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Sample records for ii transient response

  1. Model refinement using transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Carne, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A method is presented for estimating uncertain or unknown parameters in a mathematical model using measurements of transient response. The method is based on a least squares formulation in which the differences between the model and test-based responses are minimized. An application of the method is presented for a nonlinear structural dynamic system. The method is also applied to a model of the Department of Energy armored tractor trailer. For the subject problem, the transient response was generated by driving the vehicle over a bump of prescribed shape and size. Results from the analysis and inspection of the test data revealed that a linear model of the vehicle`s suspension is not adequate to accurately predict the response caused by the bump.

  2. Transient response of lateral photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, E. H.; Hieronymi, F.; Kuhl, D.; Dröge, E.; Bimberg, D.

    1993-05-01

    A two-dimensional physical device model for characterizing the transient operation of lateral photodetectors is presented. It is based upon a corpuscular approach where the impulse response is constituted by the superposition of a large number of photocurrent pulses originating from spatially distributed discrete electron-hole pairs generated by an optical impulse. The motion of photogenerated carriers and the resulting photocurrent pulses in the external circuit are related by Ramo's theorem which is shown to be fundamental for gaining a correct understanding of the time response of lateral detectors. The accuracy of the predictions obtained from the modeling is underpinned by their excellent agreement with experimental data on the impulse response of InP:Fe/InGaAs:Fe metal-semiconductor-metal detectors.

  3. Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part II: Spatial and temporal structure of response

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.; Mitchell, J.F.B.

    1995-01-01

    A high-resolution (2.75{degrees} lat x 3.75{degrees} long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases linearly, there is a delay of about 30 yr before the ocean warms appreciably. This {open_quotes}cold start{close_quotes} is, at least partly, an artifact of the experimental design. At the time of doubling (after 70 yr), the patterns of change are similar to those found in comparable studies of the equilibrium response, except in the high latitudes of the Southern Ocean and the North Atlantic, where the warming is considerably reduced. The mechanisms leading to this reduction are discussed. After two to three decades, the pattern of warming is well established. The warming over land is substantially larger than that over the sea, with a consequent lowering of surface pressure over the northern continents in summer. The patterns of changes in precipitation and soil moisture take longer to establish themselves, although locally there are consistent changes after the third decade. 55 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Catalysts on the basis of activated aluminum alloys: II. Study of carbon monoxide oxidation on copper-containing catalysts by the transient response method

    SciTech Connect

    Subbotin, A.N.; Gudkov, B.S.; Yakerson, V.I.

    1995-03-01

    Specific features of the mechanism of CO oxidation on copper-containing catalysts prepared from copper-aluminum alloys are studied by the transient-response method using mass-spectrometric analysis of the reaction mixture. Two forms of oxygen, related to the copper component of the catalyst, are found to take part in the reaction. Carbon monoxide interacts either from the gas phase or from a very weakly bonded adsorption complex at the surface.

  5. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  6. Heat pipe transient response approximation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and concise routine that approximates the response of an alkali metal heat pipe to changes in evaporator heat transfer rate is described. This analytically based routine is compared with data from a cylindrical heat pipe with a crescent-annular wick that undergoes gradual (quasi-steady) transitions through the viscous and condenser boundary heat transfer limits. The sonic heat transfer limit can also be incorporated into this routine for heat pipes with more closely coupled condensers. The advantages and obvious limitations of this approach are discussed. For reference, a source code listing for the approximation appears at the end of this paper.

  7. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part II: Analysis of ITER plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, Gianfranco; Raffray, A. René

    1997-04-01

    The transient thermal model RACLETTE (acronym of Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation) described in part I of this paper is applied here to analyse the heat transfer and erosion effects of various slow (100 ms-10 s) high power energy transients on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These have a strong bearing on the PFC design and need careful analysis. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the plasma excursions are established. The temperature variation with time and space is evaluated together with the extent of vaporisation and melting (the latter only for metals) for the different candidate armour materials considered for the design (i.e., Be for the primary first wall, Be and CFCs for the limiter, Be, W, and CFCs for the divertor plates) and including for certain cases low-density vapour shielding effects. The critical heat flux, the change of the coolant parameters and the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability that could result under certain conditions during these transients, for example for the limiter, are also evaluated. Based on the results, the design implications on the heat removal performance and erosion damage of the variuos ITER PFCs are critically discussed and some recommendations are made for the selection of the most adequate protection materials and optimum armour thickness.

  8. Transient Response of FGM Pressure Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekel, Hakan; Keles, Ibrahim; Temel, Beytullah; Tutuncu, Naki

    The present study aims to investigate the transient behavior of thick-walled cylinders under dynamic internal pressure. Analytical solutions are possible only for simple time-dependent pressure functions. The solution procedure presented is general in the sense that the pressure applied may be an arbitrary continuous function of time, impulsive or given in a discrete form. The material considered is isotropic and heterogeneous with properties varying in the radial direction termed as Functionally Graded Material (FGM). Laplace transform method is used and the inversion into the time domain is performed using the modified Durbin's method. Verification of the numerical procedure is performed by comparing the results with those of an analytical solution available in the literature for a simple exponentially-varying pressure. The inhomogeneity constant in the material property model is shown to have a significant effect on the transient response.

  9. Transient Response Astronomy: How and Why

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, R.; Williams, R.

    2010-12-01

    A time domain tsunami threatens observational astronomy. Survey archives of the static sky have the chance to mature for several years before being published. But vast cascades of celestial transient events will be released from the very beginning of grand new projects such as the Large Synoptic Survey, Pan-STARRS and the Dark Energy Survey. Rapid follow-up combined with reliable semantic classification will be required for scientifically productive transient response observing modes. The VOEvent standard of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance is one ingredient for constructing flexible, efficient, autonomous architectures for carrying out experimental design when time is of the essence. We discuss constraints of scheduling, robotic control, observing modes, cadence, instrumentation, and telescope networking that will determine the success or failure of the systematic exploration of the terrain of time.

  10. The Transient Response of Cooling Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. Eric

    1982-10-01

    Cooling ponds are a form of closed cycle cooling used for steam-electric power plants. Because of their thermal inertia they provide an advantage over cooling towers in filtering fluctuations in intake temperature, which results in improved plant efficiency. By using linear systems theory, the transient behavior of various types of ponds is analyzed in response to periodic meteorological conditions (characterized by equilibrium temperature) and plant operational conditions (characterized by condenser temperature rise). Frequency response is expressed in terms of dimensionless ratios involving frequency of input forcing, characteristic hydraulic residence and surface response times, and appropriate mixing parameters. Results are also interpreted with respect to physical design variables, such as pond area, depth, degree of stratification, intake submergence, discharge entrance mixing, condenser flow rate, and temperature rise.

  11. Transient helium II heat transfer through random packed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlaan, Mark H.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    In this study time dependant heat flow through superfluid helium (He II) contained in porous media is examined. Using a porous insulation instead of fully epoxy-impregnated insulation could potentially increase cooling efficiency by allowing an intimate contact of He II with the conductor. The present work focuses on understanding heat transfer in He II contained in a bed of polyethylene spheres of uniform size arranged in a random pack. Measured results include the transient temperature decay across the bed of packed spheres (diameters of 35, 49 and 98 microns) when heat addition is removed on one side of the porous media while the other is held at bath temperature. Bath temperatures range from 1.7 to 2.1 K. Two flow regimes (transitional and turbulent) are decipherable from the dependence of the temperature gradient on the heat flux. Past steady state, turbulent He II heat transfer experiments in the same media have concluded that the Gorter-Mellink exponent varies from 3.3 to 3.4 in this temperature range. Transient results compare favorably to a one-dimensional numerical solution that considers a variable Gorter-Mellink exponent and a piece-wise determination of the heat flux.

  12. Cascade flutter analysis with transient response aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods for calculating linear frequency domain aerodynamic coefficients from a time marching Full Potential cascade solver are developed and verified. In the first method, the Influence Coefficient, solutions to elemental problems are superposed to obtain the solutions for a cascade in which all blades are vibrating with a constant interblade phase angle. The elemental problem consists of a single blade in the cascade oscillating while the other blades remain stationary. In the second method, the Pulse Response, the response to the transient motion of a blade is used to calculate influence coefficients. This is done by calculating the Fourier Transforms of the blade motion and the response. Both methods are validated by comparison with the Harmonic Oscillation method and give accurate results. The aerodynamic coefficients obtained from these methods are used for frequency domain flutter calculations involving a typical section blade structural model. An eigenvalue problem is solved for each interblade phase angle mode and the eigenvalues are used to determine aeroelastic stability. Flutter calculations are performed for two examples over a range of subsonic Mach numbers.

  13. Transient response of premixed methane flames

    SciTech Connect

    Vagelopoulos, Christina M.; Frank, Jonathan H.

    2006-08-15

    The response of premixed methane-air flames to transient strain and local variations in equivalence ratio is studied during isolated interactions between a line-vortex pair and a V-flame. The temporal evolution of OH and CH is measured with planar laser-induced fluorescence for N{sub 2}-diluted flames with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.2. One-dimensional laminar flame calculations are used to simulate the flame response to unsteady strain and variations in reactant composition. When the reactant composition of the vortex pair and the V-flame are identical, the measurements and predictions show that the peak mole fractions of OH and CH decay monotonically in lean, stoichiometric, and rich flames. We also investigate the effects of a vortex pair with a leaner composition than the V-flame. In a stoichiometric flame, the leaner vortex enhances the decay of both OH and CH. In a rich flame, we observe an abrupt increase in OH-LIF signal and a disappearance of CH-LIF signal that are consistent with a previous experimental investigation. Our results indicate that the previously observed OH burst and CH breakage were caused by a difference in the equivalence ratios of the vortex pair and the main reactant flow. A numerical study shows that N{sub 2} dilution enhances the response of premixed flames to unsteady strain and variations in stoichiometry. Reaction-path and sensitivity analyses indicate that the peak OH and CH mole fractions exhibit significant sensitivity to the main branching reaction, H+O{sub 2} {r_reversible}OH+O. The sensitivity of OH and CH to this and other reactions is enhanced by N{sub 2} dilution. As a result, N{sub 2}-diluted flames provide a good test case for studying the reliability of chemical kinetic and transport models. (author)

  14. Analysis of nonlinear transient responses of piezoelectric resonators.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Manabu; Takahashi, Seita; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2011-09-01

    The electric transient response method is an effective technique to evaluate material constants of piezoelectric ceramics under high-power driving. In this study, we tried to incorporate nonlinear piezoelectric behaviors in the analysis of transient responses. As a base for handling the nonlinear piezoelectric responses, we proposed an assumption that the electric displacement is proportional to the strain without phase lag, which could be described by a real and constant piezoelectric e-coefficient. Piezoelectric constitutive equations including nonlinear responses were proposed to calculate transient responses of a piezoelectric resonator. The envelopes and waveforms of current and vibration velocity in transient responses observed in some piezoelectric ceramics could be fitted with the calculation including nonlinear responses. The procedure for calculation of mechanical quality factor Q(m) for piezoelectric resonators with nonlinear behaviors was also proposed.

  15. Transient response characteristics in a biomolecular integral controller.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shaunak

    2016-04-01

    The cellular behaviour of perfect adaptation is achieved through the use of an integral control element in the underlying biomolecular circuit. It is generally unclear how integral action affects the important aspect of transient response in these biomolecular systems, especially in light of the fact that it typically deteriorates the transient response in engineering contexts. To address this issue, the authors investigated the transient response in a computational model of a simple biomolecular integral control system involved in bacterial signalling. They find that the transient response can actually speed up as the integral gain parameter increases. On further analysis, they find that the underlying dynamics are composed of slow and fast modes and the speed-up of the transient response is because of the speed-up of the slow-mode dynamics. Finally, they note how an increase in the integral gain parameter also leads to a decrease in the amplitude of the transient response, consistent with the overall improvement in the transient response. These results should be useful in understanding the overall effect of integral action on system dynamics, particularly for biomolecular systems.

  16. Type II intermediate-luminosity optical transients (ILOTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2017-01-01

    We propose that in a small fraction of intermediate luminosity optical transients (ILOTs) powered by a strongly interacting binary system, the ejected mass in the equatorial plane can block the central source from our line of sight. We can therefore observe only radiation that is reprocessed by polar outflow, much as in type II active galactic nuclei (AGN). An ejection of M_ej,e=10^{-4} M_⊙ (1 M_⊙) at 30 degrees from the equatorial plane and at a velocity of v_e = 100 {km} {s}^{-1} will block the central source in the NIR for about 5 years (500 years). During that period of time the object might disappear in the visible band, and be detected only in the IR band due to polar dust. We raise the possibility that the recently observed disappearance of a red giant in the visible, designated N6946-BH1, is a type II ILOT rather than a failed supernova. For this case we estimate that the ejected mass in the polar direction was M_ej,p≈ 10^{-3} M_⊙. Our scenario predicts that this event should reinstate its visible emission in several decades.

  17. Transient response of a laminated composite plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S. K.; Ju, T. H.; Bratton, R. L.; Shah, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an investigation of the effect of layering on transient wave propagation in a laminated cross-ply plate, giving attention to the case of 2D plane strain in the case where a line vertical force is applied on a free surface of the plate; the line may be either parallel or perpendicular to the fibers in a ply. The results are in both the time and frequency domains for the normal stress component in the x direction, at a point on the surface of the plate on which the force is applied. Comparative results are also presented for a homogeneous plate whose properties are the static effective ones, when the number of plies is large.

  18. Transient response of sap flow to wind speed.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia R; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Wu, Shen-Yuang; Phillips, Nathan G

    2009-01-01

    Transient responses of sap flow to step changes in wind speed were experimentally investigated in a wind tunnel. A Granier-type sap flow sensor was calibrated and tested in a cylindrical tube for analysis of its transient time response. Then the sensor was used to measure the transient response of a well-watered Pachira macrocarpa plant to wind speed variations. The transient response of sap flow was described using the resistance-capacitance model. The steady sap flow rate increased as the wind speed increased at low wind speeds. Once the wind speed exceeded 8.0 m s(-1), the steady sap flow rate did not increase further. The transpiration rate, measured gravimetrically, showed a similar trend. The response of nocturnal sap flow to wind speed variation was also measured and compared with the results in the daytime. Under the same wind speed, the steady sap flow rate was smaller than that in the daytime, indicating differences between diurnal and nocturnal hydraulic function, and incomplete stomatal closure at night. In addition, it was found that the temporal response of the Granier sensor is fast enough to resolve the transient behaviour of water flux in plant tissue.

  19. Transient pupil response is modulated by contrast-based saliency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chin-An; Boehnke, Susan E; Itti, Laurent; Munoz, Douglas P

    2014-01-08

    The sudden appearance of a novel stimulus in the environment initiates a series of orienting responses that include coordinated shifts of gaze and attention, and also transient changes in pupil size. Although numerous studies have identified a significant effect of stimulus saliency on shifts of gaze and attention, saliency effects on pupil size are less understood. To examine salience-evoked pupil responses, we presented visual, auditory, or audiovisual stimuli while monkeys fixated a central visual spot. Transient pupil dilation was elicited after visual stimulus presentation regardless of target luminance relative to background, and auditory stimuli also evoked similar pupil responses. Importantly, the evoked pupil response was modulated by contrast-based saliency, with faster and larger pupil responses following the presentation of more salient stimuli. The initial transient component of pupil dilation was qualitatively similar to that evoked by weak microstimulation of the midbrain superior colliculus. The pupil responses elicited by audiovisual stimuli were well predicted by a linear summation of each modality response. Together, the results suggest that the transient pupil response, as one component of orienting, is modulated by contrast-based saliency, and the superior colliculus is likely involved in its coordination.

  20. Response of dairy cattle to transient voltages and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reinemann, D.J.; Laughlin, N.K.; Stetson, L.E.

    1995-07-01

    Stray voltages in dairy facilities have been studied since the 1970`s. Previous research using steady-state ac and dc voltages has defined cow-contact voltage levels which may cause behavior and associated production problems. This research was designed to address concerns over possible effects of transient voltages and magnetic fields on dairy cows. Dairy cows response to transient voltages and magnetic fields was measured. The waveforms of the transient voltages applied were: 5 cycles of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 83 ms, 1 cycle of 60-Hz ac with a total pulse time of 16 ms, and 1 cycle of an ac square wave (spiking positive and negative) of 2-ms duration. Alternating magnetic fields were produced by passing 60-Hz ac fundamental frequency with 2nd and 3rd harmonic and random noise components in metal structures around the cows. The maximum magnetic field associated with this current flow was in excess of 4 G. A wide range of sensitivity to transient voltages was observed among cows. Response levels from 24 cows to each transient exposure were normally distributed. No responses to magnetic fields were observed.

  1. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  2. Computing Response Of A Structure To Random Transient Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepcenko, Valentin; Margasahayam, Ravi

    1994-01-01

    Improved method of computing vibrational response of structure to transient random acoustic excitation at predominantly low frequencies devised, called "deterministic". Motivated by need to analyze more accurately vibro/acoustic responses of structures at spacecraft-launching facilities and determine whether need for reinforcement or redesign to withstand launch environment. Also used to study such phenomena as earthquake motions, ocean waves, aircraft pressure gusts, responses of bridges to winds, and effects to jet-engine noise on aircraft structures.

  3. Rotor response for transient unbalance changes in a nonlinear simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hine, M. J.; Landis, C. E.; Beatty, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Transient unbalance shifts were determined not to excite a rotor instability in the high pressure turbomachinery of the Space Shuttle Main Engine using the current rotor dynamic models. Sudden unbalance changes of relatively small magnitudes during fast-speed ramps showed stable nonsynchronous motion depending on the resultant unbalance distribution at subsequent high speed dwells. Transient moment unbalance may initiate a limit cycle subsynchronous response that shortly decays, but a persistent subsynchronous with large amplitudes was never achieved. These limit cycle subsynchronous amplitudes appear to be minimized with lower unbalance magnitudes, which indicates improved rotor balancing would sustain synchronous motion only. The transient unbalance phenomenon was determined to be an explanation for synchronous response shifts often observed during engine tests.

  4. Convergence of finite difference transient response computations for thin shells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, L. H.; Geers, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical studies pertaining to the limits of applicability of the finite difference method in the solution of linear transient shell response problems are performed, and a computational procedure for the use of the method is recommended. It is found that the only inherent limitation of the finite difference method is its inability to reproduce accurately response discontinuities. This is not a serious limitation in view of natural constraints imposed by the extension of Saint Venant's principle to transient response problems. It is also found that the short wavelength limitations of thin shell (Bernoulli-Euler) theory create significant convergence difficulties in computed response to certain types of transverse excitations. These difficulties may be overcome, however, through proper selection of finite difference mesh dimensions and temporal smoothing of the excitation.

  5. Transient unbalance response of four multilobe journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Li, D. F.; Choy, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    This work carries out an analysis of the transient response of four multilobe journal bearings (elliptical, offset, three-lobe, and four-lobe) subject to unbalance both below and above the linearized stability thresholds for the bearings. It extends the work of a previous paper on a balanced rotor in the same four bearing types. Transient orbits, bearing forces, and a numerical fast Fourier transform analysis of the orbits are presented. A comparison of bearing forces above the stability threshold for each bearing indicates that the elliptical bearing has the most violent whirl vibration amplitudes, while the offset bearing exhibits the least amount of subsynchronous vibration.

  6. Transient responses to spatial perturbations in advective systems.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kurt E; Nisbet, Roger M; McCauley, Edward

    2008-07-01

    We study the transient dynamics, following a spatially-extended perturbation of models describing populations residing in advective media such as streams and rivers. Our analyses emphasize metrics that are independent of initial perturbations-resilience, reactivity, and the amplification envelope-and relate them to component spatial wavelengths of the perturbation using spatial Fourier transforms of the state variables. This approach offers a powerful way of understanding the influence of spatial scale on the initial dynamics of a population following a spatially variable environmental perturbation, an important property in determining the ecological implications of transient dynamics in advective systems. We find that asymptotically stable systems may exhibit transient amplification of perturbations (i.e., have positive reactivity) for some spatial wavelengths and not others. Furthermore, the degree and duration of amplification varies strongly with spatial wavelength. For two single-population models, there is a relationship between transient dynamics and the response length that characterizes the steady state response to spatial perturbations: a long response length implies that peak amplification of perturbations is small and occurs fast. This relationship holds less generally in a specialist consumer-resource model, likely due to the model's tendency for flow-induced instabilities at an alternative characteristic spatial scale.

  7. Analysis of piping response to thermal and operational transients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reactor piping system is an extremely complex three-dimensional structure. Maintaining its structural integrity is essential to the safe operation of the reactor and the steam-supply system. In the safety analysis, various transient loads can be imposed on the piping which may cause plastic deformation and possible damage to the system, including those generated from hydrodynamic wave propagations, thermal and operational transients, as well as the seismic events. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a three-dimensional (3-D) piping code, SHAPS, aimed for short-duration transients due to wave propagation, has been developed. Since 1984, the development work has been shifted to the long-duration accidents originating from the thermal and operational transient. As a result, a new version of the code, SHAPS-2, is being established. This paper describes many features related to this later development. To analyze piping response generated from thermal and operational transients, a 3-D implicit finite element algorithm has been developed for calculating the hoop, flexural, axial, and torsional deformations induced by the thermomechanical loads. The analysis appropriately accounts for stresses arising from the temperature dependence of the elastic material properties, the thermal expansion of the materials, and the changes in the temperature-dependent yield surface. Thermal softening, failure, strain rate, creep, and stress ratching can also be considered.

  8. Reducing Conservatism of Analytic Transient Response Bounds via Shaping Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, Aiyueh; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Jan, Jiann-Woei; Grigoriadis, Karolos; Hua, Tuyen (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Recent results show that the peak transient response of a linear system to bounded energy inputs can be computed using the energy-to-peak gain of the system. However, analytically computed peak response bound can be conservative for a class of class bounded energy signals, specifically pulse trains generated from jet firings encountered in space vehicles. In this paper, shaping filters are proposed as a Methodology to reduce the conservatism of peak response analytic bounds. This Methodology was applied to a realistic Space Station assembly operation subject to jet firings. The results indicate that shaping filters indeed reduce the predicted peak response bounds.

  9. Transient and sustained neural responses to death-related linguistic cues.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhao; Han, Shihui

    2013-06-01

    Recent research showed that perception of death-related vs death-unrelated linguistic cues produced increased frontoparietal activity but decreased insular activity. This study investigated (i) whether the increased frontoparietal and decreased insular activities are, respectively, associated with transient trial-specific processes of death-related linguistic cues and sustained death-related thought during death-relevance judgments on linguistic cues and (ii) whether the neural activity underlying death-related thought can predict individuals' dispositional death anxiety. Participants were presented with death-related/unrelated words, life-related/unrelated words, and negative-valence/neutral words in separate sessions. Participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing death-relevance, life-relevance, and valence judgments on the words, respectively. The contrast of death-related vs death-unrelated words during death-relevance judgments revealed transient increased activity in the left inferior parietal lobule, the right frontal eye field, and the right superior parietal lobule. The contrast of death-relevance judgments vs life-relevance/valence judgments showed decreased activity in the bilateral insula. The sustained insular activity was correlated with dispositional death anxiety, but only in those with weak transient frontoparietal responses to death-related words. Our results dissociate the transient and sustained neural responses to death-related linguistic cues and suggest that the combination of the transient and sustained neural activities can predict dispositional death anxiety.

  10. Transient and sustained neural responses to death-related linguistic cues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhenhao

    2013-01-01

    Recent research showed that perception of death-related vs death-unrelated linguistic cues produced increased frontoparietal activity but decreased insular activity. This study investigated (i) whether the increased frontoparietal and decreased insular activities are, respectively, associated with transient trial-specific processes of death-related linguistic cues and sustained death-related thought during death-relevance judgments on linguistic cues and (ii) whether the neural activity underlying death-related thought can predict individuals’ dispositional death anxiety. Participants were presented with death-related/unrelated words, life-related/unrelated words, and negative-valence/neutral words in separate sessions. Participants were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing death-relevance, life-relevance, and valence judgments on the words, respectively. The contrast of death-related vs death-unrelated words during death-relevance judgments revealed transient increased activity in the left inferior parietal lobule, the right frontal eye field, and the right superior parietal lobule. The contrast of death-relevance judgments vs life-relevance/valence judgments showed decreased activity in the bilateral insula. The sustained insular activity was correlated with dispositional death anxiety, but only in those with weak transient frontoparietal responses to death-related words. Our results dissociate the transient and sustained neural responses to death-related linguistic cues and suggest that the combination of the transient and sustained neural activities can predict dispositional death anxiety. PMID:22422804

  11. Response of traveling waves to transient inputs in neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.; Ermentrout, Bard

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the effects of transient stimulation on traveling waves in neural field equations. Neural fields are modeled as integro-differential equations whose convolution term represents the synaptic connections of a spatially extended neuronal network. The adjoint of the linearized wave equation can be used to identify how a particular input will shift the location of a traveling wave. This wave response function is analogous to the phase response curve of limit cycle oscillators. For traveling fronts in an excitatory network, the sign of the shift depends solely on the sign of the transient input. A complementary estimate of the effective shift is derived using an equation for the time-dependent speed of the perturbed front. Traveling pulses are analyzed in an asymmetric lateral inhibitory network and they can be advanced or delayed, depending on the position of spatially localized transient inputs. We also develop bounds on the amplitude of transient input necessary to terminate traveling pulses, based on the global bifurcation structure of the neural field.

  12. Response of traveling waves to transient inputs in neural fields.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P; Ermentrout, Bard

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the effects of transient stimulation on traveling waves in neural field equations. Neural fields are modeled as integro-differential equations whose convolution term represents the synaptic connections of a spatially extended neuronal network. The adjoint of the linearized wave equation can be used to identify how a particular input will shift the location of a traveling wave. This wave response function is analogous to the phase response curve of limit cycle oscillators. For traveling fronts in an excitatory network, the sign of the shift depends solely on the sign of the transient input. A complementary estimate of the effective shift is derived using an equation for the time-dependent speed of the perturbed front. Traveling pulses are analyzed in an asymmetric lateral inhibitory network and they can be advanced or delayed, depending on the position of spatially localized transient inputs. We also develop bounds on the amplitude of transient input necessary to terminate traveling pulses, based on the global bifurcation structure of the neural field.

  13. Transient hot-film sensor response in a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.; Ortgies, K. R.; Gartenberg, E.

    1989-01-01

    Shock tube experiments were performed to determine the response of a hot-film sensor, mounted flush on the side wall of a shock tube, to unsteady flow behind a normal shock wave. The present experiments attempt to isolate the response of the anemometer due only to the change in convective heat transfer at the hot-film surface. The experiments, performed at low supersonic shock speeds in air, are described along with the data acquisition procedure. The change in convective heat transfer is deduced from the data and the results are compared with those from transient boundary layer theory and another set of experimental results. Finally, a transient local heat transfer coefficient is formulated for use as the forcing function in a hot-film sensor instrument model simulation.

  14. Transient response of a signal through a dispersive invisibility cloak.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao; Li, Rujiang; Jiang, Yuyu; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Huaping; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-01

    The transient response of the invisibility cloak has long been an interesting research topic, since it is valuable to further understand the steady-state process and to design more effective cloaks. Here we investigate the transient response of a set of dispersive invisibility cloaks impinged on by a sinusoidal signal or a modulated Gaussian pulse using the finite difference time domain method. Cylindrical cloaks with linear, convex, and concave transformation functions are studied. We find that their time to reach a steady state is different and they grow significantly when the thickness of the cloak decreases. Moreover, a centrally depressed ladder-like spatial time delay distribution is observed with a modulated Gaussian pulse. We show that the central frequency of the Gaussian pulse suffers a blue-shift in the forward scattering direction in agreement with previous theoretical predictions.

  15. Laboratory studies of spacecraft response to transient discharge pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanevicz, J. E.; Adamo, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The in-orbit measurement of spacecraft discharge properties was investigated. The experiments include design and fabrication of appropriate sensors and effects of spacecraft electromagnetic responses on the interpretation of the discharge data. Electric field sensors especially designed to response to high-speed transient signals were installed on a mock-up of a satellite. The simple mock-up was basically a sheet of aluminum rolled to form a cylinder. A movable spark-discharge noise source designed to be electromagnetically isolated from its power supply system was used to induce transient signals at various locations on the spacecraft's outer surface. The measurements and their implications are described. It is concluded that practical orbital measurements to define discharge noise source properties should be possible, and that simple mock-ups of the type described below are useful in sensor system design and data interpretation.

  16. Extended overpower transient testing of LMFBR oxide pins in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.; Tani, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a joint effort between the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan and the US Department of Energy, a series of five extended slow overpower transient tests are being conducted in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) on preirradiated mixed oxide fuel and blanket pins. In the first two tests conducted in the series, fuel and blanket pins were subjected to a 0.1%/s power ramp to approx. 60% overpower before the transient termination. None of the test pins breached during the transient. A significant cladding breaching margin over the normal PPS trip setting of approx. 12 to 15% was thus demonstrated for the 0.1%/s ramp. The transient-induced pin cladding strains, caused principally by fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, were small but measurable.

  17. Transient photocyclization in ruthenium(ii) polypyridine complexes of indolamines.

    PubMed

    Carrone, G; Zayat, L; Slep, L D; Etchenique, R

    2017-01-18

    Ruthenium polypyridine complexes have proved to be useful caging groups for visible-light photodelivery of biomolecules. In most photoreactions, one ligand is expelled upon irradiation, yielding ruthenium mono-aqua complexes and no other photoproduct. In this work we show that a long-lived transient photoproduct is generated when the ruthenium complexes involve indolamines. The spatial conformation of this species is compatible with a cyclic structure that contains both the amine and the normally non-coordinating aromatic ring coordinated to the ruthenium center.

  18. The transient thermal response of a tubular solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1976-01-01

    A special analytical solution is provided for the timewise response of the circulating fluid temperatures when a sudden step change of the input solar radiation is imposed and remains constant thereafter. An example which demonstrates the transient temperatures at the exit section of a single collector with two different flow patterns is presented. This study is used to supplement some numerical solutions to provide a fairly complete coverage for this type of solar collector.

  19. Transient rheology of stimuli responsive hydrogels: Integrating microrheology and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Jun

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have diverse potential applications in the field of drug delivery, tissue engineering, agriculture, cosmetics, gene therapy, and as sensors and actuators due to their unique responsiveness to external signals, such as pH, temperature, and ionic strength. Understanding the responsiveness of hydrogel structure and rheology to these stimuli is essential for designing materials with desirable performance. However, no instrumentation and well-defined methodology are available to characterize the structural and rheological responses to rapid solvent changes. In this thesis, a new microrheology set-up is described, which allows us to quantitatively measure the transient rheological properties and microstructure of a variety of solvent-responsive complex fluids. The device was constructed by integrating particle tracking microrheology and microfluidics and offers unique experimental capabilities for performing solvent-reponse measurements on soft fragile materials without applying external shear forces. Transient analysis methods to quantitatively obtain rheological properties were also constructed, and guidelines for the trade-off between statistical validity and temporal resolution were developed to accurately capture physical transitions. Employing the new device and methodology, we successfully quantified the transient rheological and microstructural responses during gel formation and break-up, and viscosity changes of solvent-responsive complex fluids. The analysis method was expanded for heterogeneous samples, incorporating methods to quantify the microrheology of samples with broad distributions of individual particle dynamics. Transient microrheology measurements of fragile, heterogeneous, self-assembled block copolypeptide hydrogels revealed that solvent exchange via convective mixing and dialysis can lead to significantly different gel properties and that commonly applied sample preparation protocols for the characterization of soft

  20. Transient response of a concentric evacuated tubular solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Jakubowski, Gerald S.; Springman, Richard A.

    The transient and the steady state performances of an evacuated coaxial tubular solar collector were investigated. A purely implicit central finite differencing numerical technique was used to determine the time-varying temperature distributions in the collector components as well as the fluid exit temperature. Experimental indoor transient tests were conducted in which step inputs of insolation were used. Close agreeement between the experimental and the theoretical results was obtained. The computer model was found to be useful to carry out a complete parametric study. The latter showed that the fluid flow rate had the largest effect on the performance of the collector tube. Lower flow rates resulted in lower efficiencies and longer response times.

  1. Transient cardio-respiratory responses to visually induced tilt illusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Ramsdell, C. D.; Mullen, T. J.; Oman, C. M.; Harm, D. L.; Paloski, W. H.

    2000-01-01

    Although the orthostatic cardio-respiratory response is primarily mediated by the baroreflex, studies have shown that vestibular cues also contribute in both humans and animals. We have demonstrated a visually mediated response to illusory tilt in some human subjects. Blood pressure, heart and respiration rate, and lung volume were monitored in 16 supine human subjects during two types of visual stimulation, and compared with responses to real passive whole body tilt from supine to head 80 degrees upright. Visual tilt stimuli consisted of either a static scene from an overhead mirror or constant velocity scene motion along different body axes generated by an ultra-wide dome projection system. Visual vertical cues were initially aligned with the longitudinal body axis. Subjective tilt and self-motion were reported verbally. Although significant changes in cardio-respiratory parameters to illusory tilts could not be demonstrated for the entire group, several subjects showed significant transient decreases in mean blood pressure resembling their initial response to passive head-up tilt. Changes in pulse pressure and a slight elevation in heart rate were noted. These transient responses are consistent with the hypothesis that visual-vestibular input contributes to the initial cardiovascular adjustment to a change in posture in humans. On average the static scene elicited perceived tilt without rotation. Dome scene pitch and yaw elicited perceived tilt and rotation, and dome roll motion elicited perceived rotation without tilt. A significant correlation between the magnitude of physiological and subjective reports could not be demonstrated.

  2. Potentiometric sensor for heparin polyion: transient behavior and response mechanism.

    PubMed

    Langmaier, Jan; Samcova, Eva; Samec, Zdenek

    2007-04-01

    Chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to study the transient behavior and the potentiometric response mechanism of the polymer membrane-based sensor for heparin. Membrane with a composition of 66 wt % poly(vinyl chloride), 33 wt % o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (plasticizer), and 0.05 M tridodecylmethylammonium chloride (ion exchanger) was deposited on the surface of a silver or a glassy carbon (GC) electrode. In the latter case, the membrane contained also 0.1 M 1,1'-dimethylferrocene/1,1'-dimethylferricenium+ couple ensuring the electronic contact between the membrane and GC. The sensor was dipped in an aqueous solution of 0.1 M LiCl, which was stirred with a magnetic stirrer (2-18.2 Hz), and eventually spiked with heparin (0.05-5 U mL-1). Chronopotentiometric measurements were carried out using either the Ag supported membrane with a thickness>100 microm or the GC supported membrane with a defined thickness of 2-30 microm, which was also used in impedance measurements. Remarkable features of the potentiometric response include the linear dependence of the initial slope of the potential transient on the heparin concentration in the aqueous phase and on the square root of the stirring frequency, and the absence of the effect of the membrane thickness. Impedance measurements (0.1 Hz-10 kHz) made it possible to identify and to evaluate the geometric capacitance and the capacitance of the electric double layer at the membrane/solution interface, the bulk membrane and charge-transfer resistances, and the Warburg impedance of the chloride transport. Changes in the membrane bulk and charge-transfer resistances and the Warburg impedance upon spiking the aqueous solution with heparin were found to be consistent with the steady-state response of approximately -25 mV, indicating that the bulk chloride concentration in the membrane decreased to about half of its initial value. A novel theoretical model of the transient behavior was developed

  3. Transient thermal response of a hot-wire anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, S. C.; Foss, J. F.

    2003-03-01

    The ability of a thermal anemometry system to accurately measure unsteady fluid velocity depends on the electrical control system as well as the thermal properties of the sensor. The present work is a numerical study of the thermal transient response of a hot-wire. A conventional constant temperature anemometer with an ideal feedback amplifier as well as a pulse width modulated system were used to model the electrical current supplied to the sensor to maintain a nominally constant sensor resistance. The agreement between these two electrical models confirmed that the response characteristics are only due to thermal effects. The thermal response was tested by providing a known input function for the cooling velocity, and comparing this with the output of the model. The first test used a step input function. It was found that the thermal transient effects along the length of the sensor caused the system to initially under predict the actual velocity increase; this was followed by an exponential increase to the steady state velocity. Secondly, the model was tested with sinusoidal inputs over a wide frequency range. The ratio: indicated-velocity/input-velocity, as a function of the input frequency was used to characterize the 'thermal frequency response'.

  4. Vegetation Response to Transient Drought Events in the Upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minckley, T.; Booth, R.; Jackson, S.

    2006-12-01

    Two paleohydrological proxies from bog sediments, water level based on testate amoebae assemblages and peat humification, indicate both prolonged and transient drought events over the past 3500 years. High- resolution pollen data for the periods 3000-2200 and 1400-500 cal yr BP from Minden Bog (46.6106N, 82.8347W), Michigan were examined to assess how regional vegetation composition was affected by drought events. Between 3000-2200 cal yr BP, four intervals of multi-decadal drought and one prolonged drought episode were identified. Four of the five dominant arboreal pollen taxa (Betula, Fagus, Quercus and Pinus) do not appear to response to these particular events. In contrast, Tsuga percentages rise at the onset of a prolonged drought ca. 2850 cal yr BP, but decrease rapidly for the duration of this event. Between 1400-500 cal yr BP, five transient droughts and one prolonged dry period were identified. Betula, Pinus, and Tsuga generally increased and Fagus decreased during this period. These trends are punctuated by stepwise changes in pollen percentages associated with the onset and persistence of drought, particularly with the drought starting ca. 1000 cal yr BP. These data suggest that pollen-assemblage responses to climate variation occur across a broad range of scales, involving processes at landscape, community, population, and individual levels. At centennial timescales regional forest composition changes in response to climate variation via demographic processes and altered disturbance regimes. These responses can be rapid if the forcing is large enough. Transient drought events of lower magnitude (e.g., decadal/multidecadal) are accompanied by pollen responses, but these may be linked to changes in pollen productivity at the scale of individual trees across the landscape rather than demographic changes. Tree species differ in their physiological and reproductive responses to drought stress, with some reducing allocations to pollen productivity and others

  5. Phase-Amplitude Response Functions for Transient-State Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The phase response curve (PRC) is a powerful tool to study the effect of a perturbation on the phase of an oscillator, assuming that all the dynamics can be explained by the phase variable. However, factors like the rate of convergence to the oscillator, strong forcing or high stimulation frequency may invalidate the above assumption and raise the question of how is the phase variation away from an attractor. The concept of isochrons turns out to be crucial to answer this question; from it, we have built up Phase Response Functions (PRF) and, in the present paper, we complete the extension of advancement functions to the transient states by defining the Amplitude Response Function (ARF) to control changes in the transversal variables. Based on the knowledge of both the PRF and the ARF, we study the case of a pulse-train stimulus, and compare the predictions given by the PRC-approach (a 1D map) to those given by the PRF-ARF-approach (a 2D map); we observe differences up to two orders of magnitude in favor of the 2D predictions, especially when the stimulation frequency is high or the strength of the stimulus is large. We also explore the role of hyperbolicity of the limit cycle as well as geometric aspects of the isochrons. Summing up, we aim at enlightening the contribution of transient effects in predicting the phase response and showing the limits of the phase reduction approach to prevent from falling into wrong predictions in synchronization problems. List of Abbreviations PRC phase response curve, phase resetting curve. PRF phase response function. ARF amplitude response function. PMID:23945295

  6. Curve fitting of aeroelastic transient response data with exponential functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The extraction of frequency, damping, amplitude, and phase information from unforced transient response data is considered. These quantities are obtained from the parameters determined by fitting the digitized time-history data in a least-squares sense with complex exponential functions. The highlights of the method are described, and the results of several test cases are presented. The effects of noise are considered both by using analytical examples with random noise and by estimating the standard deviation of the parameters from maximum-likelihood theory.

  7. An Analysis of the Transient Responses of Acoustic Delay Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Tatsuo; Tominaga, Goroh

    1981-09-01

    Transient responses of acoustic delay lines (ADLs) were simulated on the assumptions that gas molecules in each segment of an ADL were in thermal equilibrium and that the straight-through component in the intruding gas was negligibly small. The flow rate of gas through an orifice was evaluated by using expressions of orifice conductance applicable in a wide pressure range. In order to examine the adequateness of the present method, the results of simulations were compared with several experimental data. The influence of the location of vacuum pumps and of arranging a high speed shutter at the entrance of an ADL were also simulated.

  8. CRTS-II discovery of an outburst of BH transient Swift J1357.2-0933

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A. A.; Graham, M. J.; Stern, D.; Catelan, M.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S. M.

    2017-04-01

    On 2017-04-20.33 UT CRTS-II detected an optical outburst of short period black hole transient (BHT) candidate Swift J1357.2-0933 (Krimm et al. 2011, ATel#3138; Rau et al. 2011, ATel#3140; Sanchez et al. 2015, MNRAS, 454, 2199).

  9. Alkylation of terminal alkynes with transient σ-alkylpalladium(II) complexes: a carboalkynylation route to alkyl-substituted alkynes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Bo; Huang, Xiao-Cheng; Liu, Yan-Yun; Song, Ren-Jie; Li, Jin-Heng

    2014-02-10

    A mild and general alkylation of terminal alkynes with transient σ-alkylpalladium(II) complexes for assembling alkyl-substituted alkynes is described. This method represents a new way to the use of transient σ-alkylpalladium(II) complexes in organic synthesis through 1,2-carboalkynylation of alkenes.

  10. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field.

    PubMed

    Sadeq, Zaheen S; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal "toy" model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  11. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeq, Zaheen S.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal “toy” model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  12. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    SciTech Connect

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-29

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (∼10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N{sub 2}) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (∼10{sup −3} Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (∼1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N{sub 2} gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N{sub 2}, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  13. Transient heat transfer in helium II due to a sudden vacuum break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosque, Ernesto S.; Dhuley, Ram C.; Van Sciver, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    To ensure future cryogenic devices meet safety and operational specifications, significant value is gained from a developed understanding of the transient heat fluxes that result from failure of an insulating vacuum jacket around a helium II (He II)-cooled device. A novel, one-dimensional experiment is successfully performed examining the phenomena immediately following a vacuum rupture onto a cryosurface. In the experiment, a fast-opening (˜10 ms) valve isolates a rigid container of ultra high purity nitrogen (N2) gas kept at room temperature and adjustable pressure from a vertically oriented, highly evacuated (˜10-3 Pa) tube roughly 1 m in length. The bottom of the evacuated tube is sealed via a 2.54 mm thick copper disk, whose bottom surface is in intimate contact with an open column of He II (˜1.8 K). The evacuated tube, disk, and He II column share a diameter of 24 mm. Opening the valve results in a vacuum rupture. N2 gas is immediately drawn into the evacuated space and cryopumped onto the disk as a growing layer of solid cryodeposit. Various coupled transient heat transfer processes proceed as the internal energy of the warm gas is transferred through the growing layer of solid N2, through the copper disk, and into the He II column. This work examines the qualitative nature of these transient phenomena and the magnitude of the heat fluxes present through each of the series of thermal resistances.

  14. Angular response calibration of the burst and transient source experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1988-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory includes four experiments designed to observe the gamma-ray universe. Laboratory measurements to test the response the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) modules to gamma-ray sources that are non-axial were recently completed. The results of these observations are necessary for the correct interpretation of BATSE data obtained after it is put in Earth orbit. The launch is planned for March, 1900. Preliminary analyses of these test data show the presence of a radial dependence to the detector's light collection efficiency. It is proposed to evaluate the importance of this radial response, analyze future experimental data to derive the actual functional dependence on radius, and calculate the net effect on the output spectrum as a function of the angle of incidence.

  15. Modeling rate sensitivity of exercise transient responses to limb motion.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Stanley M; Kato, Takahide

    2014-10-01

    Transient responses of ventilation (V̇e) to limb motion can exhibit predictive characteristics. In response to a change in limb motion, a rapid change in V̇e is commonly observed with characteristics different than during a change in workload. This rapid change has been attributed to a feed-forward or adaptive response. Rate sensitivity was explored as a specific hypothesis to explain predictive V̇e responses to limb motion. A simple model assuming an additive feed-forward summation of V̇e proportional to the rate of change of limb motion was studied. This model was able to successfully account for the adaptive phase correction observed during human sinusoidal changes in limb motion. Adaptation of rate sensitivity might also explain the reduction of the fast component of V̇e responses previously reported following sudden exercise termination. Adaptation of the fast component of V̇e response could occur by reduction of rate sensitivity. Rate sensitivity of limb motion was predicted by the model to reduce the phase delay between limb motion and V̇e response without changing the steady-state response to exercise load. In this way, V̇e can respond more quickly to an exercise change without interfering with overall feedback control. The asymmetry between responses to an incremental and decremental ramp change in exercise can also be accounted for by the proposed model. Rate sensitivity leads to predicted behavior, which resembles responses observed in exercise tied to expiratory reserve volume. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Evaluation of Stability and Transient Characteristics of ABWR-II Large Bundle Core and SSR Influence for Transient phenomena by TRACG Code

    SciTech Connect

    Masao, Chaki; Hideo, Soneda; Shinya, Mizokami; Hideya, Kitamura; Kouji, Hiraiwa; Takanori, Fukahori; Andersen, Jens G.

    2004-07-01

    The next generation ABWR, the ABWR-II, has been under development for more than a decade in Japan. Among various features newly adopted for the ABWR-II, a 1.5 times lager fuel bundle is notable. This bundle design makes it possible to increase the total number of fuel rods in the core while minimizing the reactor pressure vessel size increase. As a result, the void coefficient is more negative due to the harder neutron spectrum since a smaller hydrogen-to uranium (H/U) ratio with fuel inventory increase makes the neutron spectrum harder. This more negative void coefficient affects the stability and transient characteristics of the ABWR-II plant. We have evaluated the stability and transient characteristics by using analysis codes and proven that these characteristics do not affect the realization of the ABWR-II large bundle core concept. Furthermore, we have evaluated the influences for the stability and transient phenomena by using spectral shift rods (SSRs) for the ABWR-II core. The analytical results show that the use of SSRs increases the design margin for the core stability. Regarding transient phenomena, the analyses by the TRACG code show that the influence of using SSRs is very small and do not affect the realization of the ABWR-II plant. In addition, the sensitivity analyses with the TRACG code show that design parameters of SSRs, inlet hole diameter of ascending path etc, are not very sensitive for the transient phenomena. (authors)

  17. What can He II 304 Å tell us about transient seismic emission from solar flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, C.; Donea, A. C.

    2017-10-01

    After neary 20 years since their discovery by Kosovichev and Zharkova, the mechanics of the release of seismic transients into the solar interior from some flares remain a mystery. Seismically emissive flares invariably show the signatures of intense chromosphere heating consistent with pressure variations sufficient to drive seismic transients commensurate with helioseismic observations-under certain conditions. Magnetic observations show the signatures of apparent magnetic changes, suggesting Lorentz-force transients that could likewise drive seismic transients-similarly subject to certain conditions. But, the diagnostic signatures of both of these prospective drivers are apparent over vast regions from which no significant seismic emission emanates. What distinguishes the source regions of transient seismic emission from the much vaster regions that show the signatures of both transient heating and magnetic variations but are acoustically unproductive? Observations of acoustically active flares in He II 304 Å by the Atomospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) offer a promising new resource with which to address this question.

  18. A look at Francis runner blades response during transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, M.; Nicolle, J.; Morissette, J.-F.; Lawrence, M.

    2016-11-01

    Data shows that the mechanical response of Francis runner blades is sensitive to power plant control systems. To demonstrate this, we have explored two such systems: wicket gates opening and air admission. The proper control of these systems does more than warrant safe operation; they can also be used to minimize the strain cycle amplitudes during transients such as: startups, shutdowns and load rejections. Proper control parameters settings should minimize the equipment risk of fatigue failure without negative side effects on other components and objectives. With the help of measured examples from Hydro-Québec power plants, this paper demonstrates that a better understanding of these systems is needed in order to move beyond costly trial and error fine-tuning methodology.

  19. A Transient Response Method for Linear Coupled Substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Admire, J. R.; Brunty, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the transient response of a discrete coordinate model of a linear structural system composed of substructures. The method is applicable to systems consisting of any number of substructures, both determinate and indeterminate interface boundaries, and any topological arrangement of the substructures. The method is simple to implement from a computational point of view because the equations of motion of each of the substructures are solved independently, and the interface boundary compatibility conditions are enforced at each integration time step by a matrix multiplication. The method is demonstrated for a structural system consisting of two beam segments and acted upon by a time dependent force. The numerical results from the demonstration problem validates the accuracy of the method. The application of this method to structural systems with changing interface boundary conditions between substructures is discussed.

  20. Transient response of Salix cuttings to changing water level regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, L.; Signarbieux, C.; Turberg, P.; Buttler, A.; Perona, P.

    2015-03-01

    Sustainable water management requires an understanding of the effects of flow regulation on riparian ecomorphological processes. We investigated the transient response of Salix viminalis by examining the effect of water-level regimes on its above-ground and below-ground biomass. Four sets of Salix cuttings, three juveniles (in the first growing season) and one mature (1 year old), were planted and initially grown under the same water-level regime for 1 month. We imposed three different water-level regime treatments representing natural variability, a seasonal trend with no peaks, and minimal flow (characteristic of hydropower) consisting of a constant water level and natural flood peaks. We measured sap flux, stem water potential, photosynthesis, growth parameters, and final root architecture. The mature cuttings were not affected by water table dynamics, but the juveniles displayed causal relationships between the changing water regime, plant growth, and root distribution during a 2 month transient period. For example, a 50% drop in mean sap flux corresponded with a -1.5 Mpa decrease in leaf water potential during the first day after the water regime was changed. In agreement with published field observations, the cuttings concentrated their roots close to the mean water table of the corresponding treatment, allowing survival under altered conditions and resilience to successive stress events. Juvenile development was strongly impacted by the minimum flow regime, leading to more than 60% reduction of both above-ground and below-ground biomass, with respect to the other treatments. Hence, we suggest avoiding minimum flow regimes where Salix restoration is prioritized.

  1. Dabigatran following acute transient ischemic attack and minor stroke II (DATAS II).

    PubMed

    Ng, Kuan H; Sharma, Mukul; Benavente, Oscar; Gioia, Laura; Field, Thalia S; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Butcher, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Patients with transient ischemic attack or minor stroke are at high risk of early recurrent cerebrovascular events. Anticoagulation with heparin or warfarin acutely after ischemic stroke is at least as efficacious as aspirin for preventing recurrent events but is associated with an increased risk of clinical worsening due to hemorrhagic transformation. Aim and hypothesis We aim to demonstrate the safety of early anticoagulation with dabigatran, an oral direct thrombin inhibitor, in acute cerebrovascular syndrome patients. The primary hypothesis is that symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation rates in dabigatran and aspirin-treated patients will be similar. Sample size estimates At least 136 participants in two groups required to demonstrate an absolute between-group difference in the rate of hemorrhagic transformation of 5.6% with 80% power, assuming alpha = 5%. Methods and design A randomized, multicenter open-label clinical trial (NCT02295826). Three-hundred participants with a transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≤ 9) will undergo magnetic resonance imaging within 72 h of symptom onset and will be randomized to aspirin 81 mg daily or dabigatran 150 mg twice daily for 30 days. Participants undergo repeat magnetic resonance imaging at 30 days and clinical assessment to 90 days. Study outcomes The primary outcome is the symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation rate. Secondary outcomes include recurrent stroke and new ischemic lesions on repeat magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion This study will determine the safety of early anticoagulation with dabigatran in patients with acute transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke and will inform the design of a phase III randomized trial aimed at demonstrating reduced recurrent early ischemic events after acute transient ischemic attack/stroke.

  2. Unstable transient response of gyroscopic systems with stable eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, O.

    2016-06-01

    Gyroscopic conservative dynamical systems may exhibit flutter instability that leads to a pair of complex conjugate eigenvalues, one of which has a positive real part and thus leads to a divergent free response of the system. When dealing with non-conservative systems, the pitch fork bifurcation shifts toward the negative real part of the root locus, presenting a pair of eigenvalues with equal imaginary parts, while the real parts may or may not be negative. Several works study the stability of these systems for relevant engineering applications such as the flutter in airplane wings or suspended bridges, brake squeal, etc. and a common approach to detect the stability is the complex eigenvalue analysis that considers systems with all negative real part eigenvalues as stable systems. This paper studies analytically and numerically the cases where the free response of these systems exhibits a transient divergent time history even if all the eigenvalues have negative real part thus usually considered as stable, and relates such a behaviour to the non orthogonality of the eigenvectors. Finally, a numerical method to evaluate the presence of such instability is proposed.

  3. Validation of the transient Structural Response of a Threaded Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, S. W.; Hemez, F. M.; Schultze, J. F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will demonstrate the application of model validation techniques to a transient structural dynamics problem. The problem of interest is the propagation of an explosive shock through a complex threaded joint that is a surrogate model of a system assembly. The objective is to validate the computational modeling of the key mechanical phenomena in the assembly, so that the component can be represented with adequate fidelity in the system-level model. A set of experiments was conducted on the threaded assembly where the acceleration and strain responses to an explosive load were measured on mass-simulators representing payloads. A significantly detailed computational model of the threaded assembly was also created. Numerical features that represent the important characteristics of the response were defined and calculated for both the experimental and computational data. Each step of the model validation process will be described as applied to this problem. Fundamental issues regarding the nature of model validation and the role of model validation in the engineering analysis process will also be discussed.

  4. Radial response of the burst and transient source experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1989-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) includes four experiments designed for observe the gamma-ray universe, one of which is the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). During the first summer with the BATSE team in 1988, laboratory measurements were completed which test the response of the BATSE modules to gamma-ray sources that are non-axial. The results of these observations are necessary for the correct interpretation of BATSE data obtained after it is put in earth orbit. Subsequent analysis of the data revealed a shift in the centroids of the full-energy photopeaks for angles of incidence between about 70 and 110 degrees. This effect was diagnosed as being due to a radial dependence of the light collecting efficiency of the large-area detector (LAD). Energy-depositing events that occur near the perimeter of the 10-inch radius NaI disc are not as efficiently collected as those events that occur near the disc's center. This radial response is analyzed and in so doing the non-Gaussian shape of the photopeaks seen in the spectra taken at all angles is explained.

  5. Modeling of a rotor speed transient response with radial rubbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roques, S.; Legrand, M.; Cartraud, P.; Stoisser, C.; Pierre, C.

    2010-03-01

    A rotor-stator model of a turbogenerator is introduced in order to investigate speed transients with rotor-to-stator rubbing caused by an accidental blade-off imbalance. In order to assess the angular deceleration of the rotor due to rubbing, the angular position of its cross-section is considered as an unknown of the problem. Displacement fields are discretized through a finite element formulation. The highly nonlinear equations due to contact conditions are solved through an explicit prediction-correction time-marching procedure combined with the Lagrange multiplier approach dealing with a node-to-line contact strategy. The developed numerical tool is suitable for analyzing rotor-stator interactions in turbomachines as the system passes through critical speeds during an accidental shutdown. The sensitivity of the system response to modeling, physical and numerical parameters is investigated. The results highlight the significant role of the friction coefficient together with the diaphragm modeling, from rigid to fully flexible, in the interaction phenomenon. Rigid models have the advantage of simplicity and provide reasonable estimations of the overall response of the turbine. A flexible model, however, may be more computationally intensive but is more appropriate in order to accurately capture quantities of interest such as shaft eccentricity and bearing loads.

  6. Spinal mechanisms underlying potentiation of hindpaw responses observed after transient hindpaw ischemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Sasaki, Mika; Komagata, Seiji; Tsukano, Hiroaki; Hishida, Ryuichi; Kohno, Tatsuro; Baba, Hiroshi; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2015-01-01

    Transient ischemia produces postischemic tingling sensation. Ischemia also produces nerve conduction block that may modulate spinal neural circuits. In the present study, reduced mechanical thresholds for hindpaw-withdrawal reflex were found in mice after transient hindpaw ischemia, which was produced by a high pressure applied around the hindpaw for 30 min. The reduction in the threshold was blocked by spinal application of LY354740, a specific agonist of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Neural activities in the spinal cord and the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) were investigated using activity-dependent changes in endogenous fluorescence derived from mitochondrial flavoproteins. Ischemic treatment induced potentiation of the ipsilateral spinal and contralateral S1 responses to hindpaw stimulation. Both types of potentiation were blocked by spinal application of LY354740. The contralateral S1 responses, abolished by lesioning the ipsilateral dorsal column, reappeared after ischemic treatment, indicating that postischemic tingling sensation reflects a sensory modality shift from tactile sensation to nociception in the spinal cord. Changes in neural responses were investigated during ischemic treatment in the contralateral spinal cord and the ipsilateral S1. Potentiation already appeared during ischemic treatment for 30 min. The present findings suggest that the postischemic potentiation shares spinal mechanisms, at least in part, with neuropathic pain. PMID:26165560

  7. Type II collagen is transiently expressed during avian cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Daniels, K J; Jensen, K L; Solursh, M

    1994-08-01

    We present new evidence of the temporal and spatial expression of type II collagen in the embryonic chick heart during the very early stages of its development. In particular, we emphasize the distribution of its mRNA and protein during valve formation. Type II collagen as well as several other fibrillar collagens (types I, III, and V) are present in stage 18 endocardial cushion mesenchymal cells. At stage 23, alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts and the cognate polypeptide colocalize in the atrioventricular valves. As development proceeds, the relative abundance of alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts decreases during the stages studied (stages 22 to 45; day 3.5 to day 19) as assayed by RNA blotting of extracts of whole hearts. Type II collagen protein was immunologically undetectable in stage 38 (day 12) hearts, although collagens I, III, and V persisted and localize in the valve regions, in the endothelial lining of the heart, and in the epicardium. In keeping with other observations of type II collagen expression in non-chondrogenic regions of a variety of vertebrate embryos, the avian heart also exhibits transient type II collagen expression.

  8. A theory of post-stall transients in axial compression systems. II - Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greitzer, E. M.; Moore, F. K.

    1985-01-01

    Using the theory developed in Part I, calculations have been carried out to show the evolution of the mass flow, pressure rise, and rotating-stall cell amplitude during compression system post-stall transients. In particular, it is shown that the unsteady growth or decay of the stall cell can have a significant effect on the instantaneous compressor pumping characteristic and hence on the overall system behavior. A limited parametric study is carried out to illustrate the impact of different system features on transient behavior. It is shown, for example, that the ultimate mode of system response, surge or stable rotating stall, depends not only on the B parameter, but also on the compressor length-to-radius ratio. Small values of this latter quantity tend to favor the occurrence of surge, as do large values of B. Based on the analytical and numerical results, several specific topics are suggested for future research on post-stall transients.

  9. Sensor Webs: Autonomous Rapid Response to Monitor Transient Science Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Dan; Grosvenor, Sandra; Frye, Stu; Sherwood, Robert; Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Cichy, Ben; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix

    2005-01-01

    To better understand how physical phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions, evolve over time, multiple sensor observations over the duration of the event are required. Using sensor web approaches that integrate original detections by in-situ sensors and global-coverage, lower-resolution, on-orbit assets with automated rapid response observations from high resolution sensors, more observations of significant events can be made with increased temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution. This paper describes experiments using Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) along with other space and ground assets to implement progressive mission autonomy to identify, locate and image with high resolution instruments phenomena such as wildfires, volcanoes, floods and ice breakup. The software that plans, schedules and controls the various satellite assets are used to form ad hoc constellations which enable collaborative autonomous image collections triggered by transient phenomena. This software is both flight and ground based and works in concert to run all of the required assets cohesively and includes software that is model-based, artificial intelligence software.

  10. The human ventilatory response to stimulation by transient hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Jennett, S; McKay, F C; Moss, V A

    1981-01-01

    1. The detailed pattern of transient changes in breathing pattern has been studied following a brief hypoxic stimulus (three breaths of nitrogen) in nine healthy subjects. All showed an increase in ventilation of which the magnitude and relative contributions of volume and frequency varied between subjects. 2. Ventilation, tidal volume, inspiratory, expiratory and total breath time were recorded or derived breath-by-breath; for each of these variables, several test sequences were time-averaged at half-second intervals for each individual; similarly, time-averages were obtained for percentage changes from base line over all nine subjects. 3. There ws an increase in inspiratory time accompanying the increasing tidal volume, in all but two subjects. This was statistically significant over all subjects, and in five individuals. Frequency changes were the resultant of alterations in the two phases; when total breath duration decreased it was always linked to a decrease in expiratory time. 4. Further analysis of the initial part of the response suggests that an increase of the duration of an inspiration may be the first change allowing an increase in tidal volume, before the 'drive' increases; this may be a dynamic feature of the control system whatever the nature and site of action of the stimulus. PMID:7310713

  11. Scenario dependency of the transient climate response to cumulative emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Katherine; Williams, Ric; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The transient climate response to emissions (TCRE), in relating surface temperature changes to cumulative carbon emissions, provides a means of estimating carbon budgets from global warming benchmarks. Current Earth System Model results indicate that the TCRE is linear and scenario-independent. We explore the sensitivity of the TCRE to scenario and model parameter uncertainties using 8 configurations of the UVic Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity, forced by 2 twenty-first-century emissions scenarios (RCP 4.5 and 8.5). We find that the TCRE is higher under RCP 4.5 than 8.5 by 0.3-0.8 K/1000 Pg C and shows opposing nonlinear tendencies in these scenarios: an increase of 0.15-0.5 K/1000 Pg C over RCP 4.5 and a decrease of 0-0.7 K/1000 Pg C over RCP 8.5. These differences are robust across model configurations with perturbed land and ocean parametrizations and are the result of the decreased efficiency of heat transport into the deep ocean under decelerating emissions.

