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Sample records for ii type-1 receptor

  1. The apelin receptor inhibits the angiotensin II type 1 receptor via allosteric trans-inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Siddiquee, K; Hampton, J; McAnally, D; May, LT; Smith, LH

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The apelin receptor (APJ) is often co-expressed with the angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1) and acts as an endogenous counter-regulator. Apelin antagonizes Ang II signalling, but the precise molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Understanding this interaction may lead to new therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Experimental Approach The physical interaction of APJ and AT1 receptors was detected by co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Functional and pharmacological interactions were measured by G-protein-dependent signalling and recruitment of β-arrestin. Allosterism and cooperativity between APJ and AT1 were measured by radioligand binding assays. Key Results Apelin, but not Ang II, induced APJ : AT1 heterodimerization forced AT1 into a low-affinity state, reducing Ang II binding. Likewise, apelin mediated a concentration-dependent depression in the maximal production of inositol phosphate (IP1) and β-arrestin recruitment to AT1 in response to Ang II. The signal depression approached a limit, the magnitude of which was governed by the cooperativity indicative of a negative allosteric interaction. Fitting the data to an operational model of allosterism revealed that apelin-mediated heterodimerization significantly reduces Ang II signalling efficacy. These effects were not observed in the absence of apelin. Conclusions and Implications Apelin-dependent heterodimerization between APJ and AT1 causes negative allosteric regulation of AT1 function. As AT1 is significant in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, these findings suggest that impaired apelin and APJ function may be a common underlying aetiology. Linked Article This article is commented on by Goupil et al., pp. 1101–1103 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12040 PMID:22935142

  2. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Dependent GLP-1 and PYY Secretion in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Rievaj, Juraj; Larraufie, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the key hormone mediator of the renin angiotensin system, which regulates blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. Here we report that in the colonic epithelium, the Ang II type 1 receptor is highly and exclusively expressed in enteroendocrine L cells, which produce the gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Ang II stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 and PYY release from primary cultures of mouse and human colon, which was antagonized by the specific Ang II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan. Ang II raised intracellular calcium levels in L cells in primary cultures, recorded by live-cell imaging of L cells specifically expressing the fluorescent calcium sensor GCaMP3. In Ussing chamber recordings, Ang II reduced short circuit currents in mouse distal colon preparations, which was antagonized by candesartan or a specific neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibitor but insensitive to amiloride. We conclude that Ang II stimulates PYY secretion, in turn inhibiting epithelial anion fluxes, thereby reducing net fluid secretion into the colonic lumen. Our findings highlight an important role of colonic L cells in whole-body fluid homeostasis by controlling water loss through the intestine. PMID:27447725

  3. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Node, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109TM3, Phe182ECL2, Gln257TM6, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108TM3, Ser109TM3, Ala163TM4, Phe182ECL2, Lys199TM5, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. PMID:26121982

  4. Histamine 3 receptor activation reduces the expression of neuronal angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the heart.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H₃) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT₁) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H₃ receptors and AT₁ receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H₃/AT₁ receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H₃ receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT₁ receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT₁ receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-methyl-L-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H₃ receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H₃ receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT₁ receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H₃ receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT₁ receptor expression. Thus, H₃ receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT₁ receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined

  5. Histamine 3 Receptor Activation Reduces the Expression of Neuronal Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki

    2012-01-01

    In severe myocardial ischemia, histamine 3 (H3) receptor activation affords cardioprotection by preventing excessive norepinephrine release and arrhythmias; pivotal to this action is the inhibition of neuronal Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE). Conversely, angiotensin II, formed locally by mast cell-derived renin, stimulates NHE via angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors, facilitating norepinephrine release and arrhythmias. Thus, ischemic dysfunction may depend on a balance between the NHE-modulating effects of H3 receptors and AT1 receptors. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to elucidate the H3/AT1 receptor interaction in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. We found that H3 receptor blockade with clobenpropit increased norepinephrine overflow and arrhythmias in Langendorff-perfused guinea pig hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. This coincided with increased neuronal AT1 receptor expression. NHE inhibition with cariporide prevented both increases in norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression. Moreover, norepinephrine release and AT1 receptor expression were increased by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-methyl-l-arginine and the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. H3 receptor activation in differentiated sympathetic neuron-like PC12 cells permanently transfected with H3 receptor cDNA caused a decrease in protein kinase C activity and AT1 receptor protein abundance. Collectively, our findings suggest that neuronal H3 receptor activation inhibits NHE by diminishing protein kinase C activity. Reduced NHE activity sequentially causes intracellular acidification, increased NO synthesis, and diminished AT1 receptor expression. Thus, H3 receptor-mediated NHE inhibition in ischemia/reperfusion not only opposes the angiotensin II-induced stimulation of NHE in cardiac sympathetic neurons, but also down-regulates AT1 receptor expression. Cardioprotection ultimately results from the combined attenuation of angiotensin II and

  6. Type 1 angiotensin II receptor subtypes in kidney of normal and salt-sensitive hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Bouby, N; Bankir, L; Llorens-Cortes, C

    1996-03-01

    We studied the localization and regulation of the two type 1 angiotensin II receptor subtypes AT(1A) and AT(1B) in different renal zones of the rat kidney by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplification method. The yield of the reaction was quantified with an internal standard that was a 63-bp deleted mutant cRNA of the AT(1A) receptor. In kidneys of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=4), the levels of AT(1A) and AT(1B) receptor mRNAs were highest in the inner stripe of the outer medulla, lowest in the inner medulla, and intermediate in the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla. Results (mean+/-SE) expressed in 10(5) molecules per microgram total RNA were for cortex outer stripe, inner stripe, and inner medulla, respectively, 171 +/- 15, 152 +/- 27, 322 +/- 10, and 73 +/- 3 for AT(1A), and 35 +/- 9, 26 +/- 1, 71 +/- 10, and 53 +/- 11 for AT(1B). In sabra rats sensitive (n=6) or resistant (n=6) to salt-induced hypertension and maintained on a normal salt diet, the percentage and level of each receptor subtype mRNA in cortex and outer stripe were similar in the two strains and comparable to those observed in Sprague-Dawley rats. However, AT(1A) of the inner stripe was significantly decreased in salt-resistant compared with salt-sensitive rats (166 +/- 28 and 318 +/- 58 10(5) molecules per microgram total RNA, respectively). These modifications were organ specific because no difference in the level of the receptor mRNAs was observed in the liver of the two Sabra rat strains, whereas a twofold increase in AT(1A) mRNA level but not in AT(1B) mRNA level was apparent in adrenal and in one renal zone, the inner stripe of the outer medulla, of hypertension-prone Sabra rats.

  7. Angiotensin II type 1a receptor signalling directly contributes to the increased arrhythmogenicity in cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yasuno, Shinji; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Yamada, Chinatsu; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Usami, Satoru; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Ueshima, Kenji; Harada, Masaki; Nishikimi, Toshio; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Angiotensin II has been implicated in the development of various cardiovascular ailments, including cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. The fact that inhibiting its signalling reduced the incidences of both sudden cardiac death and heart failure in several large-scale clinical trials suggests that angiotensin II is involved in increased cardiac arrhythmogenicity during the development of heart failure. However, because angiotensin II also promotes structural remodelling, including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, it has been difficult to assess its direct contribution to cardiac arrhythmogenicity independently of the structural effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We induced cardiac hypertrophy in wild-type (WT) and angiotensin II type 1a receptor knockout (AT1aR-KO) mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). The susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia (VT) assessed in an in vivo electrophysiological study was compared in the two genotypes. The effect of acute pharmacological blockade of AT1R on the incidences of arrhythmias was also assessed. KEY RESULTS As described previously, WT and AT1aR-KO mice with TAC developed cardiac hypertrophy to the same degree, but the incidence of VT was much lower in the latter. Moreover, although TAC induced an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of connexin 43, a critical component of gap junctional channels, and a reduction in ventricular levels of connexin 43 protein in both genotypes, the effect was significantly ameliorated in AT1aR-KO mice. Acute pharmacological blockade of AT1R also reduced the incidence of arrhythmias. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our findings demonstrate that AT1aR-mediated signalling makes a direct contribution to the increase in arrhythmogenicity in hypertrophied hearts independently of structural remodelling. PMID:23937445

  8. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Mediated Electrical Remodeling in Mouse Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeremy; Gao, Junyuan; Cohen, Ira S; Mathias, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    We recently characterized an autocrine renin angiotensin system (RAS) in canine heart. Activation of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors (AT1Rs) induced electrical remodeling, including inhibition of the transient outward potassium current Ito, prolongation of the action potential (AP), increased calcium entry and increased contractility. Electrical properties of the mouse heart are very different from those of dog heart, but if a similar system existed in mouse, it could be uniquely studied through genetic manipulations. To investigate the presence of a RAS in mouse, we measured APs and Ito in isolated myocytes. Application of angiotensin II (A2) for 2 or more hours reduced Ito magnitude, without affecting voltage dependence, and prolonged APs in a dose-dependent manner. Based on dose-inhibition curves, the fast and slow components of Ito (Ito,fast and IK,slow) appeared to be coherently regulated by [A2], with 50% inhibition at an A2 concentration of about 400 nM. This very high K0.5 is inconsistent with systemic A2 effects, but is consistent with an autocrine RAS in mouse heart. Pre-application of the microtubule destabilizing agent colchicine eliminated A2 effects on Ito and AP duration, suggesting these effects depend on intracellular trafficking. Application of the biased agonist SII ([Sar1-Ile4-Ile8]A2), which stimulates receptor internalization without G protein activation, caused Ito reduction and AP prolongation similar to A2-induced changes. These data demonstrate AT1R mediated regulation of Ito in mouse heart. Moreover, all measured properties parallel those measured in dog heart, suggesting an autocrine RAS may be a fundamental feedback system that is present across species. PMID:26430746

  9. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in animal models of vascular, cardiac, metabolic and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Michel, Martin C; Brunner, Hans R; Foster, Carolyn; Huo, Yong

    2016-08-01

    We have reviewed the effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (ARBs) in various animal models of hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiac function, hypertrophy and fibrosis, glucose and lipid metabolism, and renal function and morphology. Those of azilsartan and telmisartan have been included comprehensively whereas those of other ARBs have been included systematically but without intention of completeness. ARBs as a class lower blood pressure in established hypertension and prevent hypertension development in all applicable animal models except those with a markedly suppressed renin-angiotensin system; blood pressure lowering even persists for a considerable time after discontinuation of treatment. This translates into a reduced mortality, particularly in models exhibiting marked hypertension. The retrieved data on vascular, cardiac and renal function and morphology as well as on glucose and lipid metabolism are discussed to address three main questions: 1. Can ARB effects on blood vessels, heart, kidney and metabolic function be explained by blood pressure lowering alone or are they additionally directly related to blockade of the renin-angiotensin system? 2. Are they shared by other inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system, e.g. angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors? 3. Are some effects specific for one or more compounds within the ARB class? Taken together these data profile ARBs as a drug class with unique properties that have beneficial effects far beyond those on blood pressure reduction and, in some cases distinct from those of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The clinical relevance of angiotensin receptor-independent effects of some ARBs remains to be determined. PMID:27130806

  10. Agonistic antibody to angiotensin II type 1 receptor accelerates atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weijuan; Chen, Yaoqi; Li, Songhai; Guo, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Wenping; Zeng, Qiutang; Liao, Yuhua; Wei, Yumiao

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of agonistic antibody to angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-AA) on atherosclerosis in male ApoE-/- mice which were employed to establish the animal models of AT1-AA in two ways. In the first group, mice were injected subcutaneously with conjugated AT1 peptide at multiple sites; in the second group, mice were infused with AT1-AA prepared from rabbits that were treated with AT1 peptide intraperitoneally. Mice in each group were further randomly divided into five subgroups and treated with AT1 peptide/AT1-AA, AT1 peptide/AT1-AA plus valsartan, AT1 peptide/AT1-AA plus fenofibrate, AT1 peptide/ AT1-AA plus pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and control vehicle, respectively. Antibodies were detected in mice (except for mice in control group). Aortic atherosclerotic lesions were assessed by oil red O staining, while plasma CRP, TNF-α, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and H2O2 were determined by ELISA. CCR2 (the receptor of MCP-1), macrophages, and smooth muscle cells were detected by immunohistochemistry. P47phox, MCP-1 and eNOS were detected by RT-PCR, while P47phox, NF-κB and MCP-1 were detected by Western blot assay. The aortic atherosclerotic lesions were significantly increased in AT1 peptide/AT1-AA treated mice, along with simultaneous increases in inflammatory parameters. However, mice treated with valsartan, fenofibrate or PDTC showed alleviated progression of atherosclerosis and reductions in inflammatory parameters. Thus, AT1-AA may accelerate aortic atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice, which is mediated, at least in part, by the inflammatory reaction involving nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, reactive oxygen species, and NF-κB. In addition, valsartan, fenofibrate and PDTC may inhibit the AT1-AA induced atherosclerosis. PMID:25628779

  11. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers as a first choice in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Bae, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Lee, Won Kee; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Chae, Shung Chull

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have not been adequately evaluated in patients without left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or heart failure after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: Between November 2005 and January 2008, 6,781 patients who were not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or ARBs were selected from the Korean AMI Registry. The primary endpoints were 12-month major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death and recurrent AMI. Results: Seventy percent of the patients were Killip class 1 and had a LV ejection fraction ≥ 40%. The prescription rate of ARBs was 12.2%. For each patient, a propensity score, indicating the likelihood of using ARBs during hospitalization or at discharge, was calculated using a non-parsimonious multivariable logistic regression model, and was used to match the patients 1:4, yielding 715 ARB users versus 2,860 ACEI users. The effect of ARBs on in-hospital mortality and 12-month MACE occurrence was assessed using matched logistic and Cox regression models. Compared with ACEIs, ARBs significantly reduced in-hospital mortality(1.3% vs. 3.3%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.379; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.190 to0.756; p = 0.006) and 12-month MACE occurrence (4.6% vs. 6.9%; HR, 0.661; 95% CI, 0.457 to 0.956; p = 0.028). However, the benefit of ARBs on 12-month mortality compared with ACEIs was marginal (4.3% vs. 6.2%; HR, 0.684; 95% CI, 0.467 to 1.002; p = 0.051). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ARBs are not inferior to, and may actually be better than ACEIs in Korean patients with AMI. PMID:26701233

  12. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan suppresses proliferation and fibrosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuyoshi; Fushida, Sachio; Harada, Shinichi; Tsukada, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Jun; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Ninomiya, Itasu; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-12-01

    Gastric cancer with peritoneal dissemination has poor clinical prognosis because of the presence of rich stromal fibrosis and acquired drug resistance. Recently, Angiotensin II type I receptor blockers such as candesartan have attracted attention for their potential anti-fibrotic activity. We examined whether candesartan could attenuate tumor proliferation and fibrosis through the interaction between gastric cancer cell line (MKN45) cells and human peritoneal mesothelial cells. Candesartan significantly reduced TGF-β1 expression and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-like change, while tumor proliferation and stromal fibrosis were impaired. Targeting the Angiotensin II signaling pathway may therefore be an efficient strategy for treatment of tumor proliferation and fibrosis. PMID:25224569

  13. Ontogeny of angiotensin II receptors, types 1 and 2, in ovine mesonephros and metanephros.

    PubMed

    Butkus, A; Albiston, A; Alcorn, D; Giles, M; McCausland, J; Moritz, K; Zhuo, J; Wintour, E M

    1997-09-01

    By RNAse protection assay, hybridization histochemistry, and in vitro autoradiography it was shown that both mRNA and protein for AT1 and AT2 receptors were present in ovine fetal meso- and metanephroi at 40 days of gestation (term approximately 150 days). AT1 mRNA was localized to presumptive mesangial cells of glomeruli at 40-, 75-, 131-gestational-day-old fetuses and two-day-old lambs, in addition to being widely present in interstitial cells of the cortex and medulla, once these zones formed (60 days). By two days after birth the medullary AT1 distribution was confined to the inner stripe of the outer medulla. AT2 mRNA was present in peripheral interstitial/tissue of the mesonephros, and interstitial tissue surrounding developing glomeruli, but not the outermost nephrogenic mesenchyme in the metanephros from 40 to approximately 131 days (the period of active nephrogenesis). In addition, AT2 mRNA was localized to epithelial cells of the macula densa in metanephroi (40 to 131 gestational days) during, but not after completion, of nephrogenesis. These studies suggest that angiotensin II (Ang II) could have differentiating effects, via AT1 receptors, from very early in development. The unique epithelial site of AT2 expression in the macula densa raises the possibility that Ang II may play a role in the invariant positioning of the macula densa at the pole of its glomerulus, via this receptor.

  14. Rational drug design and synthesis of molecules targeting the angiotensin II type 1 and type 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kellici, Tahsin F; Tzakos, Andreas G; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2015-03-02

    The angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 and type 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) orchestrate an array of biological processes that regulate human health. Aberrant function of these receptors triggers pathophysiological responses that can ultimately lead to death. Therefore, it is important to design and synthesize compounds that affect beneficially these two receptors. Cardiovascular disease, which is attributed to the overactivation of the vasoactive peptide hormone Αng II, can now be treated with commercial AT1R antagonists. Herein, recent achievements in rational drug design and synthesis of molecules acting on the two AT receptors are reviewed. Quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and molecular modeling on the two receptors aim to assist the search for new active compounds. As AT1R and AT2R are GPCRs and drug action is localized in the transmembrane region the role of membrane bilayers is exploited. The future perspectives in this field are outlined. Tremendous progress in the field is expected if the two receptors are crystallized, as this will assist the structure based screening of the chemical space and lead to new potent therapeutic agents in cardiovascular and other diseases.

  15. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan prevents and rescues cerebrovascular, neuropathological and cognitive deficits in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Ongali, Brice; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Tong, Xin-Kang; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Lecrux, Clotilde; Imboden, Hans; Hamel, Edith

    2014-08-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) receptor blockers that bind selectively AngII type 1 (AT1) receptors may protect from Alzheimer's disease (AD). We studied the ability of the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan to cure or prevent AD hallmarks in aged (~18months at endpoint, 3months treatment) or adult (~12months at endpoint, 10months treatment) human amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. We tested learning and memory with the Morris water maze, and evaluated neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling using [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-PET and laser Doppler flowmetry responses to whisker stimulation. Cerebrovascular reactivity was assessed with on-line videomicroscopy. We measured protein levels of oxidative stress enzymes (superoxide dismutases SOD1, SOD2 and NADPH oxidase subunit p67phox), and quantified soluble and deposited amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), AngII receptors AT1 and AT2, angiotensin IV receptor AT4, and cortical cholinergic innervation. In aged APP mice, losartan did not improve learning but it consolidated memory acquisition and recall, and rescued neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling and cerebrovascular dilatory capacity. Losartan normalized cerebrovascular p67phox and SOD2 protein levels and up-regulated those of SOD1. Losartan attenuated astrogliosis, normalized AT1 and AT4 receptor levels, but failed to rescue the cholinergic deficit and the Aβ pathology. Given preventively, losartan protected cognitive function, cerebrovascular reactivity, and AT4 receptor levels. Like in aged APP mice, these benefits occurred without a decrease in soluble Aβ species or plaque load. We conclude that losartan exerts potent preventive and restorative effects on AD hallmarks, possibly by mitigating AT1-initiated oxidative stress and normalizing memory-related AT4 receptors.

  16. Angiotensin II centrally induces frequent detrusor contractility of the bladder by acting on brain angiotensin II type 1 receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Bunya; Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Higashi, Youichirou; Honda, Masashi; Sejima, Takehiro; Saito, Motoaki; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays an important role in the brain as a neurotransmitter and is involved in psychological stress reactions, for example through activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. We investigated the effects of centrally administered Ang II on the micturition reflex, which is potentially affected by the sympatho-adrenomedullary system, and brain Ang II receptors in urethane-anesthetized (1.0 g/kg, intraperitoneally) male rats. Central administration of Ang II (0.01, 0.02, and 0.07 nmol per rat, intracerebroventricularly, icv) but not vehicle rapidly and dose-dependently decreased the urinary bladder intercontraction interval, without altering the bladder detrusor pressure. Central administration of antagonists of Ang II type 1 but not type 2 receptors inhibited the Ang II-induced shortening of intercontraction intervals. Administration of the highest dose of Ang II (0.07 nmol per rat, icv) but not lower doses (0.01 and 0.02 nmol per rat, icv) elevated the plasma concentration of adrenaline. Bilateral adrenalectomy reduced Ang II-induced elevation in adrenaline, but had no effect on the Ang II-induced shortening of the intercontraction interval. These data suggest that central administration of Ang II increases urinary frequency by acting on brain Ang II type 1 receptors, independent of activation of the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. PMID:26908391

  17. Cleavage of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and nuclear accumulation of the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Cook, Julia L; Mills, Sarah J; Naquin, Ryan T; Alam, Jawed; Re, Richard N

    2007-04-01

    Our published studies show that the distribution of the ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor (AT(1)R), expressed as a enhanced yellow fluorescent fusion (YFP) protein (AT(1)R/EYFP), is altered upon cellular treatment with ANG II or coexpression with intracellular ANG II. AT(1)R accumulates in nuclei of cells only in the presence of ANG II. Several transmembrane receptors are known to accumulate in nuclei, some as holoreceptors and others as cleaved receptor products. The present study was designed to determine whether the AT(1)R is cleaved before nuclear transport. A plasmid encoding a rat AT(1)R labeled at the amino terminus with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and at the carboxy terminus with EYFP was employed. Image analyses of this protein in COS-7 cells, CCF-STTG1 glial cells, and A10 vascular smooth muscle cells show the two fluorescent moieties to be largely spatially colocalized in untreated cells. ANG II treatment, however, leads to a separation of the fluorescent moieties with yellow fluorescence accumulating in more than 30% of cellular nuclei. Immunoblot analyses of extracts and conditioned media from transfected cells indicate that the CFP domain fused to the extracellular amino-terminal AT(1)R domain is cleaved from the membrane and that the YFP domain, together with the intracellular cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R, is also cleaved from the membrane-bound receptor. The carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R is essential for cleavage; cleavage does not occur in protein deleted with respect to this region. Overexpressed native AT(1)R (nonfusion) is also cleaved; the intracellular 6-kDa cytoplasmic domain product accumulates to a significantly higher level with ANG II treatment.

  18. Troglitazone stimulates {beta}-arrestin-dependent cardiomyocyte contractility via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, Douglas G.; Nguyen, Anny D.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2010-06-11

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonists are commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases, and are reported to have several effects on cardiovascular function that may be due to PPAR{gamma}-independent signaling events. Select angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) interact with and modulate PPAR{gamma} activity, thus we hypothesized that a PPAR{gamma} agonist may exert physiologic effects via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor (AT1{sub A}R). In AT1{sub A}R-overexpressing HEK 293 cells, both angiotensin II (Ang II) and the PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone (Trog) enhanced AT1{sub A}R internalization and recruitment of endogenous {beta}-arrestin1/2 ({beta}arr1/2) to the AT1{sub A}R. A fluorescence assay to measure diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation showed that although Ang II induced AT1{sub A}R-G{sub q} protein-mediated DAG accumulation, Trog had no impact on DAG generation. Trog-mediated recruitment of {beta}arr1/2 was selective to AT1{sub A}R as the response was prevented by an ARB- and Trog-mediated {beta}arr1/2 recruitment to {beta}1-adrenergic receptor ({beta}1AR) was not observed. In isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, Trog increased both % and rate of cell shortening to a similar extent as Ang II, effects which were blocked with an ARB. Additionally, these effects were found to be {beta}arr2-dependent, as cardiomyocytes isolated from {beta}arr2-KO mice showed blunted contractile responses to Trog. These findings show for the first time that the PPAR{gamma} agonist Trog acts at the AT1{sub A}R to simultaneously block G{sub q} protein activation and induce the recruitment of {beta}arr1/2, which leads to an increase in cardiomyocyte contractility.

  19. Selectively engaging β-arrestins at the angiotensin II type 1 receptor reduces blood pressure and increases cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; DeWire, Scott M; Yamashita, Dennis; Rominger, David H; Nguyen, Lisa; Schiller, Kevin; Whalen, Erin J; Gowen, Maxine; Lark, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    Biased G protein-coupled receptor ligands engage subsets of the receptor signals normally stimulated by unbiased agonists. However, it is unclear whether ligand bias can elicit differentiated pharmacology in vivo. Here, we describe the discovery of a potent, selective β-arrestin biased ligand of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. TRV120027 (Sar-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-D-Ala-OH) competitively antagonizes angiotensin II-stimulated G protein signaling, but stimulates β-arrestin recruitment and activates several kinase pathways, including p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Src, and endothelial nitric-oxide synthase phosphorylation via β-arrestin coupling. Consistent with β-arrestin efficacy, and unlike unbiased antagonists, TRV120027 increased cardiomyocyte contractility in vitro. In rats, TRV120027 reduced mean arterial pressure, as did the unbiased antagonists losartan and telmisartan. However, unlike the unbiased antagonists, which decreased cardiac performance, TRV120027 increased cardiac performance and preserved cardiac stroke volume. These striking differences in vivo between unbiased and β-arrestin biased ligands validate the use of biased ligands to selectively target specific receptor functions in drug discovery.

  20. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mingming; Zhao, Chengrui; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Li; Liu, Huirong; Ma, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb) based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII). Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients' sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases. PMID:27057554

  1. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hypertension in elderly patients: focus on patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tadevosyan, Artavazd; MacLaughlin, Eric J; Karamyan, Vardan T

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension in the elderly is one of the main risk factors of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Knowledge regarding the mechanisms of hypertension and specific considerations in managing hypertensive elderly through pharmacological intervention(s) is fundamental to improving clinical outcomes. Recent clinical studies in the elderly have provided evidence that angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists can improve clinical outcomes to a similar or, in certain populations, an even greater extent than other classical arterial blood pressure-lowering agents. This newer class of antihypertensive agents presents several benefits, including potential for improved adherence, excellent tolerability profile with minimal first-dose hypotension, and a low incidence of adverse effects. Thus, AT1 receptor antagonists represent an appropriate option for many elderly patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, and/or left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:22915967

  2. Effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in rats with heart failure. Role of kinins and angiotensin II type 2 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y H; Yang, X P; Sharov, V G; Nass, O; Sabbah, H N; Peterson, E; Carretero, O A

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) improve cardiac function and remodeling and prolong survival in patients with heart failure (HF). Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) with an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist (AT1-ant) may have a similar beneficial effect. In addition to inhibition of the RAS, ACEi may also act by inhibiting kinin destruction, whereas AT1-ant may block the RAS at the level of the AT1 receptor and activate the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor. Using a model of HF induced by myocardial infarction (MI) in rats, we studied the role of kinins in the cardioprotective effect of ACEi. We also investigated whether an AT1-ant has a similar effect and whether these effects are partly due to activation of the AT2 receptor. Two months after MI, rats were treated for 2 mo with: (a) vehicle; (b) the ACEi ramipril, with and without the B2 receptor antagonist icatibant (B2-ant); or (c) an AT1-ant with and without an AT2-antagonist (AT2-ant) or B2-ant. Vehicle-treated rats had a significant increase in left ventricular end-diastolic (LVEDV) and end-systolic volume (LVESV) as well as interstitial collagen deposition and cardiomyocyte size, whereas ejection fraction was decreased. Left ventricular remodeling and cardiac function were improved by the ACEi and AT1-ant. The B2-ant blocked most of the cardioprotective effect of the ACEi, whereas the effect of the AT1-ant was blocked by the AT2-ant. The decreases in LVEDV and LVESV caused by the AT1-ant were also partially blocked by the B2-ant. We concluded that (a) in HF both ACEi and AT1-ant have a cardioprotective effect, which could be due to either a direct action on the heart or secondary to altered hemodynamics, or both; and (b) the effect of the ACEi is mediated in part by kinins, whereas that of the AT1-ant is triggered by activation of the AT2 receptor and is also mediated in part by kinins. We speculate that in HF, blockade of AT1 receptors increases both renin and

  3. Brain Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade Improves Dairy Blood Pressure Variability via Sympathoinhibition in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal blood pressure (BP) elevation in early morning is known to cause cardiovascular events. Previous studies have suggested that one of the reasons in abnormal dairy BP variability is sympathoexcitation. We have demonstrated that brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) causes sympathoexcitation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether central AT1R blockade attenuates the excess BP elevation in rest-to-active phase in hypertensive rats or not. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with intracerebroventricular infusion (ICV) of AT1R receptor blocker (ARB), oral administration of hydralazine (HYD), or ICV of vehicle (VEH). Telemetric averaged mean BP (MBP) was measured at early morning (EM), after morning (AM), and night (NT). At EM, MBP was significantly lower in ARB to a greater extent than in HYD compared to VEH, though MBP at AM was the same in ARB and HYD. At NT, MBP was also significantly lower in ARB than in HYD. These results in MBP were compatible to those in sympathoexcitation and suggest that central AT1R blockade attenuates excess BP elevation in early active phase and continuous BP elevation during rest phase independent of depressor response in hypertensive rats. PMID:25918643

  4. Brain Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade Improves Dairy Blood Pressure Variability via Sympathoinhibition in Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal blood pressure (BP) elevation in early morning is known to cause cardiovascular events. Previous studies have suggested that one of the reasons in abnormal dairy BP variability is sympathoexcitation. We have demonstrated that brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) causes sympathoexcitation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether central AT1R blockade attenuates the excess BP elevation in rest-to-active phase in hypertensive rats or not. Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with intracerebroventricular infusion (ICV) of AT1R receptor blocker (ARB), oral administration of hydralazine (HYD), or ICV of vehicle (VEH). Telemetric averaged mean BP (MBP) was measured at early morning (EM), after morning (AM), and night (NT). At EM, MBP was significantly lower in ARB to a greater extent than in HYD compared to VEH, though MBP at AM was the same in ARB and HYD. At NT, MBP was also significantly lower in ARB than in HYD. These results in MBP were compatible to those in sympathoexcitation and suggest that central AT1R blockade attenuates excess BP elevation in early active phase and continuous BP elevation during rest phase independent of depressor response in hypertensive rats.

