flaws can be detected by measuring the changes in the magnetic field that occur when an induced current is perturbed. In previous work, the evolution of magnetic field change due to an open crack in a conductor was evaluated with the assumption that the conductor can be treated as a half space. The response is obtained by solving an electrical field integral equation with a half space Green's function kernel. Recently, a time domain dyadic Green's function for a plate was developed in a series form, which allows us to extend the approach to a crack in a plate. The effect of crack opening, ligament and crack size have been investigated.

  4. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(II) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Kim, Tae Kyu; Groot, Frank M. F. de; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-02-28

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  5. Responsabilidad = Responsibility. Level II. Student Book and Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Civic Education, Calabasas, CA.

    This curriculum presents an overview of responsibility as a concept intrinsic to the functioning of a democratic society. The curriculum has been developed to provide students with an increased awareness of the importance of responsibility in their own lives and its place in contemporary society, and to encourage their capacity and inclination to…

  6. The 3-7 fragment of angiotensin II is probably responsible for its psychoactive properties.

    PubMed

    Braszko, J J; Własienko, J; Koziołkiewicz, W; Janecka, A; Wiśniewski, K

    1991-02-22

    The abilities of angiotensin II-(3-7)-pentapeptide (A-II-(3-7), 1 nmol) and angiotensin II (A-II, 1 nmol) to influence rat's psychomotor and cognitive behaviours were compared. Both peptides, given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), 15 min before the experiment, increased number of crossings, rearings and bar approaches in the open field. A-II-(3-7) as well as A-II, at the same doses and routes, significantly intensified stereotypy produced by apomorphine (1 mg/kg) and amphetamine (6.5 mg/kg), both given intraperitoneally. The 3-7 fragment of A-II and A-II in equimolar doses (1 nmol, i.c.v.) were similarly effective in improving learning of conditioned avoidance responses and recall of a passive avoidance behaviour. Taken together, these data and our previous findings indicate that, in rats, the 3-7 fragment of A-II is responsible for the psychoactive properties of angiotensins.

  7. Response of buoyant plumes to transient discharges investigated using an adaptive solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Callaghan, J.; Rickard, G.; Popinet, S.; Stevens, C.

    2010-11-01

    The behavior of buoyant plumes driven by variable momentum inputs were examined using an adaptive Navier-Stokes solver (Gerris). Boundary conditions were representative of an idealized stratified, coastal environment. Salinity ranged from 5 to 30 in the top 5 m of the water column to replicate the strong vertical gradients experienced in fjord environments. Two-dimensional simulations examined the response of the buoyant plume driven by zero, steady, and variable momentum fluxes. The behavior was quantified in terms of the characteristic features of a buoyant plume, the thickness of the nose (or head of gravity current), and the trailing tail. Both the nose and tail of the plume were substantially thicker for the variable momentum run, whereas elongation and thinning of the plume was evident for the steady and zero momentum inputs. Furthermore, an order of magnitude difference in available potential energy was found for the variable momentum run. Validation of the Boussinesq approximation initially utilized the classic lock-exchange experiment with excellent agreement to previous numerical and theoretical experiments. Frontal speeds of the gravity current converged toward the theoretical value of Benjamin (1968). The adaptive mesh permitted lock-exchange simulations at Reynolds number (Re) of ˜10,500 and are some of the highest Re runs to date. Moreover, improved computational efficiency was achieved using the adaptive solver with simulations completed in 20% of the time they took on a static, high-resolution grid.

  8. Thermal Response of Tritiated Co-deposits from JET and TFTR to Transient Heat Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; N. Bekrisl; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein; R. Reiswig; S. Willms

    2002-05-30

    High heat flux interactions with plasma-facing components have been studied at microscopic scales. The beam from a continuous wave neodymium laser was scanned at high speed over the surface of graphite and carbon fiber composite tiles that had been retrieved from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) after D-T plasma operations. The tiles have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was co-deposited during plasma operations, and laser scanning has released more than 80% of the co-deposited tritium. The temperature rise of the co-deposit was much higher than that of the manufactured material and showed an extended time history. The peak temperature varied dramatically (e.g., 1,436 C compared to >2,300 C), indicating strong variations in the thermal conductivity to the substrate. A digital microscope imaged the co-deposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed 100-micron scale hot spots during the interaction. Heat pulse durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, whilst a duration of =10 ms showed minimal changes to the co-deposit. These results show that reliable predictions for the response of deposition areas to off-normal events such as ELMs (edge-localized modes) and disruptions in next-step devices need to be based on experiments with tokamak generated co-deposits.

  9. Tripeptide-copper complex GHK-Cu (II) transiently improved healing outcome in a rat model of ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Sai-Chuen; Cheuk, Yau-Chuk; Chiu, Wai-Yin Vivien; Yung, Shu-Hang; Rolf, Christer G; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2015-07-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), the biological healing of the graft is a rate-limiting step which can contribute to graft failure. The tripeptide-copper complex glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine-Cu(II) (GHK-Cu) is a well-known activator of tissue remodeling. We investigated whether GHK-Cu can improve graft healing following ACLR. Seventy-two rats underwent unilateral ACLR were randomized to saline, 0.3 or 3 mg/ml GHK-Cu groups (n = 24). Post-operational intra-articular injections were given from week 2, once a week, for 4 weeks. Gait analysis was performed pre-injury and at harvesting time. At 6 or 12 weeks post-operation, knee specimens were harvested for knee laxity test, graft pull-out test, and histology. At 6 weeks post-ACLR, GHK-Cu groups resulted in a smaller side-to-side difference in knee laxity as compared to the saline group (p = 0.009), but there was no significant difference at 12 weeks post-operation. The graft complex in the 0.3 mg/ml GHK-Cu group had higher stiffness than saline group at 6 weeks post-operation (p = 0.026), but there was no significant difference in ultimate load, gait parameters, and histological scores among treatment groups. All grafts failed mid-substance during pull-out test. Intra-articular supplementation with a bioactive small molecule GHK-Cu improved graft healing following ACLR in rat, but the beneficial effects could not last as treatment discontinued. PMID:25731775

  10. Analysis of a heterodyne-detected transient-grating experiment on a molecular supercooled liquid. II. Application to m-toluidine.

    PubMed

    Azzimani, A; Dreyfus, C; Pick, R M; Bartolini, P; Taschin, A; Torre, R

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the first detailed analysis of a transient grating (TG) experiment on a supercooled molecular liquid, m-toluidine, from 330K (1.75Tg) to 190K (1.01Tg) based on the theoretical model presented in Paper I of this series. This method allows one to give a precise description, over a wide dynamical range, of the different physical phenomena giving rise to the signals. Disentangling the isotropic and the anisotropic parts of the TG response, a careful fitting analysis yields detailed information on the rotation-translation coupling function. We also extract the structural relaxation times related to the "longitudinal" viscosity over almost 10 decades in time and the corresponding stretching coefficient. The value of some other parameters and information on their thermal behavior is also reported.

  11. Investigating the zonal wind response to SST warming using transient ensemble AGCM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palipane, Erool; Lu, Jian; Staten, Paul; Chen, Gang; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2016-04-01

    The response of the atmospheric circulation to greenhouse gas-induced SST warming is investigated using large ensemble experiments with two AGCMs, with a focus on the robust feature of the poleward shift of the eddy driven jet. In these experiments, large ensembles of simulations are conducted by abruptly switching the SST forcing on from January 1st to focus on the wintertime circulation adjustment. A hybrid, finite amplitude wave activity budget analysis is performed to elucidate the nonlinear and irreversible aspects of the eddy-mean flow interaction during the adjustment of the zonal wind towards a poleward shifted state. The results confirm the results from earlier more idealized studies, particularly the importance of reduced dissipation of wave activity, in which the midlatitude decrease of effective diffusivity appears to be dominant. This reduction in dissipation increases the survival of midlatitude waves. These surviving waves, when reaching the upper propagation level in the upper troposphere, are subject to the influence of the increase of reflection phase speed at the poleward side of the mean jet, and thus more waves are reflected equatorward across the jet, giving rise to a poleward transport of momentum and thus an eddy momentum flux convergence for the poleward shift. The relative importance of wave breaking-induced PV mixing versus diabatic PV source in the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient is also investigated. The former plays the dominant role in the PV gradient formation during the initial phase of the jet shift, while the latter actually opposes the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient at times.

  12. Expert judgments about transient climate response to alternative future trajectories of radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Zickfeld, Kirsten; Morgan, M. Granger; Frame, David J.; Keith, David W.

    2010-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the response of the climate system to future trajectories of radiative forcing. To quantify this uncertainty we conducted face-to-face interviews with 14 leading climate scientists, using formal methods of expert elicitation. We structured the interviews around three scenarios of radiative forcing stabilizing at different levels. All experts ranked “cloud radiative feedbacks” as contributing most to their uncertainty about future global mean temperature change, irrespective of the specified level of radiative forcing. The experts disagreed about the relative contribution of other physical processes to their uncertainty about future temperature change. For a forcing trajectory that stabilized at 7 Wm-2 in 2200, 13 of the 14 experts judged the probability that the climate system would undergo, or be irrevocably committed to, a “basic state change” as ≥0.5. The width and median values of the probability distributions elicited from the different experts for future global mean temperature change under the specified forcing trajectories vary considerably. Even for a moderate increase in forcing by the year 2050, the medians of the elicited distributions of temperature change relative to 2000 range from 0.8–1.8 °C, and some of the interquartile ranges do not overlap. Ten of the 14 experts estimated that the probability that equilibrium climate sensitivity exceeds 4.5 °C is > 0.17, our interpretation of the upper limit of the “likely” range given by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Finally, most experts anticipated that over the next 20 years research will be able to achieve only modest reductions in their degree of uncertainty. PMID:20616045

  13. Fault Response to Variations of Loading Rate and/or Dynamic Stress Transients, from the Analysis of 1811 Repeating Micro-Earthquakes at Parkfield (CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagnini, L.; Nadeau, R. M.; Munafo, I.; Dreger, D. S.; Cocco, M.; Mayeda, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Using an approach developed for quantifying ground-motion, we analyze the spectral characteristics of 1811 repeating micro-earthquakes from 163 clusters near Parkfield (CA). Corner frequencies of a selected subset of events are also computed (Brune spectral model). Our calculations provide unprecedented accuracy on the calculation of the seismic moments of each individual event. A strong transient (3-10+ years) affects the spectral amplitudes of most repeating micro-earthquakes after the Parkfield Mw 6.0 main shock of 2004, showing a significant increase of amplitudes at the onset of the SAF postseismic response. The largest relative moment variation ((ΔM0)max/M0regular) with respect to unperturbed events, the maximum creep velocity (VMax), and the postseismic relaxation time (τ), all systematically increase, along the creeping section of the SAF, toward the area that slipped coseismically during the 2004 Parkfield main earthquake. Postseismic perturbations of the repeats' seismic moments are up to an order of magnitude larger than the typical seismic moments of the undisturbed events; recurrence times also show a systematic behavior. Dynamic stress perturbations (increased loading rate of the specific asperities, and/or changes of normal stress across the SAF) are likely to be responsible for the observed variations of the repeats' seismic moments and recurrence times. In addition to the postseismic response to a large event on the (locked) adjacent portion of the SAF, anomalous responses may be induced by: i) giant events at teleseismic distances (i.e., Sumatra, 2004); ii) strong regional events, within ~100 km (i.e., Loma Prieta, 1989, and Landers, 1992); iii) small earthquakes (M~2) in close vicinity to specific clusters. After the 2004 Parkfield main shock, the (shallow) clusters of small-magnitude repeats showed the largest relative perturbations, and the largest absolute cumulative slips. We point out an apparent inconsistency between the self

  14. One- and two-dimensional STEALTH simulations of fuel-pin transient response. Final report. [BWR; PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Wahi, K.K.

    1980-08-01

    This report presents an assessment of the adaptability of EPRI's one- and two-dimensional STEALTH computer codes to perform transient fuel rod analysis. The ability of the STEALTH code to simulate transient mechanical or thermomechanical loss-of-coolant accident is described. Analytic models of one- and two-dimensional formulations and features included in the two-dimensional simulation are discussed.

  15. NASTRAN postprocessor program for transient response to input accelerations. [procedure for generating and writing modal input data on tapes using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingate, R. T.; Jones, T. C.; Stephens, M. V.

    1973-01-01

    The description of a transient analysis program for computing structural responses to input base accelerations is presented. A hybrid modal formulation is used and a procedure is demonstrated for generating and writing all modal input data on user tapes via NASTRAN. Use of several new Level 15 modules is illustrated along with a problem associated with reading the postprocessor program input from a user tape. An example application of the program is presented for the analysis of a spacecraft subjected to accelerations initiated by thrust transients. Experience with the program has indicated it to be very efficient and economical because of its simplicity and small central memory storage requirements.

  16. The vibration of a box-type structure. II - Response to a travelling pressure wave.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popplewell, N.

    1971-01-01

    A finite element method is formulated for determining the transient response of a box-type structure to a traveling, arbitrarily shaped pressure wave. The method is illustrated by considering an example of practical concern - the sonic boom. The acceleration-time histories of a closed box are compared with those obtained experimentally from a simulated boom. Satisfactory agreement is obtained with only four rectangular elements per individual face and a simplified loading of the box.

  17. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  18. Determination of charge transfer resistance and capacitance of microbial fuel cell through a transient response analysis of cell voltage.

    PubMed

    Ha, Phuc Thi; Moon, Hyunsoo; Kim, Byung Hong; Ng, How Yong; Chang, In Seop

    2010-03-15

    An alternative method for determining the charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), easily implemented without a potentiostat, was developed. A dynamic model with two parameters, the charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance of electrodes, was derived from a linear differential equation to depict the current generation with respect to activation overvoltage. This model was then used to fit the transient cell voltage response to the current step change during the continuous operation of a flat-plate type MFC fed with acetate. Variations of the charge transfer resistance and the capacitance value with respect to the MFC design conditions (biocatalyst existence and electrode area) and operating parameters (acetate concentration and buffer strength in the catholyte) were then determined to elucidate the validity of the proposed method. This model was able to describe the dynamic behavior of the MFC during current change in the activation loss region; having an R(2) value of over 0.99 in most tests. Variations of the charge transfer resistance value (thousands of Omega) according to the change of the design factors and operational factors were well-correlated with the corresponding MFC performances. However, though the capacitance values (approximately 0.02 F) reflected the expected trend according to the electrode area change and catalyst property, they did not show significant variation with changes in either the acetate concentration or buffer strength.

  19. Highly sensitive determination of transient generation of biophotons during hypersensitive response to cucumber mosaic virus in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Enomoto, Masaru; Ehara, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is one mechanism of the resistance of plants to pathogen infection. It involves the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which have crucial roles in signal transduction or as toxic agents leading to cell death. Often, ROS generation is accompanied by an ultraweak photon emission resulting from radical reactions that are initiated by ROS through the oxidation of living materials such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. This photon emission, referred to as 'biophotons', is extremely weak, but, based on the technique of photon counting imaging, a system has been developed to analyse the spatiotemporal properties of photon emission. Using this system, the dynamics of photon emission which might be associated with the oxidative burst, which promotes the HR, have been determined. Here, the transient generation of biophotons is demonstrated during the HR process in cowpea elicited by cucumber mosaic virus. The distinctive dynamics in spatiotemporal properties of biophoton emission during the HR expression on macroscopic and microscopic levels are also described. This study reveals the involvement of ROS generation in biophoton emission in the process of HR through the determination of the inhibitory effect of an antioxidant (Tiron) on biophoton emission. PMID:17158510

  20. Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part 3: Analysis of global-mean response using simple models

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box energy balance model (EBM) and an oceanic box-diffusion model (BDM) both tuned to the simulated general circulation model response. The land-sea contrast in the surface warming is explained almost entirely by the shortwave radiative feedbacks associated with changes in cloud and surface albedo. The oceanic thermal inertia delays the response; however, the initial delay is enhanced by increases in Anarctic sea-ice cover, which substantially reduce the effective climate sensitivity of the model in the first half of the 75-year experiment. When driven by the observed anthropogenic greenhouse forcing from the pre-industrial period to present day, the energy balance model overestimates the warming observed over land. However, inclusion of the direct forcing due to anthropogenic tropospheric sulphate aerosol eliminates the land/sea contrast in the response at 1990, leaving the simulated warming over land slightly below the observed value, although the rapid warming observed during the 1980s is well reproduced. The vertical penetration of the oceanic response is small below 1000 m. Within the top 1000 m the effective diffusivities are substantially enhanced by reduced convection and thermohaline overturning, driven by increased precipitation minus evaporation at high latitudes. These changes in ocean heat transport become significant after year 30, whereupon the effective oceanic heat capacity increases substantially, although this increase is partially offset by the effect of changes in the sea-ice margin.

  1. Uptake, p53 Pathway Activation, and Cytotoxic Responses for Co(II) and Ni(II) in Human Lung Cells: Implications for Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt(II) and nickel(II) ions display similar chemical properties and act as hypoxia mimics in cells. However, only soluble Co(II) but not soluble Ni(II) is carcinogenic by inhalation. To explore potential reasons for these differences, we examined responses of human lung cells to both metals. We found that Co(II) showed almost 8 times higher accumulation than Ni(II) in H460 cells but caused a less efficient activation of the transcriptional factor p53 as measured by its accumulation, Ser15 phosphorylation, and target gene expression. Unlike Ni(II), Co(II) was ineffective in downregulating the p53 inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Co(II)-treated cells continued DNA replication at internal doses that caused massive apoptosis by Ni(II). Apoptosis and the overall cell death by Co(II) were delayed and weaker than by Ni(II). Inhibition of caspases but not programmed necrosis pathways suppressed Co(II)-induced cell death. Knockdown of p53 produced 50%–60% decreases in activation of caspases 3/7 and expression of 2 most highly upregulated proapoptotic genes PUMA and NOXA by Co(II). Overall, p53-mediated apoptosis accounted for 55% cell death by Co(II), p53-independent apoptosis for 20%, and p53/caspase-independent mechanisms for 25%. Similar to H460, normal human lung fibroblasts and primary human bronchial epithelial cells had several times higher accumulation of Co(II) than Ni(II) and showed a delayed and weaker caspase activation by Co(II). Thus, carcinogenicity of soluble Co(II) could be related to high survival of metal-loaded cells, which permits accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. High cytotoxicity of soluble Ni(II) causes early elimination of damaged cells and is expected to be cancer suppressive. PMID:24068677

  2. L-Asparaginase II Produced by Salmonella Typhimurium Inhibits T Cell Responses and Mediates Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kullas, Amy L.; McClelland, Michael; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Tam, Jason W.; Torres, AnnMarie; Porwollik, Steffen; Mena, Patricio; McPhee, Joseph B.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; van der Velden, Adrianus W.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium avoids clearance by the host immune system by suppressing T cell responses; however, the mechanisms that mediate this immunosuppression remain unknown. We show that S. Typhimurium inhibit T cell responses by producing L-Asparaginase II, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-asparagine to aspartic acid and ammonia. L-Asparaginase II is necessary and sufficient to suppress T cell blastogenesis, cytokine production, and proliferation and to downmodulate expression of the T cell receptor. Furthermore, S. Typhimurium-induced inhibition of T cells in vitro is prevented upon addition of L-asparagine. S. Typhimurium lacking the L-Asparaginase II gene (STM3106) are unable to inhibit T cell responses and exhibit attenuated virulence in vivo. L-Asparaginases are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia through mechanisms that likely involve amino acid starvation of leukemic cells, and these findings indicate that pathogens similarly use L-asparagine deprivation to limit T cell responses. PMID:23245323

  3. Transient pore pressure response to confining stress excursions in Berea sandstone flooded with an aqueous solution of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-06-01

    We measured the pore pressure response due to carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble nucleation and growth in a Berea sandstone core flooded with an initially subsaturated aqueous solution of CO2, in response to a rapid drop in confining stress, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. A portion of the CO2 in the Earth's crust, derived from volcanic, magmatic, and biogenic sources, dissolves in groundwater. Sudden reductions in confining stress in the Earth's crust occur due to dilational strain generated by the propagation of seismic Rayleigh and P waves, or aseismic slip in the near field of earthquakes. A drop in confining stress produces a proportional drop in pore fluid pressure. When the pore fluid contains dissolved CO2, the pore pressure responds to a drop in confining stress like it does in the dissolved gas-free case, until the pore pressure falls below the bubble pressure. Gas bubble nucleation and diffusive growth in the pore space trigger spontaneous, transient buildup of the pore fluid pressure, and reduction of effective stress. We measured the rate of pore fluid pressure buildup in the 100 s immediately following the confining stress drop, as a function of the saturation with respect to CO2 at the lowest pore pressure realized during the confining stress drop, using five different CO2 partial pressures. The rate scales with the saturation with respect to dissolved CO2, from 10 kPa/min at 1.25 to 166 kPa/min at 1.8. The net pore pressure rise was as large as 0.7 MPa (100 psi) over 5 h.

  4. Histone H2A-mediated transient cytokine gene delivery induces efficient antitumor responses in murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Balicki, D; Reisfeld, R A; Pertl, U; Beutler, E; Lode, H N

    2000-10-10

    A major goal of cancer immunotherapy is the induction of a cell-mediated antitumor response in poorly immunogenic malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that this can be achieved by cytokine gene therapy with a novel histone H2A-based transient transfection procedure. This was tested by using cytokine genes encoding for IL-2 and a single chain IL-12 (scIL-12) fusion protein in a recently developed murine neuroblastoma model. Here, we demonstrate that cytokine gene transfer of IL-2 and scIL-12 with histone H2A results in the induction of an antitumor immune response that is superior in some respects to gene transfer with Superfect, a commercially available activated dendrimer commonly used to effect transfection with plasmids. Three lines of evidence support this contention. First, histone H2A-mediated transfection of IL-2 induces a natural killer cell-induced rejection of primary tumors in contrast to Superfect, which produces only a partial reduction in primary tumor growth. Second, the induction of a T cell-mediated protective tumor immunity following gene transfer of scIL-12 is more efficient with the histone H2A-mediated gene transfer because rejection of a lethal wild-type tumor cell challenge is accompanied by the greatest degree of MHC class I-restricted tumor cell killing in vitro. Third, histone H2A-mediated scIL-12 gene therapy induces the greatest release of mIFN-gamma from splenocytes of vaccinated animals in contrast to Superfect and other controls.

  5. A transient elevated irisin blood concentration in response to prolonged, moderate aerobic exercise in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, R R; Shockett, P; Webb, N D; Shah, U; Castracane, V D

    2014-02-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered, PGC-1α dependent myokine, has recently been shown to increase in circulation in response to sprint exercise. This study examined the effect of prolonged exercise on irisin concentrations in young men (n=7) as well as in young women (n=5) during different stages of the menstrual cycle. Seven young men completed 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% of VO2max and a resting control trial. Five women completed the same exercise protocol in two different trials: during the early follicular phase and mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for irisin concentrations immediately before exercise, at 54 and 90 min of exercise, and at 20 min of recovery (R20). Findings revealed that by 54 min of a 90 min treadmill exercise protocol at 60% of VO2max, irisin concentrations significantly increased 20.4% in young men and 20.3% as well as 24.6% in young women during the early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, respectively. However, by 90 min of exercise as well as R20, irisin concentrations were no longer elevated. Stage of the menstrual cycle did not affect responses in young women. Findings indicate that prolonged aerobic exercise produces a transient increase in irisin concentrations during the first hour of exercise for both genders and suggest that this form of moderate exercise may be helpful in improving fat metabolism.

  6. Recorded seismic response of Pacific Park Plaza. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, F.; Celebi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the second of two companion papers on the recorded seismic response of the Pacific Park Plaza building, in Emeryville, Calif., during the October 17, 1989, Ms = 7.1 (surface-wave magnitude) Loma Prieta earthquake. In this second part, the recorded data are analyzed in more detail by using system-identification techniques. The three-dimensional behavior and the coupled modes of the building are determined, and the effects of soil-structure interaction are investigated. The study shows that the response of the building is nonlinear at the beginning, and becomes linear after 17 sec into the earthquake. The dominant motion of the building follows an elliptical path oriented in the southeast-northwest direction. Some of the modes are complex, with nonproportional damping, and there are phase differences among modal response components. The fundamental mode of the building is a translation in the southeast-northwest direction at 0.4 Hz, with 13% damping. The wing displacements relative to the center core are large, about 50% of the center core displacements, and indicate significant torsion in the center core. The soil-structure interaction is characterized by a vibration at 0.7 Hz. This is believed to be the fundamental frequency of the surrounding soil medium. The rocking motions of the building are negligible.

  7. SIV antigen immunization induces transient antigen-specific T cell responses and selectively activates viral replication in draining lymph nodes in retroviral suppressed rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV infection causes a qualitative and quantitative loss of CD4+ T cell immunity. The institution of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) restores CD4+ T cell responses to many pathogens, but HIV-specific responses remain deficient. Similarly, therapeutic immunization with HIV antigens of chronically infected, ART treated subjects results in poor induction of HIV-specific CD4 responses. In this study, we used a macaque model of ART treatment during chronic infection to study the virologic consequences of SIV antigen stimulation in lymph nodes early after immunization. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) seropositive, Mamu A*01 positive rhesus macaques were chronically infected with SIVmac251 and treated with ART. The immune and viral responses to SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 antigen immunization in draining lymph nodes and peripheral blood were analyzed. Animals were immunized on contralateral sides with SIV gag and RhCMV pp65 encoding plasmids, which allowed lymph nodes draining each antigen to be obtained at the same time from the same animal for direct comparison. Results We observed that both SIV and RhCMV immunizations stimulated transient antigen-specific T cell responses in draining lymph nodes. The RhCMV-specific responses were potent and sustained (50 days post-immunization) in the periphery, while the SIV-specific responses were transient and extinguished quickly. The SIV antigen stimulation selectively induced transient SIV replication in draining lymph nodes. Conclusions The data are consistent with a model whereby viral replication in response to SIV antigen stimulation limits the generation of SIV antigen-specific responses and suggests a potential mechanism for the early loss and poor HIV-specific CD4+ T cell response observed in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21752277

  8. In vitro cytokinetic response of human colon cancer cells to cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II).

    PubMed

    Bergerat, J P; Barlogie, B; Göhde, W; Johnston, D A; Drewinko, B

    1979-11-01

    The cytokinetic response of a human colon carcinoma cell line to cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) was investigated using flow cytometry of DNA content, autoradiography after pulse and continuous tritiated thymidine exposure, and mitotic accumulation after continuous Colcemid treatment. With increasing concentration and exposure time, cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II) delayed and then blocked cycle traverse in S and G2 phases. After prolonged treatment with high concentrations of cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II), an additional block in G1 or at the G1-S boundary was established. Irreversibility of cell cycle distribution changes after prolonged observation periods suggests cell death in G2, S, and G1 compartments.

  9. Responsive Persistence Part II. Practices of Postmodern Therapists.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Olga; Dienhart, Anna; Turner, Jean

    2013-10-01

    This article, a companion to Part I of this series of articles, discusses how therapists informed by social constructionist and postmodern ideas enact persistence in their work with families. Transcripts and video-recordings of therapy interaction facilitated by selected major champions for three postmodern (collaborative) therapies: Michael White (narrative therapy), Harlene Anderson (collaborative language systems approach), and Bill O'Hanlon (solution-oriented therapy) were examined for persistence practices. The article offers a range of possible ways in which postmodern therapists may enact their influence in facilitating generative and helpful conversations with families and remain responsive to clients' preferences and understandings. Implications for family therapy practice, training, and supervision are discussed.