  12. Analytical modeling for transient probe response in eddy current testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel

    Analytical models that describe the electromagnetic field interactions arising between field generating and sensing coils in close proximity to conducting structures can be used to enhance analysis and information extracted from signals obtained using electromagnetic non-destructive evaluation technologies. A novel strategy, which enables the derivation of exact solutions describing all electromagnetic interactions arising in inductively coupled circuits due to a voltage excitation, is developed in this work. Differential circuit equations are formulated in terms of an arbitrary voltage excitation and of the magnetic fields arising in inductive systems, using Faraday's law and convolution, and solved using the Fourier transform. The approach is valid for systems containing any number of driving and receiving coils, and include nearby conducting and ferromagnetic structures. In particular, the solutions account for feedback between a ferromagnetic conducting test piece and the driving and sensing coils, providing correct voltage response of the coils. Also arising from the theory are analytical expressions for complex inductances in a circuit, which account for real (inductive) and imaginary (loss) elements associated with conducting and ferromagnetic structures. A novel model-based method for simultaneous characterization of material parameters, which includes magnetic permeability, electrical conductivity, wall thickness and liftoff, is subsequently developed from the forward solutions. Furthermore, arbitrary excitation waveforms, such as a sinusoid or a square wave, for applications in conventional and transient eddy current, respectively, may be considered. Experimental results, obtained for a square wave excitation, are found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical predictions.

  13. Transient response of a thermal buffer: a study for ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider. W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Operation of the superconducting magnets in ISABELLE may necessitate rapid cooldown and warmup from ambient (300K) to liquid helium temperature (3K) to meet the requirements of the experimental program. Similarly, unprogrammed temperature excursions can also occur due to operator error or equipment malfunction. The coal bore tube of the magnets has a small mass relative to the more massive iron laminations and the stainless steel support tube. In addition the magnet coil, in thermal contact with the cold bore tube, has excellent heat transfer to the helium flowing through it compared to the iron mass. These two factors, mass and heat transfer, dictate that the cold bore tube will follow the temperature of the coolant more closely than the iron and hence substantial temperature gradients can exist. If the temperature difference between the coolant and the iron in the magnet exceeds 44K stress failure may occur to either the cold bore tube or the magnet dewar end cap. To preclude such failures from occuring at least two options are available. One method is to modify the magnet design by introducing flexibility between the bore tube and the end plate. Another is to introduce an insensitive thermal mass or buffer as has been suggested by Shutt, at the inlet of a sextant ahead of the first magnets. This paper describes the latter method, the design and transient response of a buffer during cooldown.

  14. Transient elastic impact response of slender graphite rods

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, I.

    2007-12-15

    Graphite rods are manufactured by extruding the mixture of calcined petroleum coke and coal tar pitch into the desired shape and baking the cooled specimens at about 800{sup o}C. Cracking can occur in rods during the manufacturing process. It is useful to be able to detect the presence of such cracks in the rods prior to their being machined and put into use as electrodes or cathodes or thermal insulator. In an effort to develop a nondestructive testing approach to evaluation of the rods, transient elastic impact was determined for slender rods. Theory for solid, slender rods provided an important starting point for this work. Subsequently, numerical models were developed and simulation was used to determine the response of rods containing cracks. Experiments on graphite rods with and without cracks were conducted and the internal condition determined from the recorded signals. The rods were then cut lengthwise to reveal the internal condition and verify the predicted results. In all cases the knowledge gained from simulation allowed for the presence of cracks to be detected.

  15. Most robust estimate of the Transient Climate Response yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, Karsten; Venema, Victor; Schurer, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Estimates of the Transient Climate Response often lack a coherent hemispheric or otherwise spatio-temporal representation. In the light of recent work that highlights the importance of inhomogeneous forcing considerations (Shindell et al 2014; Marvel et al 2015) and tas/tos-related inaccuracies (Richardson et al. 2016), here we present results from a well-tested two-box response model that takes these effects carefully into account. All external forcing data are updated based on latest emission estimates as well as recent TSI and volcanic AOD estimates. So are observed GMST data which include data for the entire year of 2016. Hence we also provide one of the first TCR estimates taking the latest El Nino into account. We demonstrate that short-term climate variability is not going to change the TCR estimate beyond very minor fluctuations. The method is therefore shown to be robust within surprisingly small uncertainty estimates. Using PMIP3 and an extended ensemble of HadCM3 simulations (Euro500; Schurer et al. 2014) GCM simulations for the pre-industrial period, we test the fast and slow response time constants that are tailored for observational data (Ripdal 2012). We also test the hemispheric response as well as the response over land and ocean separately. The TCR/ECS ratio is taken from a selected sub-set of CMIP5 simulations. The selection criteria is the best spatiotemporal match over 4 different time periods between 1860 and 2010. We will argue that this procedure should also be standard procedure to estimate ECS from observations, rather than relying on OHC estimates only. Finally, the demonstrate that PMIP3-type simulations that are initialised at least a century before 1850 (as is the standard initialisation for CMIP5-type simulations) are to be preferred. Remaining long-term radiative imbalance due to strong volcanic eruptions (e.g. Gleckler et al. 2006) tend to make CMIP5-type simulations slightly more sensitive to forcing, which leads to detectable

  16. An approximate method for analyzing transient condensation on spray in HYLIFE-II

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, R.Y.; Schrock, V.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The HYLIFE-II conceptual design calls for analysis of highly transient condensation on droplets to achieve a rapidly decaying pressure field. Drops exposed to the required transient vapor pressure field are first heated by condensation but later begin to reevaporate after the vapor temperature falls below the drop surface temperature. An approximate method of analysis has been developed based on the assumption that the thermal resistance is concentrated in the liquid. The time dependent boundary condition is treated via the Duhamel integral for the pure conduction model. The resulting Nusselt number is enhanced to account for convection within the drop and then used to predict the drop mean temperature history. Many histories are considered to determine the spray rate necessary to achieve the required complete condensation.

  17. Transient Response of Different Highly Conductive PCM Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Alhamdo, Mohammed H.; Bdaiwi, Bashar A.; Hasan, Ali H.

    In this work, the thermal conductivity of paraffin wax has been enhanced by employing four different high conductivity additives infiltrated within the PCM. These include the use of Graphite Powder (GP), Copper Particles (CP), Aluminum oxide Particles (AP), and Copper Network (CN). Four different types of pure waxes were selected, tested and compared. Twelve samples of wax/additives composites were prepared by adding different mass ratios of 3, 6 and 9 % of additives by weight in each type of wax. The storage system contains spherical capsules filled with composite PCMs that are packed in an insulated cylindrical storage. Transient temperature based governing equations have been developed and solved numerically by both ANSYS FLUENT 14 code and by numerical implicit time marching model. With progress of time, results showed that the numerical predictions of ANSYS software start to deviate from the experimental observations. The grade-B paraffin was found to be the best one. Results indicate that all the enhancement methods have significant effect on the thermal response of the system. However, the utilization of 6 % additives by weight has been found to provide the best enhancement effect. The developed new-sort CN composite is found to produce the best thermal response due to its good homogeneity with wax and its high conductivity. Results showed that for CN composite with 6 % additives, the charging and discharging time decreased by 26.4 and 30.3 % respectively than that of pure wax and the thermal conductivity enhanced by 2.57 times that of pure wax.

  18. Transient CNS responses to repeated binge ethanol treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Natalie M; Rohlfing, Torsten; Mayer, Dirk; Luong, Richard; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive changes occur in response to repeated exposure to drugs. Although ethanol (EtOH) is known to induce pharmacokinetic tolerance, the effects of EtOH on in vivo, magnetic resonance (MR)-detectable brain measures across repeated exposures have not previously been reported. Of 28 rats weighing 341±22g at baseline, 15 were assigned to the EtOH group and 13 to the control (Ctrl) group. EtOH animals were exposed to 5 cycles of 4-days of EtOH treatment followed by 10 days of recovery. Rats in both groups had structural MR imaging (MRI) scans and whole brain MR spectroscopy (MRS) at baseline, immediately following each binge period, and after each recovery period (total=11 MR scans per rat). Average blood alcohol levels (BALs) across each of the 5, 4-day binge periods were 298, 300, 301, 312, 318 mg/dL. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes of the lateral ventricles and cisterns showed enlargement with each binge EtOH exposure but recovery with each abstinence period. Similarly, changes to MRS metabolites were transient: levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) decreased, while those of choline-containing compounds (Cho) and glutamate/glutamine (Glx) increased with each binge EtOH exposure cycle, but also recovered during each abstinence period. The directionality of changes in response to EtOH were in expected directions based on previous, single-binge EtOH exposure experiments, but the current results do not provide support for accruing pathology with repeated binge EtOH exposure. PMID:26283309

  19. Transient response for interaction of two dynamic bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakar, A.; Palermo, L. G.

    1987-01-01

    During the launch sequence of any space vehicle complicated boundary interactions occur between the vehicle and the launch stand. At the start of the sequence large forces exist between the two; contact is then broken in a short but finite time which depends on the release mechanism. The resulting vehicle response produces loads which are very high and often form the design case. It is known that the treatment of the launch pad as a second dynamic body is significant for an accurate prediction of launch response. A technique was developed for obtaining loads generated by the launch transient with the effect of pad dynamics included. The method solves uncoupled vehicle and pad equations of motion. The use of uncoupled models allows the simulation of vehicle launch in a single computer run. Modal formulation allows a closed-form solution to be written, eliminating any need for a numerical integration algorithm. When the vehicle is on the pad the uncoupled pad and vehicle equations have to be modified to account for the constraints they impose on each other. This necessitates the use of an iterative procedure to converge to a solution, using Lagrange multipliers to apply the required constraints. As the vehicle lifts off the pad the coupling between the vehicle and the pad is eliminated point by point until the vehicle flies free. Results obtained by this method were shown to be in good agreement with observed loads and other analysis methods. The resulting computer program is general, and was used without modification to solve a variety of contact problems.

  20. Effects of Activation Energy to Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Ohtani, Tatsuki

    The smell classifiable gas sensor will be desired for many applications such as gas detection alarms, process controls for food production and so on. We have tried to realize the sensor using transient responses of semiconductor gas sensor consisting of tin dioxide and pointed out that the sensor gave us different transient responses for kinds of gas. Results of model calculation showed the activation energy of chemical reaction on the sensor surface strongly depended on the transient response. We tried to estimate the activation energies by molecular orbital calculation with SnO2 Cluster. The results show that there is a liner relationship between the gradient of the transient responses and activation energies for carboxylic and alcoholic gases. Transient response will be predicted from activation energy in the same kind of gas and the smell discrimination by single semiconductor gas sensor will be realized by this relationship.

  1. Transient river response, captured by channel steepness and its concavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacker, Veerle; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Govers, Gerard; Molina, Armando; Campforts, Benjamin; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Mountain rivers draining tropical regions are known to be great conveyor belts carrying efficiently more than half of the global sediment flux to the oceans. Many tropical mountain areas are located in tectonically active belts where the hillslope and stream channel morphology are rapidly evolving in response to changes in base level. Here, we report basin-wide denudation rates for an east-west transect through the tropical Andes. Hillslope and channel morphology vary systematically from east to west, reflecting the transition from high relief, strongly dissected topography in the escarpment zones into relatively low relief topography in the inter-Andean valley. The spatial pattern of differential denudation rates reflects the transient adjustment of the landscape to rapid river incision following tectonic uplift and river diversion. In the inter-Andean valley, upstream of the wave of incision, slopes and river channels display a relatively smooth, concave-up morphology and denudation rates (time scale of 104-105 a) are consistently low (3 to 200 mm/ka). In contrast, slopes and river channels of rejuvenated basins draining the eastern cordillera are steep to very steep; and the studied drainage basins show a wide range of denudation rate values (60 to 400 mm/ka) that increase systematically with increasing basin mean slope gradient, channel steepness, and channel convexity. Drainage basins that are characterised by strong convexities in their river longitudinal profiles systematically have higher denudation rates. As such, this is one of the first studies that provides field-based evidence of a correlation between channel concavity and basin mean denudation rates, consistent with process-based fluvial incision models.

  2. Distinct inflammatory responses differentiate cerebral infarct from transient ischaemic attack.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Christopher W L; Bosio, Erika; Neil, Claire; Brown, Simon G A; Hankey, Graeme J; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported on a 26-year-old patient who presented early during a large and eventually fatal cerebral infarct. Microarray analysis of blood samples from this patient demonstrated initially up-regulated and subsequently down-regulated Granzyme B (GzmB) expression, along with progressive up-regulation of genes for S100 calcium binding protein A12 (S100A12) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). To confirm these findings, we investigated these parameters in patients with suspected stroke presenting within 6h of symptom onset to a single centre. Blood samples were taken at enrolment, then 1h, 3h and 24h post-enrolment for the examination of cellular, protein and genetic changes. Patients with subsequently confirmed ischaemic (n=18) or haemorrhagic stroke (n=11) showed increased intracellular concentrations of GzmB in all cell populations investigated (CD8(+), CD8(-) and Natural Killer [NK] cells). Infarct patients, however, demonstrated significantly reduced GzmB gene expression and increased circulating MMP-9 and S100A12 levels in contrast to transient ischaemic attack (TIA) patients or healthy controls. Furthermore, a pronounced neutrophilia was noted in the infarct and haemorrhage groups, while TIA patients (n=9) reflected healthy controls (n=10). These findings suggest a spectrum of immune response during stroke. TIA showed few immunological changes in comparison to infarct and haemorrhage, which demonstrated inhibition of GzmB production and a rise in neutrophil numbers and neutrophil-associated mediators. This implies a greater role of the innate immune system. These markers may provide novel targets for inhibition and reduction of secondary injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The unique sound of the uni-vibe pedal: Part II. Transient behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius F.; Rothe, Hendrik

    2013-09-01

    The Uni-Vibe is an effect pedal mostly used by electric guitar players. It is based on an opto-electronically controlled all-pass chain. In last year's paper on the subject an idealized system model was derived, which lead to deeper discussion of the musical consequences of the effect in terms of harmonic analysis of single tones and chords in clean and distorted mode. As a direct continuation the present paper deals with the transient behaviour of the device. The transient response is essential for understanding the special sound character, the reaction on picking techniques and the interaction with certain instruments. Therefore the system model is expanded and the pulse response of the idealized time invariant system is derived.

  4. Study on transient beam loading compensation for China ADS proton linac injector II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; He, Yuan; Wang, Xian-Wu; Chang, Wei; Zhang, Rui-Feng; Zhu, Zheng-Long; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; Chen, Qi; Powers, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Significant transient beam loading effects were observed during beam commissioning tests of prototype II of the injector for the accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, which took place at the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, between October and December 2014. During these tests experiments were performed with continuous wave (CW) operation of the cavities with pulsed beam current, and the system was configured to make use of a prototype digital low level radio frequency (LLRF) controller. The system was originally operated in pulsed mode with a simple proportional plus integral and deviation (PID) feedback control algorithm, which was not able to maintain the desired gradient regulation during pulsed 10 mA beam operations. A unique simple transient beam loading compensation method which made use of a combination of proportional and integral (PI) feedback and feedforward control algorithm was implemented in order to significantly reduce the beam induced transient effect in the cavity gradients. The superconducting cavity field variation was reduced to less than 1.7% after turning on this control algorithm. The design and experimental results of this system are presented in this paper. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91426303, 11525523)

  5. Experimental Study of Hydraulic Systems Transient Response Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    point in all systems - just upstream of the control valve (P2 in Figs 1 and 6.), where the highest pressure peaks in the system occur. Those high...be seen by comparing the pressure transient downstream of the short Quincke- Tube (Fig 22), and the pressure transient upstream of the Quincke-Tube...public release; IAW AFR 190-17 ,]3r7P. HIPPS , Major USAF Diebr of Informaion 19. KEY WORDS (Conrnimo on reverse gide it nec -s ir a mll idewliv l, bl,,k

  6. Charge recombination reactions in photosystem II. 2. Transient absorbance difference spectra and their temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Hillmann, B; Brettel, K; van Mieghem, F; Kamlowski, A; Rutherford, A W; Schlodder, E

    1995-04-11

    Absorbance difference spectra of the transient states in photosystem II (PS II) have been examined in the Qv absorption region between 660 and 700 nm. The P680+Pheo-/P680Pheo, 3P680/P680, and P680+QA-/P680QA spectra were measured in O2-evolving PS II core complexes from Synechococcus and PS II-enriched membrane fragments from spinach. The low-temperature absorbance difference spectra vary only slightly between both PS II preparations. The 3P680/P680 spectrum is characterized by a bleaching at 685 nm at 25 K and indicates weak exciton coupling with neighboring pigment(s). We conclude that P680 absorbs at 685 nm in more intact PS II preparations at cryogenic temperature. The difference spectra of the radical pairs are strongly temperature dependent. At low temperature the P680+QA-/P680QA- spectrum exhibits the strongest bleaching at 675 nm whereas the P680+Phe-/P680Pheo spectra show two distinct bleaching bands at 674 and 684 nm. It is suggested that an electrochronic red shift resulting in a bleaching at 675 nm and an absorbance increase at about 682 nm dominates the spectral features of the charge-separated states. On the basis of the present results and those in the literature, we conclude that the interactions between the pigments and especially the organization of the primary donor must be quite different in PS II compared to bacterial reaction centers, although the basic structural arrangement of the pigments might be similar. Spectral data obtained with samples in the presence of singly and doubly reduced QA indicate that the primary photochemistry in PS II is not strongly influenced by the redox state of QA at low temperature and confirm the results of the accompanying paper [Van Mieghem, F. J. E., Brettel, K., Hillmann, B., Kamlowski, A., Rutherford, A. W., & Schlodder, E. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 4798-4813]. The spectra of the primary radical pair and the reaction center triplet obtained with more intact PS II preparations differ widely from those of D1/D2

  7. Discovery of a transiently separable high-speed response component in cholesteric liquid crystals with a uniform lying helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yo; Moritake, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel high-speed response component observed in the transient state in cholesteric liquid crystals (ChLCs) with a uniform lying helix (ULH). When an electric field is applied normal to the helix axis, two well-known physical phenomena are induced: (i) the flexo-electric effect and (ii) the elongation of the helical structure. In this study, we show that the latter effect can be additionally separated into two different components with fast and slow response times, which reorient the LC director along the electric field without and with the helical pitch elongation, respectively.

  8. [Response of a membrane in a cochlear model to continuous and transient sounds].

    PubMed

    Carrat, R; Thillier, J L

    1976-01-01

    Using enlarged mechanical models of the cochlea and true stimuli sinusoidal or transient, the authors give photographics documents which point out in objective way the "basilar" membrane responses. With pure tones, the membrane vibrates along its entire length no matter what the frequency. With transients, there is a maximum displacement in varying sites but always near the base.

  9. Long-rising Type II supernovae from Palomar Transient Factory and Caltech Core-Collapse Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Fremling, C.; Migotto, K.; Gal-Yam, A.; Armen, S.; Duggan, G.; Ergon, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fransson, C.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Laher, R. R.; Leloudas, G.; Leonard, D. C.; Lunnan, R.; Masci, F. J.; Moon, D.-S.; Silverman, J. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar hydrogen-rich event with a long-rising (~84 d) light curve, stemming from the explosion of a compact blue supergiant star. Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature in recent decades. Aims: We present new data for a sample of six long-rising Type II SNe (SNe II), three of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and three observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge this small family of long-rising SNe II, characterizing their differences in terms of progenitor and explosion parameters. We also study the metallicity of their environments. Methods: Optical light curves, spectra, and host-galaxy properties of these SNe are presented and analyzed. Detailed comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events in the literature are shown, with particular emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and host-galaxy metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband light curves. By modeling the early-time emission with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these transients. The modeling of the bolometric light curves also allows us to estimate other progenitor and explosion parameters, such as the ejected 56Ni mass, the explosion energy, and the ejecta mass. Results: We present PTF12kso, a long-rising SN II that is estimated to have the largest amount of ejected 56Ni mass measured for this class. PTF09gpn and PTF12kso are found at the lowest host metallicities observed for this SN group. The variety of early light-curve luminosities depends on the wide range of progenitor radii of these SNe, from a few tens of R⊙ (SN 2005ci) up to thousands (SN 2004ek) with some intermediate cases between 100 R⊙ (PTF09gpn) and 300 R⊙ (SN 2004em). Conclusions: We confirm that long-rising SNe II with light-curve shapes closely

  10. Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

    2011-07-01

    Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in Voc were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of ~1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in Voc after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale.

  11. Transient response of high temperature PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, J.; Shin, J. Y.; Song, T. W.

    A transient three-dimensional, single-phase and non-isothermal numerical model of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell with high operating temperature has been developed and implemented in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The model accounts for transient convective and diffusive transport, and allows prediction of species concentration. Electrochemical charge double-layer effect is considered. Heat generation according to electrochemical reaction and ohmic loss are involved. Water transportation across membrane is ignored due to low water electro-osmosis drag force of polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane. The prediction shows transient in current density which overshoots (undershoots) the stabilized state value when cell voltage is abruptly decreased (increased). The result shows that the peak of overshoot (undershoot) is related with cathode air stoichiometric mass flow rate instead of anode hydrogen stoichiometric mass flow rate. Current is moved smoothly and there are no overshoot or undershoot with the influence of charge double-layer effect. The maximum temperature is located in cathode catalyst layer and both fuel cell average temperature and temperature deviation are increased with increasing of current load.

  12. PWR (pressurized water reactor) pressurizer transient response: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.I.

    1987-08-01

    To predict PWR pressurizer transients, Ahl proposed a three region model with a universal coefficient to represent condensation on the water surface. Specifically, this work checks the need for three regions and the modeling of the interfacial condensation coefficient. A computer model has been formulated using the basic mass and energy conservation laws. A two region vapor and liquid model was first used to predict transients run on a one-eleventh scale Freon pressurizer. These predictions verified the need for a second liquid region. As a result, a three region model was developed and used to predict full-scale pressurizer transients at TMI-2, Shippingport, and Stade. Full-scale pressurizer predictions verified the three region model and pointed out the shortcomings of Ahl's universal condensation coefficient. In addition, experiments were run using water at low pressure to study interface condensation. These experiments showed interface condensation to be significant only when spray flow is turned on; this result was incorporated in the final three region model.

  13. Transient response of a passively mode-locked Er-doped fiber ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiu Lee, Chung; Kim, Joonyoung; Kim, Soeun; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we report on the transient response of a passively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser as studied by switching the optical pumping of the erbium doped fiber on and off. We confirm that the laser can maintain its mode-locking state even while the pump is modulated, and describe the laser behavior and its typical transient response upon abrupt changes in the intensity of the optical pump.

  14. Optimizing Performance of Far-Infrared Photoconductors: New Approach for Interpretation and Calibration of Transient Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haegel, Nancy M.

    2002-01-01

    The goals of the proposed work were to determine if final steady state current values for Ge:Ga photoconductors could be predicted from the initial fast component of the transient response and to develop algorithms to operationalize this approach. This required transient measurements as a function of photon background and signal sizes, for both single shot and modulated signals. In addition, we proposed to address the nature of the hook response and the effects of non-equilibrium background fluctuations.

  15. A transient laboratory method for determining the hydraulic properties of 'tight' rocks-II. Application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.; Cooley, C.; Silliman, S.E.; Bredehoeft, J.D.; Hsieh, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    In Part I a general analytical solution for the transient pulse test was presented. Part II presents a graphical method for analyzing data from a test to obtain the hydraulic properties of the sample. The general solution depends on both hydraulic conductivity and specific storage and, in theory, analysis of the data can provide values for both of these hydraulic properties. However, in practice, one of two limiting cases may apply in which case it is possible to calculate only hydraulic conductivity or the product of hydraulic conductivity times specific storage. In this paper we examine the conditions when both hydraulic parameters can be calculated. The analyses of data from two tests are presented. In Appendix I the general solution presented in Part I is compared with an earlier analysis, in which compressive storage in the sample is assumed negligible, and the error in calculated hydraulic conductivity due to this simplifying assumption is examined. ?? 1981.

  16. Transient absorption studies of the primary charge separation in photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, B.; Walker, L.A. II; Yocum, C.F.; Sension, R.J.

    1996-02-01

    Femtosecond transient absorption studies of the primary charge separation in photosystem II (PSII) are presented. A careful study of the dependence of the observed signal on laser intensity demonstrates that the multiple excitation of reaction centers produces additional fast components not observed at low excitation energy. In the regime where the observed signals are linear with excitation energy, a 20 {+-} 2 ps rise of the pheophytin anion absorption, bleach of the pheophytin Q{sub {chi}} absorption, and appearance of the chlorophyll cation absorption are observed. Three different protocols, involving varying exposure of the PSII complex to the detergent Triton X-100, are used to prepare D1-D2-cyt b{sub 559} complexes from spinach. The kinetic signals are independent of the method of sample preparation. 35 refs., 5 figs.

  17. A review of progress towards understanding the transient global mean surface temperature response to radiative perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Shiogama, Hideo; Oka, Akira; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Ohgaito, Rumi; Kamae, Youichi

    2016-12-01

    The correct understanding of the transient response to external radiative perturbation is important for the interpretation of observed climate change, the prediction of near-future climate change, and committed warming under climate stabilization scenarios, as well as the estimation of equilibrium climate sensitivity based on observation data. It has been known for some time that the radiative damping rate per unit of global mean surface temperature increase varies with time, and this inconstancy affects the transient response. Knowledge of the equilibrium response alone is insufficient, but understanding the transient response of the global mean surface temperature has made rapid progress. The recent progress accompanies the relatively new concept of the efficacies of ocean heat uptake and forcing. The ocean heat uptake efficacy associates the temperature response induced by ocean heat uptake with equilibrium temperature response, and the efficacy of forcing compares the temperature response caused by non-CO2 forcing with that by CO2 forcing.

  18. Transient analyses for HEU and LEU designs of the FRM-II.

    SciTech Connect

    Hanan, N. A.

    1998-10-14

    An Alternative LEU Design for the FRM-II proposed by the RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has a compact core consisting of a single fuel element that uses LEU silicide fuel with a uranium density of 4.5 g/cm{sup 3} and has a power level of 32 MW. Both the HEU design by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the alternative LEU design by ANL have the same fuel lifetime (50 days) and the same neutron flux performance (8 x 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}-s in the reflector). LEU silicide fuel with 4.5 g/cm{sup 3} has been thoroughly tested and is fully-qualified, licensable, and available now for use in a high flux reactor such as the FRM-II. Several issues raised by TUM have been addressed in Refs. 1-4. The conclusions of these analyses are summarized below. In this paper, two typical design basis transients are analyzed: control rod withdrawal at different power levels and loss of primary flow. The results show that the HEU and the LEU cores behave in a similar manner and both have excellent safety margins. Based on the excellent results for the Alternative LEU Design that were obtained in all analyses, the RERTR Program reiterates its conclusion that there are no major technical issues regarding use of LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel in the FRM-II and that it is definitely feasible to use LEU fuel in the FRM-II without compromising the safety or performance of the facility.

  19. The Coda of the Transient Response in a Sensitive Cochlea: A Computational Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In a sensitive cochlea, the basilar membrane response to transient excitation of any kind–normal acoustic or artificial intracochlear excitation–consists of not only a primary impulse but also a coda of delayed secondary responses with varying amplitudes but similar spectral content around the characteristic frequency of the measurement location. The coda, sometimes referred to as echoes or ringing, has been described as a form of local, short term memory which may influence the ability of the auditory system to detect gaps in an acoustic stimulus such as speech. Depending on the individual cochlea, the temporal gap between the primary impulse and the following coda ranges from once to thrice the group delay of the primary impulse (the group delay of the primary impulse is on the order of a few hundred microseconds). The coda is physiologically vulnerable, disappearing when the cochlea is compromised even slightly. The multicomponent sensitive response is not yet completely understood. We use a physiologically-based, mathematical model to investigate (i) the generation of the primary impulse response and the dependence of the group delay on the various stimulation methods, (ii) the effect of spatial perturbations in the properties of mechanically sensitive ion channels on the generation and separation of delayed secondary responses. The model suggests that the presence of the secondary responses depends on the wavenumber content of a perturbation and the activity level of the cochlea. In addition, the model shows that the varying temporal gaps between adjacent coda seen in experiments depend on the individual profiles of perturbations. Implications for non-invasive cochlear diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:27380177

  20. RETRAN analysis of Susquehanna Steam Electric Station Unit 2 moisture separator drain tank level transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Susquehanna Steam Electric Station Unit 2 (SSES-2) experienced three main turbine trips on high moisture separator drain tank level during initial startup testing in 1984. The SSES-2, a 3293-MW (thermal) boiling water reactor-4 with Mark II containment, uses two parallel nonreheating moisture separators between the high- and low-pressure turbine stages. Two of the main turbine trips and subsequent scrams occurred due to the high level in the ''B'' moisture separator drain tank during combined intermediate valve testing. The third trip was also initiated on the same signal, but during a recirculation pump runback event. A task group was created to determine the cause of the level excursions and to make recommendations to reduce the severity of these transients. The RETRAN-02 computer code was used to evaluate the dynamic response of both the A and B moisture separator drain systems to determine the cause of the events, including why the level excursions only occurred in the B system. RETRAN was also used to evaluate the systems' dynamic response to several proposed corrective plant modifications. Based on the recommendations of the task group, modifications were made to SSES-2 during the precommercial operation outage. Startup testing following the outage proved the success of the modifications.

  1. Transient coaxial helicity injection for solenoid-free plasma startup in HIT-II

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Jarboe, T. R; Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.

    2007-02-15

    The favorable properties of the spherical torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. Methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. In steady state tokamaks, the central solenoid can be dispensed with if suitable methods for initiating the plasma current are on hand. Coaxial helicity injection (CHI) is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma current startup in STs and tokamaks. Experiments on the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT-II) machine at the University of Washington [T. R. Jarboe, Fusion Technol. 15, 7 (1989)] have demonstrated the capability of a new method, referred to as transient CHI, to produce a high quality closed-flux equilibrium that has been successfully coupled to induction demonstrating that this new plasma current startup method is compatible with the conventional inductive method. This paper presents physics requirements for implementing this method in STs and tokamaks and supporting experimental results from the HIT-II device.

  2. Radiation belt response to transient solar wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Hoxie, V. C.; Zhao, H.

    2016-12-01

    Using observations from instruments onboard the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft, we have assembled over four years of continuous data within the Earth's radiation belts. These data show fascinating evidence of the strong control that the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field exercise over radiation belt dynamics. We have developed new graphical display and animation tools to portray the time-varying three-dimensional properties of the Van Allen belt particle populations. In this presentation, we focus on the powerful losses and subsequent enhancements of the radiation belts when solar wind transients occur. Our new display tools coupled with the cutting-edge Van Allen Probes data set open a new window on radiation belt understanding.

  3. Linear Population Allocation by Bistable Switches in Response to Transient Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Neu, John; Tanouchi, Yu; Lee, Tae Jun; You, Lingchong

    2014-01-01

    Many cellular decision processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and phenotypic switching, are controlled by bistable signaling networks. In response to transient or intermediate input signals, these networks allocate a population fraction to each of two distinct states (e.g. OFF and ON). While extensive studies have been carried out to analyze various bistable networks, they are primarily focused on responses of bistable networks to sustained input signals. In this work, we investigate the response characteristics of bistable networks to transient signals, using both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. We find that bistable systems exhibit a common property: for input signals with short durations, the fraction of switching cells increases linearly with the signal duration, allowing the population to integrate transient signals to tune its response. We propose that this allocation algorithm can be an optimal response strategy for certain cellular decisions in which excessive switching results in lower population fitness. PMID:25141235

  4. Large capacitance in the nanosecond-scale transient response of quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naser, B.; Ferry, D. K.; Heeren, J.; Reno, J. L.; Bird, J. P.

    2006-08-01

    The transient electrical response of split-gate quantum point contacts (QPCs) is investigated using ultrashort voltage pulses with rise times as small as 2ns. Our measurements reveal a large (˜1nF) parallel capacitance under conditions where the QPC is formed. The capacitance is independent of the QPC gate geometry, and the amplitude and rise time of the applied transient pulse. Some speculations on the source of this capacitance are offered.

  5. Dynamic asymmetries of cardiac output transients in response to muscular exercise in man.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Whipp, B J

    1994-01-01

    1. We determined the kinetics of cardiac output (Q) with respect to oxygen uptake (VO2) at the on- and off-transients of constant-load exercise. Six subjects performed constant-load exercise which consisted of 5 min rest, 5 min one-legged pedalling at 50 W and a 5 min recovery period. 2. The transient responses were characterized by first-order kinetics. There was no significant difference between the time constants for VO2 (tau VO2) at the on- (33.9 +/- 3.5 s, mean +/- S.E.M.) and off-transient (37.2 +/- 2.9 s). The time constant for Q (tau Q, 29.4 +/- 3.2 s) was consistently shorter than tau VO2 at the on-transient. However, tau Q was appreciably longer at the off-transient (44.3 +/- 3.6 s) than the on-transient. 3. The results support the contention that the time constant for the on-transient of Q is appreciably faster than that for VO2 and hence there seems little justification for the notion that the time constants for the kinetics of VO2 are determined by the limitations of blood flow in the transient. The asymmetry of Q kinetics, with the off-transient tau Q being appreciably slower than the on-transient tau Q, serves to maintain a sufficiently high oxygen flow to the muscle during recovery from exercise at a time when the muscle oxygen uptake remains high. PMID:7869250

  6. I got it! Transient cardiovascular response to the perception of humor.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Helmut K; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Schulter, Günter; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut; Samson, Andrea C; Papousek, Ilona

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the transient cardiovascular response to the perception of humor, that is, the impact of the cognitive process of insight as well as the modulation of the response by the affective appraisal of the humor. To this end transient heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and blood pressure responses were obtained in the immediate context of detecting the punch line in cartoons. Fine-grained analysis of the transient behavior of cardiovascular variables during viewing the cartoons was contrasted to non-humorous cartoon-like pictures. The detection of a punch line was accompanied by relative heart rate acceleration in conjunction with increased cardiac output, which was more pronounced the more amusing the cartoons were perceived. These results provide first evidence of the usefulness of cardiovascular variables for detecting the moment of insight and the quantification of the size of the emotional response accompanying it.

  7. Transient response of sand bedforms to changes in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. L.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Lowland rivers commonly experience discharge variability spanning more than an order of magnitude, producing correspondingly large changes in bed morphology. However, field and lab studies indicate that bedform geometries lag changes in flow, producing hysteretic relationships between bed morphology, roughness, and water discharge. The ability of bedforms to maintain equilibrium with hydrodynamic flow variability thus depends on the timescale of transient bedform adjustment to flow. Here, we present results of flume experiments carried out at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota, in which we continuously tracked adjustment of sand bedform morphologies to abrupt changes in water discharge. We show how the timescale of bedform adjustment is driven by three primary factors: 1. directionality of adjustment, 2. preexisting bedform geometry, and 3. sediment flux. Directionality of adjustment (rising versus falling water discharge) determines whether bedforms grow quickly by irreversible merger (rising flows) or shrink slowly through secondary bedform cannibalization of relict larger bedforms (falling flows). Preexisting bedform geometry (height and length) determines the amount of bed deformation required for adjustment to new equilibrium, and sediment flux determines the rate at which this change is affected. These three factors all favor faster adjustment of bedforms to rising flows. We experimentally demonstrate this bedform adjustment hysteresis through a variety of increasing and decreasing discharge changes, across both sand ripple and dune regimes. Finally, we propose and validate a simple conceptual model for estimating the adjustment timescale based on sediment flux and equilibrium bedform geometry.

  8. Numerical Analysis of Transient Temperature Response of Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Seiichi; Tatesaku, Akihiro; Dantsuka, Yuki; Fujiwara, Seiji; Kunimine, Kanji

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of thermophysical properties of thin liquid films are important to understand interfacial phenomena due to film structures composed of amphiphilic molecules in soap film, phospholipid bilayer of biological cell and emulsion. A transient hot-wire technique for liquid films less than 1 \\upmu m thick such as soap film has been proposed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity simultaneously. Two-dimensional heat conduction equations for a solid cylinder with a liquid film have been solved numerically. The temperature of a thin wire with liquid film increases steeply with its own heat generation. The feasibility of this technique is verified through numerical experiments for various thermal conductivities, diffusivities, and film thicknesses. Calculated results indicate that the increase in the volumetric average temperature of the thin wire sufficiently varies with the change of thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the soap film. Therefore, the temperature characteristics could be utilized to evaluate both the thermal conductivity and diffusivity using the Gauss-Newton method.

  9. Development of transient phage resistance in Campylobacter coli against the group II phage CP84.

    PubMed

    Orquera, Stefanie; Hertwig, Stefan; Alter, Thomas; Hammerl, Jens A; Jirova, Alice; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there is a growing interest in the use of bacteriophages for pre- and post-harvest applications to reduce foodborne pathogens (including Campylobacter) along the food chain. Quantitative Campylobacter reductions of up to three log10 units have been achieved by phage application. However, possible phage resistance might limit this approach. In Campylobacter (C.) jejuni, phage resistance mechanisms have been described in detail but data on these mechanisms in C. coli are still missing. To study phage resistance in C. coli, strain NCTC 12668 was infected with the lytic phage CP84, belonging to group II of Campylobacter phages. Resistant and sensitive clones were analysed using phenotypic and genotypic assays. C. coli clones acquired only transient resistance against CP84. The resistance led to cross-protection to one out of five other group II phages tested. Phage resistance was apparently neither caused by large genomic rearrangements nor by a CRISPR system. Binding assays demonstrated that CP84 could not adsorb to resistant C. coli clones suggesting a bacterial phage receptor to be involved in resistance. However, phage resistant C. coli clones did not reveal an altered motility or modified flaA sequence. Considering the loss of binding capacity and the reversion to a phage sensitive phenotype we hypothesize that acquired resistance depends on temporal phase variable switch-off modifications of the phage receptor genes, even though the resistance mechanism could not be elucidated in detail. We further speculate that even closely related phages of the same group use different bacterial receptors for binding on C. coli.

  10. Digital micromirror transient response influence on superfast 3D shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajun; Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Winer, Eliot H.; Kosmicki, Peter; El-Ratal, Wissam H.; Zhang, Song

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, the high speed (e.g., kilo-Hertz) refreshing rate of the digital micro-mirror device (DMD) has enabled superfast 3D shape measurement using the binary defocusing technique. This research finds that when the system reaches its extreme binary pattern refreshing rate, the transient response of the DMD induces a coupling effect (i.e., two neighboring patterns blend together) that may cause substantial measurement error. Since this transient response repeats itself, this systematic measurement error is substantially reduced to a negligible level when the timing between the projector and the camera is properly adjusted. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the observed phenomena, and the success of utilizing the proposed method to overcome the problems associated with the transient response of the DMD.

  11. Transient Response of Thin Film SiGe Micro Coolers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    coolers with mesa sizes ranging from 30 × 30 µm2 to 150 × 150 µm2 were fabricated on the same wafer (Fan, et. al. 2001). Theoretical predictions...times on the order of 20 to 30 µs were measured. This response time is much faster than that of conventional BiTe TE coolers and demonstrates that

  12. High-speed LWR transients simulation for optimizing emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.; Stritar, A.

    1984-11-19

    The purpose of computer-assisted emergency response in nuclear power plants, and the requirements for achieving such a response, are presented. An important requirement is the attainment of realistic high-speed plant simulations at the reactor site. Currently pursued development programs for plant simulations are reviewed. Five modeling principles are established and a criterion is presented for selecting numerical procedures and efficient computer hardware to achieve high-speed simulations. A newly developed technology for high-speed power plant simulation is described and results are presented. It is shown that simulation speeds ten times greater than real-time process-speeds are possible, and that plant instrumentation can be made part of the computational loop in a small, on-site minicomputer. Additional technical issues are presented which must still be resolved before the newly developed technology can be implemented in a nuclear power plant.

  13. On Solutions for the Transient Response of Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Robert W.

    1959-01-01

    Williams type modal solutions of the elementary and Timoshenko beam equations are presented for the response of several uniform beams to a general applied load. Example computations are shown for a free-free beam subject to various concentrated loads at its center. Discussion includes factors influencing the convergence of modal solutions and factors to be considered in a choice of beam theory. Results obtained by two numerical procedures, the traveling-wave method and Houbolt's method, are also presented and discussed.

  14. A numerical and experimental investigation of premixed methane-air flame transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Habib N. Najm; Phillip H. Paul; Omar M. Knio; Andrew McIlroy

    2000-01-06

    The authors report the results of a numerical and experimental investigation of the response of premixed methane-air flames to transient strain-rate disturbances induced by a two-dimensional counter-rotating vortex-pair. The numerical and experimental time histories of flow and flame evolution are matched over a 10 ms interaction time. Measurements and computations of CH and OH peak data evolution are reported, and found to indicate mis-prediction of the flame time scales in the numerical model. Qualitative transient features of OH at rich conditions are not predicted in the computations. On the other hand, evolution of computed and measured normalized HCO fractions are in agreement. The computed CH{sub 3}O response exhibits a strong transient driven by changes to internal flame structure, namely temperature profile steepening, induced by the flow field. Steady state experimental PLIF CH{sub 3}O data is reported, but experimental transient CH{sub 3}O data is not available. The present analysis indicates that the flame responds at time scales that are quite distinct from ``propagation'' time scale derived from flame thickness and burning speed. Evidently, these propagation time scales are not adequate for characterizing the transient flame response.

  15. Angiotensin II-stimulated Ca2+ entry mechanisms in afferent arterioles: role of transient receptor potential canonical channels and reverse Na+/Ca2+ exchange.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Arendshorst, William J

    2008-01-01

    In afferent arterioles, the signaling events that lead to an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and initiation of vascular contraction are increasingly being delineated. We have recently studied angiotensin II (ANG II)-mediated effects on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) mobilization of Ca(2+) and the role of superoxide and cyclic adenosine diphosphoribose in these processes. In the current study we investigated the participation of transient receptor potential canonical channels (TRPC) and a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) in Ca(2+) entry mechanisms. Afferent arterioles, isolated with the magnetized polystyrene bead method, were loaded with fura-2 to measure [Ca(2+)](i) ratiometrically. We observed that the Ca(2+)-dependent chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (10 and 50 microM) affects neither the peak nor plateau [Ca(2+)](i) response to ANG II. Arterioles were pretreated with ryanodine (100 microM) and TMB-8 to block SR mobilization via the ryanodine receptor and inositol trisphosphate receptor, respectively. The peak [Ca(2+)](i) response to ANG II was reduced by 40%. Addition of 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borane to block TRPC-mediated Ca(2+) entry inhibited the peak [Ca(2+)](i) ANG II response by 80% and the plateau by 74%. Flufenamic acid (FFA; 50 microM), which stimulates TRPC6, caused a sustained increase of [Ca(2+)](i) of 146 nM. This response was unaffected by diltiazem or nifedipine. KB-R7943 (at the low concentration of 10 microM) inhibits reverse (but not forward) mode NCX. KB-R7943 decreased the peak [Ca(2+)](i) response to ANG II by 48% and to FFA by 38%. We conclude that TRPC6 and reverse-mode NCX may be important Ca(2+) entry pathways in afferent arterioles.

  16. Transient Response Dynamic Module Modifications to Include Static and Kinetic Friction Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misel, J. E.; Nenno, S. B.; Takahashi, D.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology that supports forced transient response dynamic solutions when both static and kinetic friction effects are included in a structural system model is described. Modifications that support this type of nonlinear transient response solution are summarized for the transient response dynamics (TRD) NASTRAN module. An overview of specific modifications for the NASTRAN processing subroutines, INITL, TRD1C, and TRD1D, are described with further details regarding inspection of nonlinear input definitions to define the type of nonlinear solution required, along with additional initialization requirements and specific calculation subroutines to successfully solve the transient response problem. The extension of the basic NASTRAN nonlinear methodology is presented through several stages of development to the point where constraint equations and residual flexibility effects are introduced into the finite difference Newmark-Beta recurrsion formulas. Particular emphasis is placed on cost effective solutions for large finite element models such as the Space Shuttle with friction degrees of freedom between the orbiter and payloads mounted in the cargo bay. An alteration to the dynamic finite difference equations of motion is discussed, which allows one to include friction effects at reasonable cost for large structural systems such as the Space Shuttle. Data are presented to indicate the possible impact of transient friction loads to the payload designer for the Space Shuttle. Transient response solution data are also included, which compare solutions without friction forces and those with friction forces for payloads mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. These data indicate that payload components can be sensitive to friction induced loads.

  17. Distinguishing cells by their first-order transient motion response under an optically induced dielectrophoretic force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuliang; Liang, Wenfeng; Zhang, Guanglie; Mai, John D.; Liu, Lianqing; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Li, Wen J.

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports our characterization of the transient motion of cells under an optically induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP) force field. Different types of human cells repeatably undergo a first-order transient motion response when subjected to a specific ODEP force field. A kernel function is derived to describe this transient motion. This function can be generally matched to experimental data for Raji cells and red blood cells by measuring two parameters: the initial velocity and the transient time-constant. They are uniquely different for Raji cells and RBCs. Support vector machine is used to distinguish between them based on their transient response characteristics.

  18. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a main feedwater turbopump trip transient in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A.; Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R.

    1993-12-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos (ANV) have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); a load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); a load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); and, a feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the feedwater turbopump trip transient simulation. This transient actually occurred in the plant on June 19, 1989.

  19. Transient Compensatory Smoking in Response to Placebo Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, David A.; Heckman, Bryan W.; Blank, Melissa D.; Van Rensburg, Kate Janse; Evans, David E.; Drobes, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale To address the public health problems caused by smoking, researchers have suggested a gradual reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes. There remain concerns, however, about the potential for smokers to compensate for reductions in nicotine content by altering their smoking behavior. Such compensatory behaviors may negate any potential cessation and/or harm reduction benefits. Objective The purpose of this study was to quantify smoking behavior (e.g., puff number, volume, duration, inter-puff interval, and peak flow) in response to cigarettes varying only in nicotine content, administered repeatedly. Methods Sixty-seven dependent smokers participated in this two session, within-subject study. Moderate nicotine content and placebo cigarettes (Quest© brand) were administered in a double-blind and counterbalanced manner. Each session required 12-hours of tobacco abstinence, and included four ad lib smoking bouts of the condition-assigned cigarette with 40 minutes separating each bout. Results Placebo cigarettes produced increases in total puff volume and duration and decreases in total inter-puff interval relative to cigarettes with moderate nicotine content. Differences in total puff volume and duration generally dissipated across smoking bouts, with differences in total puff volume non-existent by the 3rd and 4th bouts. Conclusions Placebo cigarettes produce compensatory smoking during initial exposures; however, these effects appear to be short lived. These findings are consistent with previous work where smoking compensation has been observed in response to a single cigarette but not over several days of smoking. PMID:22427021

  20. Transient response of a plate convolved with a mechanical shaker using high speed optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Lopez, C.; Sanchez Preciado, J.

    2015-08-01

    Transient response analysis is widely used in mechanical systems; with a single stimulation the mechanical behavior of the system could be characterized. Commonly, the entrance used in transient systems is a delta function, due to the possibility of stimulate the system in a wide range of frequencies. Unfortunately, the Dirac function is not easy to achieve. For this work we stimulated a mechanical shaker with a step function obtaining a Gaussian-type displacement of the spike. The spike is then used as the entrance signal for a square elastic plate. The measurement of the convolved transient response of an elastic plate is obtained by means of a high speed camera working at 10,000 fps with an out of plane speckle interferometer. Experimental results are shown.

  1. Exciton exciton annihilation dynamics in chromophore complexes. II. Intensity dependent transient absorption of the LH2 antenna system.

    PubMed

    Bruggemann, B; May, V

    2004-02-01

    Using the multiexciton density matrix theory of excitation energy transfer in chromophore complexes developed in a foregoing paper [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 746 (2003)], the computation of ultrafast transient absorption spectra is presented. Beside static disorder and standard mechanisms of excitation energy dissipation the theory incorporates exciton exciton annihilation (EEA) processes. To elucidate signatures of EEA in intensity dependent transient absorption data the approach is applied to the B850 ring of the LH2 found in rhodobacter sphaeroides. As main indications for two-exciton population and resulting EEA we found (i) a weakening of the dominant single-exciton bleaching structure in the transient absorption, and (ii) an intermediate suppression of long-wavelength and short-wavelength shoulders around the bleaching structure. The suppression is caused by stimulated emission from the two-exciton to the one-exciton state and the return of the shoulders follows from a depletion of two-exciton population according to EEA. The EEA-signature survives as a short-wavelength shoulder in the transient absorption if orientational and energetic disorder are taken into account. Therefore, the observation of the EEA-signatures should be possible when doing frequency resolved transient absorption experiments with a sufficiently strongly varying pump-pulse intensity.

  2. Review of behavior of mixed-oxide fuel elements in extended overpower transient tests in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.; Nagai, S.; Nakae, N.

    1994-10-01

    From a series of five tests conducted in EBR-II, a substantial data base has been established on the performance of mixed-oxide fuel elements in a liquid-metal-cooled reactor under slow-ramp transient overpower conditions. Each test contained 19 preirradiated fuel elements with varying design and prior operating histories. Elements with aggressive design features, such as high fuel smear density and/or thin cladding, were included to accentuate transient effects. The ramp rates were either 0.1 or 10% {Delta}P/P/s and the overpowers ranged between {approx}60 and 100% of the elements` prior power ratings. Six elements breached during the tests, all with aggressive design parameters. The other elements, including all those with moderate design features for the reference or advanced long-life drivers for PNC`s prototype fast reactor Monju, maintained their cladding integrity during the tests. Posttest examination results indicated that fuel/cladding mechanical interaction (FCMI) was the most significant mechanism causing the cladding strain and breach. In contrast, pressure loading from the fission gas in the element plenum was less important, even in high-burnup elements. During an overpower transient, FCMI arises from fuel/cladding differential thermal expansion, transient fuel swelling, and, significantly, the gas pressure in the sealed central cavity of elements with substantial centerline fuel melting. Fuel performance data from these tests, including cladding breaching margin and transient cladding strain, are correlatable with fuel-element design and operating parameters. These correlations are being incorporated into fuel-element behavior codes. At the two tested ramp rates, fuel element behavior appears to be insensitive to transient ramp rate and there appears to be no particular vulnerability to slow ramp transients as previously perceived.

  3. Information conveyed by onset transients in responses of striate cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, J R; Metha, A B; Krauskopf, J; Lennie, P

    2001-09-01

    Normal eye movements ensure that the visual world is seen episodically, as a series of often stationary images. In this paper we characterize the responses of neurons in striate cortex to stationary grating patterns presented with abrupt onset. These responses are distinctive. In most neurons the onset of a grating gives rise to a transient discharge that decays with a time constant of 100 msec or less. The early stages of response have higher contrast gain and higher response gain than later stages. Moreover, the variability of discharge during the onset transient is disproportionately low. These factors together make the onset transient an information-rich component of response, such that the detectability and discriminability of stationary gratings grows rapidly to an early peak, within 150 msec of the onset of the response in most neurons. The orientation selectivity of neurons estimated from the first 150 msec of discharge to a stationary grating is indistinguishable from the orientation selectivity estimated from longer segments of discharge to moving gratings. Moving gratings are ultimately more detectable than stationary ones, because responses to the former are continuously renewed. The principal characteristics of the response of a neuron to a stationary grating-the initial high discharge rate, which decays rapidly, and the change of contrast gain with time-are well captured by a model in which each excitatory synaptic event leads to an immediate reduction in synaptic gain, from which recovery is slow.

  4. Transient response of an electrodynamic tether system in the ionosphere: TSS-1 first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BiléN, Sven G.; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Bonifazi, Carlo; Melchioni, Enrico

    1995-09-01

    The electrical transient response of an electrodynamic tether system in low earth orbit has been investigated experimentally and by computer simulation. Our experimental results come from the first Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1) mission flown on the space shuttle in 1992. During this mission a tethered satellite was deployed to a distance of 267 m above the shuttle using a conducting, insulated cable. It is shown by computer simulation that the electrical transient response of the system is due to a combination of both the tether electrical circuit and the interaction of the tether system with the space plasma. In general, ground measurements showed that the TSS-1 electrical circuit is approximately second order and underdamped. However, it was found that on-orbit transient decay as well as the symmetry of transient oscillations could be dramatically altered, following closely with ionospheric plasma density variations. Combined electrical circuit and plasma interaction modeling shows that these differences can be explained by accounting for ion and electron current collection capabilities of the tether end connections with the space plasma. These results have implications for the use of electrodynamic tethers for high current switched applications including direct generation of low-frequency electromagnetic signals and high electrical power generation as well as detection of natural electric field transient signatures.

  5. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  6. Neurocognitive Brain Response to Transient Impairment of Wernicke's Area

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Robert A.; Prat, Chantel S.; Just, Marcel Adam

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how the brain system adapts and reconfigures its information processing capabilities to maintain cognitive performance after a key cortical center [left posterior superior temporal gyrus (LSTGp)] is temporarily impaired during the performance of a language comprehension task. By applying repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to LSTGp and concurrently assessing the brain response with functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that adaptation consisted of 1) increased synchronization between compensating regions coupled with a decrease in synchronization within the primary language network and 2) a decrease in activation at the rTMS site as well as in distal regions, followed by their recovery. The compensatory synchronization included 3 centers: The contralateral homolog (RSTGp) of the area receiving rTMS, areas adjacent to the rTMS site, and a region involved in discourse monitoring (medial frontal gyrus). This approach reveals some principles of network-level adaptation to trauma with potential application to traumatic brain injury, stroke, and seizure. PMID:23322403

  7. Transient response of an active nonlinear sandwich piezolaminated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oveisi, Atta; Nestorović, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the dynamic modelling and active vibration control of a piezolaminated plate with geometrical nonlinearities are investigated using a semi-analytical approach. For active vibration control purposes, the core orthotropic elastic layer is assumed to be perfectly bonded with two piezo-layers on its top and bottom surfaces which act as sensor and actuator, respectively. In the modelling procedure, the piezo-layers are assumed to be connected via a proportional derivative (PD) feedback control law. Hamilton's principle is employed to acquire the strong form of the dynamic equation in terms of additional higher order strain expressions by means of von Karman strain-displacement correlation. The obtained nonlinear partial differential equation (NPDE) is converted to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (NODEs) by engaging Galerkin method and using the orthogonality of shape functions for the simply supported boundary conditions. Then, the resulting system of NODEs is solved numerically by employing the built-in Mathematica function, "NDSolve". Next, the vibration attenuation performance is evaluated and sensitivity of the closed-loop system is investigated for several control parameters and the external disturbance parameters. The proposed solution in open loop configuration is validated by finite element (FE) package ABAQUS both in the spatial domain and for the time-/frequency-dependent response.

  8. Transient visual evoked neuromagnetic responses: Identification of multiple sources

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.; George, J.; Medvick, P.; Flynn, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.; Supek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Neuromagnetic measurements and associated modeling procedures must be able to resolve multiple sources in order to localize and accurately characterize the generators of visual evoked neuromagnetic activity. Workers have identified at least 11 areas in the macaque, throughout occipital, parietal, and temporal cortex, which are primarily or entirely visual in function. The surface area of the human occipital lobe is estimated to be 150--250cm. Primary visual cortex covers approximately 26cm/sup 2/ while secondary visual areas comprise the remaining area. For evoked response amplitudes typical of human MEG data, one report estimates that a two-dipole field may be statistically distinguishable from that of a single dipole when the separation is greater than 1--2 cm. Given the estimated expanse of cortex devoted to visual processes, along with this estimate of resolution limits it is likely that MEG can resolve sources associated with activity in multiple visual areas. Researchers have noted evidence for the existence of multiple sources when presenting visual stimuli in a half field; however, they did not attempt to localize them. We have examined numerous human MEG field patterns resulting from different visual field placements of a small sinusoidal grating which suggest the existence of multiple sources. The analyses we have utilized for resolving multiple sources in these studies differ depending on whether there was evidence of (1) synchronous activation of two spatially discrete sources or (2) two discrete asynchronous sources. In some cases we have observed field patterns which appear to be adequately explained by a single source changing its orientation and location across time. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  9. On the transient response of a floating ice cover to an advancing ship

    SciTech Connect

    Valanto, P.

    1996-12-01

    Model tests on the icebreaking process were carried out in three dimensions for verification and further development of the mathematical model on the transient response of a floating ice sheet to an advancing ship model, which is under development by the author. Two bow forms were tested: (1) a Simplified Waas-Bow; (2) a Simplified Round Bow. Icebreaking forces at the design waterline on the bows of the models were measured with one and two measuring segments, simultaneously with the measurement of the transient deflection of the ice sheet in space fixed coordinates in front of the advancing model. Detailed information on the icebreaking process in model ice was acquired.

  10. Application of the Taylor transformation to the transient temperature response of an annular fin

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.T.; Chen, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the transient temperature response of a convective-radiative rectangular profile annular fin under a step temperature change occurring in its base. A convection-radiation fin tip is considered. The nonlinear transient heat transfer and boundary conditions are solved by using the hybrid method of Taylor transformation and finite-difference approximation. Also, time domain is controlled by Taylor transformation, and the spatial coordinates are handled by finite-difference approximation. Temperature distribution is implemented by employing natural cubic spline fitting.

  11. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Vegetation-Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a large, collaborative, multi-agency program to simulate and understand ecosystem dynamics for the continental U.S. The project involved the development of common data sets for model input including a high-resolution topographically-adjusted climate history of the U.S. from 1895-1993 on a 0.5? grid, with soils and vegetation cover. The vegetation cover data set includes a detailed agricultural data base based on USDA statistics and remote sensing, as well as natural vegetation (also derived from satellite imagery). Two principal model experiments were run. First, a series of ecosystem models were run from 1895 to 1993 to simulate current ecosystem biogeochemistry. Second, these same models were integrated forward using the output from two climate system models (CCC (Canadian Climate Centre) and Hadley Centre models) using climate results translated into the VEMAP grid and re-adjusted for high-resolution topography for the simulated period 1994-2100.[Quoted from http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/findings.html] The VEMAP Data Portal is a central collection of files maintained and serviced by the NCAR Data Group. These files (the VEMAP Community Datasets) represent a complete and current collection of VEMAP data files. All data files available through the Data Portal have undergone extensive quality assurance.[Taken from http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html] Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  12. Complex transient dynamics of stage-structured populations in response to environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Massie, Thomas M; Ryabov, Alexei; Blasius, Bernd; Weithoff, Guntram; Gaedke, Ursula

    2013-07-01

    Stage structures of populations can have a profound influence on their dynamics. However, not much is known about the transient dynamics that follow a disturbance in such systems. Here we combined chemostat experiments with dynamical modeling to study the response of the phytoplankton species Chlorella vulgaris to press perturbations. From an initially stable steady state, we altered either the concentration or dilution rate of a growth-limiting resource. This disturbance induced a complex transient response-characterized by the possible onset of oscillations-before population numbers relaxed to a new steady state. Thus, cell numbers could initially change in the opposite direction of the long-term change. We present quantitative indexes to characterize the transients and to show that the dynamic response is dependent on the degree of synchronization among life stages, which itself depends on the state of the population before perturbation. That is, we show how identical future steady states can be approached via different transients depending on the initial population structure. Our experimental results are supported by a size-structured model that accounts for interplay between cell-cycle and population-level processes and that includes resource-dependent variability in cell size. Our results should be relevant to other populations with a stage structure including organisms of higher order.

  13. Computer experiments on periodic systems identification using rotor blade transient flapping-torsion responses at high advance ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Prelewicz, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Systems identification methods have recently been applied to rotorcraft to estimate stability derivatives from transient flight control response data. While these applications assumed a linear constant coefficient representation of the rotorcraft, the computer experiments described in this paper used transient responses in flap-bending and torsion of a rotor blade at high advance ratio which is a rapidly time varying periodic system.

  14. Metallothionein-II Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation and Improves Functional Recovery after Transient Brain Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Vacio-Adame, Patricia; Monroy-Noyola, Antonio; Méndez-Armenta, Marisela; Ortiz-Plata, Alma; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    After transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), damaging mechanisms, such as excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, lead to irreversible neurological deficits. The induction of metallothionein-II (MT-II) protein is an endogenous mechanism after I/R. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of MT-II after I/R in rats. Male Wistar rats were transiently occluded at the middle cerebral artery for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Rats received either MT (10 μg per rat i.p.) or vehicle after ischemia. Lipid peroxidation (LP) was measured 22 h after reperfusion in frontal cortex and hippocampus; also, neurological deficit was evaluated after ischemia, using the Longa scoring scale. Infarction area was analyzed 72 hours after ischemia. Results showed increased LP in frontal cortex (30.7%) and hippocampus (26.4%), as compared to control group; this effect was fully reversed by MT treatment. Likewise, we also observed a diminished neurological deficit assessed by the Longa scale in those animals treated with MT compared to control group values. The MT-treated group showed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction of 39.9% in the infarction area, only at the level of hippocampus, as compared to control group. Results suggest that MT-II may be a novel neuroprotective treatment to prevent ischemia injury. PMID:24719677

  15. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using stroboscopic digital holography.

    PubMed

    Antkowiak, Maciej; Arita, Yoshihiko; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-12-01

    We use stroboscopic quantitative phase microscopy to study cell deformation and the response to cavitation bubbles and transient shear stress resulting from laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to cavitation induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of a nanoparticle offers localized cavitation, which interacts with a single cell but without causing cell lysis.

  16. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using stroboscopic digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antkowiak, Maciej; Arita, Yoshihiko; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-12-01

    We use stroboscopic quantitative phase microscopy to study cell deformation and the response to cavitation bubbles and transient shear stress resulting from laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to cavitation induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of a nanoparticle offers localized cavitation, which interacts with a single cell but without causing cell lysis.