  5. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 expression is suppressed by angiotensin II via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor in rat cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuya; Li, Ying; Miao, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Nan; Su, Guohai; Cai, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on angiopoietin-like protein 2 (Angptl2) in rat primary cardiomyocytes, and to investigate the potential association between angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and these effects. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from 3-day-old Wistar rats, and were cultured and identified. Subsequently, the expression levels of Angptl2 were detected following incubation with various concentrations of AngII for various durations using western blotting, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence. Finally, under the most appropriate conditions (100 nmol/l AngII, 24 h), the cardiomyocytes were divided into six groups: Normal, AngII, AngII + losartan, normal + losartan, AngII + PD123319 and normal + PD123319 groups, in order to investigate the possible function of AT1R in Angptl2 suppression. Losartan and PD123319 are antagonists of AT1R and angiotensin II type 2 receptor, respectively. The statistical significance of the results was analyzed using Student's t-test or one-way analysis of variance. The results demonstrated that Angptl2 expression was evidently suppressed (P<0.05) following incubation with 100 nmol/l AngII for 24 h. Conversely, the expression levels of Angptl2 were significantly increased in the AngII + losartan group compared with the AngII group (P<0.01). However, no significant difference was detected between the AngII + PD123319, normal + losartan or normal + PD123319 groups and the normal group. The present in vitro study indicated that AngII was able to suppress Angptl2 expression, whereas losartan was able to significantly reverse this decrease by inhibiting AT1R. PMID:27483989

  6. Effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade on kidney ischemia/reperfusion; a gender-related difference

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Fatemeh; Taheri, Pegah; Azimipoor, Mahdis; Ramtin, Sina; Hashemianfar, Mostafa; Momeni- Ashjerdi, Ali; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir; Nasri, Hamid; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury may be related to activity of reninangiotensin system (RAS), which is gender-related. In this study, it was attempted to compare the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade; losartan in I/R injury in male and female rats. Materials and Methods: Male and female Wistar rats were assigned as sham surgery, control I/R groups treated with vehicle, and case I/R groups treated with losartan (30 mg/kg). Vehicle and losartan were given 2 hours before bilateral kidney ischemia induced by clamping renal arteries for 45 minutes followed by 24 hours of renal reperfusion. Results: The I/R injury significantly increased the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr), and kidney tissue damage score in both genders. However, losartan decreased these values in female rats significantly (P < 0.05). This was not observed in male rats. Conclusion: Losartan protects the kidney from I/R injury in female but not in male rats possibly because of gender-related difference of RAS. PMID:27689110

  7. Downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor by all-trans retinoic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, K; Ichiki, T; Funakoshi, Y; Ito, K; Takeshita, A

    2000-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is a biologically active metabolite of vitamin A that plays an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation. Although neointimal formation after balloon injury of rat carotid artery is inhibited by atRA, the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Because the renin-angiotensin system is one of the crucial components of atherosclerosis, we examined the effects of atRA on the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)-R) in vascular smooth muscle cells. atRA (1 micromol/L) decreased the AT(1)-R mRNA level by 50% after 24 hours; AT(1)-R number was also reduced to the same extent after 48 hours. atRA markedly suppressed promoter activity of the AT(1)-R promoter-luciferase construct, but AT(1)-R mRNA stability was not affected. Cycloheximide blocked the atRA-induced decrease in AT(1)-R mRNA expression, suggesting that this process requires de novo protein synthesis. Simultaneous treatment with an agonist (Ro40-6055) specific for retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and an agonist (Ro25-7836) specific for retinoid X receptor (RXR) suppressed the AT(1)-R mRNA expression comparable to that with treatment with atRA, suggesting that the RAR/RXR heterodimer mediates the effect of atRA in AT(1)-R downregulation. These results suggest that atRA suppressed AT(1)-R mRNA transcription through new protein synthesis induced by RAR/RXR-dependent transcription. This study provides novel insight into a role of atRA as an important molecule that regulates AT(1)-R gene expression and provides possible mechanisms for the suppression of neointimal formation by atRA.

  8. The Prognostic Role of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Autoantibody in Non-Gravid Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jinghui; Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Suli; Wu, Ye; Wang, Pengli; Liu, Huirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin II type 1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA) is found in patients with non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia, but the relationship is uncertain. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between AT1-AA and high blood pressure using meta-analysis, and to evaluate the prognosis value of AT1-AA for hypertensive diseases. Literature search from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were conducted using keywords “hypertension” or “pre-eclampsia,” “angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody,” and its aliases from April 1999 to December 2015. Studies evaluating the association between AT1-AA and non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia were included in this analysis. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed based on the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale with some modifications. Two researchers then independently reviewed all included studies and extracted all relevant data. Association between AT1-AA and hypertension was tested with pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Finally, we evaluated whether AT1-AA predicted the prognosis of hypertension by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and sensitivity analysis. Ten studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. AT1-AA showed more significant association with pre-eclampsia than that with non-gravid hypertension (pooled OR 32.84, 95% CI 17.19–62.74; and pooled OR 4.18, 95% CI 2.20–7.98, respectively). Heterogeneity among studies was also detected probably due to different hypertensive subtypes and AT1-AA measuring methods. Area under summary ROC curve (AUC) of pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (sensitivity 0.76; specificity 0.86). Area under the ROC curve of overall hypertensive diseases or non-gravid hypertension was lower than that of pre-eclampsia (0.86 and 0.72, respectively) with lower sensitivities (0.46 and 0.26, respectively). The major limitation of this analysis was the publication bias due to lack of unpublished data

  9. Impaired endocytosis in proximal tubule from subchronic exposure to cadmium involves angiotensin II type 1 and cubilin receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to low cadmium (Cd) levels produces urinary excretion of low molecular weight proteins, which is considered the critical effect of Cd exposure. However, the mechanisms involved in Cd-induced proteinuria are not entirely clear. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the possible role of megalin and cubilin (important endocytic receptors in proximal tubule cells) and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor on Cd-induced microalbuminuria. Methods Four groups of female Wistar rats were studied. Control (CT) group, vehicle-treated rats; LOS group, rats treated with losartan (an AT1 antagonist) from weeks 5 to 8 (10 mg/kg/day by gavage); Cd group, rats subchronically exposed to Cd (3 mg/kg/day by gavage) during 8 weeks, and Cd + LOS group, rats treated with Cd for 8 weeks and LOS from weeks 5–8. Kidney Cd content, glomerular function (evaluated by creatinine clearance and plasma creatinine), kidney injury and tubular function (evaluated by Kim-1 expression, urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and glucose, and microalbuminuria), oxidative stress (measured by lipid peroxidation and NAD(P)H oxidase activity), mRNA levels of megalin, expressions of megalin and cubilin (by confocal microscopy) and AT1 receptor (by Western blot), were measured in the different experimental groups. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis test using GraphPad Prism 5 software (Version 5.00). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Administration of Cd (Cd and Cd + LOS groups) increased renal Cd content. LOS-treatment decreased Cd-induced microalbuminuria without changes in: plasma creatinine, creatinine clearance, urinary NAG and glucose, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of megalin and cubilin, neither protein expression of megalin nor AT1 receptor, in the different experimental groups studied. However, Cd exposure did induce the expression of the tubular injury marker Kim-1 and decreased

  10. Therapeutic Effect of Losartan, an Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Antagonist, on CCl4-Induced Skeletal Muscle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ok-Kyung; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Eun-Joo; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β1 is known to inhibit muscle regeneration after muscle injury. However, it is unknown if high systemic levels of TGF-β can affect the muscle regeneration process. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of a CCl4 intra-peritoneal injection and losartan (an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist) on skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius muscle) injury and regeneration. Male C57BL/6 mice were grouped randomly as follows: control (n = 7), CCl4-treatment group (n = 7), and CCl4 + losartan treatment group (n = 7). After CCl4 treatment for a 16-week period, the animals were sacrificed and analyzed. The expression of dystrophin significantly decreased in the muscle tissues of the control group, as compared with that of the CCl4 + losartan group (p < 0.01). p(phospho)-Smad2/3 expression significantly increased in the muscles of the control group compared to that in the CCl4 + losartan group (p < 0.01). The expressions of Pax7, MyoD, and myogenin increased in skeletal muscles of the CCl4 + losartan group compared to the corresponding levels in the control group (p < 0.01). We hypothesize that systemically elevated TGF-β1 as a result of CCl4-induced liver injury causes skeletal muscle injury, while losartan promotes muscle repair from injury via blockade of TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:26867195

  11. Clinical and Pharmacotherapeutic Relevance of the Double-Chain Domain of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blocker Olmesartan

    PubMed Central

    Kiya, Yoshihiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Fujino, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Saku, Keijiro

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan has two important interactions to evoke inverse agonism (IA). We refer to these interactions as the “double-chain domain (DCD).” Since the clinical pharmacotherapeutic relevance of olmesartan is still unclear, we examined these effects in rats and humans. We analyzed the effects at an advanced stage of renal insufficiency in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats (Study 1). Rats were fed a high-salt diet from age 9 weeks and arbitrarily assigned to three treatment regimens at age 16 to 21 weeks: olmesartan (2 mg/kg/day) with DCD, a compound related to olmesartan without DCD (6 mg/kg/day, R-239470) or placebo. We also compared the depressor effects of olmesartan to those of other ARBs in patients with essential hypertension (Study 2). Thirty essential hypertensive outpatients who had been receiving ARBs other than olmesartan were recruited for this study. Our protocol was approved by the hospital ethics committee and informed consent was obtained from all patients 12 weeks prior to switching from ARBs other than olmesartan to olmesartan. In Study 1, olmesartan induced a more prominent suppression of the ratio of urinary protein excretion to creatinine at age 21 weeks without lowering blood pressure among the three groups. In Study 2, the depressor effect of olmesartan was significantly stronger than those of other ARBs, which do not contain the DCD. These additive effects by olmesartan may be due to DCD. PMID:20374187

  12. High-salt intake induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in rats in response to local angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Isis A; Pereira, Rafael C; Dopona, Ellen P B; Shimizu, Maria H M; Furukawa, Luzia N S; Oliveira, Ivone B; Heimann, Joel C

    2014-10-01

    Many studies have shown that risk factors that are independent of blood pressure (BP) can contribute to the development of cardiac hypertrophy (CH). Among these factors, high-salt (HS) intake was prominent. Although some studies have attempted to elucidate the role of salt in the development of this disease, the mechanisms by which salt acts are not yet fully understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to better understand the mechanisms of CH and interstitial fibrosis (IF) caused by HS intake. Male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups according to diet [normal salt (NS; 1.27% NaCl) or HS (8% NaCl)] and treatment [losartan (LOS) (HS+LOS group), hydralazine (HZ) (HS+HZ group), or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (HS+NAC group)], which was given in the drinking water. Tail-cuff BP, transverse diameter of the cardiomyocyte, IF, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) gene and protein expression, serum aldosterone, cardiac angiotensin II, cardiac thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, and binding of conformation-specific anti-AT1 and anti-angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) antibodies in the 2 ventricles were measured. Based on the left ventricle transverse diameter data, the primary finding was the occurrence of significant BP-independent CH in the HS+HZ group (96% of the HS group) and a partial or total prevention of such hypertrophy via treatment with NAC or LOS (81% and 67% of the HS group, respectively). The significant total or partial prevention of IF using all 3 treatments (HS+HZ, 27%; HS+LOS, 27%; and HS+NAC, 58% of the HS group, respectively), and an increase in the AT1 gene and protein expression and activity in groups that developed CH, confirmed that CH occurred via the AT1 in this experimental model. Thus, this study unveiled some relevant previously unknown mechanisms of CH induced by chronic HS intake in Wistar rats. The link of oxidative stress with CH in our experimental model is very interesting and stimulates further evaluation for its full comprehension.

  13. Functional Interaction between Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 and Chemokine (C-C Motif) Receptor 2 with Implications for Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Robyn S.; See, Heng B.; Johnstone, Elizabeth K. M.; McCall, Elizabeth A.; Williams, James H.; Kelly, Darren J.; Pfleger, Kevin D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding functional interactions between G protein-coupled receptors is of great physiological and pathophysiological importance. Heteromerization provides one important potential mechanism for such interaction between different signalling pathways via macromolecular complex formation. Previous studies suggested a functional interplay between angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) and Chemokine (C-C motif) Receptor 2 (CCR2). However the molecular mechanisms are not understood. We investigated AT1-CCR2 functional interaction in vitro using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer in HEK293 cells and in vivo using subtotal-nephrectomized rats as a well-established model for chronic kidney disease. Our data revealed functional heteromers of these receptors resulting in CCR2-Gαi1 coupling being sensitive to AT1 activation, as well as apparent enhanced β-arrestin2 recruitment with agonist co-stimulation that is synergistically reversed by combined antagonist treatment. Moreover, we present in vivo findings where combined treatment with AT1- and CCR2-selective inhibitors was synergistically beneficial in terms of decreasing proteinuria, reducing podocyte loss and preventing renal injury independent of blood pressure in the subtotal-nephrectomized rat model. Our findings further support a role for G protein-coupled receptor functional heteromerization in pathophysiology and provide insights into previous observations indicating the importance of AT1-CCR2 functional interaction in inflammation, renal and hypertensive disorders. PMID:25807547

  14. Comparison of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in pregnant sheep during late gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Forhead, A. J.; Whybrew, K.; Hughes, P.; Broughton Pipkin, F.; Sutherland, M.; Fowden, A. L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of antagonism of the maternal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) with either an angiotensin II type 1-(AT1) specific receptor blocker (GR138950) or an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (captopril) were compared in chronically-catheterised ewes and their foetuses during late gestation. 2. Daily from 127 +/- 1 days of gestation until parturition at 145 +/- 2 days, each ewe received i.v. either GR138950 (3 mg kg-1; n = 10), captopril (3 mg kg-1; n = 6) or an equivalent volume of vehicle solution (0.9% w/v saline; n = 10). 3. Within 2 h of drug administration, GR138950 abolished the maternal, but not the foetal, pressor responses to angiotensin II (AII; 100-188 ng kg-1, i.v.; P < 0.05), whereas captopril abolished both the maternal and foetal pressor responses to angiotensin I (AI; 400-750 ng kg-1, i.v.; P < 0.05). 4. On the first day of treatment, maternal blood pressure decreased in all GR138950-treated (-21 +/- 4 mmHg; P < 0.05) and captopril-treated (-13 +/- 5 mmHg; P > 0.05) ewes at 2 h after drug administration. Captopril also significantly decreased foetal blood pressure by 5 +/- 1 mmHg (P < 0.05). However, foetal blood pressure in the GR138950-treated animals remained unchanged. Maternal and foetal heart rates were unaffected by any treatment. Uterine blood flow was significantly reduced within 2 h of both GR138950 (-130 +/- 20 ml min-1; P < 0.05) and captopril (-72 +/- 16 ml min-1; P < 0.05) administration. 5. On the first day of treatment, maternal arterial haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and oxygen (O2) content increased at 2 h in all GR138950-treated and captopril-treated ewes. Foetal arterial pH and oxygenation (O2 content, O2 saturation and Pao2) were reduced by a similar extent in both groups of drug-treated ewes. 6. After one week of daily GR138950 administration, maternal blood pressure decreased from a pretreatment value of 96 +/- 5 mmHg on day 1 to 79 +/- 2 mmHg by day 7 (P < 0.05). Captopril treatment had no long-term effect on

  15. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Adebiyi, Adebowale; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca(2+)]i chelator; KN-93, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca(2+)]i-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. PMID:24662198

  16. Proximal tubule NHE3 activity is inhibited by beta-arrestin-biased angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Carneiro de Morais, Carla P; Polidoro, Juliano Z; Ralph, Donna L; Pessoa, Thaissa D; Oliveira-Souza, Maria; Barauna, Valério G; Rebouças, Nancy A; Malnic, Gerhard; McDonough, Alicia A; Girardi, Adriana C C

    2015-10-15

    Physiological concentrations of angiotensin II (ANG II) upregulate the activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) in the renal proximal tubule through activation of the ANG II type I (AT1) receptor/G protein-coupled signaling. This effect is key for maintenance of extracellular fluid volume homeostasis and blood pressure. Recent findings have shown that selective activation of the beta-arrestin-biased AT1 receptor signaling pathway induces diuresis and natriuresis independent of G protein-mediated signaling. This study tested the hypothesis that activation of this AT1 receptor/beta-arrestin signaling inhibits NHE3 activity in proximal tubule. To this end, we determined the effects of the compound TRV120023, which binds to the AT1R, blocks G-protein coupling, and stimulates beta-arrestin signaling on NHE3 function in vivo and in vitro. NHE3 activity was measured in both native proximal tubules, by stationary microperfusion, and in opossum proximal tubule (OKP) cells, by Na(+)-dependent intracellular pH recovery. We found that 10(-7) M TRV120023 remarkably inhibited proximal tubule NHE3 activity both in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, stimulation of NHE3 by ANG II was completely suppressed by TRV120023 both in vivo as well as in vitro. Inhibition of NHE3 activity by TRV120023 was associated with a decrease in NHE3 surface expression in OKP cells and with a redistribution from the body to the base of the microvilli in the rat proximal tubule. These findings indicate that biased signaling of the beta-arrestin pathway through the AT1 receptor inhibits NHE3 activity in the proximal tubule at least in part due to changes in NHE3 subcellular localization. PMID:26246427

  17. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, Adebowale Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  18. miR-802 regulates human angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Sarah E.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Martin, Mickey M.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2010-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II) can regulate intestinal fluid and electrolyte transport and control intestinal wall muscular activity. Ang II is also a proinflammatory mediator that participates in inflammatory responses such as apoptosis, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling; accumulating evidence suggests that this hormone may be involved in gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation and carcinogenesis. Ang II binds to two distinct G protein-coupled receptor subtypes, the AT1R and AT2R, which are widely expressed in the GI system. Together these studies suggest that Ang II-AT1R/-AT2R actions may play an important role in GI tract physiology and pathophysiology. Currently it is not known whether miRNAs can regulate the expression of the human AT1R (hAT1R) in the GI system. PCR and in situ hybridization experiments demonstrated that miR-802 was abundantly expressed in human colon and intestine. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-802 could directly interact with the bioinformatics-predicted target site harbored within the 3′-untranslated region of the hAT1R mRNA. To validate that the levels of miR-802 were physiologically relevant in the GI system, we demonstrated that miR-802 “loss-of-function” experiments resulted in augmented hAT1R levels and enhanced Ang II-induced signaling in a human intestinal epithelial cell line. These results suggest that miR-802 can modulate the expression of the hAT1R in the GI tract and ultimately play a role in regulating the biological efficacy of Ang II in this system. PMID:20558762

  19. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan induces apoptosis and autophagy in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Soeda, Shuhei; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Arima, Naomichi; Kuroki, Ayako; Hirata, Shinya; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Imakyure, Osamu; Tone, Nanako; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Soeda, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term infection with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1), requires new treatments. Drug repositioning, reuse of a drug previously approved for the treatment of another condition to treat ATL, offers the possibility of reduced time and risk. Among clinically available angiotensin II receptor blockers, telmisartan is well known for its unique ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, which plays various roles in lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, telmisartan reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptotic cells via caspase activation in ex vivo peripheral blood monocytes from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) or via caspase-independent cell death in acute-type ATL, which has a poor prognosis. Telmisartan also induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in leukemia cell lines via caspase activation, whereas other angiotensin II receptor blockers did not induce cell death. Interestingly, telmisartan increased the LC3-II-enriched protein fraction, indicating autophagosome accumulation and autophagy. Thus, telmisartan simultaneously caused caspase activation and autophagy. A hypertension medication with antiproliferation effects on primary and leukemia cells is intriguing. Patients with an early diagnosis of ATL are generally monitored until the disease progresses; thus, suppression of progression from AC and indolent ATL to acute ATL is important. Our results suggest that telmisartan is highly effective against primary cells and leukemia cell lines in caspase-dependent and -independent manners, and its clinical use may suppress acute transformation and improve prognosis of patients with this mortal disease. This is the first report demonstrating a cell growth-inhibitory effect of telmisartan in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients. PMID:27419050

  20. Genotoxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products: Involvement of Oxidative Stress and of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schupp, Nicole; Schinzel, Reinhard; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2005-06-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure, cancer incidence is increased. This may be related to an elevated level of genomic damage, which has been demonstrated by micronuclei formation as well as by comet assay analysis. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are markedly elevated in renal failure. In the comet assay, the model AGEs methylglyoxal- and carboxy(methyl)lysine-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced significant DNA damage in colon, kidney, and liver cells. The addition of antioxidants prevented AGE-induced DNA damage, suggesting enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The coincubation with dimethylfumarate (DMF), an inhibitor of NF-κB translocation, reduced the genotoxic effect, thereby underscoring the key role of NF-κB in this process. One of the genes induced by NF-κB is angiotensinogen. The ensuing proteolytic activity yields angiotensin II, which evokes oxidative stress as well as proinflammatory responses. A modulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor 1 antagonist, candesartan, yielded a reduction of the AGE-induced DNA damage, connecting the two signal pathways, RAS and AGE signaling. We were able to identify important participants in AGE-induced DNA damage: ROS, NF-κB, and Ang II, as well as modulators to prevent this DNA damage: antioxidants, DMF, and AT1 antagonists.

  1. Antihypertensive, insulin-sensitising and renoprotective effects of a novel, potent and long-acting angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, azilsartan medoxomil, in rat and dog models.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Keiji; Igata, Hideki; Ojima, Mami; Tsuboi, Ayako; Imanishi, Mitsuaki; Yamaguchi, Fuminari; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kuroita, Takanobu; Kawaguchi, Naohiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Nagaya, Hideaki

    2011-11-01

    The pharmacological profile of a novel angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, azilsartan medoxomil, was compared with that of the potent angiotensin II receptor blocker olmesartan medoxomil. Azilsartan, the active metabolite of azilsartan medoxomil, inhibited the binding of [(125)I]-Sar(1)-I1e(8)-angiotensin II to angiotensin II type 1 receptors. Azilsartan medoxomil inhibited angiotensin II-induced pressor responses in rats, and its inhibitory effects lasted 24h after oral administration. The inhibitory effects of olmesartan medoxomil disappeared within 24h. ID(50) values were 0.12 and 0.55 mg/kg for azilsartan medoxomil and olmesartan medoxomil, respectively. In conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), oral administration of 0.1-1mg/kg azilsartan medoxomil significantly reduced blood pressure at all doses even 24h after dosing. Oral administration of 0.1-3mg/kg olmesartan medoxomil also reduced blood pressure; however, only the two highest doses significantly reduced blood pressure 24h after dosing. ED(25) values were 0.41 and 1.3mg/kg for azilsartan medoxomil and olmesartan medoxomil, respectively. In renal hypertensive dogs, oral administration of 0.1-1mg/kg azilsartan medoxomil reduced blood pressure more potently and persistently than that of 0.3-3mg/kg olmesartan medoxomil. In a 2-week study in SHRs, azilsartan medoxomil showed more stable antihypertensive effects than olmesartan medoxomil and improved the glucose infusion rate, an indicator of insulin sensitivity, more potently (≥ 10 times) than olmesartan medoxomil. Azilsartan medoxomil also exerted more potent antiproteinuric effects than olmesartan medoxomil in Wistar fatty rats. These results suggest that azilsartan medoxomil is a potent angiotensin II receptor blocker that has an attractive pharmacological profile as an antihypertensive agent.

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of angiotensin II receptor types 1 and 2 in the mesenteric artery from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Carmen; Leal, Sandra; Logan, Karen; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Soares, Ana Sofia; Rocha, Eduardo; Gonçalves, Jorge; Fresco, Paula

    2007-08-01

    Angiotensin II plays a crucial role in the control of blood pressure, acting at AT1 or AT2 receptors, and can act as a potent vasoconstrictor of the peripheral vasculature inducing hypertrophy, hyperplasia, or both, in resistance arteries. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the pattern of distribution of angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptors on mesenteric artery sections differs in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) versus their respective controls (Wistar-Kyoto [WKY] rats). Immunohistochemistry using anti-AT1 or anti-AT2 antibodies was performed on perfused-fixed/paraffin-embedded mesenteric arteries from SHR and WKY rats. 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB; activated by hydrogen peroxide) staining revealed distinct AT1 and AT2 labeling of all artery layers (adventitia, media and intima) from WKY rats, whereas in SHR an abundant AT1 labeling was found in both intima and adventitia and a sparser labeling in the media. There was a vast reduction of AT2 labeling throughout all layers. These results suggest a crucial role for AT2 receptors in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  3. Human GRK4γ142V Variant Promotes Angiotensin II Type I Receptor-Mediated Hypertension via Renal Histone Deacetylase Type 1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zeng, Chunyu; Villar, Van Anthony M; Chen, Shi-You; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Wang, Xiaoyan; Asico, Laureano D; Jones, John E; Yang, Yu; Sanada, Hironobu; Felder, Robin A; Eisner, Gilbert M; Weir, Matthew R; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-02-01

    The influence of a single gene on the pathogenesis of essential hypertension may be difficult to ascertain, unless the gene interacts with other genes that are germane to blood pressure regulation. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4 (GRK4) is one such gene. We have reported that the expression of its variant hGRK4γ(142V) in mice results in hypertension because of impaired dopamine D1 receptor. Signaling through dopamine D1 receptor and angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) reciprocally modulates renal sodium excretion and blood pressure. Here, we demonstrate the ability of the hGRK4γ(142V) to increase the expression and activity of the AT1R. We show that hGRK4γ(142V) phosphorylates histone deacetylase type 1 and promotes its nuclear export to the cytoplasm, resulting in increased AT1R expression and greater pressor response to angiotensin II. AT1R blockade and the deletion of the Agtr1a gene normalize the hypertension in hGRK4γ(142V) mice. These findings illustrate the unique role of GRK4 by targeting receptors with opposite physiological activity for the same goal of maintaining blood pressure homeostasis, and thus making the GRK4 a relevant therapeutic target to control blood pressure.

  4. Involvement of Type 1 Angiontensin II Receptor (AT1) in Cardiovascular Changes Induced by Chronic Emotional Stress: Comparison between Homotypic and Heterotypic Stressors.