  10. Seismic response of transamerica building. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Celebi, M.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the recorded seismic response of the Transamerica Building during the October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is presented. The system identification algorithm used for the analysis is based on the discrete-time linear filtering approach with least-squares approximation, and assumes a multi-input, single-output model for the building. Fifteen modes in the north-south direction, and 18 modes in the east-west direction are identified from the records. The analysis shows that the building's response to the earthquake was dominated by a coupled mode of vibration at 0.28 Hz in the southwest-northeast direction, which is almost parallel to one of the diagonals in the building's square cross section. The reason for this behavior is the symmetry of the building's structural characteristics, as well as the strong polarization of the S-waves of the earthquake. Several higher modes of the building were excited during the strong-motion part of the earthquake. The results also show a significant amount of rocking in the building at a frequency of 2.15 Hz.

  11. Transient and permanent effects of suboptimal incubation temperatures on growth, metabolic rate, immune function and adrenocortical responses in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kriengwatana, Buddhamas; Allen, Natalie; Schmidt, Kimberly L; Soma, Kiran K; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    In birds, incubation temperature can vary by several degrees Celsius among nests of a given species. Parents may alter incubation temperature to cope with environmental conditions and/or to manipulate embryonic development, and such changes in incubation behavior could have long-lasting effects on offspring phenotype. To investigate short- and long-term effects of suboptimal incubation temperatures on survival and physiological functions in zebra finches, eggs were incubated at 36.2, 37.4 or 38.4 °C for the entire incubation period. The post-hatch environment was identical among the treatment groups. We found that hatching success was lowest in the 38.4 °C group, while post-hatch survival was lowest in the 36.2 °C group. Incubation temperature had sex-specific effects on offspring phenotype: incubation temperatures affected body mass (Mb) but not physiological parameters of males and conversely, the physiological parameters but not Mb of females. Specifically, males from the 38.4 °C group weighed significantly less than males from the 36.2 °C group from the nestling period to adulthood, whereas females from different incubation temperature groups did not differ in Mb. In contrast, females incubated at 36.2 °C had transient but significantly elevated basal metabolic rate and adrenocortical responses during the nestling and fledgling periods, whereas no treatment effect was observed in males. Innate immunity was not affected by incubation temperature in either sex. These results suggest that a 1 °C deviation from what is considered an optimal incubation temperature can lower offspring performance and offspring survival.

  12. Examination of the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 in endothelial responses to shear forces

    PubMed Central

    Baratchi, Sara; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Grace, Megan S.; Darby, William; Almazi, Juhura; Mitchell, Arnan; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress is the major mechanical force applied on vascular endothelial cells by blood flow, and is a crucial factor in normal vascular physiology and in the development of some vascular pathologies. The exact mechanisms of cellular mechano-transduction in mammalian cells and tissues have not yet been elucidated, but it is known that mechanically sensitive receptors and ion channels play a crucial role. This paper describes the use of a novel and efficient microfluidic device to study mechanically-sensitive receptors and ion channels in vitro, which has three independent channels from which recordings can be made and has a small surface area such that fewer cells are required than for conventional flow chambers. The contoured channels of the device enabled examination of a range of shear stresses in one field of view, which is not possible with parallel plate flow chambers and other previously used devices, where one level of flow-induced shear stress is produced per fixed flow-rate. We exposed bovine aortic endothelial cells to different levels of shear stress, and measured the resulting change in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) using the fluorescent calcium sensitive dye Fluo-4AM. Shear stress caused an elevation of [Ca2+]i that was proportional to the level of shear experienced. The response was temperature dependant such that at lower temperatures more shear stress was required to elicit a given level of calcium signal and the magnitude of influx was reduced. We demonstrated that shear stress-induced elevations in [Ca2+]i are largely due to calcium influx through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 ion channel. PMID:25379102

  13. Human psychophysical analysis of receptive field-like properties. I. A new transient-like visual response using a moving windmill (Werblin-type) target.

    PubMed

    Enoch, J M; Lazarus, J; Johnson, C A

    1976-06-01

    A human transient-like visual response has been revealed psychophysically with a rotating windmill target, similar to that used by Werblin in his recent studies of the retina of Necturus. The windmill pattern evoked complex perceptual phenomena (important in and of themselves) which were minimized by using a high luminance for the "criterion" flashing test field (relative to its increment threshold), and by moving the four-vaned windmill pattern at a rate of two complete revolutions per second. The transient response, herein defined as the difference in threshold between the stationary and moving windmill conditions, was greatest when the windmill vanes fell completely within the sensitization (inhibition-like) portion of the Westheimer function determined at the same retinal locus. The test has been developed so that it may be readily adapted to available clinical equipment for future diagnostic purposes .

  14. Seismic responses of two adjacent buildings. II. Interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet

    1993-01-01

    Presented in this part of the two-part paper is a study of the relations between earthquake motions recorded from two, adjacent, seven-story buildings, from a downhole below the foundation of one of the buildings and from three free-field sites, all within one city block. This unique data set was obtained during the Whittier-Narrows, Calif. earthquake of Oct. 1, 1987, Part I includes background information on the two buildings, the site, and the data set. Building response characteristics of a code-type instrumented building (A) and an extensively instrumented building (B) are also studied. In this part, spectral analysis techniques are used to study the relationships between the motions of the roofs and basements, the downhole and the free-field sites. It is asserted that there is building-soil-building interaction between the two buildings at a frequency of 2.35 Hz. Furthermore, the free-field motions are shown to be influenced by the presence of the buildings.

  15. Local response dispersion method. II. Generalized multicenter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2010-11-01

    Recently introduced local response dispersion method [T. Sato and H. Nakai, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 224104 (2009)], which is a first-principles alternative to empirical dispersion corrections in density functional theory, is implemented with generalized multicenter interactions involving both atomic and atomic pair polarizabilities. The generalization improves the asymptote of intermolecular interactions, reducing the mean absolute percentage error from about 30% to 6% in the molecular C6 coefficients of more than 1000 dimers, compared to experimental values. The method is also applied to calculations of potential energy curves of molecules in the S22 database [P. Jurečka et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. The calculated potential energy curves are in a good agreement with reliable benchmarks recently published by Molnar et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 065102 (2009)]. These improvements are achieved at the price of increasing complexity in the implementation, but without losing the computational efficiency of the previous two-center (atom-atom) formulation. A set of different truncations of two-center and three- or four-center interactions is shown to be optimal in the cost-performance balance.

  16. Effect of ocean mixing on the transient climate response to a CO/sub 2/ increase: analysis of recent model results

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, L.D.D.

    1986-02-20

    Results of several recent reports on the role of ocean mixing in the transient response to a CO/sub 2/ doubling are analyzed and compared. Wigley and Schlesinger (1985) obtained an analytical solution to a one-dimensional box-diffusion (BD) ocean model in which the mixed layer e-folding time tau/sub e/ varies as f/sub 0/ /sup 2/KdeltaT/sub eq//sup 2/, where f/sub 0/ is the planetary ocean fraction, K is the ocean diffusivity, and deltaT/sub eq/ is the equilibrium temperature response. The dependence of tau/sub e/ obtained by Wigley and Schlesinger is compared with that obtained using simple land-seas resolved and box-advection-diffusion (BAD) models. For a BAD model the dependence of tau/sub e/ on both K and ..delta..T/sub eq/ is significantly less than for a BD model. A comparison of the transient response of BD and BAD models using the same effective K indicates that the behavior of the BAD model cannot be captured using a BD model, except during the first few decades of the transient response. Schlesinger et al. (1985) estimated atmospheric and mixed layer values of tau/sub e/ for their coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (A/O GCM) by fitting a BD model to the first 16 years of their A/O GCM transient response and then integrating the BD model for 200 years. However, Schlesinger et al. appear to have overestimated values of tau/sub e/ for their long-term A/O GCM by fitting their short-term A/O GCM transient response to a model in which the equilibrium globally averaged atmospheric and mixed layer temperature responses are equal, whereas this is apparently not true for their A/O GCM. Hansen et al. (1984) estimated tau/sub e/ by modeling three-dimensional ocean mixing as a series of isolated BD models, one below each horizontal grid point, and by using tritium-based diffusion coefficients, which probably are too large when applied to heat and probably lead to an overestimate of the actual tau.

  17. Myosin-II sets the optimal response time scale of chemotactic amoeba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    The response dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton to external chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in numerous cellular functions. One of the key players that governs the dynamics of the actin network is the motor protein myosin-II. Here we investigate the role of myosin-II in the response of the actin system to external stimuli. We used a microfluidic device in combination with a photoactivatable chemoattractant to apply stimuli to individual cells with high temporal resolution. We directly compare the actin dynamics in Dictyostelium discodelium wild type (WT) cells to a knockout mutant that is deficient in myosin-II (MNL). Similar to the WT a small population of MNL cells showed self-sustained oscillations even in absence of external stimuli. The actin response of MNL cells to a short pulse of chemoattractant resembles WT during the first 15 sec but is significantly delayed afterward. The amplitude of the dominant peak in the power spectrum from the response time series of MNL cells to periodic stimuli with varying period showed a clear resonance peak at a forcing period of 36 sec, which is significantly delayed as compared to the resonance at 20 sec found for the WT. This shift indicates an important role of myosin-II in setting the response time scale of motile amoeba. Institute of Physics und Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.

  18. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity alters blood pressure response to angiotensin II administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Aghdas; Saberi, Shadan; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CP) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinic, which is accompanied with nephrotoxicity. CP may also disturb hemodynamics of the circulation system. We have tested the role of CP in mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to graded angiotensin (Ang) II infusion in rats. Materials and Methods: Male and female rats were treated with CP (2.5 mg/kg/day) for a period of 1-week and compared with the vehicle-treated animals. The blood pressure response to Ang II (100–1000 ng/kg/min) was determined under the anesthesia condition. Endothelial permeability of aorta was measured according to the Evans blue uptake. The kidney tissue was also subjected to histological investigation. Results: Significant increase in serum levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and pathological findings in CP-treated rats verified CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Significant difference in percentage of change in MAP response to Ang II between male and female rats was detected in vehicle-treated groups (P < 0.05) while in CP-treated animals this response difference was not observed. The groups were not significantly different with regard to the endothelial permeability of aorta while the serum level of nitrite in male rats increased significantly following administration of CP (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It seems the different response in percentage of change of MAP to graded Ang II infusion between male and female indicates the effect of CP on renin Ang system parameters. PMID:27110550

  19. Class II haplotype differentially regulates immune response in HgCl2-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hanley, G A; Schiffenbauer, J; Sobel, E S

    1997-09-01

    One of the most striking features of exposure to low doses of mercury in mice is the high-titer haplotype-linked anti-nucleolar (ANoA) autoantibody response. Mice of H-2(s) haplotype have been high responders, while H-2(b) mice have been low. This pattern has been attributed to the class II molecule itself, but the poor response of F1 crosses between high and low responders raised the possibility that the anti-fibrillarin specificity was actually due to a closely linked dominant negative gene. To test the role of class II explicitly, F1 crosses between congenic B6.SJL (H-2(s)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice with a targeted deletion of I-AbAbeta were generated, creating mice heterozygous for all MHC loci, but expressing only I-As. In comparison with B6.SJL, no diminution of ANoA titers was found, proving that I-As itself was responsible for susceptibility and I-Ab for downregulation. Unlike I-A, expression of the I-E class II molecule could not downregulate the response in an otherwise susceptible mouse. These results suggest a complicated role for class II in the regulation of a novel, environmentally induced autoimmune response.

  20. Potential Biosignatures in Super-Earth Atmospheres II. Photochemical Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, S.; Godolt, M.; Palczynski, K.; Rauer, H.; Stock, J.; von Paris, P.; Lehmann, R.; Selsis, F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Spectral characterization of super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of 1 bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by in an earlier work by Rauer and colleagues. The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex life. An important result of our analysis is a shift in the ozone photochemistry from mainly Chapman production (which dominates in Earth's stratosphere) to smog-dominated ozone production for planets in the habitable zone of cooler (M5–M7)-class dwarf stars. This result is associated with a lower energy flux in the UVB wavelength range from the central star, hence slower planetary atmospheric photolysis of molecular oxygen, which slows the Chapman ozone production. This is important for future atmospheric characterization missions because it provides an indication of different chemical environments that can lead to very different responses of ozone, for example, cosmic rays. Nitrous oxide, a biosignature for simple bacterial life, is favored for low stratospheric UV conditions, that is, on planets orbiting cooler stars. Transport of this species from its surface source to the stratosphere where it is destroyed can also be a key process

  1. THE FLICKER RESPONSE CONTOURS FOR GENETICALLY RELATED FISHES. II

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, W. J.; Wolf, Ernst

    1939-01-01

    The flicker response contour has been determined for several species and types of the teleosts Xiphophorus (X.) and Platypoecilius (P.) under the same conditions. The curve (F vs. log Im) is the same for representatives of each generic type, but is different for the two genera. Its duplex nature is analyzable in each instance by application of the probability integral equation to the rod and cone constituent parts. The parameters of this function provide rational measures of invariant properties of the curves, which have specific values according to the genetic constitution of the animal. The F1 hybrids (H'') of X. montezuma x P. variatus show dominance of the X. properties with respect to cone Fmax. and σ' log I, but an intermediate value of the abscissa of inflection (τ'). The rod segment shows dominance of σ' log I from P., but an intermediate value of Fmax. and of τ'. The composite flicker curve involves the operation of two distinct assemblages of excitable elements, differing quantitatively but not qualitatively in physicochemical organization, probably only secondarily related to the histological differentiation of rods and cones because almost certainly of central nervous locus, but following different rules in hereditary determination, and therefore necessarily different in physical organization. The interpretation of the diverse behavior of the three parameters of the probability summation is discussed, particularly in relation to the physical significance of these parameters as revealed by their quantitative relations to temperature, retinal area, and light time fraction in the flash cycle, and to their interrelations in producing the decline of rod effects at higher intensities. It is stressed that in general the properties of the parameters of a chosen interpretive analytical function must be shown experimentally to possess the physical properties implied by the equation selected before the equation can be regarded as describing those invariant

  2. THE FLICKER RESPONSE CONTOURS FOR GENETICALLY RELATED FISHES. II.

    PubMed

    Crozier, W J; Wolf, E

    1939-03-20

    The flicker response contour has been determined for several species and types of the teleosts Xiphophorus (X.) and Platypoecilius (P.) under the same conditions. The curve (F vs. log I(m)) is the same for representatives of each generic type, but is different for the two genera. Its duplex nature is analyzable in each instance by application of the probability integral equation to the rod and cone constituent parts. The parameters of this function provide rational measures of invariant properties of the curves, which have specific values according to the genetic constitution of the animal. The F(1) hybrids (H'') of X. montezuma x P. variatus show dominance of the X. properties with respect to cone F(max.) and sigma' (log I), but an intermediate value of the abscissa of inflection (tau'). The rod segment shows dominance of sigma' (log I) from P., but an intermediate value of F(max.) and of tau'. The composite flicker curve involves the operation of two distinct assemblages of excitable elements, differing quantitatively but not qualitatively in physicochemical organization, probably only secondarily related to the histological differentiation of rods and cones because almost certainly of central nervous locus, but following different rules in hereditary determination, and therefore necessarily different in physical organization. The interpretation of the diverse behavior of the three parameters of the probability summation is discussed, particularly in relation to the physical significance of these parameters as revealed by their quantitative relations to temperature, retinal area, and light time fraction in the flash cycle, and to their interrelations in producing the decline of rod effects at higher intensities. It is stressed that in general the properties of the parameters of a chosen interpretive analytical function must be shown experimentally to possess the physical properties implied by the equation selected before the equation can be regarded as describing

  3. Potential biosignatures in super-Earth atmospheres II. Photochemical responses.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, J L; Gebauer, S; Godolt, M; Palczynski, K; Rauer, H; Stock, J; von Paris, P; Lehmann, R; Selsis, F

    2013-05-01

    Spectral characterization of super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of 1 bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by in an earlier work by Rauer and colleagues. The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex life. An important result of our analysis is a shift in the ozone photochemistry from mainly Chapman production (which dominates in Earth's stratosphere) to smog-dominated ozone production for planets in the habitable zone of cooler (M5-M7)-class dwarf stars. This result is associated with a lower energy flux in the UVB wavelength range from the central star, hence slower planetary atmospheric photolysis of molecular oxygen, which slows the Chapman ozone production. This is important for future atmospheric characterization missions because it provides an indication of different chemical environments that can lead to very different responses of ozone, for example, cosmic rays. Nitrous oxide, a biosignature for simple bacterial life, is favored for low stratospheric UV conditions, that is, on planets orbiting cooler stars. Transport of this species from its surface source to the stratosphere where it is destroyed can also be a key process. Comparing 1g with

  4. Transient activation of dopaminergic neurons during development modulates visual responsiveness, locomotion and brain activity in a dopamine ontogeny model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, B; Eyles, D; van Alphen, B; van Swinderen, B

    2013-01-08

    It has been observed that certain developmental environmental risk factors for schizophrenia when modeled in rodents alter the trajectory of dopaminergic development, leading to persistent behavioural changes in adults. This has recently been articulated as the "dopamine ontogeny hypothesis of schizophrenia". To test one aspect of this hypothesis, namely that transient dopaminergic effects during development modulate attention-like behavior and arousal in adults, we turned to a small-brain model, Drosophila melanogaster. By applying genetic tools allowing transient activation or silencing of dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain, we investigated whether a critical window exists during development when altered dopamine (DA) activity levels could lead to impairments in arousal states in adult animals. We found that increased activity in dopaminergic neurons in later stages of development significantly increased visual responsiveness and locomotion, especially in adult males. This misallocation of visual salience and hyperactivity mimicked the effect of acute methamphetamine feeding to adult flies, suggesting up-regulated DA signaling could result from developmental manipulations. Finally, brain recordings revealed significantly reduced gamma-band activity in adult animals exposed to the transient developmental insult. Together, these data support the idea that transient alterations in DA signaling during development can permanently alter behavior in adults, and that a reductionist model such as Drosophila can be used to investigate potential mechanisms underlying complex cognitive disorders such as schizophrenia.

  5. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology.

  6. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology. PMID:25524862

  7. Modeling and analysis of thermal-hydraulic response of uranium- aluminum reactor fuel plates under transient heatup conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.; Georgevich, V.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Fuketa, T.; Soyama, Kk.; Ishijima, K.; Kodaira, T.

    1995-12-31

    A 3-D model to predict the thermal behavior of ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) fuel miniplates has been developed. Possibility of explosive boiling was considered, and it was concluded that the heating rates (existant in NSRR tests) are not large enough for this to occur. However, transient boiling effects were pronounced. Because of the complexity of transient pool boiling and the unavailability of experimental data for the situations studied, an approximation was made that predicted the data very well within the uncertainties present. If pool boiling from the miniplates had been assumed to be steady during the heating pulse, the experimental data would have been greatly overestimated. This shows the importance of considering the transient nature of heat transfer in analysis of reactivity excursion accidents. An additional contribution of this work is that it provided data on highly subcooled steady nucleate boiling from the cooling portion of the thermocouple traces.

  8. Rac1 protein signaling is required for DNA damage response stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons.

    PubMed

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons.

  9. Coupled Aerosol-Chemistry-Climate Twentieth-Century Transient Model Investigation: Trends in Short-Lived Species and Climate Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Dorothy; Bauer, Susanne E.; Del Genio, Anthony; Faluvegi, Greg; McConnell, Joseph R.; Menon, Surabi; Miller, Ronald L.; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew

    2011-01-01

    The authors simulate transient twentieth-century climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with aerosol and ozone chemistry fully coupled to one another and to climate including a full dynamic ocean. Aerosols include sulfate, black carbon (BC), organic carbon, nitrate, sea salt, and dust. Direct and BC snow-albedo radiative effects are included. Model BC and sulfur trends agree fairly well with records from Greenland and European ice cores and with sulfur deposition in North America; however, the model underestimates the sulfur decline at the end of the century in Greenland. Global BC effects peak early in the century (1940s); afterward the BC effects decrease at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere but continue to increase at lower latitudes. The largest increase in aerosol optical depth occurs in the middle of the century (1940s-80s) when sulfate forcing peaks and causes global dimming. After this, aerosols decrease in eastern North America and northern Eurasia leading to regional positive forcing changes and brightening. These surface forcing changes have the correct trend but are too weak. Over the century, the net aerosol direct effect is -0.41 Watts per square meter, the BC-albedo effect is -0.02 Watts per square meter, and the net ozone forcing is +0.24 Watts per square meter. The model polar stratospheric ozone depletion develops, beginning in the 1970s. Concurrently, the sea salt load and negative radiative flux increase over the oceans around Antarctica. Net warming over the century is modeled fairly well; however, the model fails to capture the dynamics of the observedmidcentury cooling followed by the late century warming.Over the century, 20% of Arctic warming and snow ice cover loss is attributed to the BC albedo effect. However, the decrease in this effect at the end of the century contributes to Arctic cooling. To test the climate responses to sulfate and BC pollution, two experiments were branched from 1970 that removed

  10. Rat Pial Microvascular Responses to Transient Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion and Reperfusion: Quercetin's Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Lapi, D; Vagnani, S; Pignataro, G; Esposito, E; Paterni, M; Colantuoni, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess quercetin's mechanism of action in rat pial microvessels during transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) and reperfusion. Rat pial microcirculation was visualized using fluorescence microscopy through a closed cranial window. Pial arterioles were classified in five orders of branchings. In ischemic rats, 30 min BCCAO and 60 min reperfusion caused arteriolar diameter decrease, microvascular leakage, leukocyte adhesion in venules, and reduction of capillary perfusion. Quercetin highest dose determined dilation in all arteriolar orders, by 40 ± 4% of baseline in order 2 vessels, and prevented microvascular permeability [0.15 ± 0.02 normalized gray levels (NGL)], leukocyte adhesion, and capillary failure. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition exerted by chelerythrine prior to quercetin attenuated quercetin-induced effects: order 2 arterioles dilated by 19.0 ± 2.4% baseline, while there was an increase in permeability (0.40 ± 0.05 NGL) and leukocyte adhesion with a marked decrease in capillary perfusion. Tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibition by tyrphostin 47 prior to quercetin lessened smaller pial arterioles responses, dilating by 20.7 ± 2.5% of baseline, while leakage increased (0.39 ± 0.04 NGL) sustained by slight leukocyte adhesion and ameliorated capillary perfusion. Inhibition of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) prior to PKC or TK reduced the quercetin's effects on pial arteriolar diameter and leakage. eNOS inhibition by L-NAME reduced quercetin effects on pial arteriolar diameter and leakage. Finally, combined inhibition of PKC and TK prior to quercetin abolished quercetin-induced effects, decreasing eNOS expression, while blocking ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels by glibenclamide suppressed arteriolar dilation. In conclusion, the protective effects of quercetin could be due to different mechanisms resulting in NO

  11. Electrical transients in the cell-volume response to cyclic AMP of the tsetse fly Malpighian tubule

    PubMed

    Isaacson; Nicolson

    1996-01-01

    1. Using cyclic AMP to stimulate perfused tsetse fly Malpighian tubules bathed in SO42- Ringer frequently causes an immediate but transient peak in transtubular potential (Vt), before stabilisation of Vt at an increased value. 2. These transients were investigated by monitoring the associated changes in cable properties and current­voltage (I/V) relationships. Tubules were perfused and bathed in either Cl- Ringer or SO42- Ringer (containing 8 mmol l-1 Cl-). 3. Tubules bathed in Cl- Ringer showed a transient swelling of the cells on exposure to cyclic AMP. Cable analysis confirmed the visually observed narrowing of the tubular lumen and revealed transient increases in core resistance (Rc) and transtubular resistance (Rt). As the cells returned to their initial volume, the lumen became distended, and Rc and Rt fell below their initial levels. These changes were accompanied by an increase, and a subsequent decrease, in the slope of the I/V plot. 4. None of the above changes was apparent in SO42- Ringer, other than a fall in Rt and in the slope of the I/V plot. 5. The results suggest that, in Cl- Ringer, cyclic AMP induces swelling of the tubular cells by promoting increased basolateral solute (and water) entry and that the subsequent rapid return to normal cell volume, with a concomitant progressive increase in the rate of tubular secretion, reflects the operation of a specific cell-volume regulatory mechanism of transepithelial transport. 6. The cyclic-AMP-induced peak that occurs in Vt in SO42- Ringer appears to be primarily due to a transient overshoot in the fall in series resistance (i.e. an increase in basolateral Na+ conductance), accompanied by a proportionately lesser increase in shunt resistance.

  12. Development of Design Technology on Thermal-Hydraulic Performance in Tight-Lattice Rod Bundles: II - Rod Bowing Effect on Boiling Transition under Transient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Tamai, Hidesada; Kureta, Masatoshi; Ohnuki, Akira; Akimoto, Hajime

    A thermal-hydraulic feasibility project for an Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible fuel cycle (FLWR) has been performed since 2002. In this R&D project, large-scale thermal-hydraulic tests, several model experiments and development of advanced numerical analysis codes have been carried out. In this paper, we describe the critical power characteristics in a 37-rod tight-lattice bundle with rod bowing under transient states. It is observed that transient Boiling Transition (BT) always occurs axially at exit elevation of upper high-heat-flux region and transversely in the central area of the bundle, which is same as that under steady state. For the postulated power increase and flow decrease cases that may be possibly met in a normal operation of the FLWR, it is confirmed that no BT occurs when Initial Critical Power Ratio (ICPR) is 1.3. Moreover, when the transients are run under severer ICPR that causes BT, the transient critical powers are generally same as the steady ones. The experiments are analyzed with a modified TRAC-BFI code, where Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) newest critical power correlation is implemented for the BT judgement. The code shows good prediction for the occurrence or the non occurrence of the BT and predicts the BT starting time conservatively. Traditional quasi-steady state prediction of the transient BT is confirmed being applicable for the postulated abnormal transient processes in the tight-lattice bundle with rod bowing.

  13. Can intradermal administration of angiotensin II influence human heat loss responses during whole body heat stress?

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Naoto; Meade, Robert D.; Paull, Gabrielle; McGinn, Ryan; Foudil-bey, Imane; Akbari, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear if angiotensin II, which can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (oxidative stress), modulates heat loss responses of cutaneous blood flow and sweating. We tested the hypothesis that angiotensin II-induced increases in oxidative stress impair cutaneous perfusion and sweating during rest and exercise in the heat. Eleven young (24 ± 4 yr) healthy adults performed two 30-min cycling bouts at a fixed rate of metabolic heat production (400 W) in the heat (35°C). The first and second exercises were followed by a 20- and 40-min recovery. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for continuous administration of either: 1) lactated Ringer (control), 2) 10 μM angiotensin II, 3) 10 mM ascorbate (an antioxidant), or 4) a combination of 10 μM angiotensin II + 10 mM ascorbate. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) and sweating (ventilated capsule) were evaluated at each skin site. Compared with control, angiotensin II reduced both CVC and sweating at baseline resting and during each recovery in the heat (all P < 0.05). However, during both exercise bouts, there were no differences in CVC or sweating between the treatment sites (all P > 0.05). When ascorbate was coinfused with angiotensin II, the effect of angiotensin II on sweating was abolished (all P > 0.05); however, its effect on CVC at baseline resting and during each recovery remained intact (all P < 0.05). We show angiotensin II impairs cutaneous perfusion independent of oxidative stress, while it impairs sweating through increasing oxidative stress during exposure to an ambient heat stress before and following exercise. PMID:25767030

  14. American Physicists, Nuclear Weapons in World War II, and Social Responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badash, Lawrence

    2005-06-01

    Social responsibility in science has a centuries-long history, but it was such a minor thread that most scientists were unaware of the concept. Even toward the conclusion of the Manhattan Project, which produced the first nuclear weapons, only a handful of its participants had some reservations about use of a weapon of mass destruction. But the explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki not only made society more aware of the importance of science, they made scientists more aware of their responsibility to society. I describe the development of the concept of social responsibility and its appearance among American scientists both before and after the end of World War II.

  15. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4(+) T cells. ldlr(-/-) syk(-/-) mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr(-/-) mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis.