  17. Heat changes during transient tension responses to small releases in active frog muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, S H; Ford, L E

    1988-01-01

    Tension and heat production were measured in frog sartorius muscles in response to small shortening ramps (releases) at high and moderate speed. Transient tension responses to fast releases (0.1 to 0.4 mm in 1 or 4 ms) were similar to the tension transients length-clamped single fibers. Tension time courses during releases at 25 mm/s were like fiber responses calculated from the first two phases of the step responses (Ford et al., 1977). We conclude that similar crossbridge transitions produce tension transients observed in whole muscles and single fibers. Heat was absorbed during rapid tension recovery after fast releases and during the later part of releases at 25 mm/s. Variation of heat absorption with release size was compared with that of crossbridge movement predicted by the Huxley-Simmons hypothesis of force generation (Huxley and Simmons, 1971). Agreement between the two supports the conclusion that heat is absorbed by the crossbridge transitions responsible for rapid tension recovery after release. The results indicate that the entropy change of these transitions is positive. PMID:3265639

  18. Transient Eddy Current Response Due to a Subsurface Crack in a Conductive Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Fangwei

    2006-01-01

    Eddy current nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is usually carried out by exciting a time harmonic field using an inductive probe. However, a viable alternative is to use transient eddy current NDE in which a current pulse in a driver coil produces a transient .eld in a conductor that decays at a rate dependent on the conductivity and the permeability of the material and the coil configuration. By using transient eddy current, it is possible to estimate the properties of the conductive medium and to locate and size potential .aws from the measured probe response. The fundamental study described in this dissertation seeks to establish a theoretical understanding of the transient eddy current NDE. Compared with the Fourier transform method, the derived analytical formulations are more convenient when the transient eddy current response within a narrow time range is evaluated. The theoretical analysis provides a valuable tool to study the effect of layer thickness, location of defect, crack opening as well as the optimization of probe design. Analytical expressions have been developed to evaluate the transient response due to eddy currents in a conductive plate based on two asymptotic series. One series converges rapidly for a short time regime and the other for a long time regime and both of them agree with the results calculated by fast Fourier transform over all the times considered. The idea of asymptotic expansion is further applied to determine the induced electromotive force (EMF) in a pick-up coil due to eddy currents in a cylindrical rod. Starting from frequency domain representation, a quasi-static time domain dyadic Green's function for an electric source in a conductive plate has been derived. The resulting expression has three parts; a free space term, multiple image terms and partial reflection terms. The dyadic Green's function serves as the kernel of an electric field integral equation which defines the interaction of an ideal crack with the transient

  19. Transient Dysregulation of Dopamine Signaling in a Developing Drosophila Arousal Circuit Permanently Impairs Behavioral Responsiveness in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lachlan; Petty, Alice; Rohrscheib, Chelsie; Troup, Michael; Kirszenblat, Leonie; Eyles, Darryl W.; van Swinderen, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine ontogeny hypothesis for schizophrenia proposes that transient dysregulation of the dopaminergic system during brain development increases the likelihood of this disorder in adulthood. To test this hypothesis in a high-throughput animal model, we have transiently manipulated dopamine signaling in the developing fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and examined behavioral responsiveness in adult flies. We found that either a transient increase of dopamine neuron activity or a transient decrease of dopamine receptor expression during fly brain development permanently impairs behavioral responsiveness in adults. A screen for impaired responsiveness revealed sleep-promoting neurons in the central brain as likely postsynaptic dopamine targets modulating these behavioral effects. Transient dopamine receptor knockdown during development in a restricted set of ~20 sleep-promoting neurons recapitulated the dopamine ontogeny phenotype, by permanently reducing responsiveness in adult animals. This suggests that disorders involving impaired behavioral responsiveness might result from defective ontogeny of sleep/wake circuits. PMID:28243212

  20. Transient deflection response in microcantilever array integrated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ryan R; Hu, Weisheng; Noh, Jong Wook; Dahlquist, William C; Ness, Stanley J; Gustafson, Timothy M; Richards, Danny C; Kim, Seunghyun; Mazzeo, Brian A; Woolley, Adam T; Nordin, Gregory P

    2011-06-21

    We report the integration of a nanomechanical sensor consisting of 16 silicon microcantilevers with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidics. For microcantilevers positioned near the bottom of a microfluidic flow channel, a transient differential analyte concentration for the top versus bottom surface of each microcantilever is created when an analyte-bearing fluid is introduced into the flow channel (which is initially filled with a non-analyte containing solution). We use this effect to characterize a bare (nonfunctionalized) microcantilever array in which the microcantilevers are simultaneously read out with our recently developed high sensitivity in-plane photonic transduction method. We first examine the case of non-specific binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to silicon. The average maximum transient microcantilever deflection in the array is -1.6 nm, which corresponds to a differential surface stress of only -0.23 mN m(-1). This is in excellent agreement with the maximum differential surface stress calculated based on a modified rate equation in conjunction with finite element simulation. Following BSA adsorption, buffer solutions with different pH are introduced to further study microcantilever array transient response. Deflections of 20-100 nm are observed (2-14 mN m(-1) differential surface stress). At a flow rate of 5 μL min(-1), the average measured temporal width (FWHM) of the transient response is 5.3 s for BSA non-specific binding and 0.74 s for pH changes.

  1. Transient responses of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and computerized study of the steady state and transient response of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system was completed. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of the PAFC system's operation were accomplished. Four non-linear dynamic models of the fuel cell stack, reformer, shift converters, and heat exchangers were developed based on nonhomogeneous non-linear partial differential equations, which include the material, component, energy balance, and electrochemical kinetic features. Due to a lack of experimental data for the dynamic response of the components only the steady state results were compared with data from other sources, indicating reasonably good agreement. A steady state simulation of the entire system was developed using, nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The finite difference method and trial-and-error procedures were used to obtain a solution. Using the model, a PAFC system, that was developed under NASA Grant, NCC3-17, was improved through the optimization of the heat exchanger network. Three types of cooling configurations for cell plates were evaluated to obtain the best current density and temperature distributions. The steady state solutions were used as the initial conditions in the dynamic model. The transient response of a simplified PAFC system, which included all of the major components, subjected to a load change was obtained. Due to the length of the computation time for the transient response calculations, analysis on a real-time computer was not possible. A simulation of the real-time calculations was developed on a batch type computer. The transient response characteristics are needed for the optimization of the design and control of the whole PAFC system. All of the models, procedures and simulations were programmed in Fortran and run on IBM 370 computers at Cleveland State University and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  2. Transient brain responses predict the temporal dynamics of sound detection in humans.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Ville; May, Patrick; Tiitinen, Hannu

    2004-02-01

    The neural events leading up to the conscious experience of stimulus events have remained elusive. Here we describe stimulation conditions under which activation in human auditory cortex can be used to predict the temporal dynamics of behavioral sound detection. Subjects were presented with auditory stimuli whose energy smoothly increased from a silent to a clearly audible level over either 1, 1.5, or 2 s. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings were carried out in the passive and active recording conditions. In the active condition, the subjects were instructed to attend to the auditory stimuli and to press a response key when these became audible. In both conditions, the stimuli elicited a prominent transient response whose emergence is unexplainable by changes in stimulus intensity alone. This transient response was larger in amplitude over the right hemisphere and in the active condition. Importantly, behavioral sound detection followed this brain activation with a constant delay of 180 ms, and further the latency variations of the brain response were directly carried over to behavioral reaction times. Thus, noninvasively measured transient events in the human auditory cortex can be used to predict accurately the temporal course of sound detection and may therefore turn out to be useful in clinical settings.

  3. Spatial variation in transient water table responses: Differences between an upper and lower hillslope zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haught, D.R.W.; Van Meerveld, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    To better understand storage-runoff dynamics, transient groundwater responses were examined in one of the steep watersheds in British Columbia's coastal mountains. Streamflow and piezometric data were collected for 1year to determine the spatial and temporal relations between transient groundwater levels and discharge. Correlations between piezometer responses and lag-time analysis were used to identify and better understand runoff generation mechanisms in this watershed. Results showed a large spatial and temporal variation in transient water table dynamics and indicated that two distinct zones existed: a lower hillslope zone and an upslope zone. Each zone was characterized by very different water table responses. The upper hillslope was disconnected from the stream for the majority of time, suggesting that during most events, it does not directly contribute to streamflow. Piezometers in the lower hillslope zone showed hydrologically limited responses, suggesting rapid subsurface flow, likely through the many macropores and soil pipes. The lag time between peak streamflow and peak groundwater level decreased with increasing antecedent moisture conditions and was more variable for piezometers further away from the stream than for piezometers close to the stream. The study results indicate that a single storage-runoff model is not appropriate for this steep watershed and that a two- or three-compartment model would be more suitable. ?? 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Model of the transient neurovascular response based on prompt arterial dilation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Khan, Reswanul; Thompson, Jeffrey K; Ress, David

    2013-01-01

    Brief neural stimulation results in a stereotypical pattern of vascular and metabolic response that is the basis for popular brain-imaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imagine. However, the mechanisms of transient oxygen transport and its coupling to cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) are poorly understood. Recent experiments show that brief stimulation produces prompt arterial vasodilation rather than venous vasodilation. This work provides a neurovascular response model for brief stimulation based on transient arterial effects using one-dimensional convection–diffusion transport. Hemoglobin oxygen dissociation is included to enable predictions of absolute oxygen concentrations. Arterial CBF response is modeled using a lumped linear flow model, and CMRO2 response is modeled using a gamma function. Using six parameters, the model successfully fit 161/166 measured extravascular oxygen time courses obtained for brief visual stimulation in cat cerebral cortex. Results show how CBF and CMRO2 responses compete to produce the observed features of the hemodynamic response: initial dip, hyperoxic peak, undershoot, and ringing. Predicted CBF and CMRO2 response amplitudes are consistent with experimental measurements. This model provides a powerful framework to quantitatively interpret oxygen transport in the brain; in particular, its intravascular oxygen concentration predictions provide a new model for fMRI responses. PMID:23756690

  5. Permeability-thickness determination from transient production response at the southeast geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Faulder, D.D.

    1996-08-01

    The Fetkovich production decline curve analysis method was extended for application to vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs for the purpose of estimating the permeability-thickness product (kh) from the transient production response. The analytic dimensionless terms for pressure, production rate, decline rate, and decline time were derived for saturated steam using the real gas potential and customary geothermal production units of pounds-mass per hour. The derived terms were numerically validating using ``Geysers-line`` reservoir properties at initial water saturation of 0 and at permeabilities of 1, 10, and 100 mD. The production data for 48 wells in the Southeast Geysers were analyzed and the permeability-thickness products determined from the transient production response using the Fetkovich production decline type curve. The kh results were in very good agreement with the published range at the Southeast Geysers and show regions of high permeability-thickness.

  6. Pseudo-seismic wavelet transformation of transient electromagnetic response in engineering geology exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, G. Q.; Yan, Y. J.; Li, X.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents some new theoretical analysis and numerical simulations of that transient electromagnetic diffusion-field response is transformed into a pseudo-seismic wavelet in engineering geology exploration. It can clearly reveal the electric interface under ground. To simplify the integral equation used in the transformation, the integral range is separated into seven windows, and each window is compiled into a group of integral coefficients. Then, the accuracy of the coefficients is tested, and the calculated coefficients are used to derive the pseudo-seismic wavelet by optimization method. Finally, several geo-electric models are designed, so that model responses are transformed into the pseudo-seismic wavelet. The transformed imaginary wave shows that some reflection and refraction phenomena appear when the wave meets the electric interface. This result supports the introduction of the seismic interpretation in data processing of transient electromagnetic method.

  7. Transient response of isotropic, orthotropic and anisotropic composite-sandwich shells with the superparametric element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallikarjuna; Kant, T.; Fafard, M.

    1992-09-01

    The first-order Reissner-Mindlin shear deformation theory is employed to investigate the transient response of isotropic, layered orthotropic and anisotropic composite and sandwich shells. The eight-noded Serendipity and nine-noded Lagrangian quadrilateral superparametric shell elements are used. Numerical convergence and stability of the elements are established using an explicit central difference technique with a special mass matrix diagonalization scheme. The effects of transverse shear modulii of stiff layers, length/thickness and radius/length ratios, time step, finite element mesh, orientation of fibers and degree of orthotropy on the transient response of shells are studied. The variety of results presented here, based on realistic material properties of more commonly used advanced laminated composite shells, should serve as references for future investigations.

  8. Local-Global Interactions in the Transient Response of Lattice-Truss Plates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    plate model subjected to an initial out-of-plane impulse at the lower left corner. The color scale at the right of each frame represents variations of...Fiur 4. RepneapeLoain (Core ~ ~ ~ \\ and uppe sufc ebr emvdfrcaiy 23 TETRA 11 - Tranwlezt nleporave fLvtorvy 0.003 - Mrst Uccde Ix3ltial Impulse ...vidual lattice members dynamic characteristics influence the transient response charac- teristics. When the lattice members are modeled as bars. the

  9. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using time-resolved digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as one of the biophysical methods by which to permeabilize plasma membranes of cells. In particular, high pressure transient hydrodynamic flows created by laser-induced cavitation have been shown to lead to the uptake of fluorophores and plasmid DNA. While the mechanism and dynamics of cavitation have been extensively studied using a variety of time-resolved imaging techniques, the cellular response to the cavitation bubble and cavitation induced transient hydrodynamic flows has never been shown in detail. We use time-resolved quantitative phase microscopy to study cellular response to laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped polystyrene nanoparticle (500nm in diameter) irradiated with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532nm creates transient shear stress to surrounding cells without causing cell lysis. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to laser-induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle offers localized cavitation (70 μm in diameter), which interacts with a single cell.

  10. Mars atmospheric dynamics as simulated by the NASA Ames General Circulation Model. II - Transient baroclinic eddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jeffrey R.; Pollack, James B.; Haberle, Robert M.; Leovy, Conway B.; Zurek, Richard W.; Lee, Hilda; Schaeffer, James

    1993-01-01

    A large set of experiments performed with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model is analyzed to determine the properties, structure, and dynamics of the simulated transient baroclinic eddies. There is strong transient baroclinic eddy activity in the extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere during the northern autumn, winter, and spring seasons. The eddy activity remains strong for very large dust loadings, though it shifts northward. The eastward propagating eddies are characterized by zonal wavenumbers of 1-4 and periods of about 2-10 days. The properties of the GCM baroclinic eddies in the northern extratropics are compared in detail with analogous properties inferred from Viking Lander meteorology observations.

  11. Mars atmospheric dynamics as simulated by the NASA AMES General Circulation Model. II - Transient baroclinic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.; Leovy, C. B.; Zurek, R. W.; Lee, H.; Schaeffer, J.

    1993-02-01

    A large set of experiments performed with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model is analyzed to determine the properties, structure, and dynamics of the simulated transient baroclinic eddies. There is strong transient baroclinic eddy activity in the extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere during the northern autumn, winter, and spring seasons. The eddy activity remains strong for very large dust loadings, though it shifts northward. The eastward propagating eddies are characterized by zonal wavenumbers of 1-4 and periods of about 2-10 days. The properties of the GCM baroclinic eddies in the northern extratropics are compared in detail with analogous properties inferred from Viking Lander meteorology observations.

  12. Estimation of the transient response of a tuned, fractionally damped elastomeric isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredette, Luke; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-11-01

    This article addresses the frequency dependent properties of elastomeric vibration isolators in the context of lumped parameter models with fractional damping elements. A mass is placed between two fractional calculus Kelvin-Voigt elements to develop a minimal order system for the example case of a conventional elastomeric bushing typical of automotive suspension systems. Model parameters are acquired from measured dynamic stiffness spectra and a finite element model. The minimal order system model accurately predicts dynamic stiffness in both broadband resonant behavior as well as the lower-frequency regime that is controlled by damping. For transient response analysis, an inverse Laplace transform of the dynamic stiffness spectrum is taken via the Residue Theorem. Since the fractional calculus based solution is given in terms of problematic integrals, a new time-frequency domain estimation technique is proposed which approximates time-domain responses for a class of transient excitation functions. The approximation error is quantified and found to be reasonably small, and tractable closed-form transient response functions are provided along with a discussion of numerical issues.

  13. Three-dimensional numerical modeling of full-space transient electromagnetic responses of water in goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jiang-Hao; Yu, Jing-Cun; Liu, Zhi-Xin

    2016-09-01

    The full-space transient electromagnetic response of water-filled goaves in coal mines were numerically modeled. Traditional numerical modeling methods cannot be used to simulate the underground full-space transient electromagnetic field. We used multiple transmitting loops instead of the traditional single transmitting loop to load the transmitting loop into Cartesian grids. We improved the method for calculating the z-component of the magnetic field based on the characteristics of full space. Then, we established the fullspace 3D geoelectrical model using geological data for coalmines. In addition, the transient electromagnetic responses of water-filled goaves of variable shape at different locations were simulated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Moreover, we evaluated the apparent resistivity results. The numerical modeling results suggested that the resistivity differences between the coal seam and its roof and floor greatly affect the distribution of apparent resistivity, resulting in nearly circular contours with the roadway head at the center. The actual distribution of apparent resistivity for different geoelectrical models of water in goaves was consistent with the models. However, when the goaf water was located in one side, a false low-resistivity anomaly would appear on the other side owing to the full-space effect but the response was much weaker. Finally, the modeling results were subsequently confirmed by drilling, suggesting that the proposed method was effective.

  14. ORIENTATION CLASSES FOR IN-MIGRANT TRANSIENT CHILDREN. A FIRST REPORT, PART II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PONDER, EDDIE G.; AND OTHERS

    A 3-YEAR STUDY OF THE ORIENTATION OF IMMIGRANT TRANSIENT CHILDREN WAS INITIATED IN SEPTEMBER, 1960. PART ONE GIVES AN OVERVIEW OF THE PROJECT FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1961-61. IT REVIEWS THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ORIENTATION CLASSES, THE INSERVICE PROGRAM, COMMUNITY ORIENTATION, AND REPORTS OF SPECIAL SERVICES GIVEN TO THE PROJECT CLASSES. PART TWO…

  15. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part II: Transient and Modulated Flow Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Fautrelle, Yves; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Baltaretu, Florin

    2016-12-01

    The present study considers the transient and modulated flow behaviors of liquid metal driven by a helical permanent magnetic field. The transient process, in which the fluid at rest experiences an increase in the angular velocity, is observed both in secondary and global axial flow with duration time less than 1 second. The flow fields are measured quantitatively to reveal the evolution of the transient flow, and the transient process is due to the variation of the electromagnetic force. Besides, the modulated flow behaviors of global axial flow, which is significantly different from that of secondary flow, is expected to avoid flow-induced macrosegregation in solidification process if the modulated time is suitable because its direction reversed periodically with the modulated helical stirrer. In addition, an optimal modulation frequency, under which the magnetic field could efficiently stir the solute at the solidification front, exists both in secondary and global axial flow (0.1 Hz and 0.625 Hz, respectively). Future investigations will focus on additional metallic alloy solidification experiments.

  16. GH3-Mediated Auxin Conjugation Can Result in Either Transient or Oscillatory Transcriptional Auxin Responses.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Nathan; Bennett, Malcolm J; King, John R

    2016-02-01

    The conjugation of the phytohormone auxin to amino acids via members of the gene family GH3 is an important component in the auxin-degradation pathway in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana, as well as many other plant species. Since the GH3 genes are themselves up-regulated in response to auxin, providing a negative feedback on intracellular auxin levels, it is hypothesised that the GH3s have a role in auxin homoeostasis. To investigate this, we develop a mathematical model of auxin signalling and response that includes the auxin-inducible negative feedback from GH3 on the rate of auxin degradation. In addition, we include a positive feedback on the rate of auxin input via the auxin influx transporter LAX3, shown previously to be expressed in response to auxin and to have an important role during lateral root emergence. In the absence of the LAX3 positive feedback, we show that the GH3 negative feedback suffices to generate a transient transcriptional response to auxin in the shape of damped oscillations of the model system. When LAX3 positive feedback is present, sustained oscillations of the system are possible. Using steady-state analyses, we identify and discuss key parameters affecting the oscillatory behaviour of the model. The transient peak of auxin and subsequent transcriptional response caused by the up-regulation of GH3 represents a possible protective homoeostasis mechanism that may be used by plant cells in response to excess auxin.

  17. Transient response of the calcium homeostatic system of the conscious pig to bolus calcium injections.

    PubMed

    Járos, G G; Maier, H; Podzuweit, T; von Gülich, M; Schindler, J G

    1982-07-01

    Calcium injection in the pig elicits a fast transient response which reinstates the calcium concentration to within normal limits between 30 and 40 min after injection. Although the fate of the calcium that disappeared is not known, the present experiments eliminate the kidneys and the bone remodeling cells as the main short-term regulators. The fast response is independent of parathyroid hormone but is greatly dependent of calcitonin. Further experiments are being performed to discover the nature and site of the regulating mechanisms.

  18. The TOPAZ II space reactor response under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, S.S.

    1993-12-31

    The TOPAZ II is a single-cell thermionic space reactor power system developed by the Russians during the period of time from {approximately}1969 to 1989. The TOPAZ II has never been flight demonstrated, but the system was extensively tested on the ground. As part of the development and test program, the response of the TOPAZ II under accident conditions was analyzed and characterized. The US TOPAZ II team has been working closely with the Russian specialists to understand the TOPAZ II system, its operational characteristics, and its response under potential accident conditions. The purpose of the technical exchange is to enable a potential launch of a TOPAZ II by the US. The information is required to integrate the system with a US spacecraft and to support the safety review process. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the system and its response under actual and postulated accident conditions.

  19. Temporal relaxation of nonequilibrium in Y-Ba-Cu-O measured from transient photoimpedance response

    SciTech Connect

    Bluzer, N. )

    1991-11-01

    Nonequilibrium in Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films biased with a dc current is photoinduced by exposure to 300-fsec 2-eV laser pulses. The photoinduced nonequilibrium transients were measured in the superconducting, transition, and normal states occurring between 7 and 200 K. The photoabsorption produced temporal changes in the sample's impedance, which manifest themselves as transient voltage signals occurring across the samples during the nonequilibrium's relaxation process. At and above {ital T}{sub {ital c}}, the observed photoresponse is thermal. Below {ital T}{sub {ital c}}, a quantum response is obtained corresponding to changes in the Cooper-pair populations. In the zero-resistance superconducting state, a positive signal corresponds to quasiparticle generation and a negative signal corresponds to quasiparticle recombination.

  20. Response-coefficient method for heat-conduction transients with time-dependent inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceylan, Tamer

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical overview of the response coefficient method for heat conduction transients with time-dependent input forcing functions is presented with a number of illustrative applications. The method may be the most convenient and economical if the same problem is to be solved many times with different input-time histories or if the solution time is relatively long. The method is applicable to a wide variety of problems, including irregular geometries, position-dependent boundary conditions, position-dependent physical properties, and nonperiodic irregular input histories. Nonuniform internal energy generation rates within the structure can also be handled by the method. The area of interest is long-time solutions, in which initial condition is unimportant, and not the early transient period. The method can be applied to one dimensional problems in cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates as well as to two dimensional problems in cartesian and cylindrical coordinates.

  1. Sustained Inhibition of Proliferative Response After Transient FGF Stimulation Is Mediated by Interleukin 1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Poole, Ashleigh; Kacer, Doreen; Cooper, Emily; Tarantini, Francesca; Prudovsky, Igor

    2016-03-01

    Transient FGF stimulation of various cell types results in FGF memory--a sustained blockage of efficient proliferative response to FGF and other growth factors. FGF memory establishment requires HDAC activity, indicating its epigenetic character. FGF treatment stimulates proinflammatory NFκB signaling, which is also critical for FGF memory formation. The search for FGF-induced mediators of FGF memory revealed that FGF stimulates HDAC-dependent expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL1α. Similarly to FGF, transient cell treatment with recombinant IL1α inhibits the proliferative response to further FGF and EGF stimulation, but does not prevent FGF receptor-mediated signaling. Interestingly, like cells pretreated with FGF1, cells pretreated with IL1α exhibit enhanced restructuring of actin cytoskeleton and increased migration in response to FGF stimulation. IRAP, a specific inhibitor of IL 1 receptor, and a neutralizing anti-IL1α antibody prevent the formation of FGF memory and rescue an efficient proliferative response to FGF restimulation. A similar effect results following treatment with the anti-inflammatory agents aspirin and dexamethasone. Thus, FGF memory is mediated by proinflammatory IL1 signaling. It may play a role in the limitation of proliferative response to tissue damage and prevention of wound-induced hyperplasia.

  2. The transient response of land and ocean precipitation in changing climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcinerney, D. J.; Moyer, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    Although much attention in climate modeling is focused on fine-scale regional predictions, we suggest that diagnostics based on near-global characteristics of climate models provide insight into the underlying physics that differentiates general circulation models (GCMs) and in understanding the robustness of climate forecasts in conditions of changing radiative forcing. We show that certain aspects of the response of precipitation in transient climates are robust across models, including models with very different convective parameterization schemes, suggesting that they reflect some fundamental aspect of the climate system. Climate models are in broad agreement that the hydrological cycle is enhanced in conditions of higher atmospheric CO2 concentration, i.e. that global precipitation increases with surface temperature, but recent studies have shown that in transient climates the change in precipitation per warming is suppressed relative to its equilibrium value (ΔP/ΔT<ΔPeq/ΔTeq). This suppression, which we term the "disequilibrium precipitation response", manifests within days to months of a change in radiative forcing and has been cited as important for impacts assessments. We show that the disequilibrium precipitation response occurs over the ocean but is not present over land (and so has minimal effect on human welfare). This distinction is robust across 12 of 13 climate models in the CMIP3 archive. These findings are consistent with the previously proposed mechanism for this effect: that ocean heat burial reduces transient warming at the ocean surface relative to the mid-troposphere, increasing atmospheric stability and thereby inhibiting convection. This lapse rate change appears to be a common feature of climate models, although the size of the disequilibrium precipitation effect varies between them. We show that the most common representation of the disequilibrium precipitation response in the literature can be reduced to a simple statement that

  3. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part I: Theory and description of model capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffray, A. René; Federici, Gianfranco

    1997-04-01

    RACLETTE (Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation), a comprehensive but relatively simple and versatile model, was developed to help in the design analysis of plasma facing components (PFCs) under 'slow' high power transients, such as those associated with plasma vertical displacement events. The model includes all the key surface heat transfer processes such as evaporation, melting, and radiation, and their interaction with the PFC block thermal response and the coolant behaviour. This paper represents part I of two sister and complementary papers. It covers the model description, calibration and validation, and presents a number of parametric analyses shedding light on and identifying trends in the PFC armour block response to high plasma energy deposition transients. Parameters investigated include the plasma energy density and deposition time, the armour thickness and the presence of vapour shielding effects. Part II of the paper focuses on specific design analyses of ITER plasma facing components (divertor, limiter, primary first wall and baffle), including improvements in the thermal-hydraulic modeling required for better understanding the consequences of high energy deposition transients in particular for the ITER limiter case.

  4. The transient roll moment response due to forebody tangential blowing at high angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Jonathan Kwokching

    The sustained ability for controlled flight at high angles of attack is desirable for future aircraft. For combat aircraft, enhancing maneuverability is important to increasing its survivability. For future supersonic commercial aircraft, an increase in lift at high angles of attack leads to improved performance during take-offs and landing, and a reduction in noise pollution. However, nonlinear and unsteady phenomena, such as flow separation and vortex shedding dominate the aerodynamics in the high angle of attack regime. These phenomena cause the onset of lateral loads and decrease the effectiveness of conventional control surfaces. For conventional aircraft, controlled flight at high angle of attack is difficult or unfeasible without augmented means of control and a good understanding of their impact on vehicle characteristics and dynamics. The injection of thin sheets of air tangentially to the forebody of the vehicle has been found to be an extremely promising method for augmenting the control of a flight vehicle at high angles of attack. Forebody Tangential Blowing (FTB) allows the flow structure to be altered in a rational manner and increase the controllability of the vehicle under these flight conditions. The feasibility of using FTB to control the roll-yaw motion of flight vehicles has been demonstrated. Existing knowledge of FTB's nonlinear impact on the aerodynamic moment responses is limited. Currently available dynamic models predict the general trends in the behavior but do not capture important transient effects that dominate the responses when small amounts of blowing is used. These transients can be large in comparison to the steady-state values. This thesis summarizes the experimental and theoretical results of an investigation into the transient effects of Forebody Tangential Blowing. The relationship between the aerodynamic roll moment, vortical flowfield, and blowing strength is examined to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics of

  5. Modeling of the transient responses of the vocal fold lamina propria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Siegmund, Thomas; Chan, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    The human voice is produced by flow-induced self-sustained oscillation of the vocal fold lamina propria. The mechanical properties of vocal fold tissues are important for understanding phonation, including the time-dependent and transient changes in fundamental frequency (F0). Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests were conducted on a group of specimens of the vocal fold lamina propria, including the superficial layer (vocal fold cover) (5 male, 5 female) and the deeper layers (vocal ligament) (6 male, 6 female). Results showed that the vocal fold lamina propria, like many other soft tissues, exhibits both elastic and viscous behavior. Specifically, the transient mechanical responses of cyclic stress relaxation and creep were observed. A three-network constitutive model composed of a hyperelastic equilibrium network in parallel with two viscoplastic time-dependent networks proves effective in characterizing the cyclic stress relaxation and creep behavior. For male vocal folds at a stretch of 1.4, significantly higher peak stress was found in the vocal ligament than in the vocal fold cover. Also, the male vocal ligament was significantly stiffer than the female vocal ligament. Our findings may help explain the mechanisms of some widely observed transient phenomena in F0 regulation during phonation, such as the global declination in F0 during the production of declarative sentences, and local F0 changes such as overshoot and undershoot. PMID:19122858

  6. Transient thermal and mechanical response of water subject to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Apfel, R E; Sun, Y Y; Nath, R

    1992-08-01

    The ultrafast transient (10(-14) to 10(-12)S) thermal and mechanical response of water subject to ionizing radiations of different linear energy transfers has been investigated in order to understand the initial events which lead to cell mutation and lethality. Based on computational fluid dynamics, the production of a "thermal spike" around the trajectory of a charged particle and subsequent diffusion of deposited heart are calculated for particles with linear energy transfer (LET) of 4, 40, and 400 keV/microns. A radiation damage region (that is, the so-called "thermal core") is identified, and the transient behavior of the thermal core is studied. The local and transient environment has a dimension of nanometers, a scale which is of critical interest in understanding mechanisms of radiation damage in cells. The radius of the thermal core, Dd, at temperatures (or internal energy density) of up to 1,000 K, is observed to increase with LET, L, as Dd (in nanometers) = C4.L (in keV/microns)0.6, where, for example, C4 = 0.50 for T = 800 degrees C.

  7. Some exact properties of the nonequilibrium response function for transient photoabsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, E.; Stefanucci, G.

    2015-03-01

    The physical interpretation of time-resolved photoabsorption experiments is not as straightforward as for the more conventional photoabsorption experiments conducted on equilibrium systems. In fact, the relation between the transient photoabsorption spectrum and the properties of the examined sample can be rather intricate since the former is a complicated functional of both the driving pump and the feeble probe fields. In this work, we critically review the derivation of the time-resolved photoabsorption spectrum in terms of the nonequilibrium dipole response function χ and assess its domain of validity. We then analyze χ in detail and discuss a few exact properties useful to interpret the transient spectrum during (overlapping regime) and after (nonoverlapping regime) the action of the pump. The nonoverlapping regime is the simplest to address. The absorption energies are indeed independent of the delay between the pump and probe pulses and hence the transient spectrum can change only by a rearrangement of the spectral weights. We give a close expression of these spectral weights in two limiting cases (ultrashort and everlasting monochromatic probes) and highlight their strong dependence on coherence and probe envelope. In the overlapping regime, we obtain a Lehmann-type representation of χ in terms of light-dressed states and provide a unifying framework of various well-known effects in pump-driven systems. We also show the emergence of spectral substructures due to the finite duration of the pump pulse.

  8. A New Imaging Strategy Using Wideband Transient Response of Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Dustin E.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution clinical systems operating near 15 MHz are becoming more available; however, they lack sensitive harmonic imaging modes for ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) detection, primarily due to limited bandwidth. When an UCA is driven to nonlinear oscillation, a very wideband acoustic transient response is produced that extends beyond 15 MHz. We propose a novel strategy using two separate transducers at widely separated frequencies and arranged confocally to simultaneously excite and receive acoustic transients from UCAs. Experiments were performed to demonstrate that this new mode shows similar resolution, higher echo amplitudes, and greatly reduced attenuation compared to transmission at a higher frequency, and superior resolution compared to transmission and reception at a lower frequency. The proposed method is shown to resolve two 200 μm tubes with centers separated by 400 μm. Strong acoustic transients were detected for rarefaction-first 1-cycle pulses with peak-negative pressures above 300 kPa. The results of this work may lead to uses in flow and/or targeted imaging in applications requiring very high sensitivity to contrast agents. PMID:16245601

  9. Solution techniques for transient stability-constrained optimal power flow – Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Geng, Guangchao; Abhyankar, Shrirang; Wang, Xiaoyu; ...

    2017-06-28

    Transient stability-constrained optimal power flow is an important emerging problem with power systems pushed to the limits for economic benefits, dense and larger interconnected systems, and reduced inertia due to expected proliferation of renewable energy resources. In this study, two more approaches: single machine equivalent and computational intelligence are presented. Also discussed are various application areas, and future directions in this research area. In conclusion, a comprehensive resource for the available literature, publicly available test systems, and relevant numerical libraries is also provided.

  10. Preliminary Transient Performance Data on the J73 Turbojet Engine. II - Altitude, 35,000 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubick, Robert J.; Sobolewski, Adam E.

    1953-01-01

    A program was undertaken to determine the J73 turbojet engine compressor stall and surge characteristics and combustor blow-out limits encountered during transient engine operation. Data were obtained in the form of oscillograph traces showing the time history of several engine performance parameters with changes in engine fuel flow. The data presented in this report are for step changes in fuel flow at an altitude of 35,000 feet, at flight Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.8, and 1.2, and at several engine-inlet temperatures,

  11. Transient responses of an axially accelerating viscoelastic string constituted by a fractional differentiation law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Qun; Zhao, Wei-Jia; Zu, Jean W.

    2004-12-01

    This paper deals with the transverse vibration of an initially stressed moving viscoelastic string obeying a fractional differentiation constitutive law. The governing equation is derived from Newtonian second law of motion, and reduced to a set of non-linear differential-integral equations based on Galerkin's truncation. A numerical approach is proposed to solve numerically the differential-integral equation through developing an approximate expression of the fractional derivatives involved. Some numerical examples are presented to highlight the effects of viscoelastic parameters and frequencies of parametric excitations on the transient responses of the axially moving string.

  12. Matrix method calculation of the Kerr effect transient and ac stationary responses of arbitrary shaped macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Kalmykov, Yuri P

    2009-08-21

    A new and simple matrix method of evaluating the Kerr effect transient and ac stationary responses of rigid polar and polarizable particles (macromolecules) of arbitrary shape undergoing the noninertial anisotropic rotational diffusion in the presence of an external electric field is presented. The matrix calculations are accomplished by solving the corresponding coupled differential-recurrence equations for the statistical moments (ensemble averages of the Wigner D functions). The results so obtained are in agreement with previously available solutions for various particular cases and are amenable to comparison with experiment.

  13. Multichannel recordings of the human brainstem frequency-following response: scalp topography, source generators, and distinctions from the transient ABR.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M

    2015-05-01

    Brainstem frequency-following responses (FFRs) probe the neural transcription of speech/music, auditory disorders, and plasticity in subcortical auditory function. Despite clinical and empirical interest, the response's neural basis remains poorly understood. The current study aimed to more fully characterize functional properties of the human FFR (topography, source locations, generation). Speech-evoked FFRs were recorded using a high-density (64 channel) electrode montage. Source dipole modeling and 3-channel Lissajous analysis was used to localize the most likely FFR generators and their orientation trajectories. Additionally, transient auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), recorded in the same listeners, were used to predict FFRs and test the long-held assumption that the sustained potential reflects a series of overlapping onset responses. Results showed that FFRs were maximal at frontocentral scalp locations with obliquely oriented sources from putative generators in the midbrain (i.e., upper brainstem). Comparisons between derived and actual recordings revealed the FFR is not a series of repeated ABR wavelets and thus, represents a functionally distinct brainstem response. FFRs recorded at temporal electrode sites showed larger amplitudes and contained higher frequency components than vertex channels (Fz, Cz) suggesting that FFRs measured near the mastoid are generated more peripherally (auditory nerve) than measurements at frontocentral scalp locations. Furthermore, this reveals the importance of choice in reference electrode location for FFR interpretation. Our findings provide non-invasive evidence that (i) FFRs reflect sustained neural activity whose sources are consistent with rostral brainstem generators and (ii) FFRs are functionally distinct from the onset ABR response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transient response of structures with uncertain properties to nonlinear shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresta, Mauro; Langley, Robin S.; Woodhouse, Jim

    2013-10-01

    A method is presented to predict the transient response of a structure at the driving point following an impact or a shock loading. The displacement and the contact force are calculated solving the discrete convolution between the impulse response and the contact force itself, expressed in terms of a nonlinear Hertzian contact stiffness. Application of random point process theory allows the calculation of the impulse response function from knowledge of the modal density and the geometric characteristics of the structure only. The theory is applied to a wide range of structures and results are experimentally verified for the case of a rigid object hitting a beam, a plate, a thin and a thick cylinder and for the impact between two cylinders. The modal density of the flexural modes for a thick slender cylinder is derived analytically. Good agreement is found between experimental, simulated and published results, showing the reliability of the method for a wide range of situations including impacts and pyroshock applications.

  15. Transient Response of Shells of Revolution by Direct Integration and Modal Superposition Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, W. B.; Adelman, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an analytical effort to obtain and evaluate transient response data for a cylindrical and a conical shell by use of two different approaches: direct integration and modal superposition are described. The inclusion of nonlinear terms is more important than the inclusion of secondary linear effects (transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia) although there are thin-shell structures where these secondary effects are important. The advantages of the direct integration approach are that geometric nonlinear and secondary effects are easy to include and high-frequency response may be calculated. In comparison to the modal superposition technique the computer storage requirements are smaller. The advantages of the modal superposition approach are that the solution is independent of the previous time history and that once the modal data are obtained, the response for repeated cases may be efficiently computed. Also, any admissible set of initial conditions can be applied.

  16. The Transient Dermal Exposure II: Post-Exposure Absorption and Evaporation of Volatile Compounds

    PubMed Central

    FRASCH, H. FREDERICK; BUNGE, ANNETTE L.

    2016-01-01

    The transient dermal exposure is one where the skin is exposed to chemical for a finite duration, after which the chemical is removed and no residue remains on the skin’s surface. Chemical within the skin at the end of the exposure period can still enter the systemic circulation. If it has some volatility, a portion of it will evaporate from the surface before it has a chance to be absorbed by the body. The fate of this post-exposure “skin depot” is the focus of this theoretical study. Laplace domain solutions for concentration distribution, flux, and cumulative mass absorption and evaporation are presented, and time domain results are obtained through numerical inversion. The Final Value Theorem is applied to obtain the analytical solutions for the total fractional absorption by the body and evaporation from skin at infinite time following a transient exposure. The solutions depend on two dimensionless variables: χ, the ratio of evaporation rate to steady-state dermal permeation rate; and the ratio of exposure time to membrane lag time. Simple closed form algebraic equations are presented that closely approximate the complete analytical solutions. Applications of the theory to the dermal risk assessment of pharmaceutical, occupational, and environmental exposures are presented for four example chemicals. PMID:25611182

  17. The transient dermal exposure II: post-exposure absorption and evaporation of volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Bunge, Annette L

    2015-04-01

    The transient dermal exposure is one where the skin is exposed to chemical for a finite duration, after which the chemical is removed and no residue remains on the skin's surface. Chemical within the skin at the end of the exposure period can still enter the systemic circulation. If it has some volatility, a portion of it will evaporate from the surface before it has a chance to be absorbed by the body. The fate of this post-exposure "skin depot" is the focus of this theoretical study. Laplace domain solutions for concentration distribution, flux, and cumulative mass absorption and evaporation are presented, and time domain results are obtained through numerical inversion. The Final Value Theorem is applied to obtain the analytical solutions for the total fractional absorption by the body and evaporation from skin at infinite time following a transient exposure. The solutions depend on two dimensionless variables: χ, the ratio of evaporation rate to steady-state dermal permeation rate; and the ratio of exposure time to membrane lag time. Simple closed form algebraic equations are presented that closely approximate the complete analytical solutions. Applications of the theory to the dermal risk assessment of pharmaceutical, occupational, and environmental exposures are presented for four example chemicals.

  18. Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars with RXTE Cycle 4 Observations: II: Too Observations of Transient LMXBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-9045 provided funds for the research project 'TOO Observations of Transient LMxBs' approved under the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Guest Observer Program Cycle 4 and funded under the 1999 NASA Astrophysics Data Program. The principal investigator of the observing time proposal was Dr. M. Mendez (U. of Amsterdam). The grant was funded for one year beginning 3/1/2000. The original proposal was submitted by Prof. Jan van Paradijs, who passed away in 1999 before the funds were distributed. Prof. William S. Pauesas administered the grant during the period of performance. In spite of a wealth of observational data on the kHz QPO in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), the interpretation of this phenomenon is currently uncertain because the pairs of kHz QPO peaks and the oscillations seen in some Type I X-ray bursts are almost, but not quite, connected by a simple beat frequency relation. The proposal was intended to contribute to a solution to this confusion by making RXTE target-of-opportunity observations of two transient LMXBs, Aql X-1 and 4U 1608-52, if the sources became sufficiently bright.

  19. Thermal-hydraulic-structural behavior of the EBR-II IHX for overpower transients

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.; Feldman, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study has been made of the effects of the Operational Reliability Testing (ORT) program on major plant components of the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II). This paper describes the integrated thermal-hydraulic-structural analyses conducted for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) with the aid of the NATDEMO, THTB, and ANSYS codes. An extensive analysis revealed the stress limiting area to be the junction between the upper head and upper tube sheet. The analyses indicate, however, that the EBR-II IHX, the major plant component most affected by the ORT program, will be able to withstand the thermal stress and accumulated fatigue damage during the lifetime of the plant including the ORT program.

  20. Mechanism of Formation of Copper(II) Chloro Complexes Revealed by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT/TDDFT Calculations.

    PubMed

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Karabaeva, Kanykey E; Panov, Maxim S; Wilson, R Marshall; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Tveryanovich, Yury S; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2015-07-16

    Copper(II) complexes are extremely labile with typical ligand exchange rate constants on the order of 10(6)-10(9) M(-1) s(-1). As a result, it is often difficult to identify the actual formation mechanism of these complexes. In this work, using UV-vis transient absorption when probing in a broad time range (20 ps to 8 μs) in conjunction with DFT/TDDFT calculations, we studied the dynamics and underlying reaction mechanisms of the formation of extremely labile copper(II) CuCl4(2-) chloro complexes from copper(II) CuCl3(-) trichloro complexes and chloride ions. These two species, produced via photochemical dissociation of CuCl4(2-) upon 420 nm excitation into the ligand-to-metal-charge-transfer electronic state, are found to recombine into parent complexes with bimolecular rate constants of (9.0 ± 0.1) × 10(7) and (5.3 ± 0.4) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile and dichloromethane, respectively. In dichloromethane, recombination occurs via a simple one-step addition. In acetonitrile, where [CuCl3](-) reacts with the solvent to form a [CuCl3CH3CN](-) complex in less than 20 ps, recombination takes place via ligand exchange described by the associative interchange mechanism that involves a [CuCl4CH3CN](2-) intermediate. In both solvents, the recombination reaction is potential energy controlled.

  1. Active landsliding and landscape denudation in response to transient tectonic uplift, Northern California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. L.; Roering, J. J.; Miller, S. R.; Kirby, E.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Californian Coast ranges present a unique area to study landscape response to transient tectonic uplift. Studies have shown that an increase in uplift may be balanced by the rate of landsliding in settings of steady uplift. However, the landsliding response to transient tectonic uplift remains to be elucidated. The Californian Coast ranges are shaped by the northward migration of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ), which geodynamic modeling suggests produces a transient double-humped uplift field. A major research question is whether we can detect a signature of this transient tectonic uplift in landslide activity and document how the channel network communicates this signal to hillslopes. Using air photos and Worldview imagery, we manually mapped more than 2000 earthflows and debris slides in the Eel and surrounding catchments that span the ~400 km-long region. The velocities of active earthflows were estimated by visually tracking features between images spanning 1993 to 2013. We mapped channel steepness from 10m NED DEMs in Topotoolbox 2 and developed a new tool to automatically define knickpoints along the channel network. Earthflows occur almost exclusively in a band of Franciscan mélange oriented along the MTJ transect whilst debris slides are more evenly distributed by lithology. Both earthflows and debris slides are clustered in the Eel catchment around the proposed uplift peaks and are largely absent outside of these zones. Within these areas of high landslide densities, we observe peaks in active earthflows adjacent to peaks in dormant earthflows to the south, suggesting that the signature of earthflow activity remains for a period of time once the uplift peak has passed. Landslide density, mean landslide area, and earthflow velocity all increase rapidly above threshold values of channel steepness and local relief. In the Eel catchment, where the zone of rapid uplift is commencing, landslides, particularly earth flows, are concentrated

  2. Transient freezing behavior in photophobic responses of Euglena gracilis investigated in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Maeda, Mizuo

    2014-10-01

    We found that the transient freezing behavior in photophobic responses of Euglena gracilis is a good indicator of the metabolic status of the cells. The transient blue light photophobic responses of E. gracilis cells were investigated on-chip using a new measurement, 'trace momentum' (TM), to evaluate their swimming activity quantitatively in real time. When blue light of intensity >30 mW cm(-2) was repeatedly switched on and off, a large negative spike in the TM was observed at the onset of the 'blue-light-off' phase. Single-cell trace analysis at a blue light intensity of 40 mW cm(-2) showed that 48% (on average, n = 15) of tumbling Euglena cells ceased activity ('freezing') for 2-30 s at the onset of blue-light-off before commencing forward motion in a straight line (termed 'straightforward swimming'), while 45% smoothly commenced straightforward swimming without delay. The proportion of freezing Euglena cells depended on the blue light intensity (only 20% at 20 mW cm(-2)). When the cells were stimulated by four blue light pulses at the higher intensity, without pre-exposure, the transient freezing behavior was more prominent but, on repeating the stimuli after an 80 min interval in red light, the same cells did not freeze. This shows that the metabolism of the cells had changed to anti-freezing during the interval. The relationship between the interval time with/without light irradiation and the blue light adaptation was elucidated experimentally. The origin of the freezing behavior is considered to be a shortage of a metabolic substance that promotes smooth switching of flagellum movement from in situ rotation mode to a straightforward swimming mode.

  3. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-08-27

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  4. Microflowmeter-tension disc infiltrometer: Part II - Hydraulic properties estimation from transient infiltration rate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moret-Fernández, David; Latorre, Borja; González-Cebollada, César

    2012-10-01

    SummaryMeasurements of soil sorptivity (S0) and hydraulic conductivity (K0) are of paramount importance for many soil-related studies involving disciplines such as agriculture, forestry and hydrology. In the last two decades, the disc infiltrometer has become a very popular instrument for estimations of soil hydraulic properties. The previous paper in this series presented a new design of disc infiltrometer that directly estimates the transient flow of infiltration rate curves. The objective of this paper is to present a simple procedure for estimating K0 and S0 from the linearisation of the transient infiltration rate curve with respect to the inverse of the square root of time (IRC). The technique was tested in the laboratory on 1D sand columns and 1D and 3D 2-mm sieved loam soil columns and validated under field conditions on three different soil surfaces. The estimated K0 and S0 were subsequently compared to the corresponding values calculated with the Vandervaere et al. (2000) technique, which calculates the soil hydraulic parameters from the linearisation of the differential cumulative infiltration curve with respect to the square root of time (DCI). The results showed that the IRC method, with more significant linearised models and higher values of the coefficient of determination, allows more accurate estimation of K0 and S0 than the DCI technique. Field experiments demonstrate that the IRC procedure also makes it possible to detect and eliminate the effect of the sand contact layer commonly used in the disc infiltrometry technique. Comparison between the measured and the modelled cumulative infiltration curves for the K0 and S0 values estimated by the DCI and IRC methods in all the 1D and 3D laboratory experiments and field measurements shows that the IRC technique allowed better fittings between measured and modelled cumulative infiltration curves, which indicates better estimations of the soil hydraulic properties.

  5. Electronic states in ZnSe/ZnTe type-II superlattice studied by capacitance transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Q.; Lu, F.; Jung, H. D.; Song, C. D.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Okushi, H.; Cavenett, B. C.; Yao, T.

    1997-10-01

    We have studied the electronic states in N-doped ZnSe/ZnTe type-II superlattice (SL) by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS). The capture and emission processes of holes between a miniband of the SL and the valence band of ZnSe barrier were investigated. From the analysis of DLTS and ICTS spectra, the activation energy for the hole emission from the miniband energy level was determined to be 0.28±0.03 eV, which is consistent with a theoretical value (0.25 eV) of the band offset between the ZnSe/ZnTe SL calculated based on the Kronig-Penney model. A deep level with an activation energy of 0.48±0.03 eV was observed and has been assumed to originate from an interface defect in the SL region. A deep level located at 0.54±0.03 eV above the valence band of ZnSe was also observed in the ZnSe capping layer.

  6. Ventilatory response of goats to transient changes in CO2 and O2 during acute hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Smith, C A; Kellogg, R H

    1975-07-01

    The authors assessed the relative sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreceptors of 4 goats to a transient decrease in inspired CO2 using a 2-breath test. This test provides a steady-state background of hypoxia and hypercapnia and then, for 2 breaths, an equally hypoxic gas mixture containing no CO2. Another type of 2-breath test, providing 2 breaths of a hyperoxic gas mixture against a background of hypoxia, was used to establish the time course of a response known to come from peripheral chemoreceptors. Seven human subjects were studied in a similar fashion to establish the validity of the procedure. Except for 2 responses, the author's human data agree with those reported previously by others. All 4 goats resembled man in responding to removal of hypoxia with a significant decrease in ventilation, but 3 of the 4 goats, unlike man, showed no significant decrease in ventilation when CO2 was removed. The authors conclude that the peripheral chemoreceptors of goats are commonly insensitive to transient changes in inspired CO2 during acute hypoxia.

  7. An Analytical Solution for Transient Thermal Response of an Insulated Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical solution was derived for the transient response of an insulated aerospace vehicle structure subjected to a simplified heat pulse. This simplified problem approximates the thermal response of a thermal protection system of an atmospheric entry vehicle. The exact analytical solution is solely a function of two non-dimensional parameters. A simpler function of these two parameters was developed to approximate the maximum structural temperature over a wide range of parameter values. Techniques were developed to choose constant, effective properties to represent the relevant temperature and pressure-dependent properties for the insulator and structure. A technique was also developed to map a time-varying surface temperature history to an equivalent square heat pulse. Using these techniques, the maximum structural temperature rise was calculated using the analytical solutions and shown to typically agree with finite element simulations within 10 to 20 percent over the relevant range of parameters studied.

  8. Two Analyte Calibration From The Transient Response Of Potentiometric Sensors Employed With The SIA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cartas, Raul; Mimendia, Aitor; Valle, Manel del; Legin, Andrey

    2009-05-23

    Calibration models for multi-analyte electronic tongues have been commonly built using a set of sensors, at least one per analyte under study. Complex signals recorded with these systems are formed by the sensors' responses to the analytes of interest plus interferents, from which a multivariate response model is then developed. This work describes a data treatment method for the simultaneous quantification of two species in solution employing the signal from a single sensor. The approach used here takes advantage of the complex information recorded with one electrode's transient after insertion of sample for building the calibration models for both analytes. The departure information from the electrode was firstly processed by discrete wavelet for transforming the signals to extract useful information and reduce its length, and then by artificial neural networks for fitting a model. Two different potentiometric sensors were used as study case for simultaneously corroborating the effectiveness of the approach.

  9. Full Waveform Modeling of Transient Electromagnetic Response Based on Temporal Interpolation and Convolution Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Youzheng; Huang, Ling; Wu, Xin; Zhu, Wanhua; Fang, Guangyou; Yu, Gang

    2017-07-01

    Quantitative modeling of the transient electromagnetic (TEM) response requires consideration of the full transmitter waveform, i.e., not only the specific current waveform in a half cycle but also the bipolar repetition. In this paper, we present a novel temporal interpolation and convolution (TIC) method to facilitate the accurate TEM modeling. We first calculate the temporal basis response on a logarithmic scale using the fast digital-filter-based methods. Then, we introduce a function named hamlogsinc in the framework of discrete signal processing theory to reconstruct the basis function and to make the convolution with the positive half of the waveform. Finally, a superposition procedure is used to take account of the effect of previous bipolar waveforms. Comparisons with the established fast Fourier transform method demonstrate that our TIC method can get the same accuracy with a shorter computing time.

  10. Thermomechanical Response of a Gas to Spatially Resolved Power Deposition Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassoy, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) instability is characterized by growing pressure oscillations that affect the integrity and performance of the system. Modeling and prediction have been topics of intense interest to designers for more than 60 years. LPRE combustion provides a wonderful opportunity to employ thermomechanical concepts and mathematical methodologies to quantify the response of combustion chamber gases to spatially distributed, transient thermal energy deposition. Nondimensional Euler equations, including a power deposition term in the energy equation are used to identify crucial parameters, time and length scales, as well as levels of energy deposition, relevant to LPRE performance. The objective is to provide first principles explanations of physical phenomena responsible for mechanical disturbances observed in operating LPRE's.

  11. Response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation tests in preterm infants with transient hypothyroxinemia of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Kawai, M; Iwanaga, K; Matsukura, T; Niwa, F; Hasegawa, T; Heike, T

    2015-09-01

    Whether hormone supplementation is necessary for infants with transient hypothyroxinemia of prematurity (THOP) remains controversial, and further analysis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis of infants with THOP is necessary. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation tests were performed at 2 weeks of age in 50 infants with a gestational age of 30 weeks or less, and the data were analyzed retrospectively. Subjects were divided into three groups; group A consisted of euthyroid infants, group B consisted of infants with THOP and group C consisted of hypothyroid infants. The basal and peak thyroid-stimulating hormone level of group C in response to TRH stimulation tests was significantly higher than the others, but no differences were observed between groups A and B. The response of infants with THOP to the TRH stimulation test was not different from that of euthyroid infants, which suggested that their hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis was appropriately regulated in infants with THOP.

  12. Finite-element simulation of transient heat response in ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ei'ichi; Kagawa, Yukio

    1992-05-01

    The application of the finite-element method to a transient heat response problem in electrostrictive ultrasonic transducers during their pulsed operation is described. The temperature and thermal stress distribution are of practical importance for the design of the ultrasonic transducers when they are operated at intense levels. Mechanical vibratory loss is responsible for heat in the elastic parts while dielectric loss in the ferroelectric parts. A finite-element computer model is proposed for the temperature change evaluation in the transducers with time. Natural and forced cooling convection and heat radiation from the transducers' boundaries are included. Simulation is made for Langevin-type transducer models, for which comparison is made with experimental data.

  13. The KIVA-II computer program for transient multidimensional chemically reactive flows with sprays

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; Butler, T.D.; O'Rourke, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Since its public release in 1985, the KIVA computer program has been utilized for the time dependent analysis of chemically reacting flows with sprays in two and three space dimensions. This paper describes some of the improvements to the original version that have been made since that time. The new code called KIVA-II is planned for public release in early 1988. KIVA-II improves the earlier version in the accuracy and efficiency of the computational procedure, the accuracy of the physics submodels, and in versatility and ease of use. Numerical improvements include the use of the ICE solution procedure in place of the acoustic subcycling method and the implementation of a quasi-second-order-accurate convection scheme. Major extensions to the physical submodels include the inclusion of an optional k-epsilon turbulence model, and several additions to the spray model. We illustrate some of the new capabilities by means of example solutions. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Intracranial recordings reveal transient response dynamics during information maintenance in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Noy, Niv; Bickel, Stephan; Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Harel, Michal; Golan, Tal; Davidesco, Ido; Schevon, Catherine A; McKhann, Guy M; Goodman, Robert R; Schroeder, Charles E; Mehta, Ashesh D; Malach, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Despite an extensive body of work, it is still not clear how short term maintenance of information is implemented in the human brain. Most prior research has focused on "working memory"-typically involving the storage of a number of items, requiring the use of a phonological loop and focused attention during the delay period between encoding and retrieval. These studies largely support a model of enhanced activity in the delay interval as the central mechanism underlying working memory. However, multi-item working memory constitutes only a subset of storage phenomena that may occur during daily life. A common task in naturalistic situations is short term memory of a single item-for example, blindly reaching to a previously placed cup of coffee. Little is known about such single-item, effortless, storage in the human brain. Here, we examined the dynamics of brain responses during a single-item maintenance task, using intracranial recordings implanted for clinical purpose in patients (ECoG). Our results reveal that active electrodes were dominated by transient short latency visual and motor responses, reflected in broadband high frequency power increases in occipito-temporal, frontal, and parietal cortex. Only a very small set of electrodes showed activity during the early part of the delay period. Interestingly, no cortical site displayed a significant activation lasting to the response time. These results suggest that single item encoding is characterized by transient high frequency ECoG responses, while the maintenance of information during the delay period may be mediated by mechanisms necessitating only low-levels of neuronal activations.

  15. ENERGETIC PARTICLE ANISOTROPIES AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARY. II. TRANSIENT FEATURES AND RIGIDITY DEPENDENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Roux, J. A. le; Stone, E. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2015-04-10

    In the preceding paper, we showed that large second-order anisotropies of heliospheric ions measured by the Voyager 1 space probe during the August 2012 boundary crossing event could be explained by a magnetic shear across the heliopause preventing particles streaming along the magnetic field from escaping the inner heliosheath. According to Stone et al., the penetration distance of heliospheric ions into the outer heliosheath had a strong dependence on the particle’s Larmor radius. By comparing hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions with the same energy per nucleon, these authors argued that this effect must be attributed to larger cyclotron radii of heavier species rather than differences in velocity. We propose that gradient drift in a nonuniform magnetic field was the cause of both the large second-order anisotropies and the spatial differentiation based on the ion’s rigidity. A latitudinal gradient of magnetic field strength of about 10% per AU between 2012.7 and 2012.9 could have provided drift motion sufficient to match both LECP and CRS Voyager 1 observations. We explain the transient intensity dropout observed prior to the heliocliff using flux tube structures embedded in the heliosheath and magnetically connected to interstellar space. Finally, this paper reports a new indirect measurement of the plasma radial velocity at the heliopause on the basis of the time difference between two cosmic-ray telescopes measuring the same intensity dropout.

  16. Effect of cable flexibility on transient response of a beam pendulum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Raheb, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The effect on beam-pendulum response of cable flexibility is studied. The system is forced at its base by a prescribed damped periodic oscillation. Response from cable tension is estimated at a delayed time step from known variables computed at a previous time step in a linear modal analysis. The effects of base excitation and force from cable flexibility are included adopting the static-dynamic superposition method. Two distinct non-dimensional parameters κ o and μ r, control the linear modal response of beam and pendulum. Unlike periodic excitation where the pendulum may be used as an absorber of energy, in transient response the conditions leading to absorption do not apply. Even for large pendulum swings, cable flexibility has a negligible effect on flexural response considering that cable tension dominated by high frequencies is larger than the shear force Q xxL it transmits at the beam-free end. Contrary to its effect on flexure, cable flexibility induces a high-frequency axial force comparable to Q xxL.

  17. Regional estimates of the transient climate response to cumulative CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Martin; Matthews, H. Damon; de Elía, Ramón

    2016-05-01

    The Transient Climate Response to cumulative carbon Emissions (TCRE) measures the response of global temperatures to cumulative CO2 emissions. Although the TCRE is a global quantity, climate impacts manifest predominantly in response to local climate changes. Here we quantify the link between CO2 emissions and regional temperature change, showing that regional temperatures also respond approximately linearly to cumulative CO2 emissions. Using an ensemble of twelve Earth system models, we present a novel application of pattern scaling to define the regional pattern of temperature change per emission of CO2. Ensemble mean regional TCRE values range from less than 1 °C per TtC for some ocean regions, to more than 5 °C per TtC in the Arctic, with a pattern of higher values over land and at high northern latitudes. We find also that high-latitude ocean regions deviate more strongly from linearity as compared to land and lower-latitude oceans. This suggests that ice-albedo and ocean circulation feedbacks are important contributors to the overall negative deviation from linearity of the global temperature response to high levels of cumulative emissions. The strong linearity of the regional climate response over most land regions provides a robust way to quantitatively link anthropogenic CO2 emissions to local-scale climate impacts.