    PubMed

    Costa-Ferreira, Willian; Vieira, Jonas O; Almeida, Jeferson; Gomes-de-Souza, Lucas; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence has shown an important role of emotional stress in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, studies in animal models have demonstrated that daily exposure to different stressor (heterotypic stressor) evokes more severe changes than those resulting from repeated exposure to the same aversive stimulus (homotypic stressor), possibly due to the habituation process upon repeated exposure to the same stressor. Despite these pieces of evidence, the mechanisms involved in the stress-evoked cardiovascular dysfunction are poorly understood. Therefore, the present study investigated the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) acting on the type 1 Ang II receptor (AT1) in the cardiovascular dysfunctions evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic emotional stresses in rats. For this purpose, we compared the effect of the chronic treatment with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (30 mg/kg/day, p.o.) on the cardiovascular and autonomic changes evoked by the heterotypic stressor chronic variable stress (CVS) and the homotypic stressor repeated restraint stress (RRS). RRS increased the sympathetic tone to the heart and decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity, whereas CVS decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity. Additionally, both stressors impaired the baroreflex function. Alterations in the autonomic activity and the baroreflex impairment were inhibited by losartan treatment. Additionally, CVS reduced the body weight and increased the circulating corticosterone; however, these effects were not affected by losartan. In conclusion, these findings indicate the involvement of angiotensin II/AT1 receptors in the autonomic changes evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic stressors. Moreover, the present results provide evidence that the increase in the circulating corticosterone and body weight reduction evoked by heterotypic stressors are independent of AT1 receptors. PMID:27588004

  5. Involvement of Type 1 Angiontensin II Receptor (AT1) in Cardiovascular Changes Induced by Chronic Emotional Stress: Comparison between Homotypic and Heterotypic Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Ferreira, Willian; Vieira, Jonas O.; Almeida, Jeferson; Gomes-de-Souza, Lucas; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence has shown an important role of emotional stress in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, studies in animal models have demonstrated that daily exposure to different stressor (heterotypic stressor) evokes more severe changes than those resulting from repeated exposure to the same aversive stimulus (homotypic stressor), possibly due to the habituation process upon repeated exposure to the same stressor. Despite these pieces of evidence, the mechanisms involved in the stress-evoked cardiovascular dysfunction are poorly understood. Therefore, the present study investigated the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) acting on the type 1 Ang II receptor (AT1) in the cardiovascular dysfunctions evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic emotional stresses in rats. For this purpose, we compared the effect of the chronic treatment with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (30 mg/kg/day, p.o.) on the cardiovascular and autonomic changes evoked by the heterotypic stressor chronic variable stress (CVS) and the homotypic stressor repeated restraint stress (RRS). RRS increased the sympathetic tone to the heart and decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity, whereas CVS decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity. Additionally, both stressors impaired the baroreflex function. Alterations in the autonomic activity and the baroreflex impairment were inhibited by losartan treatment. Additionally, CVS reduced the body weight and increased the circulating corticosterone; however, these effects were not affected by losartan. In conclusion, these findings indicate the involvement of angiotensin II/AT1 receptors in the autonomic changes evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic stressors. Moreover, the present results provide evidence that the increase in the circulating corticosterone and body weight reduction evoked by heterotypic stressors are independent of AT1 receptors. PMID:27588004

  6. Cardiac Overexpression of Constitutively Active Galpha q Causes Angiotensin II Type1 Receptor Activation, Leading to Progressive Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmias in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Naoko; Kashihara, Toshihide; Shimojo, Hisashi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Nakada, Tsutomu; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Mende, Ulrike; Taira, Eiichi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Sanbe, Atsushi; Hirose, Masamichi

    2014-01-01

    Background Transgenic mice with transient cardiac expression of constitutively active Galpha q (Gαq-TG) exhibt progressive heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias after the initiating stimulus of transfected constitutively active Gαq becomes undetectable. However, the mechanisms are still unknown. We examined the effects of chronic administration of olmesartan on heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia in Gαq-TG mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Olmesartan (1 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was chronically administered to Gαq-TG from 6 to 32 weeks of age, and all experiments were performed in mice at the age of 32 weeks. Chronic olmesartan administration prevented the severe reduction of left ventricular fractional shortening, and inhibited ventricular interstitial fibrosis and ventricular myocyte hypertrophy in Gαq-TG. Electrocardiogram demonstrated that premature ventricular contraction (PVC) was frequently (more than 20 beats/min) observed in 9 of 10 vehicle-treated Gαq-TG but in none of 10 olmesartan-treated Gαq-TG. The collected QT interval and monophasic action potential duration in the left ventricle were significantly shorter in olmesartan-treated Gαq-TG than in vehicle-treated Gαq-TG. CTGF, collagen type 1, ANP, BNP, and β-MHC gene expression was increased and olmesartan significantly decreased the expression of these genes in Gαq-TG mouse ventricles. The expression of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) 3 and 6 channel and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) proteins but not angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor was increased in Gαq-TG ventricles compared with NTG mouse ventricles. Olmesartan significantly decreased TRPC6 and tended to decrease ACE expressions in Gαq-TG. Moreover, it increased AT1 receptor in Gαq-TG. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that angiotensin II type 1 receptor activation plays an important role in the development of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia in Gαq-TG mouse model of heart failure

  7. Impact of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ on angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated insulin sensitivity, vascular inflammation and atherogenesis in hypercholesterolemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Becher, Ulrich M.; Camara, Bakary; Yildirimtürk, Cihan; Aksoy, Adem; Kebschull, Moritz; Werner, Nikos; Nickenig, Georg; Müller, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. A number of studies have reported that AT1R inhibition or genetic AT1R disruption and PPARγ activation inhibit vascular inflammation and improve glucose and lipid metabolism, underscoring a molecular interaction of AT1R and PPARγ. We here analyzed the hypothesis that vasculoprotective anti-inflammatory and metabolic effects of AT1R inhibition are mediated by PPARγ. Material and methods Female ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice were fedwith a high-fat and cholesterol-rich diet and received continuous treatment with the selective PPARγ antagonist GW9662 or vehicle at a rate of 700 ng/kg/min for 4 weeks using subcutaneously implanted osmotic mini-pumps. Additionally, one group of female ApoE–/– mice served as a control group. After treatment for 4 weeks mice were sacrificed and read-outs (plaque development, vascular inflammation and insulinsensitivity) were performed. Results Using AT1R deficient ApoE–/– mice (ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice) we found decreased cholesterol-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis compared to ApoE–/– mice. Inhibition of PPARγ by application of the specific PPARγ antagonist GW9662 significantly abolished the anti-atherogenic effects of AT1R deficiency in ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– mice (plaque area as % of control: ApoE–/–: 39 ±5%; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–: 17 ±7%, p = 0.044 vs. ApoE–/–; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– + GW9662: 31 ±8%, p = 0.047 vs. ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–). Focusing on IL6 as a pro-inflammatory humoral marker we detected significantly increased IL-6 levels in GW9662-treated animals (IL-6 in pg/ml: ApoE–/–: 230 ±16; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–: 117 ±20, p = 0.01 vs. ApoE–/–; ApoE–/–/AT1R–/– + GW9662: 199 ±20, p = 0.01 vs. ApoE–/–/AT1R–/–), while the anti-inflammatory marker IL-10 was significantly

  8. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  9. In vivo imaging of oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice and its normalization by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker

    SciTech Connect

    Sonta, Toshiyo; Inoguchi, Toyoshi . E-mail: toyoshi@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yasukawa, Keiji; Inuo, Mieko; Tsubouchi, Hirotaka; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Utsumi, Hideo; Nawata, Hajime

    2005-05-06

    This study was undertaken to evaluate oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice by electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging technique. Oxidative stress in the kidney was evaluated as organ-specific reducing activity with the signal decay rates of carbamoyl-PROXYL probe using ESR imaging. The signal decay rates were significantly faster in corresponding image pixels of the kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice than in those of controls. This technique further demonstrated that administration of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/kg), completely restored the signal decay rates in the diabetic kidneys to control values. In conclusion, this study provided for the first time the in vivo evidence for increased oxidative stress in the kidneys of diabetic mice and its normalization by ARB as evaluated by ESR imaging. This technique would be useful as a means of further elucidating the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy.

  10. Impaired Vascular Contractility and Aortic Wall Degeneration in Fibulin-4 Deficient Mice: Effect of Angiotensin II Type 1 (AT1) Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Moltzer, Els; te Riet, Luuk; Swagemakers, Sigrid M. A.; van Heijningen, Paula M.; Vermeij, Marcel; van Veghel, Richard; Bouhuizen, Angelique M.; van Esch, Joep H. M.; Lankhorst, Stephanie; Ramnath, Natasja W. M.; de Waard, Monique C.; Duncker, Dirk J.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Rouwet, Ellen V.; Danser, A. H. Jan; Essers, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Medial degeneration is a key feature of aneurysm disease and aortic dissection. In a murine aneurysm model we investigated the structural and functional characteristics of aortic wall degeneration in adult fibulin-4 deficient mice and the potential therapeutic role of the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist losartan in preventing aortic media degeneration. Adult mice with 2-fold (heterozygous Fibulin-4+/R) and 4-fold (homozygous Fibulin-4R/R) reduced expression of fibulin-4 displayed the histological features of cystic media degeneration as found in patients with aneurysm or dissection, including elastin fiber fragmentation, loss of smooth muscle cells, and deposition of ground substance in the extracellular matrix of the aortic media. The aortic contractile capacity, determined by isometric force measurements, was diminished, and was associated with dysregulation of contractile genes as shown by aortic transcriptome analysis. These structural and functional alterations were accompanied by upregulation of TGF-β signaling in aortas from fibulin-4 deficient mice, as identified by genome-scaled network analysis as well as by immunohistochemical staining for phosphorylated Smad2, an intracellular mediator of TGF-β. Tissue levels of Ang II, a regulator of TGF-β signaling, were increased. Prenatal treatment with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, which blunts TGF-β signaling, prevented elastic fiber fragmentation in the aortic media of newborn Fibulin-4R/R mice. Postnatal losartan treatment reduced haemodynamic stress and improved lifespan of homozygous knockdown fibulin-4 animals, but did not affect aortic vessel wall structure. In conclusion, the AT1 receptor blocker losartan can prevent aortic media degeneration in a non-Marfan syndrome aneurysm mouse model. In established aortic aneurysms, losartan does not affect aortic architecture, but does improve survival. These findings may extend the potential therapeutic application of inhibitors of

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade is pivotal for the prevention of blood-brain barrier impairment and cognitive decline in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Min, Li-Juan; Mogi, Masaki; Shudou, Masachika; Jing, Fei; Tsukuda, Kana; Ohshima, Kousei; Iwanami, Jun; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2012-05-01

    We reported previously that an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, telmisartan, improved cognitive decline with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation; however, the detailed mechanisms are unclear. Enhanced blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability with alteration of tight junctions is suggested to be related to diabetes mellitus. Therefore, we examined the possibility that telmisartan could attenuate BBB impairment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation to improve diabetes mellitus-induced cognitive decline. Type 2 diabetic mice KKA(y) exhibited impairment of cognitive function, and telmisartan treatment attenuated this. Cotreatment with GW9662, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ antagonist, interfered with these protective effects of telmisartan against cognitive function. BBB permeability was increased in both the cortex and hippocampus in KKA(y) mice. Administration of telmisartan attenuated this increased BBB permeability. Coadministration of GW9662 reduced this effect of telmisartan. Significant decreases in expression of tight junction proteins and increases in matrix metalloproteinase expression, oxidative stress, and proinflammatory cytokine production were observed in the brain, and treatment with telmisartan restored these changes. Swollen astroglial end-feet in BBB were observed in KKA(y) mice, and this change in BBB ultrastructure was decreased in telmisartan. These effects of telmisartan were weakened by cotreatment with GW9662. In contrast, administration of another angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, was less effective compared with telmisartan in terms of preventing BBB permeability and astroglial end-foot swelling, and coadministration of GW9662 did not affect the effects of losartan. These findings are consistent with the possibility that, in type 2 diabetic mice, angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation by telmisartan

  12. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    PubMed Central

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile. PMID:27239293

  13. The Prognostic Role of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Autoantibody in Non-Gravid Hypertension and Pre-eclampsia: A Meta-analysis and Our Studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jinghui; Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Suli; Wu, Ye; Wang, Pengli; Liu, Huirong

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor autoantibody (AT1-AA) is found in patients with non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia, but the relationship is uncertain.The aim of the present study was to assess the association between AT1-AA and high blood pressure using meta-analysis, and to evaluate the prognosis value of AT1-AA for hypertensive diseases.Literature search from PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases were conducted using keywords "hypertension" or "pre-eclampsia," "angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody," and its aliases from April 1999 to December 2015.Studies evaluating the association between AT1-AA and non-gravid hypertension or pre-eclampsia were included in this analysis. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale with some modifications.Two researchers then independently reviewed all included studies and extracted all relevant data. Association between AT1-AA and hypertension was tested with pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Finally, we evaluated whether AT1-AA predicted the prognosis of hypertension by using a summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and sensitivity analysis.Ten studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. AT1-AA showed more significant association with pre-eclampsia than that with non-gravid hypertension (pooled OR 32.84, 95% CI 17.19-62.74; and pooled OR 4.18, 95% CI 2.20-7.98, respectively). Heterogeneity among studies was also detected probably due to different hypertensive subtypes and AT1-AA measuring methods. Area under summary ROC curve (AUC) of pre-eclampsia was 0.92 (sensitivity 0.76; specificity 0.86). Area under the ROC curve of overall hypertensive diseases or non-gravid hypertension was lower than that of pre-eclampsia (0.86 and 0.72, respectively) with lower sensitivities (0.46 and 0.26, respectively).The major limitation of this analysis was the publication bias due to lack of unpublished data and the language limitation during

  14. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-06-19

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor.

  15. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar1,Ile8]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. PMID:25934394

  16. Beneficial effects of candesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, on beta-cell function and morphology in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiaqing; Iwashita, Noseki; Ikeda, Fuki; Ogihara, Takeshi; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Shimizu, Tomoaki; Uchino, Hiroshi; Hirose, Takahisa; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2006-06-16

    Several epidemiological studies suggested that treatment with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) provided a risk reduction of developing type 2 diabetes. In this study, we investigated whether and how ARB treatment can improve abnormalities of pancreatic islets in diabetes state. We randomized db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes with obesity, at the age of 8 weeks to receive candesartan, an ARB, for 6 weeks. We also studied age-matched db/misty mice as control. Glucose tolerance test revealed that candesartan treatment improved glucose tolerance with the modest increase in serum insulin level in db/db mice. Concurrently, candesartan increased beta-cell mass, increased staining intensity of insulin, and decreased staining intensity of components of NAD(P)H oxidase, p22phox and gp91phox, and those of oxidative stress markers in beta-cells. These changes were accompanied by reduction of mitochondrial volume. Treatment with candesartan also reduced fibrosis in and around the islets and prevented the loss of endothelial cells in islets. Our results showed that candesartan partially prevented deterioration of glucose tolerance by providing protection against progressive beta-cell damage in diabetes. PMID:16650382

  17. Paracrine Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Matrix Stiffness-Induced Cardiac Myofibroblast Differentiation via Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Smad7

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kar Wey; Li, Yuhui; Liu, Fusheng; Bin Gao; Lu, Tian Jian; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Ma, Yufei; Xu, Feng; Huang, Guoyou

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) hold great promise in cardiac fibrosis therapy, due to their potential ability of inhibiting cardiac myofibroblast differentiation (a hallmark of cardiac fibrosis). However, the mechanism involved in their effects remains elusive. To explore this, it is necessary to develop an in vitro cardiac fibrosis model that incorporates pore size and native tissue-mimicking matrix stiffness, which may regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. In the present study, collagen coated polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates were fabricated, in which the pore size was adjusted without altering the matrix stiffness. Stiffness is shown to regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation independently of pore size. Substrate at a stiffness of 30 kPa, which mimics the stiffness of native fibrotic cardiac tissue, was found to induce cardiac myofibroblast differentiation to create in vitro cardiac fibrosis model. Conditioned medium of hMSCs was applied to the model to determine its role and inhibitory mechanism on cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. It was found that hMSCs secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) to inhibit cardiac myofibroblast differentiation via downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and upregulation of Smad7. These findings would aid in establishment of the therapeutic use of hMSCs in cardiac fibrosis therapy in future. PMID:27703175

  18. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Lacrimal Gland, Lung, and Liver Fibrosis in a Murine Model of Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaguchi, Saori; Ogawa, Yoko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Hatou, Shin; Satofuka, Shingo; Nakamura, Shigeru; Imada, Toshihiro; Miyashita, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Satoru; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Ozawa, Yoko; Mori, Takehiko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ishida, Susumu; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), a serious complication following allogeneic HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation), is characterized by systemic fibrosis. The tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in the fibrotic pathogenesis, and an angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) antagonist can attenuate fibrosis. Tissue RAS is present in the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver, and is known to be involved in the fibrotic pathogenesis of the lung and liver. This study aimed to determine whether RAS is involved in fibrotic pathogenesis in the lacrimal gland and to assess the effect of an AT1R antagonist on preventing lacrimal gland, lung, and liver fibrosis in cGVHD model mice. We used the B10.D2→BALB/c (H-2d) MHC-compatible, multiple minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched model, which reflects clinical and pathological symptoms of human cGVHD. First, we examined the localization and expression of RAS components in the lacrimal glands using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Next, we administered an AT1R antagonist (valsartan; 10 mg/kg) or angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) antagonist (PD123319; 10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally into cGVHD model mice and assessed the fibrotic change in the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver. We demonstrated that fibroblasts expressed angiotensin II, AT1R, and AT2R, and that the mRNA expression of angiotensinogen was greater in the lacrimal glands of cGVHD model mice than in controls generated by syngeneic-HSCT. The inhibition experiment revealed that fibrosis of the lacrimal gland, lung, and liver was suppressed in mice treated with the AT1R antagonist, but not the AT2R antagonist. We conclude that RAS is involved in fibrotic pathogenesis in the lacrimal gland and that AT1R antagonist has a therapeutic effect on lacrimal gland, lung, and liver fibrosis in cGVHD model mice. Our findings point to AT1R antagonist as a possible target for therapeutic intervention in c

  19. Angiotensin II type 1a receptors in subfornical organ contribute towards chronic intermittent hypoxia-associated sustained increase in mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashwini; Little, Joel T; Nedungadi, T Prashant; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Sleep apnea is associated with hypertension. The mechanisms contributing to a sustained increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) even during normoxic awake-state remain unknown. Rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia for 7 days, a model of the hypoxemia associated with sleep apnea, exhibit sustained increases in MAP even during the normoxic dark phase. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) hypertension. Since the subfornical organ (SFO) serves as a primary target for the central actions of circulating ANG II, we tested the effects of ANG II type 1a receptor (AT1aR) knockdown in the SFO on the sustained increase in MAP in this CIH model. Adeno-associated virus carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) and small-hairpin RNA against either AT1aR or a scrambled control sequence (SCM) was stereotaxically injected in the SFO of rats. After recovery, MAP, heart rate, respiratory rate, and activity were continuously recorded using radiotelemetry. In the normoxic groups, the recorded variables did not deviate from the baseline values. Both CIH groups exhibited significant increases in MAP during CIH exposures (P < 0.05). During the normoxic dark phase in the CIH groups, only the SCM-injected group exhibited a sustained increase in MAP (P < 0.05). The AT1aR-CIH group showed significant decreases in FosB/ΔFosB staining in the median preoptic nucleus and the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus compared with the SCM-CIH group. Our data indicate that AT1aRs in the SFO are critical for the sustained elevation in MAP and increased FosB/ΔFosB expression in forebrain autonomic nuclei associated with CIH.

  20. Renoprotective effect of renal liver-type fatty acid binding protein and angiotensin II type 1a receptor loss in renal injury caused by RAS activation.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Shibagaki, Yugo; Yasuda, Takashi; Katayama, Kimie; Hoshino, Seiko; Igarashi-Migitaka, Junko; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the renoprotective effect of renal human liver-type fatty acid binding protein (hL-FABP) and angiotensin II (ANG II) type 1A receptor (AT1a) loss in renal injury caused by renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation. We established hL-FABP chromosomal transgenic mice (L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)), crossed the L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+) with AT1a knockdown homo mice (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-)), and generated L-FABP(+/-)AT1a hetero mice (L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-)). After the back-cross of these cubs, L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-) were obtained. To activate the renal RAS, wild-type mice (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)), L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+), L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/-), L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-), L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-), and L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-) were administered high-dose systemic ANG II infusion plus a high-salt diet for 28 days. In the L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+), RAS activation (L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS) caused hypertension and tubulointerstitial damage. In the L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS, tubulointerstitial damage was significantly attenuated compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS. In the AT1a partial knockout (AT1a(+/-)) or complete knockout (AT1a(-/-)) mice, reduction of AT1a expression led to a significantly lower degree of renal injury compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS or L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/+)RAS mice. Renal injury in L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(+/-)RAS mice was significantly attenuated compared with L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(+/-)RAS mice. In both L-FABP(-/-)AT1a(-/-)RAS and L-FABP(+/-)AT1a(-/-)RAS mice, renal damage was rarely found. The degrees of renal hL-FABP expression and urinary hL-FABP levels increased by RAS activation and gradually decreased along with reduction of AT1a expression levels. In conclusion, in this mouse model, renal hL-FABP expression and a decrease in AT1a expression attenuated tubulointerstitial damage due to RAS activation.

  1. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  2. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotypes with left ventricular function and mass in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, M.; Amant, C.; Bauters, C.; Richard, F.; Helbecque, N.; McFadden, E.; Lablanche, J. M.; Bertrand, M.; Amouyel, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the potential association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass in patients with normal coronary arteries. DESIGN: Consecutive sample. SETTING: University hospital. SUBJECTS: 141 consecutive white patients referred for coronary angiography and with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Patients with valvar diseases, cardiomyopathies, or a history of myocardial infarction were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Left ventricular variables were measured for all patients. The ACE and AT1R genotypes were determined with a polymerase chain reaction based protocol using DNA prepared from white blood cells. A general linear model was used to compare data according to the ACE and to the AT1R genotypes. RESULTS: A strong association was observed between left ventricular mass and systemic hypertension (mean (SD) hypertension: 114 (31) g/m2; no hypertension 98 (23) g/m2; P < 0.003). However, no influence of ACE and AT1R polymorphisms on left ventricular mass was found, regardless of systemic hypertension. The subjects homozygous for the AT1R CC mutation had a significantly lower ejection fraction than those with allele A (AC+AA) (mean (SD) 62(12)% and 68(10)%, respectively, P < 0.05). No synergistic interaction of ACE and AT1R gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass was found. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support an association of the ACE and AT1R genotypes on left ventricular hypertrophy in white patients with normal coronary arteries. PMID:9227291

  3. Intracerebroventricular losartan infusion modulates angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in the subfornical organ and drinking behaviour in bile-duct-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Walch, Joseph D; Carreño, Flávia Regina; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes congestive liver failure that initiates haemodynamic changes, including peripheral vasodilatation and generalized oedema. Peripheral vasodilatation is hypothesized to activate compensatory mechanisms, including increased drinking behaviour and neurohumoral activation. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA and protein in the lamina terminalis are associated with BDL-induced hyposmolality in the rat. All rats received either BDL or sham-ligation surgery. The rats were housed in metabolic chambers for measurement of fluid and food intake and urine output. Expression of AT(1)R in the lamina terminalis was assessed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Average baseline water intake increased significantly in BDL rats compared with sham-operated rats, and upregulation of AT(1)R protein and AT(1a)R mRNA were observed in the subfornical organ of BDL rats. Separate groups of BDL and sham-ligated rats were instrumented with minipumps filled with either losartan (2.0 μg μl(-1)) or 0.9% saline for chronic intracerebroventricular or chronic subcutaneous infusion. Chronic intracerebroventricular losartan infusion attenuated the increased drinking behaviour and prevented the increased abundance of AT(1)R protein in the subfornical organ in BDL rats. Chronic subcutaneous infusion did not affect water intake or AT(1)R abundance in the subfornical organ. The data presented here indicate a possible role of increased central AT(1)R expression in the regulation of drinking behaviour during congestive cirrhosis.

  4. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists alleviate muscle pathology in the mouse model for laminin-α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laminin-α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) is a severe muscle-wasting disease for which no curative treatment is available. Antagonists of the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1), including the anti-hypertensive drug losartan, have been shown to block also the profibrotic action of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and thereby ameliorate disease progression in mouse models of Marfan syndrome. Because fibrosis and failure of muscle regeneration are the main reasons for the severe disease course of MDC1A, we tested whether L-158809, an analog derivative of losartan, could ameliorate the dystrophy in dyW/dyW mice, the best-characterized model of MDC1A. Methods L-158809 was given in food to dyW/dyW mice at the age of 3 weeks, and the mice were analyzed at the age of 6 to 7 weeks. We examined the effect of L-158809 on muscle histology and on muscle regeneration after injury as well as the locomotor activity and muscle strength of the mice. Results We found that TGF-β signaling in the muscles of the dyW/dyW mice was strongly increased, and that L-158809 treatment suppressed this signaling. Consequently, L-158809 reduced fibrosis and inflammation in skeletal muscle of dyW/dyW mice, and largely restored muscle regeneration after toxin-induced injury. Mice showed improvement in their locomotor activity and grip strength, and their body weight was significantly increased. Conclusion These data provide evidence that AT1 antagonists ameliorate several hallmarks of MDC1A in dyW/dyW mice, the best-characterized mouse model for this disease. Because AT1 antagonists are well tolerated in humans and widely used in clinical practice, these results suggest that losartan may offer a potential future treatment of patients with MDC1A. PMID:22943509

  5. G protein coupling and second messenger generation are indispensable for metalloprotease-dependent, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor shedding through angiotensin II type-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mifune, Mizuo; Ohtsu, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Hidekatsu; Brailoiu, Eugen; Dun, Nae J; Frank, Gerald D; Inagami, Tadashi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Thomas, Walter G; Eckhart, Andrea D; Dempsey, Peter J; Eguchi, Satoru

    2005-07-15

    A G protein-coupled receptor agonist, angiotensin II (AngII), induces epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) transactivation possibly through metalloprotease-dependent, heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF) shedding. Here, we have investigated signal transduction of this process by using COS7 cells expressing an AngII receptor, AT1. In these cells AngII-induced EGFR transactivation was completely inhibited by pretreatment with a selective HB-EGF inhibitor, or with a metalloprotease inhibitor. We also developed a COS7 cell line permanently expressing a HB-EGF construct tagged with alkaline phosphatase, which enabled us to measure HB-EGF shedding quantitatively. In the COS7 cell line AngII stimulated release of HB-EGF. This effect was mimicked by treatment either with a phospholipase C activator, a Ca2+ ionophore, a metalloprotease activator, or H2O2. Conversely, pretreatment with an intracellular Ca2+ antagonist or an antioxidant blocked AngII-induced HB-EGF shedding. Moreover, infection of an adenovirus encoding an inhibitor of G(q) markedly reduced EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF shedding through AT1. In this regard, AngII-stimulated HB-EGF shedding was abolished in an AT1 mutant that lacks G(q) protein coupling. However, in cells expressing AT1 mutants that retain G(q) protein coupling, AngII is still able to induce HB-EGF shedding. Finally, the AngII-induced EGFR transactivation was attenuated in COS7 cells overexpressing a catalytically inactive mutant of ADAM17. From these data we conclude that AngII stimulates a metalloprotease ADAM17-dependent HB-EGF shedding through AT1/G(q)/phospholipase C-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species production, representing a key mechanism indispensable for EGFR transactivation.