  16. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4+ T cells. ldlr−/− syk−/− mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr−/− mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. PMID:25946330

  17. A design of phase II cancer trials using total and complete response endpoints.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Jin, Hua; Lamborn, Kathleen R

    2005-10-30

    Phase II clinical trials in oncology are used for initial evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of a new treatment regimen. Simon's two-stage design based on total response (TR) rate is commonly used for such trials. Several authors have proposed alternative strategies to consider either response and toxicity or response and early progression. Because TR consists of both partial response (PR) and complete response (CR) and these two types of responses have different effects on subsequent patient outcome, Lin and Chen proposed a flexible design that is based on a weighted average of PR and CR rates as a way to recognize the differential significance of the two levels of response. Panageas and colleagues, on the other hand, used a trinomial model and direct search to consider a rejection region for PR and CR separately. In this paper, we reformat their hypotheses to assess efficacy based on TR and CR. A new two-stage optimum phase II trial design based on TR and CR is developed. We provide guides on searching the stopping and rejecting regions and on determining sample size. An example of a phase II trial for glioblastomas treatment is presented. In this trial, physicians would be interested in either stable disease (SD), PR, or CR as an indication of efficacy. However, because PR and CR rarely occur, observation of any PR or CR will lean towards acceptance of the treatment. Our design has the advantage of being close to the traditional Simon two-stage design while still having the flexibility to treat responses (PR and CR in this example) differently than SD.

  18. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  19. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Heather A.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Geraghty, Daniel E.; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K.; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H.; Krebs, Shelly J.; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; Juliana McElrath, M.; Montefiori, David C.; Bailer, Robert T.; Koup, Richard A.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Kim, Jerome H.; Thomas, Rasmi

    2016-01-01

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II–restricted CD4+ T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1–specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)–specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120–204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial. PMID:26180102

  20. The Coordination of C4 Photosynthesis and the CO2-Concentrating Mechanism in Maize and Miscanthus × giganteus in Response to Transient Changes in Light Quality1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Ubierna, Nerea; Ma, Jian-Ying; Walker, Berkley J.; Kramer, David M.; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2014-01-01

    Unequal absorption of photons between photosystems I and II, and between bundle-sheath and mesophyll cells, are likely to affect the efficiency of the CO2-concentrating mechanism in C4 plants. Under steady-state conditions, it is expected that the biochemical distribution of energy (ATP and NADPH) and photosynthetic metabolite concentrations will adjust to maintain the efficiency of C4 photosynthesis through the coordination of the C3 (Calvin-Benson-Bassham) and C4 (CO2 pump) cycles. However, under transient conditions, changes in light quality will likely alter the coordination of the C3 and C4 cycles, influencing rates of CO2 assimilation and decreasing the efficiency of the CO2-concentrating mechanism. To test these hypotheses, we measured leaf gas exchange, leaf discrimination, chlorophyll fluorescence, electrochromatic shift, photosynthetic metabolite pools, and chloroplast movement in maize (Zea mays) and Miscanthus × giganteus following transitional changes in light quality. In both species, the rate of net CO2 assimilation responded quickly to changes in light treatments, with lower rates of net CO2 assimilation under blue light compared with red, green, and blue light, red light, and green light. Under steady state, the efficiency of CO2-concentrating mechanisms was similar; however, transient changes affected the coordination of C3 and C4 cycles in M. giganteus but to a lesser extent in maize. The species differences in the ability to coordinate the activities of C3 and C4 cycles appear to be related to differences in the response of cyclic electron flux around photosystem I and potentially chloroplast rearrangement in response to changes in light quality. PMID:24488966

  1. Enhanced induction of thyroid cell MHC class II antigen expression in rats highly responsive to thyroglobulin.

    PubMed

    Lahat, N; Hirose, W; Davies, T F

    1989-04-01

    Initial experiments demonstrated that the degree of autoantibody and proliferative T cell responses to syngeneic rat thyroglobulin differed markedly between Buffalo (high responder) and Fisher (low responder) rats after classical immunization schedules. While varying immune responsiveness may be due to qualitative and quantitative T and B cell differences, the role of thyroid cell MHC class II antigens may be pivotal to the onset of autoimmune thyroiditis in such animal models. We, therefore, examined the induction of MHC class II antigens in thyroid monolayers derived from Buffalo and Fisher rats treated with methimazole (0.1% in their water) for 4 weeks to induce mild thyroid hyperplasia. After thyroidectomy, thyroid cell monolayers were prepared and exposed to recombinant rat gamma-interferon (gamma IF; 10-1000 U/ml) for 1-7 days in the presence and absence of TSH (1 mU/ml). Both Buffalo and Fisher thyroid monolayers responded to gamma IF with MHC class II antigen expression when assessed by laser flow cytometry using MRC OX-6 monoclonal anti-RT1.B. In both types of culture, TSH enhanced MHC class II antigen expression in the presence of gamma IF to the same degree. However, there was a consistently earlier and greater degree of MHC class II antigen expression in Buffalo thyroid monolayers compared to Fisher monolayers, a phenomenon not explicable on the basis of fibroblast contamination as assessed by cytokeratin staining. These data demonstrate that end-organ sensitivity to MHC class II antigen expression may be important in the pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid disease.

  2. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  3. Decadal-Scale Responses in Middle and Upper Stratospheric Ozone From SAGE II Version 7 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    2014-01-01

    Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) version 7 (v7) ozone profiles are analyzed for their decadal-scale responses in the middle and upper stratosphere for 1991 and 1992-2005 and compared with those from its previous version 6.2 (v6.2). Multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is applied to time series of its ozone number density vs. altitude data for a range of latitudes and altitudes. The MLR models that are fit to the time series data include a periodic 11 yr term, and it is in-phase with that of the 11 yr, solar UV (Ultraviolet)-flux throughout most of the latitude/ altitude domain of the middle and upper stratosphere. Several regions that have a response that is not quite in-phase are interpreted as being affected by decadal-scale, dynamical forcings. The maximum minus minimum, solar cycle (SClike) responses for the ozone at the low latitudes are similar from the two SAGE II data versions and vary from about 5 to 2.5% from 35 to 50 km, although they are resolved better with v7. SAGE II v7 ozone is also analyzed for 1984-1998, in order to mitigate effects of end-point anomalies that bias its ozone in 1991 and the analyzed results for 1991-2005 or following the Pinatubo eruption. Its SC-like ozone response in the upper stratosphere is of the order of 4%for 1984-1998 vs. 2.5 to 3%for 1991-2005. The SAGE II v7 results are also recompared with the responses in ozone from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) that are in terms of mixing ratio vs. pressure for 1991-2005 and then for late 1992- 2005 to avoid any effects following Pinatubo. Shapes of their respective response profiles agree very well for 1992-2005. The associated linear trends of the ozone are not as negative in 1992-2005 as in 1984-1998, in accord with a leveling off of the effects of reactive chlorine on ozone. It is concluded that the SAGE II v7 ozone yields SC-like ozone responses and trends that are of better quality than those from v6.2.

  4. Comparing Geant4 hadronic models for the WENDI-II rem meter response function.

    PubMed

    Vanaudenhove, T; Dubus, A; Pauly, N

    2013-01-01

    The WENDI-II rem meter is one of the most popular neutron dosemeters used to assess a useful quantity of radiation protection, namely the ambient dose equivalent. This is due to its high sensitivity and its energy response that approximately follows the conversion function between neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent in the range of thermal to 5 GeV. The simulation of the WENDI-II response function with the Geant4 toolkit is then perfectly suited to compare low- and high-energy hadronic models provided by this Monte Carlo code. The results showed that the thermal treatment of hydrogen in polyethylene for neutron <4 eV has a great influence over the whole detector range. Above 19 MeV, both Bertini Cascade and Binary Cascade models show a good correlation with the results found in the literature, while low-energy parameterised models are not suitable for this application.

  5. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  6. Semi-analytical solution for three-dimensional transient response of functionally graded annular plate on a two parameter viscoelastic foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xu; Wang, Zhenyu; Wang, Lizhong; Liu, Guohua

    2014-06-01

    The three-dimensional transient analysis of functionally graded annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions is carried out in this paper. The material properties of the FGM plate are assumed to vary smoothly in an exponential law along the thickness direction. The plate is assumed to rest on a two parameter viscoelastic foundation. A semi-analytical method, which integrates the state space method (SSM), Laplace transform and its inversion, as well as the one-dimensional differential quadrature method (DQM), is proposed to obtain the transient response of the plate. The state space method is used to obtain the analytical solution in the thickness direction. The differential quadrature method is employed to approximate the solution in the radial direction. The Laplace transform and the numerical inversion are used to obtain the solution in time domain. Numerical results show a good agreement between the response histories obtained by the present method and finite element method. The effects of the boundary conditions at the edges, the material graded index, the Winkler and shearing layer elastic coefficients, and the damping coefficient are studied. Numerical examples show that the peak response decreases as the material graded index, the Winkler and shearing layer elastic coefficients, and the damping coefficient increase. The results obtained in this paper can serve as benchmark data in further research.

  7. Species specificity and augmentation of responses to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules in human CD4 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Murine T cell responses to human class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules were shown to be a minimum of 20-70-fold lower than responses to allogeneic molecules. Transgenic mice expressing slightly below normal (75-95%) or very high (250-380%) cell surface levels of human CD4 were utilized to determine whether this was due to a species-specific interaction between murine CD4 and class II molecules. Human CD4 was shown to function in signal transduction events in murine T cells based on the ability of anti-human CD4 antibody to synergize with suboptimal doses of anti-murine CD3 antibody in stimulating T cell proliferation. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, T cell responses to human class II molecules were enhanced up to threefold, whereas allogeneic responses were unaltered. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were enhanced at least 10-fold, whereas allogeneic responses were between one and three times the level of normal responses. The relatively greater enhancement of the response to human class II molecules in both lines argues for a preferential interaction between human CD4 and human class II molecules. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were blocked by antibodies to CD4 of either species, indicating participation by both molecules. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to both human and murine class II molecules were almost completely blocked with anti-human CD4 antibody, whereas anti-murine CD4 antibody had no effect. However, anti-murine CD4 continued to synergize with anti-CD3 in stimulating T cell proliferation in these mice. Thus, overexpression of human CD4 selectively impaired the ability of murine CD4 to assist in the process of antigen recognition. The ability of human CD4 to support a strong allogeneic response under these conditions indicates that this molecule can interact with murine class II molecules to a

  8. Involvement of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase II in response to oxidative damage and adaptive mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Escarceller, M; Hicks, J; Gudmundsson, G; Trump, G; Touati, D; Lovett, S; Foster, P L; McEntee, K; Goodman, M F

    1994-01-01

    DNA polymerase II (Pol II) is regulated as part of the SOS response to DNA damage in Escherichia coli. We examined the participation of Pol II in the response to oxidative damage, adaptive mutation, and recombination. Cells lacking Pol II activity (polB delta 1 mutants) exhibited 5- to 10-fold-greater sensitivity to mode 1 killing by H2O2 compared with isogenic polB+ cells. Survival decreased by about 15-fold when polB mutants containing defective superoxide dismutase genes, sodA and sodB, were compared with polB+ sodA sodB mutants. Resistance to peroxide killing was restored following P1 transduction of polB cells to polB+ or by conjugation of polB cells with an F' plasmid carrying a copy of polB+. The rate at which Lac+ mutations arose in Lac- cells subjected to selection for lactose utilization, a phenomenon known as adaptive mutation, was increased threefold in polB backgrounds and returned to wild-type rates when polB cells were transduced to polB+. Following multiple passages of polB cells or prolonged starvation, a progressive loss of sensitivity to killing by peroxide was observed, suggesting that second-site suppressor mutations may be occurring with relatively high frequencies. The presence of suppressor mutations may account for the apparent lack of a mutant phenotype in earlier studies. A well-established polB strain, a dinA Mu d(Apr lac) fusion (GW1010), exhibited wild-type (Pol II+) sensitivity to killing by peroxide, consistent with the accumulation of second-site suppressor mutations. A high titer anti-Pol II polyclonal antibody was used to screen for the presence of Pol II in other bacteria and in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cross-reacting material was found in all gram-negative strains tested but was not detected in gram-positive strains or in S. cerevisiae. Induction of Pol II by nalidixic acid was observed in E. coli K-12, B, and C, in Shigella flexneri, and in Salmonella typhimurium. Images PMID:7928992

  9. The LOFAR Transients Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, John D.; Staley, Tim D.; Molenaar, Gijs J.; Rol, Evert; Rowlinson, Antonia; Scheers, Bart; Spreeuw, Hanno; Bell, Martin E.; Broderick, Jess W.; Carbone, Dario; Garsden, Hugh; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Law, Casey J.; Wise, Michael; Breton, Rene P.; Cendes, Yvette; Corbel, Stéphane; Eislöffel, Jochen; Falcke, Heino; Fender, Rob; Grießmeier, Jean-Mathias; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Stappers, Benjamin W.; Stewart, Adam J.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Wijnands, Rudy; Zarka, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Current and future astronomical survey facilities provide a remarkably rich opportunity for transient astronomy, combining unprecedented fields of view with high sensitivity and the ability to access previously unexplored wavelength regimes. This is particularly true of LOFAR, a recently-commissioned, low-frequency radio interferometer, based in the Netherlands and with stations across Europe. The identification of and response to transients is one of LOFAR's key science goals. However, the large data volumes which LOFAR produces, combined with the scientific requirement for rapid response, make automation essential. To support this, we have developed the LOFAR Transients Pipeline, or TraP. The TraP ingests multi-frequency image data from LOFAR or other instruments and searches it for transients and variables, providing automatic alerts of significant detections and populating a lightcurve database for further analysis by astronomers. Here, we discuss the scientific goals of the TraP and how it has been designed to meet them. We describe its implementation, including both the algorithms adopted to maximize performance as well as the development methodology used to ensure it is robust and reliable, particularly in the presence of artefacts typical of radio astronomy imaging. Finally, we report on a series of tests of the pipeline carried out using simulated LOFAR observations with a known population of transients.

  10. Temporal thermal response of Type II-IR fiber Bragg gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Changrui; Wang Dongning; Li Yuhua; Sun Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2009-06-01

    We use the phase mask method to investigate both experimentally and theoretically the temporal thermal response of Type II-IR fiber Bragg gratings inscribed by a femtosecond laser. A fast testing system is developed to measure the thermal response time by means of periodic CO2 laser irradiation, which creates a rapid temperature change environment. The temporal thermal response is found to be independent of the heat power and the heat direction, although the grating produced destroys the axial symmetry of the fiber. The measured values of the temporal thermal response are {approx}230 ms for heating and {approx}275 ms for cooling, which different from the simulation results obtained from a lumped system equation. The causes of such differences are investigated in detail.

  11. Suggested response criteria for phase II antitumor drug studies for neurofibromatosis type 2 related vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Plotkin, Scott R.; Halpin, Chris; Blakeley, Jaishri O.; Slattery, William H.; Welling, D. Bradley; Chang, Susan M.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Harris, Gordon J.; Sorensen, A. Gregory; McKenna, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome characterized by multiple schwannomas, especially vestibular schwannomas (VS), and meningiomas. Anticancer drug trials are now being explored, but there are no standardized endpoints in NF2. We review the challenges of NF2 clinical trials and suggest possible response criteria for use in initial phase II studies. We suggest two main response criteria in such trials. Objective radiographic response is defined as a durable 20% or greater reduction in VS volume based on postcontrast T1-weighted MRI images collected with 3 mm or finer cuts through the internal auditory canal. Hearing response is defined as a statistically significant improvement in word recognition scores using 50-word recorded lists in audiology. A possible composite endpoint incorporating both radiographic response and hearing response is outlined. We emphasize pitfalls in response assessment and suggest guidelines to minimize misinterpretations of response. We also identify research goals in NF2 to facilitate future trial conduct, such as identifying the expectations for time to tumor progression and time to measurable hearing loss in untreated NF2-related VS, and the relation of both endpoints to patient prognostic factors (such as age, baseline tumor volume, and measures of disease severity). These data would facilitate future use of endpoints based on stability of tumor size and hearing, which might be more appropriate for testing certain drugs. We encourage adoption of standardized endpoints early in the development of phase II trials for this population to facilitate comparison of results across trials of different agents. PMID:19430883

  12. The effects of elastic supports on the transient vibroacoustic response of a window caused by sonic booms.

    PubMed

    Ou, Dayi; Mak, Cheuk Ming

    2011-08-01

    The transient vibration and sound radiation (TVSR) of plate-like structures with general elastic boundary conditions was investigated using the time-domain finite element method (TDFEM) and time-domain boundary element method (TDBEM). In this model, the structure can have arbitrary elastic boundary conditions and hence the effects of the boundary conditions on the TVSR can be effectively studied. The predicted results agreed well with existing experimental data using two classical boundary conditions: simply supported at all edges and clamped-free-free-free. The TVSR of a single panel with a more general boundary condition in two connected chambers was also measured. The predicted results agreed well with these experimental results. The prediction method was subsequently applied to evaluate the effects of elastic boundary supports on the TVSR of a window caused by a sonic boom. Loudness, non-audible acoustic perception, and tactile vibration thresholds were analyzed for different boundary conditions (varying between clamped and simply supported). The possibility of improving the transient vibration and noise isolation performance by selecting an appropriate boundary condition was thereby demonstrated. PMID:21877794

  13. Deletion of Nuclear Factor kappa B p50 Subunit Decreases Inflammatory Response and Mildly Protects Neurons from Transient Forebrain Ischemia-induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Rolova, Taisia; Dhungana, Hiramani; Korhonen, Paula; Valonen, Piia; Kolosowska, Natalia; Konttinen, Henna; Kanninen, Katja; Tanila, Heikki; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed death of the hippocampal pyramidal neurons, particularly in the CA2 and medial CA1 area. Early pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory response can ameliorate neuronal death, but it also inhibits processes leading to tissue regeneration. Therefore, research efforts are now directed to modulation of post-ischemic inflammation, with the aim to promote beneficial effects of inflammation and limit adverse effects. Transcription factor NF-κB plays a key role in the inflammation and cell survival/apoptosis pathways. In the brain, NF-κB is predominantly found in the form of a heterodimer of p65 (RelA) and p50 subunit, where p65 has a transactivation domain while p50 is chiefly involved in DNA binding. In this study, we subjected middle-aged Nfkb1 knockout mice (lacking p50 subunit) and wild-type controls of both sexs to 17 min of transient forebrain ischemia and assessed mouse performance in a panel of behavioral tests after two weeks of post-operative recovery. We found that ischemia failed to induce clear memory and motor deficits, but affected spontaneous locomotion in genotype- and sex-specific way. We also show that both the lack of the NF-κB p50 subunit and female sex independently protected CA2 hippocampal neurons from ischemia-induced cell death. Additionally, the NF-κB p50 subunit deficiency significantly reduced ischemia-induced microgliosis, astrogliosis, and neurogenesis. Lower levels of hippocampal microgliosis significantly correlated with faster spatial learning. We conclude that NF-κB regulates the outcome of transient forebrain ischemia in middle-aged subjects in a sex-specific way, having an impact not only on neuronal death but also specific inflammatory responses and neurogenesis. PMID:27493832

  14. Involvement of perivascular nerves and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in vascular responses to histamine in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghua; Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Koyama, Toshihiro; Zamami, Yoshito; Tangsucharit, Panot; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-04-01

    A previous report showed that histamine in denuded mesenteric vascular beds produced a triphasic response; an initial small histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation, a transient histamine H(1) receptor-mediated vasoconstriction, and finally a long-lasting vasodilation. We further investigated the vascular effect of histamine in mesenteric preparations without an endothelium to clarify the possible involvement of perivascular nerves. Male Wistar rat mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium were perfused with Krebs solution containing methoxamine to produce active tone and lafutidine to block histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation. Histamine (1-100μM) was perfused for 1min and perfusion pressure was measured with a pressure transducer. Histamine caused a biphasic vascular response; initial vasoconstriction followed vasodilation. Tetrodotoxin (a neurotoxin, 1μM) and procaine (a local anesthetic, 100μM) significantly inhibited the vasoconstriction and vasodilation. Ruthenium red (a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, 1μM) also significantly inhibited both phases of the response. Pretreatment with capsaicin (a depletor of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves, 5μM) significantly inhibited the vasodilation without affecting the initial vasoconstriction. Both indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, 0.5μM) and seratrodast (a thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonist, 0.1μM) abolished the histamine-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent vasodilation. These results suggest that histamine-induced vasoconstriction and long-lasting vasodilation are mediated by activation of TRPV1 on capsaicin-sensitive and capsaicin-insensitive nerves. They also suggest that perivascular nerves and prostanoids, probably thromboxane A(2), are responsible for the vascular response to histamine.

  15. Attenuation of renal excretory responses to ANG II during inhibition of superoxide dismutase in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Islam, Mohammed Toriqul; Castillo, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    To examine the functional interaction between superoxide dismutase (SOD) and NADPH oxidase activity, we assessed renal responses to acute intra-arterial infusion of ANG II (0.5 ng·kg−1·min−1) before and during administration of a SOD inhibitor, diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC, 0.5 mg·kg−1·min−1), in enalaprilat-pretreated (33 μg·kg−1·min−1) rats (n = 11). Total (RBF) and regional (cortical, CBF; medullary; MBF) renal blood flows were determined by Transonic and laser-Doppler flowmetry, respectively. Renal cortical and medullary tissue NADPH oxidase activity in vitro was determined using the lucigenin-chemiluminescence method. DETC treatment alone resulted in decreases in RBF, CBF, MBF, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine flow (V), and sodium excretion (UNaV) as reported previously. Before DETC, ANG II infusion decreased RBF (−18 ± 3%), CBF (−16 ± 3%), MBF [−5 ± 6%; P = not significant (NS)], GFR (−31 ± 4%), V (−34 ± 2%), and UNaV (−53 ± 3%). During DETC infusion, ANG II also caused similar reductions in RBF (−20 ± 4%), CBF (−19 ± 3%), MBF (−2 ± 2; P = NS), and in GFR (−22 ± 7%), whereas renal excretory responses (V; −12 ± 2%; UNaV; −24 ± 4%) were significantly attenuated compared with those before DETC. In in vitro experiments, ANG II (100 μM) enhanced NADPH oxidase activity both in cortical [13,194 ± 1,651 vs. 20,914 ± 2,769 relative light units (RLU)/mg protein] and in medullary (21,296 ± 2,244 vs. 30,597 ± 4,250 RLU/mg protein) tissue. Application of DETC (1 mM) reduced the basal levels and prevented ANG II-induced increases in NADPH oxidase activity in both tissues. These results demonstrate that renal excretory responses to acute ANG II administration are attenuated during SOD inhibition, which seems related to a downregulation of NADPH oxidase in the deficient condition of SOD activity. PMID:19923406

  16. Blood glucose responses of diabetes mellitus type II patients to some local fruits.

    PubMed

    Guevarra, M T; Panlasigui, L N

    2000-12-01

    To determine the glucose responses of diabetes mellitus type II subjects to fruits, four locally available fruits (containing 25 g of available carbohydrates per serving portion) of chico, mango, pineapple, and papaya were tested among ten type II diabetic subjects, using wheat bread as the control. Results of the in vivo test indicated that chico and mango had significantly lower (P ≤ 0.05) blood glucose areas compared to wheat bread. Chico and mango also had a much lower glycemic index (GI), 57 and 59, respectively, compared to pineapple, 73 and papaya, 86. Differences in glucose responses to fruits and their varying GI are attributed to the amount of fiber, type and amount of sugars found, presence of antinutrients, acidity and physical characteristics of the fruits when chewed. The high fiber content of chico (7.9%), its fructose content (5.3%), its grainy texture when chewed and the presence of antinutrients (saponin, sapotin and achrasaponin) may contribute to its slow digestion and absorption. The low GI and blood glucose response of mango may be because of its fructose content (3.0%), acidity content (malic, citric and tartaric) and its phytic acid content (0.03%). Furthermore, starch, which is a possible factor contributing to low GI, is present in chico (0.8%) and mango (0.3%). Pineapple and papaya, the test fruits that elicited higher blood glucose responses and GI, have much lower fiber contents, less acids and contain glucose and sucrose sugars.

  17. HLA Class-II Associated HIV Polymorphisms Predict Escape from CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Nathan; Du, Victor Y.; Carlson, Jonathan; Schaefer, Malinda; Jureka, Alexander; Sterrett, Sarah; Yue, Ling; Dilernia, Dario; Lakhi, Shabir; Tang, Jianming; Sidney, John; Gilmour, Jill; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Heath, Sonya; Bansal, Anju; Goepfert, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy, antibody and CD8+ T cell-mediated responses targeting human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) exert selection pressure on the virus necessitating escape; however, the ability of CD4+ T cells to exert selective pressure remains unclear. Using a computational approach on HIV gag/pol/nef sequences and HLA-II allelic data, we identified 29 HLA-II associated HIV sequence polymorphisms or adaptations (HLA-AP) in an African cohort of chronically HIV-infected individuals. Epitopes encompassing the predicted adaptation (AE) or its non-adapted (NAE) version were evaluated for immunogenicity. Using a CD8-depleted IFN-γ ELISpot assay, we determined that the magnitude of CD4+ T cell responses to the predicted epitopes in controllers was higher compared to non-controllers (p<0.0001). However, regardless of the group, the magnitude of responses to AE was lower as compared to NAE (p<0.0001). CD4+ T cell responses in patients with acute HIV infection (AHI) demonstrated poor immunogenicity towards AE as compared to NAE encoded by their transmitted founder virus. Longitudinal data in AHI off antiretroviral therapy demonstrated sequence changes that were biologically confirmed to represent CD4+ escape mutations. These data demonstrate an innovative application of HLA-associated polymorphisms to identify biologically relevant CD4+ epitopes and suggests CD4+ T cells are active participants in driving HIV evolution. PMID:26302050

  18. Transient temperature responses of hydronic radiant floor heating system by different pipe embedding depth and water supply condition.

    PubMed

    Chung, K S; Sohn, J Y; Baik, Y K; Kang, J S

    1993-07-01

    "Ondol" is a Korean unique heating system. It is a specific radiant floor heating system using combustion heat of briquette or timber in Korea. Such traditional "Ondol" is changed to radiant heating system with pipe-coil embedded in the floor or slab. This study has contributed to the understandings of the transient behaviours of Ondol-heated floor panels and enclosure exposed to this type of heating system. The result is that the water supply temperature had a large effect on the rate of increase in floor surface and room air temperature. But, in spite of a higher water supply temperature, the heat flow rate was not increased considerably. The shallow pipe embedding depths, of course, result in a low heat flow rate. PMID:8373479

  19. Transient temperature responses of hydronic radiant floor heating system by different pipe embedding depth and water supply condition.

    PubMed

    Chung, K S; Sohn, J Y; Baik, Y K; Kang, J S

    1993-07-01

    "Ondol" is a Korean unique heating system. It is a specific radiant floor heating system using combustion heat of briquette or timber in Korea. Such traditional "Ondol" is changed to radiant heating system with pipe-coil embedded in the floor or slab. This study has contributed to the understandings of the transient behaviours of Ondol-heated floor panels and enclosure exposed to this type of heating system. The result is that the water supply temperature had a large effect on the rate of increase in floor surface and room air temperature. But, in spite of a higher water supply temperature, the heat flow rate was not increased considerably. The shallow pipe embedding depths, of course, result in a low heat flow rate.

  20. Transients from initial conditions based on Lagrangian perturbation theory in N-body simulations II: the effect of the transverse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatekawa, Takayuki

    2014-04-01

    We study the initial conditions for cosmological N-body simulations for precision cosmology. In general, Zel'dovich approximation has been applied for the initial conditions of N-body simulations for a long time. These initial conditions provide incorrect higher-order growth. These error caused by setting up the initial conditions by perturbation theory is called transients. We investigated the impact of transient on non-Gaussianity of density field by performing cosmological N-body simulations with initial conditions based on first-, second-, and third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory in previous paper. In this paper, we evaluates the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory for several statistical quantities such as power spectrum and non-Gaussianty. Then we clarified that the effect of the transverse mode in the third-order Lagrangian perturbation theory is quite small.