  18. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.P.; Leith, J.L.; Lumb, B.M.; Donaldson, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive–cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  19. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Dunham, J P; Leith, J L; Lumb, B M; Donaldson, L F

    2010-02-17

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive-cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  20. A transient response analysis of the space shuttle vehicle during liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunty, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A proposed transient response method is formulated for the liftoff analysis of the space shuttle vehicles. It uses a power series approximation with unknown coefficients for the interface forces between the space shuttle and mobile launch platform. This allows the equation of motion of the two structures to be solved separately with the unknown coefficients at the end of each step. These coefficients are obtained by enforcing the interface compatibility conditions between the two structures. Once the unknown coefficients are determined, the total response is computed for that time step. The method is validated by a numerical example of a cantilevered beam and by the liftoff analysis of the space shuttle vehicles. The proposed method is compared to an iterative transient response analysis method used by Martin Marietta for their space shuttle liftoff analysis. It is shown that the proposed method uses less computer time than the iterative method and does not require as small a time step for integration. The space shuttle vehicle model is reduced using two different types of component mode synthesis (CMS) methods, the Lanczos method and the Craig and Bampton CMS method. By varying the cutoff frequency in the Craig and Bampton method it was shown that the space shuttle interface loads can be computed with reasonable accuracy. Both the Lanczos CMS method and Craig and Bampton CMS method give similar results. A substantial amount of computer time is saved using the Lanczos CMS method over that of the Craig and Bampton method. However, when trying to compute a large number of Lanczos vectors, input/output computer time increased and increased the overall computer time. The application of several liftoff release mechanisms that can be adapted to the proposed method are discussed.

  1. Ischemic Transient Neurological Events Identified by Immune Response to Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Jickling, Glen C; Zhan, Xinhua; Stamova, Boryana; Ander, Bradley P; Tian, Yingfang; Liu, Dazhi; Sison, Shara-Mae; Verro, Piero; Johnston, S. Claiborne; Sharp, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Deciphering whether a transient neurological event (TNE) is of ischemic or nonischemic etiology can be challenging. Ischemia of cerebral tissue elicits an immune response in stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). This response, as detected by RNA expressed in immune cells, could potentially distinguish ischemic from nonischemic TNE. Methods Analysis of 208 TIAs, ischemic strokes, controls and TNE was performed. RNA from blood was processed on microarrays. TIAs (n=26) and ischemic strokes (n=94) were compared to controls (n=44) to identify differentially expressed genes (FDR<0.05, fold change ≥∣1.2∣). Genes common to TIA and stroke were used predict ischemia in TIA-DWI positive / minor-stroke (n=17), nonischemic TNE (n=13) and TNE of unclear etiology (n=14). Results Seventy-four genes expressed in TIA were common to those in ischemic stroke. Functional pathways common to TIA and stroke related to activation of innate and adaptive immune systems, involving granulocytes and B-cells. A prediction model using 26 of the 74 ischemia genes distinguished TIA and stroke subjects from controls with 89% sensitivity and specificity. In the validation cohort, 17/17 TIA-DWI positive / minor-strokes were predicted to be ischemic, and 10/13 nonischemic TNE were predicted to be nonischemic. In TNE of unclear etiology, 71% were predicted to be ischemic. These subjects had higher ABCD2 scores. Conclusions A common molecular response to ischemia in TIA and stroke was identified, relating to activation of innate and adaptive immune systems. TNE of ischemic etiology were identified based upon gene profiles that may be of clinical utility once validated. PMID:22308247

  2. Transient Response Analysis of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Considering Equivalent Electric Circuit and Mass Conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Kohei; Miyauchi, Nobuhito; Onda, Kazuo; Koori, Hironori

    Since PEFC (Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell) can produce electricity at high power density with a simple stack constitution, PEFC is expected to be applied to electric vehicles and to distributed power sources. In these applications, PEFC may be operated at a wide range of load and may have frequent starts and stops. Therefore it is important to elucidate the transient characteristics of PEFC. In this study, we made a mathematical model to predict the transient behavior of PEFC, considering an equivalent electric circuit and a mass conservation equation. Important physical properties, such as proton conductivity and double-layer capacitance of polymer electrolyte membrane were measured to be incorporated into the model. By using the model, we calculated the response of cell potential to a rapid change of load current, and compared the numerical calculation with the experimental result. After the rapid change of load current, the cell potential varies in 10-1s accompanied by the charge and discharge of the electric double layer capacitance, and then it changes in 101s by the re-distribution of water in the polymer electrolyte membrane.

  3. Transient Response Simulation of Downstream Thermofluid Field in a Gas Circuit Breaker during Current Interruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Hideya; Hamada, Katsuhisa; Uchii, Toshiyuki; Kawano, Hiromichi; Tanaka, Yasunori

    A transient response of SF6 thermofluid field inside the exhaust tube in a Gas Circuit Breaker under high temperature, high pressure and high velocity conditions is analyzed by taking compressible effect and some realistic processes into account related to the available experimental data of GCB test facility. Furthermore, computational simulation is conducted to clarify the effective cooling process of SF6 hot gas flow inside the exhaust tube for transient time to avoid the SF6 hot gas breakdown near exhaust tube exit after the arc current interruption. It is found that the SF6 hot gas flow can be effectively cooled down for the rough inside wall of exhaust tube due to the separation of SF6 hot gas flow from the inside wall and also active mixing with upstream cold gas. The effect of roughness pattern on the real time thermofluid field of SF6 hot gas flow and possible breakdown region are also clarified. Finally, the computed temperature in GCB shows the good agreement with the available experimental data for smooth surface of exhaust tube.

  4. Experimental study of frost heaving force based on transient shock response using piezoceramic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruolin; Peng, Tongxiao; Wang, Ming L.

    2016-04-01

    In seasonally frozen soil regions, the frost heaving problem made it difficult to monitor or evaluate the pile safety for long term. So far, no mature tool can be utilized to monitor the frost heaving force, which was unevenly distributed along the pile. In this paper, a piezoceramic sensing based transient excitation response approach was proposed to monitor the frost heaving force in real time. Freeze-thaw cycles can result in great changes of soil engineering properties, including the frost heaving force. So, the freeze-thaw cycle was repeated fourth to study its effect. In the experiment, transient horizontal shock on the top of the pile will be detected by the 6 PZT sensors glued on the pile. The signal data received by the 6 PZT sensors can be used to illustrate the frost heaving force distribution along the pile. Moisture content effect is also one of the important reasons that cause the variation of soil mechanical properties. So three different moisture content (6%, 12%, 18%) testing soil were used in this experiment to detect the variance of the frost heaving force. An energy indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the frost heaving force applied on the pile. The experimental results showed that the proposed method was effective in monitoring the uneven distribution of frost heaving force along the pile.

  5. Modeling the reversible sink effect in response to transient contaminant sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Dongye; Little, John C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.

    2001-02-01

    A physically based diffusion model is used to evaluate the sink effect of diffusion-controlled indoor materials and to predict the transient contaminant concentration in indoor air in response to several time-varying contaminant sources. For simplicity, it is assumed the predominant indoor material is a homogeneous slab, initially free of contaminant, and the air within the room is well mixed. The model enables transient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations to be predicted based on the material/air partition coefficient (K) and the material-phase diffusion coefficient (D) of the sink. Model predictions are made for three scenarios, each mimicking a realistic situation in a building. Styrene, phenol, and naphthalene are used as representative VOCs. A styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) backed carpet, vinyl flooring (VF), and a polyurethane foam (PUF) carpet cushion are considered as typical indoor sinks. In scenarios involving a sinusoidal VOC input and a double exponential decaying input, the model predicts the sink has a modest impact for SBR/styrene, but the effect increases for VF/phenol and PUF/naphthalene. In contrast, for an episodic chemical spill, SBR is predicted to reduce the peak styrene concentration considerably. A parametric study reveals for systems involving a large equilibrium constant (K), the kinetic constant (D) will govern the shape of the resulting gas-phase concentration profile. On the other hand, for systems with a relaxed mass transfer resistance, K will dominate the profile.

  6. Review: An integrated framework for crop adaptation to dry environments: Responses to transient and terminal drought.

    PubMed

    Berger, Jens; Palta, Jairo; Vadez, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    As the incidence of water deficit and heat stress increases in many production regions there is an increasing requirement for crops adapted to these stresses. Thus it is essential to match water supply and demand, particularly during grain-filling. Here we integrate Grime's ecological strategies approach with traditional drought resistance/yield component frameworks describing plant responses to water deficit. We demonstrate that water use is a function of both short and longer term trade-offs between competing demands for carbon. Agricultural crop adaptation is based on escape. Rapid growth rates and high reproductive investment maximize yield, and stress is avoided through a closely regulated, climate-appropriate annual phenology. Crops have neither the resources nor morphological capacity to withstand long periods of intense water deficit. Thus, under terminal drought, yield potential is traded off against drought escape, such that drought postponing and/or tolerance traits which extend the growing season and/or divert source from reproductive sinks are maladaptive. However, these traits do play a supporting role against transient water deficits, allowing longer season cultivars to survive by mining water through deeper roots, or restricting transpiration. Recognizing these trade-offs made within escape-strategy limits will allow breeders to integrate complementary adaptive traits to transient and terminal water deficits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Source impedance, transient response, and noise characterization of the TOPAZ 2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnierkiewicz, D.Y.

    1995-01-20

    Electrical measurements have been performed on the TOPAZ 2 V-71 and Ya-21 Reactors, in order to characterize the source impedance as a function of DC operating point and frequency. The response of the reactor to step changes in load current, as well as the frequency content of the electrical noise generated by the reactor have also been measured. These parameters are important to know in order to design power regulation circuitry which maintains a constant load on the reactor during spacecraft operations for any flight application of the TOPAZ 2 reactors. Voltage spikes at the reactor interface induced by load transients must be limited; the power regulation circuitry must have adequate bandwidth to compensate for spacecraft load dynamics. The methods used to make these measurements will be discussed. Results of the measurements on the Ya-21 reactor indicate the source impedance is dominated by a series resistance and inductance. The equivalent DC leakage resistance from the reactor output to structure was also measured. The self generated noise of the reactor is benign; load induced transients will be sufficiently controlled with capacitive filtering and active regulation circuitry external to the reactor/power distribution system. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  8. Assessment of RELAP5/MOD2 against a 10% load rejection transient from 75% steady state in the Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, C.; Casals, A. ); Perez, J.; Mendizabal, R. )

    1993-05-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) and the Asociacion Nuclear Vandellos have developed a model of Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant. The ANV collaboration consisted in the supply of design and actual data, the cooperation in the simulation of the control systems and other model components, as well as in the results analysis. The obtained model has been assessed against the following transients occurred in plant: A trip from the 100% power level (CSN); A load rejection from 100% to 50% (CSN); A load rejection from 75% to 65% (ANV); A feedwater turbopump trip (ANV). This copy is a report of the load rejection from 75% to 65% transient simulation. This transient was one of the tests carried out in Vandellos II NPP during the startup tests.

  9. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  10. Transient Response of Rotor on Rolling-Element Bearings with Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.; Murphy, Brian T.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Poplawski, J. V.

    2006-01-01

    Internal clearance in rolling element bearings is usually present to allow for radial and axial growth of the rotor-bearing system and to accommodate bearing fit-up. The presence of this clearance also introduces a "dead band" into the load-deflection behavior of the bearing. Previous studies demonstrated that the presence of dead band clearance might have a significant effect on synchronous rotor response. In this work, the authors investigate transient response of a rotor supported on rolling element bearings with internal clearance. In addition, the stiffness of the bearings varies nonlinearly with bearing deflection and with speed. Bearing properties were accurately calculated with a state of the art rolling bearing analysis code. The subsequent rotordynamics analysis shows that for rapid acceleration rates the maximum response amplitude may be less than predicted by steady-state analysis. The presence of clearance may shift the critical speed location to lower speed values. The rotor vibration response exhibits subharmonic components which are more prominent with bearing clearance.

  11. Transient autonomic responses during sustained attention in high and low fit young adults

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Casado, Antonio; Perakakis, Pandelis; Ciria, Luis F.; Sanabria, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining vigilance over long periods of time is especially critical in performing fundamental everyday activities and highly responsible professional tasks (e.g., driving, performing surgery or piloting). Here, we investigated the role of aerobic fitness as a crucial factor related to the vigilance capacity. To this end, two groups of young adult participants (high-fit and low-fit) were compared in terms of reaction time (RT) performance and event-related heart rate responses in a 60′ version of the psychomotor vigilance task. The results showed shorter RTs in high-fit participants, but only during the first 24′ of the task. Crucially, this period of improved performance was accompanied by a decelerative cardiac response pattern present only in the high-fit group that also disappeared after the first 24′. In conclusion, high aerobic fitness was related to a pattern of transient autonomic responses suggestive of an attentive preparatory state that coincided with improved behavioural performance, and that was sustained for 24′. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the role of the autonomic nervous system reactivity in the relationship between fitness and cognition in general, and sustained attention in particular. PMID:27271980

  12. TRANSIENT GENOME-WIDE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE TO LOW-DOSE IONIZING RADIATION IN VIVO IN HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Rocke, David M.; Dai, Jian; Schwietert, Chad W.; Santana, Alison; Stern, Robin L.; Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The in vivo effects of low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation on healthy human skin are largely unknown. Using a patient-based tissue acquisition protocol, we have performed a series of genomic analyses on the temporal dynamics over a 24-hour period to determine the radiation response after a single exposure of 10 cGy. Methods and Materials RNA from each patient tissue sample was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Data analysis was performed on selected gene groups and pathways. Results Nineteen gene groups and seven gene pathways that had been shown to be radiation responsive were analyzed. Of these, nine gene groups showed significant transient transcriptional changes in the human tissue samples, which returned to baseline by 24 hours postexposure. Conclusions Low doses of ionizing radiation on full-thickness human skin produce a definable temporal response out to 24 hours postexposure. Genes involved in DNA and tissue remodeling, cell cycle transition, and inflammation show statistically significant changes in expression, despite variability between patients. These data serve as a reference for the temporal dynamics of ionizing radiation response following low-dose exposure in healthy full-thickness human skin. PMID:17996396

  13. Transient Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation In Vivo in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Rocke, David M.; Dai Jian; Schwietert, Chad W.; Santana, Alison; Stern, Robin L.; Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo effects of low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation on healthy human skin are largely unknown. Using a patient-based tissue acquisition protocol, we have performed a series of genomic analyses on the temporal dynamics over a 24-hour period to determine the radiation response after a single exposure of 10 cGy. Methods and Materials: RNA from each patient tissue sample was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Data analysis was performed on selected gene groups and pathways. Results: Nineteen gene groups and seven gene pathways that had been shown to be radiation responsive were analyzed. Of these, nine gene groups showed significant transient transcriptional changes in the human tissue samples, which returned to baseline by 24 hours postexposure. Conclusions: Low doses of ionizing radiation on full-thickness human skin produce a definable temporal response out to 24 hours postexposure. Genes involved in DNA and tissue remodeling, cell cycle transition, and inflammation show statistically significant changes in expression, despite variability between patients. These data serve as a reference for the temporal dynamics of ionizing radiation response following low-dose exposure in healthy full-thickness human skin.

  14. LLUVIA-II: A program for two-dimensional, transient flow through partially saturated porous media; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.R.; Hopkins, P.L.

    1992-08-01

    LLUVIA-II is a program designed for the efficient solution of two- dimensional transient flow of liquid water through partially saturated, porous media. The code solves Richards equation using the method-of-lines procedure. This document describes the solution procedure employed, input data structure, output, and code verification.

  15. Development of advanced modal methods for calculating transient thermal and structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.

    1991-01-01

    Higher-order modal methods for predicting thermal and structural response are evaluated. More accurate methods or ones which can significantly reduce the size of complex, transient thermal and structural problems are desirable for analysis and are required for synthesis of real structures subjected to thermal and mechanical loading. A unified method is presented for deriving successively higher-order modal solutions related to previously-developed, lower-order methods such as the mode displacement and mode-acceleration methods. A new method, called the force-derivative method, is used to obtain higher-order modal solutions for both uncoupled (proportionally-damped) structural problems as well as thermal problems and coupled (non-proportionally damped) structural problems. The new method is called the force-derivative method because, analogous to the mode-acceleration method, it produces a term that depends on the forcing function and additional terms that depend on the time derivatives of the forcing function.

  16. Concurrent material point method and molecular dynamics approach for simulating transient responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Su, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Hetao; Jiang, Shan; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2017-01-01

    To effectively simulate multiscale transient responses such as impact and penetration without the need to invoke a master/slave treatment, the multiscale material point method (Multi-MPM) is being developed wherein molecular dynamics (MD) at the nanoscale or dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) at the mesoscale are handled concurrently within the framework of the original MPM (continuum scale). The proposed numerical scheme for concurrently linking different scales is described here along with a preliminary error analysis. Representative examples for concurrent MPM and DPD and concurrent MPM and MD simulations were presented at SCCM-2015. Because the original MPM is an extension from computational fluid dynamics to solid dynamics, the proposed Multi-MPM might also become robust for dealing with multiphase interactions involving failure evolution.

  17. Theoretical Evaluation of the Transient Response of Constant Head and Constant Flow-Rate Permeability Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, M.; Takahashi, M.; Morin, R.H.; Esaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented that compares the response characteristics of the constant head and the constant flowrate (flow pump) laboratory techniques for quantifying the hydraulic properties of geologic materials having permeabilities less than 10-10 m/s. Rigorous analytical solutions that describe the transient distributions of hydraulic gradient within a specimen are developed, and equations are derived for each method. Expressions simulating the inflow and outflow rates across the specimen boundaries during a constant-head permeability test are also presented. These solutions illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each method, including insights into measurement accuracy and the validity of using Darcy's law under certain conditions. The resulting observations offer practical considerations in the selection of an appropriate laboratory test method for the reliable measurement of permeability in low-permeability geologic materials.

  18. Transient response of multidegree-of-freedom linear systems to forcing functions with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to analyze the transient response of discrete linear systems to forcing functions with unknown time dependence but having known bounds. Particular attention is given to forcing functions which include: (1) maximum displacement of any given mass element, (2) maximum relative displacement of any two adjacent masses, and (3) maximum acceleration of a given mass. Linear mechanical systems with an arbitrary number of degrees of freedom and only one forcing function acting are considered. In the general case, the desired forcing function is found to be a function that switches from the upper-to-lower bound and vice-versa at certain moments of time. A general procedure for finding such switching times is set forth.

  19. The $10 trillion value of better information about the transient climate response.

    PubMed

    Hope, Chris

    2015-11-13

    How much is better information about climate change worth? Here, I use PAGE09, a probabilistic integrated assessment model, to find the optimal paths of CO(2) emissions over time and to calculate the value of better information about one aspect of climate change, the transient climate response (TCR). Approximately halving the uncertainty range for TCR has a net present value of about $10.3 trillion (year 2005 US$) if accomplished in time for emissions to be adjusted in 2020, falling to $9.7 trillion if accomplished by 2030. Probabilistic integrated assessment modelling is the only method we have for making estimates like these for the value of better information about the science and impacts of climate change.

  20. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 3 – Frequency Response and Transient Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N. W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2014-12-01

    Power system operators and utilities worldwide have concerns about the impact of high-penetration wind and solar generation on electric grid reliability (EirGrid 2011b, Hydro-Quebec 2006, ERCOT 2010). The stability of North American grids under these conditions is a particular concern and possible impediment to reaching future renewable energy goals. Phase 3 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-3) considers a 33% wind and solar annual energy penetration level that results in substantial changes to the characteristics of the bulk power system, including different power flow patterns, different commitment and dispatch of existing synchronous generation, and different dynamic behavior of wind and solar generation. WWSIS-3 evaluates two specific aspects of fundamental frequency system stability: frequency response and transient stability.

  1. Effects of background noise on the response of rat and cat motoneurones to excitatory current transients.

    PubMed Central

    Poliakov, A V; Powers, R K; Sawczuk, A; Binder, M D

    1996-01-01

    1. We studied the responses of rat hypoglossal motoneurones to excitatory current transients (ECTs) using a brainstem slice preparation. Steady, repetitive discharge at rates of 12-25 impulses s-1 was elicited from the motoneurones by injecting long (40 s) steps of constant current. Poisson trains of the ECTs were superimposed on these steps. The effects of additional synaptic noise was simulated by adding a zero-mean random process to the stimuli. 2. We measured the effects of the ECTs on motoneurone discharge probability by compiling peristimulus time histograms (PSTHs) between the times of occurrence of the ECTs and the motoneurone spikes. The ECTs produced modulation of motoneurone discharge similar to that produced by excitatory postsynaptic currents. 3. The addition of noise altered the pattern of the motoneurone response to the current transients: both the amplitude and the area of the PSTH peaks decreased as the power of the superimposed noise was increased. Noise tended to reduce the efficacy of the ECTs, particularly when the motoneurones were firing at lower frequencies. Although noise also increased the firing frequency of the motoneurones slightly, the effects of noise on ECT efficacy did not simply result from noise-induced changes in mean firing rate. 4. A modified version of the experimental protocol was performed in lumbar motoneurones of intact, pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats. These recordings yielded results similar to those obtained in rat hypoglossal motoneurones in vitro. 5. Our results suggest that the presence of concurrent synaptic inputs reduces the efficacy of any one input. The implications of this change in efficacy and the possible underlying mechanisms are discussed. PMID:8866358

  2. Topoisomerase IIalpha-dependent induction of a persistent DNA damage response in response to transient etoposide exposure.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Sébastien; Pope, Louise; Haché, Robert J G

    2010-02-01

    Cytotoxicity of the topoisomerase II (topoII) poison etoposide has been ascribed to the persistent covalent trapping of topoII in DNA cleavage complexes that become lethal as cells replicate their DNA. However, short term etoposide treatment also leads to subsequent cell death, suggesting that the lesions that lead to cytotoxicity arise rapidly and prior to the onset DNA replication. In the present study 1h treatment with 25muM etoposide was highly toxic and initiated a double-stranded DNA damage response as reflected by the recruitment of ATM, MDC1 and DNA-PKcs to gammaH2AX foci. While most DNA breaks were rapidly repaired upon withdrawal of the etoposide treatment, the repair machinery remained engaged in foci for at least 24h following withdrawal. TopoII siRNA ablation showed the etoposide toxicity and gammaH2AX response to correlate with the inability of the cell to correct topoIIalpha-initiated DNA damage. gammaH2AX induction was resistant to the inhibition of DNA replication and transcription, but was increased by pre-treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. These results link the lethality of etoposide to the generation of persistent topoIIalpha-dependent DNA defects within topologically open chromatin domains.

  3. Photoaquation Mechanism of Hexacyanoferrate(II) Ions: Ultrafast 2D UV and Transient Visible and IR Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Marco; Auböck, Gerald; Besley, Nicholas A; Clark, Ian P; Greetham, Gregory M; Hanson-Heine, Magnus W D; Horvath, Raphael; Murphy, Thomas S; Penfold, Thomas J; Towrie, Michael; George, Michael W; Chergui, Majed

    2017-05-31

    Ferrous iron(II) hexacyanide in aqueous solutions is known to undergo photoionization and photoaquation reactions depending on the excitation wavelength. To investigate this wavelength dependence, we implemented ultrafast two-dimensional UV transient absorption spectroscopy, covering a range from 280 to 370 nm in both excitation and probing, along with UV pump/visible probe or time-resolved infrared (TRIR) transient absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. As far as photoaquation is concerned, we find that excitation of the molecule leads to ultrafast intramolecular relaxation to the lowest triplet state of the [Fe(CN)6](4-) complex, followed by its dissociation into CN(-) and [Fe(CN)5](3-) fragments and partial geminate recombination, all within <0.5 ps. The subsequent time evolution is associated with the [Fe(CN)5](3-) fragment going from a triplet square pyramidal geometry, to the lowest triplet trigonal bipyramidal state in 3-4 ps. This is the precursor to aquation, which occurs in ∼20 ps in H2O and D2O solutions, forming the [Fe(CN)5(H2O/D2O)](3-) species, although some aquation also occurs during the 3-4 ps time scale. The aquated complex is observed to be stable up to the microsecond time scale. For excitation below 310 nm, the dominant channel is photooxidation with a minor aquation channel. The photoaquation reaction shows no excitation wavelength dependence up to 310 nm, that is, it reflects a Kasha Rule behavior. In contrast, the photooxidation yield increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The various intermediates that appear in the TRIR experiments are identified with the help of DFT calculations. These results provide a clear example of the energy dependence of various reactive pathways and of the role of spin-states in the reactivity of metal complexes.

  4. Simulations of the transient climate response to climate engineering in the form of cirrus cloud seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, Trude; Boos, William R.

    2015-04-01

    We present a global modeling study of a so far understudied climate engineering mechanism (CEM), namely the seeding of cirrus clouds to reduce their lifetimes in the upper troposphere, and hence their greenhouse effect. Different from most CEMs, the intention of cirrus seeding is not to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching Earth's surface. This particular CEM rather targets the greenhouse effect, by reducing the trapping of infrared radiation by high clouds. This avoids some of the caveats that have been identified for solar radiation management, for example the delayed recovery of stratospheric ozone or drastic changes to Earth's hydrological cycle. Here, we contrast transient simulations of the 21st century, using a modified version of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We simulate three future scenarios: (i) A simulation with the conventional high emission scenario RCP8.5, (ii) A simulation in which climate engineering in the form of high-latitude cirrus seeding is introduced in the middle of the century without any accompanying emission reductions, and (iii) The same as (ii), but with emissions that are reduced by 50% over the period 2050 to 2100. We consider the last scenario to be one in which climate engineering is used to buy time for mitigation efforts to become effective, while scenario (iii) is one in which high emissions are allowed to continue due to the naïve belief that climate engineering can be used to prevent global warming in perpetuity. Our analysis focuses on the contrasts between the regional and global climates of year 2100 produced by the three scenarios.

  5. A Precision and High-Speed Behavioral Simulation Method for Transient Response and Frequency Characteristics of Switching Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Toru; Sugimoto, Shoko; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro

    We propose a fast and precise transient response and frequency characteristics simulation method for switching converters. This method uses a behavioral simulation tool without using a SPICE-like analog simulator. The nonlinear operation of the circuit is considered, and the nonlinear function is realized by defining the nonlinear formula based on the circuit operation and by applying feedback. To assess the accuracy and simulation time of the proposed simulation method, we designed current-mode buck and boost converters and fabricated them using a 0.18-µm high-voltage CMOS process. The comparison in the transient response and frequency characteristics among SPICE, the proposed program on a behavioral simulation tool which we named NSTVR (New Simulation Tool for Voltage Regulators) and experiments of fabricated IC chips showed good agreement, while NSTVR was more than 22 times faster in transient response and 85 times faster in frequency characteristics than SPICE in CPU time in a boost converter simulation.

  6. Numerical modeling for transient electromagnetic responses on a 2.5-dimension model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y.; Xiao, M.

    2009-12-01

    The transient electromagnetic method (TEM) is widely used in mineral and oil exploration as well as water exploration, engineering and environment geophysics exploration. Numerical modeling for transient electromagnetic responses of a 3-D source over 2-D geoelectric model is so-called 2.5-D problem, in which the conductivity σ, dielectric permittivity ɛ and magnetic permeability μ of the 3-D geoelectric model are invariant along the strike direction. The 3-D problem can be converting into 2-D problem in Fourier domain by applying the Fourier transform to the electromagnetic field with respect to the strike direction. Thus the computing time is reduced compare with the real 3-D problem. And it is more accurate than pure 2-D problem since the source are three-dimensional. This paper deals with the forward numerical modeling for central-loop electromagnetic method on a 2.5-D problem using finite element method. Basic procedures of the 2.5-D forward modeling algorithmare: firstly, carry out the Laplace transform and the Fourier transform to the partial differential equations of E and H vectors in the 3-D spatial field, converting the problem into 2-D partial differential equations for scalar E and H; secondly, turn 2-D boundary-value problems into 2-D problem of calculus of variations, and use finite element technique to seek for numerical solution; and thirdly, take the inverse Fourier transform and the inverse Laplace transform to obtain transient responses of the electric field. In order to check up the algorithm’s validity, we apply it to compute the three-layer models (H-type section and K-type section) and four-layer model (HK-type section), and compare with corresponding analytical solution on the layered earth. Relative errors are less than 3%. In addition, we implement computation for several typical 2-D plate models. Results show the algorithm in this paper is valid. Main characteristics of the algorithm established in this paper are as following: (1

  7. Heat exchanger temperature response for duty-cycle transients in the NGNP/HTE.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-12

    Control system studies were performed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) interfaced to the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) plant. Temperature change and associated thermal stresses are important factors in determining plant lifetime. In the NGNP the design objective of a 40 year lifetime for the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in particular is seen as a challenge. A control system was designed to minimize temperature changes in the IHX and more generally at all high-temperature locations in the plant for duty-cycle transients. In the NGNP this includes structures at the reactor outlet and at the inlet to the turbine. This problem was approached by identifying those high-level factors that determine temperature rates of change. First are the set of duty cycle transients over which the control engineer has little control but which none-the-less must be addressed. Second is the partitioning of the temperature response into a quasi-static component and a transient component. These two components are largely independent of each other and when addressed as such greater understanding of temperature change mechanisms and how to deal with them is achieved. Third is the manner in which energy and mass flow rates are managed. Generally one aims for a temperature distribution that minimizes spatial non-uniformity of thermal expansion in a component with time. This is can be achieved by maintaining a fixed spatial temperature distribution in a component during transients. A general rule of thumb for heat exchangers is to maintain flow rate proportional to thermal power. Additionally the product of instantaneous flow rate and heat capacity should be maintained the same on both sides of the heat exchanger. Fourth inherent mechanisms for stable behavior should not be compromised by active controllers that can introduce new feedback paths and potentially create under-damped response. Applications of these principles to the development of a plant control strategy for

  8. Molecular and Cellular Responses to Interleukin-4 Treatment in a Rat Model of Transient Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Lively, Starlee; Hutchings, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Within hours after stroke, potentially cytotoxic pro-inflammatory mediators are elevated within the brain; thus, one potential therapeutic strategy is to reduce them and skew the brain toward an anti-inflammatory state. Because interleukin-4 (IL-4) treatment induces an anti-inflammatory, “alternative-activation” state in microglia and macrophages in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that early supplementation of the brain with IL-4 can shift it toward an anti-inflammatory state and reduce damage after transient focal ischemia. Adult male rat striata were injected with endothelin-1, with or without co-injection of IL-4. Inflammation, glial responses and damage to neurons and white matter were quantified from 1 to 7 days later. At 1 day, IL-4 treatment increased striatal expression of several anti-inflammatory markers (ARG1, CCL22, CD163, PPARγ), increased phagocytic (Iba1-positive, CD68-positive) microglia/macrophages, and increased VEGF-A-positive infiltrating neutrophils in the infarcts. At 7 days, there was evidence of sustained, propagating responses. IL-4 increased CD206, CD200R1, IL-4Rα, STAT6, PPARγ, CD11b, and TLR2 expression and increased microglia/macrophages in the infarct and astrogliosis outside the infarct. Neurodegeneration and myelin damage were not reduced, however. The sustained immune and glial responses when resolution and repair processes have begun warrant further studies of IL-4 treatment regimens and long-term outcomes. PMID:27634961

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of transient transpolar potential responses to solar wind density changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.; Burke, W. J.; Maynard, N. C.; Siebert, K. D.

    2007-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used to examine the response of the transpolar potential (ΦTP) to changes in the solar wind density during periods of constant solar wind electric field. For increases (decreases) in the solar wind density ΦTP responds immediately by increasing (decreasing) from the steady state values. In both cases the response of ΦTP is transient, decaying to near initial steady state values even when the density change persists. The magnitude of the ΦTP response is proportional to both the rate of erosion of the dayside magnetopause and the ionospheric Pedersen conductance. In our MHD simulations ΦTP is driven entirely by the dayside merging rate and is insensitive to changes in the nightside reconnection rate. The observed relationship between the modeled dayside merging rate and ΦTP is well characterized by an L-R circuit equation derived from integrating Faraday's Law around the Region 1 current loop. The inductive time constant for variations in the transpolar potential was found to be 6.5 (13) minutes for simulations using ionospheric Pedersen conductances of 6 (12) mhos. This corresponds in both cases to a magnetosphere-ionosphere inductance of 65 Henries. Observations of the transpolar potential derived using the assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) model are presented and shown to be consistent with the simulation results.

  10. Gestational therapy with an angiotensin II receptor antagonist and transient renal failure in a premature infant.

    PubMed

    Bass, J Kirk; Faix, Roger G

    2006-07-01

    The fetotoxic effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors when used during the second half of pregnancy are well known. The more recently developed angiotensin II receptor antagonists appear to yield similar fetal abnormalities. We report a premature infant born to a 41-year-old mother with a long history of infertility who had received losartan therapy for hypertension throughout an undetected pregnancy. Ultrasound examination 2 days prior to delivery identified a single fetus at 29 weeks gestation, anhydramnios, and an empty fetal bladder. The neonatal course was complicated by oliguria, hyperkalemia, marked renal dysfunction, respiratory failure, joint contractures, and a large anterior fontanelle with widely separated sutures. Hypotension (mean arterial pressure<25 torr) on day 1 responded to volume expansion, dopamine, and hydrocortisone. Serum creatinine reached a maximum of 2.7 mg/dL on day 6 and decreased to 0.4 by day 56. No formal urinalysis was performed, but the urine was reported to be visually clear throughout the course. Although a renal ultrasound on day 2 was normal, a follow-up study at 7 months revealed bilateral generalized parenchymal echogenicity, consistent with medical renal disease. Since then, weight and length have been at the 5th percentile or less, with apparent renal tubular acidosis necessitating the addition of sodium citrate supplements. This case emphasizes the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for potential pregnancy when contemplating the use of a drug of this class, and considering serial testing for pregnancy when using such drugs, even in patients with a longstanding history of infertility.

  11. Physical basis of short-channel MESFET operation. II - Transient behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faricelli, J. V.; Frey, J.; Krusius, J. P.

    1982-03-01

    The large-signal switching behavior of planar short-channel metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFET's) is simulated numerically. First, the intrinsic response of the MESFET is simulated in two space dimensions and time, using measured electric-field-dependent drift velocities and diffusivities in the conventional semiconductor equations; results of the intrinsic device simulations are then used to study the circuit behavior of Si and GaAs MESFET's in two-input NOR circuits. Although the simulated 1-micron-gate Si and GaAs MESFET's have intrinsic response times of 11 and 9 ps to a gate pulse of -2 V, for fan-in and fan-out = 2, the Si and GaAs NOR gates have average gates delays of 318 and 118 ps, respectively, for 1-micron gate lengths. The power-delay products for these 1-micron-gate Si and GaAs circuits are 1.8 and 1.5 pJ, respectively. These results are compared with measured data and their physical basis is discussed.

  12. [On the terminology of auditory steady-state responses. What differentiates steady-state and transient potentials?].

    PubMed

    Mühler, R

    2012-05-01

    Recording human auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) at different frequencies allows objective assessment of auditory thresholds. Common practice has been to record ASSR to pure tones that are sinusoidally modulated in amplitude and frequency. Recently, optimized chirp stimuli have been proposed to evoke transient as well as steady-state responses. Because of the resulting uncertainty about the different methods, this paper aims to reconsider the terminology of transient and steady-state responses. Two experiments demonstrate the smooth transition between transient and steady-state responses. In experiment 1, click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were recorded over a wide range of stimulus repetition rates (24/s to 72/s). In experiment 2, auditory steady-state responses were recorded for the same stimulus repetition rates, using three different stimulus types: an amplitude modulated 1-kHz tone (AM), a 1-kHz tone-burst (TB) and a flat-spectrum chirp. Experiment 1 demonstrates the merging of the typical ABR wave complexes at higher repetition rates, forming a steady-state response. This effect can only be observed if the time window is extended far beyond the window traditionally used for clinical ABR recordings. Experiment 2 reveals similar ASSR amplitude spectra regardless of the stimulus type and repetition rate used. Steady-state responses can be evoked for a large variety of stimulus types and repetition rates. Thus, from a clinician's point of view, steady-state responses cannot be considered a new type of evoked responses. They differ from transient responses primarily in the frequency response method and the longer timeframe required.

  13. Transcriptomics Modeling of the Late-Gestation Fetal Pituitary Response to Transient Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Charles E.; Chang, Eileen I.; Richards, Elaine M.; Rabaglino, Maria Belen; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Background The late-gestation fetal sheep responds to hypoxia with physiological, neuroendocrine, and cellular responses that aid in fetal survival. The response of the fetus to hypoxia represents a coordinated effort to maximize oxygen transfer from the mother and minimize wasteful oxygen consumption by the fetus. While there have been many studies aimed at investigating the coordinated physiological and endocrine responses to hypoxia, and while immunohistochemical or in situ hybridization studies have revealed pathways supporting the endocrine function of the pituitary, there is little known about the coordinated cellular response of the pituitary to the hypoxia. Results Thirty min hypoxia (from 17.0±1.7 to 8.0±0.8 mm Hg, followed by 30 min normoxia) upregulated 595 and downregulated 790 genes in fetal pituitary (123–132 days’ gestation; term = 147 days). Network inference of up- and down- regulated genes revealed a high degree of functional relatedness amongst the gene sets. Gene ontology analysis revealed upregulation of cellular metabolic processes (e.g., RNA synthesis, response to estrogens) and downregulation of protein phosphorylation, protein metabolism, and mitosis. Genes found to be at the center of the network of upregulated genes included genes important for purine binding and signaling. At the center of the downregulated network were genes involved in mRNA processing, DNA repair, sumoylation, and vesicular trafficking. Transcription factor analysis revealed that both up- and down-regulated gene sets are enriched for control by several transcription factors (e.g., SP1, MAZ, LEF1, NRF1, ELK1, NFAT, E12, PAX4) but not for HIF-1, which is known to be an important controller of genomic responses to hypoxia. Conclusions The multiple analytical approaches used in this study suggests that the acute response to 30 min of transient hypoxia in the late-gestation fetus results in reduced cellular metabolism and a pattern of gene expression that is

  14. Transient magnetorheological response of magnetoactive elastomers to step and pyramid excitations.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Inna A; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Stepanov, Gennady V; Sorokin, Vladislav V; Stadler, Dominik; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-03-21

    Transient rheological response of magnetoactive elastomers is experimentally studied using dynamic torsion at a fixed oscillation frequency in temporally stepwise changing magnetic fields and oscillation amplitudes. For step magnetic-field excitations, at least three exponential functions are required to reasonably describe the time behavior of the storage shear modulus over long time scales (>10(3) s). The deduced characteristic time constants of the corresponding rearrangement processes of the filler network differ approximately by one order of magnitude: τ1 ≲ 10(1) s, τ2 ∼ 10(2) s, and τ3 ∼ 10(3) s. The sudden imposition of the external magnetic field activates a very fast rearrangement process with the characteristic time under 10 s, which cannot be determined more precisely due to the measurement conditions. Even more peculiar transient behavior has been observed during pyramid excitations, when either the external magnetic field was first stepwise increased and then decreased in a staircase manner at a fixed strain amplitude γ or the strain amplitude γ was first stepwise increased and then decreased in a staircase manner at a fixed magnetic field. In particular, the so-called "cross-over effect" has been identified in both dynamical loading programs. This cross-over effect seems to be promoted by the application of the external magnetic field. The experimental results are discussed in the context of the specific rearrangement of the magnetic filler network under the simultaneous action of the external magnetic field and shear deformation. Striking similarities of the observed phenomena to the structural relaxation processes in glassy materials and to the jamming transition of granular materials are pointed out. The obtained results are important for fundamental understanding of material behavior in magnetic fields as well as for the development of devices on the basis of magnetoactive elastomeric materials.

  15. Measured responsivities of generation II and hybrid image intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    We have measured the absolute and coupled system responsivities of several image intensifier types at several wavelengths in the visible spectrum. Intensifiers characterized include microchannel plate (MCP) generation II proximity-focused and hybrid generation I/generation II electrostatic-focused designs. Configurations including single plate, double plate, nominal and high strip current MCPs, and standard S20 and super generation II enhanced S-20 photocathodes were evaluated. Absolute responsivity measurements were performed using NIST-traceable radiometry instrumentation. The normalized relative sensitivities and overall optical luminous gain performance provided by individual intensifiers when similarly coupled to either high resolution 10-bit RS-170 CCD or FPS cameras are presented along with their radiometric data.

  16. Orbit Response Matrix Analysis Applied at PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Steier, C.; Wolski, A.; Ecklund, S.; Safranek, J.A.; Tenenbaum, P.; Terebilo, A.; Turner, J.L.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2005-05-17

    The analysis of orbit response matrices has been used very successfully to measure and correct the gradient and skew gradient distribution in many accelerators. It allows determination of an accurately calibrated model of the coupled machine lattice, which then can be used to calculate the corrections necessary to improve coupling, dynamic aperture and ultimately luminosity. At PEP-II, the Matlab version of LOCO has been used to analyze coupled response matrices for both the LER and the HER. The large number of elements in PEP-II and the very complicated interaction region present unique challenges to the data analysis. All necessary tools to make the analysis method useable at PEP-II have been implemented and LOCO can now be used as a routine tool for lattice diagnostic.

  17. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection under conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert

    2015-04-15

    Adding large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. Our paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. Moreover, the main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  18. Chemical Analysis for Transient Response of Semiconductor Sensor by Autoregressive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Shuichi; Kawabe, Hiroyuki; Shimomura, Yuko; Shi, Liqin; Katsube, Teruaki; Oyabu, Takashi

    The objective of this study is qualitative and quantitative analysis of chemical species reacting to surface of semiconductor sensors. In ordinal studies on detection of gas species by semiconductor sensors, researchers attach importance to the chemical sensitivity of sensors and notice the output value of sensors in the stationary state of the response characteristics. However, the response in the transient state, i.e., the region between the beginning of reaction and the equilibrium of reaction, has much information of chemical processes of gases reacting to surface of sensor. Hence, in this study, we adopt an autoregressive (AR) model in which the parameters describing exponential curves are looked for. As a procedure, we construct a model of reaction on the surface of sensor and assume it as the first order reaction in gas molecule. We simulate the chemical processes mathematically, and apply the AR model on the signal. Then, we reproduce the reaction rate constants and the initial amplitudes and identify the species of gases.

  19. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H.; Mougey, E.H.

    1995-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Evaluating the dynamic response of in-flight thrust calculation techniques during throttle transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ronald J.

    1994-01-01

    New flight test maneuvers and analysis techniques for evaluating the dynamic response of in-flight thrust models during throttle transients have been developed and validated. The approach is based on the aircraft and engine performance relationship between thrust and drag. Two flight test maneuvers, a throttle step and a throttle frequency sweep, were developed and used in the study. Graphical analysis techniques, including a frequency domain analysis method, were also developed and evaluated. They provide quantitative and qualitative results. Four thrust calculation methods were used to demonstrate and validate the test technique. Flight test applications on two high-performance aircraft confirmed the test methods as valid and accurate. These maneuvers and analysis techniques were easy to implement and use. Flight test results indicate the analysis techniques can identify the combined effects of model error and instrumentation response limitations on the calculated thrust value. The methods developed in this report provide an accurate approach for evaluating, validating, or comparing thrust calculation methods for dynamic flight applications.

  1. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  2. Global electromagnetic induction in the moon and planets. [poloidal eddy current transient response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments and analyses concerning electromagnetic induction in the moon and other extraterrestrial bodies are summarized. The theory of classical electromagnetic induction in a sphere is first considered, and this treatment is extended to the case of the moon, where poloidal eddy-current response has been found experimentally to dominate other induction modes. Analysis of lunar poloidal induction yields lunar internal electrical conductivity and temperature profiles. Two poloidal-induction analytical techniques are discussed: a transient-response method applied to time-series magnetometer data, and a harmonic-analysis method applied to data numerically Fourier-transformed to the frequency domain, with emphasis on the former technique. Attention is given to complicating effects of the solar wind interaction with both induced poloidal fields and remanent steady fields. The static magnetization field induction mode is described, from which are calculated bulk magnetic permeability profiles. Magnetic field measurements obtained from the moon and from fly-bys of Venus and Mars are studied to determine the feasibility of extending theoretical and experimental induction techniques to other bodies in the solar system.

  3. An evaluation of higher-order model methods for calculating transient structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    A higher-order modal method proposed by Leung for transient structural analysis entitled the force-derivative method is evaluated. This method repeatedly integrates by parts with respect to time the convolution-integral form of the structural response to produce successively better approximations to the contribution of the higher modes which are neglected in the modal summation. Comparisons are made of the force-derivative, the mode-displacement, and the mode-acceleration methods for several numerical example problems for various times, levels of damping, and forcing functions. The example problems include a tip-loaded cantilevered beam and a simply-supported multispan beam. The force-derivative method is shown to converge to an accurate solution in fewer modes than either the mode-displacement or the mode-acceleration methods. In addition, for problems in which there are a large number of closely-spaced frequencies whose mode shapes have a negligible contribution to the response, the force-derivative method is very effective in representing the effect of the important, but otherwise neglected, higher modes.

  4. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    Hydraulic fracturing is a technique which is used to exploit geologic features and subsurface properties in an effort to increase production in low-permeability formations. The process of hydraulic fracturing provides a greater surface contact area between the producing formation and the wellbore and thus increases the amount of recoverable hydrocarbons from within the reservoir. The use of this stimulation technique has brought on massive applause from the industry due to its widespread success and effectiveness, however the dynamic processes that take part in the development of hydraulic fractures is a relatively new area of research with respect to the massive scale operations that are seen today. The process of hydraulic fracturing relies upon understanding and exploiting the in-situ stress distribution throughout the area of study. These in-situ stress conditions are responsible for directing fracture orientation and propagation paths throughout the period of injection. The relative magnitude of these principle stresses is key in developing a successful stimulation plan. In horizontal well plan development the interpretation of stress within the reservoir is required for determining the azimuth of the horizontal well path. These horizontal laterals are typically oriented in a manner such that the well path lies parallel to the minimum horizontal stress. This allows for vertical fractures to develop transversely to the wellbore, or normal to the least principle stress without the theoretical possibility of fractures overlapping, creating the most efficient use of the fluid energy during injection. The orientation and magnitude of these in-situ stress fields however can be dynamic, controlled by the subsequent fracture propagation and redistribution of the surrounding stresses. That is, that as the fracture propagates throughout the reservoir, the relative stress fields surrounding the fractures may see a shift and deviate from their original direction or

  5. The transient response of ice volume to orbital-driven climate changes of the Late Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Bas; Hunter, Stephen; Dolan, Aisling; Haywood, Alan

    2016-04-01

    The contribution to sea-level rise of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets in a warming climate is uncertain. A better understanding is evidently needed to make more rigorous projections of the impact of regional sea-level rise. A warm interval within the Late Pliocene (3.264 to 3.025 million years before present) can be used to gain a better understanding of the response of the ice sheets to a warming climate with CO2 levels close to or higher than present. Here, we will use a unique ice-sheet - sea-level model, ANICE-SELEN and couple this to the full-complexity intermediate-resolution FAMOUS climate model for the Late Pliocene interval. A first approach is presented here with a one-way coupling, using FAMOUS to force the ice-sheet models in a transient mode. The FAMOUS simulation is driven by PRISM3 boundary conditions (which were also used in PlioMIP phase 1), where we apply a changing orbit, with and without dynamic vegetation. This 40 kyr simulation is centred on the warm interglacial peak, MIS KM5c (3.225 to 3.185 Myr ago). This experiment will give a first indication of the response of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to the climate of the Late Pliocene. The results are compared with the equilibrated response of the ice sheet on Greenland and Antarctica to the PlioMIP phase 1 climate model output, as done so for the PLISMIP experiments.

  6. A model of northern treeline dynamics in response to transient changes in climate

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, C.F. III; Starfield, A.M. )

    1994-06-01

    In order to predict the future distribution of boreal vegetation, we developed what, to our knowledge, is the first model of ecosystem change in response to transient changes in climate and disturbance regime over the next 50-500 yr. The model develops scenarios of change in disturbance regime and ecosystem type in what is currently arctic tundra in response to GCM-based scenarios of climate change. Seed availability, tree growth rate, and probability of fire were the model parameters that most strongly influenced the balance between tundra and boreal forest during transitional climates. The rate of climatic warming strongly affected the time lag between climate change and the simulated ecosystem response but had less effect on the rate or pattern of ecosystem change. The model calculated that a ramped change of 3[degrees] in the next century (corresponding to average rate of warming predicted by GCMs) would lead to a 150 yr lag preceeding any change from tundra to forest, followed by rates of forestation of up to 6-12% per decade. The model predicted that tundra would first be invaded by conifer forests, but that the proportion of broad-leafed deciduous forest would increase as climate continued to warm due to increased fire frequency. The pattern of climatic warming had strong effects on simulated rates of conversion from tundra to forest. Rapid step changes in climate or increases in climatic variability both promoted more rapid ecosystem change than did ramped change in climate or climatic oscillations, particularly when oscillations were long relative to the time required for tree growth to reproductive maturity.

  7. Transient In Vivo Resistance Mechanisms of Burkholderia pseudomallei to Ceftazidime and Molecular Markers for Monitoring Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Jason E.; Slayden, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Much is known about the mode of action of drugs and resistance mechanisms under laboratory growth conditions, but research on the bacterial transcriptional response to drug pressure in vivo or efficacious mode of action and transient resistance mechanisms of clinically employed drugs is limited. Accordingly, to assess active alternative metabolism and transient resistance mechanisms, and identify molecular markers of treatment response, the in vivo transcriptional response of Burkholderia pseudomallei 1026b to treatment with ceftazidime in infected lungs was compared to the in vitro bacterial response in the presence of drug. There were 1,688 transcriptionally active bacterial genes identified that were unique to in vivo treated conditions. Of the in vivo transcriptionally active bacterial genes, 591 (9.4% coding capacity) genes were differentially expressed by ceftazidime treatment. In contrast, only 186 genes (2.7% coding capacity) were differentially responsive to ceftazidime treatment under in vitro culturing conditions. Within the genes identified were alternative PBP proteins that may compensate for target inactivation and transient resistance mechanisms, such as β-lactamses that may influence the potency of ceftazidime. This disparate observation is consistent with the thought that the host environment significantly alters the bacterial metabolic response to drug exposure compared to the response observed under in vitro growth. Notably, this study revealed 184 bacterial genes and ORFs that were unique to in vivo ceftazidime treatment and thus provide candidate molecular markers for treatment response. This is the first report of the unique transcriptional response of B. pseudomallei from host tissues in an animal model of infection and elucidates the in vivo metabolic vulnerabilities, which is important in terms of defining the efficacious mode of action and transient resistance mechanisms of a frontline meliodosis chemotherapeutic, and biomarkers for

  8. Understanding the Slow Transient Optoelectronic Response of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel Louis

    Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskites, particularly methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3), have emerged within the past decade as an exciting class of photovoltaic materials. In less than ten years, MAPbI3-based photovoltaic devices have seen unprecedented performance growth, with photoconversion efficiency increasing from 3% to over 22%, making it competitive with traditional high-efficiency solar cells. Furthermore, the fabrication of MAPbI3 devices utilize low-temperature solution processing, which could facilitate ultra low cost manufacturing. However, MAPbI3 suffers from significant instabilities under working conditions that have limited their applications outside of the laboratory. The instability of the MAPbI3 material can be generalized as a complex, slow transient optoelectronic response (STOR). The mechanism of the generalized STOR is dependent on the native defects of MAPbI3, but detailed understanding of the material defect properties is complicated by the complex ionic bonding of MAPbI3. Furthermore, characterization of the intrinsic material's response is complicated by the diverse approach to material processing and device architecture across laboratories around the world. In order to understand and mitigate the significant problems of MAPbI3 devices, a new approach focused on the material response, rather than the full device response, must be pursued. This dissertation highlights the work to analyze and mitigate the STOR intrinsic to MAPbI3. An experimental platform was developed based on lateral interdigitated electrode (IDE) arrays capable of monitoring the current and photoluminescence response simultaneously. By correlating the dynamics of the current and photoluminescence (PL) responses, both charge trapping and ion migration mechanisms were identified to contribute to the STOR. Next, a novel fabrication technique is introduced that is capable of reliably depositing MAPbI3 thin films with grain sizes at least an order of magnitude

  9. The analysis of the transient pressure response of the shuttle EPS-ECS cryogenic tanks with external pressurization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. E.; Patterson, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of transient pressures in externally pressurized cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen tanks was conducted and the effects of design variables on pressure response determined. The analysis was conducted with a computer program which solves the compressible viscous flow equations in two-dimensional regions representing the tank and external loop. The external loop volume, thermal mass, and heat leak were the dominant design variables affecting the system pressure response. No significant temperature stratification occurred in the fluid contained in the tank.

  10. Inferring the Mode of Selection from the Transient Response to Demographic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Daniel; Do, Ron; Reich, David; Sunyaev, Shamil

    2014-03-01

    Despite substantial recent progress in theoretical population genetics, most models work under the assumption of a constant population size. Deviations from fixed population sizes are ubiquitous in natural populations, many of which experience population bottlenecks and re-expansions. The non-equilibrium dynamics introduced by a large perturbation in population size are generally viewed as a confounding factor. In the present work, we take advantage of the transient response to a population bottleneck to infer features of the mode of selection and the distribution of selective effects. We develop an analytic framework and a corresponding statistical test that qualitatively differentiates between alleles under additive and those under recessive or more general epistatic selection. This statistic can be used to bound the joint distribution of selective effects and dominance effects in any diploid sexual organism. We apply this technique to human population genetic data, and severely restrict the space of allowed selective coefficients in humans. Additionally, one can test a set of functionally or medically relevant alleles for the primary mode of selection, or determine the local regional variation in dominance coefficients along the genome.

  11. Comparison of transient and stationary neutral pressure response in the DIII-D advanced divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C.C.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.; Mioduszewski, P.K. ); Maingi, R. ); Hill, D.N. ); Buchenauer, D. ); Ali Mahdavi, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Petrie, T.W.; Jackson, G.L.; Evans, T.E. (General Atomics,

    1992-05-01

    The DIII-D divertor baffle system was designed to facilitate density control in long pulse H-mode discharges by removing a particle flux equal to the neutral beam fueling rate ({approximately}20 Torr-1/s) with a {approximately}1mTorr neutral pressure under the baffle (p{sub 0}). Initial measurements of the baffle pressure indicated that p{sub 0}{approximately} 10 mTorr (without pumping or biasing), a value much in excess of that required for long pulse density control. Radial sweeps of the X-point position have been employed to determine the maximum p{sub 0}, as well as to establish the dependence of this pressure on geometry. An estimate of the particle equilibration time for the baffle system has been made by studying the baffle pressure response to giant'' ELM effects. Steady state'' experiments in which the X-point position was fixed for {approximately}2.5s have also been carried out and steady baffle pressures were observed. The scaling of baffle pressure with plasma parameters has been found to be similar under transient and steady state'' conditions. Detailed modeling of these experiments with the B2, DEGAS, and WDIFFUSE (wall model) codes has been made.

  12. Comparison of transient and stationary neutral pressure response in the DIII-D advanced divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C.C.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Maingi, R.; Hill, D.N.; Buchenauer, D.; Ali Mahdavi, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Petrie, T.W.; Jackson, G.L.; Evans, T.E.; Haas, G.

    1992-05-01

    The DIII-D divertor baffle system was designed to facilitate density control in long pulse H-mode discharges by removing a particle flux equal to the neutral beam fueling rate ({approximately}20 Torr-1/s) with a {approximately}1mTorr neutral pressure under the baffle (p{sub 0}). Initial measurements of the baffle pressure indicated that p{sub 0}{approximately} 10 mTorr (without pumping or biasing), a value much in excess of that required for long pulse density control. Radial sweeps of the X-point position have been employed to determine the maximum p{sub 0}, as well as to establish the dependence of this pressure on geometry. An estimate of the particle equilibration time for the baffle system has been made by studying the baffle pressure response to ``giant`` ELM effects. ``Steady state`` experiments in which the X-point position was fixed for {approximately}2.5s have also been carried out and steady baffle pressures were observed. The scaling of baffle pressure with plasma parameters has been found to be similar under transient and ``steady state`` conditions. Detailed modeling of these experiments with the B2, DEGAS, and WDIFFUSE (wall model) codes has been made.

  13. Time-domain approach for the transient responses in stratified viscoelastic Earth models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanyk, L.; Moser, J.; Yuen, D. A.; Matyska, C.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed the numerical algorithm for the computation of transient viscoelastic responses in the time domain for a radially stratified Earth model. Stratifications in both the elastic parameters and the viscosity profile have been considered. The particular viscosity profile employed has a viscosity maximum with a constrast of O(100) in the mid lower mantle. The distribution of relaxation times reveals the presence of a continuous spectrum situated between O(100) and O(exp 4) years. The principal mode is embedded within this continuous spectrum. From this initial-value approach we have found that for the low degree harmonics the non-modal contributions are comparable to the modal contributions. For this viscosity model the differences between the time-domain and normal-mode results are found to decrease strongly with increasing angular order. These calculations also show that a time-dependent effective relaxation time can be defined, which can be bounded by the relaxation times of the principal modes.

  14. Temperature responsive hydrogels enable transient three-dimensional tumor cultures via rapid cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, John M; Overstreet, Derek J; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Le, Long D; Vernon, Brent L; Sirianni, Rachael W

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of live cells from three-dimensional (3D) culture would improve analysis of cell behaviors in tissue engineered microenvironments. In this work, we developed a temperature responsive hydrogel to enable transient 3D culture of human glioblastoma (GBM) cells. N-isopropylacrylamide was copolymerized with hydrophilic grafts and functionalized with the cell adhesion peptide RGD to yield the novel copolymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Jeffamine(®) M-1000 acrylamide-co-hydroxyethylmethacrylate-RGD), or PNJ-RGD. This copolymer reversibly gels in aqueous solutions when heated under normal cell culture conditions (37°C). Moreover, these gels redissolve within 70 s when cooled to room temperature without the addition of any agents to degrade the synthetic scaffold, thereby enabling rapid recollection of viable cells after 3D culture. We tested the efficiency of cell recovery following extended 3D culture and were able to recover more than 50% of viable GBM cells after up to 7 days in culture. These data demonstrate the utility of physically crosslinked PNJ-RGD hydrogels as a platform for culture and recollection of cells in 3D. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A multi-signature brain-computer interface: use of transient and steady-state responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severens, Marianne; Farquhar, Jason; Duysens, Jacques; Desain, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper was to increase the information transfer in brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Therefore, a multi-signature BCI was developed and investigated. Stimuli were designed to simultaneously evoke transient somatosensory event-related potentials (ERPs) and steady-state somatosensory potentials (SSSEPs) and the ERPs and SSSEPs in isolation. Approach. Twelve subjects participated in two sessions. In the first session, the single and combined stimulation conditions were compared on these somatosensory responses and on the classification performance. In the second session the on-line performance with the combined stimulation was evaluated while subjects received feedback. Furthermore, in both sessions, the performance based on ERP and SSSEP features was compared. Main results. No difference was found in the ERPs and SSSEPs between stimulation conditions. The combination of ERP and SSSEP features did not perform better than with ERP features only. In both sessions, the classification performances based on ERP and combined features were higher than the classification based on SSSEP features. Significance. Although the multi-signature BCI did not increase performance, it also did not negatively impact it. Therefore, such stimuli could be used and the best performing feature set could then be chosen individually.

  16. Pharmacological analysis of calcium transients in response to gravity vector change in Arabidopsis hypocotyls and petioles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, M.; Furuichi, T.; Tatsumi, H.; Sokabe, M.

    Plants regulate their growth and morphology in response to gravity field known as gravitropism in general In the process of gravitropism gravity sensing will form the critical earliest event which is supposed to take place in specialized cells statocytes such as columella cells and shoot endodermal cells Although gravistimulation is assumed to be converted into certain intracellular signals the underlying transduction mechanisms have hardly been explored One of the potential candidates for the intracellular signals is an increase in the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration Ca 2 c Here we measured Ca 2 c changes induced by gravistimulation in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing aequorin as a calcium reporter When a plate of seedlings was turned through 180 r Ca 2 c transiently increased within 50 s and decayed exponentially with a time constant of ca 60 s The amplitude of the Ca 2 c increase was independent of the angular velocity of the rotation The Ca 2 c increase was reversibly blocked by extracellularly applied potential mechanosensitive channel blockers La 3 Gd 3 or a Ca 2 chelator BAPTA indicating that it arose from Ca 2 -influx via Ca 2 -permeable channel s on the plasma membrane Furthermore the Ca 2 c increase was attenuated by actin-disrupting drugs latrunculin B cytochalasin B but not by microtuble-disrupting drugs oryzalin nocodazole indicating that the activation of

  17. Declining uncertainty in transient climate response as CO2 forcing dominates future climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, Gunnar; Boucher, Olivier; Bréon, François-Marie; Forster, Piers; Shindell, Drew

    2015-03-01

    Carbon dioxide has exerted the largest portion of radiative forcing and surface temperature change over the industrial era, but other anthropogenic influences have also contributed. However, large uncertainties in total forcing make it difficult to derive climate sensitivity from historical observations. Anthropogenic forcing has increased between the Fourth and Fifth Assessment Reports of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC; refs , ), although its relative uncertainty has decreased. Here we show, based on data from the two reports, that this evolution towards lower uncertainty can be expected to continue into the future. Because it is easier to reduce air pollution than carbon dioxide emissions and because of the long lifetime of carbon dioxide, the less uncertain carbon dioxide forcing is expected to become increasingly dominant. Using a statistical model, we estimate that the relative uncertainty in anthropogenic forcing of more than 40% quoted in the latest IPCC report for 2011 will be almost halved by 2030, even without better scientific understanding. Absolute forcing uncertainty will also decline for the first time, provided projected decreases in aerosols occur. Other factors being equal, this stronger constraint on forcing will bring a significant reduction in the uncertainty of observation-based estimates of the transient climate response, with a 50% reduction in its uncertainty range expected by 2030.