  6. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is associated with angiotensin II type 1 receptor in a rat model of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    FAN, HUI-NING; CHEN, NI-WEI; SHEN, WEI-LIN; ZHAO, XIANG-YUN; ZHANG, JING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the expression levels of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) in a rat model of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis. A total of 56 Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Normal control group, model group, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) group, and DL-propargylglycine (PAG) group. Hepatic fibrosis was induced by CCl4. The rats in the PAG group were intraperitoneally injected with PAG, an inhibitor of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). The rats in the NaHS group were intraperitoneally injected with NaHS. An equal volume of saline solution was intraperitoneally injected into both the control and model groups. All rats were sacrificed at week three or four following treatment. The serum levels of hyaluronidase (HA), laminin protein (LN), procollagen III (PcIII), and collagen IV (cIV) were detected using ELISA. The serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and albumin (ALB) were detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. The liver mRNA expression levels of CSE were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The liver expression levels of AGTR1 and the plasma expression levels of H2S were detected using western blot analyses. The results indicated that the severity of hepatic fibrosis, the serum expression levels of HA, LN, PcIII, cIV, ALT, and AST, the liver expression levels of CSE and AGTR1, and the plasma expression levels of H2S were significantly higher in the PAG group, as compared with the model group (P<0.05). Conversely, the expression levels of ALB were significantly lower in the PAG group, as compared with the model group. In addition, the severity of hepatic fibrosis, the serum expression levels of HA, LN, PcIII, cIV, ALT, and AST, the liver expression levels of CSE and AGTR1, and the plasma expression levels of H2S were significantly lower in the NaHS group, as compared with

  7. COX-1-derived PGE2 and PGE2 type 1 receptors are vital for angiotensin II-induced formation of reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+) influx in the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Sarkar, Pallabi; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Anrather, Josef; Pierce, Joseph P; Moore, Jamie M; Feng, Ji; Zhou, Ping; Milner, Teresa A; Pickel, Virginia M; Iadecola, Costantino; Davisson, Robin L

    2013-11-15

    Regulation of blood pressure by angiotensin II (ANG II) is a process that involves the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium. We have shown that ANG-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) type 1 receptors (EP1R) are required in the subfornical organ (SFO) for ROS-mediated hypertension induced by slow-pressor ANG-II infusion. However, the signaling pathway associated with this process remains unclear. We sought to determine mechanisms underlying the ANG II-induced ROS and calcium influx in mouse SFO cells. Ultrastructural studies showed that cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) codistributes with AT1R in the SFO, indicating spatial proximity. Functional studies using SFO cells revealed that ANG II potentiated PGE2 release, an effect dependent on AT1R, phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and COX-1. Furthermore, both ANG II and PGE2 increased ROS formation. While the increase in ROS initiated by ANG II, but not PGE2, required the activation of the AT1R/PLA2/COX-1 pathway, both ANG II and PGE2 were dependent on EP1R and Nox2 as downstream effectors. Finally, ANG II potentiated voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) currents in SFO neurons via the same signaling pathway required for PGE2 production. Blockade of EP1R and Nox2-derived ROS inhibited ANG II and PGE2-mediated Ca(2+) currents. We propose a mechanism whereby ANG II increases COX-1-derived PGE2 through the AT1R/PLA2 pathway, which promotes ROS production by EP1R/Nox2 signaling in the SFO. ANG II-induced ROS are coupled with Ca(2+) influx in SFO neurons, which may influence SFO-mediated sympathoexcitation. Our findings provide the first evidence of a spatial and functional framework that underlies ANG-II signaling in the SFO and reveal novel targets for antihypertensive therapies.

  8. Angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) regulates expansion, differentiation, and functional capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Filho, João Luiz; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia Sá

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and its receptor AT1 (AT1R), an important effector axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), have been demonstrated to regulate T-cell responses. However, these studies characterized Ang II and AT1R effects using pharmacological tools, which do not target only Ang II/AT1R axis. The specific role of AT1R expressed by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is unknown. Then we immunized transgenic mice expressing a T-cell receptor specific for SIINFEKL epitope (OT-I mice) with sporozoites of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei expressing the cytotoxic epitope SIINFEKL. Early priming events after immunization were not affected but the expansion and contraction of AT1R-deficient (AT1R−/−) OT-I cells was decreased. Moreover, they seemed more activated, express higher levels of CTLA-4, PD-1, LAG-3, and have decreased functional capacity during the effector phase. Memory AT1R−/− OT-I cells exhibited higher IL-7Rα expression, activation, and exhaustion phenotypes but less cytotoxic capacity. Importantly, AT1R−/− OT-I cells show better control of blood parasitemia burden and ameliorate mice survival during lethal disease induced by blood-stage malaria. Our study reveals that AT1R in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells regulates expansion, differentiation, and function during effector and memory phases of the response against Plasmodium, which could apply to different infectious agents. PMID:27782175

  9. Role of Mas receptor antagonist (A779) on pressure diuresis and natriuresis and renal blood flow in the absence of angiotensin II receptors type 1 and 2 in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, A; Oryan, S; Nematbakhsh, M

    2014-10-01

    Sexual differences in blood pressure are associated with angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) and its receptor and enzyme function targeting. Blockade of angiotensin II (AngII) receptors type 1 and 2 (AT1R and AT2R) inhibits some actions of Ang1-7. We described the role of Ang1-7 receptor (MasR) antagonist (A779) on kidney hemodynamics when AT1R and AT2R are blocked with losartan and PD123319. In anaesthetized male and female rats after blockade of both AT1R and AT2R, the renal perfusion pressure (RPP) was controlled in two levels of 80 and 100 mmHg via an adjustable clamp placed around the aorta above the level of the renal arteries. Then, the effects of saline vehicle and MasR blocker (A779) were tested on pressure natriuresis and diuresis, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR). In the absence of AT1R and AT2R; RVR, RBF/wet kidney tissue weight, and serum level of renin did not alter in both genders either MasR was blocked or not. However, urine flow rate (UF) and sodium excretion (UNaV) increased significantly at the pressure level of 100 mmHg in the presence of MasR in male (P<0.05) but not in female rats. When AT1R and AT2R were blocked, the impact of MasR is gender-related in pressure natriuresis and diuresis, and pressure natriuresis and diuresis in male rats (not female) increases in the presence of MasR.

  10. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockade decreases CTGF/CCN2-mediated damage and fibrosis in normal and dystrophic skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Morales, María Gabriela; Cabrera, Daniel; Vio, Carlos P; Brandan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN-2) is mainly involved in the induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The levels of CTGF correlate with the degree and severity of fibrosis in many tissues, including dystrophic skeletal muscle. The CTGF overexpression in tibialis anterior skeletal muscle using an adenoviral vector reproduced many of the features observed in dystrophic muscles including muscle damage and regeneration, fibrotic response and decrease in the skeletal muscle strength. The renin–angiotensin system is involved in the genesis and progression of fibrotic diseases through its main fibrotic components angiotensin-II and its transducer receptor AT-1. The use of AT-1 receptor blockers (ARB) has been shown to decrease fibrosis. In this paper, we show the effect of AT-1 receptor blockade on CTGF-dependent biological activity in skeletal muscle cells as well as the response to CTGF overexpression in normal skeletal muscle. Our results show that in myoblasts ARB decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM protein levels, extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK-1/2) phosphorylation and stress fibres formation. In tibialis anterior muscle overexpressing CTGF using an adenovirus, ARB treatment decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM molecules, α-SMA and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation levels. Quite remarkable, ARB was able to prevent the loss of contractile force of tibialis anterior muscles overexpressing CTGF. Finally, we show that ARB decreased the levels of fibrotic proteins, CTGF and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation augmented in a dystrophic skeletal muscle from mdx mice. We propose that ARB is a novel pharmacological tool that can be used to decrease the fibrosis induced by CTGF in skeletal muscle associated with muscular dystrophies. PMID:21645240

  11. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in vascular smooth muscle regulates blood pressure homeostasis through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-angiotensin II receptor type 1 axis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Jiang, Weidong; Cantalupo, Anna; Sessa, William C; Giordano, Frank J

    2013-09-01

    Hypertension is a major worldwide health issue for which only a small proportion of cases have a known mechanistic pathogenesis. Of the defined causes, none have been directly linked to heightened vasoconstrictor responsiveness, despite the fact that vasomotor tone in resistance vessels is a fundamental determinant of blood pressure. Here, we reported a previously undescribed role for smooth muscle hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in controlling blood pressure homeostasis. The lack of HIF-1α in smooth muscle caused hypertension in vivo and hyperresponsiveness of resistance vessels to angiotensin II stimulation ex vivo. These data correlated with an increased expression of angiotensin II receptor type I in the vasculature. Specifically, we show that HIF-1α, through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, reciprocally defined angiotensin II receptor type I levels in the vessel wall. Indeed, pharmacological blockade of angiotensin II receptor type I by telmisartan abolished the hypertensive phenotype in smooth muscle cell-HIF-1α-KO mice. These data revealed a determinant role of a smooth muscle HIF-1α/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ/angiotensin II receptor type I axis in controlling vasomotor responsiveness and highlighted an important pathway, the alterations of which may be critical in a variety of hypertensive-based clinical settings. PMID:23918749

  12. Blood pressure, magnesium and other mineral balance in two rat models of salt-sensitive, induced hypertension: effects of a non-peptide angiotensin II receptor type 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rondón, Lusliany Josefina; Marcano, Eunice; Rodríguez, Fátima; del Castillo, Jesús Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is critically involved in regulating arterial blood pressure (BP). Inappropriate angiotensin type-1 receptor activation by angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is related to increased arterial BP. Mg has a role in BP; it can affect cardiac electrical activity, myocardial contractility, and vascular tone. To evaluate the relationship between high BP induced by a high sodium (Na) diet and Mg, and other mineral balances, two experimental rat models of salt-sensitive, induced-hypertension were used: Ang-II infused and Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We found that: 1) Ang-II infusion progressively increased BP, which was accompanied by hypomagnesuria and signs of secondary hyperaldosteronism; 2) an additive effect between Ang-II and a high Na load may have an effect on strontium (Sr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) balances; 3) Dahl SS rats fed a high Na diet had a slow pressor response, accompanied by altered Mg, Na, potassium (K), and phosphate (P) balances; and 4) losartan prevented BP increases induced by Ang II-NaCl, but did not modify mineral balances. In Dahl SS rats, losartan attenuated high BP and ameliorated magnesemia, Na and K balances. Mg metabolism maybe considered a possible defect in this strain of rat that may contribute to hypertension.

  13. Effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker on renal function, arterial blood pressure and parathyroid hormone related protein over expression in cadmium induced nephrotoxicity in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Marwa A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible effect of angiotensin II type 1 Receptor blocker (AT1 blocker) on renal function, arterial blood pressure and parathyroid hormone related protein over expression in cadmium induced nephrotoxicity in adult male rats. Forty five rats were divided randomly into a control (group I), group II, received cadmium chloride at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day, orally, for nine weeks, group III received telmisartan (TEL) treatment (1 mg/kg/day, orally) one week before cadmium administration and continued for ten weeks. Results: Telmisartan significantly reduced blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine levels which were increased significantly by cadmium. Telmisartan significantly suppressed lipid peroxidation, compensated deficits in the antioxidant defenses (super oxide dismutase (SOD) level and catalase activity), decreased the elevations of nitric oxide (NO) and cadmium ion concentrations in renal tissue observed in Cd-treated rats. Group III had a significant decrease of urinary levels of total protein, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT) and urinary 8-isoprostanes than those of group II. Telmisartan decreased the systolic blood pressure significantly than those of group II. Histopathological examination revealed that cadmium-induced renal tissue damage was ameliorated by telmisartan treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that telmisartan significantly decreased the cadmium-induced overexpression of parathyroid hormone receptor 1 (PTHR1) in renal tissue. RT-PCR analysis showed that Cd increased renal expression of PTHrP; however telmisartan could decrease the expression of PTHrP in group III. Conclusion: Blocking AT1 receptors significantly decreases PTHrP over expression and ameliorates renal dysfunction in Cd induced nephrotoxicity. These data suggest that Ang II might contribute to pathophysiology and deleterious effects in cadmium nephrotoxicity. PMID:23750309

  14. Sex differences in NMDA GluN1 plasticity in rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons containing corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor following slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, T A; Dodos, M; Woods, C; Marques-Lopes, J; Justice, N J; Iadecola, C; Pickel, V M; Glass, M J; Milner, T A

    2015-10-29

    There are profound, yet incompletely understood, sex differences in the neurogenic regulation of blood pressure. Both corticotropin signaling and glutamate receptor plasticity, which differ between males and females, are known to play important roles in the neural regulation of blood pressure. However, the relationship between hypertension and glutamate plasticity in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-receptive neurons in brain cardiovascular regulatory areas, including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), is not understood. In the present study, we used dual-label immuno-electron microscopy to analyze sex differences in slow-pressor angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension with respect to the subcellular distribution of the obligatory NMDA glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the RVLM and PVN. Studies were conducted in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) under the control of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) promoter (i.e., CRF1-EGFP reporter mice). By light microscopy, GluN1-immunoreactivity (ir) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons of the RVLM and PVN. Moreover, in both regions tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons. In response to AngII, male mice showed an elevation in blood pressure that was associated with an increase in the proportion of GluN1 on presumably functional areas of the plasma membrane (PM) in CRF1-EGFP dendritic profiles in the RVLM. In female mice, AngII was neither associated with an increase in blood pressure nor an increase in PM GluN1 in the RVLM. Unlike the RVLM, AngII-mediated hypertension had no effect on GluN1 localization in CRF1-EGFP dendrites in the PVN of either male or female mice. These studies provide an anatomical mechanism for sex-differences in the convergent modulation of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons by CRF and glutamate. Moreover, these results suggest that sexual dimorphism in

  15. Sex differences in NMDA GluN1 plasticity in rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons containing corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor following slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, T A; Dodos, M; Woods, C; Marques-Lopes, J; Justice, N J; Iadecola, C; Pickel, V M; Glass, M J; Milner, T A

    2015-10-29

    There are profound, yet incompletely understood, sex differences in the neurogenic regulation of blood pressure. Both corticotropin signaling and glutamate receptor plasticity, which differ between males and females, are known to play important roles in the neural regulation of blood pressure. However, the relationship between hypertension and glutamate plasticity in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-receptive neurons in brain cardiovascular regulatory areas, including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), is not understood. In the present study, we used dual-label immuno-electron microscopy to analyze sex differences in slow-pressor angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension with respect to the subcellular distribution of the obligatory NMDA glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the RVLM and PVN. Studies were conducted in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) under the control of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) promoter (i.e., CRF1-EGFP reporter mice). By light microscopy, GluN1-immunoreactivity (ir) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons of the RVLM and PVN. Moreover, in both regions tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons. In response to AngII, male mice showed an elevation in blood pressure that was associated with an increase in the proportion of GluN1 on presumably functional areas of the plasma membrane (PM) in CRF1-EGFP dendritic profiles in the RVLM. In female mice, AngII was neither associated with an increase in blood pressure nor an increase in PM GluN1 in the RVLM. Unlike the RVLM, AngII-mediated hypertension had no effect on GluN1 localization in CRF1-EGFP dendrites in the PVN of either male or female mice. These studies provide an anatomical mechanism for sex-differences in the convergent modulation of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons by CRF and glutamate. Moreover, these results suggest that sexual dimorphism in

  16. Angiotensin type 2 receptor actions contribute to angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker effects on kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Takashi; Ma, Li-Jun; Yang, Haichun; Zuo, Yiqin; Tang, Yiwei; Han, Jee Young; Kon, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker (ARB) ameliorates progression of chronic kidney disease. Whether this protection is due solely to blockade of AT1, or whether diversion of angiotensin II from the AT1 to the available AT2 receptor, thus potentially enhancing AT2 receptor effects, is not known. We therefore investigated the role of AT2 receptor in ARB-induced treatment effects in chronic kidney disease. Adult rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy. Glomerulosclerosis was assessed by renal biopsy 8 wk later, and rats were divided into four groups with equivalent glomerulosclerosis: no further treatment, ARB, AT2 receptor antagonist, or combination. By week 12 after nephrectomy, systolic blood pressure was decreased in all treatment groups, but proteinuria was decreased only with ARB. Glomerulosclerosis increased significantly in AT2 receptor antagonist vs. ARB. Kidney cortical collagen content was decreased in ARB, but increased in untreated 5/6 nephrectomy, AT2 receptor antagonist, and combined groups. Glomerular cell proliferation increased in both untreated 5/6 nephrectomy and AT2 receptor antagonist vs. ARB, and phospho-Erk2 was increased by AT2 receptor antagonist. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 mRNA and protein were increased at 12 wk by AT2 receptor antagonist in contrast to decrease with ARB. Podocyte injury is a key component of glomerulosclerosis. We therefore assessed effects of AT1 vs. AT2 blockade on podocytes and interaction with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Cultured wild-type podocytes, but not plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 knockout, responded to angiotensin II with increased collagen, an effect that was completely blocked by ARB with lesser effect of AT2 receptor antagonist. We conclude that the benefical effects on glomerular injury achieved with ARB are contributed to not only by blockade of the AT1 receptor, but also by increasing angiotensin effects transduced through the AT2 receptor. PMID:20042458

  17. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade partially attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets: relationship with the nitrergic system

    PubMed Central

    Camelo, J.S.; Martins, A.R.; Rosa, E.; Ramos, S.G.; Hehre, D.; Bancalari, E.; Suguihara, C.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe possible interactions between the renin-angiotensin and nitrergic systems in chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in newborn piglets. Thirteen chronically instrumented newborn piglets (6.3 ± 0.9 days; 2369 ± 491 g) were randomly assigned to receive saline (placebo, P) or the AT1 receptor (AT1-R) blocker L-158,809 (L) during 6 days of hypoxia (FiO2 = 0.12). During hypoxia, pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa; P < 0.0001), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR; P < 0.02) and the pulmonary to systemic vascular resistance ratio (PVR/SVR; P < 0.05) were significantly attenuated in the L (N = 7) group compared to the P group (N = 6). Western blot analysis of lung proteins showed a significant decrease of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in both P and L animals, and of AT1-R in P animals during hypoxia compared to normoxic animals (C group, N = 5; P < 0.01 for all groups). AT1-R tended to decrease in L animals. Inducible NOS (iNOS) did not differ among P, L, and C animals and iNOS immunohistochemical staining in macrophages was significantly more intense in L than in P animals (P < 0.01). The vascular endothelium showed moderate or strong eNOS and AT1-R staining. Macrophages and pneumocytes showed moderate or strong iNOS and AT1-R staining, but C animals showed weak iNOS and AT1-R staining. Macrophages of L and P animals showed moderate and weak AT2-R staining, respectively, but the endothelium of all groups only showed weak staining. In conclusion, pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia in newborn piglets is partially attenuated by AT1-R blockade. We suggest that AT1-R blockade might act through AT2-R and/or Mas receptors and the nitrergic system in the lungs of hypoxemic newborn piglets. PMID:22310488

  18. Adenosine, type 1 receptors: role in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption

    PubMed Central

    Welch, William J

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine type 1 receptor (A1-AR) antagonists induce diuresis and natriuresis in experimental animals and humans. Much of this effect is due to inhibition of A1-ARs in the proximal tubule, which is responsible for 60–70% of the reabsorption of filtered Na+ and fluid. Intratubular application of receptor antagonists indicates that A1-AR mediates a portion of Na+ uptake in PT and PT cells, via multiple transport systems, including Na+/H+ exchanger-3 (NHE3), Na+/PO4− co-transporter and Na+-dependent glucose transporter, SGLT. Renal microperfusion and recollection studies have shown that fluid reabsorption is reduced by A1-AR antagonists and is lower in A1-AR KO mice., compared to WT mice. Absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) measured by free-flow micropuncture is equivocal, with studies that show either lower APR or similar APR in A1-AR KO mice, compared to WT mice. Inhibition of A1-ARs lowers elevated blood pressure in models of salt-sensitive hypertension, partially due to their effects in the proximal tubule. PMID:25345761

  19. The beta-arrestin pathway-selective type 1A angiotensin receptor (AT1A) agonist [Sar1,Ile4,Ile8]angiotensin II regulates a robust G protein-independent signaling network.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Ryan T; Strungs, Erik G; Rachidi, Saleh M; Lee, Mi-Hye; El-Shewy, Hesham M; Luttrell, Deirdre K; Janech, Michael G; Luttrell, Louis M

    2011-06-01

    The angiotensin II peptide analog [Sar(1),Ile(4),Ile(8)]AngII (SII) is a biased AT(1A) receptor agonist that stimulates receptor phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, receptor internalization, and β-arrestin-dependent ERK1/2 activation without activating heterotrimeric G-proteins. To determine the scope of G-protein-independent AT(1A) receptor signaling, we performed a gel-based phosphoproteomic analysis of AngII and SII-induced signaling in HEK cells stably expressing AT(1A) receptors. A total of 34 differentially phosphorylated proteins were detected, of which 16 were unique to SII and eight to AngII stimulation. MALDI-TOF/TOF mass fingerprinting was employed to identify 24 SII-sensitive phosphoprotein spots, of which three (two peptide inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (I1PP2A and I2PP2A) and prostaglandin E synthase 3 (PGES3)) were selected for validation and further study. We found that phosphorylation of I2PP2A was associated with rapid and transient inhibition of a β-arrestin 2-associated pool of protein phosphatase 2A, leading to activation of Akt and increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β in an arrestin signalsome complex. SII-stimulated PGES3 phosphorylation coincided with an increase in β-arrestin 1-associated PGES3 and an arrestin-dependent increase in cyclooxygenase 1-dependent prostaglandin E(2) synthesis. These findings suggest that AT(1A) receptors regulate a robust G protein-independent signaling network that affects protein phosphorylation and autocrine/paracrine prostaglandin production and that these pathways can be selectively modulated by biased ligands that antagonize G protein activation.

  20. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Mutations and a Severe Recessive Pseudohypoaldosteronism Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Edwige-Ludiwyne; Teissier, Raphaël; Fernandes-Rosa, Fábio L.; Fay, Michel; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Metz, Chantal; Escoubet, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is a rare genetic disease of mineralocorticoid resistance characterized by salt wasting and failure to thrive in infancy. Here we describe the first case of a newborn with severe recessive PHA1 caused by two heterozygous mutations in NR3C2, gene coding for the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Independent segregation of the mutations occurred in the family, with p.Ser166X being transmitted from the affected father and p.Trp806X from the asymptomatic mother Whereas the truncated MR166X protein was degraded, MR806X was expressed both at the mRNA and protein level. Functional studies demonstrated that despite its inability to bind aldosterone, MR806X had partial ligand-independent transcriptional activity. Partial nuclear localization of MR806X in the absence of hormone was identified as a prerequisite to initiate transcription. This exceptional case broadens the spectrum of clinical phenotypes of PHA1 and demonstrates that minimal residual activity of MR is compatible with life. It also suggests that rare hypomorphic NR3C2 alleles may be more common than expected from the prevalence of detected PHA1 cases. This might prove relevant for patient's care in neonatal salt losing disorders and may affect renal salt handling and blood pressure in the general population. PMID:21903996

  1. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  2. Tannic Acid Down-Regulates the Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor Through a MAPK-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yesudas, Rekha; Gumaste, Upendra; Snyder, Russell

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of tannic acid (TA), a hydrolysable polyphenol, on angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression in continuously passaged rat liver epithelial cells. Under normal conditions, exposure of cells to TA resulted in the down-regulation of AT1R-specific binding in concentrations ranging from 12.5–100 μg/ml (7.34–58.78 μm) over a time period of 2–24 h with no change in receptor affinity to angiotensin II (AngII). The inhibitory effect of TA on AT1R was specific and reversible. In TA-treated cells, we observed a significant reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium signaling, a finding consistent with receptor down-regulation. Under similar conditions, TA down-regulated AT1R mRNA expression without changing the rate of mRNA degradation, suggesting that TA's effect is mediated through transcriptional inhibition. Cells expressing recombinant AT1R without the native promoter show no change in receptor expression, whereas a pCAT reporter construct possessing the rat AT1R promoter was significantly reduced in activity. Furthermore, TA induced the phosphorylation of MAPK p42/p44. Pretreatment of the cells with a MAPK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 prevented TA-induced MAPK phosphorylation and down-regulation of the AT1R. Moreover, there was no reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium release upon MEK inhibition, suggesting that TA's observed inhibitory effect is mediated through MEK/MAPK signaling. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TA inhibits AT1R gene expression and cellular response, suggesting the observed protective effects of dietary polyphenols on cardiovascular conditions may be, in part, through inhibition of AT1R expression. PMID:22322600

  3. Endocannabinoids Stimulate Human Melanogenesis via Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Pasquariello, Nicoletta; Battista, Natalia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Rapino, Cinzia; Fezza, Filomena; Zuccolo, Michela; Jourdain, Roland; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Breton, Lionel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We show that a fully functional endocannabinoid system is present in primary human melanocytes (normal human epidermal melanocyte cells), including anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the respective target receptors (CB1, CB2, and TRPV1), and their metabolic enzymes. We also show that at higher concentrations AEA induces normal human epidermal melanocyte apoptosis (∼3-fold over controls at 5 μm) through a TRPV1-mediated pathway that increases DNA fragmentation and p53 expression. However, at lower concentrations, AEA and other CB1-binding endocannabinoids dose-dependently stimulate melanin synthesis and enhance tyrosinase gene expression and activity (∼3- and ∼2-fold over controls at 1 μm). This CB1-dependent activity was fully abolished by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716 or by RNA interference of the receptor. CB1 signaling engaged p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which in turn activated the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Silencing of tyrosinase or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor further demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in AEA-induced melanogenesis. In addition, CB1 activation did not engage the key regulator of skin pigmentation, cyclic AMP, showing a major difference compared with the regulation of melanogenesis by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone through melanocortin 1 receptor. PMID:22431736

  4. Angiotensin II receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Yee, Daniel K; Fluharty, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II plays a key role in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. To correct body fluid deficits that occur during hypovolaemia, an animal needs to ingest both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is not surprising that angiotensin II, which is synthesized in response to hypovolaemia, acts centrally to increase both water and NaCl intake. Here, we review findings relating to the properties of angiotensin II receptors that give rise to changes in behaviour. Data are described to suggest that divergent signal transduction pathways are responsible for separable behavioural responses to angiotensin II, and a hypothesis is proposed to explain how this divergence may map onto neural circuits in the brain.

  5. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor activity during Alzheimer's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Iván; González de San Román, Estíbaliz; Giralt, M Teresa; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The activity of CB1 cannabinoid receptors was studied in postmortem brain samples of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients during clinical deterioration. CB1 activity was higher at earlier AD stages in limited hippocampal areas and internal layers of frontal cortex, but a decrease was observed at the advanced stages. The pattern of modification appears to indicate initial hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system in brain areas that lack classical histopathological markers at earlier stages of AD, indicating an attempt to compensate for the initial synaptic impairment, which is then surpassed by disease progression. These results suggest that initial CB1 stimulation might have therapeutic relevance.

  6. Loss of striatal type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic factor in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Cristina; Chiarlone, Anna; Sagredo, Onintza; Aguado, Tania; Pazos, M Ruth; Resel, Eva; Palazuelos, Javier; Julien, Boris; Salazar, María; Börner, Christine; Benito, Cristina; Carrasco, Carolina; Diez-Zaera, María; Paoletti, Paola; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel; Ruiz, Carolina; Sendtner, Michael; Lucas, José J; de Yébenes, Justo G; Marsicano, Giovanni; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Romero, Julián; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Kraus, Jürgen; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guzmán, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids act as neuromodulatory and neuroprotective cues by engaging type 1 cannabinoid receptors. These receptors are highly abundant in the basal ganglia and play a pivotal role in the control of motor behaviour. An early downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors has been documented in the basal ganglia of patients with Huntington's disease and animal models. However, the pathophysiological impact of this loss of receptors in Huntington's disease is as yet unknown. Here, we generated a double-mutant mouse model that expresses human mutant huntingtin exon 1 in a type 1 cannabinoid receptor-null background, and found that receptor deletion aggravates the symptoms, neuropathology and molecular pathology of the disease. Moreover, pharmacological administration of the cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol to mice expressing human mutant huntingtin exon 1 exerted a therapeutic effect and ameliorated those parameters. Experiments conducted in striatal cells show that the mutant huntingtin-dependent downregulation of the receptors involves the control of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor gene promoter by repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor and sensitizes cells to excitotoxic damage. We also provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that supports type 1 cannabinoid receptor control of striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and the decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels concomitant with type 1 cannabinoid receptor loss, which may contribute significantly to striatal damage in Huntington's disease. Altogether, these results support the notion that downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic event in Huntington's disease, and suggest that activation of these receptors in patients with Huntington's disease may attenuate disease progression.