  1. Inactivation of the EP3 receptor attenuates the Angiotensin II pressor response via decreasing arterial contractility

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihong; Miao, Yifei; Zhang, Yahua; Dou, Dou; Liu, Limei; Tian, Xiaoyu; Yang, Guangrui; Pu, Dan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jihong; Gao, Yuansheng; Wang, Shiqiang; Breyer, Matthew D.; Wang, Nanping; Zhu, Yi; Huang, Yu; Breyer, Richard M; Guan, Youfei

    2012-01-01

    Objective The present studies aimed at elucidating the role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor subtype 3 (EP3) in regulating blood pressure. Methods and Results Mice bearing a genetic disruption of the EP3 gene (EP3−/−) exhibited reduced baseline mean arterial pressure monitored by both tail-cuff and carotid arterial catheterization. The pressor responses induced by EP3 agonists M&B28767 and sulprostone were markedly attenuated in EP3−/− mice, while the reduction of BP induced by PGE2 was comparable in both genotypes. Vasopressor effect of acute or chronic infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) was attenuated in EP3−/− mice. AngII–induced vasoconstriction in mesenteric arteries decreased in EP3−/− group. In mesenteric arteries from wild type mice, AngII–induced vasoconstriction was inhibited by EP3 selective antagonist DG-041 or L798106. The expression of Arhgef-1 is attenuated in EP3 deficient mesenteric arteries. EP3 antagonist DG-041 diminished AngII-induced phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 in isolated mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), AngII induced intracellular Ca2+ increase was potentiated by EP3 agonist sulprostone, while inhibited by DG-041. Conclusions Activation of the EP3 receptor raises baseline blood pressure and contributes to AngII-dependent hypertension at least partially via enhancing Ca2+ sensitivity and intracellular calcium concentration in VSMCs. Selective targeting of the EP3 receptor may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:23065824

  2. Role of transiently altered sarcolemmal membrane permeability and basic fibroblast growth factor release in the hypertrophic response of adult rat ventricular myocytes to increased mechanical activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, D; Pimental, D; Prasad, S; Mäki, T; Berger, H J; McNeil, P L; Smith, T W; Kelly, R A

    1996-01-01

    One of the trophic factors that has been implicated in initiating or facilitating growth in response to increased mechanical stress in several tissues and cell types is basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; FGF-2). Although mammalian cardiac muscle cells express bFGF, it is not known whether it plays a role in mediating cardiac adaptation to increased load, nor how release of the cytosolic 18-kD isoform of bFGF would be regulated in response to increased mechanical stress. To test the hypothesis that increased mechanical activity induces transient alterations in sarcolemmal permeability that allow cytosolic bFGF to be released and subsequently to act as an autocrine and paracrine growth stimulus, we examined primary isolates of adult rat ventricular myocytes maintained in serum-free, defined medium that were continually paced at 3 Hz for up to 5 d. Paced myocytes, but not nonpaced control cells, exhibited a "hypertrophic" response, which was characterized by increases in the rate of phenylalanine incorporation, total cellular protein content, and cell size. These changes could be mimicked in control cells by exogenous recombinant bFGF and could be blocked in continually paced cells by a specific neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. In addition, medium conditioned by continually paced myocytes contained significantly more bFGF measured by ELISA and more mitogenic activity for 3T3 cells, activity that could be reduced by a neutralizing anti-bFGF antibody. The hypothesis that transient membrane disruptions sufficient to allow release of cytosolic bFGF occur in paced myocytes was examined by monitoring the rate of uptake into myocytes from the medium of 10-kD dextran linked to fluorescein. Paced myocytes exhibited a significantly higher rate of fluoresceinlabeled dextran uptake. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that nonlethal, transient alterations in sarcolemmal membrane permeability with release of cytosolic bFGF is one mechanism by which increased

  3. Transcriptional and functional studies of a Cd(II)/Pb(II)-responsive transcriptional regulator(CmtR) from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunli; Li, Yanjun; Nie, Li; Qian, Lin; Cai, Lu; Liu, Jianshe

    2012-08-01

    The acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can resist exceptionally high cadmium (Cd) concentrations. This property is important for its use in biomining processes, where Cd and other metal levels range usually between 15 and 100 mM. To learn about the mechanisms that allow A. ferrooxidans cells to survive in this environment, a bioinformatic search of its genome showed the presence of that a Cd(II)/Pb(II)-responsive transcriptional regulator (CmtR) was possibly related to Cd homeostasis. The expression of the CmtR was studied by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR using A. ferrooxidans cells adapted for growth in the presence of high concentrations of Cd. The putative A. ferrooxidans Cd resistance determinant was found to be upregulated when this bacterium was exposed to Cd in the range of 15-30 mM. The CmtR from A. ferrooxidans was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, the soluble protein was purified by one-step affinity chromatography to apparent homogeneity. UV-Vis spectroscopic measurements showed that the reconstruction CmtR was able to bind Cd(II) forming Cd(II)-CmtR complex in vitro. The sequence alignment and molecular modeling showed that the crucial residues for CmtR binding were likely to be Cys77, Cys112, and Cys121. The results reported here strongly suggest that the high resistance of the extremophilic A. ferrooxidans to Cd including the Cd(II)/Pb(II)-responsive transcriptional regulator. PMID:22555344

  4. Transient thermoelectric supercooling: Isosceles current pulses from a response surface perspective and the performance effects of pulse cooling a heat generating mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piggott, Alfred J., III

    With increased public interest in protecting the environment, scientists and engineers aim to improve energy conversion efficiency. Thermoelectrics offer many advantages as thermal management technology. When compared to vapor compression refrigeration, above approximately 200 to 600 watts, cost in dollars per watt as well as COP are not advantageous for thermoelectrics. The goal of this work was to determine if optimized pulse supercooling operation could improve cooling capacity or efficiency of a thermoelectric device. The basis of this research is a thermal-electrical analogy based modeling study using SPICE. Two models were developed. The first model, a standalone thermocouple with no attached mass to be cooled. The second, a system that includes a module attached to a heat generating mass. With the thermocouple study, a new approach of generating response surfaces with characteristic parameters was applied. The current pulse height and pulse on-time was identified for maximizing Net Transient Advantage, a newly defined metric. The corresponding pulse height and pulse on-time was utilized for the system model. Along with the traditional steady state starting current of Imax, Iopt was employed. The pulse shape was an isosceles triangle. For the system model, metrics new to pulse cooling were Qc, power consumption and COP. The effects of optimized current pulses were studied by changing system variables. Further studies explored time spacing between pulses and temperature distribution in the thermoelement. It was found net Q c over an entire pulse event can be improved over Imax steady operation but not over steady I opt operation. Qc can be improved over Iopt operation but only during the early part of the pulse event. COP is reduced in transient pulse operation due to the different time constants of Qc and Pin. In some cases lower performance interface materials allow more Qc and better COP during transient operation than higher performance interface materials

  5. Transient MPK6 activation in response to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation is mediated by mitochondria and aids seedling survival in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ruth; Jang, Charles J H; Branco-Price, Cristina; Nghiem, Peter; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MPKs) are regulated by diverse stresses with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) component. Here, we report the rapid and transient activation of MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 upon oxygen deprivation as well as reoxygenation in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. MPK activation peaked within 2 h of oxygen deprivation and again at a higher magnitude within 5 min of reoxygenation. MPK6 was the predominant kinase regulated by oxygen availability in both aerial and root tissue, except in mpk6 mutants, which displayed compensatory activation of MPK3. A universal consequence of oxygen deprivation in eukaryotes is inhibition of the terminal step of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC). We demonstrate that treatment of seedlings with the mETC inhibitors antimycin A and potassium cyanide under normoxia promotes transient MPK6 and MPK3 activation. Confocal imaging of seedlings provided evidence that both oxygen deprivation and mETC inhibitors stimulate mitochondria-associated ROS production. We found that seedling survival of prolonged oxygen deprivation was improved in transgenics that ectopically overexpress MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6, but the induction of mRNAs associated with low oxygen acclimation responses were not markedly altered in MPK6 overexpression lines or mpk6 loss-of-function mutants. However, distinctions in MPK6 activation potential were correlated with other differences in mRNAs accumulation. Our findings suggest that oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation trigger mitochondrial ROS production to activate MPK signaling, which in turn regulate reversible processes that aid survival of transient oxygen deprivation. PMID:22086331

  6. Laughter as a social rejection cue: gelotophobia and transient cardiac responses to other persons' laughter and insult.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Aydin, Nilüfer; Lackner, Helmut K; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Bühner, Markus; Schulter, Günter; Charlesworth, Canice; Freudenthaler, H Harald

    2014-11-01

    Other persons' laughter, normally perceived as a signal that persons are friendly and inviting others to approach, can also be perceived as a cue of social rejection. In this study, prerecorded laughter was placed in a realistic and personally relevant context, and participants' responses were related to gelotophobia, a trait predisposing to perceiving laughter as a cue of social rejection. Individuals with gelotophobia showed marked heart rate deceleration in response to the laughter stimulus, possibly indicating a "freezing-like" response. Moreover, cardiac responses to anger provocation by overtly insulting statements indicated heightened aggressive anger in response to cumulated social threat. The study adds to recent research showing specific cardiac responses to social rejection and to the literature on social rejection sensitivity by demonstrating the value of using well interpretable physiological measures in this research context.

  7. Aquifer response to stream-stage and recharge variations. II. Convolution method and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.M.; DeSimone, L.A.; Moench, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    In this second of two papers, analytical step-response functions, developed in the companion paper for several cases of transient hydraulic interaction between a fully penetrating stream and a confined, leaky, or water-table aquifer, are used in the convolution integral to calculate aquifer heads, streambank seepage rates, and bank storage that occur in response to streamstage fluctuations and basinwide recharge or evapotranspiration. Two computer programs developed on the basis of these step-response functions and the convolution integral are applied to the analysis of hydraulic interaction of two alluvial stream-aquifer systems in the northeastern and central United States. These applications demonstrate the utility of the analytical functions and computer programs for estimating aquifer and streambank hydraulic properties, recharge rates, streambank seepage rates, and bank storage. Analysis of the water-table aquifer adjacent to the Blackstone River in Massachusetts suggests that the very shallow depth of water table and associated thin unsaturated zone at the site cause the aquifer to behave like a confined aquifer (negligible specific yield). This finding is consistent with previous studies that have shown that the effective specific yield of an unconfined aquifer approaches zero when the capillary fringe, where sediment pores are saturated by tension, extends to land surface. Under this condition, the aquifer's response is determined by elastic storage only. Estimates of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, specific storage, and recharge for a water-table aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River in eastern Iowa, determined by the use of analytical methods, are in close agreement with those estimated by use of a more complex, multilayer numerical model of the aquifer. Streambank leakance of the semipervious streambank materials also was estimated for the site. The streambank-leakance parameter may be considered to be a general (or lumped

  8. Visual BOLD Response in Late Blind Subjects with Argus II Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, E.; Cicchini, G. M.; Cinelli, L.; Rizzo, S.; Morrone, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal prosthesis technologies require that the visual system downstream of the retinal circuitry be capable of transmitting and elaborating visual signals. We studied the capability of plastic remodeling in late blind subjects implanted with the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis with psychophysics and functional MRI (fMRI). After surgery, six out of seven retinitis pigmentosa (RP) blind subjects were able to detect high-contrast stimuli using the prosthetic implant. However, direction discrimination to contrast modulated stimuli remained at chance level in all of them. No subject showed any improvement of contrast sensitivity in either eye when not using the Argus II. Before the implant, the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activity in V1 and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) was very weak or absent. Surprisingly, after prolonged use of Argus II, BOLD responses to visual input were enhanced. This is, to our knowledge, the first study tracking the neural changes of visual areas in patients after retinal implant, revealing a capacity to respond to restored visual input even after years of deprivation. PMID:27780207

  9. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  10. Temperature-Centric Evaluation of Sensor Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayhan, Tuba; Muezzinoglu, Kerem; Vergara, Alexander; Yalcin, Mustak

    2011-09-01

    Controllable sensing conditions provide the means for diversifying sensor response and achieving better selectivity. Modulating the sensing layer temperature of metal-oxide sensors is a popular method for multiplexing the limited number of sensing elements that can be employed in a practical array. Time limitations in many applications, however, cannot tolerate an ad-hoc, one-size-fits-all modulation pattern. When the response pattern is itself non-stationary, as in the transient phase, a temperature program also becomes infeasible. We consider the problem of determining and tuning into a fixed optimum temperature in a sensor array. For this purpose, we present an empirical analysis of the temperature's role on the performance of a metal-oxide gas sensor array in the identification of odorants along the response transient. We show that the optimal temperature in this sense depends heavily on the selection of (i) the set of candidate analytes, (ii) the time-window of the analysis, (iii) the feature extracted from the sensor response, and (iv) the computational identification method used.

  11. The Mysterious Transient ROTSE3 J115649.1+542726 is an Extremely Luminous Type II SN at z = 0.21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chornock, R.; Miller, A. A.; Perley, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.

    2008-08-01

    We report on further spectroscopic observations of the transient ROTSE3 J115649.1+542726 discovered by Yuan et al. (ATEL #1515) and followed up by several groups (ATEL #1524, ATEL #1576, ATEL #1578, and ATEL #1593). We observed the object for 840 s using the Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS; Oke et al. 1995) on the Keck I 10-m telescope on 2008 Aug 3.25 UT. Our initial observations of this object (ATEL #1576) showed a blue and largely featureless spectrum, but at later epochs several unidentified weak spectral features appeared (ATEL #1576 and ATEL #1593).

  12. Stimulus-response coupling in monocytes infected with Leishmania. Attenuation of calcium transients is related to defective agonist-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Olivier, M; Baimbridge, K G; Reiner, N E

    1992-02-15

    Mononuclear phagocytes infected with Leishmania have been shown to have defective responses to extracellular stimuli. To investigate the potential relationship of these findings to alterations in calcium-dependent signaling pathways, the regulation of [Ca2+]i concentrations was examined in human peripheral blood monocytes infected with amastigotes of Leishmania donovani. Measurements of [Ca2+]i in fura-2-loaded monocytes were made at the single cell level by microfluorimetry. In normal monocytes, resting [Ca2+]i was 56 +/- 2 nM (mean +/- SEM). In contrast, in monocytes infected with Leishmania there was an approximately twofold increase in basal [Ca2+]i (122 +/- 5 nM, p less than 0.01 vs control). Treatment of cells with pertussis toxin before infection did not abrogate infection-induced increases in basal [Ca2+]i, suggesting that this effect was not mediated via the activation of a G protein coupled to phospholipase C. However, elevated resting [Ca2+]i did correlate with increased rates of 45Ca2+ uptake by infected monocytes. As expected, in response to treatment with 10(-7) M FMLP, control monocytes showed rapid net increases in [Ca2+]i of 303 +/- 19 nM. In contrast, net transients of [Ca2+]i in infected monocytes in response to FMLP were attenuated to only 137 +/- 9 nM (p less than 0.01 vs control). This result was not related to excess buffering of [Ca2+]i in infected cells as both control and infected monocytes showed equivalent transients of [Ca2+]i in response to the calcium ionophore A23187. Rather, inhibition of agonist-induced calcium release in infected cells appeared related to defective generation of second messenger because compared to control cells labeled with myo-[2-3H]inositol, little accumulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate was detected in infected monocytes. Attenuation of inositol phosphate accumulation and calcium release in response to chemotactic peptide correlated with decreased FMLP-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production

  13. MHC class II transcription is associated with inflammatory responses in a wild marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Montano-Frías, Jorge E; Vera-Massieu, Camila; Álvarez-Martínez, Roberto; Flores-Morán, Adriana; Acevedo-Whitehouse, Karina

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation is one of the most important non-specific and rapid responses that a vertebrate can elicit in response to damage or a foreign insult. To date, despite increasing evidence that the innate and adaptive branches of immunity are more intricately related than previously thought, few have examined interactions between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC, a polymorphic region of the vertebrate genome that is involved with antigen presentation) and inflammation, and even less is known about these interactions in an eco-immunological context. Here, we examined the effect of MHC class II DRB gene multiplicity and transcription on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced inflammation during the early stages of development of California sea lions. Neither constitutive nor expressed ZacaDRB diversity was found to be associated with pup responses to PHA at any of the stages of pup development. However, for two-month-old pups, those with a specific MHC-DRB locus (ZacaDRB-A) tended to have less efficient responsive inflammation. Transcription of distinct MHC-DRB loci was also linked to PHA-induced inflammation, with patterns that varied markedly between ages, and that suggested that ongoing infectious processes could limit the capacity to respond to a secondary challenge. Life history constraints and physiological processes associated with development of California sea lions, in conjunction with their changing pathogenic environment could explain the observed effects of MHC class II transcription on PHA-induced inflammation. To our knowledge, ours is the first study to examine the importance of expressed vs. constitutive MHC loci on inflammation in a natural population. PMID:27137083

  14. Investigation of charge weight and shock factor effect on non-linear transient structural response of rectangular plates subjected to underwater explosion (UNDEX) shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Ozgur; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Yilmaz, Tamer

    2012-09-01

    Underwater explosion induced shock loads are capable of causing considerable structural damage. Investigations of the underwater explosion (UNDEX) effects on structures have seen continuous developments because of security risks. Most of the earlier experimental investigations were performed by military since the World War I. Subsequently; Cole [1] established mathematical relations for modeling underwater explosion shock loading, which were the outcome of many experimental investigations This study predicts and establishes the transient responses of a panel structure to underwater explosion shock loads using non-linear finite element code Ls-Dyna. Accordingly, in this study a new MATLAB code has been developed for predicting shock loading profile for different weight of explosive and different shock factors. Numerical analysis was performed for various test conditions and results are compared with Ramajeyathilagam's experimental study [8].

  15. Dilated cardiomyopathy and impaired cardiac hypertrophic response to angiotensin II in mice lacking FGF-2

    PubMed Central

    Pellieux, Corinne; Foletti, Alessandro; Peduto, Giovanni; Aubert, Jean-François; Nussberger, Jürg; Beermann, Friedrich; Brunner, Hans-R.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    FGF-2 has been implicated in the cardiac response to hypertrophic stimuli. Angiotensin II (Ang II) contributes to maintain elevated blood pressure in hypertensive individuals and exerts direct trophic effects on cardiac cells. However, the role of FGF-2 in Ang II–induced cardiac hypertrophy has not been established. Therefore, mice deficient in FGF-2 expression were studied using a model of Ang II–dependent hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic measurements show the presence of dilated cardiomyopathy in normotensive mice lacking FGF-2. Moreover, hypertensive mice without FGF-2 developed no compensatory cardiac hypertrophy. In wild-type mice, hypertrophy was associated with a stimulation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase, the extracellular signal regulated kinase, and the p38 kinase pathways. In contrast, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation was markedly attenuated in FGF-2–deficient mice. In vitro, FGF-2 of fibroblast origin was demonstrated to be essential in the paracrine stimulation of MAPK activation in cardiomyocytes. Indeed, fibroblasts lacking FGF-2 expression have a defective capacity for releasing growth factors to induce hypertrophic responses in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, these results identify the cardiac fibroblast population as a primary integrator of hypertrophic stimuli in the heart, and suggest that FGF-2 is a crucial mediator of cardiac hypertrophy via autocrine/paracrine actions on cardiac cells. PMID:11748268

  16. Differential analysis of transient increases of serum cTnI in response to handling in rats.

    PubMed

    Mikaelian, Igor; Dunn, Michael E; Mould, Diane R; Hirkaler, Gerard; Geng, Wanping; Coluccio, Denise; Nicklaus, Rosemary; Singer, Thomas; Reddy, Micaela

    2013-12-01

    Serum cardiac troponins are the key biomarkers of myocardial necrosis in humans and in preclinical species. The use of ultrasensitive assays for serum cardiac troponin I (cTnI) as a biomarker in safety studies is hampered by interindividual differences. In this study, we investigated the effect of handling procedures on serum cTnI and explored modeling and simulation approaches to mitigate the impact of these interindividual differences. Femoral-catheterized male Crl:WI(Han) rats (n = 16/group) were left undisturbed in their cages with no handling; subjected to 5 min of isoflurane/O2 anesthesia (A); or placed into a rodent restrainer followed by simulated tail vein injection (RR). Serum cTnI concentrations were assessed over a 24-h period using an ultrasensitive assay, and the study was repeated for confirmation. The mean serum cTnI concentration pre-procedure was 4.2 pg/mL, and remained stable throughout the duration of the study in the rats submitted to the A procedure. Serum cTnI concentrations increased transiently after the RR procedure with a median time to maximum concentration (T max), of 1 and 2 h and a mean maximum value concentration (C max), of 53.0 and 7.2 pg/mL in the initial and repeat studies, respectively. A population pharmacodynamic model identified interindividual, procedure- and study-specific effects on serum cTnI concentrations in rats. It is concluded that a modeling and simulation approach more appropriately describes and statistically analyzes the data obtained with this ultrasensitive assays.

  17. Pressure changes within the sac of human cerebral aneurysms in response to artificially induced transient increases in systemic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hasan, David M; Hindman, Bradley J; Todd, Michael M

    2015-08-01

    Formation and rupture of cerebral aneurysms have been associated with chronic hypertension. The effect of transient increase in blood pressure and its effect on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics have not been studied. We examined the effects of controlled increases in blood pressure on different pressure parameters inside the sac of human cerebral aneurysms and corresponding parent arteries using invasive technology. Twelve patients (10 female, 2 male, age 54±15 years) with unruptured cerebral aneurysms undergoing endovascular coiling were recruited. Dual-sensor microwires with the capacity to simultaneously measure flow velocity and pressure were used to measure systolic, diastolic, and mean pressure inside the aneurysm sac and to measure both pressures and flow velocities in the feeder vessel just outside the aneurysm. These pressures were recorded simultaneously with pressures from a radial arterial catheter. Measurements were taken at baseline and then during a gradual increase in systemic systolic blood pressure to a target value of ≈25 mm Hg above baseline, using a phenylephrine infusion. The dose needed to achieve the required increase in radial arterial systolic blood pressure was 0.8±0.2 μg/kg/min. There was a clear linear relationship between changes in radial and aneurysmal pressures with substantial patient-by-patient variation in the slopes of those relationships. The overall increases in systolic and mean pressures in both radial artery and in the aneurysms were similar. Pressures in the aneurysm and in the parent vessels were similar. Peak and mean flow velocities in the parent arteries did not change significantly with phenylephrine infusion, nor did vessel diameters as measured angiographically.

  18. Transient transfection of purified Babesia bovis merozoites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient transfection of intraerythrocytic Babesia bovis parasites has been previously reported. In this study, we describe the development and optimization of methods for transfection of purified B. bovis merozoites using either nucleofection (Amaxa) or conventional electroporation (Gene Pulser II...

  19. NRF2 and the Phase II Response in Acute Stress Resistance Induced by Dietary Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Christopher M.; Mitchell, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) as a means to increase longevity is well-established in a number of model organisms from yeast to primates. DR also improves metabolic fitness and increases resistance to acute oxidative, carcinogenic and toxicological stressors - benefits with more immediate potential for clinical translation than increased lifespan. While the detailed mechanism of DR action remains unclear, a conceptual framework involving an adaptive, or hormetic response to the stress of nutrient/energy deprivation has been proposed. A key prediction of the hormesis hypothesis of DR is that beneficial adaptations occur in response to an increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS). These ROS may be derived either from increased mitochondrial respiration or increased xenobiotic metabolism in the case of some DR mimetics. This review will focus on the potential role of the redox-sensing transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and its control of the evolutionarily conserved antioxidant/redox cycling and detoxification systems, collectively known as the Phase II response, in the adaptive response to DR. PMID:23505614

  20. Dynamic reorganization of photosystem II supercomplexes in response to variations in light intensities.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Pascal; Manfredi, Marcello; Meneghesso, Andrea; Marengo, Emilio; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James; Morosinotto, Tomas; Pagliano, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Plants are sessile organisms and need to acclimate to ever-changing light conditions in order to survive. These changes trigger a dynamic reorganization of the membrane protein complexes in the thylakoid membranes. Photosystem II (PSII) and its light harvesting system (LHCII) are the major target of this acclimation response, and accumulating evidences indicate that the amount and composition of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in thylakoids are dynamically adjusted in response to changes in light intensity and quality. In this study, we characterized the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes of pea plants in response to long-term acclimation to different light intensities. We provide evidence of a reorganization of the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes showing distinct changes in their antenna moiety. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed a specific reduction of Lhcb3, Lhcb6 and M-LHCII trimers bound to the PSII cores, while the Lhcb4.3 isoform increased in response to high light intensities. The modulation of Lhcb protein content correlates with the reduction of the functional PSII antenna size. These results suggest that the Lhcb3, Lhcb4.3 and Lhcb6 antenna subunits are major players in modulation of the PSII antenna size upon long-term acclimation to increased light levels. PsbS was not detected in the isolated PSII-LHCII supercomplexes at any light condition, despite an increased accumulation in thylakoids of high light acclimated plants, suggesting that PsbS is not a constitutive component of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes.