  18. Estimating transient climate response using consistent temperature reconstruction methods in models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M.; Cowtan, K.; Hawkins, E.; Stolpe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observational temperature records such as HadCRUT4 typically have incomplete geographical coverage and blend air temperature over land with sea surface temperatures over ocean, in contrast to model output which is commonly reported as global air temperature. This complicates estimation of properties such as the transient climate response (TCR). Observation-based estimates of TCR have been made using energy-budget constraints applied to time series of historical radiative forcing and surface temperature changes, while model TCR is formally derived from simulations where CO2 increases at 1% per year. We perform a like-with-like comparison using three published energy-budget methods to derive modelled TCR from historical CMIP5 temperature series sampled in a manner consistent with HadCRUT4. Observation-based TCR estimates agree to within 0.12 K of the multi-model mean in each case and for 2 of the 3 energy-budget methods the observation-based TCR is higher than the multi-model mean. For one energy-budget method, using the HadCRUT4 blending method leads to a TCR underestimate of 0.3±0.1 K, relative to that estimated using global near-surface air temperatures.

  19. Low temperature transient response and electroluminescence characteristics of OLEDs based on Alq3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Guan, Min; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yiyang; Liu, Shuangjie; Zeng, Yiping

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on Alq3 are fabricated. In order to make clear the transport mechanism of carriers in organic light-emitting devices at low temperature, detailed electroluminescence transient response and the current-voltage-luminescence (I-V-L) characteristics under different temperatures in those OLEDs are investigated. It founds that the acceleration of brightness increases with increasing temperature is maximum when the temperature is 200 K and it is mainly affected by the electron transport layer (Alq3). The MoO3 injection layer and the electroluminescent layer have great influence on the delay time when the temperature is 200 K. Once the temperature is greater than 250 K, the delay time is mainly affected by the MoO3 injection layer. On the contrary, the fall time is mainly affected by the electroluminescent material. The Vf is the average growth rate of fall time when the temperature increases 1 K which represents the accumulation rate of carriers. The difference between Vf caused by the MoO3 injection layer is 0.52 us/K and caused by the electroluminescent material Ir(ppy)3 is 0.73 us/K.

  20. Transient response of Ge:Be and Ge:Zn FIR photoconductors under low background photon flux conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haegel, N. M.; Haller, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the transient behavior of Ge:Be and Ge:Zn photoconductors to changes in photon flux rates has been performed under the low background flux conditions (10 to the 8th photon/s) typical of astronomy and astrophysics applications. A characteristic transient behavior with time constants ranging from 0.1 to greater than 5 s has been observed in both materials when the shallow levels are very closely compensated. The detector response consists of both a fast and a slow component. The amplitude of the slow component can be up to 10 times greater than the initial fast component. It has been established that this phenomenon cannot be explained by current models of carrier sweep-out or dielectric relaxation. The transient behavior has been characterized as a function of temperature, electric field, photoconductive gain and material parameters.

  1. Response of cyt a,a3 in the situ canine heart to transient ischemic episodes.

    PubMed

    Snow, T R; Kleinmann, L H; LaManna, J C; Wechsler, A S; Jöbsis, F F

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the response of cyt a,a3 to transient ischemic and hypoxic episodes in the empty, fibrillating canine heart in situ. Using a dual wavelength, differential spectrophotometer, reaction spectra show an absorption peak at approximately 605 nm consistent with that obtained from purified cyt a,a3. The characteristics of the averaged reaction spectrum in the interval 590 nm to 610 nm indicate that hemoglobin/myoglobin contribute no more than 23% to the signal measured at 605 nm. A regimen of one 30 sec global ischemia (GI) repeated once every 3 minutes over a 90 min period showed no appreciable signal deterioration. Therefore, five such interventions were subsequently used as the test perturbation. Studies of the effects of ischemic episodes of 30 and 60 min show that the response of cyt a,a3 to this test intervention was smaller (90 +/- 6% and 89 +/- 7%) than that observed prior to the ischemic episode. Changes in coronary perfusion pressure (+/- 10 Torr) produced an immediate oxidation/reduction of cyt a,a3. In the working heart, just prior to fibrillation, 6 sec to interrupted ventilation resulted in a continuous reduction of cyt a,a3. The data from these studies show: 1) The redox state of cyt a,a3 may be continuously monitored in the canine heart in situ. 2) Following ischemias of 30 and 60 min duration, respiratory chain function may be impaired; and 3) The well-perfused epicardium is extremely sensitive to small changes in oxygen delivery.

  2. TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF ABLATING AXISYMMETRIC BODIES INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF SHAPE CHANGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howser, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to analyze the transient response of an ablating axisymmetric body, including the effect of shape change. The governing differential equation, the boundary conditions for the analysis on which the computer program is based, and the method of solution of the resulting finite-difference equations are discussed in the documentation. Some of the features of the analysis and the associated program are (1) the ablation material is considered to be orthotropic with temperature-dependent thermal properties; (2) the thermal response of the entire body is considered simultaneously; (3) the heat transfer and pressure distribution over the body are adjusted to the new geometry as ablation occurs; (4) the governing equations and several boundary-condition options are formulated in terms of generalized orthogonal coordinates for fixed points in a moving coordinate system; (5) the finite-difference equations are solved implicitly; and (6) other instantaneous body shapes can be displayed with a user-supplied plotting routine. The physical problem to be modeled with the analysis is described by FORTRAN input variables. For example, the external body geometry is described in the W, Z coordinates; material density is given; and the stagnation cold-wall heating rate is given in a time-dependent array. Other input variables are required which control the solution, specify boundary conditions, and determine output from the program. The equations have been programmed so that either the International System of Units or the U. S. Customary Units may be used. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 Series computer. This program was developed in 1972.

  3. The ocean's role in the transient response of climate to abrupt greenhouse gas forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, John; Scott, Jeffery R.; Armour, Kyle C.; Campin, J.-M.; Kelley, Maxwell; Romanou, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    We study the role of the ocean in setting the patterns and timescale of the transient response of the climate to anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing. A novel framework is set out which involves integration of an ocean-only model in which the anthropogenic temperature signal is forced from the surface by anomalous downwelling heat fluxes and damped at a rate controlled by a `climate feedback' parameter. We observe a broad correspondence between the evolution of the anthropogenic temperature () in our simplified ocean-only model and that of coupled climate models perturbed by a quadrupling of . This suggests that many of the mechanisms at work in fully coupled models are captured by our idealized ocean-only system. The framework allows us to probe the role of the ocean in delaying warming signals in the Southern Ocean and in the northern North Atlantic, and in amplifying the warming signal in the Arctic. By comparing active and passive temperature-like tracers we assess the degree to which changes in ocean circulation play a role in setting the distribution and evolution of . The background ocean circulation strongly influences the large-scale patterns of ocean heat uptake and storage, such that is governed by an advection/diffusion equation and weakly damped to the atmosphere at a rate set by climate feedbacks. Where warming is sufficiently small, for example in the Southern Ocean, changes in ocean circulation play a secondary role. In other regions, most noticeably in the North Atlantic, changes in ocean circulation induced by are central in shaping the response.

  4. TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF ABLATING AXISYMMETRIC BODIES INCLUDING THE EFFECTS OF SHAPE CHANGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howser, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to analyze the transient response of an ablating axisymmetric body, including the effect of shape change. The governing differential equation, the boundary conditions for the analysis on which the computer program is based, and the method of solution of the resulting finite-difference equations are discussed in the documentation. Some of the features of the analysis and the associated program are (1) the ablation material is considered to be orthotropic with temperature-dependent thermal properties; (2) the thermal response of the entire body is considered simultaneously; (3) the heat transfer and pressure distribution over the body are adjusted to the new geometry as ablation occurs; (4) the governing equations and several boundary-condition options are formulated in terms of generalized orthogonal coordinates for fixed points in a moving coordinate system; (5) the finite-difference equations are solved implicitly; and (6) other instantaneous body shapes can be displayed with a user-supplied plotting routine. The physical problem to be modeled with the analysis is described by FORTRAN input variables. For example, the external body geometry is described in the W, Z coordinates; material density is given; and the stagnation cold-wall heating rate is given in a time-dependent array. Other input variables are required which control the solution, specify boundary conditions, and determine output from the program. The equations have been programmed so that either the International System of Units or the U. S. Customary Units may be used. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 Series computer. This program was developed in 1972.

  5. Characterizing the transient geomorphic response to base-level fall in the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huiping; Kirby, Eric; Pitlick, John; Anderson, Robert S.; Zhang, Peizhen

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of hillslope gradient, landscape relief, and channel steepness in the Daxia River basin provides evidence of a transient geomorphic response to base-level fall on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. Low-gradient channels and gentle hillslopes of the upper watershed are separated from a steeper, high-relief landscape by a series of convex knickzones along channel longitudinal profiles. Downstream projection of the "relict" portions of the profiles implies 800-850 m of incision, consistent with geologic and geomorphic records of post 1.7 Ma incision in the lower watershed. We combine optically stimulated luminescence dating of fluvial terrace deposits to constrain incision rates downstream of knickpoints with catchment-averaged 10Be concentrations in modern sediment to estimate erosion rates in tributary basins both above and below knickpoints. Both sources of data imply landscape lowering rates of 300 m Ma-1 below the knickpoint and 50-100 m Ma-1 above. Field measurements of channel width (n = 48) and calculations of bankfull discharge (n = 9) allow determination of scaling relations among channel hydraulic geometry, discharge, and contributing area that we employ to estimate the patterns of basal shear stress, unit stream power, and bed load transport rate throughout the channel network. Our results imply a clear downstream increase of incision potential; this result would appear to be consistent with a detachment-limited response to imposed base-level fall, in which steepening of channels drives an increase in erosion rates. In contrast, however, we do not observe apparent narrowing of channels across the transition from slowly eroding to rapidly eroding portions of the watershed. Rather, the present-day channel morphology as well as its scaling of hydraulic geometry imply that the river is primarily adjusted to transport its sediment load and suggest that channel morphology may not always reflect the presence of knickpoints and differences in landscape

  6. Groundwater response to changing water-use practices in sloping aquifers using convolution of transient response functions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examines the impact of a sloping base on the movement of transients through groundwater systems. Dimensionless variables and regression of model results are employed to develop functions relating the transient change in saturated thickness to the distance upgradient and downgradient from ...

  7. Rapid Real-time Discrimination Method of Transient Voltage Sability Based on Wide-area Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xu; Gang, Wang

    2017-05-01

    Quick identify of transient voltage stability of power system, which is based on real-time measurement information from wide-area measurement system (WAMS) is a hotspot issue of today’s power engineering. This paper presents a method to early predict the transient voltage stability. The proposed technique uses disturbed voltage-time integral to construct the quantitative indicator which can achieve rapid real-time determination of transient voltage stability. In order to ensure the speed and accuracy of transient voltage stability determination, each of the key parameter variables in the integration method was set reasonably. The proposed method has been tested on a practical example of Guangdong power grid, the results verify that it can guarantee a high recognition accuracy rate while shortening the duration of determination.

  8. Ecological robustness of the gut microbiota in response to ingestion of transient food-borne microbes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenhong; Derrien, Muriel; Levenez, Florence; Brazeilles, Rémi; Ballal, Sonia A; Kim, Jason; Degivry, Marie-Christine; Quéré, Gaëlle; Garault, Peggy; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T; Garrett, Wendy S; Doré, Joël; Veiga, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Resident gut microbes co-exist with transient bacteria to form the gut microbiota. Despite increasing evidence suggesting a role for transient microbes on gut microbiota function, the interplay between resident and transient members of this microbial community is poorly defined. We aimed to determine the extent to which a host's autochthonous gut microbiota influences niche permissivity to transient bacteria using a fermented milk product (FMP) as a vehicle for five food-borne bacterial strains. Using conventional and gnotobiotic rats and gut microbiome analyses (16S rRNA genes pyrosequencing and reverse transcription qPCR), we demonstrated that the clearance kinetics of one FMP bacterium, Lactococcus lactis CNCM I-1631, were dependent on the structure of the resident gut microbiota. Susceptibility of the resident gut microbiota to modulation by FMP intervention correlated with increased persistence of L. lactis. We also observed gut microbiome configurations that were associated with altered stability upon exposure to transient bacteria. Our study supports the concept that allochthonous bacteria have transient and subject-specific effects on the gut microbiome that can be leveraged to re-engineer the gut microbiome and improve dysbiosis-related diseases. PMID:26953599

  9. Reduced-order wavelet-Galerkin solution for the coupled, nonlinear stochastic response of slender buildings in transient winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thai-Hoa; Caracoglia, Luca

    2015-05-01

    A tall building is prone to wind-induced stochastic vibration, originating from complex fluid-structure interaction, dynamic coupling and nonlinear aerodynamic phenomena. The loading induced by extreme wind events, such as "downburst storms", hurricanes and tornadoes is naturally transient and nonstationary in comparison with the hypothesis of stationary wind loads, used in both structural engineering research and practice. Time-domain integration methods, widely applied for solving nonlinear differential equations, are hardly applicable to the analysis of coupled, nonlinear and stochastic response of tall buildings under transient winds. Therefore, the investigation of alternative and computationally-efficient simulation methods is important. This study employs the wavelet-Galerkin (WG) method to achieve this objective, by examining the stochastic dynamic response of two tall building models subject to stationary and transient wind loads. These are (1) a single-degree-of-freedom equivalent model of a tall structure and (2) a multi-degree-of-freedom reduced-order full building model. Compactly supported Daubechies wavelets are used as orthonormal basis functions in conjunction with the Galerkin projection scheme to decompose and transform the coupled, nonlinear differential equations of the two models into random algebraic equations in the wavelet domain. Methodology, feasibility and applicability of the WG method are investigated in some special cases of stiffness nonlinearity (Duffing type) and damping nonlinearity (Van-der-Pol type) for the single-degree-of-freedom model. For the reduced-order tall building model the WG method is used to solve for dynamic coupling, aerodynamics and transient wind load effects. Computation of "connection coefficients", effects of boundary conditions, wavelet resolution and wavelet order are examined in order to adequately replicate the dynamic response. Realizations of multivariate stationary and transient wind loads for the

  10. Transient response in longitudinal grain size to reduced sediment supply in a large river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Bed material grain size is an important degree of freedom in fluvial systems as they adjust to system-wide perturbations such as sediment supply changes. However, little is known about processes and patterns of such adjustment in longitudinal grain size sorting in large rivers. This research uses unprecedented datasets collected in a large fluvial system to investigate transient response to recent supply changes associated with anthropogenic activities. Separate fining trends for gravel and fines, a protracted gravel-sand (G-S) transition, and bed patchiness identified in Singer (2008) were interrogated using output from a hydraulic model with grain size distributions (GSDs) extracted from ~125 cross sections spanning ~400 river kilometers of the Sacramento River, California. The analysis suggests that interactions between hydraulics, bed material sorting, and sediment flux explain these previously identified anomalies. Highest values of sorting occur in the G-S transition and represent the overlap of separate fining trends for gravel and fines, where the long profile is jagged with evidence of progressive incision. Much of the sediment in this poorly sorted zone is organized into patches, where transport apparently occurs as bedload sheets. Patchiness occurs over short length scales leading to strong differences in entrainment and flux, regardless of hydraulic conditions. A modified Shields stress is proposed that is scaled by GSD sorting to improve characterization of entrainment/disentrainment. Sediment flux calculations based on an equation sensitive bed material conditions (Singer and Dunne, 2004) reveal a strong relationship between fine sediment flux and d90, suggesting that the efficiency of fine patch flux controls bed material bed surface roughness. Results are in part consistent with Paola and Seal (1995) suggesting that patches are a result of overlapping pdfs of shear stress and sorting and with Ferguson (2003) in that the final end of the protracted G

  11. A numerical comparison with an exact solution for the transient response of a cylinder immersed in a fluid. [computer simulated underwater tests to determine transient response of a submerged cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giltrud, M. E.; Lucas, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    The transient response of an elastic cylindrical shell immersed in an acoustic media that is engulfed by a plane wave is determined numerically. The method applies to the USA-STAGS code which utilizes the finite element method for the structural analysis and the doubly asymptotic approximation for the fluid-structure interaction. The calculations are compared to an exact analysis for two separate loading cases: a plane step wave and an exponentially decaying plane wave.

  12. Algorithm for transient response of whole body indirect calorimeter: deconvolution with a regularization parameter.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Kumpei; Ogata, Hitomi; Katayose, Yasuko; Satoh, Makoto

    2009-02-01

    A whole body indirect calorimeter provides accurate measurement of energy expenditure over long periods of time, but it has limitations to assess its dynamic changes. The present study aimed to improve algorithms to compute O(2) consumption and CO(2) production by adopting a stochastic deconvolution method, which controls the relative weight of fidelity to the data and smoothness of the estimates. The performance of the new algorithm was compared with that of other algorithms (moving average, trends identification, Kalman filter, and Kalman smoothing) against validation tests in which energy metabolism was evaluated every 1 min. First, an in silico simulation study, rectangular or sinusoidal inputs of gradually decreasing periods (64, 32, 16, and 8 min) were applied, and samples collected from the output were corrupted with superimposed noise. Second, CO(2) was infused into a chamber in gradually decreasing intervals and the CO(2) production rate was estimated by algorithms. In terms of recovery, mean square error, and correlation to the known input signal in the validation tests, deconvolution performed better than the other algorithms. Finally, as a case study, the time course of energy metabolism during sleep, the stages of which were assessed by a standard polysomnogram, was measured in a whole body indirect calorimeter. Analysis of covariance revealed an association of energy expenditure with sleep stage, and energy expenditure computed by deconvolution and Kalman smoothing was more closely associated with sleep stages than that based on trends identification and the Kalman filter. The new algorithm significantly improved the transient response of the whole body indirect calorimeter.

  13. Modeling the transient response of saline intrusion to rising sea-levels.

    PubMed

    Webb, Matt D; Howard, Ken W F

    2011-01-01

    Sea levels are expected to rise as a result of global temperature increases, one implication of which is the potential exacerbation of sea water intrusion into coastal aquifers. Given that approximately 70% of the world's population resides in coastal regions, it is imperative to understand the interaction between fresh groundwater and sea water intrusion in order to best manage available resources. For this study, controlled investigation has been carried out concerning the temporal variation in sea water intrusion as a result of rising sea levels. A series of fixed inland head two-dimensional sea water intrusion models were developed with SEAWAT in order to assess the impact of rising sea levels on the transient migration of saline intrusion in coastal aquifers under a range of hydrogeological property conditions. A wide range of responses were observed for typical hydrogeological parameter values. Systems with a high ratio of hydraulic conductivity to recharge and high effective porosity lagged behind the equilibrium sea water toe positions during sea-level rise, often by many hundreds of meters, and frequently taking several centuries to equilibrate following a cease in sea-level rise. Systems with a low ratio of hydraulic conductivity to recharge and low effective porosity did not develop such a large degree of disequilibrium and generally stabilized within decades following a cease in sea-level rise. This study provides qualitative initial estimates for the expected rate of intrusion and predicted degree of disequilibrium generated by sea-level rise for a range of hydrogeological parameter values. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  14. Steady-State Visual Evoked Potentials Can Be Explained by Temporal Superposition of Transient Event-Related Responses

    PubMed Central

    Capilla, Almudena; Pazo-Alvarez, Paula; Darriba, Alvaro; Campo, Pablo; Gross, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Background One common criterion for classifying electrophysiological brain responses is based on the distinction between transient (i.e. event-related potentials, ERPs) and steady-state responses (SSRs). The generation of SSRs is usually attributed to the entrainment of a neural rhythm driven by the stimulus train. However, a more parsimonious account suggests that SSRs might result from the linear addition of the transient responses elicited by each stimulus. This study aimed to investigate this possibility. Methodology/Principal Findings We recorded brain potentials elicited by a checkerboard stimulus reversing at different rates. We modeled SSRs by sequentially shifting and linearly adding rate-specific ERPs. Our results show a strong resemblance between recorded and synthetic SSRs, supporting the superposition hypothesis. Furthermore, we did not find evidence of entrainment of a neural oscillation at the stimulation frequency. Conclusions/Significance This study provides evidence that visual SSRs can be explained as a superposition of transient ERPs. These findings have critical implications in our current understanding of brain oscillations. Contrary to the idea that neural networks can be tuned to a wide range of frequencies, our findings rather suggest that the oscillatory response of a given neural network is constrained within its natural frequency range. PMID:21267081

  15. A numerical algorithm to evaluate the transient response for a synchronous scanning streak camera using a time-domain Baum-Liu-Tesche equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Chengquan; Tian, Jinshou; Wu, Shengli; He, Jiai; Liu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    The transient response is of great influence on the electromagnetic compatibility of synchronous scanning streak cameras (SSSCs). In this paper we propose a numerical method to evaluate the transient response of the scanning deflection plate (SDP). First, we created a simplified circuit model for the SDP used in an SSSC, and then derived the Baum-Liu-Tesche (BLT) equation in the frequency domain. From the frequency-domain BLT equation, its transient counterpart was derived. These parameters, together with the transient-BLT equation, were used to compute the transient load voltage and load current, and then a novel numerical method to fulfill the continuity equation was used. Several numerical simulations were conducted to verify this proposed method. The computed results were then compared with transient responses obtained by a frequency-domain/fast Fourier transform (FFT) method, and the accordance was excellent for highly conducting cables. The benefit of deriving the BLT equation in the time domain is that it may be used with slight modifications to calculate the transient response and the error can be controlled by a computer program. The result showed that the transient voltage was up to 1000 V and the transient current was approximately 10 A, so some protective measures should be taken to improve the electromagnetic compatibility.

  16. Analysis of the photosystem II by modelling the fluorescence yield transients during 10 seconds after a 10 ns pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Natalya E.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Riznichenko, Galina Yu.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2014-10-01

    The dynamics of the photosystem II (PS II) redox states is imitated over nine orders of magnitude in time. Our simulations focus on the information of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induced by a 10 ns laser flash. The PS II model analyzes differences in the PS II reaction between leaves (A. Thaliana, spinach) and thermophilic Chlorella cells.

  17. Transient Responses of Gravel Bars to Increases in Sediment Supply - Field & Flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolak, C.

    2010-12-01

    Bedforms in a gravel-bed river respond to a combination of water discharge, the rate and size of sediment supply, and valley-scale geometry. This study investigates bar response to an increase in sediment supply. In a large flume (2.75 m wide) with a plane bed of mixed sand and gravel (gravel D50 = 10 mm; 15% sand), alternate bars were formed by inducing a slight perturbation in the flow at the upstream end. After the bars and sediment flux reached a steady state, sediment supply was increased (from 45 kg/min to 70 kg/min). After the bed and sediment flux reached steady state, sediment supply was again increased (from 70 kg/min to 140 kg/min). Throughout the experiment high-frequency (1 Hz) measurements of the sediment flux, as well as moderate frequency (every 90 minutes) measurements of the bed topography were made. As the channel increased transport capacity to match the increased sediment supply, the initial bed adjustment was an increase in slope with near uniform deposition in the cross-stream direction. The bed then evolved to a steady-state configuration in which the locations and dimensions of the bars and pools were very similar to the pre-augmentation condition. During the adjustment process, the cross-stream relief initially decreased, the bar wavelengths decreased, and the bar celerity increased. The evolution from the lower-relief interim state to the post-augmentation steady state was reminiscent of initial bar development from a plane bed. A similar sequence of bed adjustment was observed on the Sandy River, Oregon, following a large increase in sediment flux due to the 2007 Marmot Dam removal. Measurements of bedform evolution immediately downstream of the dam show a transition from a long high-relief lateral bar along the right bank, to a lower-relief multiple short wavelength mid-channel bars, finally back to a long high-relief lateral bar along the right bank, albeit 4-5 meters higher than the original. Previous work on bedform response to

  18. DEFORM-4: fuel pin characterization and transient response in the SAS4A accident analysis code system

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, K.J.; Hill, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The DEFORM-4 module is the segment of the SAS4A Accident Analysis Code System that calculates the fuel pin characterization in response to a steady state irradiation history, thereby providing the initial conditions for the transient calculation. The various phenomena considered include fuel porosity migration, fission gas bubble induced swelling, fuel cracking and healing, fission gas release, cladding swelling, and the thermal-mechanical state of the fuel and cladding. In the transient state, the module continues the thermal-mechanical response calculation, including fuel melting and central cavity pressurization, until cladding failure is predicted and one of the failed fuel modules is initiated. Comparisons with experimental data have demonstrated the validity of the modeling approach.

  19. Stability, Transient Response, Control, and Safety of a High-Power Electric Grid for Turboelectric Propulsion of Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Michael; Ross, Christine; Phillips, Danny; Blackwelder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This document contains the deliverables for the NASA Research and Technology for Aerospace Propulsion Systems (RTAPS) regarding the stability, transient response, control, and safety study for a high power cryogenic turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) system. The objective of this research effort is to enumerate, characterize, and evaluate the critical issues facing the development of the N3-X concept aircraft. This includes the proposal of electrical grid architecture concepts and an evaluation of any needs for energy storage.

  20. Transient Treg-cell depletion in adult mice results in persistent self-reactive CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Sofia N; Bourges, Dorothée; Garry, Sarah; Ross, Ellen M; van Driel, Ian R; Gleeson, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    Depletion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in adults results in chronic inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, the impact of transient Treg-cell depletion on self-reactive responses is poorly defined. Here, we studied the effect of transient depletion of Treg cells on CD4(+) T-cell responses to endogenous self-antigens. Short-term ablation of Treg cells in mice resulted in rapid activation of CD4(+) T cells, increased percentage of IFN-γ(+) and Th17 cells in lymphoid organs, and development of autoimmune gastritis. To track self-reactive responses, we analyzed the activation of naïve gastric-specific CD4(+) T cells. There was a dramatic increase in proliferation and acquisition of effector function of gastric-specific T cells in the stomach draining LNs of Treg-cell-depleted mice, compared with untreated mice, either during Treg-cell depletion or after Treg-cell reconstitution. Moreover, the hyperproliferation of gastric-specific T cells in the Treg-cell-ablated mice was predominantly antigen-dependent. Transient depletion of Treg cells resulted in a shift in the ratio of peripheral:thymic Treg cells in the reemerged Treg-cell population, indicating an altered composition of Treg cells. These findings indicate that transient Treg-cell depletion results in ongoing antigen-driven self-reactive T-cell responses and emphasize the continual requirement for an intact Treg-cell population. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Transient temperature and sea level response of a two-dimensional ocean-climate model to greenhouse gas increases

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, L.D.D.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional dynamical ocean model is coupled to an energy balance climate model and used to investigate the transient surface temperature and sea level response to greenhouse gas increases. For most experiments a step function surface-troposphere heating perturbation of 6 W/sq m is applied. A transient reduction in the thermohaline overturning flux of 15-30% occurs in most experiments, although in some cases a near-total circulation collapse occurs within the first 100 years and lasts 700-1000 years. The transient circulation decrease is attributed to the greater rate of downward penetration of the heating anomaly in downwelling rather than in upwelling regions and is not a result of reduced convection. For experiments in which the steady state circulation is qualitatively unchanged after a heating perturbation, the surface temperature response is roughly uniform with latitude, in the absence of ice and snow. However, in some cases a heating perturbation induces the transition from a one-cell to a two-cell overturning circulation, or causes a complete reversal in the direction of overturning when a single cell spans both hemispheres, causing marked latitudinal variations in the surface temperature response.

  2. Dynamic response of a lightweight gun barrel during a firing-pressure transient

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, S.V.; Phillips, L.P. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    This report presents the results of a nonlinear, dynamic structural analysis of a gun barrel design during a firing-pressure transient. The final design was defined by an iterative design/analysis process in which the effects of design modifications were compared with established design criteria. The ADINA finite element code was used to analyze the titanium/carbon composite gun barrel assembly for a maximum transient pressure of 29,000 psi. The gun barrel weighs 42 lb; however, a significant potential exists for weight savings in future gun barrel designs. 2 refs., 41 figs.

  3. Transient Modulations of Neural Responses to Heartbeats Covary with Bodily Self-Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong-Dong; Bernasconi, Fosco; Bello-Ruiz, Javier; Pfeiffer, Christian; Salomon, Roy; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-08-10

    Recent research has investigated self-consciousness associated with the multisensory processing of bodily signals (e.g., somatosensory, visual, vestibular signals), a notion referred to as bodily self-consciousness, and these studies have shown that the manipulation of bodily inputs induces changes in bodily self-consciousness such as self-identification. Another line of research has highlighted the importance of signals from the inside of the body (e.g., visceral signals) and proposed that neural representations of internal bodily signals underlie self-consciousness, which to date has been based on philosophical inquiry, clinical case studies, and behavioral studies. Here, we investigated the relationship of bodily self-consciousness with the neural processing of internal bodily signals. By combining electrical neuroimaging, analysis of peripheral physiological signals, and virtual reality technology in humans, we show that transient modulations of neural responses to heartbeats in the posterior cingulate cortex covary with changes in bodily self-consciousness induced by the full-body illusion. Additional analyses excluded that measured basic cardiorespiratory parameters or interoceptive sensitivity traits could account for this finding. These neurophysiological data link experimentally the cortical mapping of the internal body to self-consciousness. What are the brain mechanisms of self-consciousness? Prominent views propose that the neural processing associated with signals from the internal organs (such as the heart and the lung) plays a critical role in self-consciousness. Although this hypothesis dates back to influential views in philosophy and psychology (e.g., William James), definitive experimental evidence supporting this idea is lacking despite its recent impact in neuroscience. In the present study, we show that posterior cingulate activities responding to heartbeat signals covary with changes in participants' conscious self-identification with a body

  4. Transient Ecotone Response to Climatic Change: Some Conceptual and Modelling Approaches.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Ronald P

    1993-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the ecological impacts of climatic change is a pressing challenge to the science of ecology. The current state of the art for broad-scale estimates of change in biomes and ecotones between biomes is limited to equilibrium estimates of ecological change under some future equilibrium climate. Uncertainties in these estimates abound, ranging from uncertainties in future climate scenarios to uncertainties in our ecological models and finally to uncertainties in modelling the feedbacks between the climate and the biosphere. Ecologists and policymakers need to go beyond equilibrium estimates of biosphere change to transient responses of the biosphere as the climate changes. Ecotones between biomes have been suggested as sensitive areas of change that could be effectively modelled and monitored for future change. Ecotones are also important in influencing local and regional biodiversity patterns and ecological flows. The ecological processes that could affect change at ecotones and within biomes are discussed; they include internal ecosystem processes, such as competition, and external abiotic processes, most notably drought and related disturbances. Drought followed by infestations and fire appears to be the most likely process that could mediate ecological change under a rapidly changing climate. The impacts would be apparent all across biomes, not just at ecotones. However, specific predictions about the dynamics of ecotones can be made qualitatively, based on a theory of patch scaling and diversity in relation to abiotic stressors. Under current conditions, the size of homogeneous patches is expected to be small at ecotones, but to enlarge with distance from the ecotone. Directional climatic change should promote a coalescence of patches on one side of the ecotone and increased fragmentation on the other side. Ecotones should begin to blur as viewed from a satellite only to re-form at some later date in a new location. This view is in contrast

  5. A Simple Control Strategy Using Speedy Transient Response for Multiphase Buck Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikala, K.; Ravikumar, D.; Rubini, B.

    2017-03-01

    The high performance of recent originating digital processors requires power supply for transient output, firm voltage regulation and high current. Industry has taken up interleaved multiphase synchronous buck converters for meeting such demands. Application of the voltage mode (ripple) hysteretic strategy to multiphase Voltage Regulator Units (VRU) would help satisfying many of the upcoming digital processors and IC’s powering demands. This arises from the use of the various advantages that can be obtained from this technique. This current division method is known for several benefits it provides: easy accessibility in application to all control methods, with freedom from the prime control technique in voltage regulation loop, absence of any necessity for current reference, better accuracy in current division of equal magnitude at almost every load conditions in standstill and transients. As against this, there are several challenges that involve distribution of multiple control signals, current sharing and sensitivity to noise, high speed comparators, hysteretic band accuracy and stable at large load transients. In addition, application of the current division technique presented was made to a multiphase voltage mode ripple controlled Buck Converter that produced a novel and easy control strategy having minimum output voltage ripples and speedy transient output.

  6. Nonlinear subjective and biodynamic responses to continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J.

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the magnitude of continuous and transient whole-body vibration in the vertical direction on both subjective and biodynamic responses of human subjects has been investigated experimentally. Additionally, the relation between the subjective responses and the dynamic responses has also been studied. Twelve subjects were exposed to sinusoidal continuous vibrations at five frequencies (3.15-8.0 Hz) and at three magnitudes (0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms). They were also exposed to transient vibrations that were modulated one-and-half cycle sinusoidal waveforms at the same frequencies as the continuous vibrations and at three magnitudes corresponding to the magnitudes used for the continuous vibrations. Discomfort was measured by the method of magnitude estimation with reference stimuli having frequency components in the middle of the frequency range used in this study. The driving-point dynamic responses (the ratio between the force and the motion, i.e., acceleration and velocity, at the driving point) were also measured and divided by the responses to the reference stimuli used in the measurement of discomfort so as to allow the comparison of the dynamic responses with the discomfort responses. Both the discomfort estimates and the normalised driving-point dynamic responses were influenced by the stimuli magnitudes, especially with the continuous vibration. At 3.15 and 4.0 Hz, the discomfort estimates and the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass increased significantly with increases in vibration magnitude from 0.5-2.0 m s -2 rms. Magnitude estimates for discomfort were correlated with the normalised mechanical impedance and apparent mass in the frequency range investigated. For the transient vibrations, the discomfort estimates and the driving-point dynamic responses were interpreted as responses in frequency bands around the fundamental frequency of the input motion. The results indicate similar nonlinearities in discomfort and driving-point dynamic

  7. Classification methods for noise transients in advanced gravitational-wave detectors II: performance tests on Advanced LIGO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jade; Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Lynch, Ryan; Trifirò, Daniele; Cuoco, Elena; Cavaglià, Marco; Heng, Ik Siong; Font, José A.

    2017-02-01

    The data taken by the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors contains short duration noise transients that limit the significance of astrophysical detections and reduce the duty cycle of the instruments. As the advanced detectors are reaching sensitivity levels that allow for multiple detections of astrophysical gravitational-wave sources it is crucial to achieve a fast and accurate characterization of non-astrophysical transient noise shortly after it occurs in the detectors. Previously we presented three methods for the classification of transient noise sources. They are Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT), Principal Component LALInference Burst (PC-LIB) and Wavelet Detection Filter with Machine Learning (WDF-ML). In this study we carry out the first performance tests of these algorithms on gravitational-wave data from the Advanced LIGO detectors. We use the data taken between the 3rd of June 2015 and the 14th of June 2015 during the 7th engineering run (ER7), and outline the improvements made to increase the performance and lower the latency of the algorithms on real data. This work provides an important test for understanding the performance of these methods on real, non stationary data in preparation for the second advanced gravitational-wave detector observation run, planned for later this year. We show that all methods can classify transients in non stationary data with a high level of accuracy and show the benefits of using multiple classifiers.

  8. The detector response matrices of the burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, William S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Koshut, Tom M.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.; Horack, John M.; Lestrade, John Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The detector response matrices for the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are described, including their creation and operation in data analysis. These response matrices are a detailed abstract representation of the gamma-ray detectors' operating characteristics that are needed for data analysis. They are constructed from an extensive set of calibration data coupled with a complex geometry electromagnetic cascade Monte Carlo simulation code. The calibration tests and simulation algorithm optimization are described. The characteristics of the BATSE detectors in the spacecraft environment are also described.

  9. Transient response to three-phase faults on a wind turbine generator. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    In order to obtain a measure of its responses to short circuits a large horizontal axis wind turbine generator was modeled and its performance was simulated on a digital computer. Simulation of short circuit faults on the synchronous alternator of a wind turbine generator, without resort to the classical assumptions generally made for that analysis, indicates that maximum clearing times for the system tied to an infinite bus are longer than the typical clearing times for equivalent capacity conventional machines. Also, maximum clearing times are independent of tower shadow and wind shear. Variation of circuit conditions produce the modifications in the transient response predicted by analysis.

  10. Photoelectric responses of oxygen-evolving complexes of photosystem II

    PubMed

    Mamedov; Beshta; Gurovskaya; Mamedova; Neverov; Samuilov; Semenov

    1999-05-01

    The generation of a transmembrane electric potential difference induced by a series of laser flashes was studied by the direct electrometrical method in proteoliposomes containing oxygen-evolving particles of photosystem II. In addition to the fast stage of generation of the membrane potential, which is due to electron transfer from the redox active tyrosine residue Tyr-161 (YZ) to the primary quinone acceptor QA, electrogenic stages corresponding to the S1 --> S2 (tau = 30 &mgr;sec), S2 --> S3 (tau = 240 &mgr;sec), and S3 --> S4 --> S0 (tau = 6.2 msec) transitions of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) were observed. The amplitudes of the photoelectric responses show that the contribution of the OEC to the overall electrogenicity is small. The parameters of the electrogenic reactions of the OEC as measured in photosystem II preparations containing the peripheral proteins of 23 and 17 kD were similar to those of photosystem II preparations devoid of these peptides. It is concluded that neither the 23- nor the 17-kD proteins are involved in the electrogenic reactions of the OEC.

  11. The Study of Interface States in ZnO Varistors by Injection Pulse Width Dependence of Transient Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohbuchi, Yasuhiro; Kawahara, Toshio; Okamoto, Yoichi; Morimoto, Jun

    2000-05-01

    The injection pulse width dependence of transient response was studied to investigate the interface states in the Bi- and Pr-type ZnO varistors in more detail using isothermal capacitance transient spectroscopy (ICTS). Although the interface states have been considered to be distributed monoenergetically or discretely, two or three different interface states of the emission process were confirmed by varying the injection pulse width at each measurement temperature. For both types of ZnO varistors, the ICTS spectrum overlapping of the interface states consists of two transient responses: the previously reported trap (Trap 1) and Trap 0 which has a faster emission process than Trap 1. For only Bi-type ZnO, Trap 2 which has a slower emission process, was successfully detected at the longer region of the injection pulse widths tW from 1 s to 100 s. This result suggests that the formation of Trap 2 can be attributed to the existence of Bi2O3. In the case of the application of ICTS for the interface states in ZnO varistors, it is necessary to select the optimal injection pulse width which takes into account the emission processes at each measurement temperature.

  12. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-15

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of {sup 75}As, {sup 69}Ga and {sup 71}Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  13. En face optical coherence tomography of transient light response at photoreceptor outer segments in living frog eyecup

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Benquan; Lu, Rongwen; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Jiang, Yuqiang; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to test the feasibility of en face mapping of the transient intrinsic optical signal (IOS) response at photoreceptor outer segments and to assess the effect of spatial resolution on functional IOS imaging of retinal photoreceptors. A line-scan optical coherence tomography (LS-OCT) was constructed to achieve depth-resolved functional IOS imaging of living frog eyecups. Rapid en face OCT revealed transient IOS almost immediately (<3 ms) after the onset of visible light flashes at photoreceptor outer segments. Quantitative analysis indicated that the IOS kinetics may reflect dynamics of G-protein binding and releasing in early phases of visual transduction, and high resolution is essential to differentiate positive and negative IOS changes in adjacent locations. PMID:24322065

  14. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE TRANSIENT PRESSURE RESPONSE FROM A CONSTANT FLOW RATE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, Roger H.; Olsen, Harold W.

    1987-01-01

    Incorporating a flow pump into a conventional triaxial laboratory system allows fluid to be supplied to or withdrawn from the base of a sediment sample at small and constant rates. An initial transient record of hydraulic head versus time is observed which eventually stabilizes to a constant steady state gradient across the sample; values of hydraulic conductivity can subsequently be determined from Darcy's law. In this paper, analytical methods are presented for determining values of specific storage and hydraulic conductivity from the initial transient phase of such a constant flow rate test. These methods are based on a diffusion equation involving pore pressure and are analogous to those used to describe the soil consolidation process and also to interpret aquifer properties from pumping tests.

  15. Transient response of glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow to step changes in arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Jackson, T E; Guyton, A C; Hall, J E

    1977-11-01

    Measurement of rapid renal hemodynamic changes were made for 90 s in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs following step increases and decreases in renal arterial pressure between 80 and 120 mm Hg. Transient analysis was used to observe time characteristics of the autoregulatory relationships which are obscured in steadystate measurements. Temporal decoupling of blood flow and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) occurred with both step increases and decreases of arterial pressure. Steady-state autoregulation of blood flow was attained in about 30 s, whereas steady-state autoregulation of GFR was not demonstrably attained even 90 s after the arterial pressure maneuver. The temporal decoupling of renal blood flow and GRR supports the concept of transient involvement of proximal tubular dynamics and efferent resistance changes during acute autoregulation of GFR following step changes in arterial pressure.

  16. Modeling Longitudinal Preclinical Tumor Size Data to Identify Transient Dynamics in Tumor Response to Antiangiogenic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, H‐J; Gaffney, EA; Maini, PK; Wagg, J; Phipps, A; Boetsch, C; Byrne, HM; Ribba, B

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that antiangiogenic therapy gives rise to a transient window of vessel normalization, within which the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy may be enhanced. Preclinical experiments that measure components of vessel normalization are invasive and expensive. We have developed a mathematical model of vascular tumor growth from preclinical time‐course data in a breast cancer xenograft model. We used a mixed‐effects approach for model parameterization, leveraging tumor size data to identify a period of enhanced tumor growth that could potentially correspond to the transient window of vessel normalization. We estimated the characteristics of the window for mice treated with an anti‐VEGF antibody (bevacizumab) or with a bispecific anti‐VEGF/anti‐angiopoietin‐2 antibody (vanucizumab). We show how the mathematical model could theoretically be used to predict how to coordinate antiangiogenic therapy with radiotherapy or chemotherapy to maximize therapeutic effect, reducing the need for preclinical experiments that directly measure vessel normalization parameters. PMID:27863175

  17. The Chaperone Activity of GRP94 Toward Insulin-like Growth Factor II Is Necessary for the Stress Response to Serum Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovsky, Olga; Ahmed, Noreen T.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II is a hormone with mitogenic activity for many cell types and tissues. We demonstrate that its intracellular processing and secretion strictly depend on the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 94. GRP94 interacts physically and transiently with pro-IGF-II intermediates, and its activity is essential for secretion of active IGF-II, thus establishing IGF-II as a client of GRP94. Embryonic stem (ES) cells that lack GRP94 are hypersensitive to stress conditions such as serum deprivation and die by apoptosis because they cannot respond to the stress by producing active IGF-II. This chaperone–client interaction may explain the previously documented antiapoptotic activity of GRP94 in a number of stress responses. PMID:19158397

  18. The frontline antibiotic vancomycin induces a zinc starvation response in bacteria by binding to Zn(II)

    PubMed Central

    Zarkan, Ashraf; Macklyne, Heather-Rose; Truman, Andrew W.; Hesketh, Andrew R.; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin is a front-line antibiotic used for the treatment of nosocomial infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite its clinical importance the global effects of vancomycin exposure on bacterial physiology are poorly understood. In a previous transcriptomic analysis we identified a number of Zur regulon genes which were highly but transiently up-regulated by vancomycin in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we show that vancomycin also induces similar zinc homeostasis systems in a range of other bacteria and demonstrate that vancomycin binds to Zn(II) in vitro. This implies that vancomycin treatment sequesters zinc from bacterial cells thereby triggering a Zur-dependent zinc starvation response. The Kd value of the binding between vancomycin and Zn(II) was calculated using a novel fluorometric assay, and NMR was used to identify the binding site. These findings highlight a new biologically relevant aspect of the chemical property of vancomycin as a zinc chelator. PMID:26797186

  19. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. PMID:25324298

  20. Early and delayed long-term transcriptional changes and short-term transient responses during cold acclimation in olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Pérez, María de la O; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Valderrama, Raquel; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Muñoz-Merida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; Barroso, Juan Bautista; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Luque, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    Low temperature severely affects plant growth and development. To overcome this constraint, several plant species from regions having a cool season have evolved an adaptive response, called cold acclimation. We have studied this response in olive tree (Olea europaea L.) cv. Picual. Biochemical stress markers and cold-stress symptoms were detected after the first 24 h as sagging leaves. After 5 days, the plants were found to have completely recovered. Control and cold-stressed plants were sequenced by Illumina HiSeq 1000 paired-end technique. We also assembled a new olive transcriptome comprising 157,799 unigenes and found 6,309 unigenes differentially expressed in response to cold. Three types of response that led to cold acclimation were found: short-term transient response, early long-term response, and late long-term response. These subsets of unigenes were related to different biological processes. Early responses involved many cold-stress-responsive genes coding for, among many other things, C-repeat binding factor transcription factors, fatty acid desaturases, wax synthesis, and oligosaccharide metabolism. After long-term exposure to cold, a large proportion of gene down-regulation was found, including photosynthesis and plant growth genes. Up-regulated genes after long-term cold exposure were related to organelle fusion, nucleus organization, and DNA integration, including retrotransposons. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  1. Use of NAD(P)H and Flavoprotein Autofluorescence Transients to Probe Neuron and Astrocyte Responses to Synaptic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shuttleworth, C. William

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic stimulation in brain slices is accompanied by changes in tissue autofluorescence, which are a consequence of changes in tissue metabolism. Autofluorescence excited by ultraviolet light has been most extensively studied, and is due to reduced pyridine nucleotides (NADH and NADPH, collectively termed NAD(P)H). Stimulation generates a characteristic compound NAD(P)H response, comprising an initial fluorescence decrease and then an overshooting increase that slowly recovers to baseline levels. Evoked NAD(P)H transients are relatively easy to record, do not require the addition of exogenous indicators and have good signal-noise ratios. These characteristics make NAD(P)H imaging methods very useful for tracking the spread of neuronal activity in complex brain tissues, however the cellular basis of synaptically-evoked autofluorescence transients has been the subject of recent debate. Of particular importance is the question of whether signals are due primarily to changes in neuronal mitochondrial function, and/or whether astrocyte metabolism triggered by glutamate uptake may be a significant contributor to the overshooting NAD(P)H fluorescence increases. This mini-review addresses the subcellular origins of NAD(P)H autofluorescence and the evidence for mitochondrial and glycolytic contributions to compound transients. It is concluded that there is no direct evidence for a contribution to NAD(P)H signals from glycolysis in astrocytes following synaptic glutamate uptake. In contrast, multiple lines of evidence, including from complimentary flavoprotein autofluorescence signals, imply that mitochondrial NADH dynamics in neurons dominate compound evoked NAD(P)H transients. These signals are thus appropriate for studies of mitochondrial function and dysfunction in brain slices, in addition to providing robust maps of postsynaptic neuronal activation following physiological activation. PMID:20036704

  2. Transient inactivation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell prominently ameliorates responses to acute stress in female rats.

    PubMed

    Javadifar, Tahereh-Sadat; Sahraei, Hedayat; Ketabi, Mohammad-Ali; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-10-15

    It is clear that the stress response differs between females and males. Moreover, the nucleus accumbens shell is considered a critical area in the brain's response to stress. In the present study we investigate the effect of the transient inactivation of the NAc shell on the metabolic and hormonal disturbance induced by acute stress in female rats. Female Wistar rats were canulated uni- or bilaterally in the NAc shell before stress induction. Electric foot shock was applied to the animals and lidocaine hydrochloride was administered intra-acumbally 5min before each stress session. Food and water intake, delay to eating time, plasma corticosterone, estradiol and progesterone were measured after stress administration. Our results indicate that food intake increased whereas water intake decreased in stress group, furthermore, delay in the onset of eating also was observed. In addition, plasma corticosterone and progesterone concentrations were increased whereas estradiol was decreased. Transient inactivation of right side of NAc shell inhibited the stress effect on food intake; however, the effect of stress was exacerbated when the left part of the NAc shell was inhibited. Transient inactivation of both NAc shell sides augmented the stress effect on water intake. The same results also obtained for the effect of stress on delay to eating time. Lidocaine administration inhibited the effects of stress on all of the hormones we tested. It can be concluded that the NAc shell plays an important role in the mediation of stress responses in female rats and this influence shows asymmetrical manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Seismic analysis of the large 70-meter antenna, part 1: Earthquake response spectra versus full transient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiedron, K.; Chian, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    As a check on structure safety aspects, two approaches in seismic analysis for the large 70-m antennas are presented. The first approach, commonly used by civil engineers, utilizes known recommended design response spectra. The second approach, which is the full transient analysis, is versatile and applicable not only to earthquake loading but also to other dynamic forcing functions. The results obtained at the fundamental structural frequency show that the two approaches are in good agreement with each other and both approaches show a safe design. The results also confirm past 64-m antenna seismic studies done by the Caltech Seismology Staff.

  4. The Cervico-Ocular Reflex of normal human subjects in response to transient and sinusoidal trunk rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Robert N., Jr.; Thurston, Stephen E.; Becker, Keith R.; Ackley, Charles V.; Seidman, Scott H.; Leigh, R. John

    1994-01-01

    We used the magnetic search coil technique to measure the horizontal cervico-ocular reflex (COR) of 8 subjects in response to transient or sinusoidal (0.1-1.0 Hz) trunk rotations while their heads were firmly immobilized. Although we were able to resolve eye rotations of less than 0.05 deg, the COR was hardly measurable (gain was always less than 0.07). This finding, made with the most precise measurement technique used to date, suggests that the COR makes a negligible contribution to the stability of gaze in normal subjects during natural activities.

  5. Seismic analysis of the large 70-meter antenna, part 1: Earthquake response spectra versus full transient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiedron, K.; Chian, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    As a check on structure safety aspects, two approaches in seismic analysis for the large 70-m antennas are presented. The first approach, commonly used by civil engineers, utilizes known recommended design response spectra. The second approach, which is the full transient analysis, is versatile and applicable not only to earthquake loading but also to other dynamic forcing functions. The results obtained at the fundamental structural frequency show that the two approaches are in good agreement with each other and both approaches show a safe design. The results also confirm past 64-m antenna seismic studies done by the Caltech Seismology Staff.

  6. Evaluation of transient response of spinning solar sail with flexible membrane by eigenfunction analysis and continuum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chujo, Toshihiro; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluates the transient response of large spinning membrane structures in space - especially spinning solar sails - by two different methods. A flexible sail membrane is easily deformed when a spacecraft changes its attitude, such as when using thrusters, and the control response including membrane vibration must be estimated in advance of operation. In order to estimate the motion of the membrane, numerical simulations using a multi-particle model (MPM) are conducted, where the membrane is modeled with masses, spring, and dampers. Usually, force propagation is calculated directly in this model and the position and velocity of each particle represent the membrane motion, which is referred to as a continuum analysis in this study. This method is useful for the analysis of membrane vibration because it replaces the complex dynamics with simple equations of motion. However, the computational cost is high and the calculations require a considerable amount of time. This study introduces an eigenfunction analysis to solve this problem. In this method, natural vibration modes and natural frequencies for the entire spacecraft are derived and used for dynamics computation, which reduces the computational cost dramatically compared to the conventional continuum analysis. In this study, the transient response of a spinning solar sail is analyzed using both methods, and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. It is shown that the eigenfunction analysis provides a suitable method for acquiring approximate solutions in a very low computation time.

  7. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  8. Transient current response of iron-nickel-chromium alloy rotating cylindrical electrodes scribed with a dropped stylus

    SciTech Connect

    Odegard, C.A.; Bronson, A.

    1997-10-01

    The scribing technique was used to investigate dissolution and repassivation kinetics of three iron-nickel-chromium (Fe-Ni-Cr) electrodes immersed in a 0.01 M potassium chloride (KCl) + 0.01 M sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) electrolyte. The study related the extent of surface deformation with the electrochemical response, as a result of a Vickers diamond impacting a rotating cylindrical electrode (RCE). The transient current response and transient impact force (F{sub imp}) of the stylus were measured simultaneously. For a given alloy, the scratch current density (i{sub s}) was observed to remain unchanged with respect to F{sub imp} of the stylus from 44 N to 432 N. Activation charge density (q{sub act}) was observed to remain constant with F{sub imp}, whereas the repassivation charge density (q{sub rep}) increased with increasing F{sub imp}. Surface deformation of the alloys was discussed according to the principles of microindentation of alloys, which showed that electrochemical responses for the alloys corresponded with the plastically deformed zone associated with the scratch. Alloy composition affected i{sub s}, q{sub act}, and q{sub rep} for the F{sub imp} values measured.

  9. CFORM- LINEAR CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS: CLOSED FORM SOLUTION AND TRANSIENT RESPONSE OF THE LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamison, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    CFORM was developed by the Kennedy Space Center Robotics Lab to assist in linear control system design and analysis using closed form and transient response mechanisms. The program computes the closed form solution and transient response of a linear (constant coefficient) differential equation. CFORM allows a choice of three input functions: the Unit Step (a unit change in displacement); the Ramp function (step velocity); and the Parabolic function (step acceleration). It is only accurate in cases where the differential equation has distinct roots, and does not handle the case for roots at the origin (s=0). Initial conditions must be zero. Differential equations may be input to CFORM in two forms - polynomial and product of factors. In some linear control analyses, it may be more appropriate to use a related program, Linear Control System Design and Analysis (KSC-11376), which uses root locus and frequency response methods. CFORM was written in VAX FORTRAN for a VAX 11/780 under VAX VMS 4.7. It has a central memory requirement of 30K. CFORM was developed in 1987.

  10. Transient Response to Rapid Cooling of a Stainless Steel Sodium Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Houts, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Compact fission power systems are under consideration for use in long duration space exploration missions. Power demands on the order of 500 W, to 5 kW, will be required for up to 15 years of continuous service. One such small reactor design consists of a fast spectrum reactor cooled with an array of in-core alkali metal heat pipes coupled to thermoelectric or Stirling power conversion systems. Heat pipes advantageous attributes include a simplistic design, lack of moving parts, and well understood behavior. Concerns over reactor transients induced by heat pipe instability as a function of extreme thermal transients require experimental investigations. One particular concern is rapid cooling of the heat pipe condenser that would propagate to cool the evaporator. Rapid cooling of the reactor core beyond acceptable design limits could possibly induce unintended reactor control issues. This paper discusses a series of experimental demonstrations where a heat pipe operating at near prototypic conditions experienced rapid cooling of the condenser. The condenser section of a stainless steel sodium heat pipe was enclosed within a heat exchanger. The heat pipe - heat exchanger assembly was housed within a vacuum chamber held at a pressure of 50 Torr of helium. The heat pipe was brought to steady state operating conditions using graphite resistance heaters then cooled by a high flow of gaseous nitrogen through the heat exchanger. Subsequent thermal transient behavior was characterized by performing an energy balance using temperature, pressure and flow rate data obtained throughout the tests. Results indicate the degree of temperature change that results from a rapid cooling scenario will not significantly influence thermal stability of an operating heat pipe, even under extreme condenser cooling conditions.

  11. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  12. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  13. Design of structure/control systems with transient response constraints exhibiting relative minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.

    1992-01-01

    Structural optimization problems involving dynamic behavior constraints often exhibit nonconvex design spaces. The direct application of a global optimization algorithm requires a large number of function evaluations which in term require a large number of dynamic structural analyses. This work presents a strategy aimed at finding the global optimum for problems with transient dynamic behavior constraints based on approximation concepts. The method consists of generating and solving a sequence of approximate problems using a global optimizer. The approximations are explicit and capture the inherent nonconvexity of the exact functions. A simple example problem is presented.

  14. Active control of the forced and transient response of a finite beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John T.

    1990-01-01

    Structural vibrations from a point force are modelled on a finite beam. This research explores the theoretical limit on controlling beam vibrations utilizing another point source as an active controller. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. For harmonic excitation, control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam. Control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the required interval, is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. The form of the controller is specified as either one or two delayed pulses, thus constraining the controller to be casual. The best possible control is examined while varying the region of control and the controller location. It is found that control is always possible using either one or two control pulses.

  15. Active Control of the Forced and Transient Response of a Finite Beam. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, John Theodore

    1989-01-01

    When studying structural vibrations resulting from a concentrated source, many structures may be modelled as a finite beam excited by a point source. The theoretical limit on cancelling the resulting beam vibrations by utilizing another point source as an active controller is explored. Three different types of excitation are considered, harmonic, random, and transient. In each case, a cost function is defined and minimized for numerous parameter variations. For the case of harmonic excitation, the cost function is obtained by integrating the mean squared displacement over a region of the beam in which control is desired. A controller is then found to minimize this cost function in the control interval. The control interval and controller location are continuously varied for several frequencies of excitation. The results show that control over the entire beam length is possible only when the excitation frequency is near a resonant frequency of the beam, but control over a subregion may be obtained even between resonant frequencies at the cost of increasing the vibration outside of the control region. For random excitation, the cost function is realized by integrating the expected value of the displacement squared over the interval of the beam in which control is desired. This is shown to yield the identical cost function as obtained by integrating the cost function for harmonic excitation over all excitation frequencies. As a result, it is always possible to reduce the cost function for random excitation whether controlling the entire beam or just a subregion, without ever increasing the vibration outside the region in which control is desired. The last type of excitation considered is a single, transient pulse. A cost function representative of the beam vibration is obtained by integrating the transient displacement squared over a region of the beam and over all time. The form of the controller is chosen a priori as either one or two delayed pulses. Delays

  16. Transient Small-Scale Magnetic Flux Emergence and Atmospheric Response Observed with New Solar Telescope and SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2014-06-01

    State-of-the art solar instrumentation is now revealing the activity of the Sun at the highest temporal and spatial resolution. Granular-scale magnetic flux emergence and the response of the solar atmosphere is one of the key topics. Observations with the 1.6m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) are making next steps in our understanding of the solar surface structure. On August 7, 2013, NST observed active region NOAA 11810 in different photospheric and chromospheric wavelengths. The region displays a group of solar pores, in the vicinity of which we detected a site of emerging magnetic flux accompanied by intense and very confined abnormal granulation dynamics, observed in the photospheric TiO 7057 A with a resolution of 0.034 “/pix. Following the expansion of exploding granules in this site, we observed a sudden appearance of an extended surge in the HeI 10830A data (bandpass of 0.05 A). The SDO/HMI data used to study the evolution of the magnetic field and Doppler velocities reveal a short-lived emerging loop-like structure with strong upflows. We used the SDO/AIA data to investigate the response of the transition region and corona to the transient emerging flux phenomenon. We compare the results with previous observations, and propose a scenario for the production of plasma surges by the transient magnetic flux emergence events.

  17. A peak filtering method with improved transient response for narrow-band disturbance rejection in hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Fan; Khiang Pang, Chee

    2014-02-01

    Peak filtering methods are commonly used in track-following control of hard disk drives (HDDs) to suppress narrow-band disturbances around a specific frequency. When there are significant plant dynamics within the bandwidth of the filter, the closed-loop system is prone to be unstable due to the lightly damped poles of the filter, as well as lightly damped poles of the plant. On the other hand, settling response of such peak filters during shock disturbances is slow, and increases tremendously with decreasing damping ratios. In this article, we present a novel design of peak filters with improved transient responses using a phase scheduling method in addition to varying gain and damping ratio. By doing so, the stability margin of the closed-loop systems during both transient stage and steady-state stage will be improved. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is verified with extensive simulations and the proposed method is then applied in an integrative servo analysis platform to carry out a scaling exercise to evaluate and predict servo performance to support 10 Terabits/in2.

  18. Nonlinear transient response analysis for double walls with a porous material supported by nonlinear springs using FEM and MSKE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takao; Hozumi, Hiroaki; Hirano, Yuta; Tobita, Kazuhiro; Kurosawa, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we newly propose a fast computation method for the nonlinear transient responses including coupling between nonlinear springs and sound proof structures having porous materials using FEM. In this method, we extend our numerical method named as Modal Strain and Kinetic Method (i.e. MSKE method proposed previously by Yamaguchi who is one of the authors) from linear damping analysis to nonlinear dynamic analysis. We assume that the restoring force of the spring has cubic nonlinearity and linear hysteresis damping. To calculate damping properties for soundproof structures including elastic body, viscoelastic body and porous body, displacement vectors as common unknown variable are solved under coupled condition. The damped sound fields in the porous materials are defined by complex effective density and complex bulk modulus. The discrete equations in physical coordinate for this system are transformed into nonlinear ordinary coupled differential equations using normal coordinates corresponding to linear natural modes. Further, using MSKE method, modal damping can be derived approximately under coupled conditions between hysteresis damping of viscoelastic materials, damping of the springs and damping due to flow resistance in porous materials. The modal damping is used for the nonlinear differential equation to compute nonlinear transient responses.

  19. Mimicking mechanical response of natural tissues. Strain hardening induced by transient reticulation in lactose-modified chitosan (chitlac).

    PubMed

    Cok, Michela; Sacco, Pasquale; Porrelli, Davide; Travan, Andrea; Borgogna, Massimiliano; Marsich, Eleonora; Paoletti, Sergio; Donati, Ivan

    2017-08-13

    The effect of transient cross-links has been explored on a lactose-modified chitosan, which previously had shown interesting biological features. The presence of galactose side chains and of the polyol spacer resulted particularly appealing for the reticulation by borate ions. The interaction between chitlac and borax was investigated by means of (11)B NMR while rheology pointed to a marked non-linear behavior depending on the amount of borax added to the system. The presence of limited amount of cross-linking ion led to dilatant behavior when the steady flow curve was measured. In addition, strain stiffening was noticed on elastic response upon exceeding a critical stress, indicating a transient nature in the formation of the cross-links. The non-linear response of chitlac in the presence of borax compared surprisingly well with the one showed by proteins composing the natural ECM pointing at a possible role of mechanotransduction in the biological significance of the modified chitosan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A rapid, extensive, and transient transcriptional response to estrogen signaling in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hah, Nasun; Danko, Charles G; Core, Leighton; Waterfall, Joshua J; Siepel, Adam; Lis, John T; Kraus, W Lee

    2011-05-13

    We report the immediate effects of estrogen signaling on the transcriptome of breast cancer cells using global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq). The data were analyzed using a new bioinformatic approach that allowed us to identify transcripts directly from the GRO-seq data. We found that estrogen signaling directly regulates a strikingly large fraction of the transcriptome in a rapid, robust, and unexpectedly transient manner. In addition to protein-coding genes, estrogen regulates the distribution and activity of all three RNA polymerases and virtually every class of noncoding RNA that has been described to date. We also identified a large number of previously undetected estrogen-regulated intergenic transcripts, many of which are found proximal to estrogen receptor binding sites. Collectively, our results provide the most comprehensive measurement of the primary and immediate estrogen effects to date and a resource for understanding rapid signal-dependent transcription in other systems.