  7. Distribution of angiotensin type-1 receptor messenger RNA expression in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lenkei, Z; Palkovits, M; Corvol, P; Llorens-Cortes, C

    1998-02-01

    Angiotensin II and angiotensin III in the brain exert their various effects by acting on two pharmacologically well-defined receptors, the type-1 (AT1) and the type-2 (AT2) receptors. Receptor binding autoradiography has revealed the dominant presence of AT1 in brain nuclei involved in cardiovascular, body fluid and neuroendocrine control. The cloning of the AT1 complementary DNA has revealed the existence of two receptor subtypes in rodents, AT1A and AT1B. Using specific riboprobes for in situ hybridization, we have previously shown that the AT1A messenger RNA is predominantly expressed in the rat forebrain; in contrast the AT1B subtype predominates in the anterior pituitary. Using a similar technical approach, the aim of the present study was to establish the precise anatomical localization of cells synthetising the AT1A receptor in the adult rat brain. High AT1A messenger RNA expression was found in the vascular organ of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus, the subfornical organ, the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus, the parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the area postrema, in agreement with previous autoradiographic studies, describing a high density of AT1 binding sites in these nuclei. In addition, AT1A messenger RNA expression was detected in several brain areas, where no AT1 binding was reported previously. Thus, we identify strong expression of AT1A messenger RNA expression in scattered cells of the lateral parts of the preoptic region, the lateral hypothalamus and several brainstem nuclei. In none of these structures was the AT1B messenger RNA detectable at the microscopic level. In conclusion, it is suggested that angiotensins may exert their central effects on body fluid and cardiovascular homeostasis mainly via the AT1A receptor subtype. PMID:9483539

  8. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of mannose receptor C type 1 in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Lichun; Zhou, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoheng; Xi, Mingjun; Wei, Shun; Fang, Rui; Ji, Wei; Chen, Nan; Gu, Zemao; Liu, Xueqin; Wang, Weimin; Asim, Muhammad; Liu, Xiaoling; Lin, Li

    2014-03-01

    Mannose receptor C type 1 (MRC1) is a pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) which plays a significant role in immune responses. Much work on MRC1 has been done in mammals and birds while little in fish. In this study, we cloned and characterized MRC1 in grass carp (gcMR). The full-length gcMR contained 5291bp encoding a putative protein of 1432 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequences showed that gcMR contained a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich (CR) domain, a fibronectin type II (FN II) domain, eight C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs), a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic domain. gcMR were constitutively expressed in different organs with the higher expression in spleen and head kidney. During embryonic development, gcMR transcript levels were highest at cleavage stage. The up-regulation expression of gcMR, IL-1β and TNF-α in liver, spleen, head kidney and intestine after Aeromonas hydrophila infection indicating it involved in innate immune regulation during bacterial infections. PMID:24184700

  9. Obtaining anti-type 1 melatonin receptor antibodies by immunization with melatonin receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nelia; Wijkhuisen, Anne; Savatier, Alexandra; Moulharat, Natacha; Ferry, Gilles; Léonetti, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs) specific to cell-surface receptors are attractive tools for studying the physiological role of such receptors or for controlling their activity. We sought to obtain such antibodies against the type 1 receptor for melatonin (MT1). For this, we injected mice with CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human MT1 (CHO-MT1-h), in the presence or absence of an adjuvant mixture containing Alum and CpG1018. As we previously observed that the immune response to a protein antigen is increased when it is coupled to a fusion protein, called ZZTat101, we also investigated if the association of ZZTat101 with CHO-MT1-h cells provides an immunogenic advantage. We measured similar levels of anti-CHO and anti-MT1-h Ab responses in animals injected with either CHO-MT1-h cells or ZZTat101/CHO-MT1-h cells, with or without adjuvant, indicating that neither the adjuvant mixture nor ZZTat101 increased the anti-cell immune response. Then, we investigated whether the antisera also recognized murine MT1 (MT1-m). Using cloned CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding MT1-m, we found that antisera raised against CHO-MT1-h cells also bound the mouse receptor. Altogether our studies indicate that immunizing approaches based on MT1-h-expressing CHO cells allow the production of polyclonal antibodies against MT1 receptors of different origins. This paves the way to preparation of MT1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

  10. POLLUTANT PARTICLES PRODUCE VASOCONSTRICTION AND ENHANCE MAPK SIGNALING VIA ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with acute cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but the mechanisms are not entirely clear. In this study, we hypothesized that PM may activate the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates ...

  11. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-04-15

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT(1)R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT(1)R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT(1)R paralleling those observed in the human AT(1)R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT(1)R mRNA, bind (125)I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes (125)I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block (125)I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT(1A)Rs, which have a conserved AT(1)R-binding pocket with human AT(1)R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT(1)Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT(1)R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations.

  12. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket

    PubMed Central

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T.; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C.; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT1R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT1R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT1R paralleling those observed in the human AT1R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT1R mRNA, bind 125I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes 125I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block 125I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT1ARs, which have a conserved AT1R-binding pocket with human AT1R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT1Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT1R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations. PMID:23389452

  13. Differential regulation of types-1 and -3 inositol trisphosphate receptors by cytosolic Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Cardy, T J; Traynor, D; Taylor, C W

    1997-01-01

    Biphasic regulation of inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-stimulated Ca2+ mobilization by cytosolic Ca2+ is believed to contribute to regenerative intracellular Ca2+ signals. Since cells typically express several IP3 receptor isoforms and the effects of cytosolic Ca2+ are not mediated by a single mechanism, it is important to resolve the properties of each receptor subtype. Full-length rat types-1 and -3 IP3 receptors were expressed in insect Sf9 cells at levels 10-40-fold higher than the endogenous receptors. The expressed receptors were glycosylated and assembled into tetramers, and binding of [3H]IP3 to each subtype was regulated by cytosolic Ca2+. The effects of increased [Ca2+] on native cerebellar and type-1 receptors expressed in Sf9 cells were indistinguishable. A maximally effective increase in [Ca2+] reversibly inhibited [3H]IP3 binding by approx. 50% by decreasing the number of IP3-binding sites (Bmax) without affecting their affinity for IP3. The effects of Ca2+ on type-3 receptors were more complex: increasing [Ca2+] first stimulated [3H]IP3 binding by increasing Bmax, and then inhibited it by causing a substantial decrease in the affinity of the receptor for IP3. The different effects of Ca2+ on the receptor subtypes were not a consequence of limitations in the availability of accessory proteins or of artifactual effects of Ca2+ on membrane structure. We conclude that Ca2+ can inhibit IP3 binding to types-1 and -3 IP3 receptors although by different mechanisms, and that IP3 binding to type-3 receptors is stimulated at intermediate [Ca2+]. A consequence of these differences is that, at resting cytosolic [Ca2+], type-3 receptors are more sensitive than type-1 receptors to IP3, but the situation reverses at higher cytosolic [Ca2+]. Such differences may be important in generating the spatially and temporally complex changes in cytosolic [Ca2+] evoked by receptors linked to IP3 formation. PMID:9396721

  14. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  15. Rising stars: modulation of brain functions by astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The type-1-cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptor is amongst the most widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. In few decades, CB1 receptors have been shown to regulate a large array of functions from brain cell development and survival to complex cognitive processes. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions of CB1 is complex due to the heterogeneity of the brain cell types on which the receptor is expressed. Although the large majority of CB1 receptors act on neurons, early studies pointed to a direct control of CB1 receptors over astroglial functions including brain energy supply and neuroprotection. In line with the growing concept of the tripartite synapse highlighting astrocytes as direct players in synaptic plasticity, astroglial CB1 receptor signaling recently emerged as the mediator of several forms of synaptic plasticity associated to important cognitive functions. Here, we shortly review the current knowledge on CB1 receptor-mediated astroglial functions. This functional spectrum is large and most of the mechanisms by which CB1 receptors control astrocytes, as well as their consequences in vivo, are still unknown, requiring innovative approaches to improve this new cannabinoid research field.

  16. THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE UV AND OPTICAL Fe ii EMISSION LINES IN TYPE 1 AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacević-Dojcinović, Jelena; Popović, Luka Č. E-mail: lpopovic@aob.bg.ac.rs

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the spectral properties of the UV (λλ2650–3050 Å) and optical (λλ4000–5500 Å) Fe ii emission features in a sample of 293 Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. We explore different correlations between their emission line properties, as well as the correlations with other emission lines from the spectral range. We find several interesting correlations and outline the most interesting results as follows. (i) There is a kinematical connection between the UV and optical Fe ii lines, indicating that the UV and optical Fe ii lines originate from the outer part of the broad line region, the so-called intermediate line region. (ii) The unexplained anticorrelations of the optical Fe ii equivalent width (EW Fe ii{sub opt}) versus EW [O iii] 5007 Å and EW Fe ii{sub opt} versus FWHM Hβ have not been detected for the UV Fe ii lines. (iii) The significant averaged redshift in the UV Fe ii lines, which is not present in optical Fe ii, indicates an inflow in the UV Fe ii emitting clouds, and probably their asymmetric distribution. (iv) Also, we confirm the anticorrelation between the intensity ratio of the optical and UV Fe ii lines and the FWHM of Hβ, and we find the anticorrelations of this ratio with the widths of Mg ii 2800 Å, optical Fe ii, and UV Fe ii. This indicates a very important role for the column density and microturbulence in the emitting gas. We discuss the starburst activity in high-density regions of young AGNs as a possible explanation of the detected optical Fe ii correlations and intensity line ratios of the UV and optical Fe ii lines.

  17. Recognition of a Functional Peroxisome Type 1 Target by the Dynamic Import Receptor Pex5p

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Will A.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Kursula, Petri; Schüller, Nicole; Erdmann, Ralf; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Sattler, Michael; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Summary Peroxisomes require the translocation of folded and functional target proteins of various sizes across the peroxisomal membrane. We have investigated the structure and function of the principal import receptor Pex5p, which recognizes targets bearing a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal type 1. Crystal structures of the receptor in the presence and absence of a peroxisomal target, sterol carrier protein 2, reveal major structural changes from an open, snail-like conformation into a closed, circular conformation. These changes are caused by a long loop C terminal to the 7-fold tetratricopeptide repeat segments. Mutations in residues of this loop lead to defects in peroxisomal import in human fibroblasts. The structure of the receptor/cargo complex demonstrates that the primary receptor-binding site of the cargo is structurally and topologically autonomous, enabling the cargo to retain its native structure and function. PMID:17157249

  18. Different Involvement of Type 1, 2, and 3 Ryanodine Receptors in Memory Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Quattrone, Alessandro; Vivoli, Elisa; Norcini, Monica; Bartolini, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla

    2008-01-01

    The administration of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) agonist 4-Cmc (0.003-9 nmol per mouse intracerebroventricularly [i.c.v.]) ameliorated memory functions, whereas the RyR antagonist ryanodine (0.0001-1 nmol per mouse i.c.v.) induced amnesia in the mouse passive avoidance test. The role of the type 1, 2, and 3 RyR isoforms in memory processes was…

  19. The Connections Between the UV and Optical Fe ii Emission Lines in Type 1 AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačević-Dojčinović, Jelena; Popović, Luka Č.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of the UV (λλ2650-3050 Å) and optical (λλ4000-5500 Å) Fe ii emission features in a sample of 293 Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. We explore different correlations between their emission line properties, as well as the correlations with other emission lines from the spectral range. We find several interesting correlations and outline the most interesting results as follows. (i) There is a kinematical connection between the UV and optical Fe ii lines, indicating that the UV and optical Fe ii lines originate from the outer part of the broad line region, the so-called intermediate line region. (ii) The unexplained anticorrelations of the optical Fe ii equivalent width (EW Fe iiopt) versus EW [O iii] 5007 Å and EW Fe iiopt versus FWHM Hβ have not been detected for the UV Fe ii lines. (iii) The significant averaged redshift in the UV Fe ii lines, which is not present in optical Fe ii, indicates an inflow in the UV Fe ii emitting clouds, and probably their asymmetric distribution. (iv) Also, we confirm the anticorrelation between the intensity ratio of the optical and UV Fe ii lines and the FWHM of Hβ, and we find the anticorrelations of this ratio with the widths of Mg ii 2800 Å, optical Fe ii, and UV Fe ii. This indicates a very important role for the column density and microturbulence in the emitting gas. We discuss the starburst activity in high-density regions of young AGNs as a possible explanation of the detected optical Fe ii correlations and intensity line ratios of the UV and optical Fe ii lines.

  20. Toll-like receptor 3 gene polymorphisms in South African Blacks with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pirie, F J; Pegoraro, R; Motala, A A; Rauff, S; Rom, L; Govender, T; Esterhuizen, T M

    2005-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is the consequence of exposure of genetically susceptible individuals to specific environmental precipitants. The innate immune system provides the initial response to exogenous antigen and links with the adaptive immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the role of polymorphisms occurring in the cytoplasmic region of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 gene and immediate 5' sequence, in subjects of Zulu descent with type 1 diabetes in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Seventy-nine subjects with type 1 diabetes and 74 healthy normal glucose tolerant gender-matched control subjects were studied. Parts of exon 4 and exon 3/intron 3 of the TLR3 gene were studied by polymerase chain reaction, direct sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion with Bts 1. Of the nine polymorphisms studied, a significant association with type 1 diabetes was found for the major allele in the 2593 C/T polymorphism and for the minor alleles in the 2642 C/A and 2690 A/G polymorphisms, which were found to be in complete linkage disequilibrium. Correction of the P-values for the number of alleles studied, however, rendered the results no longer significant. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the TLR3 gene, which is part of the innate immune system, may be associated with type 1 diabetes in this population. PMID:16029432

  1. THE NEURONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CANNABINOID RECEPTOR TYPE 1 IN THE TRIGEMINAL GANGLION OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    PRICE, T. J.; HELESIC, G.; PARGHI, D.; HARGREAVES, K. M.; FLORES, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoid compounds have been shown to produce antinociception and antihyperalgesia by acting upon cannabinoid receptors located in both the CNS and the periphery. A potential mechanism by which cannabinoids could inhibit nociception in the periphery is the activation of cannabinoid receptors located on one or more classes of primary nociceptive neurons. To address this hypothesis, we evaluated the neuronal distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of the adult rat through combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). CB1 receptor mRNA was localized mainly to medium and large diameter neurons of the maxillary and mandibular branches of the TG. Consistent with this distribution, in a de facto nociceptive sensory neuron population that exhibited vanilloid receptor type 1 immunoreactivity, colocalization with CB1 mRNA was also sparse (<5%). Furthermore, very few neurons (approximately 5%) in the peptidergic (defined as calcitonin gene-related peptide- or substance P-immunoreactive) or the isolectin B4-binding sensory neuron populations contained CB1 mRNA. In contrast, and consistent with the neuron-size distribution for CB1, nearly 75% of CB1-positive neurons exhibited N52-immunoreactivity, a marker of myelinated axons. These results indicate that in the rat TG, CB1 receptors are expressed predominantly in neurons that are not thought to subserve nociceptive neurotransmission in the noninjured animal. Taken together with the absence of an above background in situ signal for CB2 mRNA in TG neurons, these findings suggest that the peripherally mediated antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids may involve either as yet unidentified receptors or interaction with afferent neuron populations that normally subserve non-nociceptive functions. PMID:12849749

  2. The neuronal distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in the trigeminal ganglion of the rat.

    PubMed

    Price, T J; Helesic, G; Parghi, D; Hargreaves, K M; Flores, C M

    2003-01-01

    Cannabinoid compounds have been shown to produce antinociception and antihyperalgesia by acting upon cannabinoid receptors located in both the CNS and the periphery. A potential mechanism by which cannabinoids could inhibit nociception in the periphery is the activation of cannabinoid receptors located on one or more classes of primary nociceptive neurons. To address this hypothesis, we evaluated the neuronal distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of the adult rat through combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). CB1 receptor mRNA was localized mainly to medium and large diameter neurons of the maxillary and mandibular branches of the TG. Consistent with this distribution, in a de facto nociceptive sensory neuron population that exhibited vanilloid receptor type 1 immunoreactivity, colocalization with CB1 mRNA was also sparse (<5%). Furthermore, very few neurons (approximately 5%) in the peptidergic (defined as calcitonin gene-related peptide- or substance P-immunoreactive) or the isolectin B4-binding sensory neuron populations contained CB1 mRNA. In contrast, and consistent with the neuron-size distribution for CB1, nearly 75% of CB1-positive neurons exhibited N52-immunoreactivity, a marker of myelinated axons. These results indicate that in the rat TG, CB1 receptors are expressed predominantly in neurons that are not thought to subserve nociceptive neurotransmission in the noninjured animal. Taken together with the absence of an above background in situ signal for CB2 mRNA in TG neurons, these findings suggest that the peripherally mediated antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids may involve either as yet unidentified receptors or interaction with afferent neuron populations that normally subserve non-nociceptive functions.

  3. Rectification of muscle and nerve deficits in paralyzed ryanodine receptor type 1 mutant embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, M. Gartz; Niswander, Lee A.

    2015-01-01

    Locomotion and respiration require motor axon connectivity and activation of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Through a forward genetic screen for muscle weakness, we recently reported an allele of ryanodine receptor type 1 (Ryr1AG). Here we reveal a role for functional RyR1 during acetylcholine receptor (AChR) cluster formation and embryonic synaptic transmission. Ryr1AG homozygous embryos are non-motile. Motor axons extend past AChR clusters and enlarged AChR clusters are found under fasciculated nerves. Using physiological and pharmacological methods, we show that contractility can be resumed through the masking of a potassium leak, and evoked vesicular release can be resumed via bypassing the defect in RyR1 induced calcium release. Moreover, we show the involvement of ryanodine receptors in presynaptic release at the NMJ. This data provides evidence of a role for RyR1 on both the pre- and postsynaptic sides of the NMJ. PMID:26025922

  4. NO EVIDENCE FOR A SYSTEMATIC Fe II EMISSION LINE REDSHIFT IN TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sulentic, Jack W.; Marziani, Paola; Zamfir, Sebastian; Meadows, Zachary A. E-mail: paola.marziani@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: Zachary.A.Meadows@uwsp.edu

    2012-06-10

    We test the recent claim by Hu et al. that Fe II emission in type 1 active galactic nuclei shows a systematic redshift relative to the local source rest frame and broad-line H{beta}. We compile high signal-to-noise median composites using Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra from both the Hu et al. sample and our own sample of the 469 brightest DR5 spectra. Our composites are generated in bins of FWHM H{beta} and Fe II strength as defined in our 4D Eigenvector 1 formalism. We find no evidence for a systematic Fe II redshift and consistency with previous assumptions that Fe II shift and width (FWHM) follow H{beta} shift and FWHM in virtually all sources. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that Fe II emission (quasi-ubiquitous in type 1 sources) arises from a broad-line region with geometry and kinematics the same as that producing the Balmer lines.

  5. Type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu1) trigger the gating of GluD2 delta glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ady, Visou; Perroy, Julie; Tricoire, Ludovic; Piochon, Claire; Dadak, Selma; Chen, Xiaoru; Dusart, Isabelle; Fagni, Laurent; Lambolez, Bertrand; Levenes, Carole

    2014-01-01

    The orphan GluD2 receptor belongs to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family but does not bind glutamate. Ligand-gated GluD2 currents have never been evidenced, and whether GluD2 operates as an ion channel has been a long-standing question. Here, we show that GluD2 gating is triggered by type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, both in a heterologous expression system and in Purkinje cells. Thus, GluD2 is not only an adhesion molecule at synapses but also works as a channel. This gating mechanism reveals new properties of glutamate receptors that emerge from their interaction and opens unexpected perspectives regarding synaptic transmission and plasticity. PMID:24357660

  6. Cannabinoid type-1 receptor signaling in central serotonergic neurons regulates anxiety-like behavior and sociability

    PubMed Central

    Häring, Martin; Enk, Vanessa; Aparisi Rey, Alejandro; Loch, Sebastian; Ruiz de Azua, Inigo; Weber, Tillmann; Bartsch, Dusan; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system possesses neuromodulatory functions by influencing the release of various neurotransmitters, including γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate. A functional interaction between eCBs and the serotonergic system has already been suggested. Previously, we showed that cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor mRNA and protein are localized in serotonergic neurons of the raphe nuclei, implying that the eCB system can modulate serotonergic functions. In order to substantiate the physiological role of the CB1 receptor in serotonergic neurons of the raphe nuclei, we generated serotonergic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neuron-specific CB1 receptor-deficient mice, using the Cre/loxP system with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase under the control of the regulatory sequences of the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2-CreERT2), thus, restricting the recombination to 5-HT neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). Applying several different behavioral paradigms, we revealed that mice lacking the CB1 receptor in serotonergic neurons are more anxious and less sociable than control littermates. Thus, we were able to show that functional CB1 receptor signaling in central serotonergic neurons modulates distinct behaviors in mice. PMID:26388750

  7. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids. PMID:24726577

  8. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids.

  9. Type 1 receptor tyrosine kinases are differentially phosphorylated in mammary carcinoma and differentially associated with steroid receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bacus, S. S.; Chin, D.; Yarden, Y.; Zelnick, C. R.; Stern, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The neu/erbB-2/HER-2 proto-oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in up to 30% of mammary carcinomas and has been variably correlated with poor prognosis. The signaling activity of the encoded receptor tyrosine kinase is regulated by interactions with other type 1 receptors and their ligands. We have used a novel approach, phosphorylation-sensitive anti-Neu antibodies, to quantify signaling by Neu and epidermal growth factor receptor in a panel of frozen sections of mammary carcinoma specimens. We also determined the relationship of Neu, phosphorylated Neu (and epidermal growth factor receptor), and phosphotyrosine to the expression of Neu-related receptors (epidermal growth factor receptor, HER-3, and HER-4) and to prognostic factors (estrogen and progesterone receptor). We found that tyrosine phosphorylation of Neu (and hence signaling activity) is highly variable among mammary carcinomas. Neu and HER-4 were associated with divergent correlates, suggesting that they have profoundly different biological activities. These results have implications for etiology of mammary carcinoma for clinical evaluation of mammary carcinoma patients, and for development of Neu-targeted therapeutic strategies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8579117

  10. Comparison of Risk Factors and survival of Type 1 and Type II Endometrial Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Tahira Y.; Chishti, Uzma; Aziz, Aliya B.; Sheikh, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare risk factors and progression free survival of type 1 & 2 endometrial cancers. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 149 patients with early stage endometrial carcinoma treated between 1997 and 2012 in Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi was performed. Results: A total of 149 patients were analyzed. Type I tumors accounted for 92% of cases in the study while 8% were type II tumors. The mean age, BMI, parity, co-morbidities (hypertension & Diabetes), family history and history of polycystic disease were comparable in both groups. Overall better survival (113 Vs 24 months) was observed for type I endometrial cancer. Conclusion: Both types of endometrial cancer may share common etiologic factors. Despite the limitation of small numbers in one group this study confirms better survival in type 1 endometrial cancer. PMID:27648033

  11. Comparison of Risk Factors and survival of Type 1 and Type II Endometrial Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Tahira Y.; Chishti, Uzma; Aziz, Aliya B.; Sheikh, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare risk factors and progression free survival of type 1 & 2 endometrial cancers. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 149 patients with early stage endometrial carcinoma treated between 1997 and 2012 in Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi was performed. Results: A total of 149 patients were analyzed. Type I tumors accounted for 92% of cases in the study while 8% were type II tumors. The mean age, BMI, parity, co-morbidities (hypertension & Diabetes), family history and history of polycystic disease were comparable in both groups. Overall better survival (113 Vs 24 months) was observed for type I endometrial cancer. Conclusion: Both types of endometrial cancer may share common etiologic factors. Despite the limitation of small numbers in one group this study confirms better survival in type 1 endometrial cancer.

  12. Aldosterone-Induced Vascular Remodeling and Endothelial Dysfunction Require Functional Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors.

    PubMed

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Coelho, Suellen C; Ouerd, Sofiane; Rautureau, Yohann; Coffman, Thomas M; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the role of angiotensin type 1a receptors (AGTR1a) in vascular injury induced by aldosterone activation of mineralocorticoid receptors in Agtr1a(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with aldosterone for 14 days while receiving 1% NaCl in drinking water. Aldosterone increased systolic blood pressure (BP) by ≈30 mm Hg in WT mice and ≈50 mm Hg in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Aldosterone induced aortic and small artery remodeling, impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in WT mice, and enhanced fibronectin and collagen deposition and vascular inflammation. None of these vascular effects were observed in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Aldosterone effects were prevented by the AGTR1 antagonist losartan in WT mice. In contrast to aldosterone, norepinephrine caused similar BP increase and mesenteric artery remodeling in WT and Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Agtr1a(-/-) mice infused with aldosterone did not increase sodium excretion in response to a sodium chloride challenge, suggesting that sodium retention could contribute to the exaggerated BP rise induced by aldosterone. Agtr1a(-/-) mice had decreased mesenteric artery expression of the calcium-activated potassium channel Kcnmb1, which may enhance myogenic tone and together with sodium retention, exacerbate BP responses to aldosterone/salt in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. We conclude that although aldosterone activation of mineralocorticoid receptors raises BP more in Agtr1a(-/-) mice, AGTR1a is required for mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation to induce vascular remodeling and inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

  13. Age-associated repression of type 1 inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor impairs muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bora; Lee, Seung-Min; Bahn, Young Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Kang, Moonkyung; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Eunhee; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and power decrease with age, leading to impairment of mobility and metabolism in the elderly. Ca2+ signaling is crucial for myoblast differentiation as well as muscle contraction through activation of transcription factors and Ca2+-dependent kinases and phosphatases. Ca2+ channels, such as dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two-pore channel (TPC) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (ITPR), function to maintain Ca2+ homeostasis in myoblasts. Here, we observed a significant decrease in expression of type 1 IP3 receptor (ITPR1), but not types 2 and 3, in aged mice skeletal muscle and isolated myoblasts, compared with those of young mice. ITPR1 knockdown using shRNA-expressing viruses in C2C12 myoblasts and tibialis anterior muscle of mice inhibited myotube formation and muscle regeneration after injury, respectively, a typical phenotype of aged muscle. This aging phenotype was associated with repression of muscle-specific genes and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. ERK inhibition by U0126 not only induced recovery of myotube formation in old myoblasts but also facilitated muscle regeneration after injury in aged muscle. The conserved decline in ITPR1 expression in aged human skeletal muscle suggests utility as a potential therapeutic target for sarcopenia, which can be treated using ERK inhibition strategies. PMID:27658230

  14. The cannabinoid type-1 receptor carboxyl-terminus, more than just a tail.

    PubMed

    Stadel, Rebecca; Ahn, Kwang H; Kendall, Debra A

    2011-04-01

    The cannabinoid type-1 (CB(1)) receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor that binds the main active ingredient of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and has been implicated in several disease states, including drug addiction, anxiety, depression, obesity, and chronic pain. In the two decades since the discovery of CB(1), studies at the molecular level have centered on the transmembrane core. This interest has now expanded as we discover that other regions of CB(1), including the CB(1) carboxyl-terminus, have critical structures that are important for CB(1) activity and regulation. Following the recent description of the three dimensional structure of the full-length CB(1) carboxyl-terminal tail [Biopolymers (2009) vol. 91, pp. 565-573], several residues and structural motifs including two α-helices (termed H8 and H9) have been postulated to interact with common G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins, such as G-proteins and β-arrestins. This discourse will focus on the CB(1) carboxyl-terminus; our current understanding of the structural features of this region, evidence for its interaction with proteins, and the impact of structure on the binding and regulatory function of CB(1) accessory proteins. The involvement of the carboxyl-terminus in the receptor life cycle including activation, desensitization, and internalization will be highlighted.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 and chemokines: beyond competition for common cellular receptors.

    PubMed

    Stantchev, T S; Broder, C C

    2001-01-01

    The chemokines and their receptors have been receiving exceptional attention in recent years following the discoveries that some chemokines could specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and that certain chemokine receptors were the long-sought coreceptors which, along with CD4, are required for the productive entry of HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. Several chemokine receptors or orphan chemokine receptor-like molecules can support the entry of various viral strains, but the clinical significance of the CXCR4 and CCR5 coreceptors appear to overshadow a critical role for any of the other coreceptors and all HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains best employ one or both of these coreceptors. Binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 subunit to CD4 and/or an appropriate chemokine receptor triggers conformational changes in the envelope glycoprotein oligomer that allow it to facilitate the fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. During these interactions, gp120 appears to be capable of inducing a variety of signaling events, all of which are still not defined in detail. In addition, the more recently observed dichotomous effects, of both inhibition and enhancement, that chemokines and their receptor signaling events elicit on the HIV-1 entry and replication processes has once again highlighted the intricate and complex balance of factors that govern the pathogenic process. Here, we will review and discuss these new observations summarizing the potential significance these processes may have in HIV-1 infection. Understanding the complexities and significance of the signaling processes that the chemokines and viral products induce may substantially enhance our understanding of HIV-1 pathogenesis, and perhaps facilitate the discovery of new ways for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 disease.