  1. Nature and specificity of the immune response to collagen in type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J M; Townes, A S; Kang, A H

    1982-01-01

    To determine the role of collagen-immunity in the development of collagen-induced arthritis, DBA/1 mice were immunized with type II collagen and observed for the development of polyarthritis. 96% of the mice immunized with native type II collagen developed inflammatory arthritis between 4 and 5 wk after primary immunization. Immunization with denatured type II collagen in exactly the same manner was not effective in inducing arthritis. Cell-mediated immunity in arthritic mice was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine incorporation by mononuclear cells cultured in the presence of collagen. The maximal proliferative response to collagen occurred at 2 wk after immunization. Equally good incorporation of label occurred when cells were cultured with native or denatured type II collagen or type I collagen. The cellular response of nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen was indistinguishable from that seen in arthritic mice. Humoral immunity was assessed by an ELISA assay for antibodies to collagen. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) response peaked at 2 wk and the IgG response at 5 wk after immunization. Antisera from arthritic mice immunized with native type II collagen were relatively specific for conformational determinants on the native type II molecule although some reactivity with denatured collagen was noted. Antisera from nonarthritic mice immunized with denatured collagen primarily recognized covalent structural determinants. It was concluded that native type II collagen was essential for the induction of arthritis and that an antibody response specific for native type II collagen may be important for the development of arthritis. Images PMID:6174550

  2. The transcriptomic response to thermal stress is immediate, transient and potentiated by ultraviolet radiation in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Moya, A; Ganot, P; Furla, P; Sabourault, C

    2012-03-01

    Among the environmental threats to coral reef health, temperature and ultraviolet increases have been proposed as major agents, although the relative contribution of each in the cnidarian/zooxanthellae symbiosis breakdown has been poorly addressed. We have investigated the transcriptomic response to thermal stress, with and without ultraviolet radiation (UVR), in the symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Using the Oligo2K A. viridis microarray, dedicated to genes potentially involved in the symbiosis interaction, we monitored the gene expression profiles after 1, 2 and 5 days of stresses that further lead to massive losses of zooxanthellae. Each stress showed a specific gene expression profile with very little overlap. We showed that the major response to thermal stress is immediate (24 h) but returns to the baseline gene expression profile after 2 days. UVR alone has little effect but potentiates thermal stress, as a second response at 5 days was observed when the two stresses were coupled. Several pathways were highlighted, such as mesoglea loosening, cell death and calcium homeostasis and described in more details. Finally, we showed that the dermatopontin gene family, potentially involved in collagen fibrillogenesis, issued from actinarian-specific duplication events, with one member preferentially expressed in the gastroderm and specifically responding to stress. Anemonia viridis EST sequences have been deposited into GenBank dbEST ([GenBank:FK719875–FK759813]. PMID:22288383

  3. Response of hydrothermal system to stress transients at Lassen Volcanic Center, California, inferred from seismic interferometry with ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Brenguier, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Time-lapse monitoring of seismic velocity at volcanic areas can provide unique insight into the property of hydrothermal and magmatic fluids and their temporal variability. We established a quasi real-time velocity monitoring system by using seismic interferometry with ambient noise to explore the temporal evolution of velocity in the Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California. Our monitoring system finds temporal variability of seismic velocity in response to stress changes imparted by an earthquake and by seasonal environmental changes. Dynamic stress changes from a magnitude 5.7 local earthquake induced a 0.1 % velocity reduction at a depth of about 1 km. The seismic velocity susceptibility defined as ratio of seismic velocity change to dynamic stress change is estimated to be about 0.006 MPa-1, which suggests the Lassen hydrothermal system is marked by high-pressurized hydrothermal fluid. By combining geodetic measurements, our observation shows that the long-term seismic velocity fluctuation closely tracks snow-induced vertical deformation without time delay, which is most consistent with an hydrological load model (either elastic or poroelastic response) in which surface loading drives hydrothermal fluid diffusion that leads to an increase of opening of cracks and subsequently reductions of seismic velocity. We infer that heated-hydrothermal fluid in a vapor-dominated zone at a depth of 2-4 km range is responsible for the long-term variation in seismic velocity[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Differential responses of photosystems I and II to seasonal drought in two Ficus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shubin; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jiaolin; Cao, Kunfang

    2016-05-01

    Hemiepiphytic Ficus species exhibit more conservative water use strategy and are more drought-tolerant compared with their non-hemiepiphytic congeners, but a difference in the response of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) to drought stress has not been documented to date. The enhancement of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and cyclic electron flow (CEF) have been identified as important mechanisms that protect the photosystems under drought conditions. Using the hemiepiphytic Ficus tinctoria and the non-hemiepiphytic Ficus racemosa, we studied the water status and the electron fluxes through PSI and PSII under seasonal water stress. Our results clearly indicated that the decline in the leaf predawn water potential (ψpd), the maximum photosynthetic rate (Amax) and the predawn maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) were more pronounced in F. racemosa than in F. tinctoria at peak drought. The Fv/Fm of F. racemosa was reduced to 0.69, indicating net photoinhibition of PSII. Concomitantly, the maximal photo-oxidizable P700 (Pm) decreased significantly in F. racemosa but remained stable in F. tinctoria. The fraction of non-photochemical quenching [Y(NPQ)] and the ratio of effective quantum yield of PSI to PSII [Y(I)/Y(II)] increased for both Ficus species at peak drought, with a stronger increase in F. racemosa. These results indicated that the enhancement of NPQ and the activation of CEF contributed to the photoprotection of PSI and PSII for both Ficus species under seasonal drought, particularly for F. racemosa.

  5. An Intersubjective View of Empathy and Hypnotic Trance: Response to Wickramasekera II.

    PubMed

    Henning, Janna A

    2016-01-01

    In response to Wickramasekera II's description of his empathic involvement theory of hypnosis in "Mysteries of hypnosis and the self are revealed by the psychology and neuroscience of empathy" (Wickramasekera II, 2015), Henning offers further reflections on what empathy might be and what it allows therapists to do, particularly in conditions of hypnotic trance. She defines her intersubjective view of hypnotic trance as an experience in which client and therapist mutually engage in a shared state of consciousness, and a mutual bidirectional or multidirectional exchange of verbal and nonverbal, as well as conscious and unconscious, material occurs, and which may include shared taking on of roles and expectations in each party, as suggested by the other, particularly when both client and therapist are highly hypnotizable. Research on the concept of "mutual hypnosis," or co-trance, is reviewed, and barriers to scholarly discussions about intersubjectivity in therapy relationships are described. Concepts from other disciplines and traditions, including quantum physics, transpersonal psychology, contemplative Christianity, and shamanistic practices and trance in other cultures are then offered to clarify the processes of intersubjectivity, and perspectives about empathy and hypnotic co-trance are offered from the context of the author's own clinical work as a trauma therapist. Finally, suggestions are provided for future research approaches and methods to further explore and understand these phenomena.

  6. Characteristics and control response of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-time Dynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1993-11-12

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulations of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and casualty conditions.

  7. Platinum(II) Metallomesogens: New External-Stimuli-Responsive Photoluminescence Materials.

    PubMed

    Cuerva, Cristián; Campo, José A; Cano, Mercedes; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2016-07-11

    New dicatenar isoquinoline-functionalized pyrazoles, [Hpz(R(n,n)iq) ] (R(n,n)=C6 H3 (OCn H2n+1 )2 ; n=4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18), have been strategically designed and synthesized to induce mesomorphic and luminescence properties into the corresponding bis(isoquinolinylpyrazolate)platinum(II) complexes [Pt(pz(R(n,n)iq) )2 ]. Thermal studies reveal that all platinum(II) compounds exhibit columnar mesophases over an exceptionally wide temperature range, above 300 °C in most cases. The photophysical behavior was also investigated in solution and in the solid state. As a consequence of the formation of Pt⋅⋅⋅Pt interactions, the weak greenish emission of the platinum derivatives turns bright orange in the mesophase. Additionally, the complexes are sensitive to a great variety of external inputs, such as temperature, mechanical grinding, pressure, solvents, and vapors. On this basis, they are used as dopant agents of a polyvinylpyrrolidone or poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer matrix to achieve stimuli-responsive thin films. PMID:27273696

  8. Transient upsets in microprocessor controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. E.; Masson, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The modeling and analysis of transient faults in microprocessor based controllers are discussed. Such controllers typically consist of a microprocessor, read only memory storing and application program, random access memory for data storage, and input/output devices for external communications. The effects of transient faults on the performance of the controller are reviewed. An instruction level perspective of performance is taken which is the basis of a useful high level program state description of the microprocessor controller. A transition matrix is defined which determines the controller's response to transient fault arrivals.

  9. Simplified methods for interpreting the effect of transfer-function zeros on the transient response of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onken, R.

    1972-01-01

    Two simple methods are outlined for evaluating the effect of transfer-function zeros on the system time response. The pole effects can also be evaluated. These methods are useful for simplified analysis or creating design criteria in terms of desirable regions of pole-zero locations. The type of transfer function studied is limited to those linear systems. Corresponding to ordinary longitudinal or lateral aircraft transfer functions, the denominator polynomial is of fourth order and the numerator of third order at most. With the longitudinal motion of the aircraft as an example, the methods are used in the evaluation of optimal regulator control with respect to a particular performance index structure.

  10. Feasibility demonstration of a variable frequency driver-microwave transient regression rate measurement system. [for solid propellant combustion response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Mcnamara, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of a system capable of rapidly and directly measuring the low-frequency (motor characteristics length bulk mode) combustion response characteristics of solid propellants has been investigated. The system consists of a variable frequency oscillatory driver device coupled with an improved version of the JPL microwave propellant regression rate measurement system. The ratio of the normalized regression rate and pressure amplitudes and their relative phase are measured as a function of varying pressure level and frequency. Test results with a well-characterized PBAN-AP propellant formulation were found to compare favorably with the results of more conventional stability measurement techniques.

  11. Shallow landslide stability computation using a distributed transient response model for susceptibility assessment and validation. A case study from Ribeira Quente valley (S. Miguel island, Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, P.; Marques, R.; Zêzere, J. L.; Marques, F.; Queiroz, G.

    2009-04-01

    In the last 15 years, several heavy rainstorms have occurred in Povoação County (S. Miguel Island, Azores), namely in the Ribeira Quente Valley. These rainfall events have triggered hundreds of shallow landslides that killed tens of people and have been responsible for direct and indirect damages amounting to tens of millions of Euros. On the 6th March 2005 an intense rainfall episode, up to 160 mm of rain in less than 24 h, triggered several shallow landslides that caused 3 victims and damaged/blocked roads. The Ribeira Quente Valley has an area of about 9.5 km2 and is mainly constituted by pyroclastic materials (pumice ash and lapilli), that were produced by the Furnas Volcano explosive eruptions. To provide an assessment of slope-failure conditions for the 6th March 2005 rainfall event, it was applied a distributed transient response model for slope stability analysis. The adopted methodology is a modified version of Iversońs (2000) transient response model, which couple an infinite slope stability analysis with an analytic solution of the Richard's equation for vertical water infiltration in quasi-saturated soil. The validation was made on two different scales: (1) at a slope scale, using two distinct test sites where landslides were triggered; and (2) at the basin scale, using the entire landslide database and generalizing the modeling input parameters for the regional spatialization of results. At the slope scale, the obtained results were very accurate, and it was possible to predict the precise time of the slope failures. At the basin scale, the obtained results were very conservative, even though the model predicted all the observed landslide locations, in the 23.7% of the area classified as untable at the time of the slope failures. This methodology revealed to be a reasonable tool for landslide forecast for both temporal and spatial distributions, on both slope and regional scales. In the future, the model components will be integrated into a GIS

  12. Analysis of a predator-prey model with Holling II functional response concerning impulsive control strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Teng, Zhidong; Chen, Lansun

    2006-08-01

    According to biological and chemical control strategy for pest control, we investigate the dynamic behavior of a Holling II functional response predator-prey system concerning impulsive control strategy-periodic releasing natural enemies and spraying pesticide at different fixed times. By using Floquet theorem and small amplitude perturbation method, we prove that there exists a stable pest-eradication periodic solution when the impulsive period is less than some critical value. Further, the condition for the permanence of the system is also given. Numerical results show that the system we consider can take on various kinds of periodic fluctuations and several types of attractor coexistence and is dominated by periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic solutions, which implies that the presence of pulses makes the dynamic behavior more complex. Finally, we conclude that our impulsive control strategy is more effective than the classical one if we take chemical control efficiently.

  13. Campbell Response in Type-II Superconductors under Strong Pinning Conditions.

    PubMed

    Willa, R; Geshkenbein, V B; Prozorov, R; Blatter, G

    2015-11-13

    Measuring the ac magnetic response of a type II superconductor provides valuable information on the pinning landscape (pinscape) of the material. We use strong pinning theory to derive a microscopic expression for the Campbell length λ(C), the penetration depth of the ac signal. We show that λ(C) is determined by the jump in the pinning force, in contrast to the critical current j(c), which involves the jump in pinning energy. We demonstrate that the Campbell lengths generically differ for zero-field-cooled and field-cooled samples and predict that hysteretic behavior can appear in the latter situation. We compare our findings with new experimental data and show the potential of this technique in providing information on the material's pinscape. PMID:26613463

  14. Campbell response in type-II superconductors under strong pinning conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willa, R.; Geshkenbein, V. B.; Prozorov, R.; Blatter, G.

    2015-11-11

    Measuring the ac magnetic response of a type II superconductor provides valuable information on the pinning landscape (pinscape) of the material. We use strong pinning theory to derive a microscopic expression for the Campbell length λC, the penetration depth of the ac signal. We show that λC is determined by the jump in the pinning force, in contrast to the critical current jc, which involves the jump in pinning energy. We demonstrate that the Campbell lengths generically differ for zero-field-cooled and field-cooled samples and predict that hysteretic behavior can appear in the latter situation. As a result, we compare ourmore » findings with new experimental data and show the potential of this technique in providing information on the material’s pinscape.« less

  15. Dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qun; Zu, Li; Jiang, Daqing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the dynamics of stochastic predator-prey models with Holling II functional response. For the stochastic systems, we firstly establish sufficient conditions for the existence of the globally positive solutions. Then we investigate the asymptotic moment estimations of the positive solutions and study the ultimately bounded in the mean of them. Thirdly, by constructing some suitable Lyapunov functions, we verify that there are unique stationary distributions and they are ergodic. The obtained results show that the systems still retain some stability in the sense of weak stability provided that the intensity of the white noise is relatively small. Finally, some numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate our main results.

  16. Brainstem pathology of infantile Gaucher's disease with only wave I and II of auditory brainstem response.

    PubMed

    Kaga, K; Ono, M; Yakumaru, K; Owada, M; Mizutani, T

    1998-11-01

    We studied the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and neuropathology in a female infant who died at six months of age because of typical infantile Gaucher's disease. The patient was hospitalized for hepatosplenomegaly and failure to thrive. Her ABR showed only waves I and II. The neuropathological study disclosed that: (1) Gaucher's cells were found in the perivascular region of the cerebrum and anterior ventral nucleus of the thalamus. (2) Gliosis was found in the dorsal part of the brainstem rather than the ventral part. (3) Neuronal cells in the superior olivary nucleus were lost, and marked gliosis was found in the cochlear nucleus. The disappearance of wave III and later waves of ABR could be supported by these pathological findings. PMID:10197147

  17. Campbell response in type-II superconductors under strong pinning conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Willa, R.; Geshkenbein, V. B.; Prozorov, R.; Blatter, G.

    2015-11-11

    Measuring the ac magnetic response of a type II superconductor provides valuable information on the pinning landscape (pinscape) of the material. We use strong pinning theory to derive a microscopic expression for the Campbell length λC, the penetration depth of the ac signal. We show that λC is determined by the jump in the pinning force, in contrast to the critical current jc, which involves the jump in pinning energy. We demonstrate that the Campbell lengths generically differ for zero-field-cooled and field-cooled samples and predict that hysteretic behavior can appear in the latter situation. As a result, we compare our findings with new experimental data and show the potential of this technique in providing information on the material’s pinscape.

  18. Health as Submission and Social Responsibilities: Embodied Experiences of Javanese Women With Type II Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pitaloka, Dyah; Hsieh, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    By examining women's experiences with type II diabetes, we explore how illness can provide resources to construct meanings of everyday life in Javanese culture. We conducted in-depth interviews with 30 female participants in Central Java, Indonesia, and adopted grounded theory for data analysis. We identified four themes that diabetes serves as resources for women in Indonesia to (a) normalize suffering, (b) resist social control, (c) accept fate, and (d) validate faith. We concluded by noting three unique aspects of Javanese women's illness management. First, through the performance of submission, our participants demonstrated spirituality and religiosity as essential elements of health. Second, diabetes empowers individuals in everyday suffering through two divergent processes: embracing submission and resisting control. Finally, diabetes provides opportunities for individuals within a social network to (re)negotiate social responsibilities. In summary, diabetes provides unique resources to empower our participants to obtain voices that they otherwise would not have had.

  19. Group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to different aspects of visual response processing in the rat superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cirone, Jennifer; Salt, Thomas E

    2001-01-01

    Neurones in the superior colliculus (SC) respond to novel sensory stimuli and response habituation is a key feature of this. It is known that both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors participate in visual responses of superficial SC neurones. A feature of Group II and Group III mGlu receptors is that they may modulate specific neural pathways, possibly via presynaptic mechanisms. However, less is known about how this may relate to functions of systems in whole animals. We have therefore investigated whether these receptors affect specific attributes of visual responses in the superficial SC. Recordings were made from visually responsive neurones in anaesthetised rats, and agonists and antagonists of Group II and III mGlu receptors were applied iontophoretically at the recording site. We found that application of the Group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist l-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4) produced an increase in visual response habituation, whilst Group III antagonists decreased habituation. These effects were independent of the response habituation mediated via GABAB receptors. In contrast, modulation of Group II mGlu receptors with the specific agonist LY354740 or the antagonist LY341495 did not affect response habituation, although these compounds did modulate visual responses. This suggests a specific role for Group III mGlu receptors in visual response habituation. The magnitude of Group II effects was smaller during presentation of low contrast stimuli compared with high contrast stimuli. This suggests that activation of Group II receptors may be activity dependent and that these receptors can translate this into a functional effect in adapting to high contrast stimuli. PMID:11433000

  20. Unsolved problems in observational astronomy. II. Focus on rapid response - mining the sky with ``thinking" telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Theiler, J.; Woznia, P. R.

    2004-10-01

    The existence of rapidly slewing robotic telescopes and fast alert distribution via the Internet is revolutionizing our capability to study the physics of fast astrophysical transients. But the salient challenge that optical time domain surveys must conquer is mining the torrent of data to recognize important transients in a scene full of normal variations. Humans simply do not have the attention span, memory, or reaction time required to recognize fast transients and rapidly respond. Autonomous robotic instrumentation with the ability to extract pertinent information from the data stream in real time will therefore be essential for recognizing transients and commanding rapid follow-up observations while the ephemeral behavior is still present. Here we discuss how the development and integration of three technologies: (1) robotic telescope networks; (2) machine learning; and (3) advanced database technology, can enable the construction of smart robotic telescopes, which we loosely call ``thinking'' telescopes, capable of mining the sky in real time.

  1. Electronic and optical response of functionalized Ru(II) complexes: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei; Sykora, Milan; Albert, Victor; Badaeva, Ekaterina; Koposov, Alexey

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the Ru(II) complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge -- a carboxyl group -- needs to be added to one or two of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure affect electronic and optical properties and, consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru(II)-systems. In this study, we analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state properties, respectively, of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solution. In addition, an effective Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states in all molecules. All theoretical results nicely complement and allow for detailed interpretation of experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes that have been done in parallel with our theoretical investigations. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show that deprotonation of the carboxyl group in the Ru-complexes results in a slight blue shift and decrease of oscillator strengths of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotonated complexes demonstrate strong agreement if the theoretical calculations are performed with the addition of a dielectric continuum model. A polar solvent is found to play an

  2. Salt marsh equilibrium states and transient dynamics in response to changing rates of sea level rise and sediment supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alpaos, A.; Mudd, S. M.; Carniello, L.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the response of salt-marsh bio-geomorphic systems to changes in the rate of sea level rise and sediment supply is an issue of paramount importance due to the crucial role exerted by salt marshes within the tidal landscape. Salt-marsh platforms, in fact, buffer coastlines against storms, filter nutrients and pollutants from tidal waters, provide nursery areas for coastal biota, and serve as a sink for organic carbon. Observations of marsh degradation worldwide and the acceleration in the rate of global sea level rise highlight the importance of improving our understanding of the chief processes which control salt-marsh response to current natural climate changes and to the effects of variations in sediment supply. The results of our analytical model of salt-marsh bio-morphodynamic evolution in the vertical plane, accounting for two-way interactions between ecological and geomorphological processes, show that marshes are more resilient to a step decrease in the rate of relative sea level rise rather than to a step increase of the same magnitude. Interestingly, marshes respond more rapidly to an increase in sediment load or vegetation productivity, rather than to a decrease (of the same amount) in sediment load or vegetation productivity. Model results also suggest that marsh stability is positively correlated with tidal range: marshes with high tidal ranges respond more slowly to changes in the environmental forcings and therefore are less likely to be affected by perturbations than their counterparts in low tidal ranges. Finally, the model suggests that, in the case of a oscillating rate of sea level rise, marsh stratigraphy will be unable to fully record short term fluctuations in relative mean sea level, whereas it will be able to capture long term fluctuations particularly in sediment rich, microtidal settings.

  3. Containment of simian immunodeficiency virus infection: cellular immune responses and protection from rechallenge following transient postinoculation antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Lifson, J D; Rossio, J L; Arnaout, R; Li, L; Parks, T L; Schneider, D K; Kiser, R F; Coalter, V J; Walsh, G; Imming, R J; Fisher, B; Flynn, B M; Bischofberger, N; Piatak, M; Hirsch, V M; Nowak, M A; Wodarz, D

    2000-03-01

    To better understand the viral and host factors involved in the establishment of persistent productive infection by primate lentiviruses, we varied the time of initiation and duration of postinoculation antiretroviral treatment with tenofovir (9-[2-(R)-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine) while performing intensive virologic and immunologic monitoring in rhesus macaques, inoculated intravenously with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmE660. Postinoculation treatment did not block the initial infection, but we identified treatment regimens that prevented the establishment of persistent productive infection, as judged by the absence of measurable plasma viremia following drug discontinuation. While immune responses were heterogeneous, animals in which treatment resulted in prevention of persistent productive infection showed a higher frequency and higher levels of SIV-specific lymphocyte proliferative responses during the treatment period compared to control animals, despite the absence of either detectable plasma viremia or seroconversion. Animals protected from the initial establishment of persistent productive infection were also relatively or completely protected from subsequent homologous rechallenge. Even postinoculation treatment regimens that did not prevent establishment of persistent infection resulted in downmodulation of the level of plasma viremia following treatment cessation, compared to the viremia seen in untreated control animals, animals treated with regimens known to be ineffective, or the cumulative experience with the natural history of plasma viremia following infection with SIVsmE660. The results suggest that the host may be able to effectively control SIV infection if the initial exposure occurs under favorable conditions of low viral burden and in the absence of ongoing high level cytopathic infection of responding cells. These findings may be particularly important in relation to prospects for control of primate lentiviruses in the settings of

  4. Short-latency ocular following responses of monkey. II. Dependence on a prior saccadic eye movement.

    PubMed

    Kawano, K; Miles, F A

    1986-11-01

    The ocular following responses elicited by brief unexpected movements of the visual scene were studied in eight rhesus monkeys. Test patterns were random dots except in one experiment when sine-wave gratings were used. Test stimuli were velocity steps of 100-ms duration applied after spontaneous saccades. Two response measures were used: the initial peak in the eye velocity profile (ei), and the average final eye velocity over the period of 110-140 ms measured from stimulus onset (ef). Responses were best when the test ramps began soon after saccades and attenuated progressively as the postsaccadic delay interval was increased: postsaccadic enhancement of ocular following. The decline in ei was roughly exponential: average time constant, 60 ms; average asymptote, 22%. Later measures (ef) were generally less affected. We suggest that this transient enhancement aids the visual suppression of postsaccadic ocular drifts (glissades) and the tracking of moving images newly acquired with a saccade. The magnitude of the postsaccadic enhancement was dependent on the amount of retinal stimulation during the antecedent saccade; when this stimulation was compromised, as when a vertical saccade was made while viewing a grating pattern with vertically oriented stripes, subsequent enhancement of ocular following was much reduced. Further, saccade-like conditioning movements of the visual scene resulted in an enhancement of the ocular following, elicited by subsequent test ramps, that was similar in magnitude and time course to that in the wake of real saccades. We conclude that the postsaccadic enhancement of ocular following is largely due to the visual stimulation produced by the saccade sweeping the scene across the retina. Data obtained with the visual field partitioned into central and peripheral regions (center 20-60 degrees diam) and with gaze centered suggested that the short-latency ocular following system and the enhancement mechanism that modulates it both receive

  5. Transient neonatal zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krieger, I; Alpern, B E; Cunnane, S C

    1986-06-01

    We report an infant who developed clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency during the first month of life although the diet was adequate for zinc and no other causes could be ascertained. The diagnosis was confirmed by low plasma-zinc concentrations and a positive response to zinc treatment. The fatty acid profile of plasma phospholipids was typical of zinc deficiency (ie, arachidonic acid was markedly decreased). The transient nature of this disorder was evident when no relapse occurred after cessation of zinc therapy and plasma-zinc and arachidonic acid concentrations remained normal. Several explanations for the development of transient neonatal zinc deficiency are offered. The observation demonstrates that occasional infants may have requirements for zinc that are beyond the intakes of the conventional RDA. PMID:3717070

  6. Workshop on Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Steve; Gaensler, Bryan

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryWe are entering a new era in the study of variable and transient radio sources. This workshop discussed the instruments and the strategies employed to study those sources, how they are identified and classified, how results from different surveys can be compared, and how radio observations tie in with those at other wavelengths. The emphasis was on learning what common ground there is between the plethora of on-going projects, how methods and code can be shared, and how best practices regarding survey strategy could be adopted. The workshop featured the four topics below. Each topic commenced with a fairly brief introductory talk, which then developed into discussion. By way of preparation, participants had been invited to upload and discuss one slide per topic to a wiki ahead of the workshop. 1. Telescopes, instrumentation and survey strategy. New radio facilities and on-going projects (including upgrades) are both studying the variability of the radio sky, and searching for transients. The discussion first centred on the status of those facilities, and on projects with a time-domain focus, both ongoing and planned, before turning to factors driving choices of instrumentation, such as phased array versus single pixel feeds, the field of view, spatial and time resolution, frequency and bandwidth, depth, area, and cadence of the surveys. 2. Detection, pipelines, and classification. The workshop debated (a) the factors that influence decisions to study variability in the (u,v) plane, in images, or in catalogues, (b) whether, and how much, pipeline code could potentially be shared between one project and another, and which software packages are best for different approaches, (c) how data are stored and later accessed, and (d) how transients and variables are defined and classified. 3. Statistics, interpretation, and synthesis. It then discussed how (i) the choice of facility and strategy and (ii) detection and classification schemes

  7. Time-Resolved Transient Optical Absorption Study of Bis(terpyridyl)oligothiophenes and Their Metallo-Supramolecular Polymers with Zn(II) Ion Couplers.

    PubMed

    Rais, David; Menšík, Miroslav; Štenclová-Bláhová, Pavla; Svoboda, Jan; Vohlídal, Jiří; Pfleger, Jiří

    2015-06-18

    α,ω-Bis(terpyridyl)oligothiophenes spontaneously assemble with Zn(II) ions giving conjugated constitutional dynamic polymers (dynamers) of the metallo-supramolecular class, which potentially might be utilized in optoelectronics. Their photophysical properties, which are of great importance in this field of application, are strongly influenced by the dynamic morphology. It was assessed in this study by using ultrafast pump-probe optical absorption spectroscopy. We identified and characterized relaxation processes running in photoexcited molecules of these oligomers and dynamers and show impacts of disturbed coplanarity of adjacent rings (twisting the thiophene-thiophene and thiophene-terpyridyl bonds by attached hexyl side groups) and Zn(II) ion couplers on these processes. Major effects are seen in the time constants of rotational relaxation, intersystem crossing, and de-excitation lifetimes. The photoexcited states formed on different repeating units within the same dynamer chain do not interact with each other even at very high excitation density. The method is presented that allows determining the equilibrium fraction of unbound oligothiophene species in a dynamer solution, from which otherwise hardly accessible values of the average degree of polymerization of constitutionally dynamic chains in solution can be estimated. PMID:25913085

  8. Cholesterol lowering drug may influence cellular immune response by altering MHC II function[S

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Koushik; Ghosh, Moumita; Pal, Tuhin Kumar; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Roy, Syamal

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) displays peptides to CD4+ T cells. Depletion of membrane cholesterol from APCs by methyl β-cyclodextrin treatment compromises peptide-MHC II complex formation coupled with impaired binding of conformational antibody, which binds close to the peptide binding groove of MHC II. Interestingly, the total cell surface of MHC II remains unaltered. These defects can be corrected by restoring membrane cholesterol. In silico docking studies with a three-dimensional model showed the presence of a cholesterol binding site in the transmembrane domain of MHC II (TM-MHC-II). From the binding studies it was clear that cholesterol, indeed, interacts with the TM-MHC-II and alters its conformation. Mutation of cholesterol binding residues (F240, L243, and F246) in the TM-MHC-II decreased the affinity for cholesterol. Furthermore, transfection of CHO cells with full-length mutant MHC II, but not wild-type MHC II, failed to activate antigen-specific T cells coupled with decreased binding of conformation-specific antibodies. Thus, cholesterol-induced conformational change of TM-MHC-II may allosterically modulate the peptide binding groove of MHC II leading to T cell activation. PMID:24038316

  9. Continuum electrodynamics of type-II superconductors in the mixed state: The dc and ac response

    SciTech Connect

    Placais, B.; Mathieu, P.; Simon, Y.; Sonin, E.B.; Traito, K.B.