  1. Transient Earth system responses to cumulative carbon dioxide emissions: linearities, uncertainties, and probabilities in an observation-constrained model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacher, M.; Joos, F.

    2016-02-01

    Information on the relationship between cumulative fossil CO2 emissions and multiple climate targets is essential to design emission mitigation and climate adaptation strategies. In this study, the transient response of a climate or environmental variable per trillion tonnes of CO2 emissions, termed TRE, is quantified for a set of impact-relevant climate variables and from a large set of multi-forcing scenarios extended to year 2300 towards stabilization. An ˜ 1000-member ensemble of the Bern3D-LPJ carbon-climate model is applied and model outcomes are constrained by 26 physical and biogeochemical observational data sets in a Bayesian, Monte Carlo-type framework. Uncertainties in TRE estimates include both scenario uncertainty and model response uncertainty. Cumulative fossil emissions of 1000 Gt C result in a global mean surface air temperature change of 1.9 °C (68 % confidence interval (c.i.): 1.3 to 2.7 °C), a decrease in surface ocean pH of 0.19 (0.18 to 0.22), and a steric sea level rise of 20 cm (13 to 27 cm until 2300). Linearity between cumulative emissions and transient response is high for pH and reasonably high for surface air and sea surface temperatures, but less pronounced for changes in Atlantic meridional overturning, Southern Ocean and tropical surface water saturation with respect to biogenic structures of calcium carbonate, and carbon stocks in soils. The constrained model ensemble is also applied to determine the response to a pulse-like emission and in idealized CO2-only simulations. The transient climate response is constrained, primarily by long-term ocean heat observations, to 1.7 °C (68 % c.i.: 1.3 to 2.2 °C) and the equilibrium climate sensitivity to 2.9 °C (2.0 to 4.2 °C). This is consistent with results by CMIP5 models but inconsistent with recent studies that relied on short-term air temperature data affected by natural climate variability.

  2. Surface Assisted Transient Displacement Charge Technique. II. Effect of Gases on Photoinduced Charge Transfer in Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V.; Smirnov, Sergei N.

    2008-01-01

    Surface assisted photoinduced transient displacement charge (SPTDC) technique was used to study charge transfer in self-assembled monolayers of 7-diethylaminocoumarin covalently linked to oxide surface in atmosphere of different gases. The dipole signal was found to be opposite to that in solution and dependent on the nature of gas and its pressure. The results were explained by collision-induced relaxation that impedes uninhibited tilting of molecules onto the surface. Collisions with paramagnetic oxygen induce intersystem crossing to long-lived triplet dipolar states of coumarin with the rate close to the half of that for the collision rate. PMID:16956285

  3. First Principles Modeling of RFQ Cooling System and Resonant Frequency Responses for Fermilab’s PIP-II Injector Test

    DOE PAGES

    Edelen, J. P.; Edelen, A. L.; Bowring, D.; ...

    2016-12-23

    In this study we develop an a priori method for simulating dynamic resonant frequency and temperature responses in a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and its associated water-based cooling system respectively. Our model provides a computationally efficient means to evaluate the transient response of the RFQ over a large range of system parameters. The model was constructed prior to the delivery of the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ and was used to aid in the design of the water-based cooling system, data acquisition system, and resonance control system. Now that the model has been validated with experimental data, it can confidently bemore » used to aid in the design of future RFQ resonance controllers and their associated water-based cooling systems. Finally, without any empirical fitting, it has demonstrated the ability to predict absolute temperature and frequency changes to 11% accuracy on average, and relative changes to 7% accuracy.« less

  4. First Principles Modeling of RFQ Cooling System and Resonant Frequency Responses for Fermilab’s PIP-II Injector Test

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, J. P.; Edelen, A. L.; Bowring, D.; Chase, B. E.; Steimel, J.; Biedron, S. G.; Milton, S. V.

    2016-12-23

    In this study we develop an a priori method for simulating dynamic resonant frequency and temperature responses in a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and its associated water-based cooling system respectively. Our model provides a computationally efficient means to evaluate the transient response of the RFQ over a large range of system parameters. The model was constructed prior to the delivery of the PIP-II Injector Test RFQ and was used to aid in the design of the water-based cooling system, data acquisition system, and resonance control system. Now that the model has been validated with experimental data, it can confidently be used to aid in the design of future RFQ resonance controllers and their associated water-based cooling systems. Finally, without any empirical fitting, it has demonstrated the ability to predict absolute temperature and frequency changes to 11% accuracy on average, and relative changes to 7% accuracy.

  5. 3-D transient hydraulic tomography in unconfined aquifers with fast drainage response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, M.; Barrash, W.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate, through numerical experiments, the viability of three-dimensional transient hydraulic tomography (3DTHT) for identifying the spatial distribution of groundwater flow parameters (primarily, hydraulic conductivity K) in permeable, unconfined aquifers. To invert the large amount of transient data collected from 3DTHT surveys, we utilize an iterative geostatistical inversion strategy in which outer iterations progressively increase the number of data points fitted and inner iterations solve the quasi-linear geostatistical formulas of Kitanidis. In order to base our numerical experiments around realistic scenarios, we utilize pumping rates, geometries, and test lengths similar to those attainable during 3DTHT field campaigns performed at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). We also utilize hydrologic parameters that are similar to those observed at the BHRS and in other unconsolidated, unconfined fluvial aquifers. In addition to estimating K, we test the ability of 3DTHT to estimate both average storage values (specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy) as well as spatial variability in storage coefficients. The effects of model conceptualization errors during unconfined 3DTHT are investigated including: (1) assuming constant storage coefficients during inversion and (2) assuming stationary geostatistical parameter variability. Overall, our findings indicate that estimation of K is slightly degraded if storage parameters must be jointly estimated, but that this effect is quite small compared with the degradation of estimates due to violation of "structural" geostatistical assumptions. Practically, we find for our scenarios that assuming constant storage values during inversion does not appear to have a significant effect on K estimates or uncertainty bounds.

  6. Stronger Pharmacological Cortisol Suppression and Anticipatory Cortisol Stress Response in Transient Global Amnesia

    PubMed Central

    Griebe, Martin; Nees, Frauke; Gerber, Benjamin; Ebert, Anne; Flor, Herta; Wolf, Oliver T.; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G.; Szabo, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a disorder characterized by a sudden attack of severe anterograde memory disturbance that is frequently preceded by emotional or physical stress and resolves within 24 h. By using MRI following the acute episode in TGA patients, small lesions in the hippocampus have been observed. Hence, it has been hypothesized that the disorder is caused by a stress-related transient inhibition of memory formation in the hippocampus. To study the factors that may link stress and TGA, we measured the cortisol day-profile, the dexamethasone feedback inhibition and the effect of experimental exposure to stress on cortisol levels (using the socially evaluated cold pressor test and a control procedure) in 20 patients with a recent history of TGA and in 20 healthy controls. We used self-report scales of depression, anxiety and stress, and a detailed neuropsychological assessment to characterize our collective. We did not observe differences in mean cortisol levels in the cortisol day-profile between the two groups. After administration of low-dose dexamethasone, TGA patients showed significantly stronger cortisol suppression in the daytime profile compared to the control group (p = 0.027). The mean salivary cortisol level was significantly higher in the TGA group prior to and after the experimental stress exposure (p = 0.008 and 0.010 respectively), as well as prior to and after the control condition (p = 0.022 and 0.024, respectively). The TGA group had higher scores of depressive symptomatology (p = 0.021) and anxiety (p = 0.007), but the groups did not differ in the neuropsychological assessment. Our findings of a stronger pharmacological suppression and higher cortisol levels in anticipation of experimental stress in participants with a previous TGA indicate a hypersensitivity of the HPA axis. This suggests that an individual stress sensitivity might play a role in the pathophysiology of TGA. PMID:25805980

  7. 3-D Transient Hydraulic Tomography in Unconfined Aquifers with Fast Drainage Response

    SciTech Connect

    Cardiff, Michael A.; Barrash, Warren

    2011-12-16

    We investigate, through numerical experiments, the viability of three-dimensional transient hydraulic tomography (3DTHT) for identifying the spatial distribution of groundwater flow parameters (primarily, hydraulic conductivity K) in permeable, unconfined aquifers. To invert the large amount of transient data collected from 3DTHT surveys, we utilize an iterative geostatistical inversion strategy in which outer iterations progressively increase the number of data points fitted and inner iterations solve the quasilinear geostatistical formulas of Kitanidis. In order to base our numerical experiments around realistic scenarios, we utilize pumping rates, geometries, and test lengths similar to those attainable during 3DTHT field campaigns performed at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). We also utilize hydrologic parameters that are similar to those observed at the BHRS and in other unconsolidated, unconfined fluvial aquifers. In addition to estimating K, we test the ability of 3DTHT to estimate both average storage values (specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy) as well as spatial variability in storage coefficients. The effects of model conceptualization errors during unconfined 3DTHT are investigated including: (1) assuming constant storage coefficients during inversion and (2) assuming stationary geostatistical parameter variability. Overall, our findings indicate that estimation of K is slightly degraded if storage parameters must be jointly estimated, but that this effect is quite small compared with the degradation of estimates due to violation of ‘‘structural’’ geostatistical assumptions. Practically, we find for our scenarios that assuming constant storage values during inversion does not appear to have a significant effect on K estimates or uncertainty bounds.

  8. Assessing the implications of human land-use change for the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, C. T.; Matthews, H. D.

    2016-03-01

    Recent research has shown evidence of a linear climate response to cumulative CO2 emissions, which implies that the source, timing, and amount of emissions does not significantly influence the climate response per unit emission. Furthermore, these analyses have generally assumed that the climate response to land-use CO2 emissions is equivalent to that of fossil fuels under the assumption that, once in the atmosphere, the radiative forcing induced by CO2 is not sensitive to the emissions source. However, land-cover change also affects surface albedo and the strength of terrestrial carbon sinks, both of which have an additional climate effect. In this study, we use a coupled climate-carbon cycle model to assess the climate response to historical and future cumulative land-use CO2 emissions, in order to compare it to the response to fossil fuel CO2. We find that when we isolate the CO2-induced (biogeochemical) temperature changes associated with land-use change, then the climate response to cumulative land-use emissions is equivalent to that of fossil fuel CO2. We show further that the globally-averaged albedo-induced biophysical cooling from land-use change is non-negligible and may be of comparable magnitude to the biogeochemical warming, with the result that the net climate response to land-use change is substantially different from a linear response to cumulative emissions. However, our new simulations suggest that the biophysical cooling from land-use change follows its own independent (negative) linear response to cumulative net land-use CO2 emissions, which may provide a useful scaling factor for certain applications when evaluating the full transient climate response to emissions.

  9. A hybrid plasma-induction model to study the electromagnetic response of an object's interior to a magnetic transient signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, S.; Delory, G. T.; Poppe, A. R.; Fuqua, H.

    2016-12-01

    Resolving the interior of the solar system objects is crucial to our understanding of the fundamental processes of their formation and evolution, and adds insight to the conditions in the early solar system and formation of the Earth. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) self consistent hybrid model (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) that includes induction of the conducting interior of an object to simulate the electromagnetic response of the lunar interior to disturbances in the solar wind. Often the required time step to solve the diffusion equation for the interior, especially when a part of the interior contains highly resistive layers like the lunar crust, is much smaller than the minimum required time step to solve the general hybrid model equations. Therefore, we developed a new algorithm that explicitly solves the general hybrid model equations, while the diffusion equation for the interior is solved implicitly using Crank-Nicholson method. This new development enables us to overcome the diffusive restriction on the time step and run our hybrid model long enough to resolve the interior electromagnetic response. We used this model to analyze time-domain response of the Moon to a magnetic transient signal. We applied various conductivity profiles for the lunar interior, and examined the lunar electromagnetic response on the side day and night sides of the Moon. We also studied the effects of a magnetic transient on redistribution of the lunar plasma wake current systems, as well as their effects on the induced signals from lunar interior. A similar method can also be applied to study the plasma interaction with other solar system objects, like Europa.

  10. Computing the internal transient voltage response of a transformer with a nonlinear core using gear`s method. Part 2: Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Vakilian, M.; Degeneff, R.C.; Kupferschmid, M.

    1995-05-01

    An EHV transformer`s insulation structure must be designed to withstand the internal electrical stresses generated during system transients. Computer models are employed for predetermination of these stresses. Part 1 of this paper developed a detailed transformer model and solution method representing the nonlinear, saturable characteristic of the core during transients. The resulting set of stiff nonlinear differential algebraic equations (DAE`s) are solved by application of Gear`s method. Part 2 presents the verification of this methodology. This is accomplished by comparing the computed and measured response of a 765/345/34.5 kV 500MVA autotransformer during energization and transient excitation.

  11. Optical studies of the X-ray transient XTE J2123-058 - II. Phase-resolved spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, R. I.; Charles, P. A.; Haswell, C. A.; Casares, J.; Zurita, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2001-06-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the soft X-ray transient XTEJ2123-058 in outburst. A useful spectral coverage of 3700-6700Å was achieved spanning two orbits of the binary, with single-epoch coverage extending to ~9000Å. The optical spectrum approximates a steep blue power law, consistent with emission on the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot blackbody spectrum. The strongest spectral lines are Heii 4686Å and Ciii/Niii 4640Å (Bowen blend) in emission. Their relative strengths suggest that XTEJ2123-058 was formed in the Galactic plane, not in the halo. Other weak emission lines of Heii and Civ are present, and Balmer lines show a complex structure, blended with Heii. Heii 4686-Å profiles show a complex multiple S-wave structure, with the strongest component appearing at low velocities in the lower-left quadrant of a Doppler tomogram. Hα shows transient absorption between phases 0.35 and 0.55. Both of these effects appear to be analogous to similar behaviour in SW Sex type cataclysmic variables. We therefore consider whether the spectral line behaviour of XTEJ2123-058 can be explained by the same models invoked for those systems.

  12. A comparison of the three isoforms of the light-harvesting complex II using transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Miguel A; Standfuss, Joerg; Vengris, Mikas; van Oort, Bart F; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Kühlbrandt, Werner; van Amerongen, Herbert; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2006-06-01

    In this article we report the characterization of the energy transfer process in the reconstituted isoforms of the plant light-harvesting complex II. Homotrimers of recombinant Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 and monomers of Lhcb3 were compared to native trimeric complexes. We used low-intensity femtosecond transient absorption (TA) and time-resolved fluorescence measurements at 77 K and at room temperature, respectively, to excite the complexes selectively in the chlorophyll b absorption band at 650 nm with 80 fs pulses and on the high-energy side of the chlorophyll a absorption band at 662 nm with 180 fs pulses. The subsequent kinetics was probed at 30-35 different wavelengths in the region from 635 to 700 nm. The rate constants for energy transfer were very similar, indicating that structurally the three isoforms are highly homologous and that probably none of them play a more significant role in light-harvesting and energy transfer. No signature has been found in the transient absorption measurements at 77 K for Lhcb3 which might suggest that this protein acts as a relative energy sink of the excitations in heterotrimers of Lhcb1/Lhcb2/Lhcb3. Minor differences in the amplitudes of some of the rate constants and in the absorption and fluorescence properties of some pigments were observed, which are ascribed to slight variations in the environment surrounding some of the chromophores depending on the isoform. The decay of the fluorescence was also similar for the three isoforms and multi-exponential, characterized by two major components in the ns regime and a minor one in the ps regime. In agreement with previous transient absorption measurements on native LHC II complexes, Chl b --> Chl a energy transfer exhibited very fast channels but at the same time a slow component (ps). The Chls absorbing at around 660 nm exhibited both fast energy transfer which we ascribe to transfer from 'red' Chl b towards 'red' Chl a and slow transfer from 'blue' Chl a towards 'red' Chl a. The

  13. Transcriptional 'memory' of a stress: transient chromatin and memory (epigenetic) marks at stress-response genes.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Zoya

    2015-07-01

    Drought, salinity, extreme temperature variations, pathogen and herbivory attacks are recurring environmental stresses experienced by plants throughout their life. To survive repeated stresses, plants provide responses that may be different from their response during the first encounter with the stress. A different response to a similar stress represents the concept of 'stress memory'. A coordinated reaction at the organismal, cellular and gene/genome levels is thought to increase survival chances by improving the plant's tolerance/avoidance abilities. Ultimately, stress memory may provide a mechanism for acclimation and adaptation. At the molecular level, the concept of stress memory indicates that the mechanisms responsible for memory-type transcription during repeated stresses are not based on repetitive activation of the same response pathways activated by the first stress. Some recent advances in the search for transcription 'memory factors' are discussed with an emphasis on super-induced dehydration stress memory response genes in Arabidopsis.

  14. A rapid and transient peripheral inflammatory response precedes brain inflammation after experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Katie Z; Dale, Verity Q; Dénes, Adám; Bennett, Gavin; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M; McColl, Barry W

    2009-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that peripheral inflammatory responses to stroke and other brain injuries have an important role in determining neurological outcome. The mediators of this response and the temporal relationships between peripheral and central inflammatory alterations are poorly understood. In this study, we show that experimental stroke in mice induces a peripheral inflammatory response that peaks 4 h after stroke, and precedes the peak in brain inflammation 24 h after stroke. This peripheral response is dominated by the induction of the chemokine CXCL-1 and the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and could serve as an accessible target for therapy and as a source of biomarkers predictive of prognosis.

  15. Inelastic Response of an Infinite Cylindrical Shell to a Transient Acoustic Wave.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    decomposition of shell and fluid response into circumferential Fourier harmonics yields v(e,t) - E vn(t) sin ne n-1 w(et) - a w(t) cos ne (1) n-O - *(r,e,t...number of Fourier harmonics ; Fourier superposition in accordance with (1) then produces response histories of interest. In prac- 5 tice, however

  16. Transient and sustained increases in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate precede the differential growth response in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, I. Y.; Heilmann, I.; Boss, W. F.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The internodal maize pulvinus responds to gravistimulation with differential cell elongation on the lower side. As the site of both graviperception and response, the pulvinus is an ideal system to study how organisms sense changes in orientation. We observed a transient 5-fold increase in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) within 10 s of gravistimulation in the lower half of the pulvinus, indicating that the positional change was sensed immediately. Over the first 30 min, rapid IP3 fluctuations were observed between the upper and lower halves. Maize plants require a presentation time of between 2 and 4 h before the cells on the lower side of the pulvinus are committed to elongation. After 2 h of gravistimulation, the lower half consistently had higher IP3, and IP3 levels on the lower side continued to increase up to approximately 5-fold over basal levels before visible growth. As bending became visible after 8-10 h, IP3 levels returned to basal values. Additionally, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase activity in the lower pulvinus half increased transiently within 10 min of gravistimulation, suggesting that the increased IP3 production was accompanied by an up-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate biosynthesis. Neither IP3 levels nor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase activity changed in pulvini halves from vertical control plants. Our data indicate the involvement of IP3 and inositol phospholipids in both short- and long-term responses to gravistimulation. As a diffusible second messenger, IP3 provides a mechanism to transmit and amplify the signal from the perceiving to the responding cells in the pulvinus, coordinating a synchronized growth response.

  17. Transient and sustained increases in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate precede the differential growth response in gravistimulated maize pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perera, I. Y.; Heilmann, I.; Boss, W. F.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The internodal maize pulvinus responds to gravistimulation with differential cell elongation on the lower side. As the site of both graviperception and response, the pulvinus is an ideal system to study how organisms sense changes in orientation. We observed a transient 5-fold increase in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) within 10 s of gravistimulation in the lower half of the pulvinus, indicating that the positional change was sensed immediately. Over the first 30 min, rapid IP3 fluctuations were observed between the upper and lower halves. Maize plants require a presentation time of between 2 and 4 h before the cells on the lower side of the pulvinus are committed to elongation. After 2 h of gravistimulation, the lower half consistently had higher IP3, and IP3 levels on the lower side continued to increase up to approximately 5-fold over basal levels before visible growth. As bending became visible after 8-10 h, IP3 levels returned to basal values. Additionally, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase activity in the lower pulvinus half increased transiently within 10 min of gravistimulation, suggesting that the increased IP3 production was accompanied by an up-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate biosynthesis. Neither IP3 levels nor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase activity changed in pulvini halves from vertical control plants. Our data indicate the involvement of IP3 and inositol phospholipids in both short- and long-term responses to gravistimulation. As a diffusible second messenger, IP3 provides a mechanism to transmit and amplify the signal from the perceiving to the responding cells in the pulvinus, coordinating a synchronized growth response.

  18. Finite-element nonlinear transient response computer programs PLATE 1 and CIVM-PLATE 1 for the analysis of panels subjected to impulse or impact loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, R. L.; Witmer, E. A.; French, S. E.; Rodal, J. J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs are described for predicting the transient large deflection elastic viscoplastic responses of thin single layer, initially flat unstiffened or integrally stiffened, Kirchhoff-Lov ductile metal panels. The PLATE 1 program pertains to structural responses produced by prescribed externally applied transient loading or prescribed initial velocity distributions. The collision imparted velocity method PLATE 1 program concerns structural responses produced by impact of an idealized nondeformable fragment. Finite elements are used to represent the structure in both programs. Strain hardening and strain rate effects of initially isotropic material are considered.

  19. Low Stretch Solid-Fuel Flame Transient Response to a Step Change in Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. B.; Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a step change in gravity level on the stability of low stretch diffusion flames over a solid fuel is studied both numerically and experimentally. Drop tower experiments have been conducted in NASA Glenn Research Center's 5.2 Zero Gravity Facility. In the experiments burning PMMA cylinders, a dynamic transition is observed when the steadily burning 1g flame is dropped and becomes a 0g flame. To understand the physics behind this dynamic transition, a transient stagnation point model has been developed which includes gas-phase radiation and solid phase coupling to describe this dynamic process. In this paper, the experimental results are compared with the model predictions. Both model and experiment show that the interior of the solid phase does not have time to change significantly in the few seconds of drop time, so the experimental results are pseudo-steady in the gas-phase, but the solid is inherently unsteady over long time scales. The model is also used to examine the importance of fractional heat losses on extinction, which clearly demonstrates that as the feedback from the flame decreases, the importance of the ongoing heat losses becomes greater, and extinction is observed when these losses represent 80% or more of the flame feedback.

  20. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-3 (TRPM3) Mediates Nociceptive-Like Responses in Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Scalici, Massimiliano; Lauro, Filomena; Russo, Valeria; Persichini, Tiziana; Salvemini, Daniela; Mollace, Vincenzo; Fini, Massimo; Raffaeli, William; Muscoli, Carolina; Colasanti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mammals to feel noxious stimuli lies in a heterogeneous group of primary somatosensory neurons termed nociceptors, which express specific membrane receptors, such as the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. Here, we show that one of the most important nociceptive-like pathways is conserved in the freshwater coelenterate Hydra vulgaris, the most primitive organism possessing a nervous system. In particular, we found that H. vulgaris expresses TRPM3, a nociceptor calcium channel involved in the detection of noxious heat in mammals. Furthermore, we detected that both heat shock and TRPM3 specific agonist (i.e., pregnenolone sulfate) induce the modulation of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), two genes activated by TRP-mediated heat painful stimuli in mammals. As expected, these effects are inhibited by a TRPM3 antagonist (i.e., mefenamic acid). Interestingly, the TRPM3 agonist and heat shock also induce the expression of nuclear transcription erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), known markers of oxidative stress; noteworthy gene expression was also inhibited by the TRPM3 antagonist. As a whole, our results demonstrate the presence of conserved molecular oxidative/nociceptive-like pathways at the primordial level of the animal kingdom.

  1. Modeling the hydrologic response of groundwater dominated wetlands to transient boundary conditions: Implications for wetland restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, James S.; Olyphant, Greg A.

    2007-01-01

    SummaryA variably-saturated groundwater model, based on that of Freeze [Freeze, R.A., 1971. Three-dimensional, transient, saturated-unsaturated flow in a groundwater basin. Water Resources Research 7, 347-366.], was used to analyze the details of surface-groundwater interaction and resulting hydroperiods of a site undergoing wetland restoration (the Lake Station Wetland Restoration Site in Northwest Indiana, USA). The three-dimensional groundwater flow model couples the saturated and unsaturated zones through the use of van Genuchten's [van Genuchten, M.T., 1980. A closed-form equation for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Science Society of America Journal 44, 892-898.] characteristic equations. Initial estimates of hydraulic parameters were refined through a calibration exercise aimed at minimizing the discrepancy between simulated and measured water levels in seven wells within the study. Numerical simulations using the calibrated model, and driven by annual time series of rainfall and potential evaporation, were used to generate hydroperiod maps of surface saturation and root-zone saturation over a three-year period of study. This allowed identification of regularly saturated areas that would support hydric plants, as well as more rarely saturated areas that would require more dry tolerant species or additional hydrological remediation. The simulations also revealed the critical roles that topography, rainfall history, and antecedent conditions play in the hydrology of degraded wetlands that have been targeted for restoration.

  2. Emergence of Hysteresis and Transient Ferroelectric Response in Organo-Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Sakai, Nobuya; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2015-01-02

    Although there has been rapid progress in the efficiency of perovskite-based solar cells, hysteresis in the current-voltage performance is not yet completely understood. Owing to its complex structure, it is not easy to attribute the hysteretic behavior to any one of different components, such as the bulk of the perovskite or different heterojunction interfaces. Among organo-lead halide perovskites, methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) is known to have a ferroelectric property. The present investigation reveals a strong correlation between transient ferroelectric polarization of CH3NH3PbI3 induced by an external bias in the dark and hysteresis enhancement in photovoltaic characteristics. Our results demonstrate that the reverse bias poling (-0.3 to -1.1 V) of CH3NH3PbI3 photovoltaic layers prior to the photocurrent-voltage measurement generates stronger hysteresis whose extent changes significantly by the cell architecture. The phenomenon is interpreted as the effect of remanent polarization in the perovskite film on the photocurrent, which is most enhanced in planar perovskite structures without mesoporous scaffolds.

  3. Thermal and power availability transient responses for the Argonne monolithic solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, Nelson A.; Carlson, Larry W.

    The Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a candidate electric power source for space applications which require multimegawatts within short startup times. In a previous systems study, an SOFC was coupled to a nuclear Rankine cycle to provide both long term housekeeping power, short term alert power, and shorter term burst power. Waste heat from the nuclear system was used to maintain the SOFC components at an elevated initial temperature. Despite this provision, it was not known whether the SOFC would provide required power levels within the especially short time frame demanded by the application. A finite difference transient thermal analysis, coupled with the electrochemical equations, was done using the Dusinberre methodology. The Argonne Monolithic fuel cell construction consists of a corrugated sandwich of anode, electrolyte, and cathode elements alternating with a sandwich of anode, interconnection, and cathode materials in a multilayer structure. Electrical potential develops across the anode-electrolyte-cathode sandwich and builds in the layered direction. The interconnection material permits electron transport, but blocks oxygen ion back diffusion, which otherwise would short out the cell.

  4. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin-3 (TRPM3) Mediates Nociceptive-Like Responses in Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Malafoglia, Valentina; Traversetti, Lorenzo; Del Grosso, Floriano; Scalici, Massimiliano; Lauro, Filomena; Russo, Valeria; Persichini, Tiziana; Salvemini, Daniela; Mollace, Vincenzo; Fini, Massimo; Raffaeli, William

    2016-01-01

    The ability of mammals to feel noxious stimuli lies in a heterogeneous group of primary somatosensory neurons termed nociceptors, which express specific membrane receptors, such as the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. Here, we show that one of the most important nociceptive-like pathways is conserved in the freshwater coelenterate Hydra vulgaris, the most primitive organism possessing a nervous system. In particular, we found that H. vulgaris expresses TRPM3, a nociceptor calcium channel involved in the detection of noxious heat in mammals. Furthermore, we detected that both heat shock and TRPM3 specific agonist (i.e., pregnenolone sulfate) induce the modulation of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS), two genes activated by TRP-mediated heat painful stimuli in mammals. As expected, these effects are inhibited by a TRPM3 antagonist (i.e., mefenamic acid). Interestingly, the TRPM3 agonist and heat shock also induce the expression of nuclear transcription erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), known markers of oxidative stress; noteworthy gene expression was also inhibited by the TRPM3 antagonist. As a whole, our results demonstrate the presence of conserved molecular oxidative/nociceptive-like pathways at the primordial level of the animal kingdom. PMID:26974325

  5. Frontal brain asymmetry and transient cardiovascular responses to the perception of humor.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Schulter, Günter; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Samson, Andrea C; Freudenthaler, H Harald; Lackner, Helmut K

    2013-04-01

    The study examined the relationship of individual differences in prefrontal brain asymmetry, measured by the EEG in resting conditions, to the individual's responsivity in the context of humor (n=42). Several weeks after the EEG recording, immediate cardiovascular responses to the perception of humor and behavioral indicators of humor processing were obtained in an experimental paradigm involving non-verbal cartoons. Relatively greater resting activity in the left than right prefrontal cortex, particularly at the ventrolateral positions, was associated with faster detection of humor, a more pronounced cardiac response to the perception of humor (heart rate and cardiac output), and more accessible internal positive affective states (indicated by faster reports of amusement levels). The study confirms and extends findings of the relevance of prefrontal brain asymmetry to affective responsivity, contributing evidence in the domain of positive affect and humor, and demonstrating relationships to the immediate cardiovascular response pattern to an emotional event.

  6. Transient α-helices in the disordered RPEL motifs of the serum response factor coactivator MKL1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Fuju, Takahiro; Obita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Tsuda, Masaaki; Tabuchi, Akiko

    2014-06-01

    The megakaryoblastic leukemia 1 (MKL1) protein functions as a transcriptional coactivator of the serum response factor. MKL1 has three RPEL motifs (RPEL1, RPEL2, and RPEL3) in its N-terminal region. MKL1 binds to monomeric G-actin through RPEL motifs, and the dissociation of MKL1 from G-actin promotes the translocation of MKL1 to the nucleus. Although structural data are available for RPEL motifs of MKL1 in complex with G-actin, the structural characteristics of RPEL motifs in the free state have been poorly defined. Here we characterized the structures of free RPEL motifs using NMR and CD spectroscopy. NMR and CD measurements showed that free RPEL motifs are largely unstructured in solution. However, NMR analysis identified transient α-helices in the regions where helices α1 and α2 are induced upon binding to G-actin. Proline mutagenesis showed that the transient α-helices are locally formed without helix-helix interactions. The helix content is higher in the order of RPEL1, RPEL2, and RPEL3. The amount of preformed structure may correlate with the binding affinity between the intrinsically disordered protein and its target molecule.

  7. Ultrafast electronic response of Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces: From early excitonic transients to saturated image potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silkin, V. M.; Lazić, P.; Došlić, N.; Petek, H.; Gumhalter, B.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of attosecond to femtosecond screening and emergent potentials that govern the dynamics and energetics of electrons and holes excited in the various stages of multiphoton photoemission processes and control the photoelectron yield in recently reported experiments [X. Cui, C. Wang, A. Argondizzo, S. Garrett-Roe, B. Gumhalter, and H. Petek, Nat. Phys. 10, 505 (2014), 10.1038/nphys2981]. The study is focused on the dynamical screening of holes created in preexistent quasi-two-dimensional Shockley state bands on Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces and of electrons excited to the intermediate and emerging screened states. Using the formalism of self-consistent electronic response, we analyze first the effects of screening on the dynamics of photoexcited electrons and holes and then of the Coulomb correlated photoexcited pair. Special attention is paid to the correlated primary electron-hole states, which commence as transient surface excitons and develop in the course of screening into uncorrelated electrons and holes propagating in the image potential and surface state bands, respectively. The obtained results enable to establish a consistent picture of transient electron dynamics at Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces that are becoming accessible by the time-, energy-, and momentum-resolved pump-probe multiphoton photoelectron spectroscopies.

  8. Non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging of the neutrophil response in a mouse model of transient cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Vaas, Markus; Enzmann, Gaby; Perinat, Therese; Siler, Ulrich; Reichenbach, Janine; Licha, Kai; Kipar, Anja; Rudin, Markus; Engelhardt, Britta; Klohs, Jan

    2016-10-27

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of molecular and cellular processes in live animals. Here we demonstrate the suitability of NIRF imaging to investigate the neutrophil response in the brain after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). We established procedures for ex vivo fluorescent labelling of neutrophils without affecting their activation status. Adoptive transfer of labelled neutrophils in C57BL/6 mice before surgery resulted in higher fluorescence intensities over the ischaemic hemisphere in tMCAO mice with NIRF imaging when compared with controls, corroborated by ex vivo detection of labelled neutrophils using fluorescence microscopy. NIRF imaging showed that neutrophils started to accumulate immediately after tMCAO, peaking at 18 h, and were still visible until 48 h after reperfusion. Our data revealed accumulation of neutrophils also in extracranial tissue, indicating damage in the external carotid artery territory in the tMCAO model. Antibody-mediated inhibition of α4-integrins did reduce fluorescence signals at 18 and 24, but not at 48 h after reperfusion, compared with control treatment animals. Antibody treatment reduced cerebral lesion volumes by 19%. In conclusion, the non-invasive nature of NIRF imaging allows studying the dynamics of neutrophil recruitment and its modulation by targeted interventions in the mouse brain after transient experimental cerebral ischaemia.

  9. Hardware-Based Simulation of a Fuel Cell Turbine Hybrid Response to Imposed Fuel Cell Load Transients

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.P.; Tucker, D.A.; Haynes, C.L.; Liese, E.A.; Wepfer, W.J.

    2006-11-01

    Electrical load transients imposed on the cell stack of a solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid power system are studied using the Hybrid Performance (HyPer) project. The hardware simulation facility is located at the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). A computational fuel cell model capable of operating in real time is integrated with operating gas turbine hardware. The thermal output of a modeled 350 kW solid oxide fuel cell stack is replicated in the facility by a natural gas fired burner in a direct fired hybrid configuration. Pressure vessels are used to represent a fuel cell stack's cathode flow and post combustion volume and flow impedance. This hardware is used to simulate the fuel cell stack and is incorporated with a modified turbine, compressor, and 120 kW generator on a single shaft. For this study, a simulation was started with a simulated current demand of 307 A on the fuel cell at approximately 0.75 V and an actual 45 kW electrical load on the gas turbine. An open loop response, allowing the turbine rotational speed to respond to thermal transients, was successfully evaluated for a 5% current reduction on the fuel cell followed by a 5% current increase. The impact of the fuel cell load change on system process variables is presented. The test results demonstrate the capabilities of the hardware-in-the-loop simulation approach in evaluating hybrid fuel cell turbine dynamics and performance.

  10. LUNAR OUTGASSING, TRANSIENT PHENOMENA, AND THE RETURN TO THE MOON. II. PREDICTIONS AND TESTS FOR OUTGASSING/REGOLITH INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Crotts, Arlin P. S.; Hummels, Cameron

    2009-12-20

    We follow Paper I with predictions of how gas leaking through the lunar surface could influence the regolith, as might be observed via optical transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) and related effects. We touch on several processes, but concentrate on low and high flow rate extremes, which are perhaps the most likely. We model explosive outgassing for the smallest gas overpressure at the regolith base that releases the regolith plug above it. This disturbance's timescale and affected area are consistent with observed TLPs; we also discuss other effects. For slow flow, escape through the regolith is prolonged by low diffusivity. Water, found recently in deep magma samples, is unique among candidate volatiles, capable of freezing between the regolith base and surface, especially near the lunar poles. For major outgassing sites, we consider the possible accumulation of water ice. Over geological time, ice accumulation can evolve downward through the regolith. Depending on gases additional to water, regolith diffusivity might be suppressed chemically, blocking seepage and forcing the ice zone to expand to larger areas, up to km{sup 2} scales, again, particularly at high latitudes. We propose an empirical path forward, wherein current and forthcoming technologies provide controlled, sensitive probes of outgassing. The optical transient/outgassing connection, addressed via Earth-based remote sensing, suggests imaging and/or spectroscopy, but aspects of lunar outgassing might be more covert, as indicated above. TLPs betray some outgassing, but does outgassing necessarily produce TLPs? We also suggest more intrusive techniques from radar to in situ probes. Understanding lunar volatiles seems promising in terms of resource exploitation for human exploration of the Moon and beyond, and offers interesting scientific goals in its own right. Many of these approaches should be practiced in a pristine lunar atmosphere, before significant confusing signals likely to be produced upon

  11. Transient Raman response and soliton self-frequency shift in tellurite microstructured fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin; Qin, Guanshi; Liao, Meisong; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2010-12-01

    We report on the Raman response function and the soliton self-frequency shift in a tellurite microstructured fiber pumped at 1557 nm. The Raman response function in a tellurite fiber quantifies a contribution of the Raman fraction to the nonlinear optical response. Continuous soliton wavelength shift from 1582 to 1851 nm is observed in a tellurite microstructured optical fiber with the length of 6.5 cm. The experimental results strongly correlated with the numerical simulations based on a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  12. PS II model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield measured on whole leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana after excitation with light flashes of different energies.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2011-02-01

    Our recently presented PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008) was improved in order to permit a consistent simulation of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) traces that were earlier measured by Steffen et al. (2005) on whole leaves of Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana at four different energies of the actinic flash. As the essential modification, the shape of the actinic flash was explicitly taken into account assuming that an exponentially decaying rate simulates the time dependent excitation of PS II by the 10 ns actinic flash. The maximum amplitude of this excitation exceeds that of the measuring light by 9 orders of magnitude. A very good fit of the SFITFY data was achieved in the time domain from 100 ns to 10s for all actinic flash energies (the maximum energy of 7.5 × 10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash) is set to 100%, the relative energies of weaker actinic flashes were of ∼8%, 4%, ∼1%). Our model allows the calculation and visualization of the transient PS II redox state populations ranging from the dark adapted state, via excitation energy and electron transfer steps induced by pulse excitation, followed by final relaxation into the stationary state eventually attained under the measuring light. It turned out that the rate constants of electron transfer steps are invariant to intensity of the actinic laser flash. In marked contrast, an increase of the actinic flash energy by more than two orders of magnitude from 5.4×10¹⁴ photons/(cm²flash) to 7.5×10¹⁶ photons/(cm²flash), leads to an increase of the extent of fluorescence quenching due to carotenoid triplet (³Car) formation by a factor of 14 and of the recombination reaction between reduced primary pheophytin (Phe(-)) and P680(+) by a factor of 3 while the heat dissipation in the antenna complex remains virtually constant. The modified PS II model offers new opportunities to compare electron transfer and dissipative parameters for different species (e.g. for the green algae and the

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the transient response of solvation structure during the translational diffusion of solute.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Matsuoka, T; Koda, S

    2005-01-01

    The transient response function of the density profile of the solvent around a solute during the translational diffusion of the solute is formulated based on the generalized Langevin formalism. The resultant theory is applied to both neat Lennard-Jones fluids and cations in liquid water, and the response functions are obtained from the analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations. In the case of the self-diffusion of Lennard-Jones fluids, the responses of the solvation structures are in harmony with conventional pictures based on the mode-coupling theory, that is, the binary collision in the low-density fluids, the backflow effect from medium to high density fluids, and the backscatter effect in the liquids near the triple point. In the case of cations in water, the qualitative behavior is strongly dependent on the size of cations. The pictures similar to simple dense liquids are obtained for the large ion and the neutral molecule, while the solvent waters within the first solvation shell of small ions show an oscillatory response in the short-time region. In particular, the oscillation is remarkably underdumped for lithium ion. The origin of the oscillation is discussed in relation to the theoretical treatment of the translational diffusion of ions in water. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the transient response of solvation structure during the translational diffusion of solute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Koda, S.

    2005-01-01

    The transient response function of the density profile of the solvent around a solute during the translational diffusion of the solute is formulated based on the generalized Langevin formalism. The resultant theory is applied to both neat Lennard-Jones fluids and cations in liquid water, and the response functions are obtained from the analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations. In the case of the self-diffusion of Lennard-Jones fluids, the responses of the solvation structures are in harmony with conventional pictures based on the mode-coupling theory, that is, the binary collision in the low-density fluids, the backflow effect from medium to high density fluids, and the backscatter effect in the liquids near the triple point. In the case of cations in water, the qualitative behavior is strongly dependent on the size of cations. The pictures similar to simple dense liquids are obtained for the large ion and the neutral molecule, while the solvent waters within the first solvation shell of small ions show an oscillatory response in the short-time region. In particular, the oscillation is remarkably underdumped for lithium ion. The origin of the oscillation is discussed in relation to the theoretical treatment of the translational diffusion of ions in water.

  15. Transient Thermal Response of Lightweight Cementitious Composites Made with Polyurethane Foam Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kismi, M.; Poullain, P.; Mounanga, P.

    2012-07-01

    The development of low-cost lightweight aggregate (LWA) mortars and concretes presents many advantages, especially in terms of lightness and thermal insulation performances of structures. Low-cost LWA mainly comes from the recovery of vegetal or plastic wastes. This article focuses on the characterization of the thermal conductivity of innovative lightweight cementitious composites made with fine particles of rigid polyurethane (PU) foam waste. Five mortars were prepared with various mass substitution rates of cement with PU-foam particles. Their thermal conductivity was measured with two transient methods: the heating-film method and the hot-disk method. The incorporation of PU-foam particles causes a reduction of up to 18 % of the mortar density, accompanied by a significant improvement of the thermal insulating performance. The effect of segregation on the thermal properties of LWA mortars due to the differences of density among the cementitious matrix, sand, and LWA has also been quantified. The application of the hot-disk method reveals a gradient of thermal conductivity along the thickness of the specimens, which could be explained by a non-uniform repartition of fine PU-foam particles and mineral aggregates within the mortars. The results show a spatial variation of the thermal conductivity of the LWA mortars, ranging from 9 % to 19 %. However, this variation remains close to or even lower than that observed on a normal weight aggregate mortar. Finally, a self-consistent approach is proposed to estimate the thermal conductivity of PU-foam cement-based composites.

  16. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Christine; Cooper, Reid F.; Goldsby, David L.; Durham, William B.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-04-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 • 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ≤ 0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ˜6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates.

  17. Estradiol Sensitizes the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Receptor in Pain Responses.

    PubMed

    Payrits, Maja; Sághy, Éva; Cseko, Kata; Pohóczky, Krisztina; Bölcskei, Kata; Ernszt, Dávid; Barabás, Klaudia; Szolcsányi, János; Ábrahám, István M; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Szoke, Éva

    2017-10-01

    Sex differences exist in chronic pain pathologies, and gonadal estradiol (E2) alters the pain sensation. The nocisensor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor plays a critical role in triggering pain. Here we examined the impact of E2 on the function of TRPV1 receptor in mice sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo. Both mechano- and thermonociceptive thresholds of the plantar surface of the paw of female mice were significantly lower in proestrus compared with the estrus phase. These thresholds were higher in ovariectomized (OVX) mice and significantly lower in sham-operated mice in proestrus compared with the sham-operated mice in estrus phase. This difference was absent in TRPV1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, E2 potentiated the TRPV1 receptor activation-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in OVX mice. Long pretreatment (14 hours) with E2 induced a significant increase in TRPV1 receptor messenger RNA expression and abolished the capsaicin-induced TRPV1 receptor desensitization in primary sensory neurons. The short E2 incubation (10 minutes) also prevented the desensitization, which reverted after coadministration of E2 and the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) receptor inhibitor. Our study provides in vivo and in vitro evidence for E2-induced TRPV1 receptor upregulation and sensitization mediated by TrkAR via E2-induced genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. The sensitization and upregulation of TRPV1 receptor by E2 in sensory neurons may explain the greater pain sensitivity in female mice. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  18. Transient and steady state creep response of ice I and magnesium sulfate hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Goldsby, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Using uniaxial compression creep experiments, we characterized the transient and steady state deformation behaviors of eutectic aggregates of system ice I and MgSO4 11H2O (MS11; meridianiite), which has significance because of its likely presence on moons of the outer solar system. Synthetic samples of eutectic liquid bulk composition, which produce eutectic colonies containing 0.35-0.50 volume fraction MS11, were tested as functions of colony size and lamellar spacing, temperature (230-250 K), and confining pressure (0.1 and 50 MPa) to strains ???0.2. Up to a differential stress of 6 MPa, the ice I-MS11 aggregates display an order of magnitude higher effective viscosity and higher stress sensitivity than do aggregates of pure polycrystalline ice at the same conditions. The creep data and associated microstructural observations demonstrate, however, that the aggregates are additionally more brittle than pure ice, approaching rate-independent plasticity that includes rupture of the hydrate phase at 6-8 MPa, depending on the scale of the microstructure. Microstructures of deformed samples reveal forms of semibrittle flow in which the hydrate phase fractures while the ice phase deforms plastically. Semibrittle flow in the icy shell of a planetary body would truncate the lithospheric strength envelope and thereby decrease the depth to the brittle-ductile transition by 55% and reduce the failure limit for compressional surface features from 10 to ???6 MPa. A constitutive equation that includes eutectic colony boundary sliding and intracolony flow is used to describe the steady state rheology of the eutectic aggregates. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Alcohol delays the emergence of the fetal elicited startle response, but only transiently

    PubMed Central

    Hepper, Peter G; Dornan, James C; Lynch, Catherine; Maguire, Jennifer F

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol may exert a significant detrimental effect on the functioning of the individual’s brain, however few studies have examined this before birth. This longitudinal study examined the effect of maternal alcohol consumption on the elicited startle response of the fetus. Two groups of fetuses were examined: one whose mothers drank alcohol (approximately 10 units per week); the other whose mothers did not drink alcohol. Fetuses were examined at 29, 32 and 35 weeks gestation and their startle response observed using ultrasound in response to 2 presentations of a pink noise (70–250Hz) at 90dB(A) separated by 30 seconds. Fetuses exposed to alcohol exhibited a weaker startle response at 29 weeks gestation than did fetuses not exposed to alcohol. There was no difference in the response at 32 and 35 weeks gestation. To ensure the effects were not due to a more general effect of alcohol on fetal movement, a second experiment compared the spontaneous movements (observed on ultrasound for 45 minutes) of fetuses whose mothers drank alcohol and fetuses of mothers who didn’t drink alcohol. There were no differences in movements exhibited by the fetuses. The results suggest that exposure to alcohol delays the emergence of the elicited startle response at 29 weeks gestation but this delay has disappeared by 32 weeks gestation. The possible role of altered neural development, acute exposure to alcohol and disruptions to the fetus’s behavioural repertoire, in mediating these effects are discussed. PMID:22691707

  20. A femtosecond visible/visible and visible/mid-infrared transient absorption study of the light harvesting complex II.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Andreas D; Di Donato, Mariangela; van Stokkum, Ivo; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-12-16

    Light harvesting complex II (LHCII) is the most abundant protein in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. LHCII acts to collect solar radiation, transferring this energy mainly toward photosystem II, with a smaller amount going to photosystem I; it is then converted into a chemical, storable form. We performed time-resolved femtosecond visible pump/mid-infrared probe and visible pump/visible probe absorption difference spectroscopy on purified LHCII to gain insight into the energy transfer in this complex occurring in the femto-picosecond time regime. We find that information derived from mid-infrared spectra, together with structural and modeling information, provides a unique visualization of the flow of energy via the bottleneck pigment chlorophyll a604.

  1. Finite-strain large-deflection elastic-viscoplastic finite-element transient response analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodal, J. J. A.; Witmer, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of analysis for thin structures that incorporates finite strain, elastic-plastic, strain hardening, time dependent material behavior implemented with respect to a fixed configuration and is consistently valid for finite strains and finite rotations is developed. The theory is formulated systematically in a body fixed system of convected coordinates with materially embedded vectors that deform in common with continuum. Tensors are considered as linear vector functions and use is made of the dyadic representation. The kinematics of a deformable continuum is treated in detail, carefully defining precisely all quantities necessary for the analysis. The finite strain theory developed gives much better predictions and agreement with experiment than does the traditional small strain theory, and at practically no additional cost. This represents a very significant advance in the capability for the reliable prediction of nonlinear transient structural responses, including the reliable prediction of strains large enough to produce ductile metal rupture.

  2. Transient Response of Arc Temperature and Iron Vapor Concentration Affected by Current Frequency with Iron Vapor in Pulsed Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuro; Maeda, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    TIG arc welding is chemically a joining technology with melting the metallic material and it can be high quality. However, this welding should not be used in high current to prevent cathode melting. Thus, the heat transfer is poor. Therefore, the deep penetration cannot be obtained and the weld defect sometimes occurs. The pulsed arc welding has been used for the improvement of this defect. The pulsed arc welding can control the heat flux to anode. The convention and driving force in the weld pool are caused by the arc. Therefore, it is important to grasp the distribution of arc temperature. The metal vapor generate from the anode in welding. In addition, the pulsed current increased or decreased periodically. Therefore, the arc is affected by such as a current value and current frequency, the current rate of increment and the metal vapor. In this paper, the transient response of arc temperature and the iron vapor concentration affected by the current frequency with iron vapor in pulsed arc was elucidated by the EMTF (ElectroMagnetic Thermal Fluid) simulation. As a result, the arc temperature and the iron vapor were transient response as the current frequency increase. Thus, the temperature and the electrical conductivity decreased. Therefore, the electrical field increased in order to maintain the current continuity. The current density and electromagnetic force increased at the axial center. In addition, the electronic flow component of the heat flux increased at the axial center because the current density increased. However, the heat conduction component of the heat flux decreased.

  3. The impact of transient combination antiretroviral treatment in early HIV infection on viral suppression and immunologic response in later treatment.

    PubMed

    Pantazis, Nikos; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Olson, Ashley; Costagliola, Dominique; Kelleher, Anthony D; Lutsar, Irja; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Fisher, Martin; Moreno, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud

    2016-03-27

    Effects of transient combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) initiated during early HIV infection (EHI) remain unclear. We investigate whether this intervention affects viral suppression and CD4 cell count increase following its reinitiation in chronic infection (CHI). Longitudinal observational study. We identified adult patients from Concerted Action of Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe who seroconverted after 1/1/2000, had a 12 months or less HIV test interval and initiated cART from naive. We classified individuals as 'pretreated in EHI' if treated within 6 months of seroconversion, interrupted for at least 12 weeks, and reinitiated during CHI. Statistical analysis was performed using survival analysis methods and mixed models. Pretreated and initiated in CHI groups comprised 202 and 4263 individuals, with median follow-up after CHI treatment 4.5 and 3 years, respectively. Both groups had similar virologic response and relapse rates (P = 0.585 and P = 0.206) but pretreated individuals restarted treatment with higher baseline CD4 cell count (∼80 cells/μl; P < 0.001) and retained significantly higher CD4 cell count for more than 3 years after treatment (re)initiation. Assuming common baseline CD4 cell count, differences in CD4 cell count slopes were nonsignificant. Immunovirologic response to CHI treatment was not associated with timing or duration of the transient treatment. Although treatment interruptions are not recommended, stopping cART initiated in EHI does not seem to reduce the chance of a successful outcome of treatment in CHI.

  4. Alcohol delays the emergence of the fetal elicited startle response, but only transiently.

    PubMed

    Hepper, Peter G; Dornan, James C; Lynch, Catherine; Maguire, Jennifer F

    2012-08-20

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol may exert a significant detrimental effect on the functioning of the individual's brain, however few studies have examined this before birth. This longitudinal study examined the effect of maternal alcohol consumption on the elicited startle response of the fetus. Two groups of fetuses were examined: one whose mothers drank alcohol (approximately 10 units per week); the other whose mothers did not drink alcohol. Fetuses were examined at 29, 32 and 35 weeks gestation and their startle response observed using ultrasound in response to 2 presentations of a pink noise (70-250Hz) at 90dB(A) separated by 30s. Fetuses exposed to alcohol exhibited a weaker startle response at 29 weeks gestation than did fetuses not exposed to alcohol. There was no difference in the response at 32 and 35 weeks gestation. To ensure that the effects were not due to a more general effect of alcohol on fetal movement, a second experiment compared the spontaneous movements (observed on ultrasound for 45 min) of fetuses whose mothers drank alcohol and fetuses of mothers who didn't drink alcohol. There were no differences in movements exhibited by the fetuses. The results suggest that exposure to alcohol delays the emergence of the elicited startle response at 29 weeks gestation but this delay has disappeared by 32 weeks gestation. The possible role of altered neural development, acute exposure to alcohol and disruptions to the fetus's behavioural repertoire, in mediating these effects are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Complete multiwavelength evolution of galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. II. Compact jets and X-ray variability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Dinçer, T.; Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the relation between compact jet emission and X-ray variability properties of all black hole transients with multiwavelength coverage during their outburst decays. We studied the evolution of all power spectral components (including low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations; QPOs), and related this evolution to changes in jet properties tracked by radio and infrared observations. We grouped sources according to their tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation and show that the standards show stronger broadband X-ray variability than outliers at a given X-ray luminosity when the compact jet turns on. This trend is consistent with the internal shock model and can be important for the understanding of the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation. We also observed that the total and the QPO rms amplitudes increase together during the earlier part of the outburst decay, but after the compact jet turns, either the QPO disappears or its rms amplitude decreases significantly while the total rms amplitudes remain high. We discuss these results with a scenario including a variable corona and a non-variable disk with a mechanism for the QPO separate from the mechanism that creates broad components. Finally, we evaluated the timing predictions of the magnetically dominated accretion flow model that can explain the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation.

  6. Nonlinear optical response of C60 in solvents: picosecond transient grating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudyakov, Dmitriy V.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Lobach, Anatolii S.; Nadtochenko, Victor A.

    1996-05-01

    Time-resolved resonant nonlinear optical response of C60 in a chlorobenzene solution was measured for 528 nm excitation and 1055, 528, and 351 nm probing for zzzz and zzyy configurations. The slow part of the signal (8 +/- 2 ps) was attributed to the orientational motion of C60 excited molecules.

  7. Time-Critical Studies: Rapid response to Transient Dynamic Mid-Ocean Ridge Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, R. P.; Cowen, J. P.; Baker, E. T.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    The Time-Critical Studies (TCS) Theme of Ridge 2000 focuses on observations of the immediate geochemical and geobiological consequences of magmatic and tectonic events along the global mid-ocean ridge system. NOAA's T-Phase Monitoring Program has accessed the U.S. Navy's NE SOSUS data in real-time since 1993, providing the TCS community with detection of seismicity associated with eruptive or tectonic activity along the Juan de Fuca (JFR) and Gorda Ridges. This remote detection of earthquake swarms, coupled to NSF and NOAA funding for pre-event staging of equipment and supplies, allows directed and increasingly well-organized field responses to event sites. On 27 February 2005, one of the largest submarine earthquake sequences recorded with SOSUS occurred at the Endeavour segment of the JFR. The swarm met all criteria for magmatic earthquake sequences (see Dziak et al. poster and upcoming EOS article). This swarm differed from other plume-producing swarms in that it migrated more slowly (< 0.1 m/s) and over less distance (< 30 km) and occurred entirely within an overlap zone rather than within the bathymetric minimum of a segment. Despite the ambiguous character of the earthquake swarm, the Event Response Community responded since: (1) Although the swarm appeared to be magmatic, there is no way to confirm seafloor or water-column effects without in situ observations; and (2) absent a seafloor eruption, the physical process of injecting magma into the crust should cause significant faulting and fissuring that could result in the release of hydrothermal fluids. The high intensity of the earthquake swarm greatly increased this possibility. This response effort marked the sixth time since 1993 that a research cruise was organized for rapid response to the site of earthquake activity. The response team was on station just 6 days after notification of the seismic swarm, the fastest response yet mounted. Although the team detected no evidence of a new lava flow, or event

  8. Biogeochemical Processes Responsible for the Enhanced Transport of Plutonium Under transient Unsaturated Ground Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fred J. Molz, III

    2010-05-28

    To better understand longer-term vadose zone transport in southeastern soils, field lysimeter experiments were conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC, in the 1980s. Each of the three lysimeters analyzed herein contained a filter paper spiked with different Pu solutions, and they were left exposed to natural environmental conditions (including the growth of annual weed grasses) for 11 years. The resulting Pu activity measurements from each lysimeter core showed anomalous activity distributions below the source, with significant migration of Pu above the source. Such results are not explainable by adsorption phenomena alone. A transient variably saturated flow model with root water uptake was developed and coupled to a soil reactive transport model. Somewhat surprisingly, the fully transient analysis showed results nearly identical to those of a much simpler steady flow analysis performed previously. However, all phenomena studied were unable to produce the upward Pu transport observed in the data. This result suggests another transport mechanism such as Pu uptake by roots and upward transport due to transpiration. Thus, the variably saturated flow and reactive transport model was extended to include uptake and transport of Pu within the root xylem, along with computational methodology and results. In the extended model, flow velocity in the soil was driven by precipitation input along with transpiration and drainage. Water uptake by the roots determined the flow velocity in the root xylem, and this along with uptake of Pu in the transpiration stream drove advection and dispersion of the two Pu species in the xylem. During wet periods with high potential evapotranspiration, maximum flow velocities through the xylem would approached 600 cm/hr, orders of magnitude larger that flow velocities in the soil. Values for parameters and the correct conceptual viewpoint for Pu transport in plant xylem was uncertain. This motivated further experiments devoted

  9. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1-mediated calcium responses are inhibited by the alkylamine antihistamines dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Campi, Barbara; Trevisani, Marcello; Compton, Steven J; Morice, Alyn H

    2008-12-01

    American guidelines, unlike European guidelines, support the use of antihistamines as a first line of treatment for some causes of chronic cough. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel activated by the tussive agents capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and protons. It is predominantly expressed by C-fiber and some Adelta -fiber sensory neurons and is thought to be a cough receptor. By measuring increases in intracellular calcium as an indicator of TRPV1 activation, the authors sought to determine whether antihistamines could antagonise TRPV1 permanently expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells and TRPV1 endogenously expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons. In human TRPV1-expressing HEK cells (hTRPV1-HEK), diphenhydramine and fexofenadine failed to inhibit capsaicin-triggered calcium responses. However, both dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine significantly inhibited capsaicin-evoked responses in hTRPV1-HEK. Dexbrompheniramine also inhibited activation of rat TRPV1 expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells, without interfering with TRPA1 and proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) activation. Finally, in rat dorsal root ganglia neuron preparations, dexbrompheniramine dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-evoked calcium responses. Thus, the inhibition of TRPV1 activation by dexbrompheniramine may provide one potential mechanism whereby this antihistamine exerts its therapeutic effect in chronic cough.

  10. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy induces transient clinical response in advanced rat fibrosarcoma - comparison with preventive anti-tumour vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kucera, A; Pýcha, K; Pajer, P; Spísek, R; Skába, R

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present the models of preventive and therapeutic vaccination of sarcoma-bearing rats with dendritic cells that present tumour antigens from killed tumour cells. We present the characteristics of dendritic cell-based vaccine and its capacity to induce anti-tumour immune response both in vitro and in vivo. We show that preventive vaccination efficiently prevents tumour growth. On the other hand, vaccination of rats with established tumours did not lead to eradication of the tumours. Despite the induction of a vigorous immune response after administration of dendritic cell-based vaccine and transient decrease in tumour progression, tumours eventually resumed their growth and animals vaccinated with dendritic cells succumbed to cancer. In both settings, preventive and therapeutic, dendritic cell-based vaccination induced a vigorous tumour-specific T-cell response. These results argue for the timing of cancer immunotherapy to the stages of low tumour load. Immunotherapy initiated at the stage of minimal residual disease, after reduction of tumour load by other modalities, will have much better chance to offer a clinical benefit to cancer patients than the immunotherapy at the stage of metastatic disease.

  11. Effects of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel agonists and antagonists on slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, Peter M B

    2009-12-01

    The possible functional role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels was investigated by testing various TRP agonists and antagonists in an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation. Extracellular recordings from slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptor units were made. The antagonist capsazepine depressed spontaneous and mechanically evoked activity, with an IC(50) of 82 microM. In one-third of units, capsazepine caused a selective depression of mechanically evoked firing, such that the existing spontaneous firing was interrupted by an absence of activity during the mechanical stimulus. The broad spectrum TRP blocker ruthenium red (30 microM) had inconsistent effects, although in some units a delayed onset (following wash) bursting and paroxysmal firing ensued. The agonist icilin (50-100 microM) had an excitatory effect on spontaneous firing, and (-)-menthol (200 microM) had inconsistent effects. Cinnamaldehyde (1-2 mM) depressed all types of activity equally, mechanically evoked and spontaneous. Camphor (0.5-2 mM) also depressed all types of activity, although it had a preferential effect on spontaneous activity. Capsaicin (1-10 microM) and allyl isothiocyanate (50-100 microM) had no clear effects. These results rule out any role for TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors.