  16. Blocking 5-HT2 receptor restores cardiovascular disorders in type 1 experimental diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; Ferreira-Santos, Pedro; Aparicio, Rubén; Montero, María-José; Morán, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the serotonergic modulation, through selective 5-HT2 receptor blockade, restores cardiovascular disturbances in type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by alloxan (150 mg/kg, s.c.) and maintained for 4 weeks. 5-HT2 receptor was blocked by sarpogrelate (30 mg/kg.day; 14 days; p.o.). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), glycaemia and body weight (BW) were monitored periodically. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the study and the heart, right kidney and thoracic aorta were removed; plasma samples were also obtained. Left ventricular hypertrophy index (LVH) and renal hypertrophy index (RH) were determined. Vascular function was studied in aorta rings; additionally, superoxide anion (O2•−) production (by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence) and lipid peroxidation (by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay) were measured. Neither alloxan nor sarpogrelate treatments altered HR, LVH or endothelium-independent relaxation. SBP, glycaemia, BW, RH, O2•− production and lipid peroxidation were significantly altered in diabetic animals compared with controls. Sarpogrelate treatment considerably decreased SBP, RH, O2•− production and lipid peroxidation. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was severely reduced in diabetic animal aortas compared to controls; sarpogrelate treatment markedly improved it. Our outcomes show that selectively blocking 5-HT2 receptors has beneficial effects on impaired cardiovascular parameters in diabetes. PMID:27659784

  17. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  18. Estrogens and Spermiogenesis: New Insights from Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, Giovanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex mechanism which allows the production of male gametes; it consists of mitotic, meiotic, and differentiation phases. Spermiogenesis is the terminal differentiation process during which haploid round spermatids undergo several biochemical and morphological changes, including extensive remodelling of chromatin and nuclear shape. Spermiogenesis is under control of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, like gonadotropins and testosterone. More recently, emerging pieces of evidence are suggesting that, among these factors, estrogens may have a role. To date, this is a matter of debate and concern because of the agonistic and antagonistic estrogenic effects that environmental chemicals may have on animal and human with damaging outcome on fertility. In this review, we summarize data which fuel this debate, with a particular attention to our recent results, obtained using type 1 cannabinoid receptor knockout male mice as animal model. PMID:24324492

  19. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) in Type 1 Diabetes Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sherman S; Forbes, Josephine M; Borg, Danielle J

    2016-10-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a novel protein increasingly studied in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). RAGE is expressed by several immune cell types, including T cells, antigen-presenting cells, endothelial cells, and the endocrine cells of the pancreatic islets. RAGE binds various ligands including advanced glycation end products (AGEs), high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), S100 proteins, β-amyloid, β-sheet fibrils, and lipopolysaccharide. AGEs are a particularly interesting ligand because their exogenous introduction into the body can be accelerated by the consumption of AGE-rich processed foods. This review will detail RAGE isoforms and its ligands and discuss how RAGE binding on the aforementioned cells could be linked to T1D pathogenesis. PMID:27612847

  20. Canavanine activates imidazoline I-2 receptors to reduce hyperglycemia in type 1-like diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Hong; Chao, Pin-Chun; Niu, Ho-Shan; Huang, Gin-Chi; Chen, Li-Jen; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2015-10-01

    Canavanine is a guanidinium derivative that has the basic structure of a ligand for the imidazoline receptor (I-R). Furthermore, canavanine is found in an herb that has been shown to improve diabetic disorders. Thus, the present study was designed to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic action of canavanine in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1-like diabetes. Canavanine decreased hyperglycemia in the STZ-induced diabetic rats, and this action was blocked by the antagonist specific to imidazoline I-2 receptors (I-2R), BU224, in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, canavanine increased the plasma β-endorphin level, as measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and this increase was also blocked by BU224 in the same manner. Moreover, amiloride at a dose sufficient to block I-2AR attenuated the actions of canavanine, including the increased β-endorphin level and the antihyperglycemic effect. Otherwise, canavanine increased the radioactive glucose uptake into skeletal muscles isolated from the diabetic rats. Furthermore, canavanine increased the phosphorylation of AMPK measured using Western blot analysis in these isolated skeletal muscles in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the insulin sensitivity of the diabetic rats was markedly increased by canavanine, and this action was also blocked by BU224. Overall, canavanine is capable of activating imidazoline I-2R; I-2AR is linked to an increase in the plasma level of β-endorphin, and I-2BR is related to effects on the glucose uptake by skeletal muscle that reduces hyperglycemia in type 1-like diabetic rats. Therefore, canavanine can be developed as effective agent to treat the diabetic disorders in the future. PMID:26362499

  1. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  2. The autoimmunity-associated gene PTPN22 potentiates toll-like receptor-driven, type 1 interferon-dependent immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaya; Shaked, Iftach; Stanford, Stephanie M; Zhou, Wenbo; Curtsinger, Julie M; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Shaheen, Zachary R; Cheng, Genhong; Sawatzke, Kristy; Campbell, Amanda M; Auger, Jennifer L; Bilgic, Hatice; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Schmeling, David O; Balfour, Henry H; Hasegawa, Kiminori; Chan, Andrew C; Corbett, John A; Binstadt, Bryce A; Mescher, Matthew F; Ley, Klaus; Bottini, Nunzio; Peterson, Erik J

    2013-07-25

    Immune cells sense microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLR), which trigger host defense responses including type 1 interferons (IFNs) secretion. A coding polymorphism in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene is a susceptibility allele for human autoimmune and infectious disease. We report that Ptpn22 selectively regulated type 1 IFN production after TLR engagement in myeloid cells. Ptpn22 promoted host antiviral responses and was critical for TLR agonist-induced, type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of inflammation in colitis and arthritis. PTPN22 directly associated with TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and promotes TRAF3 lysine 63-linked ubiquitination. The disease-associated PTPN22W variant failed to promote TRAF3 ubiquitination, type 1 IFN upregulation, and type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of arthritis. The findings establish a candidate innate immune mechanism of action for a human autoimmunity "risk" gene in the regulation of host defense and inflammation.

  3. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  4. Aberrant Methylation Inactivates Somatostatin and Somatostatin Receptor Type 1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Misawa, Yuki; Kondo, Haruki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Uehara, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to define somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SSTR1) methylation profiles for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors at diagnosis and follow up and to evaluate their prognostic significance and value as a biomarker. Methods Gene expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter methylation status was determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) in HNSCC. Results Methylation was associated with transcription inhibition. SST methylation in 81% of HNSCC tumor specimens significantly correlated with tumor size (P = 0.043), stage (P = 0.008), galanin receptor type 2 (GALR2) methylation (P = 0.041), and tachykinin-1 (TAC1) (P = 0.040). SSTR1 hypermethylation in 64% of cases was correlated with tumor size (P = 0.037), stage (P = 0.037), SST methylation (P < 0.001), and expression of galanin (P = 0.03), GALR2 (P = 0.014), TAC1 (P = 0.023), and tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1) (P = 0.003). SST and SSTR1 promoter hypermethylation showed highly discriminating receiver operator characteristic curve profiles, which clearly distinguished HNSCC from adjacent normal mucosal tissues. Concurrent hypermethylation of galanin and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.0001). Among patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, methylation of both SST and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.028). In multivariate logistic-regression analysis, concomitant methylation of galanin and SSTR1 was associated with an odds ratio for recurrence of 12.53 (95% CI, 2.62 to 59.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions CpG hypermethylation is a likely mechanism of SST and SSTR1 gene inactivation, supporting the hypothesis that SST and SSTR1 play a role in the tumorigenesis of HNSCC and that this hypermethylation may serve as an important biomarker. PMID:25734919

  5. Angiotensin type 1a receptor deficiency decreases amyloid β-protein generation and ameliorates brain amyloid pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Matsumoto, Yukino; Murakami, Saki; Sugakawa, Yusuke; Kami, Ayako; Tanabe, Chiaki; Maeda, Tomoji; Michikawa, Makoto; Komano, Hiroto; Zou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by neuronal loss and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and lowering the generation of Aβ is a pivotal approach in the strategy of Alzheimer’s disease treatment. Midlife hypertension is a major risk factor for the future onset of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease and the use of some antihypertensive drugs may decrease the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it is largely unknown how the blood pressure regulation system is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we found that the deficiency of angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1a), a key receptor for regulating blood pressure, significantly decreased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. The lack of AT1a inhibited the endocleavage of presenilin-1 (PS1), which is essential for γ-secretase complex formation and Aβ generation. Notably, the ligand of AT1a, angiotensin II, enhanced Aβ generation, PS1 endocleavage and γ-secretase complex formation. Our results suggest that AT1a activation is closely associated with Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation by regulating γ-secretase complex formation. Thus, removal of life style factors or stresses that stimulate AT1a to elevate blood pressure may decrease Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation, thereby preventing the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26154270

  6. Targeting Anti-Insulin B Cell Receptors Improves Receptor Editing in Type 1 Diabetes-Prone Mice.

    PubMed

    Bonami, Rachel H; Thomas, James W

    2015-11-15

    Autoreactive B lymphocytes that commonly arise in the developing repertoire can be salvaged by receptor editing, a central tolerance mechanism that alters BCR specificity through continued L chain rearrangement. It is unknown whether autoantigens with weak cross-linking potential, such as insulin, elicit receptor editing, or whether this process is dysregulated in related autoimmunity. To resolve these issues, we developed an editing-competent model in which anti-insulin Vκ125 was targeted to the Igκ locus and paired with anti-insulin VH125Tg. Physiologic, circulating insulin increased RAG-2 expression and was associated with BCR replacement that eliminated autoantigen recognition in a proportion of developing anti-insulin B lymphocytes. The proportion of anti-insulin B cells that underwent receptor editing was reduced in the type 1 diabetes-prone NOD strain relative to a nonautoimmune strain. Resistance to editing was associated with increased surface IgM expression on immature (but not transitional or mature) anti-insulin B cells in the NOD strain. The actions of mAb123 on central tolerance were also investigated, because selective targeting of insulin-occupied BCR by mAb123 eliminates anti-insulin B lymphocytes and prevents type 1 diabetes. Autoantigen targeting by mAb123 increased RAG-2 expression and dramatically enhanced BCR replacement in newly developed B lymphocytes. Administering F(ab')2123 induced IgM downregulation and reduced the frequency of anti-insulin B lymphocytes within the polyclonal repertoire of VH125Tg/NOD mice, suggesting enhanced central tolerance by direct BCR interaction. These findings indicate that weak or faulty checkpoints for central tolerance can be overcome by autoantigen-specific immunomodulatory therapy.

  7. Type 1 chemokine receptor expression in Chagas' disease correlates with morbidity in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Juliana A S; Bahia-Oliveira, Lilian M G; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C; Busek, Solange C U; Teixeira, Mauro M; Silva, João Santana; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2005-12-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors (CKRs) control the migration of leukocytes during the inflammatory process and are important immunological markers of type 1 (CCR5 and CXCR3) and type 2 (CCR3 and CCR4) responses. The coexpression of CKRs (CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR4) and intracellular cytokines (interleukin-10 [IL-10], IL-4, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha], and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) on T CD4+ and CD8+ peripheral cells from individuals with indeterminate (IND) or cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas' disease after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, were evaluated in this study. The percentage of T CD4+ and CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR5 and IFN-gamma, CXCR3 and IFN-gamma, and CXCR3 and TNF-alpha were higher in CARD than in IND individuals; on the other hand, the percentage of T CD4+ or CD8+ cells coexpressing CCR3 and IL-10 or coexpressing CCR3 and IL-4 were lower in CARD individuals than in IND individuals. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR5 or CXCR3 and IFN-gamma was observed in CARD individuals contrasting with a significant positive correlation between the expression of CCR3 and IL-4 and of CCR3 and IL-10 in IND patients. These results reinforce the hypothesis that a T. cruzi-exacerbated specific type 1 immune response developed by CARD chagasic patients is associated with the development of heart pathology.

  8. Regulation of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor by dopamine receptors in cocaine-induced place conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Mizuno, Koji; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Ohkuma, Seitaro

    2012-02-01

    Recent study shows that type 1 inositol-1,4,5-triphosohate receptors (IP(3) Rs) may be involved in amphetamine-induced conditioned preference, but little is known about its role in psychological dependence on cocaine. This study investigated the role and regulation of IP(3) R-1 in mice with cocaine-induced place preference. The cocaine-induced place preference was dose-dependently inhibited by intracerebroventricular pretreatment with IP(3) R antagonists, 2-aminophenoxyethane-borate (2-APB), and xestospongin C. The levels of IP(3) R-1 in the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens of cocaine-conditioned mice significantly increased, which was completely abolished by SCH23390 and sulpiride, selective dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, respectively. These findings suggest that IP(3) R-1-mediated intracellular signaling pathway may play an important role in the development of cocaine-induced place preference and that the expression of IP(3) R-1 is controlled by both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens of mice with cocaine-induced place preference.

  9. Distribution of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-immunoreactive axons in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Gábor; Deli, Levente; Kalló, Imre; Hrabovszky, Erik; Watanabe, Masahiko; Liposits, Zsolt; Fekete, Csaba

    2007-07-10

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the principal receptor for endocannabinoids in the brain; it mainly occurs in preterminal/terminal axons and mediates retrograde neuronal signaling mechanisms. A large body of physiological and electrophysiological evidence indicates the critical role of CB1 in the regulation of hypothalamic functions. Conversely, the distribution of CB1-containing axons in the hypothalamus is essentially unknown. Therefore, we have analyzed the distribution and the ultrastructural characteristics of the CB1-immunoreactive (IR) axons in the mouse hypothalamus by using an antiserum against the C-terminal 31 amino acids of the mouse CB1. We found that CB1-IR axons innervated densely the majority of hypothalamic nuclei, except for the suprachiasmatic and lateral mammillary nuclei, in which only scattered CB1-IR fibers occurred. CB1-IR innervation of the arcuate, ventromedial, dorsomedial, and paraventricular nuclei and the external zone of the median eminence corroborated the important role of CB1 in the regulation of energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine functions. Ultrastructural studies to characterize the phenotype of CB1-IR fibers established that most CB1 immunoreactivity appeared in the preterminal and terminal portions of axons. The CB1-IR boutons formed axospinous, axodendritic, and axosomatic synapses. Analysis of labeled synapses in the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei detected approximately equal numbers of symmetric and asymmetric specializations. In conclusion, the study revealed the dense and differential CB1-IR innervation of most hypothalamic nuclei and the median eminence of the mouse brain. At the ultrastructural level, CB1-IR axons established communication with hypothalamic neurons via symmetric and asymmetric synapses indicating the occurrence of retrograde signaling by endocannabinoids in hypothalamic neuronal networks.

  10. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhencheng; Liu Daoyan; Zhang Lili; Shen Chenyi; Ma Qunli; Cao Tingbing; Wang Lijuan; Nie Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu Zhiming . E-mail: zhuzm@yahoo.com

    2007-03-09

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta} (PPAR-{delta})-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-{delta}. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-{delta} by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-{delta} significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Both CB1 and PPAR-{delta} are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor.

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Action of Triazolobenzodiazepinone Agonists of the Type 1 Cholecystokinin Receptor. Possible Cooperativity across the Receptor Homodimeric Complex.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aditya J; Lam, Polo C H; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Miller, Laurence J

    2015-12-24

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of postcibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none have yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs.

  12. Cannabinoid type-1 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus inhibit stimulated food intake.

    PubMed

    Soria-Gómez, E; Massa, F; Bellocchio, L; Rueda-Orozco, P E; Ciofi, P; Cota, D; Oliet, S H R; Prospéro-García, O; Marsicano, G

    2014-03-28

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-dependent signaling in the brain is known to modulate food intake. Recent evidence has actually shown that CB1 can both inhibit and stimulate food intake in fasting/refeeding conditions, depending on the specific neuronal circuits involved. However, the exact brain sites where this bimodal control is exerted and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are not fully understood yet. Using pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches, we show that local CB1 blockade in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) increases fasting-induced hyperphagia in rats. Furthermore, local CB1 blockade in the PVN also increases the orexigenic effect of the gut hormone ghrelin in animals fed ad libitum. At the electrophysiological level, CB1 blockade in slices containing the PVN potentiates the decrease of the activity of PVN neurons induced by long-term application of ghrelin. Hence, the PVN is (one of) the site(s) where signals associated with the body's energy status determine the direction of the effects of endocannabinoid signaling on food intake.

  13. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC.

  14. Neurotensin receptor type 1 regulates ethanol intoxication and consumption in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moonnoh R.; Hinton, David J.; Song, Jane Y.; Lee, Kyung Won; Choo, Christopher; Johng, Heidi; Unal, Sencan S.; Richelson, Elliott; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2010-01-01

    Neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTS1) is known to mediate a variety of biological functions of neurotensin (NT) in the central nervous system. In this study, we found that NTS1 null mice displayed decreased sensitivity to the ataxic effect of ethanol on the rotarod and increased ethanol consumption when given free choice between ethanol and tap water containing bottles. Interestingly, the administration of NT69L, a brain-permeable NT analog, increased ethanol sensitivity in wild-type littermates but had no such effect in NTS1 null mice, suggesting that NTS1 contributes to NT-mediated ethanol intoxication. Furthermore, the daily treatment of NT69L, for 4 consecutive days, significantly reduced alcohol preference and consumption in wild-type littermates but had no such effects in NTS1 null mice in a two-bottle drinking experiment. Our study provides evidence for one possible pharmacological role of NT69L in which it increases sensitivity to the ataxic effect, and decreases voluntary consumption, of ethanol. Our study also demonstrates NTS1-mediated behavioral effects of NT69L. Therefore, our findings will be useful for understanding some aspects of alcoholism as well as to develop novel pharmacological therapeutic options for humans. PMID:20122953

  15. Astrocytic expression of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in rat and human sclerotic hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xian-Dong; Wei, Dong; Li, Juan; Kang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Chen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Liu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), which is traditionally located on axon terminals, plays an important role in the pathology of epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases by modulating synaptic transmission. Using the pilocarpine model of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures, which mimics the main features of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in humans, we examined the expression of CB1R in hippocampal astrocytes of epileptic rats. Furthermore, we also examined the expression of astrocytic CB1R in the resected hippocampi from patients with medically refractory mesial TLE. Using immunofluorescent double labeling, we found increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in hippocampi of epileptic rats, whereas expression of astrocytic CB1R was not detectable in hippocampi of saline treated animals. Furthermore, CB1R was also found in some astrocytes in sclerotic hippocampi in a subset of patients with intractable mesial TLE. Detection with immune electron microscopy showed that the expression of CB1R was increased in astrocytes of epileptic rats and modest levels of CB1R were also found on the astrocytic membrane of sclerotic hippocampi. These results suggest that increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in sclerotic hippocampi might be involved in the cellular basis of the effects of cannabinoids on epilepsy. PMID:25031702

  16. Detachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from germinal centers by blocking complement receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Kacani, L; Prodinger, W M; Sprinzl, G M; Schwendinger, M G; Spruth, M; Stoiber, H; Döpper, S; Steinhuber, S; Steindl, F; Dierich, M P

    2000-09-01

    After the transition from the acute to the chronic phase of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, complement mediates long-term storage of virions in germinal centers (GC) of lymphoid tissue. The contribution of particular complement receptors (CRs) to virus trapping in GC was studied on tonsillar specimens from HIV-infected individuals. CR2 (CD21) was identified as the main binding site for HIV in GC. Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) blocking the CR2-C3d interaction were shown to detach 62 to 77% of HIV type 1 from tonsillar cells of an individual in the presymptomatic stage. Although they did so at a lower efficiency, these antibodies were able to remove HIV from tonsillar cells of patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy, suggesting that the C3d-CR2 interaction remains a primary entrapment mechanism in treated patients as well. In contrast, removal of HIV was not observed with MAb blocking CR1 or CR3. Thus, targeting CR2 may facilitate new approaches toward a reduction of residual virus in GC. PMID:10933708

  17. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  18. Enhanced type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide signaling after pertussis toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A M; Challiss, R A; Mistry, R; Saunders, R; Thomsen, C; Nahorski, S R

    1997-09-01

    The regulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by the type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1alpha) was investigated in stably transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Incubation of the cells with L-glutamate, quisqualate, and 1-aminocyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid resulted in a marked accumulation of [3H]inositol monophosphate (InsP1) and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] mass in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BHK-mGluR1alpha cells with pertussis toxin [ 100 ng/ml, 24 hr] led to a dramatic 12-16-fold increase in the accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and a 2-fold increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the absence of added agonist. Although only very low levels (/=75%, and the EC50 shifted leftward by 65-fold [-log EC50 values (molar), 7.26 +/- 0.23 versus 5.45 +/- 0.07; n = 4) in PTX-treated compared with control cells. In contrast, antagonist effects on agonist-stimulated [3H]InsP1 responses were similar in control and PTX-treated BHK-mGluR1alpha cells. These changes in the concentration-effect curves for mGluR agonists are consistent with a model in which the receptor associates with PTX-sensitive inhibitory (Gi/o) and PTX-insensitive stimulatory (Gq/11) G proteins that can each influence PIC activity. The present observations are consistent with a dual regulation of mGluR1alpha-mediated PIC activity that could be fundamental in

  19. Clonidine displacement from type 1 imidazoline receptor by p-aminobenzamidine, the prototype of trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pallottini, Valentina; Marino, Maria; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2002-11-01

    p-Aminobenzamidine inhibits competitively the catalytic activity of enzymes that recognize preferentially the L-arginyl side chain and related structures. Notably, p-aminobenzamidine is considered as the prototype of trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, p-aminobenzamidine inhibits the catalytic activity of nitric oxide synthase type I and type II as well as copper amine oxidase. Taking into account the structural similarity between p-aminobenzamidine, agmatine (the putative endogenous ligand of the membrane type 1 imidazoline receptor (I1-R)), and N-amidino-2-hydroxypyrrolidine (the product of agmatine oxidation by copper amine oxidase), the [3H]clonidine displacement from I1-R in rat heart membranes by p-aminobenzamidine was investigated. p-Aminobenzamidine is as effective as agmatine and N-amidino-2-hydroxypyrrolidine and more effective than the antihypertensive drug clonidine to displace [3H]clonidine from I1-R. Therefore, trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors structurally related to p-aminobenzamidine should be administrated under careful control. PMID:12587981

  20. Angiotensin type 1a receptors on corticotropin-releasing factor neurons contribute to the expression of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Hurt, R C; Garrett, J C; Keifer, O P; Linares, A; Couling, L; Speth, R C; Ressler, K J; Marvar, P J

    2015-09-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1a R) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1a R signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1a R gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) ). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) mice exhibit less freezing than wild-type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression-an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1a R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1 R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction.

  1. Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors on Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Neurons Contribute to the Expression of Conditioned Fear

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Robert C.; Garrett, Jacob C.; Keifer, Orion P.; Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena; Speth, Robert C.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Marvar, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1aR) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1aR signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1aR gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1aR(−/−)). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety, and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1aR(−/−) mice exhibit less freezing than wild type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression—an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction. PMID:26257395

  2. Blocking the ghrelin receptor type 1a in the rat brain impairs memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Siamak; Shahrokhi, Shahrzad

    2015-08-01

    Studies have shown that intracerebral administration of ghrelin hormone affects learning and memory in different experimental models of learning. However, the effect of antagonism of ghrelin receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a) on different stages of learning has not been investigated. In this study the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) injection of a GHS-R1a selective antagonist (d-Lys-3-GHRP-6) was examined on acquisition and consolidation of learning in the passive avoidance task. In total, 72 male Wistar rats weighing 230-280g were randomly distributed into 9 groups of 8 each. Animals underwent stereotaxic surgery and cannulated in their right ventricle. One week after surgery, the rats received different doses of d-Lys-3-GHRP-6 (0.2, 2, 20 and 80nM/5μl; i.c.v) 10min before, or (2, 20 and 80nM/5μl; i.c.v) immediately after training. The control groups received solvent of the drug. Twenty four hours later in the test day, memory retrieval was assessed. Pre-training injection of d-Lys-3-GHRP-6 decreased step-through latency (STL) and increased number of step-throughs into the dark compartment (NST) in a dose-dependent manner, but failed to be statistically significant. It also increased time spent in the dark compartment (TDC), significantly and in a dose-dependent manner. Post-training injection of d-Lys-3-GHRP-6 decreased step-through latency and increased time spent in the dark compartment and number of step-throughs into the dark compartment, significantly and in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that antagonism of the GHS-R1a in the rat brain impairs memory encoding on both acquisition and consolidation stages. Further studies are required to elucidate the main brain regions affected by the antagonist.

  3. Type 1 and 3 inositol trisphosphate receptors are required for extra-embryonic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Keiko; Nakazawa, Maki; Yamagishi, Chihiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The embryonic-maternal interface of the placental labyrinth, allantois, and yolk sac are vital during embryogenesis; however, the precise mechanism underlying the vascularization of these structures remains unknown. Herein we focus on the role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R), which are intracellular Ca(2+) release channels, in placentation. Double knockout (DKO) of type 1 and 3 IP3Rs (IP3R1 and IP3R3, respectively) in mice resulted in embryonic lethality around embryonic day (E) 11.5. Because IP3R1 and IP3R3 were co-expressed in endothelial cells in the labyrinth, allantois, and yolk sac, we investigated extra-embryonic vascular development in IP3R1- and IP3R3-DKO mice. The formation of chorionic plates and yolk sac vessels seemed dysregulated around the timing of the chorio-allantoic attachment, immediately followed by the disorganization of allantoic vessels, the decreased expression of the spongiotrophoblast cell marker Tpbpa and the growth retardation of the embryos in DKO mice. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry demonstrated downregulation of a vascular endothelial marker, CD31, in labyrinth embryonic vessels and poor elongation of extra-embryonic mesoderm into the labyrinth layer in DKO placenta, whereas the branching of the DKO chorionic trophoblast was initiated. In addition, allantoic and yolk sac vessels in extra-embryonic tissues were less remodeled in DKO mice. In vitro endothelial cord formation and migration activities of cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein were downregulated under the inhibition of IP3R. Our results suggest that IP3R1 and IP3R3 are required for extra-embryonic vascularization in the placenta, allantois, and yolk sac. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of IP3/IP3Rs signaling in the development of the vasculature at the embryonic-maternal interface. PMID:27514653

  4. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation.

  5. Type 1 and 3 inositol trisphosphate receptors are required for extra-embryonic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Keiko; Nakazawa, Maki; Yamagishi, Chihiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The embryonic-maternal interface of the placental labyrinth, allantois, and yolk sac are vital during embryogenesis; however, the precise mechanism underlying the vascularization of these structures remains unknown. Herein we focus on the role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R), which are intracellular Ca(2+) release channels, in placentation. Double knockout (DKO) of type 1 and 3 IP3Rs (IP3R1 and IP3R3, respectively) in mice resulted in embryonic lethality around embryonic day (E) 11.5. Because IP3R1 and IP3R3 were co-expressed in endothelial cells in the labyrinth, allantois, and yolk sac, we investigated extra-embryonic vascular development in IP3R1- and IP3R3-DKO mice. The formation of chorionic plates and yolk sac vessels seemed dysregulated around the timing of the chorio-allantoic attachment, immediately followed by the disorganization of allantoic vessels, the decreased expression of the spongiotrophoblast cell marker Tpbpa and the growth retardation of the embryos in DKO mice. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry demonstrated downregulation of a vascular endothelial marker, CD31, in labyrinth embryonic vessels and poor elongation of extra-embryonic mesoderm into the labyrinth layer in DKO placenta, whereas the branching of the DKO chorionic trophoblast was initiated. In addition, allantoic and yolk sac vessels in extra-embryonic tissues were less remodeled in DKO mice. In vitro endothelial cord formation and migration activities of cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein were downregulated under the inhibition of IP3R. Our results suggest that IP3R1 and IP3R3 are required for extra-embryonic vascularization in the placenta, allantois, and yolk sac. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of IP3/IP3Rs signaling in the development of the vasculature at the embryonic-maternal interface.