    1996-11-01

    The dc and ac response of the ideal type-II superconductor in the mixed state is analyzed in the frame of a continuum electrodynamics, in which all fields are averaged on a scale exceeding the intervortex distance. The results of previous calculations are brought together and compared, while paying special attention to the role of the vortex line tension and the normal current. The electromagnetic response is studied in the whole range of magnetic fields and frequencies. The possible effect of the normal current on vortex motion is discussed. We argue in this respect that existing theories, where the Lorentz force involves the normal current, are not consistent with Onsager relations. Due to vortex line tension the external fields penetrate into a superconductor as a superposition of two modes with different complex wave numbers (the two-mode electrodynamics). Obtained expressions for the surface impedance should permit one to determine the parameters of the theory from the experiment and to discriminate different models of vortex motion. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Formulation of the respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein with a polymer-based combination adjuvant promotes transient and local innate immune responses and leads to improved adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Indranil; Garg, Ravendra; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2016-09-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes serious upper and lower respiratory tract infections in newborns and infants. Presently, there is no licensed vaccine against RSV. We previously reported the safety and efficacy of a novel vaccine candidate (ΔF/TriAdj) in rodent and lamb models following intranasal immunization. However, the effects of the vaccine on the innate immune system in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, when delivered intranasally, have not been characterized. In the present study, we found that ΔF/TriAdj triggered transient production of chemokines, cytokines and interferons in the nasal tissues and lungs of BALB/c mice. The types of chemokines produced were consistent with the populations of immune cells recruited, i.e. dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils, in the nose-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), lung and their draining lymph nodes of the ΔF/TriAdj-immunized group. In addition, ΔF/TriAdj stimulated cellular activation with generation of mucosal and systemic antibody responses, and conferred complete protection from viral infection in the lungs upon RSV challenge. The effect of ΔF/TriAdj was short-lived in the nasal tissues and more prolonged in the lungs. In addition, both innate and adaptive immune responses were lower when mice were immunized with ΔF alone. These results suggest that ΔF/TriAdj modulates the innate mucosal environment in both upper and lower respiratory tracts, which contributes to robust adaptive immune responses and long-term protective efficacy of this novel vaccine formulation. PMID:27591951

  11. Mutant MHC class II epitopes drive therapeutic immune responses to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kreiter, Sebastian; Vormehr, Mathias; van de Roemer, Niels; Diken, Mustafa; Löwer, Martin; Diekmann, Jan; Boegel, Sebastian; Schrörs, Barbara; Vascotto, Fulvia; Castle, John C.; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Schoenberger, Stephen P.; Huber, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-specific mutations are ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy as they lack expression in healthy tissues and can potentially be recognized as neo-antigens by the mature T-cell repertoire. Their systematic targeting by vaccine approaches, however, has been hampered by the fact that every patient’s tumour possesses a unique set of mutations (‘the mutanome’) that must first be identified. Recently, we proposed a personalized immunotherapy approach to target the full spectrum of a patient’s individual tumour-specific mutations1. Here we show in three independent murine tumour models that a considerable fraction of non-synonymous cancer mutations is immunogenic and that, unexpectedly, the majority of the immunogenic mutanome is recognized by CD4+ T cells. Vaccination with such CD4+ immunogenic mutations confers strong antitumour activity. Encouraged by these findings, we established a process by which mutations identified by exome sequencing could be selected as vaccine targets solely through bioinformatic prioritization on the basis of their expression levels and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding capacity for rapid production as synthetic poly-neo-epitope messenger RNA vaccines. We show that vaccination with such polytope mRNA vaccines induces potent tumour control and complete rejection of established aggressively growing tumours in mice. Moreover, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cell neo-epitope vaccination reshapes the tumour microenvironment and induces cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against an independent immunodominant antigen in mice, indicating orchestration of antigen spread. Finally, we demonstrate an abundance of mutations predicted to bind to MHC class II in human cancers as well by employing the same predictive algorithm on corresponding human cancer types. Thus, the tailored immunotherapy approach introduced here may be regarded as a universally applicable blueprint for comprehensive exploitation of the substantial neo

  12. Mathematical modelling of the light response curve of photoinhibition of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Tyystjärvi, Esa; Hakala, Marja; Sarvikas, Päivi

    2005-06-01

    The light response curves of the acceptor and donor side mechanisms of photoinhibition of Photosystem II were calculated, using Arabidopsis as a model organism. Acceptor-side photoinhibition was modelled as double reduction of QA, noting that non-photochemical quenching has the same effect on the quantum yield of QA double reduction in closed PSII centres as it has on the quantum yield of electron transport in open centres. The light response curve of acceptor-side photoinhibition in Arabidopsis shows very low efficiency under low intensity light and a relatively constant quantum yield above light saturation of photosynthesis. To calculate the light response curve of donor-side photoinhibition, we built a model describing the concentration of the oxidized primary donor P680 + during steady-state photosynthesis. The model is based on literature values of rate constants of electron transfer reactions of PSII, and it was fitted with fluorescence parameters measured in the steady state. The modelling analysis showed that the quantum yield of donor-side photoinhibition peaks under moderate light. The deviation of the acceptor and donor side mechanisms from the direct proportionality between photoinhibition and photon flux density suggests that these mechanisms cannot solely account for photoinhibition in vivo, but contribution of a reaction whose quantum yield is independent of light intensity is needed. Furthermore, a simple kinetic calculation suggests that the acceptor-side mechanism may not explain singlet oxygen production by photoinhibited leaves. The theoretical framework described here can be used to estimate the yields of different photoinhibition mechanisms under different wavelengths or light intensities.

  13. Tumour-specific MHC-class-II-restricted responses after in vitro sensitization to synthetic peptides corresponding to gp100 and Annexin II eluted from melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, K; Adibzadeh, M; Halder, T; Kalbacher, H; Heinzel, S; Müller, C; Zeuthen, J; Pawelec, G

    1998-09-01

    In a search for potentially tumour-specific MHC-class-II-restricted antigens, the immunogenicity of endogenous peptides that had been eluted from HLA-DR molecules of the human melanoma cell line FM3 (HLA-DRB1*02x, DRB1*0401) was tested in vitro. Two 16-mers representing gp100 positions 44-59, and annexin II positions 208-223 bound well to isolated DRB1*0401 molecules and are discussed here. HLA-DR-matched normal donors' T cells were cultured with peptide-pulsed artificial antigen-presenting cells (CHO cells cotransfected with genes for HLA-DRB1*0401 and CD80 and coexpressing high levels of both human molecules). Specific sensitization was achieved against both peptides, as measured in assays of autocrine proliferation and interleukin-2 secretion. Moreover, responses to native autologous melanoma cells but not to autologous B cells were also observed. In view of the expression of fas by the activated T cells and of fas ligand by the melanoma cells, blockade of potential fas/ fas-ligand interactions was undertaken using monoclonal antibodies (mAb). The antagonistic fas-specific mAb M3, but not the fas agonist M33, caused a markedly enhanced T cell response to FM3 cells. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide antigens are able to sensitize T cells in vitro for effective MHC-class-II-restricted recognition of melanoma cells. PMID:9755876

  14. Time response of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te crystals under transient and pulsed irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X. C.; Han, H. T.; Zhang, Z. C.; Ouyang, X. P.; Xu, Y. D.; Wang, T.; Zha, G. Q.; Ouyang, X.

    2012-03-15

    A CdZnTe detector based on high-quality Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te crystals was developed and tested as a monitor in high-intensity radiation fields. The current-voltage measurements were performed using thermally evaporated Au contacts deposited on the crystals, which revealed resistivity of 10{sup 10}{Omega}{center_dot}cm. Typical leakage current for the planar devices was {approx}3 nA for a field strength of 1000 V{center_dot}cm{sup -1}. The test results show that the CdZnTe detector has a fast time response, with a rise time of approximately 2 ns, when exposed to transient and pulsed irradiation of X-rays or electron beams. The decay of current curves is observed and discussed according to charge carrier trapping effects and space-charge accumulation mechanisms. It is suggested that the current decreases quickly with strengthening of the electric field, possibly because of charge de-trapping.

  15. Responses of the summer Asian-Pacific zonal thermal contrast and the associated evolution of atmospheric circulation to transient orbital changes during the Holocene

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Dong; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Yue; Zhou, Xiuji

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the response of large-scale atmospheric circulation over the Asian-Pacific sector and precipitation over eastern China to transient orbital changes during the Holocene summer using an intermediate-complexity climate model. Corresponding to variations in the incoming solar radiation, the eddy sea level pressure (SLP) exhibited an out-of-phase relationship between the North Pacific and the Eurasian landmass that was similar to the present-day Asia-Pacific Oscillation (APO) pattern and was defined as the paleo-APO. Its index presented an increasing trend, which implies the enhancement of a zonal thermal contrast between Asia and the North Pacific. Associated with the strengthening of the paleo-APO was the westward shift in North Pacific high pressure. Accordingly, there was less/more summer precipitation over both the middle reach of the Yangtze River and Southwest China/over North China. The high-resolution stalagmite δ18O records further support this decrease in the model precipitation. Along with the strengthening of paleo-APO from the early Holocene to the present, the eddy SLP anomalies exhibited a decreasing/increasing trend over the Eurasian landmass/the North Pacific, with a phase change of approximately 4.5 ka BP, and they both moved westward. Meanwhile, a less rainfall belt over eastern China exhibited northward propagation from southern China. PMID:27779217

  16. Transient presence of clonal chromosomal aberrations in Ph-negative cells in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia remaining in deep molecular response on tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Gniot, Michał; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Ratajczak, Błażej; Lewandowska, Maria; Lehmann-Kopydłowska, Agata; Jarmuż-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) turned this formerly fatal neoplasm into a manageable chronic condition. Therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) often leads to significant reduction of disease burden, known as the deep molecular response (DMR). Herein, we decided to analyze the cohort of CML patients treated in our center with TKIs, who obtain and retain DMR for a period longer than 24 months. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency of clonal cytogenetic aberrations in Philadelphia-negative (Ph-) cells in patients with DMR during TKI treatment. The analyzed data was obtained during routine molecular and cytogenetic treatment monitoring, using G-banded trypsin and Giemsa stain (GTG) karyotyping and reverse transcription quantitative PCR. We noticed that approximately 50% of patients (28 of 55) in DMR had, at some follow-up point, transient changes in the karyotype of their Ph- bone marrow cells. In 9.1% of cases (5 of 55), the presence of the same aberrations was observed at different time points. The most frequently appearing aberrations were monosomies of chromosomes 19, 20, 21, and Y. Statistical analysis suggests that the occurrence of such abnormalities in CML patients correlates with the TKI treatment time. PMID:25496750

  17. Interaction among the vacuole, the mitochondria, and the oxidative stress response is governed by the transient receptor potential channel in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Baopeng; Chen, Jiatong; Wang, Hui; Jia, Chang; Ding, Xiaohui; Xu, Ning; Dong, Yijie; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-12-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens, causing both mucosal candidiasis and life-threatening systemic infections. To survive in the host immune defense system, this pathogen uses an elaborate signaling network to recognize and respond to oxidative stress, which is essential for its pathogenicity. However, the exact mechanisms that this fungus employs to integrate the oxidative stress response (OSR) with functions of various organelles remain uncharacterized. Our previous work implicated a connection between the calcium signaling system and the OSR. In this study, we find that the vacuolar transient receptor potential (TRP) channel Yvc1, one of the calcium signaling members, plays a critical role in cell tolerance to oxidative stress. We further provide evidence that this channel is required not only for activation of Cap1-related transcription of OSR genes but also for maintaining the stability of both the mitochondria and the vacuole in a potassium- and calcium-dependent manner. Element assays reveal that this TRP channel affects calcium influx and potassium transport from the vacuole to the mitochondria. Therefore, the TRP channel governs the novel interaction among the OSR, the vacuole, and the mitochondria by mediating ion transport in this pathogen under oxidative stress. PMID:25308698

  18. Interaction among the vacuole, the mitochondria, and the oxidative stress response is governed by the transient receptor potential channel in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Baopeng; Chen, Jiatong; Wang, Hui; Jia, Chang; Ding, Xiaohui; Xu, Ning; Dong, Yijie; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-12-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens, causing both mucosal candidiasis and life-threatening systemic infections. To survive in the host immune defense system, this pathogen uses an elaborate signaling network to recognize and respond to oxidative stress, which is essential for its pathogenicity. However, the exact mechanisms that this fungus employs to integrate the oxidative stress response (OSR) with functions of various organelles remain uncharacterized. Our previous work implicated a connection between the calcium signaling system and the OSR. In this study, we find that the vacuolar transient receptor potential (TRP) channel Yvc1, one of the calcium signaling members, plays a critical role in cell tolerance to oxidative stress. We further provide evidence that this channel is required not only for activation of Cap1-related transcription of OSR genes but also for maintaining the stability of both the mitochondria and the vacuole in a potassium- and calcium-dependent manner. Element assays reveal that this TRP channel affects calcium influx and potassium transport from the vacuole to the mitochondria. Therefore, the TRP channel governs the novel interaction among the OSR, the vacuole, and the mitochondria by mediating ion transport in this pathogen under oxidative stress.

  19. Advanced PFBC transient analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.S.; Bonk, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Transient modeling and analysis of advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems is a research area that is currently under investigation by the US Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC). The object of the effort is to identify key operating parameters that affect plant performance and then quantify the basic response of major sub-systems to changes in operating conditions. PC-TRAX{trademark}, a commercially available dynamic software program, was chosen and applied in this modeling and analysis effort. This paper describes the development of a series of TRAX-based transient models of advanced PFBC power plants. These power plants burn coal or other suitable fuel in a PFBC, and the high temperature flue gas supports low-Btu fuel gas or natural gas combustion in a gas turbine topping combustor. When it is utilized, the low-Btu fuel gas is produced in a bubbling bed carbonizer. High temperature, high pressure combustion products exiting the topping combustor are expanded in a modified gas turbine to generate electrical power. Waste heat from the system is used to raise and superheat steam for a reheat steam turbine bottoming cycle that generates additional electrical power. Basic control/instrumentation models were developed and modeled in PC-TRAX and used to investigate off-design plant performance. System performance for various transient conditions and control philosophies was studied.

  20. Benchmark Simulations of the Thermal-Hydraulic Responses during EBR-II Inherent Safety Tests using SAM

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Rui; Sumner, Tyler S.

    2016-01-01

    An advanced system analysis tool SAM is being developed for fast-running, improved-fidelity, and wholeplant transient analyses at Argonne National Laboratory under DOE-NE’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. As an important part of code development, companion validation activities are being conducted to ensure the performance and validity of the SAM code. This paper presents the benchmark simulations of two EBR-II tests, SHRT-45R and BOP- 302R, whose data are available through the support of DOE-NE’s Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program. The code predictions of major primary coolant system parameter are compared with the test results. Additionally, the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code simulation results are also included for a code-to-code comparison.

  1. Conceptualization of the predevelopment groundwater flow system and transient water-level responses in Yucca Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Elliott, Peggy E.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2012-01-01

    aquifer. Flow directions in the alluvial-volcanic aquifer are variable and are controlled by localized areas where small amounts of water can drain into the regional carbonate aquifer. These areas commonly are controlled by geologic structures, such as Yucca fault. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer generally drains to the center of the basin; from there flow is to the south-southeast out of the study area toward downgradient discharge areas. Southward flow in the regional carbonate aquifer occurs in a prominent potentiometric trough that results from a faulted zone of enhanced permeability centered about Yucca fault. Vertical hydraulic gradients between the aquifer systems are downward throughout the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer is believed to be minor because of the intervening confining unit. Transient water levels were identified and analyzed to understand hydraulic responses to stresses in Yucca Flat. Transient responses have only a minimal influence on the general predevelopment flow directions in the aquifers. The two primary anthropogenic stresses on the groundwater system since about 1950 are nuclear testing and pumping. Most of the potentiometric response in the aquifers to pumping or past nuclear testing is interim and localized. Persistent, long-lasting changes in hydraulic head caused by nuclear testing occur only in confining units where groundwater fluxes are negligible. A third stress on the groundwater system is natural recharge, which can cause minor, short- and long-term changes in water levels. Long-term hydrographs affected by natural recharge, grouped by similar trend, cluster in distinct areas of Yucca Flat and are controlled primarily by spatial differences in local recharge patterns.

  2. Responsive supramolecular polymers based on the bis[alkynylplatinum(II)] terpyridine molecular tweezer/arene recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Kui; Shi, Yong-Gang; Yang, Zhi-Shuai; Wang, Feng

    2014-06-10

    Supramolecular polymers are constructed based on the novel bis[alkynylplatinum(II)] terpyridine molecular tweezer/pyrene recognition motif. Successive addition of anthracene as the diene and cyano-functionalized dienophile triggers the reversible supramolecular polymerization process, thus advancing the concept of utilizing Diels-Alder chemistry to access stimuli-responsive materials in compartmentalized systems.

  3. Time-domain parameter identification of aeroelastic loads by forced-vibration method for response of flexible structures subject to transient wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bochao

    Slender structures representing civil, mechanical and aerospace systems such as long-span bridges, high-rise buildings, stay cables, power-line cables, high light mast poles, crane-booms and aircraft wings could experience vortex-induced and buffeting excitations below their design wind speeds and divergent self-excited oscillations (flutter) beyond a critical wind speed because these are flexible. Traditional linear aerodynamic theories that are routinely applied for their response prediction are not valid in the galloping, or near-flutter regime, where large-amplitude vibrations could occur and during non-stationary and transient wind excitations that occur, for example, during hurricanes, thunderstorms and gust fronts. The linear aerodynamic load formulation for lift, drag and moment are expressed in terms of aerodynamic functions in frequency domain that are valid for straight-line winds which are stationary or weakly-stationary. Application of the frequency domain formulation is restricted from use in the nonlinear and transient domain because these are valid for linear models and stationary wind. The time-domain aerodynamic force formulations are suitable for finite element modeling, feedback-dependent structural control mechanism, fatigue-life prediction, and above all modeling of transient structural behavior during non-stationary wind phenomena. This has motivated the developing of time-domain models of aerodynamic loads that are in parallel to the existing frequency-dependent models. Parameters defining these time-domain models can be now extracted from wind tunnel tests, for example, the Rational Function Coefficients defining the self-excited wind loads can be extracted using section model tests using the free vibration technique. However, the free vibration method has some limitations because it is difficult to apply at high wind speeds, in turbulent wind environment, or on unstable cross sections with negative aerodynamic damping. In the current

  4. Drainage effects on the transient, near-surface hydrologic response of a steep hillslope to rainfall: Implications for slope stability, Edmonds, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biavati, G.; Godt, J.W.; McKenna, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Shallow landslides on steep (>25??) hillsides along Puget Sound have resulted in occasional loss of life and costly damage to property during intense or prolonged rainfall. As part of a larger project to assess landslide hazards in the Seattle area, the U.S. Geological Survey instrumented two coastal bluff sites in 2001 to observe the subsurface hydrologic response to rainfall. The instrumentation at one of these sites, near Edmonds, Washington, consists of two rain gauges, two water-content probes that measure volumetric water content at eight depths between 0.2 and 2.0 m, and two tensiometer nests that measure soil-water suction at six depths ranging from 0.2 to 1.5m. Measurements from these instruments are used to test one- and two-dimensional numerical models of infiltration and groundwater flow. Capillary-rise tests, performed in the laboratory on soil sample from the Edmonds site, are used to define the soil hydraulic properties for the wetting process. The field observations of water content and suction show an apparent effect of porosity variation with depth on the hydraulic response to rainfall. Using a range of physical properties consistent with our laboratory and field measurements, we perform sensitivity analyses to investigate the effects of variation in physical and hydraulic properties of the soil on rainfall infiltration, pore-pressure response, and, hence, slope stability. For a two-layer-system in which the hydraulic conductivity of the upper layer is at least 10 times greater than the conductivity of the lower layer, and the infiltration rate is greater than the conductivity of the lower layer, a perched water table forms above the layer boundary potentially destabilizing the upper layer of soil. Two-dimensional modeling results indicate that the addition of a simple trench drain to the same two-layer slope has differing effects on the hydraulic response depending on the initial pressure head conditions. For slope-parallel flow conditions

  5. Functional and biochemical responses of cultured heart cells to angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, I.; Gaa, S.; Rogers, T.B.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have utilized a cultured neonatal rat heart myocyte system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the stimulation of heart cells by angiotensin II (AII). The intact cultured cells, and membranes from these cells, have specific, high affinity receptors for /sup 125/I-AII and for an AII antagonist, /sup 125/I-Sar/sup 1/,Leu/sup 8/-AII. Binding affinity was in the nanomolar range and was inhibited by guanine nucleotides. Functional studies on intact, beating cells revealed a maximal increase in contractile frequency of 50%, observed at 5 nM AII, with half maximal effects noted at around 1 nM. These responses were reversible and specific as the antagonist, Sar/sup 1/, Ala/sup 8/-AII, inhibited AII-induced chronotropic stimulation. AII (100 nM) had no effect on basal adenylate cyclase activity (20 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg/sup 2 +/) in cell membranes. Further, in membranes where cyclase activity was stimulated with isoproterenol (290 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg/sup 2 +/), addition of AII had no effect. The cyclase-inhibitory muscarinic agonist, carbachol, also failed to reduce isoproterenol-stimulated activity. In preliminary work with the intact cells, AII again did not alter basal cAMP levels (3-10 pmoles cAMP/mg prot). However, the hormone increased isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP levels by almost 50%. These cells are an excellent system for correlating AII receptor binding with functional and biochemical responses.

  6. Increased hexokinase II expression in the renal glomerulus of mice in response to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D.; Sollome, James J.; Regan, Suzanne; Cardinal, Trevor R.; Hoying, James B.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2007-10-01

    Epidemiological studies link arsenic exposure to increased risks of cancers of the skin, kidney, lung, bladder and liver. Additionally, a variety of non-cancerous conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease have been associated with chronic ingestion of low levels of arsenic. However, the biological and molecular mechanisms by which arsenic exerts its effects remain elusive. Here we report increased renal hexokinase II (HKII) expression in response to arsenic exposure both in vivo and in vitro. In our model, HKII was up-regulated in the renal glomeruli of mice exposed to low levels of arsenic (10 ppb or 50 ppb) via their drinking water for up to 21 days. Additionally, a similar effect was observed in cultured renal mesangial cells exposed to arsenic. This correlation between our in vivo and in vitro data provides further evidence for a direct link between altered renal HKII expression and arsenic exposure. Thus, our data suggest that alterations in renal HKII expression may be involved in arsenic-induced pathological conditions involving the kidney. More importantly, these results were obtained using environmentally relevant arsenic concentrations.

  7. Transient Transcriptional Regulation of the CYS-C1 Gene and Cyanide Accumulation upon Pathogen Infection in the Plant Immune Response1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  8. Transient transcriptional regulation of the CYS-C1 gene and cyanide accumulation upon pathogen infection in the plant immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2013-08-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  9. Channel Incision in the Inyo Mountains, CA: Transient response to non-steady slip on a Basin and Range normal fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, E.; Kirby, E.

    2005-12-01

    Deciphering the landscape record of tectonic forcing requires understanding the rates and processes by which changes in base level are communicated throughout the fluvial network. Progress toward this goal has been hampered in part by a lack of field sites where we can observe a transient response to a known change in boundary conditions. Here we present preliminary observations of channel profile form in the Inyo Mountains, CA. This range is bound on its eastern side by an active normal fault in Saline Valley, which links strike-slip displacement on the Hunter Mountain fault to extension in northern Saline and Eureka Valleys. Channels draining across the fault system exhibit strongly convex, non-equilibrium profiles, characterized by steep lower reaches and low-gradient upper reaches. In contrast, channels developed in similar lithology north and south of the fault tips exhibit smoothly concave profiles. Channels are developed in relatively uniform granitic bedrock and under similar climatic regimes. Upstream reaches of all channels display uniform steepness indices, consistent with a previous quasi-equilibrium form. Knickpoints separating upper and lower reaches, however, show systematic variations in elevation and upstream drainage area along strike of the range, suggesting non-uniform propagation rates. Overall, we conclude that the channels are responding to an increase in slip rate on the bounding fault. Previous structural mapping in the region suggests an increase in extension rate at ca. 1.4 Ma (Sternlof, 1988). We are undertaking a preliminary test of fluvial incision models to assess to what degree the observed differences in knickpoint position can be explained as a consequence of along-strike variations in slip rate.

  10. Opposite effects of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activity on the pressor response to angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhonghua; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Langenbach, Robert I.; Breyer, Richard M.; Redha, Reyadh; Morrow, Jason D.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic use of cyclooxygenase-inhibiting (COX-inhibiting) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is often complicated by renal side effects including hypertension and edema. The present studies were undertaken to elucidate the roles of COX1 and COX2 in regulating blood pressure and renal function. COX2 inhibitors or gene knockout dramatically augment the pressor effect of angiotensin II (Ang II). Unexpectedly, after a brief increase, the pressor effect of Ang II was abolished by COX1 deficiency (either inhibitor or knockout). Ang II infusion also reduced medullary blood flow in COX2-deficient but not in control or COX1-deficient animals, suggesting synthesis of COX2-dependent vasodilators in the renal medulla. Consistent with this, Ang II failed to stimulate renal medullary prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin I2 production in COX2-deficient animals. Ang II infusion normally promotes natriuresis and diuresis, but COX2 deficiency blocked this effect. Thus, COX1 and COX2 exert opposite effects on systemic blood pressure and renal function. COX2 inhibitors reduce renal medullary blood flow, decrease urine flow, and enhance the pressor effect of Ang II. In contrast, the pressor effect of Ang II is blunted by COX1 inhibition. These results suggest that, rather than having similar cardiovascular effects, the activities of COX1 and COX2 are functionally antagonistic. PMID:12093889

  11. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: A feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qiang Pi Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-06-15

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  12. Transient Shifts of Incubation Temperature Reveal Immediate and Long-Term Transcriptional Response in Chicken Breast Muscle Underpinning Resilience and Phenotypic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Naraballobh, Watcharapong; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Brunner, Ronald; Krischek, Carsten; Janisch, Sabine; Wicke, Michael; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Variations in egg incubation temperatures can have acute or long-term effects on gene transcription in avian species. Altered gene expression may, in turn, affect muscle traits in poultry and indirectly influence commercial production. To determine how changes in eggshell temperature affect gene expression, incubation temperatures were varied [36.8°C (low), 37.8°C (control), 38.8°C (high)] at specific time periods reflecting two stages of myogenesis [embryonic days (ED) 7-10 and 10-13]. Gene expression was compared between interventions and matching controls by microarrays in broiler breast muscle at ED10 or ED13 and post-hatch at day 35. Early (ED7-10) high incubation temperature (H10ΔC) resulted in 1370 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in embryos. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed temporary activation of cell maintenance, organismal development, and survival ability genes, but these effects were not maintained in adults. Late high incubation temperature (ED10-13) (H13ΔC) had slightly negative impacts on development of cellular components in embryos, but a cumulative effect was observed in adults, in which tissue development and nutrition metabolism were affected. Early low incubation temperature (L10ΔC) produced 368 DEGs, most of which were down-regulated and involved in differentiation and formation of muscle cells. In adults, this treatment down-regulated pathways of transcriptional processes, but up-regulated cell proliferation. Late low temperature incubation (L13ΔC) produced 795 DEGs in embryos, and activated organismal survival and post-transcriptional regulation pathways. In adults this treatment activated cellular and organ development, nutrition and small molecule activity, and survival rate, but deactivated size of body and muscle cells. Thermal interventions during incubation initiate immediate and delayed transcriptional responses that are specific for timing and direction of treatment. Interestingly, the transcriptional response to

  13. Transient Shifts of Incubation Temperature Reveal Immediate and Long-Term Transcriptional Response in Chicken Breast Muscle Underpinning Resilience and Phenotypic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Naraballobh, Watcharapong; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Brunner, Ronald; Krischek, Carsten; Janisch, Sabine; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2016-01-01

    Variations in egg incubation temperatures can have acute or long-term effects on gene transcription in avian species. Altered gene expression may, in turn, affect muscle traits in poultry and indirectly influence commercial production. To determine how changes in eggshell temperature affect gene expression, incubation temperatures were varied [36.8°C (low), 37.8°C (control), 38.8°C (high)] at specific time periods reflecting two stages of myogenesis [embryonic days (ED) 7–10 and 10–13]. Gene expression was compared between interventions and matching controls by microarrays in broiler breast muscle at ED10 or ED13 and post-hatch at day 35. Early (ED7-10) high incubation temperature (H10ΔC) resulted in 1370 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in embryos. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed temporary activation of cell maintenance, organismal development, and survival ability genes, but these effects were not maintained in adults. Late high incubation temperature (ED10-13) (H13ΔC) had slightly negative impacts on development of cellular components in embryos, but a cumulative effect was observed in adults, in which tissue development and nutrition metabolism were affected. Early low incubation temperature (L10ΔC) produced 368 DEGs, most of which were down-regulated and involved in differentiation and formation of muscle cells. In adults, this treatment down-regulated pathways of transcriptional processes, but up-regulated cell proliferation. Late low temperature incubation (L13ΔC) produced 795 DEGs in embryos, and activated organismal survival and post-transcriptional regulation pathways. In adults this treatment activated cellular and organ development, nutrition and small molecule activity, and survival rate, but deactivated size of body and muscle cells. Thermal interventions during incubation initiate immediate and delayed transcriptional responses that are specific for timing and direction of treatment. Interestingly, the transcriptional response to

  14. Transient Shifts of Incubation Temperature Reveal Immediate and Long-Term Transcriptional Response in Chicken Breast Muscle Underpinning Resilience and Phenotypic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Naraballobh, Watcharapong; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Brunner, Ronald; Krischek, Carsten; Janisch, Sabine; Wicke, Michael; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Variations in egg incubation temperatures can have acute or long-term effects on gene transcription in avian species. Altered gene expression may, in turn, affect muscle traits in poultry and indirectly influence commercial production. To determine how changes in eggshell temperature affect gene expression, incubation temperatures were varied [36.8°C (low), 37.8°C (control), 38.8°C (high)] at specific time periods reflecting two stages of myogenesis [embryonic days (ED) 7-10 and 10-13]. Gene expression was compared between interventions and matching controls by microarrays in broiler breast muscle at ED10 or ED13 and post-hatch at day 35. Early (ED7-10) high incubation temperature (H10ΔC) resulted in 1370 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in embryos. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed temporary activation of cell maintenance, organismal development, and survival ability genes, but these effects were not maintained in adults. Late high incubation temperature (ED10-13) (H13ΔC) had slightly negative impacts on development of cellular components in embryos, but a cumulative effect was observed in adults, in which tissue development and nutrition metabolism were affected. Early low incubation temperature (L10ΔC) produced 368 DEGs, most of which were down-regulated and involved in differentiation and formation of muscle cells. In adults, this treatment down-regulated pathways of transcriptional processes, but up-regulated cell proliferation. Late low temperature incubation (L13ΔC) produced 795 DEGs in embryos, and activated organismal survival and post-transcriptional regulation pathways. In adults this treatment activated cellular and organ development, nutrition and small molecule activity, and survival rate, but deactivated size of body and muscle cells. Thermal interventions during incubation initiate immediate and delayed transcriptional responses that are specific for timing and direction of treatment. Interestingly, the transcriptional response to

  15. Transient response of the CO2 airborne fraction to fluctuations in emissions: the role of climate-carbon feedbacks versus emissions growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, J. P.; Terenzi, F.; Khatiwala, S.