  12. The transient and asynchronous response of ice volume to orbital-driven climate changes of the Late Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, B.; Hunter, S. J.; Dolan, A. M.; Haywood, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The contribution to sea-level rise of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets in a warming climate is uncertain. A better understanding is evidently needed to make more rigorous projections of the impact of regional sea-level rise. A warm interval within the Late Pliocene (3.264 to 3.025 million years before present) can be used to gain a better understanding of the response of the ice sheets to a warming climate with CO2 levels close to or higher than present. For this interval, the highest rise in sea level relative to the present might expected to be a combination of the smallest ice sheet on both Antarctica and Greenland. However, it has been hypothesised that an asynchronous response of ice sheets in the northern and southern hemisphere might be expected.Here, we present results from transient experiments with ice-sheet models forced with multiple snapshot experiments of the HadCM3 climate model. The HadCM3 simulations used Pliocene boundary conditions with an atmospheric CO2 level set to 405 ppm. Simulations 20 kyr on either side of two interglacial interval within the Late Pliocene, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) KM5c (from 3.225 to 3.185 Myr ago) and K1 (from 3.080 to 3.040 Myr ago), have been carried out with different orbital parameters related to the specific time points.Global ice volume simulations of four ice sheets were run starting from 3.5 Myr ago to the start of the KM5c interval (3.225 Myr ago) and for the intermediate time period from 3.185 to 3.080 Myr ago between MIS KM5c and K1. For the 40 kyr simulations for MIS KM5c and K1 the ice-sheet models for Antarctica and Greenland were run simultaneously forced by the HadCM3 climate every 2000 (KM5c) and 4000 years (K1). Our simulations indicate that the hypothesis of an asynchronous response of ice sheets combined with our transient modelling is indeed a key factor in simulating sea level. In particular, simply summing the maximum individual contribution of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sea

  13. Influence of electric-double-layer structure on the transient response of nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-05-01

    A fundamental Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes model is presented for the impedance response of a long nanochannel under zero bias, capturing the effects of surface conduction and the coupling between transverse momentum and axial ion distribution in a manner reminiscent of Taylor dispersion. This is shown to result in a shift of the impedance frequency spectrum with bulk concentration similar to previous experimental observation [Schiffbauer, Liel, and Yossifon, Phys. Rev. E 89, 033017 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.033017]. It further predicts an additional downward shift in frequency with increasing viscosity. Finally, the introduction of a phenomenological model for the impedance response of a dynamic Stern layer in parallel with the diffuse layer transport model is shown to yield good agreement between theory and experiment. As a result, we are able to obtain an equivalent circuit model based on the fundamental model and proposed corrections.

  14. Transient and Prolonged Response of Chicken Cecum Mucosa to Colonization with Different Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Volf, Jiri; Polansky, Ondrej; Varmuzova, Karolina; Gerzova, Lenka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Faldynova, Marcela; Babak, Vladimir; Medvecky, Matej; Smith, Adrian L.; Kaspers, Bernd; Velge, Philippe; Rychlik, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we determined protein and gene expression in the caeca of newly hatched chickens inoculated with cecal contents sourced from hens of different ages. Over 250 proteins exhibited modified expression levels in response to microbiota inoculation. The most significant inductions were observed for ISG12-2, OASL, ES1, LYG2, DMBT1-L, CDD, ANGPTL6, B2M, CUZD1, IgM and Ig lambda chain. Of these, ISG12-2, ES1 and both immunoglobulins were expressed at lower levels in germ-free chickens compared to conventional chickens. In contrast, CELA2A, BRT-2, ALDH1A1, ADH1C, AKR1B1L, HEXB, ALDH2, ALDOB, CALB1 and TTR were expressed at lower levels following inoculation of microbiota. When chicks were given microbiota preparations from different age donors, the recipients mounted differential responses to the inoculation which also differed from the response profile in naturally colonised birds. For example, B2M, CUZD1 and CELA2A responded differently to the inoculation with microbiota of 4- or 40-week-old hens. The increased or decreased gene expression could be recorded 6 weeks after the inoculation of newly hatched chickens. To characterise the proteins that may directly interact with the microbiota we characterised chicken proteins that co-purified with the microbiota and identified a range of host proteins including CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda. We propose that induction of ISG12-2 results in reduced apoptosis of host cells exposed to the colonizing commensal microbiota and that CDD, ANGPTL6, DMBT1-L, MEP1A and Ig lambda reduce contact of luminal microbiota with the gut epithelium thereby reducing the inflammatory response. PMID:27685470

  15. Transient physiological responses of planting frozen root plugs of Douglas-fir seedlings

    Treesearch

    M. Anisul Islam; Douglass F. JAcobs; Kent G. Apostol; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2008-01-01

    Short-term physiological responses of planting frozen (FR) and rapidly thawed (TR) root plugs of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) seedlings were examined through time series (0 h, 6 h, 12 h, 1 day, 3 days, and 7 days) measurements in two separate experiments: 10 C day: 6 C night, RH 75% and 30 C day: 20 C night, RH 50%, respectively...

  16. Calculation of Natural Vibration Frequencies and Transient Response of Partially Submerged, Supercavitating Marine Propellers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Dynamic Response NASTRAN - DMAP Application Propeller Vibration 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reveree side if neceeary end Identify by block number) Procedures...by means of a standard NASTRAN structural analysis program. The use of these procedures was demonstrated by analyses of an existing pro- peller, for...submerged, supercavitating marine propellers may be calculated by means of a standard NASTRAN structural analysis program. The use of these procedures was

  17. Blast Induced Liquefaction Potential and Transient Porewater Pressure Response of Saturated Sands.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-15

    Induced Licuefaction , Dames 4 Moore/U.S. Air Force, Maidenhead, United Kingdom, September 17-19, pp. 57-64. Schaepermeier, Z., (1978b), " Soil Liquefaction...block number) GROUP SUB. GR. Liquefaction, Porewater Pressure, Dynamic Testing, Blast Loading, Soil Mechanics, Laboratory Testing, Material Model- -Al...long term porewater pressure response5;f saturated soils . The facility is capable of generatin compressive shock loadings on the order of 35000 KPa with

  18. A free radical scavenger edaravone suppresses systemic inflammatory responses in a rat transient focal ischemia model.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Norio; Som, Angel T; Pham, Loc-Duyen D; Lee, Brian J; Mandeville, Emiri T; Lo, Eng H; Arai, Ken

    2016-10-28

    A free radical scavenger edaravone is clinically used in Japan for acute stroke, and several basic researches have carefully examined the mechanisms of edaravone's protective effects. However, its actions on pro-inflammatory responses under stroke are still understudied. In this study, we subjected adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to 90-min middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion followed by reperfusion. Edaravone was treated twice via tail vein; after MCA occlusion and after reperfusion. As expected, edaravone-treated group showed less infarct volume and edema formation compared with control group at 24-h after an ischemic onset. Furthermore, edaravone reduced the levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-1β and matrix metalloproteinase-9 at 3-h after ischemic onset. Several molecules besides IL-1β and MMP-9 are involved in inflammatory responses under stroke conditions. Therefore, we also examined whether edaravone treatment could decrease a wide range of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines by testing rat plasma samples with a rat cytokine array. MCAO rats showed elevations in plasma levels of CINC-1, Fractalkine, IL-1α, IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-10, IP-10, MIG, MIP-1α, and MIP-3α, and all these increases were reduced by edaravone treatment. These data suggest that free radical scavengers may reduce systemic inflammatory responses under acute stroke conditions, and therefore, oxidative stress can be still a viable target for acute stroke therapy.

  19. Response of an old-growth tropical rainforest to transient high temperature and drought.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos E; Kellner, James R; Clark, David B; Clark, Deborah A

    2013-11-01

    Tropical rainforests have experienced episodes of severe heat and drought in recent decades, and climate models project a warmer and potentially drier tropical climate over this century. However, likely responses of tropical rainforests are poorly understood due to a lack of frequent long-term measurements of forest structure and dynamics. We analyzed a 12-year record (1999-2010) of 47 817 annual measurements of canopy height to characterize the response of an old-growth Neotropical rainforest to the severe heat and drought associated with the 1997-1998 El Niño. Well-drained soils on slopes and plateaus experienced a threefold increase in the fraction of the landscape in gaps (≤2 m) and a reduction in the fraction in high canopy (>15 m) causing distributions of canopy height to depart from equilibrium for a period of 2-3 years. In contrast, forests on low-lying alluvial terraces remained in equilibrium and were nearly half as likely to experience upper canopy (>15 m) disturbance over the 12 years of observation. Variation in forest response across topographic positions suggests that tropical rainforests are more sensitive to moisture deficits than high temperature and that topography likely structures landscape-level variation in the severity of drought impacts. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Atmospheric Response to Zonal Variations in Midlatitude SST: Transient and Stationary Eddies and Their Feedback(.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatsu, Masaru; Mukougawa, Hitoshi; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2003-10-01

    Midwinter storm track response to zonal variations in midlatitude sea surface temperatures (SSTs) has been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model under aquaplanet and perpetual-January conditions. Zonal wavenumber-1 SST variations with a meridionally confined structure are placed at various latitudes. Having these SST variations centered at 30°N leads to a zonally localized storm track, while the storm track becomes nearly zonally uniform when the same SST forcing is moved farther north at 40° and 50°N. Large (small) baroclinic energy conversion north of the warm (cold) SST anomaly near the axis of the storm track (near 40°N) is responsible for the large (small) storm growth. The equatorward transfer of eddy kinetic energy by the ageostrophic motion and the mechanical damping are important to diminish the storm track activity in the zonal direction.Significant stationary eddies form in the upper troposphere, with a ridge (trough) northeast of the warm (cold) SST anomaly at 30°N. Heat and vorticity budget analyses indicate that zonally localized condensational heating in the storm track is the major cause for these stationary eddies, which in turn exert a positive feedback to maintain the localized storm track by strengthening the vertical shear near the surface. These results indicate an active role of synoptic eddies in inducing deep, tropospheric-scale response to midlatitude SST variations. Finally, the application of the model results to the real atmosphere is discussed.

  1. Conductometric study of shear-dependent processes in red cell suspensions. II. Transient cross-stream hematocrit distribution.

    PubMed

    Pribush, A; Meyerstein, D; Meiselman, H J; Meyerstein, N

    2004-01-01

    A novel experimental approach based on electrical properties of red blood cell (RBC) suspensions was applied to study the effects of the size and morphology of RBC aggregates on the transient cross-stream hematocrit distribution in suspensions flowing through a square cross-section flow channel. The information about the effective size of RBC aggregates and their morphology is extracted from the capacitance (C) and conductance (G) recorded during RBC aggregation, whereas a slower process of particle migration is manifested by delayed long-term changes in the conductance. Migration-induced changes in the conductance measured at low shear rates (< or =3.1 s(-1)) for suspensions of RBCs in a strongly aggregating medium reveal an increase to a maximum followed by a decrease to the stationary level. The ascending branch of G(t) curves reflects the aggregate migration in the direction of decreasing shear rate. A further RBC aggregation in the region of lower shear stresses leads to the formation of RBC networks and results in the transformation of the rheological behavior of suspensions from the thinning to the thickening. It is suggested that the descending branches of the G(t) curves recorded at low shear rates reflect an adjustment of the Hct distribution to a new state caused by a partial dispersion of RBC networks. For suspensions of non-aggregating RBCs it is found that depending on whether the shear rate is higher or lower compared with the prior value, individual RBCs migrate either toward the centerline of the flow or in the opposite direction.

  2. Transient inhibition of primary motor cortex suppresses hand muscle responses during a reactive reach to grasp.

    PubMed

    Bolton, David A E; Patel, Rupesh; Staines, W Richard; McIlroy, William E

    2011-10-24

    Rapid balance reactions such as compensatory reach to grasp represent important response strategies following unexpected loss of balance. While it has been assumed that early corrective actions arise from subcortical networks, recent research has prompted speculation about the potential role of cortical involvement. With reach to grasp reactions there is evidence of parallels in the control of perturbation-evoked reaching versus rapid voluntary reaching. However, the potential role of cortical involvement in such rapid balance reactions remains speculative. To test if cortical motor regions are involved we used continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to temporarily suppress the hand area of primary motor cortex (M1) in participants involved in two reaching conditions: (1) rapid compensatory perturbation-evoked reach to grasp and (2) voluntary reach to grasp in response to an auditory cue. We hypothesized that following cTBS to the left M1 hand area we would find diminished EMG responses in the reaching (right) hand for both compensatory and voluntary movements. To isolate balance reactions to the upper limb participants were seated in an elevated tilt-chair with a stable handle positioned in front of their right shoulder. The chair was held vertical by a magnet and triggered to fall backward randomly. To regain balance, participants were instructed to reach for the handle as quickly as possible with the right hand upon chair release. Intermixed with perturbation trials, participants were also required to reach for the same handle but in response to an auditory tone. Muscle activity was recorded from several muscles of the right arm/hand using electromyography. As expected, movement time and muscle onsets were much faster following perturbation versus auditory-cued reaching. The novel finding from our study was the reduced amplitude of hand muscle activity post-cTBS for both perturbation-cued and auditory-cued reaches. Moreover, this reduction was specific to the

  3. Structural response of transient heat loading on a molybdenum surface exposed to low-energy helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, G.; Tripathi, J. K.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-03-01

    The advancement of fusion reactor engineering is currently inhibited by the lack of knowledge surrounding the stability of plasma facing components (PFCs) in a tokamak environment. During normal operation, events of high heat loading occur periodically where large amounts of energy are imparted onto the PFC surface. Concurrently, irradiation by low-energy helium ions present in the fusion plasma can result in the synthesis of a fibre form nanostructure on the PFC surface, called ‘fuzz’. In order to understand how this heterogeneous structure evolves and deforms in response to transient heat loading, a pulsed Nd:YAG millisecond laser is used to simulate these events on a fuzz form molybdenum (Mo) surface. Performance was analysed by three metrics: nanostructure evolution, particle emission, and improvement in optical properties. Experiments performed at the upper end of the expected range for type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs) found that the helium-induced nanostructure completely disappears after 200 pulses of the laser at 1.5 MJ m-2. In situ mass loss measurements found that the amount of particles leaving the surface increases as energy density increases and the rate of emission increases with pulse count. Finally, optical properties assisted in providing a qualitative indication of fuzz density on the Mo surface; after 400 pulses at 1.5 MJ m-2, the optical reflectivity of the damaged surface is ~90% of that of a mirror polished Mo sample. These findings provide different results than previous studies done with tungsten (W), and further help illustrate the complicated nature of how transient events of high heat loading in a tokamak environment might impact the performance and lifetime of PFCs in ITER and future DEMO devices (Ueda et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 901-6).

  4. Mesospheric, Thermospheric, and Ionospheric Responses to Acoustic and Gravity Waves Generated by Transient Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Strong acoustic waves with periods ~1-4 minutes have been confirmed to perturb the ionosphere following their generation by earthquakes [e.g., Garcia et al., GRL, 40(5), 2013] and volcanic eruption events [e.g., Heki, GRL, 33, L14303, 2006]. Clear acoustic and gravity wave signatures have also been reported in ionospheric data above strong tropospheric convection [Nishioka, GRL, 40(21), 2013], and prior modeling results suggest that convectively-generated acoustic waves with ~3-4 minute periods are readily detectable above their sources in TEC [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. These observations have provided quantitative insight into the coupling of processes occurring near Earth's surface with the upper atmosphere and ionosphere over short time-scales. Here, we investigate acoustic waves and short-period gravity waves generated by sources near ground level, and the observable responses of the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI) systems. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model, in cylindrically-axisymmetric coordinates, to investigate wave generation, upward propagation, steepening, and dissipation. Acoustic waves may produce observable signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer [e.g., Snively, GRL, 40(17), 2013], and can strongly perturb the lower-thermosphere and E- and F-region ionosphere, prior to the arrival of simultaneously-generated gravity waves. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for mid and low latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013], we investigate its response to realistic acoustic wave perturbations. In particular, we demonstrate that the MLT and ionospheric responses are significantly and nonlinearly determined by the acoustic wave source geometry, spectrum, and amplitude, in addition to the local ambient state of the

  5. LES of wind farm response to transient scenarios using a high fidelity actuator disk model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, M.; Duponcheel, M.; Winckelmans, G.; Chatelain, P.

    2016-09-01

    Large eddy simulations coupled to Actuator Disks are used to investigate wake effects in wind farms. An effort is made on the wind turbine model: it uses the prevailing velocities at each point of the disk to estimate the aerodynamic loads and is improved using a tip-loss correction and realistic control schemes. This accurate and efficient tool is used to study the wind farm response in terms of flow and power production during an unsteady scenario: this work focuses on an emergency shutdown of one rotor inside a wind farm.

  6. Analysis of the transient response of shell structures by numerical methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geers, T. L.; Sobel, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    This paper examines some basic considerations underlying dynamic shell response analysis and the impact of these considerations upon the practical aspects of solution by numerical methods. Emphasis is placed on the solution of linear problems. The present states of development of the finite difference and finite element methods are reviewed, and techniques for the treatment of temporal variation are discussed. An examination is made of the frequency parameters characteristic of thin shell theory, applied excitations, and spatial mesh geometries, and the significance of these parameters with respect to computational convergence is illustrated.

  7. Effect of a misspecification of response rates on type I and type II errors, in a phase II Simon design.

    PubMed

    Baey, Charlotte; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Phase-II trials are a key stage in the clinical development of a new treatment. Their main objective is to provide the required information for a go/no-go decision regarding a subsequent phase-III trial. In single arm phase-II trials, widely used in oncology, this decision relies on the comparison of efficacy outcomes observed in the trial to historical controls. The false positive rate generally accepted in phase-II trials, around 10%, contrasts with the very high attrition rate of new compounds tested in phase-III trials, estimated at about 60%. We assumed that this gap could partly be explained by the misspecification of the response rate expected with standard treatment, leading to erroneous hypotheses tested in the phase-II trial. We computed the false positive probability of a defined design under various hypotheses of expected efficacy probability. Similarly we calculated the power of the trial to detect the efficacy of a new compound for different expected efficacy rates. Calculations were done considering a binary outcome, such as the response rate, with a decision rule based on a Simon two-stage design. When analysing a single-arm phase-II trial, based on a design with a pre-specified null hypothesis, a 5% absolute error in the expected response rate leads to a false positive rate of about 30% when it is supposed to be 10%. This inflation of type-I error varies only slightly according to the hypotheses of the initial design. Single-arm phase-II trials poorly control for the false positive rate. Randomised phase-II trials should, therefore, be more often considered.

  8. Evidence from simultaneous intracellular- and surface-pH transients that carbonic anhydrase II enhances CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F

    2014-11-01

    The α-carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3 (-). Here, we focus on human CA II (CA II), a ubiquitous cytoplasmic enzyme. In the second paper in this series, we examine CA IV at the extracellular surface. After microinjecting recombinant CA II in a Tris solution (or just Tris) into oocytes, we expose oocytes to 1.5% CO2/10 mM HCO3 (-)/pH 7.50 while using microelectrodes to monitor intracellular pH (pHi) and surface pH (pHS). CO2 influx causes the familiar sustained pHi fall as well as a transient pHS rise; CO2 efflux does the opposite. Both during CO2 addition and removal, CA II increases the magnitudes of the maximal rate of pHi change, (dpHi/dt)max, and the maximal change in pHS, ΔpHS. Preincubating oocytes with the inhibitor ethoxzolamide eliminates the effects of CA II. Compared with pHS, pHi begins to change only after a delay of ~9 s and its relaxation has a larger (i.e., slower) time constant (τpHi > τpHS ). Simultaneous measurements with two pHi electrodes, one superficial and one deep, suggest that impalement depth contributes to pHi delay and higher τpHi . Using higher CO2/HCO3 (-) levels, i.e., 5%/33 mM HCO3 (-) or 10%/66 mM HCO3 (-), increases (dpHi/dt)max and ΔpHS, though not in proportion to the increase in [CO2]. A reaction-diffusion mathematical model (described in the third paper in this series) accounts for the above general features and supports the conclusion that cytosolic CA-consuming entering CO2 or replenishing exiting CO2-increases CO2 fluxes across the cell membrane. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Evidence from simultaneous intracellular- and surface-pH transients that carbonic anhydrase II enhances CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.

    2014-01-01

    The α-carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the interconversion of CO2 and HCO3−. Here, we focus on human CA II (CA II), a ubiquitous cytoplasmic enzyme. In the second paper in this series, we examine CA IV at the extracellular surface. After microinjecting recombinant CA II in a Tris solution (or just Tris) into oocytes, we expose oocytes to 1.5% CO2/10 mM HCO3−/pH 7.50 while using microelectrodes to monitor intracellular pH (pHi) and surface pH (pHS). CO2 influx causes the familiar sustained pHi fall as well as a transient pHS rise; CO2 efflux does the opposite. Both during CO2 addition and removal, CA II increases the magnitudes of the maximal rate of pHi change, (dpHi/dt)max, and the maximal change in pHS, ΔpHS. Preincubating oocytes with the inhibitor ethoxzolamide eliminates the effects of CA II. Compared with pHS, pHi begins to change only after a delay of ∼9 s and its relaxation has a larger (i.e., slower) time constant (τpHi > τpHS). Simultaneous measurements with two pHi electrodes, one superficial and one deep, suggest that impalement depth contributes to pHi delay and higher τpHi. Using higher CO2/HCO3− levels, i.e., 5%/33 mM HCO3− or 10%/66 mM HCO3−, increases (dpHi/dt)max and ΔpHS, though not in proportion to the increase in [CO2]. A reaction-diffusion mathematical model (described in the third paper in this series) accounts for the above general features and supports the conclusion that cytosolic CA—consuming entering CO2 or replenishing exiting CO2—increases CO2 fluxes across the cell membrane. PMID:24965587

  10. Transient stability and control of renewable generators based on Hamiltonian surface shaping and power flow control. Part II, analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Wilson, David Gerald

    2010-11-01

    The swing equations for renewable generators connected to the grid are developed and a wind turbine is used as an example. The swing equations for the renewable generators are formulated as a natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. A two-step process referred to as Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) is used to analyze and design feedback controllers for the renewable generators system. This formulation extends previous results on the analytical verification of the Potential Energy Boundary Surface (PEBS) method to nonlinear control analysis and design and justifies the decomposition of the system into conservative and non-conservative systems to enable a two-step, serial analysis and design procedure. The first step is to analyze the system as a conservative natural Hamiltonian system with no externally applied non-conservative forces. The Hamiltonian surface of the swing equations is related to the Equal-Area Criterion and the PEBS method to formulate the nonlinear transient stability problem. This formulation demonstrates the effectiveness of proportional feedback control to expand the stability region. The second step is to analyze the system as natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. The time derivative of the Hamiltonian produces the work/rate (power flow) equation which is used to ensure balanced power flows from the renewable generators to the loads. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is applied to the power flow equations to determine the stability boundaries (limit cycles) of the renewable generators system and enable design of feedback controllers that meet stability requirements while maximizing the power generation and flow to the load. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of renewable generators systems are determined based on the concepts of Hamiltonian systems, power flow, exergy (the maximum work that can be extracted from an energy flow) rate

  11. Novel configuration of a myosin II transient intermediate analogue revealed by quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimori, Yoshitaka; Baba, Norio; Katayama, Eisaku

    2013-02-15

    In the present paper, we described our attempt to characterize the rough three-dimensional features of the structural analogue of the key intermediate of myosin's cross-bridge cycle. Using quick-freeze deep-etch replica electron microscopy, we observed that actin-attached myosin during in vitro sliding was bent superficially as postulated by the conventional hypothesis, but in the opposite direction of the putative pre-power-stroke configuration, as for ADP·Vi (inorganic vanadate)-bound myosin. We searched for the conformational species with a similar appearance and found that SH1-SH2 (thiols 1 and 2)-cross-linked myosin is a good candidate. To characterize such small asymmetric structures, we employed a new pattern-recognition procedure that accommodates the metal-replicated samples. In this method, the best-matched views of the target microscopic images were selected from a comprehensive set of images simulated from known atomic co-ordinates of relevant proteins. Together with effective morphological filtering, we could define the conformational species and the view angles of the catalytic domain and the lever arm cropped from averaged images of disulfide-cross-linked myosin. Whereas the catalytic domain of the new conformer closely resembled the pPDM (N,N'-p-phenylenedimaleimide)-treated, but SH2 Lys705-cross-linked, structure (PDB code 1L2O), a minor product of the same cross-linking reaction, the lever arm projected differently. Using separately determined view angles of the catalytic domain and the lever arm, we built a model of disulfide-cross-linked myosin. Further combination with the 'displacement-mapping' procedure enabled us to reconstruct the global three-dimensional envelope of the unusual structure whose lever arm orientation is compatible with our reports on the actin-sliding cross-bridge structure. Assuming this conformer as the structural analogue of the transient intermediate during actin sliding, the power stroke of the lever arm might

  12. Transient response of forests to CO2-induced climate change: simulation modeling experiments in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Allen M

    1986-03-01

    The temporal response of forests to CO2-induced climate changes was examined for eastern North America. A forest stand simulation model was used with the assumption that climate will change at a constant rate as atmospheric CO2 doubles, and then as CO2 doubles again. Before being used to project future vegetation trends, the simulation model FORENA was verified by its ability to reproduce long, temporal sequences of plant community change recorded by fossil pollen and by its ability to reproduce today's vegetation. The simulated effects of changing monthly temperature and precipitation included a distinctive dieback of extant trees at most locations, with only partial recovery of biomass in areas of today's temperate deciduous forest. In the southern portion of today's deciduous-coniferous transition forests the simulated dieback was indistinct and recovery by deciduous tree species was rapid. In more northerly transition areas, the dieback not only was clearly expressed, but occurred twice, when new dominant species replaced extant conifers, then were themselves replaced, as climate change continued. Boreal conifers also underwent diebacks and were replaced by deciduous hardwoods more slowly in the north than in the south. Transient responses in species composition and carbon storage continued as much as 300 years after simulated climate changes ceased.

  13. A Study on Response of a Contoured Composite Panel with Co-cured Stiffeners Under Transient Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Shahnaaz; Jain, Prakash Chand; Venkatesh, Siddu

    2016-07-01

    Composite materials are emerging to be the best applied materials for aerospace applications. With rapid improvement in computational facilities, it is now possible to design the best composite lay up for a particular kind of application. This paper presents the development of a Finite Element model of a contoured composite panel with co-cured stiffeners using Finite Element Simulation. Commercial package ANSYS 15.0 is used for this study. Such half contoured panels find wide application in Aerospace industry. The panel is hinged at one of the ends and dynamically loaded at the other end over a relatively small surface area by transverse load. The response of the panel is observed for variation in stresses, deflections and failure criteria. The panel is expected to rotate about the hinge point by 4° from the initial point. The transient response of the composite panel has been observed for expected load and two test load cases and results reported in this paper. Analysis has become useful input for the design of panel.

  14. A fractional transient model for the viscoplastic response of polymers based on a micro-mechanism of free volume distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spathis, G.; Kontou, E.

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, the nonlinear viscoelastic/viscoplastic response of polymeric materials is described by introducing essential modifications on a model developed in previous works. A constitutive equation of viscoelasticity, based on the transient network theory, is introduced in a more generalized form, which takes into account volume changes during deformation. This time-dependent equation accounts for the nonlinearity and viscoplasticity at small elastic and finite plastic strain regime. The present description was proved to be more flexible, given that it contains a relaxation function that has been derived by considering instead of first order kinetics a fractional derivative that controls the rate of molecular chain detachment from their junctions. Therefore, the new equation has a more global character, appropriate for cases where heavy tails are expected. On the basis of the distributed nature of free volume, a new functional form of the rate of plastic deformation is developed, which is combined with a proper kinematic formulation and leads to the separation of the total strain into the elastic and plastic part. A three-dimensional constitutive equation is then derived for an isotropic, compressible medium. This analysis was proved to be capable of capturing the main aspects of inelastic response as well as the instability stage taking place at the tertiary creep, related to the creep failure.

  15. Estrogen-Responsive Transient Expression Assay Using a Brain Aromatase-Based Reporter Gene in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Jae; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Baek, Min-Won; Lee, Hui-Young; Na, Yi-Rang; Park, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Dutta, Noton Kumar; Kawakami, Koichi; Park, Jae-Hak

    2009-01-01

    Whereas endogenous estrogens play an important role in the development, maintenance, and function of female and male reproductive organs, xenoestrogens present in the environment disrupt normal endocrine function in humans and wildlife. Various in vivo and in vitro assays have been developed to screen these xenoestrogens. However, traditional in vivo assays are laborious and unsuitable for large-scale screening, and in vitro assays do not necessarily replicate in vivo functioning. To overcome these limitations, we developed a transient expression assay in zebrafish, into which a brain aromatase (cyp19a1b)-based estrogen-responsive reporter gene was introduced. In response to 17β-estradiol (10−6 M) and heptachlor (10−6 M), zebrafish embryos carrying the reporter construct expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein in the olfactory bulb, telencephalon, preoptic area, and mediobasal hypothalamus. This system will serve to model the in vivo conversion and breakdown of estrogenic compounds and thus provide a rapid preliminary screening method to estimate their estrogenicity. PMID:19887024

  16. Transient and oscillating response of Ovonic devices for high-speed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, E.; Brunetti, R.; Bordone, P.; Rudan, M.; Jacoboni, C.

    2016-12-01

    The electric response of Ovonic devices to a time-dependent voltage is analysed by means of a charge-transport model previously proposed by the authors. The numerical implementation of the model shows that the features of the I(V) characteristics depend not only upon the external bias but also on more complex effects due to the interplay between intrinsic microscopic relaxation times and the inevitable parasitic elements of the system. Either stable or oscillating solutions are found, according to the position of the load line. The model also allows for speculation on the potential of Ovonic materials in the design of selector devices for two-terminal non-volatile memories.

  17. Spectroscopic, orbital, and physical properties of the binary Feige 24 and detection of transient He II absorption in the system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennes, S.; Thorstensen, J. R.

    1994-11-01

    We have obtained new high-dispersion optical spectroscopy at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and new International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectroscopy of the white dwarf+red dwarf binary system Feige 24. The optical range shows a composite DA+dM spectrum, together with H I Balmer and He I emission. The orbital phase dependence of the emission shows that it results from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light reprocessing in the red dwarf upper atmosphere. The systems close enough and hot enough to show this reprocessing signature only recently emerged from common-envelope evolution. The ultraviolet spectrum exclusively emanates from the white dwarf and shows numerous heavy element absorption lines. We measured accurate radial velocities of the red dwarf component motion, traced by both optical absorption and emission lines, and new radial velocities of the white dwarf, traced by ultraviolet Fe V lines. Combining these measurements, we refined the orbital parameters presented by Vennes et al. (1991), and we confirmed that the white dwarf gravitational redshift is exceptionally small with 9 +/- 2 km/s. From this we deduced that the interior is either pure helium or carbon with a thick hydrogen layer, and we derived, for the combined interior compositions, a white dwarf mass and radius of MWD = 0.44-050 solar mass and RWD = 0.028-0.036 solar radius. We suggest that Feige 24 could be a typical case of close binary evolution leading to the formation of a low-mass helium white dwarf. The mass of the red dwarf and the inclination of the system naturally follow: MdM = 0.26-0.33 solar mass, i greater than or equal to 75 deg. High-dispersion H-alpha line profiles are asymmetrical, strongly enhanced toward the blue, suggesting a moving atmosphere possibly linked to a mass loss rate of 10-10 solar mass/yr. The IUE spectra taken when the system is near inferior conjunction show strong He II 1640 A absorption. The profile is highly variable in width and intensity. Because it

  18. Sex differences in the drinking response to angiotensin II (AngII): Effect of body weight.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Torregrossa, Ann-Marie; Daniels, Derek

    2017-07-01

    Sex differences in fluid intake stimulated by angiotensin II (AngII) have been reported, but the direction of the differences is inconsistent. To resolve these discrepancies, we measured water intake by male and female rats given AngII. Males drank more than females, but when intake was normalized to body weight, the sex difference was reversed. Weight-matched males and females, however, had no difference in intake. Using a linear mixed model analysis, we found that intake was influenced by weight, sex, and AngII dose. We used linear regression to disentangle these effects further. Comparison of regression coefficients revealed sex and weight differences at high doses of AngII. Specifically, after 100ng AngII, weight was a predictor of intake in males, but not in females. Next, we tested for differences in AngII-induced intake in male and females allowed to drink both water and saline. Again, males drank more water than females, but females showed a stronger preference for saline. Drinking microstructure analysis suggested that these differences were mediated by postingestive signals and more bottle switches by the females. Finally, we probed for differences in the expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system in the brains of males and females and found sex differences in several genes in discrete brain regions. These results provide new information to help understand key sex differences in ingestive behaviors, and highlight the need for additional research to understand baseline sex differences, particularly in light of the new NIH initiative to balance sex in biomedical research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ligand-field symmetry effects in Fe(ii) polypyridyl compounds probed by transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Hong, Kiryong; Jamula, Lindsey; Gullikson, Eric M.; Kim, Tae Kyu; de Groot, Frank M. F.; McCusker, James K.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Huse, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast excited-state evolution in polypyridyl FeII complexes are of fundamental interest for understanding the origins of the sub-ps spin-state changes that occur upon photoexcitation of this class of compounds as well as for the potential impact such ultrafast dynamics have on incorporation of these compounds in solar energy conversion schemes or switchable optical storage technologies. We have demonstrated that ground-state and, more importantly, ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption methods can offer unique insights into the interplay between electronic and geometric structure that underpin the photo-induced dynamics of this class of compounds. The present contribution examines in greater detail how the symmetry of the ligand field surrounding the metal ion can be probed using these x-ray techniques. In particular, we show that steady-state K-edge spectroscopy of the nearest-neighbour nitrogen atoms reveals the characteristic chemical environment of the respective ligands and suggests an interesting target for future charge-transfer femtosecond and attosecond spectroscopy in the x-ray water window.

  20. Thermal Response of Tritiated Co-deposits from JET and TFTR to Transient Heat Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; N. Bekrisl; J.P. Coad; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein; R. Reiswig; S. Willms

    2002-05-30

    High heat flux interactions with plasma-facing components have been studied at microscopic scales. The beam from a continuous wave neodymium laser was scanned at high speed over the surface of graphite and carbon fiber composite tiles that had been retrieved from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) after D-T plasma operations. The tiles have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was co-deposited during plasma operations, and laser scanning has released more than 80% of the co-deposited tritium. The temperature rise of the co-deposit was much higher than that of the manufactured material and showed an extended time history. The peak temperature varied dramatically (e.g., 1,436 C compared to >2,300 C), indicating strong variations in the thermal conductivity to the substrate. A digital microscope imaged the co-deposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed 100-micron scale hot spots during the interaction. Heat pulse durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, whilst a duration of =10 ms showed minimal changes to the co-deposit. These results show that reliable predictions for the response of deposition areas to off-normal events such as ELMs (edge-localized modes) and disruptions in next-step devices need to be based on experiments with tokamak generated co-deposits.

  1. A dynamic-biased dual-loop-feedback CMOS LDO regulator with fast transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wang; Maomao, Sun

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a low-dropout regulator (LDO) for portable applications with dual-loop feedback and a dynamic bias circuit. The dual-loop feedback structure is adopted to reduce the output voltage spike and the response time of the LDO. The dynamic bias circuit enhances the slew rate at the gate of the power transistor. In addition, an adaptive miller compensation technique is employed, from which a single pole system is realized and over a 59° phase margin is achieved under the full range of the load current. The proposed LDO has been implemented in a 0.6-μm CMOS process. From the experimental results, the regulator can operate with a minimum dropout voltage of 200 mV at a maximum 300 mA load and IQ of 113 μA. The line regulation and load regulation are improved to 0.1 mV/V and 3.4 μV/mA due to the sufficient loop gain provided by the dual feedback loops. Under a full range load current step, the voltage spikes and the recovery time of the proposed LDO is reduced to 97 mV and 0.142 μs respectively.

  2. Electron temperature response to ECRH on FTU tokamak in transient conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacchia, A.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Granucci, G.; Sozzi, C.; de Luca, F.; Amadeo, P.; Bracco, G.; Tudisco, O.

    2001-10-01

    Steady-state electron heat transport analysis of FTU high density plasmas under Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECRH) shows "stiff" electron temperature profiles [1,2,3]. Plasma response to off-axis EC heating, in fact, exibits a lower limit to electron temperature gradient length, Lc , below which electron thermal conductivity switches to higher values. Stiffness, however, is attenuated in the plasma core of saw-tooth free discharges with flat-hollow temperature profile and during current ramp-up [3,4,5], in which cases the temperature gradient length can be brought to very low values by means of on-axis ECH. Steady and current ramp-up discharges probed by steady and modulated ECH are analyzed in terms of stiffnes. Critical gradient length dependence on local features of computed current density profile is discussed. [1] Sozzi, C. et al., Paper EXP5/13, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fus. Res., Proc.18th IAEA Conf., Sorrento, 2000. [2] Jacchia, A. et al. Topical Conference on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas, Oxnard, USA, (2001). [3] Cirant, S. et al. Topical Conference on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas, Oxnard, USA, (2001). [4] Sozzi, C. et al., EPS, Madeira 2001. [5] Bracco, G. et al.,Plasma Phys. Contr. Fus. Res., Proc.18th IAEA Conf., Sorrento, 2000.

  3. A transient intracellular coupling explains the facilitation of responses in the bioluminescent system of scale worms

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Isolated elytra of polynoid worms emit a flash of bioluminescence when stimulated by an electric shock. With repeated stimulation, hundreds of flashes can be elicited which, in typical series, exhibit large and progressive variations. The amount of luminescence emitted by each flash first increases during a period of facilitation and then decreases exponentially during a longer period of decay. Through a microscope and image intensifier, the activity of individual microsources or photosomes was observed, using their fluorescence as a natural probe, in that its intensity is a function of the amount of luminescence previously emitted. Sequential observation showed a progressive and basically intracellular recruitment that correlated with facilitation. Facilitation and/or recruitment depended on the frequency of the stimulation. Recruitment proceeded among the photosomes of each photocyte, beginning with those of the cell periphery and progressing to those of the center. When the repetitive stimulation was interrupted and then resumed, the refacilitation was a function of the duration of the pause, and the pathway of recruitment duplicated that of the preceding sequence. It therefore appears that, within a given cell, individual photosomes can be either coupled and respond to stimulation or uncoupled and quiescent, that the coupled state has a basic lifetime of about 1 s which can be lengthened by reinforcement, and that this state must be established in a matter of milliseconds as a result of the stimulation. In preparing an increased response to a forthcoming stimulation, coupling acts as a short-term memory. PMID:3680380

  4. Spectacular Oscillations in Plant Isoprene Emission under Transient Conditions Explain the Enigmatic CO2 Response.

    PubMed

    Rasulov, Bahtijor; Talts, Eero; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-12-01

    Plant isoprene emissions respond to light and temperature similarly to photosynthesis, but CO2 dependencies of isoprene emission and photosynthesis are profoundly different, with photosynthesis increasing and isoprene emission decreasing with increasing CO2 concentration due to reasons not yet understood. We studied isoprene emission, net assimilation rate, and chlorophyll fluorescence under different CO2 and O2 concentrations in the strong isoprene emitter hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides), and used rapid changes in ambient CO2 or O2 concentrations or light level to induce oscillations. As isoprene-emitting species support very high steady-state chloroplastic pool sizes of the primary isoprene substrate, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), which can mask the effects of oscillatory dynamics on isoprene emission, the size of the DMADP pool was experimentally reduced by either partial inhibition of isoprenoid synthesis pathway by fosmidomycin-feeding or by changes in ambient gas concentrations leading to DMADP pool depletion in intact leaves. In feedback-limited conditions observed at low O2 and/or high CO2 concentration under which the rate of photosynthesis is governed by the limited rate of ATP and NADPH formation due to low chloroplastic phosphate levels, oscillations in photosynthesis and isoprene emission were repeatedly induced by rapid environmental modifications in both partly fosmidomycin-inhibited leaves and in intact leaves with in vivo reduced DMADP pools. The oscillations in net assimilation rate and isoprene emission in feedback-inhibited leaves were in the same phase, and relative changes in the pools of photosynthetic metabolites and DMADP estimated by in vivo kinetic methods were directly proportional through all oscillations induced by different environmental perturbations. We conclude that the oscillations in isoprene emission provide direct experimental evidence demonstrating that the response of isoprene emission to changes in

  5. Investigating the zonal wind response to SST warming using transient ensemble AGCM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palipane, Erool; Lu, Jian; Staten, Paul; Chen, Gang; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-01-01

    The response of the atmospheric circulation to greenhouse gas-induced SST warming is investigated using large ensemble experiments with two AGCMs, with a focus on the robust feature of the poleward shift of the eddy driven jet. In these experiments, large ensembles of simulations are conducted by abruptly switching the SST forcing on from January 1st to focus on the wintertime circulation adjustment. A hybrid, finite amplitude wave activity budget analysis is performed to elucidate the nonlinear and irreversible aspects of the eddy-mean flow interaction during the adjustment of the zonal wind towards a poleward shifted state. The results confirm the results from earlier more idealized studies, particularly the importance of reduced dissipation of wave activity, in which the midlatitude decrease of effective diffusivity appears to be dominant. This reduction in dissipation increases the survival of midlatitude waves. These surviving waves, when reaching the upper propagation level in the upper troposphere, are subject to the influence of the increase of reflection phase speed at the poleward side of the mean jet, and thus more waves are reflected equatorward across the jet, giving rise to a poleward transport of momentum and thus an eddy momentum flux convergence for the poleward shift. The relative importance of wave breaking-induced PV mixing versus diabatic PV source in the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient is also investigated. The former plays the dominant role in the PV gradient formation during the initial phase of the jet shift, while the latter actually opposes the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient at times.

  6. Investigating the zonal wind response to SST warming using transient ensemble AGCM experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Palipane, Erool; Lu, Jian; Staten, Paul; Chen, Gang; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2016-04-13

    The response of the atmospheric circulation to greenhouse gas-induced SST warming is investigated using large ensemble experiments with two AGCMs, with a focus on the robust feature of the poleward shift of the eddy driven jet. In these experiments, large ensembles of simulations are conducted by abruptly switching the SST forcing on from January 1st to focus on the wintertime circulation adjustment. A hybrid, nite amplitude wave activity budget analysis is performed to elucidate the nonlinear and irreversible aspects of the eddy-mean ow interaction during the adjustment of the zonal wind towards a poleward shifted state. The results conrm the results from earlier more idealized studies, particularly the importance of reduced dissipation of wave activity and the dominant role of the decrease of elective diffusivity in the midlatitudes. Some quantitative discrences do exist between the wave activity budgets of our more realistic experiments and the earlier idealized ones, including larger wave activity tendency and diabatic wave source, and a somewhat greater role of the changing PV gradient in the total reduction of the wave activity dissipation. The relative importance of wave breaking-induced PV mixing versus diabatic PV source in the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient is also investigated. The former plays the dominant role in the PV gradient formation during the initial phase of the jet shift, while the latter even opposes the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient at times. The possible involvement of the wave reflection level at the poleward flank of the mean jet is also investigated.

  7. Expert judgments about transient climate response to alternative future trajectories of radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Zickfeld, Kirsten; Morgan, M. Granger; Frame, David J.; Keith, David W.

    2010-01-01

    There is uncertainty about the response of the climate system to future trajectories of radiative forcing. To quantify this uncertainty we conducted face-to-face interviews with 14 leading climate scientists, using formal methods of expert elicitation. We structured the interviews around three scenarios of radiative forcing stabilizing at different levels. All experts ranked “cloud radiative feedbacks” as contributing most to their uncertainty about future global mean temperature change, irrespective of the specified level of radiative forcing. The experts disagreed about the relative contribution of other physical processes to their uncertainty about future temperature change. For a forcing trajectory that stabilized at 7 Wm-2 in 2200, 13 of the 14 experts judged the probability that the climate system would undergo, or be irrevocably committed to, a “basic state change” as ≥0.5. The width and median values of the probability distributions elicited from the different experts for future global mean temperature change under the specified forcing trajectories vary considerably. Even for a moderate increase in forcing by the year 2050, the medians of the elicited distributions of temperature change relative to 2000 range from 0.8–1.8 °C, and some of the interquartile ranges do not overlap. Ten of the 14 experts estimated that the probability that equilibrium climate sensitivity exceeds 4.5 °C is > 0.17, our interpretation of the upper limit of the “likely” range given by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Finally, most experts anticipated that over the next 20 years research will be able to achieve only modest reductions in their degree of uncertainty. PMID:20616045

  8. Expert judgments about transient climate response to alternative future trajectories of radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Zickfeld, Kirsten; Morgan, M Granger; Frame, David J; Keith, David W

    2010-07-13

    There is uncertainty about the response of the climate system to future trajectories of radiative forcing. To quantify this uncertainty we conducted face-to-face interviews with 14 leading climate scientists, using formal methods of expert elicitation. We structured the interviews around three scenarios of radiative forcing stabilizing at different levels. All experts ranked "cloud radiative feedbacks" as contributing most to their uncertainty about future global mean temperature change, irrespective of the specified level of radiative forcing. The experts disagreed about the relative contribution of other physical processes to their uncertainty about future temperature change. For a forcing trajectory that stabilized at 7 Wm(-2) in 2200, 13 of the 14 experts judged the probability that the climate system would undergo, or be irrevocably committed to, a "basic state change" as > or =0.5. The width and median values of the probability distributions elicited from the different experts for future global mean temperature change under the specified forcing trajectories vary considerably. Even for a moderate increase in forcing by the year 2050, the medians of the elicited distributions of temperature change relative to 2000 range from 0.8-1.8 degrees C, and some of the interquartile ranges do not overlap. Ten of the 14 experts estimated that the probability that equilibrium climate sensitivity exceeds 4.5 degrees C is > 0.17, our interpretation of the upper limit of the "likely" range given by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Finally, most experts anticipated that over the next 20 years research will be able to achieve only modest reductions in their degree of uncertainty.

  9. Transient response of microbial communities in a water well field to application of an impressed current.

    PubMed

    Medihala, P G; Lawrence, J R; Swerhone, G D W; Korber, D R

    2013-02-01

    Deterioration of water wells due to clogging and corrosion over time is a common problem where solutions may be costly and ineffective. Pilot studies have suggested that impressed current or cathodic protection may be used to reduce microbially-induced declines in water well performance. Two water wells in an alluvial aquifer close to the North Saskatchewan River were selected to study the response of subsurface microbial communities to the application of an impressed current as an anti-fouling technology. The treated well was exposed to an impressed current while the untreated well was used as a reference site. Biofilms grown on in situ coupons under the influence of the impressed current were significantly (p < 0.05) thicker (mean thickness = 67.3 μm) when compared to the biofilms (mean thickness = 19.3 μm) grown outside the electric field. Quantitative PCR analyses showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher numbers of total bacteria, iron- and nitrate-reducers in the electrified zone. Molecular analysis revealed that the predominant bacteria present in biofilms grown under the influence of the impressed current belonged to Rhodobacter spp., Sediminibacterium spp. and Geobacter spp. In addition to favouring the growth of biofilms, direct microscopic and ICP-AES analyses revealed that the impressed current also caused the deposition of iron and manganese on, and in the vicinity of, the well screen. Together, these factors contributed to rapid clogging leading to reduced specific pumping capacities of the treated well. The study revealed that the impressed current system was not effective as an anti-fouling technology but actually promoted both microbial growth and physical clogging in this aquifer.

  10. Transient Deformation Patterns in Response to Quaternary Glacial Advance-Retreat Across the Offshore St. Elias Mountains, southern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, L. L.; Clary, W. A.; Daigle, H.; Koons, P. O.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The southern Alaska margin, home to the St. Elias Mountains, the highest coastal mountain range on Earth experiencing the highest erosion rates on Earth, provides a superb setting for evaluating competing influences of rheological and climate control on orogen development. Previous studies have recognized this potential, but conclusions were limited due to the absence of information on the time-dependent behavior of climate and rheological processes. These limitations can now be surpassed due to 1) the recent availability of high-precision age constraints on the structural and stratigraphic evolution of offshore sediments and structures and 2) geotechnical information on the extent of dewatering and related spatial changes in the material properties of these sediments. We correlate emerging results from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 341 Sites U1420 and U1421 with regional seismic data across the continental shelf and slope to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of thrusting in response to Yakutat-North American convergence. Our mapping shows that the pattern of faulting changed from distributed across the shelf to highly localized away from the primary glacial depocenter over the course of one glacial cycle. Core samples suggest that the glacially derived sediment is overpressured, with pore pressures possibly reaching >90% of lithostatic stress. Elevated pore pressures develop rapidly in response to focused glaciomarine sedimentation, in addition to direct ice loading, and may induce a transient state of wedge reorganization manifested as a change in localization of deformation. This relationship suggests that the additive response of pore pressure variations over glacial cycles throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene result in constant reorganization of deformation style and location.

  11. In-plane response and mode II fracture response of Z-pin woven laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hseng-Ji

    Textile composites are proven to be an attractive choice over traditional pre-preg based composites because of reduced manufacturing costs and improved transverse mechanical properties. However, similar to traditional pre-preg composites, 2D laminates consisting of multiple layers of laminae still suffer from delamination under impact or transverse loads. Z-pin (carbon fiber of small diameter inserted in the thickness direction-z) composites are a means to provide higher through-thethickness stiffness and strength that 2D woven composites lack. In this thesis, The influences of Z-pin density and Z-pin diameter on the response of Z-pin under in-plane loads (compression) and transverse loads (mode II fracture) are examined. Both experiments and numerical simulations were performed to address the problems. Compression tests were conducted first and failure mechanism in each loading scenario was identified, through optical and mechanical measurements, during and after the tests. This was followed by the development of different numerical models of varying degree of sophistication, which include in-plane 2D models, (used to study fiber distortion and damage due to Z-pin insertion), multi-layer 2D models, (used to provide an inexpensive multi-layer model to study the effect of phase difference due to stacking consolidation), and multi-layer-multi-cell models (used to provide a full 3D multi-layer and multi-representative unit cell description). The second part of this thesis investigates the mode II fracture response under static and dynamic loading. Discrete Cohesive Zone Model (DCZM) was adopted to obtain the fracture toughness in conjunction with experimental data. In dynamic test, a crack advance gage (CAG) was designed to capture the exact time when the crack begins to propagate. By use of these CAGs, the corresponding crack propagation speed between different CAGs can be computed accordingly. These observations are supplemented through high speed optical images

  12. Mechanism of Generation of Therapy Related Leukemia in Response to Anti-Topoisomerase II Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, Ian G.; Austin, Caroline A.

    2012-01-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases have the ability to generate a transient DNA double-strand break through which a second duplex can be passed; an activity essential for DNA decatenation and unknotting. Topoisomerase poisons stabilize the normally transient topoisomerase-induced DSBs and are potent and widely used anticancer drugs. However, their use is associated with therapy-related secondary leukemia, often bearing 11q23 translocations involving the MLL gene. We will explain recent discoveries in the fields of topoisomerase biology and transcription that have consequences for our understanding of the etiology of leukemia, especially therapy-related secondary leukemia and describe how these findings may help minimize the occurrence of these neoplasias. PMID:22829791

  13. NASTRAN postprocessor program for transient response to input accelerations. [procedure for generating and writing modal input data on tapes using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingate, R. T.; Jones, T. C.; Stephens, M. V.

    1973-01-01

    The description of a transient analysis program for computing structural responses to input base accelerations is presented. A hybrid modal formulation is used and a procedure is demonstrated for generating and writing all modal input data on user tapes via NASTRAN. Use of several new Level 15 modules is illustrated along with a problem associated with reading the postprocessor program input from a user tape. An example application of the program is presented for the analysis of a spacecraft subjected to accelerations initiated by thrust transients. Experience with the program has indicated it to be very efficient and economical because of its simplicity and small central memory storage requirements.

  14. Fault Response to Variations of Loading Rate and/or Dynamic Stress Transients, from the Analysis of 1811 Repeating Micro-Earthquakes at Parkfield (CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagnini, L.; Nadeau, R. M.; Munafo, I.; Dreger, D. S.; Cocco, M.; Mayeda, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Using an approach developed for quantifying ground-motion, we analyze the spectral characteristics of 1811 repeating micro-earthquakes from 163 clusters near Parkfield (CA). Corner frequencies of a selected subset of events are also computed (Brune spectral model). Our calculations provide unprecedented accuracy on the calculation of the seismic moments of each individual event. A strong transient (3-10+ years) affects the spectral amplitudes of most repeating micro-earthquakes after the Parkfield Mw 6.0 main shock of 2004, showing a significant increase of amplitudes at the onset of the SAF postseismic response. The largest relative moment variation ((ΔM0)max/M0regular) with respect to unperturbed events, the maximum creep velocity (VMax), and the postseismic relaxation time (τ), all systematically increase, along the creeping section of the SAF, toward the area that slipped coseismically during the 2004 Parkfield main earthquake. Postseismic perturbations of the repeats' seismic moments are up to an order of magnitude larger than the typical seismic moments of the undisturbed events; recurrence times also show a systematic behavior. Dynamic stress perturbations (increased loading rate of the specific asperities, and/or changes of normal stress across the SAF) are likely to be responsible for the observed variations of the repeats' seismic moments and recurrence times. In addition to the postseismic response to a large event on the (locked) adjacent portion of the SAF, anomalous responses may be induced by: i) giant events at teleseismic distances (i.e., Sumatra, 2004); ii) strong regional events, within ~100 km (i.e., Loma Prieta, 1989, and Landers, 1992); iii) small earthquakes (M~2) in close vicinity to specific clusters. After the 2004 Parkfield main shock, the (shallow) clusters of small-magnitude repeats showed the largest relative perturbations, and the largest absolute cumulative slips. We point out an apparent inconsistency between the self

  15. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m =1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G ˜1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller ˜50μs is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G ˜10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  16. The effect of Platelet Lysate on osteoblast proliferation associated with a transient increase of the inflammatory response in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ruggiu, Alessandra; Ulivi, Valentina; Sanguineti, Francesca; Cancedda, Ranieri; Descalzi, Fiorella

    2013-12-01

    Platelet Lysate (PL) contains a cocktail of growth factors and cytokines, which actively participates in tissue repair and its clinical application has been broadly described. The aim of this study was to assess the regenerative potential of PL for bone repair. We demonstrated that PL stimulation induces a transient increase of the inflammatory response in quiescent human osteoblasts, via NF-kB activation, COX-2 induction, PGE2 production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, we showed that long-term PL stimulation enhances proliferation of actively replicating osteoblasts, without affecting their differentiation potential, along with changes of cell morphology, resulting in increased cell density at confluence. In confluent resting osteoblasts, PL treatment induced resumption of proliferation, change in cell morphology and increase of cell density at confluence. A burst of PL treatment (24-h) was sufficient to trigger such processes in both conditions. These results correlated with up-regulation of the proliferative and survival pathways ERKs and Akt and with cell cycle re-activation via induction of CyclinD1 and phosphorylation of Rb, following PL stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that PL treatment results in activation and expansion of resting osteoblasts, without affecting their differentiation potential. Therefore PL represents a good therapeutic candidate in regenerative medicine for bone repair.

  17. Brucella CβG induces a dual pro- and anti-inflammatory response leading to a transient neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Degos, Clara; Gagnaire, Aurélie; Banchereau, Romain; Moriyón, Ignacio; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is the causing agent of a chronic zoonosis called brucellosis. The Brucella β-1,2 cyclic glucan (CβG) is a virulence factor, which has been described as a potent immune stimulator, albeit with no toxicity for cells and animals. We first used a genome-wide approach to characterize human myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) responses to CβG. Transcripts related to inflammation (IL-6, IL2RA, PTGS2), chemokine (CXCR7, CXCL2) and anti-inflammatory pathways (TNFAIP6, SOCS3) were highly expressed in CβG-treated mDC. In mouse GMCSF-derived DC, CβG triggered the expression of both activation (CXCL2, KC) and inhibition (SOCS3 and TNFAIP6) molecules. We then characterized the inflammatory infiltrates at the level of mouse ear when injected with CβG or LPS. CβG yielded a lower and transient recruitment of neutrophils compared to LPS. The consequence of these dual pro- and anti-inflammatory signals triggered by CβG corresponds to the induction of a controlled local inflammation.

  18. Simulation of steady state and transient cardiac muscle response experiments with a Huxley-based contraction model.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C

    2008-08-01

    A cardiac muscle model is presented with the purpose of representing a wide range of mechanical experiments at constant and transient Ca(2+) concentration. Modifications of a previous model were: weak and power attached crossbridge states, a troponin system involving three consecutive regulatory troponin-tropomyosin units acting together in Ca(2+) kinetics and detachment constants depending on crossbridge length. This model improved cooperativity (Hill coefficient close to 4) and the force-velocity relationship, and incorporated the representation of the four phases of muscle response to length and force steps, isotonic shortening and isosarcometric contractions, preserving previous satisfactory results. Moreover, experimentally reported effects, such as length dependence on Ca(2+) affinity, the decreased cooperativity at higher Ca(2+) concentrations, temperature effects on the stiffness-frequency relationship and the isometric internal shortening due to series elasticity, were obtained. In conclusion, the model is more comprehensive than a previous version because it is able to represent a wider variety of steady state experiments, the mechanical variables in twitches can be adequately related to intracellular Ca(2+), and all the simulations were performed with the same set of parameters.

  19. Highly sensitive determination of transient generation of biophotons during hypersensitive response to cucumber mosaic virus in cowpea.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Enomoto, Masaru; Ehara, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is one mechanism of the resistance of plants to pathogen infection. It involves the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which have crucial roles in signal transduction or as toxic agents leading to cell death. Often, ROS generation is accompanied by an ultraweak photon emission resulting from radical reactions that are initiated by ROS through the oxidation of living materials such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. This photon emission, referred to as 'biophotons', is extremely weak, but, based on the technique of photon counting imaging, a system has been developed to analyse the spatiotemporal properties of photon emission. Using this system, the dynamics of photon emission which might be associated with the oxidative burst, which promotes the HR, have been determined. Here, the transient generation of biophotons is demonstrated during the HR process in cowpea elicited by cucumber mosaic virus. The distinctive dynamics in spatiotemporal properties of biophoton emission during the HR expression on macroscopic and microscopic levels are also described. This study reveals the involvement of ROS generation in biophoton emission in the process of HR through the determination of the inhibitory effect of an antioxidant (Tiron) on biophoton emission.

  20. Determination of charge transfer resistance and capacitance of microbial fuel cell through a transient response analysis of cell voltage.

    PubMed

    Ha, Phuc Thi; Moon, Hyunsoo; Kim, Byung Hong; Ng, How Yong; Chang, In Seop

    2010-03-15

    An alternative method for determining the charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), easily implemented without a potentiostat, was developed. A dynamic model with two parameters, the charge transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance of electrodes, was derived from a linear differential equation to depict the current generation with respect to activation overvoltage. This model was then used to fit the transient cell voltage response to the current step change during the continuous operation of a flat-plate type MFC fed with acetate. Variations of the charge transfer resistance and the capacitance value with respect to the MFC design conditions (biocatalyst existence and electrode area) and operating parameters (acetate concentration and buffer strength in the catholyte) were then determined to elucidate the validity of the proposed method. This model was able to describe the dynamic behavior of the MFC during current change in the activation loss region; having an R(2) value of over 0.99 in most tests. Variations of the charge transfer resistance value (thousands of Omega) according to the change of the design factors and operational factors were well-correlated with the corresponding MFC performances. However, though the capacitance values (approximately 0.02 F) reflected the expected trend according to the electrode area change and catalyst property, they did not show significant variation with changes in either the acetate concentration or buffer strength.

  1. Transient early neurotrophin release and delayed inflammatory cytokine release by microglia in response to PAR-2 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Ouyang, Qing; Sun, Ji-Hu; Liu, Fang-Ting; Song, Dian-Wen; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2012-06-25

    Activated microglia exerts both beneficial and deleterious effects on neurons, but the signaling mechanism controlling these distinct responses remain unclear. We demonstrated that treatment of microglial cultures with the PAR-2 agonist, 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, evoked early transient release of BDNF, while sustained PAR-2 stimulation evoked the delayed release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) and nitric oxide. Culture medium harvested during the early phase (at 1 h) of microglial activation induced by 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 (microglial conditioned medium, MCM) had no deleterious effects on cultured neurons, while MCM harvested during the late phase (at 72 h) promoted DNA fragmentation and apoptosis as indicated by TUNEL and annexin/PI staining. Blockade of PAR-1 during the early phase of PAR-2 stimulation enhanced BDNF release (by 11%, small but significant) while a PAR-1 agonist added during the late phase (24 h after 2-Furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 addition) suppressed the release of cytokines and NO. The neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of activated microglial exhibit distinct temporal profiles that are regulated by PAR-1 and PAR-2 stimulation. It may be possible to facilitate neuronal recovery and repair by appropriately timed stimulation and inhibition of microglial PAR-1 and PAR-2 receptors.

  2. Gender differences in response to acute and chronic angiotensin II infusion: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Toering, Tsjitske J; van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Visser, Folkert W; Buikema, Hendrik; Navis, Gerjan; Faas, Marijke M; Lely, A Titia

    2015-01-01

    Women with renal disease progress at a slower rate to end stage renal disease than men. As angiotensin II has both hemodynamic and direct renal effects, we hypothesized that the female protection may result from gender differences in responses to angiotensin II. Therefore, we studied gender differences in response to angiotensin II, during acute (human) and chronic (rats) angiotensin II administration. In young healthy men (n = 18) and women (n = 18) we studied the responses of renal hemodynamics (125I-iothalamate and 131I-Hippuran) and blood pressure to graded angiotensin II infusion (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 ng/kg/min for 1 h). Men had increased responses of diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.01), mean arterial pressure (P = 0.05), and a more pronounced decrease in effective renal plasma flow (P = 0.009) than women. We measured the changes in proteinuria and blood pressure in response to chronic administration (200 ng/kg/min for 3 weeks) of angiotensin II in rats. Male rats had an increased response of proteinuria compared with females (GEE analysis, P = 0.001). Male, but not female, angiotensin II-treated rats had increased numbers of renal interstitial macrophages compared to sham-treated rats (P < 0.001). In conclusion, gender differences are present in the response to acute and chronic infusion of angiotensin II. Difference in angiotensin II sensitivity could play a role in gender differences in progression of renal disease. PMID:26149279

  3. Using prior information to separate the temperature response to greenhouse gas forcing from that of aerosols - Estimating the transient climate response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurer, Andrew; Hegerl, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    The evaluation of the transient climate response (TCR) is of critical importance to policy makers as it can be used to calculate a simple estimate of the expected warming given predicted greenhouse gas emissions. Previous studies using optimal detection techniques have been able to estimate a TCR value from the historic record using simulations from some of the models which took part in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) but have found that others give unconstrained results. At least partly this is due to degeneracy between the greenhouse gas and aerosol signals which makes separation of the temperature response to these forcings problematic. Here we re-visit this important topic by using an adapted optimal detection analysis within a Bayesian framework. We account for observational uncertainty by the use of an ensemble of instrumental observations, and model uncertainty by combining the results from several different models. This framework allows the use of prior information which is found to help separate the response to the different forcings leading to a more constrained estimate of TCR.