  6. FRET-based localization of fluorescent protein insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Raina, Shweta A; Tsai, Jeffrey; Samsó, Montserrat; Fessenden, James D

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM) maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP) insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1), a large intracellular Ca(2+) release channel that plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. A series of full-length His-tagged GFP-RyR1 fusion constructs were created, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells and then complexed with Cy3NTA, a His-tag specific FRET acceptor. FRET efficiency values measured from each GFP donor to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag acceptor site were converted into intermolecular distances and the positions of each inserted GFP were then triangulated relative to a previously published X-ray crystal structure of a 559 amino acid RyR1 fragment. We observed that the chromophoric centers of fluorescent proteins inserted into RyR1 can be located as far as 45 Å from their insertion sites and that the fused proteins can also be located in internal cavities within RyR1. These findings should prove useful in interpreting structural results obtained in cryo EM maps using fusions of small fluorescent proteins. More accurate point-to-point distance information may be obtained using complementary orthogonal labeling systems that rely on fluorescent probes that bind directly to amino acid side chains.

  7. Discovery and characterization of ACT-335827, an orally available, brain penetrant orexin receptor type 1 selective antagonist.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Gatfield, John; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Dietrich, Hendrik; Treiber, Alexander; Jenck, Francois; Boss, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Stress relief: Orexin neuropeptides regulate arousal and stress processing through orexin receptor type 1 (OXR-1) and 2 (OXR-2) signaling. A selective OXR-1 antagonist, represented by a phenylglycine-amide substituted tetrahydropapaverine derivative (ACT-335827), is described that is orally available, penetrates the brain, and decreases fear, compulsive behaviors and autonomic stress reactions in rats.

  8. GPS-MBA: computational analysis of MHC class II epitopes in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ruikun; Liu, Zexian; Ren, Jian; Ma, Chuang; Gao, Tianshun; Zhou, Yanhong; Yang, Qing; Xue, Yu

    2012-01-01

    As a severe chronic metabolic disease and autoimmune disorder, type 1 diabetes (T1D) affects millions of people world-wide. Recent advances in antigen-based immunotherapy have provided a great opportunity for further treating T1D with a high degree of selectivity. It is reported that MHC class II I-A(g7) in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse and human HLA-DQ8 are strongly linked to susceptibility to T1D. Thus, the identification of new I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes would be of great help to further experimental and biomedical manipulation efforts. In this study, a novel GPS-MBA (MHC Binding Analyzer) software package was developed for the prediction of I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes. Using experimentally identified epitopes as the training data sets, a previously developed GPS (Group-based Prediction System) algorithm was adopted and improved. By extensive evaluation and comparison, the GPS-MBA performance was found to be much better than other tools of this type. With this powerful tool, we predicted a number of potentially new I-A(g7) and HLA-DQ8 epitopes. Furthermore, we designed a T1D epitope database (TEDB) for all of the experimentally identified and predicted T1D-associated epitopes. Taken together, this computational prediction result and analysis provides a starting point for further experimental considerations, and GPS-MBA is demonstrated to be a useful tool for generating starting information for experimentalists. The GPS-MBA is freely accessible for academic researchers at: http://mba.biocuckoo.org.

  9. Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Varga, Angelika; Selvarajah, Srikumaran; Jenes, Agnes; Dienes, Beatrix; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Kulik, Akos; Veress, Gabor; Brain, Susan D.; Baker, David; Urban, Laszlo; Mackie, Ken; Nagy, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both capsaicin and the endogenous TRPV1 and CB1 receptor ligand anandamide (ACR neurons). Blocking or deleting the CB1 receptor only reduces both anandamide- and capsaicin-evoked responses in ACR neurons. Deleting the CB1 receptor also reduces the proportion of ACR neurons without any effect on the overall number of capsaicin-responding cells. Regarding the distribution pattern of the two receptors, neurons express CB1 and TRPV1 receptors either isolated in low densities or in close proximity with medium/high densities. We suggest that spatial distribution of the CB1 receptor and TRPV1 contributes to the complexity of their functional interaction. PMID:27653550

  10. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV-1) channels contribute to cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J; Fieger, Sarah M

    2010-11-01

    The initial, rapid increase in skin blood flow in response to direct application of heat is thought to be mediated by an axon reflex, which is dependent on intact cutaneous sensory nerves. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV-1) channels, which are putative channels located on sensory nerves, would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans. Ten subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres which were randomly assigned one of four treatments: (1) vehicle control (90% propylene glycol + 10% lactated Ringer solution); (2) 20 mm capsazepine to inhibit TRPV-1 channels; (3) 10 mm l-NAME to inhibit NO synthase; and (4) combined 20 mm capsazepine + 10 mm l-NAME. Following baseline measurements, the temperature of skin heaters was increased from 33°C to 42°C at a rate of 1.0°C every 10 s and local temperature was held at 42°C for 20-30 min until a stable plateau in skin blood flow was achieved. An index of skin blood flow was measured directly over each microdialysis site via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Beat-by-beat blood pressure was measured via photoplethysmography and verified via automated brachial auscultation. At the end of the local heating protocol, temperature of the heaters was increased to 43°C and 28 mm nitroprusside was infused to achieve maximal vasodilatation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (%CVCmax). Initial peak in capsazepine (44 ± 4%CVCmax), l-NAME (56 ± 4%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (32 ± 6%CVCmax) sites was significantly attenuated compared to control (87 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). The plateau phase of thermal hyperaemia was significantly attenuated in capsazepine (73 ± 6%CVCmax), l-NAME (47 ± 5%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (31 ± 7%CVCmax) sites compared to control (92 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). These data suggest TRPV-1

  11. Structural determinants critical for localization and signaling within the seventh transmembrane domain of the type 1 corticotropin releasing hormone receptor: lessons from the receptor variant R1d.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Danijela; Lehnert, Hendrik; Levine, Michael A; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K

    2008-11-01

    The type 1 CRH receptor (CRH-R1) plays a fundamental role in homeostatic adaptation to stressful stimuli. CRH-R1 gene activity is regulated through alternative splicing and generation of various CRH-R1 mRNA variants. One such variant is the CRH-R1d, which has 14 amino acids missing from the putative seventh transmembrane domain due to exon 13 deletion, a splicing event common to other members of the B1 family of G protein-coupled receptors. In this study, using overexpression of recombinant receptors in human embryonic kidney 293 and myometrial cells, we showed by confocal microscopy that in contrast to CRH-R1alpha, the R1d variant is primarily retained in the cytoplasm, although some cell membrane expression is also evident. Use of antibodies against the CRH-R1 C terminus in nonpermeabilized cells showed that membrane-expressed CRH-R1d contains an extracellular C terminus. Interestingly, treatment of CRH-R1d-expressing cells with CRH (100 nM) for 45-60 min elicited functional responses associated with a significant reduction of plasma membrane receptor expression, redistribution of intracellular receptors, and increased receptor degradation. Site-directed mutagenesis studies identified the cassette G356-F358 within transmembrane domain 7 as crucial for CRH-R1alpha stability to the plasma membrane because deletion of this cassette caused substantial intracellular localization of CRH-R1 alpha. Most importantly, coexpression studies between CRH-R1d and CRH-R2beta demonstrated that the CRH-R2beta could partially rescue CRH-R1d membrane expression, and this was associated with a significant attenuation of urocotrin II-induced cAMP production and ERK1/2 and p38MAPK activation, suggesting that CRH-R1d might specifically induce heterologous impairment of CRH-R2 signaling responses. This mechanism appears to involve accelerated CRH-R2beta endocytosis.

  12. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  13. Functional Overexpression of Vomeronasal Receptors Using a Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1)-Derived Amplicon.

    PubMed

    Stein, Benjamin; Alonso, María Teresa; Zufall, Frank; Leinders-Zufall, Trese; Chamero, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In mice, social behaviors such as mating and aggression are mediated by pheromones and related chemosignals. The vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects olfactory information from other individuals by sensory neurons tuned to respond to specific chemical cues. Receptors expressed by vomeronasal neurons are implicated in selective detection of these cues. Nearly 400 receptor genes have been identified in the mouse VNO, but the tuning properties of individual receptors remain poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here we develop a herpes virus-based amplicon delivery system to overexpress three types of vomeronasal receptor genes and to characterize cell responses to their proposed ligands. Through Ca2+ imaging in native VNO cells we show that virus-induced overexpression of V1rj2, V2r1b or Fpr3 caused a pronounced increase of responsivity to sulfated steroids, MHC-binding peptide or the synthetic hexapeptide W-peptide, respectively. Other related ligands were not recognized by infected individual neurons, indicating a high degree of selectivity by the overexpressed receptor. Removal of G-protein signaling eliminates Ca2+ responses, indicating that the endogenous second messenger system is essential for observing receptor activation. Our results provide a novel expression system for vomeronasal receptors that should be useful for understanding the molecular logic of VNO ligand detection. Functional expression of vomeronasal receptors and their deorphanization provides an essential requirement for deciphering the neural mechanisms controlling behavior. PMID:27195771

  14. Microinjection of orexin-A into the rat locus coeruleus nucleus induces analgesia via cannabinoid type-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Hossein Mohammad-Pour; Azizi, Hossein; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Reza, Mani Ali; Semnanian, Saeed

    2015-10-22

    Locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus is involved in noradrenergic descending pain modulation. LC receives dense orexinergic projections from the lateral hypothalamus. Orexin-A and -B are hypothalamic peptides which modulate a variety of brain functions via orexin type-1 (OX1) and orexin type-2 (OX2) receptors. Previous studies have shown that activation of OX1 receptors induces endocannabinoid synthesis and alters synaptic neurotransmission by retrograde signaling via affecting cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors. In the present study the interaction of orexin-A and endocannabinoids was examined at the LC level in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Pain was induced by formalin (2%) injection into the hind paw. Intra-LC microinjection of orexin-A decreased the nociception score during both phases of formalin test. Furthermore, intra-LC microinjection of either SB-334867 (OX1 receptor antagonist) or AM251 (CB1 receptor antagonist) increased flinches and also the nociception score during phase 1, 2 and the inter-phase of formalin test. The analgesic effect of orexin-A was diminished by prior intra-LC microinjection of either SB-334867 or AM251. This data show that, activation of OX1 receptors in the LC can induce analgesia and also the blockade of OX1 or CB1 receptors is associated with hyperalgesia during formalin test. Our findings also suggest that CB1 receptors may modulate the analgesic effect of orexin-A. These results outline a new mechanism by which orexin-A modulates the nociceptive processing in the LC nucleus.

  15. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane–solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane–solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor. PMID

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of Candidate PET Radioligands for Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type-1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Nicholas J.; Li, Yu-Wen; Chin, Frederick T.; Dischino, Douglas D.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Deskus, Jeffrey A.; Mattson, Ronald J.; Imaizumo, Masao; Pieschl, Rick; Molski, Thaddeus F.; Fujita, Masahiro; Dulac, Heidi; Zaczek, Robert; Bronson, Joanne J.; Macor, John E.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A radioligand for measuring the density of corticotrophin-releasing factor subtype-1 receptors (CRF1 receptors) in living animal and human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) would be a useful tool for neuropsychiatric investigations and the development of drugs intended to interact with this target. This study was aimed at discovery of such a radioligand from a group of CRF1 receptor ligands based on a core 3-(phenylamino)pyrazin-2(1H)-one scaffold. Methods CRF1 receptor ligands were selected for development as possible PET radioligands based on their binding potency at CRF receptors (displacement of [125I]CRF from rat cortical membranes), measured lipophilicity, autoradiographic binding profile in rat and rhesus monkey brain sections, rat biodistribution, and suitability for radiolabeling with carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Two identified candidates (BMS-721313 and BMS-732098) were labeled with fluorine-18. A third candidate (BMS-709460) was labeled with carbon-11 and all three radioligands were evaluated in PET experiments in rhesus monkey. CRF1 receptor density (Bmax) was assessed in rhesus brain cortical and cerebellum membranes with the CRF receptor ligand, [3H]BMS-728300. Results The three ligands selected for development showed high binding affinity (IC50 values, 0.3–8 nM) at CRF1 receptors and moderate lipophilicity (LogD, 2.8–4.4). [3H]BMS-728300 and the two 18F-labeled ligands showed region-specific binding in rat and rhesus monkey brain autoradiography, namely higher binding density in the frontal and limbic cortex, and cerebellum than in thalamus and brainstem. CRF1 receptor Bmax in rhesus brain was found to be 50–120 fmol/mg protein across cortical regions and cerebellum. PET experiments in rhesus monkey showed that the radioligands [18F]BMS-721313, [18F]BMS-732098 and [11C]BMS-709460 gave acceptably high brain radioactivity uptake but no indication of the specific binding as seen in vitro. Conclusions Candidate CRF1 receptor

  17. Monoglyceride lipase deficiency causes desensitization of intestinal cannabinoid receptor type 1 and increased colonic μ-opioid receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Taschler, U; Eichmann, T O; Radner, F P W; Grabner, G F; Wolinski, H; Storr, M; Lass, A; Schicho, R; Zimmermann, R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) degrades 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), an endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors (CB1/2). Because the CB1 receptor is involved in the control of gut function, we investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of MGL on intestinal motility. Furthermore, we determined whether defective 2-AG degradation affects μ-opioid receptorreceptor) signalling, a parallel pathway regulating gut motility. Experimental Approach Gut motility was investigated by monitoring Evans Blue transit and colonic bead propulsion in response to MGL inhibition and CB1 receptor or μ receptor stimulation. Ileal contractility was investigated by electrical field stimulation. CB1 receptor expression in ileum and colon was assessed by immunohistochemical analyses. Key Results Pharmacological inhibition of MGL slowed down whole gut transit in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. Conversely, genetic deletion of MGL did not affect gut transit despite increased 2-AG levels. Notably, MGL deficiency caused complete insensitivity to CB1 receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of whole gut transit and ileal contractility suggesting local desensitization of CB1 receptors. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses of myenteric ganglia of MGL-deficient mice revealed that CB1 receptors were trapped in endocytic vesicles. Finally, MGL-deficient mice displayed accelerated colonic propulsion and were hypersensitive to μ receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. This phenotype was reproduced by chronic pharmacological inhibition of MGL. Conclusion and Implications Constantly elevated 2-AG levels induce severe desensitization of intestinal CB1 receptors and increased sensitivity to μ receptor-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. These changes should be considered when cannabinoid-based drugs are used in the therapy of gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26075589

  18. ACVR1B (ALK4, activin receptor type 1B) gene mutations in pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gloria H.; Bansal, Ravi; Murphy, Kathleen M.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Yeo, Charles J.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kern, Scott E.

    2001-01-01

    DPC4 is known to mediate signals initiated by type β transforming growth factor (TGFβ) as well as by other TGFβ superfamily ligands such as activin and BMP (bone morphogenic proteins), but mutational surveys of such non-TGFβ receptors have been negative to date. Here we describe the gene structure and novel somatic mutations of the activin type I receptor, ACVR1B, in pancreatic cancer. ACVR1B has not been described previously as a mutated tumor-suppressor gene. PMID:11248065

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced elimination of the type 1 interferon receptor is required for efficient angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Qian, Juan; Carbone, Christopher J; Leu, N Adrian; Baker, Darren P; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2011-10-01

    Angiogenesis is stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and antagonized by type 1 interferons, including IFN-α/β. On engaging their respective receptors (VEGFR2 and IFNAR), both stimuli activate protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and type 1 IFNs require PKD2 activation and recruitment to IFNAR1 to promote the phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination, down-regulation, and degradation of the cognate receptor chain, IFNAR1. Data reveal that PKD2 activity is dispensable for VEGF-stimulated down-regulation of VEGFR2. Remarkably, VEGF treatment promotes the recruitment of PKD2 to IFNAR1 as well as ensuing phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation of IFNAR1. In cells exposed to VEGF, phosphorylation-dependent degradation of IFNAR1 leads to an inhibition of type 1 IFN signaling and is required for efficient VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis. Importance of this mechanism for proangiogenic or antiangiogenic responses in cells exposed to counteracting stimuli and the potential medical significance of this regulation are discussed. PMID:21832278

  20. Polymodal Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 Nocisensor: Structure, Modulators, and Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Minghua; Gosu, Vijayakumar; Basith, Shaherin; Hong, Sunhye; Choi, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels belong to a superfamily of sensory-related ion channels responding to a wide variety of thermal, mechanical, or chemical stimuli. In an attempt to comprehend the piquancy and pain mechanism of the archetypal vanilloids, transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 was discovered. TRPV1, a well-established member of the TRP family, is implicated in a range of functions including inflammation, painful stimuli sensation, and mechanotransduction. TRPV1 channels are nonselective cation receptors that are gated by a broad array of noxious ligands. Such polymodal-sensor aspect makes the TRPV1 channel extremely versatile and important for its role in sensing burning pain. Besides ligands, TRPV1 signaling can also be modulated by lipids, secondary messengers, protein kinases, cytoskeleton, and several other proteins. Due to its central role in hyperalgesia transduction and inflammatory processes, it is considered as the primary pharmacological pain target. Moreover, understanding the structural and functional intricacies of the channel is indispensable for the therapeutic intervention of TRPV1 in pain and other pathological disorders. In this chapter, we seek to give a mechanistic outlook on the TRPV1 channel. Specifically, we will explore the TRPV1 structure, activation, modulation, ligands, and its therapeutic targeting. However, the major objective of this review is to highlight the fact that TRPV1 channel can be treated as an effective therapeutic target for treating several pain- and nonpain-related physiological and pathological states. PMID:27038373

  1. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-González, Maria; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  2. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Gomis-González, Maria; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  3. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Gomis-González, Maria; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-08-31

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS.

  4. Cannabinoid type-1 receptor reduces pain and neurotoxicity produced by chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Khasabova, Iryna A.; Khasabov, Sergey; Paz, Justin; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Simone, Donald A.; Seybold, Virginia S.

    2012-01-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting complication of chemotherapy. Cisplatin produces a cumulative toxic effect on peripheral nerves, and 30%–40% of cancer patients receiving this agent experience pain. By modeling cisplatin-induced hyperalgesia in mice with daily injections of cisplatin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) for 7 days, we investigated the antihyperalgesic effects of anandamide (AEA) and URB597, an inhibitor of AEA hydrolysis. Cisplatin-induced mechanical and heat hyperalgesia were accompanied by a decrease in the level of AEA in plantar paw skin. No changes in motor activity were observed after 7 injections of cisplatin. Intraplantar injection of AEA (10 μg/10 μl) or URB597 (9 μg/10 μl) transiently attenuated hyperalgesia through activation of peripheral CB1 receptors. Co-injections of URB597 (0.3 mg/kg daily, i.p.) with cisplatin decreased and delayed the development of mechanical and heat hyperalgesia. The effect of URB597 was mediated by CB1 receptors since AM281 (0.33 mg/kg daily, i.p) blocked the effect of URB597. Co-injection of URB597 also normalized the cisplatin-induced decrease in conduction velocity of Aα/Aβ fibers and reduced the increase of ATF-3 and TRPV-1 immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Since DRGs are a primary site of toxicity by cisplatin, effects of cisplatin were studied on cultured DRG neurons. Incubation of DRG neurons with cisplatin (4 μg/ml) for 24 h decreased the total length of neurites. URB597 (100 nM) attenuated these changes through activation of CB1 receptors. Collectively, these results suggest that pharmacological facilitation of AEA signaling is a promising strategy for attenuating cisplatin-associated sensory neuropathy. PMID:22593077

  5. Modulatory effect of insulin on T cell receptor mediated calcium signaling is blunted in long lasting type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Demkow, Urszula; Winklewski, Paweł; Ciepiela, Olga; Popko, Katarzyna; Lipińska, Anna; Kucharska, Anna; Michalska, Beata; Wąsik, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Insulin significantly influences Ca(2+) signals evoked by various stimulants. In type 1 recent onset diabetes mellitus the proliferative response of T cells is significantly decreased. The number of clinical trials exploring the role of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) as a therapeutic agent in recent onset diabetes mellitus type 1 is increasing last years. Therefore, a better understanding of the interplay between T cell receptor (TCR) dependent Ca(2+) increase, and insulin is of vital clinical significance. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of insulin on TCR evoked Ca(2+) responses in T lymphocytes obtained from healthy volunteers and patients suffering from long lasting diabetes mellitus type 1. Analysis was performed with use of the flow cytometer. We demonstrated that T cells ability to mobilize Ca(2+) was significantly reduced in long lasting diabetes mellitus type 1. Ca(2+) decrease achieved by the long term incubation with anti-CD3 mAb in T cells from healthy volunteers was restored by insulin. Strong interrelationship between baseline Ca(2+) level and plateau phase response to TCR stimulation was observed in the cytoplasm of cells pre-incubated with insulin from both healthy subjects and diabetic patients (r = 0.95, p < 0.0001 and r = 0.94, p < 0.0001, respectively). We postulate the existence of the interplay between TCR mediated activation and insulin. The TCR-insulin interplay is blunted in long lasting diabetes mellitus type 1. These observations may have an important implication for future therapeutic options in diabetes.

  6. Clozapine effects on adenylyl cyclase activity and serotonin type 1A receptors in human brain post-mortem.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Giannaccini, Gino; Castagna, Maura; Naccarato, Antonio G; Luccachini, Antonio; Catena-Dell'Osso, Mario; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2014-04-01

    Although the pharmacological profile of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine has been extensively studied in animal models, little information is available on its effects in the human brain. In particular, much interest is focused on the understanding of clozapine activity on serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission, particularly on 5-HT receptor of type 1A (5-HT(1A)) that seems to play a pivotal role in the control of the 5-HT system. The present work, therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of clozapine and its major metabolite, norclozapine, on the modulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) velocity via 5-HT(1A) receptors in human post-mortem brain regions, in particular the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and raphe nuclei. Concomitantly, the ability of the two compounds to displace the specific binding of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist [³H]-8-hydroxy-(2-di-N-propylamino) tetralin ([³H]-8-OH-DPAT) was evaluated in the same brain areas. The results showed that both clozapine and norclozapine, although with a 20-fold lower affinity, displaced [³H]8-OH-DPAT binding in all of the brain regions analysed, suggesting their interaction with 5-HT(1A) receptors. At the same time, clozapine and, to a lesser extent, norclozapine were found to inhibit the forskolin (FK)-stimulated AC system, while decreasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations in the hippocampus only. The receptor characterisation of the clozapine effect on AC observed in the hippocampus by the use of antagonists showed a mixed profile, involving not only the 5-HT(1A) receptor but also a muscarinic (M) receptor subtype, most likely the M₄ one. These findings, while considering all the limitations due to the use of post-mortem tissues, are strongly suggestive of a region-dependent pharmacological action of clozapine in the human brain that may explain its peculiar clinical effects and open up research towards novel targets for future antipsychotic drugs.

  7. Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 promotes adipogenesis via interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Peng; Chen, Yi; Ji, Ning; Lin, Yunfeng; Yuan, Quan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) is an essential enzyme for taurine biosynthesis and the biodegradation of toxic cysteine. As previously suggested, Cdo1 may be a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation, but the role of Cdo1 in adipogenesis has yet been reported. In this study, we found that the expression of Cdo1 is dramatically elevated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs). Conversely, knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 cells and mBMSCs. Mechanistically, we found Cdo1 interacted with Pparγ in response to adipogenic stimulus. Further, depletion of Cdo1 reduced the recruitment of Pparγ to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4. Collectively, our finding indicates that Cdo1 may be a co-activator of Pparγ in adipogenesis, and may contribute to the development of disease associated with excessive adipose tissue. - Highlights: • Cdo1expression is highly up-regulated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 and mBMSCs. • Depletion of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation. • Cdo1interacts with Pparγ during adipogenesis. • Knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited Pparγ binding to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4.

  8. Absence of NMDA receptor antibodies in the rare association between Type 1 Narcolepsy and Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Dauvilliers, Y.; Gaig, C.; Barateau, L.; Graus, F.; Iranzo, A.; Lopez, R.; Santamaria, J.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and mechanisms underlying the association between narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) and psychosis remain unclear with potential role for a common immune pathway. We estimated the frequency of psychosis and its characteristics in NT1 at two European sleep centers (France, n = 381; Spain, n = 161) and measured IgG autoantibodies that recognize the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR in 9 patients with NT1 with psychosis, and 25 NT1 patients without psychosis. Ten NT1 patients (6 in France, 4 in Spain) were diagnosed with comorbid psychosis, a frequency of 1.8%. One patient reported psychotic symptoms few months before narcolepsy onset, two patients few months after onset, and one patient one year after onset but after modafinil introduction. The six remaining patients reported long delays between NT1 and psychosis onset. Half the patients, mostly male adults, reported onset or worsening of psychotic symptoms after medication. We found no IgG antibodies to NR1/NR2B heteromers of the NMDARs in patients with NT1 with or without psychosis. To conclude, psychosis is rare in NT1, with limited evidence for a key impact of stimulants, and no association with anti-NMDAR antibodies. However, dramatic NT1 and schizophrenia exists especially in early onset NT1, which may lead to inappropriate diagnosis and management. PMID:27143278

  9. Vitamin D level and Fok-I vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism in Egyptian patients with type-1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Elham O; Abdel-Aal, Amal M; Din, Amal K Norel; Atia, Mervat M A

    2013-01-01

    Many cellular, preclinical and observational studies support a role of vitamin D in pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM). The vitamin D receptor (VDR) locus has been studied in different populations for association with susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases, but with inconsistent findings in type-1 DM. This study aimed to investigate vitamin D status in patients with type-1 DM. We examined the frequency of VDR Fokl (rs10735810) gene polymorphism, and its association with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) level in Egyptian patients with type-1 DM. 132 children with type-1 DM and 40 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were studied. VDR Fokl polymorphism was assessed using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Diabetic children demonstrated lower circulating levels of 25(OH) D than the controls (13.4 +/- 7.6 vs 32.1 +/- 3.8ng/ml) (P < 0.01). Patients with deficient 25(OH) D showed lower calcium levels and higher HbA1c% than those with sufficient levels (8.1 +/- 2.1 versus 9.1 +/- 1.6 mg/dl & 9.9 +/- 2.5 versus 8.1 +/- 1.4%, respectively (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the genotype distribution or the allele frequencies of VDR Fokl between patients and controls. The odds ratio (OR) was 1.08 (P = 0.76), and the 95% confidence interval (CI) ranged from 0.64-1.85. The diabetic carriers of the ff genotype showed low serum levels of 25(OH) D and calcium when compared with the carriers of the F allele (9.1 +/- 4.4 vs 13.1 +/- 7 and 13.9 +/- 6.09 ng/ml & 8.1 +/- 2.1 vs 9.1 +/- 1.1 and 9.3 +/- 1.2 mg/dl, respectively) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, 84.8% of children with type-1 DM have low circulating levels of 25(OH) D. These patients have poor glycemic control (56.06%) than those with sufficient levels of 25(OH) D. Fokl polymorphism of VDR gene is associated with vitamin D deficiency but has no significant role in susceptibility to type-1 diabetes.

  10. Role of fosaprepitant, a neurokinin Type 1 receptor antagonist, in morphine-induced antinociception in rats

    PubMed Central

    Prasoon, Pranav; Gupta, Shivani; Kumar, Rahul; Gautam, Mayank; Kaler, Saroj; Ray, Subrata Basu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Opioids such as morphine form the cornerstone in the treatment of moderate to severe pain. However, opioids also produce serious side effects such as tolerance. Fosaprepitant is a substance P (SP) receptor antagonist, which is used for treating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. SP is an important neuropeptide mediating transmission of pain at the spinal level. Thus, it was hypothesized that combining morphine with fosaprepitant would increase the antinociceptive effect of morphine. The objectives were to evaluate the effect of fosaprepitant on morphine-induced antinociception in rats and to investigate its mechanism of action. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with morphine (10 mg/kg twice daily) and/or fosaprepitant (30 mg/kg once daily) for 7 days. Pain threshold was assessed by the hot plate test. Expression of SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the spinal cords of these rats was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Morphine administration resulted in an antinociceptive effect compared to the control group (day 1 and to a lesser extent on day 4). The decreased antinociception despite continued morphine treatment indicated development of tolerance. Co-administration of fosaprepitant attenuated tolerance to morphine (days 1 and 3) and increased the antinociceptive effect compared to control group (days 1–4). Expression of SP was increased in the morphine + fosaprepitant group. Conclusions: The results show that fosaprepitant attenuates the development of tolerance to morphine and thereby, increases the antinociceptive effect. This is likely linked to decreased release of SP from presynaptic terminals.