    2010-12-01

    The airborne fraction (AF), the proportion of anthropogenic CO2 emissions remaining in the atmosphere, has stayed remarkably constant over the past several decades. Studies have speculated that this historical constancy may be an inherent characteristic of the carbon cycle, leading to recent reports of an apparent increase in AF over the past few decades being interpreted in terms of a decrease in the efficiency of the ocean and land sinks. If this decrease is a response to hypothesized climate-carbon cycle feedbacks--for example changes in ocean circulation in the Southern Ocean due to global warming-induced increase in Westerlies--then it suggests an earlier than anticipated shift in the uptake capacity of the principal sinks that play a key role in mitigating the impact of human CO2 emissions on the climate system. Before invoking such mechanisms, however, it is important to distinguish variability due to feedbacks from that due to the intrinsic behavior of the system. Specifically, we believe that the large increase in emissions growth rate between the 1990s and the present decade -- from ~1% per year to over 3% per year -- may also serve as a viable explanation for decadal variability in the AF. Here, we use an ocean carbon cycle model driven by a state-of-the-art circulation state estimate coupled with an atmosphere and land biosphere, to explore and quantify the response of the AF to different idealized emission histories. The model closely reproduces the observed atmospheric and oceanic inventory of CO2 when forced with historical emissions. We find that the AF displays a complex transient behavior, taking on the O(100 y) to ``spin up'' to equilibrium. Moreover, its final steady state value depends sensitively on the shape of the emission history and, in particular, the rate-of-increase of the emissions. These results, which are qualitatively consistent with recent studies based on conceptual models (Gloor et al, 2010; Terenzi, PhD. Thesis, 2009), suggest

  16. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/cAMP response element-binding protein/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade regulates angiotensin II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Lingling; Song, Yuxian; Li, Jianzhong; Mao, Junhua; Zhao, Allan Zijian; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2013-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a pivotal role in promoting podocyte dysfunction and albuminuria, however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully delineated. In this study, we found that Ang II induced Wnt1 expression and β-catenin nuclear translocation in cultured mouse podocytes. Blocking Wnt signaling with Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) or β-catenin siRNA attenuated Ang II-induced podocyte injury. Ang II could also induce the phosphorylation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in cultured podocytes. Blockade of this pathway with CK59 or CREB siRNA could significantly inhibit Ang II-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling and podocyte injury. In in vivo studies, administration of Ang II promoted Wnt/β-catenin signaling, aggregated podocyte damage, and albuminuria in mice. CK59 could remarkably ameliorate Ang II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria. Furthermore, ectopic expression of exogenous Dkk1 also attenuated Ang II-induced podocytopathy in mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the CaMK II/CREB/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade plays an important role in regulating Ang II-induced podocytopathy. Targeting this signaling pathway may offer renal protection against the development of proteinuric kidney diseases. PMID:23803607

  17. Hydrogen peroxide and antioxidizing enzymes involved in modulation of transient facilitatory effects of nicotine on neurogenic contractile responses in rat gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Ozger Ilhan, Sevil; Sarioglu, Yusuf; Vural, Ismail Mert; Dileköz, Ergin; Oztürk, Gökçe Sevim; Ercan, Zeynep Sevim

    2008-06-10

    Nicotine acts as an agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors play a role in the modulation of neurotransmitter release in both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Moderate reactive oxygen species levels modulate the regulation of physiological functions e.g. neurotransmitter release. Previously in rabbit gastric fundus we demonstrated that nicotine transiently increased neurogenic contraction induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS). In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), antioxidizing enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) on nicotine induced increases at cholinergic neurotransmission in rabbit gastric fundus. Although H2O2 did not alter nicotine induced transient neurogenic contractions at concentrations of 10(-6) and 10(-5) M, at high concentration (10(-4) M) H2O2 inhibited nicotine induced increases. Catalase (500 units/ml), enhanced the effect of nicotine but did not alter nicotine induced transient neurogenic contractions at the concentrations of 100 and 250 units/ml. SOD (75,150 and 225 units/ml) did not alter nicotine induced transient neurogenic contractions. In conclusion, at high concentration H2O2 (10(-4) M) inhibited nicotine's transient ability to augment neurogenic contractions and catalase (500 units/ml) enhanced the effect of nicotine. PMID:18455720

  18. Multivesicular bodies in intestinal epithelial cells: responsible for MHC class II-restricted antigen processing and origin of exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Büning, Jürgen; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Tafazzoli, Kianush; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Strobel, Stephan; Apostolaki, Maria; Kollias, George; Heath, Joan K; Ludwig, Diether; Gebert, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    In normal conditions intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) constitutively stimulate regulatory CD4+ T cells. However, in Crohn's disease (CD), this major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted antigen presentation results in stimulation of proinflammatory CD4+ T cells. We hypothesized that these alternative functions might be mediated by differential sorting and processing of antigens into distinct MHC II-enriched compartments (MIICs). Accordingly, we analysed the endocytic pathways of lumenally applied ovalbumin (OVA) in IECs of the jejunum and ileum of wild-type (WT) and TNFΔARE/WT mice that develop a CD-resembling ileitis. Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found that messenger RNA levels of interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-17 and interleukin-10 were significantly up-regulated in the inflamed ileum of TNFΔARE/WT mice, confirming CD-like inflammation. Fluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy revealed the presence of MHC II and invariant chain throughout the late endocytic compartments, with most molecules concentrated in the multivesicular bodies (MVB). OVA was targeted into MVB and, in contrast to other MIICs, accumulated in these structures within 120 min of exposure. The IEC-specific A33 antigen localized to internal vesicles of MVB and A33/class II-bearing exosomes were identified in intercellular spaces. Remarkably, the expression pattern of MHC II/invariant chain molecules and the trafficking of OVA were independent of mucosal inflammation and the specific region in the small intestine. MVB seem to be principally responsible for class II-associated antigen processing in IECs and to constitute the origin of MHC II-loaded exosomes. The distinctive functions of IECs in antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells might arise as a result of differential processing within the MVB identified here. PMID:18710406

  19. The β-arrestin-biased ligand TRV120023 inhibits angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy while preserving enhanced myofilament response to calcium.

    PubMed

    Monasky, Michelle M; Taglieri, Domenico M; Henze, Marcus; Warren, Chad M; Utter, Megan S; Soergel, David G; Violin, Jonathan D; Solaro, R John

    2013-09-15

    In the present study, we compared the cardioprotective effects of TRV120023, a novel angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) ligand, which blocks G protein coupling but stimulates β-arrestin signaling, against treatment with losartan, a conventional AT1R blocker in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy and regulation of myofilament activity and phosphorylation. Rats were subjected to 3 wk of treatment with saline, ANG II, ANG II + losartan, ANG II + TRV120023, or TRV120023 alone. ANG II induced increased left ventricular mass compared with rats that received ANG II + losartan or ANG II + TRV120023. Compared with saline controls, ANG II induced a significant increase in pCa50 and maximum Ca(2+)-activated myofilament tension but reduced the Hill coefficient (nH). TRV120023 increased maximum tension and pCa50, although to lesser extent than ANG II. In contrast to ANG II, TRV120023 increased nH. Losartan blocked the effects of ANG II on pCa50 and nH and reduced maximum tension below that of saline controls. ANG II + TRV120023 showed responses similar to those of TRV120023 alone; compared with ANG II + losartan, ANG II + TRV120023 preserved maximum tension and increased both pCa50 and cooperativity. Tropomyosin phosphorylation was lower in myofilaments from saline-treated hearts compared with the other groups. Phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I was significantly reduced in ANG II + TRV120023 and TRV120023 groups versus saline controls, and myosin-binding protein C phosphorylation at Ser(282) was unaffected by ANG II or losartan but significantly reduced with TRV120023 treatment compared with all other groups. Our data indicate that TRV120023-related promotion of β-arrestin signaling and enhanced contractility involves a mechanism promoting the myofilament response to Ca(2+) via altered protein phosphorylation. Selective activation of β-arrestin-dependent pathways may provide advantages over conventional AT1R blockers.

  20. Structural response of phyllomanganates to wet aging and aqueous Mn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Margaret A. G.; Flynn, Elaine D.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-11-01

    Naturally occurring Mn(IV/III) oxides are often formed through microbial Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in reactive phyllomanganates with varying Mn(IV), Mn(III), and vacancy contents. Residual aqueous Mn(II) may adsorb in the interlayer of phyllomanganates above vacancies in their octahedral sheets. The potential for interlayer Mn(II)-layer Mn(IV) comproportionation reactions and subsequent formation of structural Mn(III) suggests that aqueous Mn(II) may cause phyllomanganate structural changes that alters mineral reactivity or trace metal scavenging. Here we examine the effects of aging phyllomanganates with varying initial vacancy and Mn(III) content in the presence and absence of dissolved Mn(II) at pH 4 and 7. Three phyllomanganates were studied: two exhibiting turbostratic layer stacking (δ-MnO2 with high vacancy content and hexagonal birnessite with both vacancies and Mn(III) substitutions) and one with rotationally ordered layer stacking (triclinic birnessite containing predominantly Mn(III) substitutions). Structural analyses suggest that during aging at pH 4, Mn(II) adsorbs above vacancies and promotes the formation of phyllomanganates with rotationally ordered sheets and mixed symmetries arranged into supercells, while structural Mn(III) undergoes disproportionation. These structural changes at pH 4 correlate with reduced Mn(II) uptake onto triclinic and hexagonal birnessite after 25 days relative to 48 h of reaction, indicating that phyllomanganate reactivity decreases upon aging with Mn(II), or that recrystallization processes involving Mn(II) uptake occur over 25 days. At pH 7, Mn(II) adsorbs and causes limited structural effects, primarily increasing sheet stacking in δ-MnO2. These results show that aging-induced structural changes in phyllomanganates are affected by aqueous Mn(II), pH, and initial solid-phase Mn(III) content. Such restructuring likely alters manganese oxide reactions with other constituents in environmental and geologic systems

  1. Modeling a Transient Catalytic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Transient model of monolith catalytic combustor presented in report done under NASA/DOE contract. Model assumes quasi-steady gas phase and thermally "thin" solid. In gas-phase treatment, several quasi-global chemical reactions assumed capable of describing CO and unburnt hydrocarbon emissions in fuel-lean operations. In steady-state computation presented, influence of selected operating and design parameters on minimum combustor length studied. When fast transient responses required, both steady and unsteady studies made to achieve meaningful compromise in design.

  2. Transient effects in Herschel/PACS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Jacobson, Jeffery D.; Appleton, Philip N.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The Ge:Ga detectors used in the PACS spectrograph onboard the Herschel space telescope react to changes of the incident flux with a certain delay. This generates transient effects on the resulting signal which can be important and last for up to an hour. Aims: The paper presents a study of the effects of transients on the detected signal and proposes methods to mitigate them especially in the case of the unchopped mode. Methods: Since transients can arise from a variety of causes, we classified them in three main categories: transients caused by sudden variations of the continuum due to the observational mode used; transients caused by cosmic ray impacts on the detectors; transients caused by a continuous smooth variation of the continuum during a wavelength scan. We propose a method to disentangle these effects and treat them separately. In particular, we show that a linear combination of three exponential functions is needed to fit the response variation of the detectors during a transient. An algorithm to detect, fit, and correct transient effects is presented. Results: The solution proposed to correct the signal for the effects of transients substantially improves the quality of the final reduction with respect to the standard methods used for archival reduction in the cases where transient effects are most pronounced. Conclusions: The programs developed to implement the corrections are offered through two new interactive data reduction pipelines in the latest releases of the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment.

  3. Endothelial AT₁ and AT₂ pathways in aortic responses to angiotensin II after stress and ethanol consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Rafaela de Fátima Ferreira; Chies, Agnaldo Bruno; Taipeiro, Elane de Fátima; Cordellini, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Stress and ethanol are important cardiovascular risk factors. Their vascular and blood pressure (BP) effects were evaluated alone and in combination. Adult male Wistar rats (8-10 per group) were separated into control, ethanol (ethanol 20% in drinking water for 6 weeks), stress (restraint 1 h/d 5 d/week for 6 weeks), and ethanol/stress (in combination) groups. Systolic BP was evaluated weekly. Concentration-response curves for contractile responses to angiotensin II in the absence and the presence of losartan (AT1-blocker), PD123-319 (AT2-blocker), L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) were obtained in isolated intact and endothelium-denuded aortas. Effective concentration 50% (EC50) and maximum response (MR) were compared among groups using MANOVA/Tukey tests. Stress and stress plus ethanol increased BP. Ethanol and stress, alone and in combination, did not alter angiotensin responses of intact aortas. PD123-319 decreased MR to angiotensin II in intact aortas from the ethanol and ethanol/stress groups relative to control in the presence of PD123-319. Losartan increased MR to angiotensin II in intact aortas from the stress and ethanol/stress groups relative to control in the presence of losartan. None of the protocols altered angiotensin responses of denuded aortas. Neither indomethacin nor L-NAME altered angiotensin responses of intact aortas from the experimental groups. Thus ethanol and ethanol plus stress may alter endothelial signaling via AT1-receptors, without changing systemic BP. Stress and stress plus ethanol may alter endothelial signaling via AT2-receptors, and thereby increase BP. Knowledge of such vascular changes induced by stress and/or ethanol may contribute to understanding adverse cardiovascular effects of stress and ethanol consumption in humans.

  4. Flocculation of copper(II) and tetracycline from water using a novel pH- and temperature-responsive flocculants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Jia, Shuying; Zhuo, Ning; Yang, Weiben; Wang, Yuping

    2015-12-01

    Insufficient research is available on flocculation of combined pollutants of heavy metals and antibiotics, which widely exist in livestock wastewaters. Aiming at solving difficulties in flocculation of this sort of combined pollution, a novel pH- and temperature-responsive biomass-based flocculant, carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-poly(N-isoproyl acrylamide-co-diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (denoted as CND) with two responsive switches [lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and isoelectric point (IEP)], was designed and synthesized. Its flocculation performance at different temperatures and pHs was evaluated using copper(II) and tetracycline (TC) as model contaminants. CND exhibited high efficiency for coremoval of both contaminants, whereas two commercial flocculants (polyaluminum chloride and polyacrylamide) did not. Especially, flocculation performance of the dual-responsive flocculant under conditions of temperature>LCST and IEP(contaminants)II) and TC were present in bridging flocculation, including charge attraction, coordination and hydrophobic effect. Based on these pairwise interactions, copper(II) and TC exerted "aid" roles to each other's removal with the existence of CND, and preferable flocculation performance was thus achieved. PMID:26162528

  5. Angiotensin II is a new component involved in splenic T lymphocyte responses during Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filho, João Luiz; Souza, Mariana Conceição; Ferreira-Dasilva, Claudio Teixeira; Silva, Leandro Souza; Costa, Maria Fernanda Souza; Padua, Tatiana Almeida; Henriques, Maria das Graças; Morrot, Alexandre; Savino, Wilson; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia Sá

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of T cells in severe malaria pathogenesis has been described. Here, we provide evidence for the potential role of angiotensin II (Ang II) in modulating splenic T cell responses in a rodent model of cerebral malaria. T cell activation induced by infection, determined by 3 to 4-fold enhancement in CD69 expression, was reduced to control levels when mice were treated with 20 mg/kg losartan (IC₅₀ = 0.966 mg/kg/d), an AT₁ receptor antagonist, or captopril (IC₅₀ = 1.940 mg/kg/d), an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Moreover, the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-17 by CD4+ T cells diminished 67% and 70%, respectively, by both treatments. Losartan reduced perforin expression in CD8+ T cells by 33% while captopril completely blocked it. The upregulation in chemokine receptor expression (CCR2 and CCR5) observed during infection was abolished and CD11a expression was partially reduced when mice were treated with drugs. T cells activated by Plasmodium berghei ANKA antigens showed 6-fold enhance in AT₁ levels in comparison with naive cells. The upregulation of AT₁ expression was reduced by losartan (80%) but not by captopril. Our results suggest that the AT₁/Ang II axis has a role in the establishment of an efficient T cell response in the spleen and therefore could participate in a misbalanced parasite-induced T cell immune response during P. berghei ANKA infection.

  6. Flocculation of copper(II) and tetracycline from water using a novel pH- and temperature-responsive flocculants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Jia, Shuying; Zhuo, Ning; Yang, Weiben; Wang, Yuping

    2015-12-01

    Insufficient research is available on flocculation of combined pollutants of heavy metals and antibiotics, which widely exist in livestock wastewaters. Aiming at solving difficulties in flocculation of this sort of combined pollution, a novel pH- and temperature-responsive biomass-based flocculant, carboxymethyl chitosan-graft-poly(N-isoproyl acrylamide-co-diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) (denoted as CND) with two responsive switches [lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and isoelectric point (IEP)], was designed and synthesized. Its flocculation performance at different temperatures and pHs was evaluated using copper(II) and tetracycline (TC) as model contaminants. CND exhibited high efficiency for coremoval of both contaminants, whereas two commercial flocculants (polyaluminum chloride and polyacrylamide) did not. Especially, flocculation performance of the dual-responsive flocculant under conditions of temperature>LCST and IEP(contaminants)II) and TC were present in bridging flocculation, including charge attraction, coordination and hydrophobic effect. Based on these pairwise interactions, copper(II) and TC exerted "aid" roles to each other's removal with the existence of CND, and preferable flocculation performance was thus achieved.

  7. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and < 0.16″ in the near infrared leading to an increase of the infrared point-source sensitivity against the sky background by a factor of ~9, crucial for efficient near-infrared spectroscopy.RTS will allow us to map the dark matter distribution in the z < 0.1 local universe with ten times better accuracy and precision than previous experiments. ATLAS will discover several thousand SNIae per year, measuring SNIa peak brightness, and decline rates, while RTS will measure reddening by dust, confirm SN type and

  8. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    MedlinePlus

    TTN; Wet lungs - newborns; Retained fetal lung fluid; Transient RDS; Prolonged transition; Neonatal - transient tachypnea ... As the baby grows in the womb, the lungs make a special fluid. This fluid fills the ...

  9. Amino Acid Variation in HLA Class II Proteins Is a Major Determinant of Humoral Response to Common Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Christian; Begemann, Martin; McLaren, Paul J.; Bartha, István; Michel, Angelika; Klose, Beate; Schmitt, Corinna; Waterboer, Tim; Pawlita, Michael; Schulz, Thomas F.; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Fellay, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude of the human antibody response to viral antigens is highly variable. To explore the human genetic contribution to this variability, we performed genome-wide association studies of the immunoglobulin G response to 14 pathogenic viruses in 2,363 immunocompetent adults. Significant associations were observed in the major histocompatibility complex region on chromosome 6 for influenza A virus, Epstein-Barr virus, JC polyomavirus, and Merkel cell polyomavirus. Using local imputation and fine mapping, we identified specific amino acid residues in human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II proteins as the most probable causal variants underlying these association signals. Common HLA-DRβ1 haplotypes showed virus-specific patterns of humoral-response regulation. We observed an overlap between variants affecting the humoral response to influenza A and EBV and variants previously associated with autoimmune diseases related to these viruses. The results of this study emphasize the central and pathogen-specific role of HLA class II variation in the modulation of humoral immune response to viral antigens in humans. PMID:26456283

  10. AMA1-Deficient Toxoplasma gondii Parasites Transiently Colonize Mice and Trigger an Innate Immune Response That Leads to Long-Lasting Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lagal, Vanessa; Dinis, Márcia; Cannella, Dominique; Bargieri, Daniel; Gonzalez, Virginie; Andenmatten, Nicole; Meissner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) protein was believed to be essential for the perpetuation of two Apicomplexa parasite genera, Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, until we genetically engineered viable parasites lacking AMA1. The reduction in invasiveness of the Toxoplasma gondii RH-AMA1 knockout (RH-AMA1KO) tachyzoite population, in vitro, raised key questions about the outcome associated with these tachyzoites once inoculated in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In this study, we used AMNIS technology to simultaneously quantify and image the parasitic process driven by AMA1KO tachyzoites. We report their ability to colonize and multiply in mesothelial cells and in both resident and recruited leukocytes. While the RH-AMA1KO population amplification is rapidly lethal in immunocompromised mice, it is controlled in immunocompetent hosts, where immune cells in combination sense parasites and secrete proinflammatory cytokines. This innate response further leads to a long-lasting status immunoprotective against a secondary challenge by high inocula of the homologous type I or a distinct type II T. gondii genotypes. While AMA1 is definitively not an essential protein for tachyzoite entry and multiplication in host cells, it clearly assists the expansion of parasite population in vivo. PMID:25847964

  11. Transient drainage summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the history of transient drainage issues on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. It defines and describes the UMTRA Project disposal cell transient drainage process and chronicles UMTRA Project treatment of the transient drainage phenomenon. Section 4.0 includes a conceptual cross section of each UMTRA Project disposal site and summarizes design and construction information, the ground water protection strategy, and the potential for transient drainage.

  12. A computer simulation of the transient response of a 4 cylinder Stirling engine with burner and air preheater in a vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, W. R.

    1981-03-01

    A series of computer programs are presented with full documentation which simulate the transient behavior of a modern 4 cylinder Siemens arrangement Stirling engine with burner and air preheater. Cold start, cranking, idling, acceleration through 3 gear changes and steady speed operation are simulated. Sample results and complete operating instructions are given. A full source code listing of all programs are included.

  13. A computer simulation of the transient response of a 4 cylinder Stirling engine with burner and air preheater in a vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A series of computer programs are presented with full documentation which simulate the transient behavior of a modern 4 cylinder Siemens arrangement Stirling engine with burner and air preheater. Cold start, cranking, idling, acceleration through 3 gear changes and steady speed operation are simulated. Sample results and complete operating instructions are given. A full source code listing of all programs are included.

  14. Use of MHC class II tetramers to investigate CD4+ T cell responses: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Virginia; Moro, Monica; Del Mare, Sara; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2008-11-01

    MHC-class I tetramers technology enabled the characterization of peptide-specific T cells at the single cell level in a variety of studies. Several laboratories have also developed MHC-class II multimers to characterize Ag-specific CD4+ T cells. However, the generation and use of MHC-class II multimers seems more problematic than that of MHC-I multimers. We have generated HLA-DR*1101 tetramers in a versatile empty form, which can be loaded after purification with peptides of interest. We discuss the impact of critical biological and structural parameters for the optimal staining of Ag-specific CD4+ T cells using HLA-DR*1101 tetramers, such as: (i) activation state of CD4+ T cells; (ii) membrane trafficking in the target CD4+ T cells; (iii) binding characteristics of the loaded CD4 epitope. Our data indicate that reorganization of TCR on the plasma membrane upon CD4+ T cell activation, as well as an homogenous binding frame of the CD4 epitopes to the soluble HLA-DR monomer, are critical for a stable TCR/MHC-class II tetramer interaction. These factors, together with the low frequencies and affinities of specific CD4+ T cells, explain the need for in vitro expansion or ex vivo enrichment of specific T cells for the optimal visualization with MHC-class II tetramers. PMID:18612991

  15. Roles of an unconventional protein kinase and myosin II in amoeba osmotic shock responses.

    PubMed

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2009-12-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is a dynamic organelle that enables Dictyostelium amoeba and other protist to maintain osmotic homeostasis by expelling excess water. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism that coordinates the mechanics of the CV with myosin II, regulated by VwkA, an unconventional protein kinase that is conserved in an array of protozoa. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VwkA fusion proteins localize persistently to the CV during both filling and expulsion phases of water. In vwkA null cells, the established CV marker dajumin still localizes to the CV, but these structures are large, spherical and severely impaired for discharge. Furthermore, myosin II cortical localization and assembly are abnormal in vwkA null cells. Parallel analysis of wild-type cells treated with myosin II inhibitors or of myosin II null cells also results in enlarged CVs with impaired dynamics. We suggest that the myosin II cortical cytoskeleton, regulated by VwkA, serves a critical conserved role in the periodic contractions of the CV, as part of the osmotic protective mechanism of protozoa.

  16. Transient catalytic combustor model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    A quasi-steady gas phase and thermally thin substrate model is used to analyze the transient behavior of catalytic monolith combustors in fuel lean operation. The combustor response delay is due to the substrate thermal inertia. Fast response is favored by thin substrate, short catalytic bed length, high combustor inlet and final temperatures, and small gas channel diameters. The calculated gas and substrate temperature time history at different axial positions provides an understanding of how the catalytic combustor responds to an upstream condition change. The computed results also suggest that the gas residence times in the catalytic bed in the after bed space are correlatable with the nondimensional combustor response time. The model also performs steady state combustion calculations; and the computed steady state emission characteristics show agreement with available experimental data in the range of parameters covered. A catalytic combustor design for automotive gas turbine engine which has reasonably fast response ( 1 second) and can satisfy the emission goals in an acceptable total combustor length is possible.