  4. On the relation between the Kautsky effect (chlorophyll a fluorescence induction) and Photosystem II: basics and applications of the OJIP fluorescence transient.

    PubMed

    Stirbet, Alexandrina; Govindjee

    2011-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence is a highly sensitive, non-destructive, and reliable tool for measuring, rather quickly, photosynthetic efficiency, particularly of Photosystem II (PSII), the water-plastoquinone oxidoreductase. We briefly review here the connection between the fast (up to 2 s) chlorophyll fluorescence rise and PSII, as well as the empirical use of the fluorescence rise kinetics in understanding photosynthetic reactions, particularly of PSII. When dark-adapted photosynthetic samples are exposed to light, a fluorescence induction is observed, known as the Kautsky effect, after Hans Kautsky, the discoverer of the phenomenon showing the existence of variable fluorescence. The chlorophyll fluorescence intensity rises from a minimum level (the O level), in less than 1 s, to a maximum level (the P-level) via two intermediate steps labeled J and I. This is followed by a decline to a lower semi-steady state level, the S level, which is reached in about one minute. We provide here an educational review on how this phenomenon has been exploited through analysis of the fast OJIP fluorescence transient, by discussing basic assumptions, derivation of equations, as well as application to PSII-related questions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Riboflavin-responsive glutaric aciduria type II with recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen-Chen; Tsai, Kun-Bon; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Chen, Liang-Hui; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2004-09-01

    A 22-year-old woman had suffered from several episodes of acute pancreatitis since the age of 11. Other than exercise intolerance since early childhood, her psychomotor development was normal. At age 21, she experienced two episodes of generalized muscle weakness including acute respiratory failure and hepatomegaly. Liver biopsy indicated fatty metamorphosis, and muscle biopsy revealed vacuolar myopathy with lipid accumulation. Biochemical investigations demonstrated elevated serum creatine kinase and elevated 2-hydroxylglutaric, pyruvic, ethylmalonic, hippuric, adipic, and seburic acids in urinary organic acid analysis. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of glutaric aciduria type II. Although acute pancreatitis in glutaric aciduria type II has been reported previously, this is the first reported case of recurrent pancreatitis occurring in glutaric aciduria type II. We treated the patient with l-carnitine and riboflavin. As of the latest follow-up 2.5 years later, the patient has had no further episodes of muscle weakness or pancreatitis. We suggested analyzing urine organic acid when lipid storage myopathy is suspected.

  6. Transient Fluvial Response to Alpine Deglaciation, Mount Rainier, WA: Geomorphic Process Domains and Proglacial Flux Controls on Channel Evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyeler, J. D.; Montgomery, D.; Kennard, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Downwasting of all glaciers on the flanks of Mount Rainier, WA, in recent decades has debuttressed Little Ice Age glaciogenic sediments driving proglacial responses to regionally warming climate. Rivers draining the deglaciating edifice are responding to paraglacial sedimentation processes through transient storage of retreat-liberated sediments in aggrading (e.g., >5m) fluvial networks with widening channel corridors (i.e., 50-150%) post-LIA (ca., 1880-1910 locally). We hypothesize that the downstream transmission of proglacial fluxes (i.e., sediment and water) through deglaciating alpine terrain is a two-step geomorphic process. The ice-proximal portion of the proglacial system is dominated by the delivery of high sediment-to-water ratio flows (i.e., hyperconcentrated and debris slurries) and sediment retention by in-channel accumulation (e.g., confined debris fans within channel margins of valley segments) exacerbated by recruitment and accumulation of large wood (e.g., late seral stage conifers), whereas ice-distal fluvial reworking of transient sediment accumulations generates downstream aggradation. Historical Carbon River observations show restricted ice-proximal proglacial aggradation until a mainstem avulsion in 2009 initiated incision into sediment accumulations formed in recent decades, which is translating into aggradation farther down the network. Surficial morphology mapped with GPS, exposed subsurface sedimentology, and preliminary dating of buried trees suggest a transitional geomorphic process zone has persisted along the proglacial Carbon River through recent centuries and prior to the ultimate LIA glaciation. Structure-from-motion DEM differencing through the 2016 water year shows discrete zones of proglacial evolution through channel-spanning bed aggradation forced by interactions between large wood and sediment-rich flows that transition to fluvial process dominance as sediment is transported downstream. Long-term DEM differencing suggests

  7. A transient elevated irisin blood concentration in response to prolonged, moderate aerobic exercise in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, R R; Shockett, P; Webb, N D; Shah, U; Castracane, V D

    2014-02-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered, PGC-1α dependent myokine, has recently been shown to increase in circulation in response to sprint exercise. This study examined the effect of prolonged exercise on irisin concentrations in young men (n=7) as well as in young women (n=5) during different stages of the menstrual cycle. Seven young men completed 90 min of treadmill exercise at 60% of VO2max and a resting control trial. Five women completed the same exercise protocol in two different trials: during the early follicular phase and mid-luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Blood samples were collected and analyzed for irisin concentrations immediately before exercise, at 54 and 90 min of exercise, and at 20 min of recovery (R20). Findings revealed that by 54 min of a 90 min treadmill exercise protocol at 60% of VO2max, irisin concentrations significantly increased 20.4% in young men and 20.3% as well as 24.6% in young women during the early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, respectively. However, by 90 min of exercise as well as R20, irisin concentrations were no longer elevated. Stage of the menstrual cycle did not affect responses in young women. Findings indicate that prolonged aerobic exercise produces a transient increase in irisin concentrations during the first hour of exercise for both genders and suggest that this form of moderate exercise may be helpful in improving fat metabolism.

  8. Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part 3: Analysis of global-mean response using simple models

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box energy balance model (EBM) and an oceanic box-diffusion model (BDM) both tuned to the simulated general circulation model response. The land-sea contrast in the surface warming is explained almost entirely by the shortwave radiative feedbacks associated with changes in cloud and surface albedo. The oceanic thermal inertia delays the response; however, the initial delay is enhanced by increases in Anarctic sea-ice cover, which substantially reduce the effective climate sensitivity of the model in the first half of the 75-year experiment. When driven by the observed anthropogenic greenhouse forcing from the pre-industrial period to present day, the energy balance model overestimates the warming observed over land. However, inclusion of the direct forcing due to anthropogenic tropospheric sulphate aerosol eliminates the land/sea contrast in the response at 1990, leaving the simulated warming over land slightly below the observed value, although the rapid warming observed during the 1980s is well reproduced. The vertical penetration of the oceanic response is small below 1000 m. Within the top 1000 m the effective diffusivities are substantially enhanced by reduced convection and thermohaline overturning, driven by increased precipitation minus evaporation at high latitudes. These changes in ocean heat transport become significant after year 30, whereupon the effective oceanic heat capacity increases substantially, although this increase is partially offset by the effect of changes in the sea-ice margin.

  9. Responsabilidad = Responsibility. Level II. Student Book and Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Civic Education, Calabasas, CA.

    This curriculum presents an overview of responsibility as a concept intrinsic to the functioning of a democratic society. The curriculum has been developed to provide students with an increased awareness of the importance of responsibility in their own lives and its place in contemporary society, and to encourage their capacity and inclination to…

  10. Responsabilidad = Responsibility. Level II. Student Book and Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Civic Education, Calabasas, CA.

    This curriculum presents an overview of responsibility as a concept intrinsic to the functioning of a democratic society. The curriculum has been developed to provide students with an increased awareness of the importance of responsibility in their own lives and its place in contemporary society, and to encourage their capacity and inclination to…

  11. Responses of chemical erosion rates to transient perturbations in physical erosion rates, and implications for relationships between chemical and physical erosion rates in regolith-mantled hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Ken L.; West, Nicole

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the relationship between chemical erosion rates (W) and physical erosion rates (E) is of wide interest due to their roles in driving landscape evolution, supplying nutrients to soils and streams, and modulating the global carbon cycle. Measured relationships between W and E vary around the globe, with some regions exhibiting positive correlations between W and E, some negative correlations, and others no correlation within uncertainty. Here we use a numerical model for mineral weathering in well-mixed ridgetop regolith to explore how complex W- E relationships can be generated by simple transient perturbations in E. We show that a Gaussian perturbation in E can produce positive or negative responses in W, and can result in a variety of hysteresis loops - clockwise, counterclockwise, or figure-eight - in plots of W against E. The nature of the transient response depends on the shape of the steady-state W- E relationship, which is set by regolith mineralogy, and the ratio of E to the maximum possible regolith production rate. The response time of W is controlled by the response time of soluble mineral concentrations at low E, where soluble mineral concentrations are low, and by the response time of regolith thickness at high E, where regolith thickness is low. These complex W- E relationships arise in the absence of variations in climate and lithology, which suggests that transients may account for some of the observed differences in W- E relationships among field sites, even among sites that share the same climate and lithology.

  12. Modeling and analysis of thermal-hydraulic response of uranium-aluminum reactor fuel plates under transient heatup conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the analysis performed to predict the thermal behavior of fuel miniplates under rapid transient heatup conditions. The possibility of explosive boiling was considered, and it was concluded that the heating rates are not large enough for explosive boiling to occur. However, transient boiling effects were pronounced. Because of the complexity of transient pool boiling and the unavailability of experimental data for the situations studied, an approximation was made that predicted the data very well within the uncertainties present. If pool boiling from the miniplates had been assumed to be steady during the heating pulse, the experimental data would have been greatly overestimated. This fact demonstrates the importance of considering the transient nature of heat transfer in the analysis of reactivity excursion accidents. An additional contribution of the present work is that it provided data on highly subcooled steady nulceate boiling from the cooling portion of the thermocouple traces.

  13. Modulation of intracellular calcium transient in response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation in the hearts of 4-wk-old rats during simulated weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Zhang, Quan-Yu; Fan, Rong; Li, Juan; Guo, Hai-Tao; Bi, Hui; Wang, Yue-Min; Hu, Yu-Zhen; Zheng, Qi-Jun; Gu, Chun-Hu; Yu, Shi-Qiang; Yi, Ding-Hua; Li, Zhi-Chao; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2010-04-01

    Modulation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) transient in response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation in the hearts of hindlimb unweighted (HLU) rats during simulated weightlessness has not been reported. In the present study, we adopted the rat tail suspension for 4 wk to simulate weightlessness. Effects of simulated microgravity on beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness were then studied. Mean arterial blood pressure, left ventricular pressure (LVP), systolic function [maximum positive change in pressure over time (+dP/dt(max))], and diastolic function [maximum negative change in pressure over time (-dP/dt(max))] were monitored during the in vivo experiment. beta-Adrenoceptor density was quantitated by radioactive ligand binding. Single rat ventricular myocyte was obtained by enzymatic dissociation method. +/-dP/dt(max), myocyte contraction, intracellular [Ca(2+)](i) transient, and L-type calcium current in response to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation with isoproterenol were measured. Compared with the control group, no significant changes were found in heart weight, body weight, and mean arterial blood pressure, whereas LVP and +/-dP/dt(max) were significantly reduced. LVP and +/-dP/dt(max) were significantly attenuated in the HLU group in response to isoproterenol administration. In the in vitro study, the beta-adrenoceptor density was unchanged. Effects of isoproterenol on electrically induced single-cell contraction and [Ca(2+)](i) transient in myocytes of ventricles in HLU rats were significantly attenuated. The enhanced L-type Ca(2+) current elicited by isoproterenol in cardiomyocytes was significantly decreased in the HLU group. The above results indicate that impaired function of L-type Ca(2+) current and decreased [Ca(2+)](i) transient cause the depressed responsiveness of the beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, which may be partially responsible for the depression of cardiac function.

  14. Investigations of the non-linear transient response of quantum point contacts using pulsed excitation with sub-nanosecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naser, B.; Ferry, D. K.; Heeren, J.; Reno, J. L.; Bird, J. P.

    2007-10-01

    We review recent work where we have investigated the non-linear transient response of quantum point contacts (QPCs) using pulsed excitation with sub-nanosecond time resolution. The transient response of these devices is shown to be dominated by a large parallel capacitance that is independent of the QPC conductance and pulse amplitude. These characteristics lead us to suggest that the capacitance is associated with charging of the two-dimensional reservoirs that source and sink current to the QPC. Our investigations also show that the transient conductance of the QPC must develop very quickly as the voltage pulse is applied, at least on a time scale shorter than the fastest rise time (2 ns) used in the experiments. We also find the existence of a characteristic fixed point in the non-linear conductance, at which its value is bias independent. The fixed point appears to correspond to the situation where the unbiased QPC is almost depopulated and can be accounted for by considering the unidirectional population of QPC subbands by the voltage bias. To discuss the behavior of the transient conductance away from the fixed point, we find that it should be necessary to consider the influence of the applied bias on the QPC profile and electron-phonon scattering.

  15. The vibration of a box-type structure. II - Response to a travelling pressure wave.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popplewell, N.

    1971-01-01

    A finite element method is formulated for determining the transient response of a box-type structure to a traveling, arbitrarily shaped pressure wave. The method is illustrated by considering an example of practical concern - the sonic boom. The acceleration-time histories of a closed box are compared with those obtained experimentally from a simulated boom. Satisfactory agreement is obtained with only four rectangular elements per individual face and a simplified loading of the box.

  16. Dissipative interface waves and the transient response of a three-dimensional sliding interface with Coulomb friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Eric M.

    2005-02-01

    We investigate the linearized response of two elastic half-spaces sliding past one another with constant Coulomb friction to small three-dimensional perturbations. Starting with the assumption that friction always opposes slip velocity, we derive a set of linearized boundary conditions relating perturbations of shear traction to slip velocity. Friction introduces an effective viscosity transverse to the direction of the original sliding, but offers no additional resistance to slip aligned with the original sliding direction. The amplitude of transverse slip depends on a nondimensional parameter η=csτ0/μv0, where τ0 is the initial shear stress, 2v0 is the initial slip velocity, μ is the shear modulus, and cs is the shear wave speed. As η→0, the transverse shear traction becomes negligible, and we find an azimuthally symmetric Rayleigh wave trapped along the interface. As η→∞, the inplane and antiplane wavesystems frictionally couple into an interface wave with a velocity that is directionally dependent, increasing from the Rayleigh speed in the direction of initial sliding up to the shear wave speed in the transverse direction. Except in these frictional limits and the specialization to two-dimensional inplane geometry, the interface waves are dissipative. In addition to forward and backward propagating interface waves, we find that for η>1, a third solution to the dispersion relation appears, corresponding to a damped standing wave mode. For large-amplitude perturbations, the interface becomes isotropically dissipative. The behavior resembles the frictionless response in the extremely strong perturbation limit, except that the waves are damped. We extend the linearized analysis by presenting analytical solutions for the transient response of the medium to both line and point sources on the interface. The resulting self-similar slip pulses consist of the interface waves and head waves, and help explain the transmission of forces across fracture

  17. Drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to ANG II in young and old rats

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2010-01-01

    We investigated water drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to intravenous infusions of ANG II in young (4 mo), middle-aged adult (12 mo), and old (29 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Infusions of ANG II began with arterial blood pressure either at control levels or at reduced levels following injection of the vasodilator minoxidil. Under control conditions, mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to ANG II rose to the same level for all groups, and middle-aged and old rats drank as much or more water in response to ANG II compared with young rats, depending on whether intakes were analyzed using absolute or body weight-adjusted values. When arterial blood pressure first was reduced with minoxidil, MAP in response to ANG II stabilized at significantly lower levels compared with control conditions for all groups. Young rats drank significantly more water under reduced pressure conditions compared with control conditions, while middle-aged and old rats did not. Urine volume in response to ANG II was lower, while water balance was higher, under conditions of reduced pressure compared with control conditions. Baroreflex control of heart rate was substantially reduced in old rats compared with young and middle-aged animals. In summary, young rats appear to be more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of increased arterial blood pressure on water drinking than are older animals. PMID:20739604

  18. Drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to ANG II in young and old rats.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2010-11-01

    We investigated water drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to intravenous infusions of ANG II in young (4 mo), middle-aged adult (12 mo), and old (29 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Infusions of ANG II began with arterial blood pressure either at control levels or at reduced levels following injection of the vasodilator minoxidil. Under control conditions, mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to ANG II rose to the same level for all groups, and middle-aged and old rats drank as much or more water in response to ANG II compared with young rats, depending on whether intakes were analyzed using absolute or body weight-adjusted values. When arterial blood pressure first was reduced with minoxidil, MAP in response to ANG II stabilized at significantly lower levels compared with control conditions for all groups. Young rats drank significantly more water under reduced pressure conditions compared with control conditions, while middle-aged and old rats did not. Urine volume in response to ANG II was lower, while water balance was higher, under conditions of reduced pressure compared with control conditions. Baroreflex control of heart rate was substantially reduced in old rats compared with young and middle-aged animals. In summary, young rats appear to be more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of increased arterial blood pressure on water drinking than are older animals.

  19. Immersion infection of germ-free zebrafish with Listeria monocytogenes induces transient expression of innate immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ying; Fang, Chun; Cheng, Changyong; Wang, Yong; Peng, Jinrong; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish, Denio rerio, can be an alternative to other classic animal models for human infectious diseases to examine the processes of microbial infections and host–pathogen interactions in vivo because of their small body dimension but large clutch size. We established germ-free zebrafish infection models of Listeria monocytogenes through different routes of infection: oral immersion and injection via yolk sac, brain ventricle and blood island. Immersion of zebrafish larva even with 1010 CFU/mL L. monocytogenes EGDe strain in egg water was unable to cause mortality, but GFP-expressing bacteria in the gut lumen can be observed in frozen sections. Several selected maker genes of the innate immune system, including cyp1a, irg1l, il1b, and mmp9, were significantly induced by oral immersion not only with strain EGDe, but also with strain M7 and L. innocua, though to a lesser degree (P < 0.01). Such induction appears to be transient with peak at 48 h post-infection, but returned to basal level at 72 h post-infection. Of the three injection routes, mortality after infection by yolk sac was 80% in early stage of infection. Few eggs can survive and hatch. Injection into zebrafish embryos via brain ventricle or blood island led to progressive lethal infection. L. mocytogenes EGDe showed steady replication in the fish embryos and was far more pathogenic than strain M7, which is consistent with findings in the murine model. We conclude that zebrafish can serve as susceptible and microscopically visible infection models for L. monocytogenes via different routes and can be applied to further studies on the interactions between bacterial virulence factors and host immune responses. PMID:25972853

  20. Transient activation of mucosal effector immune responses by resident intestinal bacteria in normal hosts is regulated by interleukin-10 signalling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cong; Sartor, R Balfour; Huang, Kehe; Tonkonogy, Susan L

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a key regulator of mucosal homeostasis. In the current study we investigated the early events after monoassociating germ-free (GF) wild-type (WT) mice with an Escherichia coli strain that we isolated previously from the caecal contents of a normal mouse housed under specific pathogen-free conditions. Our results show that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secreted by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from both IL-10 deficient mice and WT mice, stimulated ex vivo with E. coli lysate, was dramatically higher at day 4 after monoassociation compared with IFN-γ secreted by cells from GF mice without E. coli colonization. Production of IFN-γ rapidly and progressively declined after colonization of WT but not IL-10-deficient mice. The E. coli lysate-stimulated WT MLN cells also produced IL-10 that peaked at day 4 and subsequently declined, but not as precipitously as IFN-γ. WT cells that express CD4, CD8 and NKp46 produced IFN-γ; WT CD4-positive cells and B cells produced IL-10. Recombinant IL-10 added to E. coli-stimulated MLN cell cultures inhibited IFN-γ secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. MLN cells from WT mice treated in vivo with neutralizing anti-IL-10 receptor antibody produced more IFN-γ compared with MLN cells from isotype control antibody-treated mice. These findings show that a resident E. coli that induces chronic colitis in monoassociated IL-10-deficient mice rapidly but transiently activates the effector immune system in normal hosts, in parallel with induction of protective IL-10 produced by B cells and CD4(+) cells that subsequently suppresses this response to mediate mucosal homeostasis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Luminous Extragalactic Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Jonker, Peter; Athena Explosive Transients Working Group

    2015-09-01

    The ESA Athena X-ray observatory mission will combine exceptionally high throughout with high spectral-energy resolution and will revolutionise many aspects of high-energy astrophysics. Many of the most powerful transient sources, including gamma-ray bursts and tidal disruptions events, are bright X-ray sources. Athena will be designed to have a fast-response capability permitting efficient observations of many transients. We will summarise the proposed capability of the mission and illustrate science programs to study transients ranging from the most distant GRBs to nuclear activity in nearby galaxies.

  2. Response-restriction analysis: II. Alteration of activity preferences.

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Gregory P; Iwata, Brian A; Roscoe, Eileen M; Thompson, Rachel H; Lindberg, Jana S

    2003-01-01

    We used response-restriction (RR) assessments to identify the preferences of 7 individuals with mental retardation for a variety of vocational and leisure activities. We subsequently increased their engagement in nonpreferred activities using several procedures: response restriction per se versus a Premack-type contingency (Study 1), supplemental reinforcement for engagement in target activities (Study 2), and noncontingent pairing of reinforcers with nonpreferred activities (Study 3). Results indicated that preferences are not immutable and can be altered through a variety of relatively benign interventions and that the results of RR assessments may be helpful in determining which types of procedures may be most effective on an individual basis. PMID:12723867

  3. The Forgotten American and the Response of Liberal Arts II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ping, Charles J.

    1970-01-01

    Author suggests specific reforms in liberal learning to make it more meaningful and responsive to the growing numbers of students in higher education and indicates that the alternative will be an insignificant impact of liberal arts and a lessening of the strength they bring to American society. (IR)

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation on the transient vascular thermal response to multi-pulse Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Li, Ruohui; Jia, Hao; Chen, Bin; Wu, Wenjuan; Ying, Zhaoxia

    2017-06-09

    Port wine stains (PWS) are congenital vascular malformations that progressively darken and thicken with age. Laser therapy is currently the most effective way in clinical practice for PWS. A 1,064 nm Nd:YAG laser in the near-infrared band can achieve a deeper treatment depth compared to the current widely adopted pulsed dye laser. However, because of its relatively weak absorption by blood, single-pulse Nd:YAG laser requires high energy density to cause effective vessel damage, but may inflict undesirable burning to surrounding collagen. Multi-pulse laser has great potential in clinical treatment because it needs less energy density for each pulse. This paper presented an experimental and theoretical study of the transient thermal effects of low-energy multi-pulse Nd:YAG laser on blood vessels. In vivo experiments were performed on dorsal skin chamber. By using a high speed camera (up to 2,000 fps), the complete and dynamic thermal response of blood vessels during laser irradiation and between pulse intervals was obtained. In vitro experiment in capillary tubes and Numerical simulations by two-scale heat transfer model were also conducted to further explore the in vivo experimental findings. The complete and dynamic response of blood vessels were obtained, including vessel dilation, thrombus formation, partial vessel constriction, thread-like constriction, cavitation and bubbles, and hemorrhage. Thread-like constriction is the desirable treatment end point, which will only occur after thrombus completely occludes the vessel lumen. Cavitation can cause hemorrhage when thrombus fails to occlude the vessel lumen. In vitro experiment found that vessel constriction was due to the constriction of thrombus induced by laser irradiation. Theoretical investigation revealed that the mechanism for the effective reduction of energy density by multi-pulse Nd:YAG laser was due to enhanced light absorption of the blood with thrombus formation. For multi-pulse treatment, laser

  5. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the physiological response to transient common carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Quartu, Marina; Poddighe, Laura; Melis, Tiziana; Serra, Maria Pina; Boi, Marianna; Lisai, Sara; Carta, Gianfranca; Murru, Elisabetta; Muredda, Laura; Collu, Maria; Banni, Sebastiano

    2017-01-19

    The transient global cerebral hypoperfusion/reperfusion achieved by induction of Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion followed by Reperfusion (BCCAO/R) may trigger a physiological response in an attempt to preserve tissue and function integrity. There are several candidate molecules among which the endocannabinoid system (ECS) and/or peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) may play a role in modulating oxidative stress and inflammation. The aims of the present study are to evaluate whether the ECS, the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and PPAR-alpha are involved during BCCAO/R in rat brain, and to identify possible markers of the ongoing BCCAO/R-induced challenge in plasma. Adult Wistar rats underwent BCCAO/R with 30 min hypoperfusion followed by 60 min reperfusion. The frontal and temporal-occipital cortices and plasma were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) to determine concentrations of endocannabinoids (eCBs) and related molecules behaving as ligands of PPAR-alpha, and of oxidative-stress markers such as lipoperoxides, while Western Blot and immunohistochemistry were used to study protein expression of cannabinoid receptors, COX-2 and PPAR-alpha. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to evaluate statistical differences between groups. The acute BCCAO/R procedure is followed by increased brain tissue levels of the eCBs 2-arachidonoylglycerol and anandamide, palmitoylethanolamide, an avid ligand of PPAR-alpha, lipoperoxides, type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors, and COX-2, and decreased brain tissue concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one of the major targets of lipid peroxidation. In plasma, increased levels of anandamide and lipoperoxides were observed. The BCCAO/R stimulated early molecular changes that can be easily traced in brain tissue and plasma, and that are indicative of the tissue physiological response to the reperfusion-induced oxidative stress and

  6. Concepts for a theoretical and experimental study of lifting rotor random loads and vibrations (identification of lifting rotor system parameters from transient response data), Phase 7-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Prelewicz, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    System identification methods have been applied to rotorcraft to estimate stability derivatives from transient flight control response data. While these applications assumed a linear constant coefficient representation of the rotorcraft, the computer experiments used transient responses in flap-bending and torsion of a rotor blade at high advance ratio which is a rapidly time varying periodic system. It was found that a simple system identification method applying a linear sequential estimator also called least square estimator or equation of motion estimator, is suitable for this periodic system and can be used directly if only the acceleration data are noise polluted. In the case of noise being present also in the state variable data the direct application of the estimator gave poor results.

  7. Recorded seismic response of Pacific Park Plaza. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, F.; Celebi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the second of two companion papers on the recorded seismic response of the Pacific Park Plaza building, in Emeryville, Calif., during the October 17, 1989, Ms = 7.1 (surface-wave magnitude) Loma Prieta earthquake. In this second part, the recorded data are analyzed in more detail by using system-identification techniques. The three-dimensional behavior and the coupled modes of the building are determined, and the effects of soil-structure interaction are investigated. The study shows that the response of the building is nonlinear at the beginning, and becomes linear after 17 sec into the earthquake. The dominant motion of the building follows an elliptical path oriented in the southeast-northwest direction. Some of the modes are complex, with nonproportional damping, and there are phase differences among modal response components. The fundamental mode of the building is a translation in the southeast-northwest direction at 0.4 Hz, with 13% damping. The wing displacements relative to the center core are large, about 50% of the center core displacements, and indicate significant torsion in the center core. The soil-structure interaction is characterized by a vibration at 0.7 Hz. This is believed to be the fundamental frequency of the surrounding soil medium. The rocking motions of the building are negligible.

  8. Transient activation of dopaminergic neurons during development modulates visual responsiveness, locomotion and brain activity in a dopamine ontogeny model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, B; Eyles, D; van Alphen, B; van Swinderen, B

    2013-01-01

    It has been observed that certain developmental environmental risk factors for schizophrenia when modeled in rodents alter the trajectory of dopaminergic development, leading to persistent behavioural changes in adults. This has recently been articulated as the “dopamine ontogeny hypothesis of schizophrenia”. To test one aspect of this hypothesis, namely that transient dopaminergic effects during development modulate attention-like behavior and arousal in adults, we turned to a small-brain model, Drosophila melanogaster. By applying genetic tools allowing transient activation or silencing of dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain, we investigated whether a critical window exists during development when altered dopamine (DA) activity levels could lead to impairments in arousal states in adult animals. We found that increased activity in dopaminergic neurons in later stages of development significantly increased visual responsiveness and locomotion, especially in adult males. This misallocation of visual salience and hyperactivity mimicked the effect of acute methamphetamine feeding to adult flies, suggesting up-regulated DA signaling could result from developmental manipulations. Finally, brain recordings revealed significantly reduced gamma-band activity in adult animals exposed to the transient developmental insult. Together, these data support the idea that transient alterations in DA signaling during development can permanently alter behavior in adults, and that a reductionist model such as Drosophila can be used to investigate potential mechanisms underlying complex cognitive disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:23299394

  9. Modeling and analysis of thermal-hydraulic response of uranium- aluminum reactor fuel plates under transient heatup conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.; Georgevich, V.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Fuketa, T.; Soyama, Kk.; Ishijima, K.; Kodaira, T.

    1995-12-31

    A 3-D model to predict the thermal behavior of ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) fuel miniplates has been developed. Possibility of explosive boiling was considered, and it was concluded that the heating rates (existant in NSRR tests) are not large enough for this to occur. However, transient boiling effects were pronounced. Because of the complexity of transient pool boiling and the unavailability of experimental data for the situations studied, an approximation was made that predicted the data very well within the uncertainties present. If pool boiling from the miniplates had been assumed to be steady during the heating pulse, the experimental data would have been greatly overestimated. This shows the importance of considering the transient nature of heat transfer in analysis of reactivity excursion accidents. An additional contribution of this work is that it provided data on highly subcooled steady nucleate boiling from the cooling portion of the thermocouple traces.

  10. A splice-junction mutation responsible for familial apolipoprotein A-II deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, S S; Takata, K; Peng, R L; Kajiyama, G; Albers, J J

    1990-01-01

    The first case of familial apolipoprotein A-II (apo A-II) deficiency was recently reported from Hiroshima, Japan, and designated apo A-IIHiroshima. The proband had no immunologically detectable apo A-II in her plasma. DNA sequence analysis showed that the proband was homozygous for a G----A transition at position 1 of intron 3 of the apo A-II gene. A sister of the proband, who had an intermediate level of plasma apo AII, was shown to be heterozygous for this base substitution. This splice-junction alteration is most likely responsible for apo A-II deficiency, since it would be expected to completely block splicing of intron 3 from the primary transcript and therefore prevent formation of functional mRNA. This deficiency seems to have little influence either on lipid and lipoprotein profiles or on the occurrence of coronary artery disease. Images Figure 2 PMID:2107739

  11. Modified sprint interval training protocols. Part II. Psychological responses.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Logan K; Islam, Hashim; Dunn, Emily; Eys, Mark; Robertson-Wilson, Jennifer; Hazell, Tom J

    2017-04-01

    Sprint-interval training (SIT) is a viable method to improve health and fitness. However, researchers have questioned the utility of SIT because of its strenuous nature. The current study aimed to determine if manipulating the sprint and recovery duration, while maintaining the 1:8 work to rest ratio, could uncover a more favourable SIT protocol. Nine healthy active males (age, 23.3 ± 3.0 years; body mass index, 22.4 ± 2.2 kg·m(-2); maximal oxygen consumption, 48.9 ± 5.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) participated in 3 experimental running SIT sessions: (i) 30:240 (4 × 30-s efforts, 240-s recovery), (ii) 15:120 (8 × 15-s efforts, 120-s recovery), (iii) 5:40 (24 × 5-s efforts, 40-s recovery), and (iv) a final behavioural choice follow-up session. Affect, intentions, task self-efficacy, enjoyment, and preference were evaluated. Midway through exercise, affect became more positive for 5:40 compared with 30:240 (p < 0.05) and postexercise affect was greater for both 5:40 (p = 0.014) and 15:120 (p = 0.015) compared with 30:240. Participants expressed greater intentions to perform 5:40 3 and 5 times/week compared with 15:120 and 30:240 (p < 0.05). Participants felt more confident in their ability to perform 5:40 (p = 0.001) and 15:120 (p = 0.008) compared with 30:240. The 5:40 session was also rated as more enjoyable than 15:120 (p = 0.025) and 30:240 (p = 0.026). All participants preferred the 5:40 protocol. These data suggest that shorter sprints with more repetitions are perceived as more enjoyable and lead to greater intentions to engage in SIT.

  12. Responsive Persistence Part II. Practices of Postmodern Therapists.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Olga; Dienhart, Anna; Turner, Jean

    2013-10-01

    This article, a companion to Part I of this series of articles, discusses how therapists informed by social constructionist and postmodern ideas enact persistence in their work with families. Transcripts and video-recordings of therapy interaction facilitated by selected major champions for three postmodern (collaborative) therapies: Michael White (narrative therapy), Harlene Anderson (collaborative language systems approach), and Bill O'Hanlon (solution-oriented therapy) were examined for persistence practices. The article offers a range of possible ways in which postmodern therapists may enact their influence in facilitating generative and helpful conversations with families and remain responsive to clients' preferences and understandings. Implications for family therapy practice, training, and supervision are discussed.

  13. Picroside II protects myocardium from ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury through inhibition of the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Zhe; Xie, Mei-Qing; Mo, Dan; Zhao, Xiao-Fang; Yu, Shu-Yi; Liu, Li-Juan; Wu, Cheng; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response is important in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Picroside II, the primary active constituent of Picrorhizae, has been reported to protect the myocardium from I/R-induced injury, however, the exact mechanism underlying these protective effects remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the protective effects of picroside II on I/R-induced myocardial injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 1 h left coronary artery occlusion followed by 3 h reperfusion. Picroside II was administered (10 mg/kg) via the tail vein 30 min prior to left coronary artery occlusion. The results revealed that pretreatment of picroside II could significantly alleviate I/R-induced myocardial injury concomitantly with a decrease in inflammatory factor production. In addition, picroside II was also able to decrease high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) expression, and release and downregulate the expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4. Furthermore, picroside II was able to inhibit nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. The results indicated that the protective effect of picroside II on I/R-induced myocardial injury was associated, at least partly, with inhibition of the inflammatory response by suppressing the HMGB1-RAGE/TLR-2/TLR-4-NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:28105084

  14. Seismic response of transamerica building. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Celebi, M.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the recorded seismic response of the Transamerica Building during the October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is presented. The system identification algorithm used for the analysis is based on the discrete-time linear filtering approach with least-squares approximation, and assumes a multi-input, single-output model for the building. Fifteen modes in the north-south direction, and 18 modes in the east-west direction are identified from the records. The analysis shows that the building's response to the earthquake was dominated by a coupled mode of vibration at 0.28 Hz in the southwest-northeast direction, which is almost parallel to one of the diagonals in the building's square cross section. The reason for this behavior is the symmetry of the building's structural characteristics, as well as the strong polarization of the S-waves of the earthquake. Several higher modes of the building were excited during the strong-motion part of the earthquake. The results also show a significant amount of rocking in the building at a frequency of 2.15 Hz.

  15. Rat Pial Microvascular Responses to Transient Bilateral Common Carotid Artery Occlusion and Reperfusion: Quercetin’s Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, D.; Vagnani, S.; Pignataro, G.; Esposito, E.; Paterni, M.; Colantuoni, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess quercetin’s mechanism of action in rat pial microvessels during transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) and reperfusion. Rat pial microcirculation was visualized using fluorescence microscopy through a closed cranial window. Pial arterioles were classified in five orders of branchings. In ischemic rats, 30 min BCCAO and 60 min reperfusion caused arteriolar diameter decrease, microvascular leakage, leukocyte adhesion in venules, and reduction of capillary perfusion. Quercetin highest dose determined dilation in all arteriolar orders, by 40 ± 4% of baseline in order 2 vessels, and prevented microvascular permeability [0.15 ± 0.02 normalized gray levels (NGL)], leukocyte adhesion, and capillary failure. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition exerted by chelerythrine prior to quercetin attenuated quercetin-induced effects: order 2 arterioles dilated by 19.0 ± 2.4% baseline, while there was an increase in permeability (0.40 ± 0.05 NGL) and leukocyte adhesion with a marked decrease in capillary perfusion. Tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibition by tyrphostin 47 prior to quercetin lessened smaller pial arterioles responses, dilating by 20.7 ± 2.5% of baseline, while leakage increased (0.39 ± 0.04 NGL) sustained by slight leukocyte adhesion and ameliorated capillary perfusion. Inhibition of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME) prior to PKC or TK reduced the quercetin’s effects on pial arteriolar diameter and leakage. eNOS inhibition by L-NAME reduced quercetin effects on pial arteriolar diameter and leakage. Finally, combined inhibition of PKC and TK prior to quercetin abolished quercetin-induced effects, decreasing eNOS expression, while blocking ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels by glibenclamide suppressed arteriolar dilation. In conclusion, the protective effects of quercetin could be due to different mechanisms resulting in NO

  16. Transient expression of βC1 protein differentially regulates host genes related to stress response, chloroplast and mitochondrial functions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses are emerging plant pathogens that infect a wide variety of crops including cotton, cassava, vegetables, ornamental plants and cereals. The geminivirus disease complex consists of monopartite begomoviruses that require betasatellites for the expression of disease symptoms. These complexes are widespread throughout the Old World and cause economically important diseases on several crops. A single protein encoded by betasatellites, termed βC1, is a suppressor of gene silencing, inducer of disease symptoms and is possibly involved in virus movement. Studies of the interaction of βC1 with hosts can provide useful insight into virus-host interactions and aid in the development of novel control strategies. We have used the differential display technique to isolate host genes which are differentially regulated upon transient expression of the βC1 protein of chili leaf curl betasatellite (ChLCB) in Nicotiana tabacum. Results Through differential display analysis, eight genes were isolated from Nicotiana tabacum, at two and four days after infitration with βC1 of ChLCB, expressed under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Cloning and sequence analysis of differentially amplified products suggested that these genes were involved in ATP synthesis, and acted as electron carriers for respiration and photosynthesis processes. These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) play an important role in plant growth and development, cell protection, defence processes, replication mechanisms and detoxification responses. Kegg orthology based annotation system analysis of these DEGs demonstrated that one of the genes, coding for polynucleotide nucleotidyl transferase, is involved in purine and pyrimidine metabolic pathways and is an RNA binding protein which is involved in RNA degradation. Conclusion βC1 differentially regulated genes are mostly involved in chloroplast and mitochondrial functions. βC1 also increases the expression of those

  17. Coupled Aerosol-Chemistry-Climate Twentieth-Century Transient Model Investigation: Trends in Short-Lived Species and Climate Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Dorothy; Bauer, Susanne E.; Del Genio, Anthony; Faluvegi, Greg; McConnell, Joseph R.; Menon, Surabi; Miller, Ronald L.; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Shindell, Drew

    2011-01-01

    The authors simulate transient twentieth-century climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with aerosol and ozone chemistry fully coupled to one another and to climate including a full dynamic ocean. Aerosols include sulfate, black carbon (BC), organic carbon, nitrate, sea salt, and dust. Direct and BC snow-albedo radiative effects are included. Model BC and sulfur trends agree fairly well with records from Greenland and European ice cores and with sulfur deposition in North America; however, the model underestimates the sulfur decline at the end of the century in Greenland. Global BC effects peak early in the century (1940s); afterward the BC effects decrease at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere but continue to increase at lower latitudes. The largest increase in aerosol optical depth occurs in the middle of the century (1940s-80s) when sulfate forcing peaks and causes global dimming. After this, aerosols decrease in eastern North America and northern Eurasia leading to regional positive forcing changes and brightening. These surface forcing changes have the correct trend but are too weak. Over the century, the net aerosol direct effect is -0.41 Watts per square meter, the BC-albedo effect is -0.02 Watts per square meter, and the net ozone forcing is +0.24 Watts per square meter. The model polar stratospheric ozone depletion develops, beginning in the 1970s. Concurrently, the sea salt load and negative radiative flux increase over the oceans around Antarctica. Net warming over the century is modeled fairly well; however, the model fails to capture the dynamics of the observedmidcentury cooling followed by the late century warming.Over the century, 20% of Arctic warming and snow ice cover loss is attributed to the BC albedo effect. However, the decrease in this effect at the end of the century contributes to Arctic cooling. To test the climate responses to sulfate and BC pollution, two experiments were branched from 1970 that removed

  18. Coupled Aerosol-Chemistry-Climate Twentieth-Century Transient Model Investigation: Trends in Short-Lived Species and Climate Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Dorothy; Bauer, Susanne E.; Del Genio, Anthony; Faluvegi, Greg; McConnell, Joseph R.; Menon, Surabi; Miller, Ronald L.; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto; Schmidt, Gavin A.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The authors simulate transient twentieth-century climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with aerosol and ozone chemistry fully coupled to one another and to climate including a full dynamic ocean. Aerosols include sulfate, black carbon (BC), organic carbon, nitrate, sea salt, and dust. Direct and BC snow-albedo radiative effects are included. Model BC and sulfur trends agree fairly well with records from Greenland and European ice cores and with sulfur deposition in North America; however, the model underestimates the sulfur decline at the end of the century in Greenland. Global BC effects peak early in the century (1940s); afterward the BC effects decrease at high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere but continue to increase at lower latitudes. The largest increase in aerosol optical depth occurs in the middle of the century (1940s-80s) when sulfate forcing peaks and causes global dimming. After this, aerosols decrease in eastern North America and northern Eurasia leading to regional positive forcing changes and brightening. These surface forcing changes have the correct trend but are too weak. Over the century, the net aerosol direct effect is -0.41 Watts per square meter, the BC-albedo effect is -0.02 Watts per square meter, and the net ozone forcing is +0.24 Watts per square meter. The model polar stratospheric ozone depletion develops, beginning in the 1970s. Concurrently, the sea salt load and negative radiative flux increase over the oceans around Antarctica. Net warming over the century is modeled fairly well; however, the model fails to capture the dynamics of the observedmidcentury cooling followed by the late century warming.Over the century, 20% of Arctic warming and snow ice cover loss is attributed to the BC albedo effect. However, the decrease in this effect at the end of the century contributes to Arctic cooling. To test the climate responses to sulfate and BC pollution, two experiments were branched from 1970 that removed

  19. Seismic responses of two adjacent buildings. II. Interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet

    1993-01-01

    Presented in this part of the two-part paper is a study of the relations between earthquake motions recorded from two, adjacent, seven-story buildings, from a downhole below the foundation of one of the buildings and from three free-field sites, all within one city block. This unique data set was obtained during the Whittier-Narrows, Calif. earthquake of Oct. 1, 1987, Part I includes background information on the two buildings, the site, and the data set. Building response characteristics of a code-type instrumented building (A) and an extensively instrumented building (B) are also studied. In this part, spectral analysis techniques are used to study the relationships between the motions of the roofs and basements, the downhole and the free-field sites. It is asserted that there is building-soil-building interaction between the two buildings at a frequency of 2.35 Hz. Furthermore, the free-field motions are shown to be influenced by the presence of the buildings.

  20. Potential Biosignatures in Super-Earth Atmospheres II. Photochemical Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, S.; Godolt, M.; Palczynski, K.; Rauer, H.; Stock, J.; von Paris, P.; Lehmann, R.; Selsis, F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Spectral characterization of super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of 1 bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by in an earlier work by Rauer and colleagues. The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex life. An important result of our analysis is a shift in the ozone photochemistry from mainly Chapman production (which dominates in Earth's stratosphere) to smog-dominated ozone production for planets in the habitable zone of cooler (M5–M7)-class dwarf stars. This result is associated with a lower energy flux in the UVB wavelength range from the central star, hence slower planetary atmospheric photolysis of molecular oxygen, which slows the Chapman ozone production. This is important for future atmospheric characterization missions because it provides an indication of different chemical environments that can lead to very different responses of ozone, for example, cosmic rays. Nitrous oxide, a biosignature for simple bacterial life, is favored for low stratospheric UV conditions, that is, on planets orbiting cooler stars. Transport of this species from its surface source to the stratosphere where it is destroyed can also be a key process

  1. Potential biosignatures in super-Earth atmospheres II. Photochemical responses.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, J L; Gebauer, S; Godolt, M; Palczynski, K; Rauer, H; Stock, J; von Paris, P; Lehmann, R; Selsis, F

    2013-05-01

    Spectral characterization of super-Earth atmospheres for planets orbiting in the habitable zone of M dwarf stars is a key focus in exoplanet science. A central challenge is to understand and predict the expected spectral signals of atmospheric biosignatures (species associated with life). Our work applies a global-mean radiative-convective-photochemical column model assuming a planet with an Earth-like biomass and planetary development. We investigated planets with gravities of 1g and 3g and a surface pressure of 1 bar around central stars with spectral classes from M0 to M7. The spectral signals of the calculated planetary scenarios have been presented by in an earlier work by Rauer and colleagues. The main motivation of the present work is to perform a deeper analysis of the chemical processes in the planetary atmospheres. We apply a diagnostic tool, the Pathway Analysis Program, to shed light on the photochemical pathways that form and destroy biosignature species. Ozone is a potential biosignature for complex life. An important result of our analysis is a shift in the ozone photochemistry from mainly Chapman production (which dominates in Earth's stratosphere) to smog-dominated ozone production for planets in the habitable zone of cooler (M5-M7)-class dwarf stars. This result is associated with a lower energy flux in the UVB wavelength range from the central star, hence slower planetary atmospheric photolysis of molecular oxygen, which slows the Chapman ozone production. This is important for future atmospheric characterization missions because it provides an indication of different chemical environments that can lead to very different responses of ozone, for example, cosmic rays. Nitrous oxide, a biosignature for simple bacterial life, is favored for low stratospheric UV conditions, that is, on planets orbiting cooler stars. Transport of this species from its surface source to the stratosphere where it is destroyed can also be a key process. Comparing 1g with

  2. Myosin-II sets the optimal response time scale of chemotactic amoeba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    The response dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton to external chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in numerous cellular functions. One of the key players that governs the dynamics of the actin network is the motor protein myosin-II. Here we investigate the role of myosin-II in the response of the actin system to external stimuli. We used a microfluidic device in combination with a photoactivatable chemoattractant to apply stimuli to individual cells with high temporal resolution. We directly compare the actin dynamics in Dictyostelium discodelium wild type (WT) cells to a knockout mutant that is deficient in myosin-II (MNL). Similar to the WT a small population of MNL cells showed self-sustained oscillations even in absence of external stimuli. The actin response of MNL cells to a short pulse of chemoattractant resembles WT during the first 15 sec but is significantly delayed afterward. The amplitude of the dominant peak in the power spectrum from the response time series of MNL cells to periodic stimuli with varying period showed a clear resonance peak at a forcing period of 36 sec, which is significantly delayed as compared to the resonance at 20 sec found for the WT. This shift indicates an important role of myosin-II in setting the response time scale of motile amoeba. Institute of Physics und Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.

  3. Slower heart rate and oxygen consumption kinetic responses in the on- and off-transient during a discontinuous incremental exercise: effects of aging.

    PubMed

    Simões, Rodrigo P; Bonjorno, José C; Beltrame, Thomas; Catai, Aparecida M; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the kinetic responses of heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO(2)) are an important tool for the evaluation of exercise performance and health status. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aging on the HR and VO(2) kinetics during the rest-exercise transition (on-transient) and the exercise-recovery transition (off-transient), in addition to investigating the influence of exercise intensity (mild and moderate) on these variables. A total of 14 young (23±3 years) and 14 elderly (70±4 years) healthy men performed an incremental exercise testing (ramp protocol) on a cycle-ergometer to determine the maximal power (MP). Discontinuous exercise testing was initiated at 10% of the MP with subsequent increases of 10% until exhaustion. The measurement of HR, ventilatory and metabolic variables and blood lactate were obtained at rest and during the discontinuous exercise. The lactate threshold was determined in each subject and was similar between the groups (30±7% of MP in the young group and 29±5% of MP in the elderly group, p>0.05). The HR and VO(2) kinetics (on- and off-transient) were slower in the elderly group compared to the young group (p<0.05). Additionally, in the young group, the values of HR and VO(2) kinetics were higher in the moderate compared to the mild exercise intensity. We concluded that the elderly group presented with slower HR and VO(2) kinetics in relation to the young group for both on- and off-transients of the dynamic exercise. Moreover, in the young group, the kinetic responses were slower in the moderate intensity in relation to the mild intensity.

  4. LOX-1 dependent overexpression of immunoglobulins in cardiomyocytes in response to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bum-Yong; Hu, Changping; Prayaga, Sastry; Khaidakov, Magomed; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Seung, Ki-Bae; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2009-02-06

    LOX-1, a cell surface lectin-like receptor, is upregulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) and angiotensin II (Ang II), and plays an important role in host defense. The specific C-type lectin domain on LOX-1 is essential for ox-LDL binding and internalization, generation of oxidant species and eliciting immune response. Here, we show that LOX-1 deletion alters genes that relate to immune response. Microarray (and qPCR) analysis of cardiac tissues showed downregulated expression of several immunoglobulins (Igk-V8, Igk-C, Igh-6, Igj, Ighg, Igh, and Igl-V1) in the LOX-1 knockout (KO) mice [p<0.05 vs. the wild-type (WT) mice]. The expression of these immunoglobulins was upregulated several-fold in the LOX-1 KO mice hearts when these mice were infused with Ang II (p<0.05, vs. WT mice). Importantly, cultured mouse HL-1 cardiomyocytes expressed these immunoglobulins, and pretreatment of cardiomyocytes with a specific anti-LOX-1 antibody enhanced the generation of immunoglobulins upon subsequent exposure to Ang II. These observations mirrored the data obtained from WT and LOX-1 KO mice hearts in the resting state and following Ang II infusion. This study provides first set of data on immunoglobulin expression in cardiac tissues of WT and LOX-1 KO mice and in cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, and demonstrates that LOX-1 inactivation leads to upregulation of immunoglobulins in cardiomyocytes upon challenge with Ang II.

  5. HLA class II genes modulate vaccine-induced antibody responses to affect HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Heather A; Tomaras, Georgia D; Geraghty, Daniel E; Apps, Richard; Fong, Youyi; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Rolland, Morgane; Kijak, Gustavo H; Krebs, Shelly J; Nelson, Wyatt; DeCamp, Allan; Shen, Xiaoying; Yates, Nicole L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Ferrari, Guido; McElrath, M Juliana; Montefiori, David C; Bailer, Robert T; Koup, Richard A; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Gilbert, Peter B; Kim, Jerome H; Thomas, Rasmi

    2015-07-15

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, two antibody responses were found to correlate with HIV-1 acquisition. Because human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells are involved in antibody production, we tested whether HLA class II genotypes affected HIV-1-specific antibody levels and HIV-1 acquisition in 760 individuals. Indeed, antibody responses correlated with acquisition only in the presence of single host HLA alleles. Envelope (Env)-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies were associated with increased risk of acquisition specifically in individuals with DQB1*06. IgG antibody responses to Env amino acid positions 120 to 204 were higher and were associated with decreased risk of acquisition and increased vaccine efficacy only in the presence of DPB1*13. Screening IgG responses to overlapping peptides spanning Env 120-204 and viral sequence analysis of infected individuals defined differences in vaccine response that were associated with the presence of DPB1*13 and could be responsible for the protection observed. Overall, the underlying genetic findings indicate that HLA class II modulated the quantity, quality, and efficacy of antibody responses in the RV144 trial.

  6. Synaptotagmins I and II in the developing rat auditory brainstem: Synaptotagmin I is transiently expressed in glutamate-releasing immature inhibitory terminals.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Alan P; Gillespie, Deda C

    2011-08-15

    The lateral superior olive (LSO), a nucleus in the auditory brainstem, computes interaural intensity differences for sound localization by comparing converging excitatory and inhibitory inputs that carry tonotopically matched information from the two ears. Tonotopic refinement in the inhibitory projection pathway from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is known to be established during the first postnatal week in rats. During this period, immature MNTB terminals in the LSO contain vesicular transporters for both inhibitory and excitatory amino acids and release glutamate. The primary Ca(2+) sensors for vesicular release in the CNS are understood to be synaptotagmins, and in adult auditory brainstem synaptotagmin 2 is the predominant synaptotagmin. We asked here whether a different Ca(2+) sensor might be expressed in the immature auditory brainstem. We have found that synaptotagmin 1 is indeed expressed transiently in the immature auditory brainstem, most highly in those areas that receive glutamate-releasing immature inhibitory inputs from the MNTB, and that during the first postnatal week synaptotagmin 1 co-localizes with the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT3, a marker of glutamate-releasing immature inhibitory terminals from the MNTB. We suggest that immature MNTB terminals may contain two populations of synaptic vesicles, one expressing the vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter together with synaptotagmin 2 and another expressing VGLUT3 together with synaptotagmin 1. Because Ca(2+) sensing is an important determinant of release properties for the presynaptic terminal, differential expression of the synaptotagmins might allow the differential release of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in response to differing patterns of neural activity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Transient osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Korompilias, Anastasios V; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Lykissas, Marios G; Beris, Alexandros E

    2008-08-01

    Transient osteoporosis is characterized primarily by bone marrow edema. The disease most commonly affects the hip, knee, and ankle in middle-aged men. Its cause remains unknown. The hallmark that separates transient osteoporosis from other conditions presenting with a bone marrow edema pattern is its self-limited nature. Laboratory tests usually do not contribute to the diagnosis. Plain radiographs may reveal regional osseous demineralization. Magnetic resonance imaging is used primarily for early diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. Early differentiation from more aggressive conditions with long-term sequelae is essential to avoid unnecessary treatment. Clinical entities such as transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis are spontaneously resolving conditions. However, early differential diagnosis and surgical treatment are crucial for the patient with osteonecrosis of the hip or knee.

  9. Rac1 protein signaling is required for DNA damage response stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons.

    PubMed

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-11-09

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons.

  10. Rac1 Protein Signaling Is Required for DNA Damage Response Stimulated by Topoisomerase II Poisons*

    PubMed Central

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C.; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons. PMID:23012366

  11. A Bayesian design for phase II clinical trials with delayed responses based on multiple imputation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chunyan; Liu, Suyu; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Interimmonitoring is routinely conducted in phase II clinical trials to terminate the trial early if the experimental treatment is futile. Interim monitoring requires that patients’ responses be ascertained shortly after the initiation of treatment so that the outcomes are known by the time the interim decision must be made. However, in some cases, response outcomes require a long time to be assessed, which causes difficulties for interim monitoring. To address this issue, we propose a Bayesian trial design to allow for continuously monitoring phase II clinical trials in the presence of delayed responses. We treat the delayed responses as missing data and handle them using a multiple imputation approach. Extensive simulations show that the proposed design yields desirable operating characteristics under various settings and dramatically reduces the trial duration. PMID:24817556

  12. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  13. Caudal ventrolateral medulla mediates baroreceptor afferent inputs to subfornical organ angiotensin II responsive neurons.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-01-23

    Although anatomical data indicates that the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) projects directly to the subfornical organ (SFO), little is known about the afferent information relayed through the CVLM to SFO. Experiments were done in the anesthetized rat to investigate whether CVLM neurons mediate baroreceptor afferent information to SFO and whether this afferent information alters the response of SFO neurons to systemic injections of angiotensin II (ANG II). Extracellular single unit recordings were made from 78 spontaneously discharging single units in SFO. Of these, 32 (41%) responded to microinjection of L-glutamate (L-Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) into CVLM (27/32 were inhibited and 5/32 were excited). All 32 units also were excited by systemic injections of ANG II (250ng/0.1ml, ia). However, only those units inhibited by CVLM (n=27) were found to be inhibited by the reflex activation of baroreceptors following systemic injections of phenylephrine (2μg/kg, iv). Activation of CVLM or arterial baroreceptors in conjunction with ANG II resulted in an attenuation of the SFO unit's response to ANG II. Finally, microinjections (100nl) of the synaptic blocker CoCl(2) or the non-specific glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid into CVLM attenuated (10/13 units tested) the SFO neuron's response to activation of baroreceptors, but not the unit's response evoked by systemic ANG II. Taken together, these data suggest that baroreceptor afferent information relayed through CVLM functions to modulate of the activity of neurons within SFO to extracellular signals of body fluid balance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Type II Toxoplasma gondii induction of CD40 on infected macrophages enhances interleukin-12 responses.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Pedro; Sudarshana, Dattanand M; Gov, Lanny; Harker, Katherine S; Lam, Tonika; Casali, Paolo; Boyle, Jon P; Lodoen, Melissa B

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that can cause severe neurological disease in infected humans. CD40 is a receptor on macrophages that plays a critical role in controlling T. gondii infection. We examined the regulation of CD40 on the surface of T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMdMs). T. gondii induced CD40 expression both at the transcript level and on the cell surface, and interestingly, the effect was parasite strain specific: CD40 levels were dramatically increased in type II T. gondii-infected BMdMs compared to type I- or type III-infected cells. Type II induction of CD40 was specific to cells harboring intracellular parasites and detectable as early as 6 h postinfection (hpi) at the transcript level. CD40 protein expression peaked at 18 hpi. Using forward genetics with progeny from a type II × type III cross, we found that CD40 induction mapped to a region of chromosome X that included the gene encoding the dense granule protein 15 (GRA15). Using type I parasites stably expressing the type II allele of GRA15 (GRA15II), we found that type I GRA15II parasites induced the expression of CD40 on infected cells in an NF-κB-dependent manner. In addition, stable expression of hemagglutinin-tagged GRA15II in THP-1 cells resulted in CD40 upregulation in the absence of infection. Since CD40 signaling contributes to interleukin-12 (IL-12) production, we examined IL-12 from infected macrophages and found that CD40L engagement of CD40 amplified the IL-12 response in type II-infected cells. These data indicate that GRA15II induction of CD40 promotes parasite immunity through the production of IL-12. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Role of multilayer-like interference effects on the transient optical response of Si3N4 films pumped with free-electron laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casolari, F.; Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Manfredda, M.; Mincigrucci, R.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Kiskinova, M.

    2014-05-01

    X-ray/optical cross-correlation methods are attracting increasing interest for exploring transient states of matter using ultrashort free-electron laser (FEL) pulses. Our paper shows that in such studies the difference in the penetration depth of the FEL-pump and the infrared (IR) probe pulses become important, in particular, when exploring the changes in the optical properties of solid targets. We discuss the role of interference effects, using a phenomenological model with excited and unperturbed slabs. The reliability of this model was experimentally verified by measuring the transient optical response of free-standing and silicon (Si) supported silicon nitride (Si3N4) films, simultaneously in reflection and transmission, using s- and p-polarized IR light. The changes in the Si3N4 optical refractive index, induced by the FEL pulses, have fully been described in the frame of the proposed model. The experimental results confirm that the differences, observed in the FEL-induced transient reflectance and transmittance of the Si3N4 targets with different thicknesses, arise from multilayer-like interferometric phenomena.

  16. The Coordination of C4 Photosynthesis and the CO2-Concentrating Mechanism in Maize and Miscanthus × giganteus in Response to Transient Changes in Light Quality1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Ubierna, Nerea; Ma, Jian-Ying; Walker, Berkley J.; Kramer, David M.; Cousins, Asaph B.

    2014-01-01

    Unequal absorption of photons between photosystems I and II, and between bundle-sheath and mesophyll cells, are likely to affect the efficiency of the CO2-concentrating mechanism in C4 plants. Under steady-state conditions, it is expected that the biochemical distribution of energy (ATP and NADPH) and photosynthetic metabolite concentrations will adjust to maintain the efficiency of C4 photosynthesis through the coordination of the C3 (Calvin-Benson-Bassham) and C4 (CO2 pump) cycles. However, under transient conditions, changes in light quality will likely alter the coordination of the C3 and C4 cycles, influencing rates of CO2 assimilation and decreasing the efficiency of the CO2-concentrating mechanism. To test these hypotheses, we measured leaf gas exchange, leaf discrimination, chlorophyll fluorescence, electrochromatic shift, photosynthetic metabolite pools, and chloroplast movement in maize (Zea mays) and Miscanthus × giganteus following transitional changes in light quality. In both species, the rate of net CO2 assimilation responded quickly to changes in light treatments, with lower rates of net CO2 assimilation under blue light compared with red, green, and blue light, red light, and green light. Under steady state, the efficiency of CO2-concentrating mechanisms was similar; however, transient changes affected the coordination of C3 and C4 cycles in M. giganteus but to a lesser extent in maize. The species differences in the ability to coordinate the activities of C3 and C4 cycles appear to be related to differences in the response of cyclic electron flux around photosystem I and potentially chloroplast rearrangement in response to changes in light quality. PMID:24488966

  17. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  18. Catalina/Palomar Optical Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeshalingam, M.; Griffith, C. V.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.

    2008-07-01

    Inspection of a CCD spectrum (range 330-1000 nm), obtained on July 7 UT with the 3-m Shane reflector (+ Kast spectrograph) at Lick Observatory, shows that the transient reported in ATel 1604 has a very blue, featureless continuum. This could be a very young Type II supernova (though at this time no clear hydrogen Balmer features are present), or some kind of Galactic transient. Further observations are encouraged.

  19. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Deficiency Leads to Hypersensitivity of the Pressor Response Against Angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Norikazu; Kanasaki, Keizo; Kanasaki, Megumi; Takeda, Satoru; Koya, Daisuke

    2017-06-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes 2-hydroxyestradiol into 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME); COMT deficiency has shown to be associated with hypertension in men and preeclampsia, the disease associated with hypersensitivity of pressor response against angiote