  17. Transient Ischemic Attack

    MedlinePlus

    Transient Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only ... TIA is that with TIA the blockage is transient (temporary). TIA symptoms occur rapidly and last a ...

  18. When infants look to their parents: II. Twelve-month-olds' response to conflicting parental emotional signals.

    PubMed

    Hirshberg, L

    1990-08-01

    12-months-olds were seen in a laboratory procedure in which they were given happy, fearful, and conflicting emotional signals by their mothers and fathers with reference to 5 unusual toy stimuli. Measures included: positive and negative affect, affect lability, and approach and proximity behavior toward the toy. Infants did not "select" a signal on the basis of a maternal or paternal primacy in emotional referencing, but responded to both signals and experienced conflict. They showed increased negative affect and decreased positive affect and toy exploration with conflicting signals compared with both happy and with fearful signals alone. Greater levels of lability were not found with conflicting signals. Marked differences among infants in capacity and style of coping with conflict were observed, as were a variety of specific conflict responses, such as agitated sucking, rocking, avoidance, extreme motor inhibition, aimless or disoriented behavior, and transient, unintegrated affect expressions. PMID:2209188

  19. Attenuated cardiovascular hypertrophy and oxidant generation in response to angiotensin II infusion in glutaredoxin-1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Bachschmid, Markus M.; Xu, Shanqin; Maitland-Toolan, Karlene A.; Ho, Ye-Shih; Cohen, Richard A.; Matsui, Reiko

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxin-1 (Glrx) is a thioltransferase that regulates protein S-glutathiolation. To elucidate the role of endogenous Glrx in cardiovascular disease, Glrx knockout (KO) mice were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) for 6 days. After Ang II infusion, body weight and blood pressure were similar between WT and Glrx KO mice. However, compared to WT mice, Glrx KO mice demonstrated (1) less cardiac and aortic medial hypertrophy, (2) less oxidant generation in aorta assessed by dihydroethidium staining and nitrotyrosine, (3) decreased phosphorylation of Akt in the heart, and (4) less expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) in aorta and heart. In cultured embryonic fibroblasts from Glrx KO mice, S-glutathiolation of actin was enhanced and actin depolymerization was impaired after hydrogen peroxide stimulation compared with WT cells. Furthermore, oxidant generation in phorbol ester-stimulated fibroblasts and RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells was lower with Glrx siRNA knockdown. These data indicate that Ang II-induced oxidant production and hypertrophic responses were attenuated in Glrx KO mice, which may result from impaired NADPH oxidase activation. PMID:20638471

  20. Metabolic response in type I and type II muscle fibers during a 30-s cycle sprint in men and women.

    PubMed

    Esbjörnsson-Liljedahl, M; Sundberg, C J; Norman, B; Jansson, E

    1999-10-01

    The acute metabolic response to sprint exercise was studied in 20 male and 19 female students. We hypothesized that the reduction of muscle glycogen content during sprint exercise would be smaller in women than in men and that a possible gender difference in glycogen reduction would be higher in type II than in type I fibers. The exercise-induced increase in blood lactate concentration was 22% smaller in women than in men. A considerable reduction of ATP (50%), phosphocreatine (83%), and glycogen (35%) was found in type II muscle fibers, and it did not differ between the genders. A smaller reduction of ATP (17%) and phosphocreatine (78%) was found in type I fibers, and it did not differ between the genders. However, the exercise-induced reduction in glycogen content in type I fibers was 50% smaller in women than in men. The hypothesis was indeed partly confirmed: the exercise-induced glycogen reduction was attenuated in women compared with men, but the gender difference was in type I rather than in type II fibers. Fiber-type-specific and gender-related differences in the metabolic response to sprint exercise might have implications for the design of training programs for men and women.

  1. Class II-targeted antigen is superior to CD40-targeted antigen at stimulating humoral responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Frleta, D; Demian, D; Wade, W F

    2001-02-01

    We examined the efficacy of using monoclonal antibodies to target antigen (avidin) to different surface molecules expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC). In particular, we targeted CD40 to test whether the "adjuvant" properties of CD40 signaling combined with targeted antigen would result in enhanced serologic responses. We targeted avidin to class II as a positive control and to CD11c as a negative control. These surface proteins represent an ensemble of surface molecules that signal upon ligation and that are expressed on professional APC, in particular dendritic cells (DC). We observed that targeting class II molecules on APC was superior to targeting CD40, or CD11c. However, CD40 and CD11c could function as targets for antigen bound monoclonal antibodies under certain conditions. Interestingly, inclusion of anti-CD40 mAb with the targeting anti-class II-targeted antigens negatively affects humoral response, suggesting that CD40 signaling under certain conditions may suppress processing and/or presentation of targeted antigen. PMID:11360928

  2. Plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and aldosterone responses to angiotensin II and corticotropin in diabetic patients with hyporeninemic and normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, R; Kigoshi, T; Uchida, K; Morimoto, S

    1989-07-01

    To examine the nature of adrenal abnormalities in diabetic patients with hyporeninemic and normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism, responses of plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone to angiotension II infusions and ACTH injection were investigated in 8 diabetic patients with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and 9 diabetic patients with normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism compared to 11 control subjects. In both the patients with hyporeninemic and normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism, plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone were low, whereas plasma cortisol and plasma corticosterone were within normal ranges. Percent increments of plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone above their baseline levels after angiotensin II infusions were low or somewhat low in the patients with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism and low in the patients with normoreninemic hypoaldosteronism. Percent increments of plasma 18-hydroxycorticosterone and plasma aldosterone above their baseline levels after ACTH injection were similar in three groups. These results suggest that in diabetic patients with isolated hypoaldosteronism, the adrenal abnormality, regardless of whether it is primary or secondary, is mainly due to impaired adrenal responsiveness to angiotension II and atrophy and the zona glomerulosa.

  3. World Wars at Home: U.S. Response to World War II Propaganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Focuses on how the United States Post Office reacted to the massive influx of political propaganda, primarily from the Soviet Union, immediately prior to and during World War II. Describes how the Post Office played an active role in stopping and burning some 50 tons of incoming material. (RS)

  4. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated with /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  5. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man. II. Response of the salivary glands during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1983-08-01

    A quantitative dose-response curve for salivary gland function in patients during radiotherapy is presented. Salivary-function data used in this study were obtained from four previously published reports. All patients were treated wih /sup 60/Co teletherapy to the head and neck using conventional treatment techniques. Salivary dysfunction was determined at specific dose levels by comparing salivary flow rates before therapy with flow rates at specific dose intervals during radiotherapy up to a total dose of 6000 cGy. Fifty percent salivary dysfunction occurred after 1000 cGy and eighty percent dysfunction was observed by the end of the therapy course (6000 cGy). The salivary-function curve was also compared to the previously published dose-response curve for taste function. Comparisons of the two curves indicate that salivary dysfunction precedes taste loss and that the shapes of the dose-response curves are different. A new term, tissue tolerance ratio, defined as the ratio of responses of two tissues given the same radiation dose, was used to make the comparisons between gustatory and salivary gland tissue effects. Measurements of salivary gland function and analysis of dose-response curves may be useful in evaluating chemical modifiers of radiation response.

  6. Cd(II)-coordination framework: synthesis, anion-induced structural transformation, anion-responsive luminescence, and anion separation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shan; Liu, Qi-Kui; Ma, Jian-Ping; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2013-03-18

    A series of Cd(II) coordination frameworks that are constructed from a new oxadiazole-bridged ligand 3,5-bis(3-pyridyl-3-(3'-methylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (L) and CdX2 (X = NO3(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), N3(-), and SCN(-)) were synthesized. The NO3(-) anion of the solid CdL2(NO3)2·2THF (1) is able to be quantitatively exchanged with Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), SCN(-), and N3(-) in the solid state. For Cl(-) and Br(-), the anion exchange resulted in a anion-induced structural transformation to form the structures of 2 and 3, respectively. In addition, the Cd(II) structure herein exhibits the anion-responsive photoluminescence, which could be a useful method to monitor the anion-exchange process. Notably, compound 1 can recognize and completely separate SCN(-)/N3(-) with similar geometry.

  7. A graphical and analytical method to determine the transient response for an ideal transmission line, loaded by a time-varying impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Krehl, P.; Novender, W.R.

    1985-04-01

    Based on Bergeron's theory, a graphical and analytical method has been worked out to determine the dynamic load characteristic and load transients for a time-varying load impedance, pulsed by a lossless transmission line. The analytical solution has been compared with the numerical solution of the network analysis code SCEPTRE. A parametric study for a time-decreasing load function, demonstrated by the example of a vacuum-discharge flash X-ray tube, reveals that the dynamic load characteristic I /SUB L/ (U /SUB L/ (t),U/sub 0/,Z/sub 0/,T) and the transients U /SUB L/ (t,U/sub 0/,Z/sub 0/,T) and I /SUB L/ (t,U/sub 0/,Z/sub 0/,T) are dependent on the diode function Z /SUB L/ (t) as well as on the charging voltage U/sub 0/ and the characterics T and Z/sub 0/ of the line.

  8. Selective reduction of fMRI responses to transient achromatic stimuli in the magnocellular layers of the LGN and the superficial layer of the SC of early glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wen, Wen; Sun, Xinghuai; He, Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Glaucoma is now viewed not just a disease of the eye but also a disease of the brain. The prognosis of glaucoma critically depends on how early the disease can be detected. However, early glaucomatous loss of the laminar functions in the human lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and superior colliculus (SC) remains difficult to detect and poorly understood. Using functional MRI, we measured neural signals from different layers of the LGN and SC, as well as from the early visual cortices (V1, V2 and MT), in patients with early-stage glaucoma and normal controls. Compared to normal controls, early glaucoma patients showed more reduction of response to transient achromatic stimuli than to sustained chromatic stimuli in the magnocellular layers of the LGN, as well as in the superficial layer of the SC. Magnocellular responses in the LGN were also significantly correlated with the degree of behavioral deficits to the glaucomatous eye. Finally, early glaucoma patients showed no reduction of fMRI response in the early visual cortex. These findings demonstrate that 'large cells' in the human LGN and SC suffer selective loss of response to transient achromatic stimuli at the early stage of glaucoma. Hum Brain Mapp 37:558-569, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Influence of Hot Carrier Transport on the Transient Response of an InGaAs/InAlAs Metal-Semiconductor Schottky Diode Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Ali F.; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1996-01-01

    The calculated transient characteristic of a heterostructure, rectifying contact is theoretically examined. It is found that hot carrier transport drastically affects the output terminal characteristics of the heterostructure Schottky contact and, hence, the working of a blocking contact. This is of importance to the understanding of InGaAs MSM devices in particular, as well as any structure which contains a blocking contact in general.

  10. A responsive supramolecular metallogel constructed by coordination-driven self-assembly of a crown ether-based [3]pseudorotaxane and a diplatinum(II) acceptor.

    PubMed

    Xing, Hao; Wang, Hu; Yan, Xuzhou; Ji, Xiaofan

    2015-07-01

    Herein, a stimuli-responsive supramolecular metallogel was prepared by orthogonal coordination-driven self-assembly of a crown ether-based [3]pseudorotaxane and a 180° organic di-Pt(II) acceptor. PMID:26030667

  11. Genetic variability in swine leukocyte antigen class II and Toll-like receptors affects immune responses to vaccination for bacterial infections in pigs.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, H; Arakawa, A; Tanaka-Matsuda, M; Ide-Okumura, H; Terada, K; Chikyu, M; Kawarasaki, T; Ando, A; Uenishi, H

    2012-12-01

    The genes encoding swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) are highly polymorphic in pig populations, and likely have influences on infection and the effects of vaccination. We explored the associations of different genotypes of SLA class II and of the genes TLR1, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR6 with antibody responses after vaccination against Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (ER) and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) serotypes 1, 2, and 5 in 191 Duroc pigs maintained under specific pathogen-free conditions. We demonstrated close relationships between SLA class II and ER antibody response and between TLR genes other than TLR4 and APP antibody responses. Pigs with specific haplotypes in SLA class II or TLR5 showed decreased antibody response to ER vaccination or increased responses to APP2 and APP5 vaccination, respectively. It might be possible to breed for responsiveness to vaccination and to implement new vaccine development strategies unaffected by genetic backgrounds of pigs.

  12. Tyrosinaemia type II: an easily diagnosed metabolic disorder with a rewarding therapeutic response.

    PubMed

    al-Essa, M A; Rashed, M S; Ozand, P T

    1999-11-01

    We retrospectively reviewed clinical and biochemical data of four patients diagnosed with tyrosinaemia type II. Diagnosis was established by high plasma tyrosine and normal plasma phenylalanine levels using plasma high-pressure liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. All patients were mildly mentally retarded and had painful non-pruritic and hyperkeratotic plaques on the soles and palms. There were no ophthalmic symptoms. The patients dramatically responded clinically and biochemically to a diet restricted in tyrosine and phenylalanine.

  13. Auditory Brainstem Responses from Children Three Months to Three Years of Age: Normal Patterns of Response II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorga, Michael P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were measured in 535 children from 3 months to 3 years of age. Results suggested that changes in wave V latency with age are due to central (neural) factors and that age-appropriate norms should be used in evaluations of ABR latencies in children. (Author/DB)

  14. Role of multilayer-like interference effects on the transient optical response of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} films pumped with free-electron laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Casolari, F.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Kiskinova, M.; Mincigrucci, R.

    2014-05-12

    X-ray/optical cross-correlation methods are attracting increasing interest for exploring transient states of matter using ultrashort free-electron laser (FEL) pulses. Our paper shows that in such studies the difference in the penetration depth of the FEL-pump and the infrared (IR) probe pulses become important, in particular, when exploring the changes in the optical properties of solid targets. We discuss the role of interference effects, using a phenomenological model with excited and unperturbed slabs. The reliability of this model was experimentally verified by measuring the transient optical response of free-standing and silicon (Si) supported silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) films, simultaneously in reflection and transmission, using s- and p-polarized IR light. The changes in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} optical refractive index, induced by the FEL pulses, have fully been described in the frame of the proposed model. The experimental results confirm that the differences, observed in the FEL-induced transient reflectance and transmittance of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} targets with different thicknesses, arise from multilayer-like interferometric phenomena.

  15. Amplifying the sensitivity of zinc(II) responsive MRI contrast agents by altering water exchange rates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Martins, André F; Preihs, Christian; Clavijo Jordan, Veronica; Chirayil, Sara; Zhao, Piyu; Wu, Yunkou; Nasr, Khaled; Kiefer, Garry E; Sherry, A Dean

    2015-11-11

    Given the known water exchange rate limitations of a previously reported Zn(II)-sensitive MRI contrast agent, GdDOTA-diBPEN, new structural targets were rationally designed to increase the rate of water exchange to improve MRI detection sensitivity. These new sensors exhibit fine-tuned water exchange properties and, depending on the individual structure, demonstrate significantly improved longitudinal relaxivities (r1). Two sensors in particular demonstrate optimized parameters and, therefore, show exceptionally high longitudinal relaxivities of about 50 mM(-1) s(-1) upon binding to Zn(II) and human serum albumin (HSA). This value demonstrates a 3-fold increase in r1 compared to that displayed by the original sensor, GdDOTA-diBPEN. In addition, this study provides important insights into the interplay between structural modifications, water exchange rate, and kinetic stability properties of the sensors. The new high relaxivity agents were used to successfully image Zn(II) release from the mouse pancreas in vivo during glucose stimulated insulin secretion. PMID:26462412

  16. Intracellular photoactivation of caged cGMP induces myosin II and actin responses in motile cells.

    PubMed

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Anielski, Alexander; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger in eukaryotic cells. It is assumed to regulate the association of myosin II with the cytoskeleton of motile cells. When cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum are exposed to chemoattractants or to increased osmotic stress, intracellular cGMP levels rise, preceding the accumulation of myosin II in the cell cortex. To directly investigate the impact of intracellular cGMP on cytoskeletal dynamics in a living cell, we released cGMP inside the cell by laser-induced photo-cleavage of a caged precursor. With this approach, we could directly show in a live cell experiment that an increase in intracellular cGMP indeed induces myosin II to accumulate in the cortex. Unexpectedly, we observed for the first time that also the amount of filamentous actin in the cell cortex increases upon a rise in the cGMP concentration, independently of cAMP receptor activation and signaling. We discuss our results in the light of recent work on the cGMP signaling pathway and suggest possible links between cGMP signaling and the actin system. PMID:24136144

  17. Angiotensin II Is a New Component Involved in Splenic T Lymphocyte Responses during Plasmodium berghei ANKA Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Filho, João Luiz; Souza, Mariana Conceição; Ferreira-DaSilva, Claudio Teixeira; Silva, Leandro Souza; Costa, Maria Fernanda Souza; Padua, Tatiana Almeida; Henriques, Maria das Graças; Morrot, Alexandre; Savino, Wilson; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia Sá

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of T cells in severe malaria pathogenesis has been described. Here, we provide evidence for the potential role of angiotensin II (Ang II) in modulating splenic T cell responses in a rodent model of cerebral malaria. T cell activation induced by infection, determined by 3 to 4-fold enhancement in CD69 expression, was reduced to control levels when mice were treated with 20 mg/kg losartan (IC50 = 0.966 mg/kg/d), an AT1 receptor antagonist, or captopril (IC50 = 1.940 mg/kg/d), an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Moreover, the production of interferon-γ and interleukin-17 by CD4+ T cells diminished 67% and 70%, respectively, by both treatments. Losartan reduced perforin expression in CD8+ T cells by 33% while captopril completely blocked it. The upregulation in chemokine receptor expression (CCR2 and CCR5) observed during infection was abolished and CD11a expression was partially reduced when mice were treated with drugs. T cells activated by Plasmodium berghei ANKA antigens showed 6-fold enhance in AT1 levels in comparison with naive cells. The upregulation of AT1 expression was reduced by losartan (80%) but not by captopril. Our results suggest that the AT1/Ang II axis has a role in the establishment of an efficient T cell response in the spleen and therefore could participate in a misbalanced parasite-induced T cell immune response during P. berghei ANKA infection. PMID:23646169

  18. Spectral signatures of penumbral transients

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, K.; Tritschler, A.

    2013-12-20

    In this work we investigate the properties of penumbral transients observed in the upper photospheric and chromospheric region above a sunspot penumbra using two-dimensional spectroscopic observations of the Ca II 854.21 nm line with a 5 s cadence. In our 30 minutes of observations, we identify several penumbral-micro jets (PMJs) with cotemporal observations from Dunn Solar Telescope/IBIS and Hinode/SOT. We find that the line profiles of these PMJ events show emission in the two wings of the line (±0.05 nm), but little modification of the line core. These are reminiscent of the line profiles of Ellerman bombs observed in plage and network regions. Furthermore, we find evidence that some PMJ events have a precursor phase starting 1 minute prior to the main brightening that might indicate initial heating of the plasma prior to an acoustic or bow shock event. With the IBIS data, we also find several other types of transient brightenings with timescales of less than 1 minute that are not clearly seen in the Hinode/SOT data. The spectral profiles and other characteristics of these events are significantly different from those of PMJs. The different appearances of all these transients are an indicator of the general complexity of the chromospheric magnetic field and underscore the highly dynamic behavior above sunspots. It also highlights the care that is needed in interpreting broadband filter images of chromospheric lines, which may conceal very different spectral profiles, and the underlying physical mechanisms at work.

  19. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response.

    PubMed

    Long, Heather M; Chagoury, Odette L; Leese, Alison M; Ryan, Gordon B; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T; Abbott, Rachel J M; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William; Rickinson, Alan B

    2013-05-01

    Virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8(+) T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II-epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4(+) T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8(+) T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4(+) T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4(+) T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4(+) T cell priming. PMID:23569328

  20. How Porcupines Make Love II: Teaching a Response-Centered Literature Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan C.; And Others

    Written in the same spirit as the earlier edition but thoroughly revised and updated, this book is designed to make teachers aware of reader-response theory and its implications for literature instruction and curriculum. The book demonstrates how a response-centered curriculum brings students to a greater understanding of all forms of literature…

  1. Comparing clinical responses and the biomarkers of BDNF and cytokines between subthreshold bipolar disorder and bipolar II disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Li, Chia-Ling; Chung, Yi-Lun; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2016-01-01

    Patients with subthreshold hypomania (SBP; subthreshold bipolar disorder) were indistinguishable from those with bipolar disorder (BP)-II on clinical bipolar validators, but their analyses lacked biological and pharmacological treatment data. Because inflammation and neuroprogression underlies BP, we hypothesized that cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are biomarkers for BP. We enrolled 41 drug-naïve patients with SBP and 48 with BP-II undergoing 12 weeks of pharmacological treatment (valproic acid, fluoxetine, risperidone, lorazepam). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical responses at baseline and at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. Inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-α, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8 and IL-1β) and BDNF levels were also measured. Mixed models repeated measurement was used to examine the therapeutic effect and changes in BDNF and cytokine levels between the groups. HDRS and YMRS scores significantly (P < 0.001) declined in both groups, the SBP group had significantly lower levels of BDNF (P = 0.005) and TGF-β1 (P = 0.02). Patients with SBP and BP-II respond similarly to treatment, but SBP patients may have different neuroinflammation marker expression. PMID:27270858

  2. Comparing clinical responses and the biomarkers of BDNF and cytokines between subthreshold bipolar disorder and bipolar II disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Li, Chia-Ling; Chung, Yi-Lun; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2016-01-01

    Patients with subthreshold hypomania (SBP; subthreshold bipolar disorder) were indistinguishable from those with bipolar disorder (BP)-II on clinical bipolar validators, but their analyses lacked biological and pharmacological treatment data. Because inflammation and neuroprogression underlies BP, we hypothesized that cytokines and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are biomarkers for BP. We enrolled 41 drug-naïve patients with SBP and 48 with BP-II undergoing 12 weeks of pharmacological treatment (valproic acid, fluoxetine, risperidone, lorazepam). The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were used to evaluate clinical responses at baseline and at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. Inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor [TNF]-α, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8 and IL-1β) and BDNF levels were also measured. Mixed models repeated measurement was used to examine the therapeutic effect and changes in BDNF and cytokine levels between the groups. HDRS and YMRS scores significantly (P < 0.001) declined in both groups, the SBP group had significantly lower levels of BDNF (P = 0.005) and TGF-β1 (P = 0.02). Patients with SBP and BP-II respond similarly to treatment, but SBP patients may have different neuroinflammation marker expression. PMID:27270858

  3. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Can Enhance Baculovirus-Mediated Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells through the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Kun; Lin, Jhe-Jhih; Chen, Chung-Yung; Kuo, Szu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Ming; Chan, Hong-Lin; Wu, Tzong Yuan

    2016-01-01

    BacMam is an insect-derived recombinant baculovirus that can deliver genes into mammalian cells. BacMam vectors carrying target genes are able to enter a variety of cell lines by endocytosis, but the level of expression of the transgene depends on the cell line and the state of the transduced cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the DNA damage response (DDR) could act as an alternative pathway to boost the transgene(s) expression by BacMam and be comparable to the inhibitors of histone deacetylase. Topoisomerase II (Top II) inhibitor-induced DDR can enhance the CMV-IE/enhancer mediated gene expression up to 12-fold in BacMam-transduced U-2OS cells. The combination of a Top II inhibitor, VM-26, can also augment the killing efficiency of a p53-expressing BacMam vector in U-2OS osteosarcoma cells. These results open a new avenue to facilitate the application of BacMam for gene delivery and therapy. PMID:27314325

  4. The sweet taste in the calf. II. Glossopharyngeal nerve responses to taste stimulation of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Hård af Segerstad, C H; Hellekant, G

    1989-05-01

    Recordings were obtained from the glossopharyngeal nerve in 1-5-week-old calves during stimulation of the circumvallate tongue area with NaCl, quinine hydrochloride, citric acid, and the sweet compounds: acesulfam-K, aspartame, fructose, galactose, glucose, glycine, lactose, maltose, monellin, Na-saccharin, sucrose, thaumatin, and xylitol. All compounds except aspartame, monellin and thaumatin gave a nerve response. Glycine, followed by Na-saccharin, elicited the largest responses. Sucrose gave the largest response among the disaccharides, while there was no significant difference between the monosaccharides. Expressed as percent of the NaCl responses, the responses to glycine, sucrose, xylitol, fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose and maltose were considerably larger in the glossopharyngeal nerve than in the chorda tympani nerve. This can be taken as an indication that the posterior region of the tongue serves as the major receptive area for sweet in cattle.

  5. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses.

    PubMed

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M; Blyth, Gavin T; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-01-29

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses.

  6. Nox4 NADPH Oxidase Mediates Peroxynitrite-dependent Uncoupling of Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase and Fibronectin Expression in Response to Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doug-Yoon; Wauquier, Fabien; Eid, Assaad A.; Roman, Linda J.; Ghosh-Choudhury, Goutam; Khazim, Khaled; Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Activation of glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) by angiotensin II (Ang II) leads to extracellular matrix accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that, in MCs, Ang II induces endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased production of NO. Ang II promotes a rapid increase in 3-nitrotyrosine formation, and uric acid attenuates Ang II-induced decrease in NO bioavailability, demonstrating that peroxynitrite mediates the effects of Ang II on eNOS dysfunction. Ang II rapidly up-regulates Nox4 protein. Inhibition of Nox4 abolishes the increase in ROS and peroxynitrite generation as well as eNOS uncoupling triggered by Ang II, indicating that Nox4 is upstream of eNOS. This pathway contributes to Ang II-mediated fibronectin accumulation in MCs. Ang II also elicits an increase in mitochondrial abundance of Nox4 protein, and the oxidase contributes to ROS production in mitochondria. Overexpression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase prevents the stimulatory effects of Ang II on mitochondrial ROS production, loss of NO availability, and MC fibronectin accumulation, whereas manganese superoxide dismutase depletion increases mitochondrial ROS, NO deficiency, and fibronectin synthesis basally and in cells exposed to Ang II. This work provides the first evidence that uncoupled eNOS is responsible for Ang II-induced MC fibronectin accumulation and identifies Nox4 and mitochondrial ROS as mediators of eNOS dysfunction. These data shed light on molecular processes underlying the oxidative signaling cascade engaged by Ang II and identify potential targets for intervention to prevent renal fibrosis. PMID:23940049

  7. Innate mechanisms for Bifidobacterium lactis to activate transient pro-inflammatory host responses in intestinal epithelial cells after the colonization of germ-free rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Hoffmann, Micha; Szcesny, Silke; Blaut, Michael; Haller, Dirk

    2005-08-01

    Bifidobacteria comprise a dominant microbial population group in the human intestinal tract with purported beneficial health effects on the host. In this study, we characterized the molecular mechanisms for the initial interaction of probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis strain BB12 with native and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines. We showed that B. lactis-monoassociated Fisher F344 rats transiently induce phosphorylation/activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptionally active subunit RelA and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 in native IEC at day 5 after initial bacterial colonization. In addition, Interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene expression was significantly increased at day 5, demonstrating the physiological relevance of transient transcription factor activation in IEC. In contrast, Bacteroides vulgatus-monoassociated Fisher rats revealed RelA but not p38 MAPK phosphorylation and failed to trigger significant IL-6 gene expression in native IEC. Moreover, we demonstrated that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB RelA and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in IEC lines. Adenoviral delivery of mutant IKK-beta (Ad5dnIKKbeta) and inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway through the pharmacological inhibitor SB203580 significantly blocked B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression in IEC, suggesting that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB and MAPK signaling to induce gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Regarding the mechanisms of bacteria epithelial cell cross-talk, B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression was completely inhibited in TLR2 deficient mouse embryogenic fibroblasts (MEF TLR2-/-) as well as TLR2DeltaTIR transfected Mode-K cells. In