  11. HLA class II susceptibility pattern for type 1 diabetes (T1D) in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Kiani, J; Hajilooi, M; Furst, D; Rezaei, H; Shahryari-Hesami, S; Kowsarifard, S; Zamani, A; Solgi, G

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQB1 susceptibility and protection pattern for type 1 diabetes (T1D) in a population from Hamadan, north-west of Iran. A total of 133 patients with T1D were tested for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles using PCR-SSP compared to 100 ethnic-matched healthy controls. Alleles and haplotypes frequencies were compared between both groups. The most susceptible alleles for disease were HLA-DRB1*03:01, DRB1*04:02, DQB1*02:01 and DQB1*03:02, and protective alleles were HLA-DRB1*07:01, *11:01, *13:01, *14:01 and DRB1*15 and HLA-DQB1*06:01, *06:02 and *06:03. Haplotype analysis revealed that patients with T1D had higher frequencies of DRB1*03:01-DQB1*02:01 (OR = 4.86, P < 10(-7) ) and DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 9.93, P < 10(-7) ) and lower frequencies of DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:01 (P = 0.0005), DRB1*11:01-DQB1*03:01 (P = 0.001), DRB1*13:01-DQB1*06:03 (P = 0.002) and DRB1*15-DQB1*06:01 (P = 0.001) haplotypes compared to healthy controls. Heterozygote combination of both susceptible haplotypes (DR3/DR4) confers the highest risk for T1D (RR = 18.80, P = 4 × 10(-5) ). Additionally, patients with homozygote diplotype, DR3/DR3 and DR4/DR4, showed a similar risk with less extent to heterozygote combination (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.01, respectively). Our findings not only confirm earlier reports from Iranians but also are in line with Caucasians and partly with Asians and some African patients with T1D. Remarkable differences were the identification of DRB1*04:01-DQB1*03:02, DRB1*07:01-DQB1*03:03 and DRB1*16-DQB1*05:02 as neutral and DRB1*13:01-DQB1*06:03 as the most protective haplotypes in this study.

  12. Copper(II) Ions Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Dynamics in Key Structural Regions That Govern Stability.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S; Qureshi, Tihami; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2016-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu(II) on PAI-1. We utilize backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to assess PAI-1 dynamics in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions with and without the SMB domain of VN. We show that Cu(II) produces an increase in dynamics in regions important for the function and overall stability of PAI-1, while the SMB domain elicits virtually the opposite effect. A mutant form of PAI-1 lacking two N-terminal histidine residues at positions 2 and 3 exhibits similar increases in dynamics upon Cu(II) binding compared to that of active wild-type PAI-1, indicating that the observed structural effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing dimension to the mechanisms for regulation of PAI-1 stability and function. PMID:27416303

  13. Copper(II) Ions Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Dynamics in Key Structural Regions That Govern Stability.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Joel C; Trelle, Morten Beck; McClintock, Carlee S; Qureshi, Tihami; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2016-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) regulates the fibrinolysis pathway by inhibiting the protease activity of plasminogen activators. PAI-1 works in concert with vitronectin (VN), an extracellular protein that aids in localization of active PAI-1 to tissues. The Peterson laboratory demonstrated that Cu(II) and other transition metals modulate the stability of PAI-1, exhibiting effects that are dependent on the presence or absence of the somatomedin B (SMB) domain of VN. The study presented here dissects the changes in molecular dynamics underlying the destabilizing effects of Cu(II) on PAI-1. We utilize backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry to assess PAI-1 dynamics in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions with and without the SMB domain of VN. We show that Cu(II) produces an increase in dynamics in regions important for the function and overall stability of PAI-1, while the SMB domain elicits virtually the opposite effect. A mutant form of PAI-1 lacking two N-terminal histidine residues at positions 2 and 3 exhibits similar increases in dynamics upon Cu(II) binding compared to that of active wild-type PAI-1, indicating that the observed structural effects are not a result of coordination of Cu(II) to these histidine residues. Finally, addition of Cu(II) results in an acceleration of the local unfolding kinetics of PAI-1 presumed to be on pathway to the latency conversion. The effect of ligands on the dynamics of PAI-1 adds another intriguing dimension to the mechanisms for regulation of PAI-1 stability and function.

  14. Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors on Sim1-expressing neurons regulate energy expenditure in male mice.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Pierre; Bellocchio, Luigi; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; André, Caroline; Clark, Samantha; Elie, Melissa; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Gonzales, Delphine; Cannich, Astrid; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulates energy balance by modulating not only food intake, but also energy expenditure (EE) and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. To test the hypothesis that cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor in PVN neurons might control these processes, we used the Cre/loxP system to delete CB1 from single-minded 1 (Sim1) neurons, which account for the majority of PVN neurons. On standard chow, mice lacking CB1 receptor in Sim1 neurons (Sim1-CB1-knockout [KO]) had food intake, body weight, adiposity, glucose metabolism, and EE comparable with wild-type (WT) (Sim1-CB1-WT) littermates. However, maintenance on a high-fat diet revealed a gene-by-diet interaction whereby Sim1-CB1-KO mice had decreased adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased EE, whereas feeding behavior was similar to Sim1-CB1-WT mice. Additionally, high-fat diet-fed Sim1-CB1-KO mice had increased mRNA expression of the β3-adrenergic receptor, as well as of uncoupling protein-1, cytochrome-c oxidase subunit IV and mitochondrial transcription factor A in the brown adipose tissue, all molecular changes suggestive of increased thermogenesis. Pharmacological studies using β-blockers suggested that modulation of β-adrenergic transmission play an important role in determining EE changes observed in Sim1-CB1-KO. Finally, chemical sympathectomy abolished the obesity-resistant phenotype of Sim1-CB1-KO mice. Altogether, these findings reveal a diet-dependent dissociation in the CB1 receptor control of food intake and EE, likely mediated by the PVN, where CB1 receptors on Sim1-positive neurons do not impact food intake but hinder EE during dietary environmental challenges that promote body weight gain.

  15. Role of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor Type 1 Receptor in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Duo; Jiang, Shuang; Meng, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Defective cognitive function is common in patients with diabetes, suggesting that insulin normally exerts anabolic actions in neuron, namely, diabetic encephalopathy. However, because insulin can cross-activate the insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R), which also functions in most of tissues, such as muscle and bone, it has been difficult to establish the direct (IGF-1-independent) actions of insulin in the pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy. To overcome this problem, we examined insulin signaling and action in primary PC-12 cells engineered for conditional disruption of the IGF-1 receptor (ΔIGF-1R). The results showed that the lower glucose metabolism and high expression of IGF-1R occurred in the brain of the DE rat model. The results also showed the defect of IGF-1R could significantly improve the ability of glucose consumption and enhance sensitivity to insulin-induced IR and Akt phosphorylation in PC12 cells. And meanwhile, IGF-1R allele gene knockout (IGF-1Rneo) mice treated with HFD/STZ had better cognitive abilities than those of wild mice. Those results indicate that insulin exerts direct anabolic actions in neuron-like cells by activation of its cognate receptor and prove that IGF-1R plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy. PMID:26089889

  16. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  17. Simultaneous determination of multiple angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists and its application to high-throughput pharmacokinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Jianguo; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji; Hu, Xiaoling; Lv, Hua; Gu, Shenghua; Wu, Xiaoming; Xu, Jinyi

    2008-05-01

    A rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of multiple angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists (AT1RAs) WX472, WX581, 1b and telmisartan in rat plasma for the purpose of high-throughout pharmacokinetic screening. The method was operated under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode in the positive ion mode. The analytes and the internal standard (pitavastatin) were extracted from 100 [mu]L rat plasma under acidic conditions by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. The analytes and internal standard were baseline separated on a Gemini analytical column (3 [mu]m, 150 mm × 2.0 mm) with the adoption of a gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.05% aqueous formic acid. The standard curves were linear in the concentration ranges of 4.5-900 ng/mL for WX472, 5-1000 ng/mL for WX581 and 0.5-100 ng/mL for 1b and telmisartan. Intra- and inter-batch precisions (R.S.D.%) were all within 15% and the method assessed a quite good accuracy (R.E.%). Recoveries were found to be >65% for all the compounds and no obvious matrix effects were found. This method has been successfully applied to the high-throughput pharmacokinetic screening study for both cassette dosing and cassette analysis of four compounds to rats. Significant drug-drug interactions were observed after cassette dosing. The study suggested that cassette analysis of pooled samples would be a better choice for the high-throughput pharmacokinetic screening of angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists.

  18. Monomeric ß-amyloid interacts with type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors to provide energy supply to neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Maria L.; Tomasello, Marianna F.; Pandini, Giuseppe; Caraci, Filippo; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Busceti, Carla; Di Pietro, Paola; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Attanasio, Francesco; Chiechio, Santina; Bagnoli, Silvia; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Vigneri, Riccardo; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2015-01-01

    ß-amyloid (Aß1−42) is produced by proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane type-1 protein, amyloid precursor protein. Under pathological conditions, Aß1−42self-aggregates into oligomers, which cause synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss, and are considered the culprit of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, Aß1−42 is mainly monomeric at physiological concentrations, and the precise role of monomeric Aß1−42 in neuronal function is largely unknown. We report that the monomer of Aß1−42 activates type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors and enhances glucose uptake in neurons and peripheral cells by promoting the translocation of the Glut3 glucose transporter from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In neurons, activity-dependent glucose uptake was blunted after blocking endogenous Aß production, and re-established in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid Aß. APP-null neurons failed to enhance depolarization-stimulated glucose uptake unless exogenous monomeric Aß1−42 was added. These data suggest that Aß1−42 monomers were critical for maintaining neuronal glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, exogenous Aß1−42 monomers were able to rescue the low levels of glucose consumption observed in brain slices from AD mutant mice. PMID:26300732

  19. NAADP-mediated Ca2+ signaling via type 1 ryanodine receptor in T cells revealed by a synthetic NAADP antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Dammermann, Werner; Zhang, Bo; Nebel, Merle; Cordiglieri, Chiara; Odoardi, Francesca; Kirchberger, Tanja; Kawakami, Naoto; Dowden, James; Schmid, Frederike; Dornmair, Klaus; Hohenegger, Martin; Flügel, Alexander; Guse, Andreas H.; Potter, Barry V. L.

    2009-01-01

    The nucleotide NAADP was recently discovered as a second messenger involved in the initiation and propagation of Ca2+ signaling in lymphoma T cells, but its impact on primary T cell function is still unknown. An optimized, synthetic, small molecule inhibitor of NAADP action, termed BZ194, was designed and synthesized. BZ194 neither interfered with Ca2+ mobilization by d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate or cyclic ADP-ribose nor with capacitative Ca2+ entry. BZ194 specifically and effectively blocked NAADP-stimulated [3H]ryanodine binding to the purified type 1 ryanodine receptor. Further, in intact T cells, Ca2+ mobilization evoked by NAADP or by formation of the immunological synapse between primary effector T cells and astrocytes was inhibited by BZ194. Downstream events of Ca2+ mobilization, such as nuclear translocation of “nuclear factor of activated T cells” (NFAT), T cell receptor-driven interleukin-2 production, and proliferation in antigen-experienced CD4+ effector T cells, were attenuated by the NAADP antagonist. Taken together, specific inhibition of the NAADP signaling pathway constitutes a way to specifically and effectively modulate T-cell activation and has potential in the therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:19541638

  20. Lack of tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 inhibits liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Kaori; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2005-03-01

    Chronic liver injury causes liver regeneration, resulting in fibrosis. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is involved in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic liver diseases. TNF has pleiotropic functions, but its role in liver fibrosis has not been clarified. Chronic repeated injection of CCl4 induces liver fibrosis in mice. We examined whether signaling through TNF receptors was critical for this process, using mice lacking either TNF receptor (TNFR) type 1 or TNFR type 2 to define the pathophysiologic role of TNFR signals in liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis caused by chronic CCl4 exposure was TNF-dependent; histological fibrosis was seen in wild-type (WT) and TNFR-2 knockout (KO) mice, but not in TNFR-1 KO mice. Furthermore, a marked reduction in procollagen and TGF-beta synthesis was observed in TNFR-1 KO mice, which also had little detectable NF-kappa B, STAT3, and AP1 binding, and reduced levels of liver interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA compared to WT and TNFR-2 KO mice. In conclusion, our results indicate the possibility that NF-kappa B, STAT3, and AP1 binding by signals transduced through TNFR-1 plays an important role in liver fibrosis formation.

  1. Circulating angiotensin II deteriorates left ventricular function with sympathoexcitation via brain angiotensin II receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Keisuke; Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Sympathoexcitation contributes to the progression of heart failure. Activation of brain angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R) causes central sympathoexcitation. Thus, we assessed the hypothesis that the increase in circulating angiotensin II comparable to that reported in heart failure model affects cardiac function through the central sympathoexcitation via activating AT1R in the brain. In Sprague-Dawley rats, the subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II for 14 days increased the circulating angiotensin II level comparable to that reported in heart failure model rats after myocardial infarction. In comparison with the control, angiotensin II infusion increased 24 hours urinary norepinephrine excretion, and systolic blood pressure. Angiotensin II infusion hypertrophied left ventricular (LV) without changing chamber dimensions while increased end-diastolic pressure. The LV pressure–volume relationship indicated that angiotensin II did not impact on the end-systolic elastance, whereas significantly increased end-diastolic elastance. Chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of AT1R blocker, losartan, attenuated these angiotensin II-induced changes. In conclusion, circulating angiotensin II in heart failure is capable of inducing sympathoexcitation via in part AT1R in the brain, subsequently leading to LV diastolic dysfunction. PMID:26290529

  2. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  3. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  4. Cannabinoids increase type 1 cannabinoid receptor expression in a cell culture model of striatal neurons: implications for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-09-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed at high levels in the striatum. Activation of CB1 increases expression of neuronal trophic factors and inhibits neurotransmitter release from GABA-ergic striatal neurons. CB1 mRNA levels can be elevated by treatment with cannabinoids in non-neuronal cells. We wanted to determine whether cannabinoid treatment could induce CB1 expression in a cell culture model of striatal neurons and, if possible, determine the molecular mechanism by which this occurred. We found that treatment of STHdh(7/7) cells with the cannabinoids ACEA, mAEA, and AEA produced a CB1receptor-dependent increase in CB1 promoter activity, mRNA, and protein expression. This response was Akt- and NF-κB-dependent. Because decreased CB1 expression is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD), we wanted to determine whether cannabinoids could increase CB1 expression in STHdh(7/111) and (111/111) cells expressing the mutant huntingtin protein. We observed that cannabinoid treatment increased CB1 mRNA levels approximately 10-fold in STHdh(7/111) and (111/111) cells, compared to vehicle treatment. Importantly, cannabinoid treatment improved ATP production, increased the expression of the trophic factor BDNF-2, and the mitochondrial regulator PGC1α, and reduced spontaneous GABA release, in HD cells. Therefore, cannabinoid-mediated increases in CB1 levels could reduce the severity of some molecular pathologies observed in HD.

  5. Formation of permitted lines in the spectrum of type 1 Seyfert galaxies and quasars. II - Fe II lines and the low excitation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin-Souffrin, S.; Joly, M.; Dumont, S.; Heidmann, N.

    1980-03-01

    Following a previous study (Collin-Souffrin et al., 1979) we investigate the relative intensities of the visible and UV lines of the intense Fe II spectrum of type 1 Seyfert galaxies and quasars. A 9-level atom is used in the computation of the line intensities and relatively accurate collision strengths are computed as we devote particular attention to the collisional excitation mechanism. We confirm that the excitation mechanism is collisional: we show that, in addition to the drawbacks mentioned in Paper I, if the excitation was radiative, the line intensities would be too small compared to the observations. We find that relative intensities of the Fe II lines and of the Mg II 2798 line are well accounted for by an emission region with 1010 ≦ ne ≦ 1011 and 7500 ≦ Te ≦ 10,000 °K. The optical thickness in the UV lines of Fe II is large (˜105). We examine also other low excitation lines and show that Hα is likely to be emitted at least partly by the same Fe II region, while Lα, Si II, O I, should be emitted by a hotter region and Ca II by a colder one. The Fe II region is ionized by collisions from level 2 of hydrogen which is populated by the trapped Lα photons (τLα ˜109). We discuss the geometry of this Fe II region, and find typical dimensions of R ˜ 1016 cm, and H (thickness) ˜ 1014-1016 cm. Finally we examine the significance of this region and conclude that it is likely to be the outer part of an extended accretion disk completely shielded from the UV and X radiation of the central object. We discuss the reality of the photoionized models and, although we are not able to give a definite answer to this problem, we suggest that the collisional models could perhaps account for all the broad lines in quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  6. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle; Lutz, Beat

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL

  7. Dysfunctionally phosphorylated type 1 insulin receptor substrate in neural-derived blood exosomes of preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B; Abner, Erin L; Biragyn, Arya; Masharani, Umesh; Frassetto, Lynda; Petersen, Ronald C; Miller, Bruce L; Goetzl, Edward J

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance causes diminished glucose uptake in similar regions of the brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Brain tissue studies suggested that insulin resistance is caused by low insulin receptor signaling attributable to its abnormal association with more phospho (P)-serine-type 1 insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1) and less P-tyrosine-IRS-1. Plasma exosomes enriched for neural sources by immunoabsorption were obtained once from 26 patients with AD, 20 patients with DM2, 16 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and matched case control subjects. At 2 time points, they were obtained from 22 others when cognitively normal and 1 to 10 yr later when diagnosed with AD. Mean exosomal levels of extracted P-serine 312-IRS-1 and P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1 by ELISA and the ratio of P-serine 312-IRS-1 to P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1 (insulin resistance factor, R) for AD and DM2 and P-serine 312-IRS-1 and R for FTD were significantly different from those for case control subjects. The levels of R for AD were significantly higher than those for DM2 or FTD. Stepwise discriminant modeling showed correct classification of 100% of patients with AD, 97.5% of patients with DM2, and 84% of patients with FTD. In longitudinal studies of 22 patients with AD, exosomal levels of P-serine 312-IRS-1, P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1, and R were significantly different 1 to 10 yr before and at the time of diagnosis compared with control subjects. Insulin resistance reflected in R values from this blood test is higher for patients with AD, DM2, and FTD than case control subjects; higher for patients with AD than patients with DM2 or FTD; and accurately predicts development of AD up to 10 yr prior to clinical onset. PMID:25342129

  8. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor ligands display functional selectivity in a cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Dupré, Denis J; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2014-09-01

    Modulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activity has been touted as a potential means of treating addiction, anxiety, depression, and neurodegeneration. Different agonists of CB1 are known to evoke varied responses in vivo. Functional selectivity is the ligand-specific activation of certain signal transduction pathways at a receptor that can signal through multiple pathways. To understand cannabinoid-specific functional selectivity, different groups have examined the effect of individual cannabinoids on various signaling pathways in heterologous expression systems. In the current study, we compared the functional selectivity of six cannabinoids, including two endocannabinoids (2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA)), two synthetic cannabinoids (WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940), and two phytocannabinoids (cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) on arrestin2-, Gα(i/o)-, Gβγ-, Gα(s)-, and Gα(q)-mediated intracellular signaling in the mouse STHdh(Q7/Q7) cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons that endogenously express CB1. In this system, 2-AG, THC, and CP55,940 were more potent mediators of arrestin2 recruitment than other cannabinoids tested. 2-AG, AEA, and WIN55,212-2, enhanced Gα(i/o) and Gβγ signaling, with 2-AG and AEA treatment leading to increased total CB1 levels. 2-AG, AEA, THC, and WIN55,212-2 also activated Gα(q)-dependent pathways. CP55,940 and CBD both signaled through Gα(s). CP55,940, but not CBD, activated downstream Gα(s) pathways via CB1 targets. THC and CP55,940 promoted CB1 internalization and decreased CB1 protein levels over an 18-h period. These data demonstrate that individual cannabinoids display functional selectivity at CB1 leading to activation of distinct signaling pathways. To effectively match cannabinoids with therapeutic goals, these compounds must be screened for their signaling bias.

  9. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor ligands display functional selectivity in a cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Dupré, Denis J; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2014-09-01

    Modulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activity has been touted as a potential means of treating addiction, anxiety, depression, and neurodegeneration. Different agonists of CB1 are known to evoke varied responses in vivo. Functional selectivity is the ligand-specific activation of certain signal transduction pathways at a receptor that can signal through multiple pathways. To understand cannabinoid-specific functional selectivity, different groups have examined the effect of individual cannabinoids on various signaling pathways in heterologous expression systems. In the current study, we compared the functional selectivity of six cannabinoids, including two endocannabinoids (2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA)), two synthetic cannabinoids (WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940), and two phytocannabinoids (cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) on arrestin2-, Gα(i/o)-, Gβγ-, Gα(s)-, and Gα(q)-mediated intracellular signaling in the mouse STHdh(Q7/Q7) cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons that endogenously express CB1. In this system, 2-AG, THC, and CP55,940 were more potent mediators of arrestin2 recruitment than other cannabinoids tested. 2-AG, AEA, and WIN55,212-2, enhanced Gα(i/o) and Gβγ signaling, with 2-AG and AEA treatment leading to increased total CB1 levels. 2-AG, AEA, THC, and WIN55,212-2 also activated Gα(q)-dependent pathways. CP55,940 and CBD both signaled through Gα(s). CP55,940, but not CBD, activated downstream Gα(s) pathways via CB1 targets. THC and CP55,940 promoted CB1 internalization and decreased CB1 protein levels over an 18-h period. These data demonstrate that individual cannabinoids display functional selectivity at CB1 leading to activation of distinct signaling pathways. To effectively match cannabinoids with therapeutic goals, these compounds must be screened for their signaling bias. PMID:25037227

  10. Angiotensin type 1a receptors in the subfornical organ are required for deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hilzendeger, Aline M; Cassell, Martin D; Davis, Deborah R; Stauss, Harald M; Mark, Allyn L; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2013-03-01

    Although elevated renin-angiotensin system activity and angiotensinergic signaling within the brain are required for hypertension, polydipsia, and increased metabolic rate induced by deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt, the contribution of specific receptor subtypes and brain nuclei mediating these responses remains poorly defined. We hypothesized that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT(1a)R) within the subfornical organ (SFO) mediate these responses. Transgenic mice carrying a conditional allele of the endogenous AT(1a)R (AT(1a)R(flox)) were administered an adenovirus encoding Cre-recombinase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) or adenovirus encoding eGFP alone into the lateral cerebral ventricle. Adenovirus encoding Cre-recombinase reduced AT(1a)R mRNA and induced recombination in AT(1a)R(flox) genomic DNA specifically in the SFO, without significant effect in the paraventricular or arcuate nuclei, and also induced SFO-specific recombination in ROSA(TdTomato) reporter mice. The effect of SFO-targeted ablation of endogenous AT(1a)R was evaluated in AT(1a)R(flox) mice at 3 time points: (1) baseline, (2) 1 week after virus injection but before DOCA-salt, and (3) after 3 weeks of DOCA-salt. DOCA-salt-treated mice with deletion of AT(1a)R in SFO exhibited a blunted increase in arterial pressure. Increased sympathetic cardiac modulation and urine copeptin, a marker of vasopressin release, were both significantly reduced in DOCA-salt mice when AT(1a)R was deleted in the SFO. Additionally, deletion of AT(1a)R in the SFO significantly attenuated the polydipsia, polyuria, and sodium intake in response to DOCA-salt. Together, these data highlight the contribution of AT(1a)R in the SFO to arterial pressure regulation potentially through changes on sympathetic cardiac modulation, vasopressin release, and hydromineral balance in the DOCA-salt model of hypertension.

  11. P7, a novel antagonist of corticotropin releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRFR1) screened from phage display library.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinmei; Zhuo, Rengong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wei, Xiaoli; Ma, Xiaoyun

    2015-07-31

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) plays a central role in regulating the activities of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the presence of a variety of stressful stimuli via binding to its type 1 receptors (CRFR1). Despite that many peptidic or non-peptidic antagonists of CRFR1 have been developed to serve as therapeutic tools to CRF-related pathologies, none of them have been utilized clinically. Targeting the extracellular domain 1 (EC1) of CRFR1, the CRF-binding site, represents a new strategy to inhibit the function of the receptor. However, no such agents have been identified up to now. Herein, by using an 87-amino acid fragment corresponding to the EC1 region as the bait, we screened the binding polypeptides from a phage display (Ph.D.-12) peptide library. After 3-round biopanning, positive clones were selected and the polypeptides carried by them were identified. 5 polypeptides were found to bind with the target specifically. Among them, the P7 exhibited the highest affinity. By evaluating the cAMP accumulation in the CRFR1 or CRFR2-expressing HEK293 cells, we demonstrated that P7 blocking the function of CRFR1, but not CRFR2. In addition, we also found that P7 and CRF act on CRFR1 competitively. Taken together, we reveal that P7, a novel polypeptide identified from phage display library, inhibits the function of CRFR1 effectively and specifically by binding at its EC1 domain. The new polypeptide might provide a promising agent for diagnostic or therapeutic utilities in CRF-related disorders.

  12. The type 1 cannabinoid receptor is highly expressed in embryonic cortical projection neurons and negatively regulates neurite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vitalis, Tania; Lainé, Jeanne; Simon, Anne; Roland, Alexandre; Leterrier, Christophe; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2008-11-01

    In the rodent and human embryonic brains, the cerebral cortex and hippocampus transiently express high levels of type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB(1)Rs), at a developmental stage when these areas are composed mainly of glutamatergic neurons. However, the precise cellular and subcellular localization of CB(1)R expression as well as effects of CB(1)R modulation in this cell population remain largely unknown. We report that, starting from embryonic day 12.5, CB(1)Rs are strongly expressed in both reelin-expressing Cajal-Retzius cells and newly differentiated postmitotic glutamatergic neurons of the mouse telencephalon. CB(1)R protein is localized first to somato-dendritic endosomes and at later developmental stages it localizes mostly to developing axons. In young axons, CB(1)Rs are localized both to the axolemma and to large, often multivesicular endosomes. Acute maternal injection of agonist CP-55940 results in the relocation of receptors from axons to somato-dendritic endosomes, indicating the functional competence of embryonic CB(1)Rs. The adult phenotype of CB(1)R expression is established around postnatal day 5. By using pharmacological and mutational modulation of CB(1)R activity in isolated cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we also show that basal activation of CB(1)R acts as a negative regulatory signal for dendritogenesis, dendritic and axonal outgrowth, and branching. Together, the overall negative regulatory role in neurite development suggests that embryonic CB(1)R signaling may participate in the correct establishment of neuronal connectivity and suggests a possible mechanism for the development of reported glutamatergic dysfunction in the offspring following maternal cannabis consumption.

  13. Corticotropin releasing factor receptor type 1: molecular cloning and investigation of alternative splicing in the hamster skin.

    PubMed

    Pisarchik, Alexander; Slominski, Andrzej

    2002-06-01

    The coding region of the hamster corticotropin releasing factor receptor type 1 was sequenced. Hamster gene appeared to be similar to mouse, rat, and human sequences with 95%, 94%, and 91% homology, respectively. Protein substitutions were generally found in the corticotropin releasing factor-binding domain. Thus, this domain can be more prone to mutations leading to changes in amino acid sequence. Hamster pituitary, eye, spleen, heart, skin, and four melanoma lines differentially expressed nine corticotropin releasing factor-R1 isoforms. These included the corticotropin releasing factor-R1alpha and corticotropin releasing factor-R1d homologs of human isoforms as well as e, f, h, j, k, m, and n isoforms. Corticotropin releasing factor-R1e mRNA had deletion of exons 3 and 4, CRF-R1j of exon 5, CRF-R1f of exon 11, CRF-R1k of exon 10, CRF-R1m of exons 11 and 12, and CRF-R1n of exons 10, 11, and 12. Corticotropin releasing factor-R1h had an insertion of a cryptic exon between exons 4 and 5. Reading frames of isoforms e, f, j, k, m, and h contained frameshifts, expected to produce truncated proteins. Corticotropin releasing factor-R1n isoform preserved the reading frame, but the transmembrane domains 6, 7, and one-third of the fifth were deleted. The AbC1 hamster melanoma cell line changed the pattern of alternative splicing after irradiation with ultraviolet light or induction of melanogenesis; this suggests that corticotropin releasing factor receptor alternative splicing may be regulated by common stressors, through modifications of activity and/or availability of splicing factors.

  14. Toll-Like Receptor 3 Is Critical for Coxsackievirus B4-Induced Type 1 Diabetes in Female NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thuma, Jean R.; Courreges, Maria C.; Benencia, Fabian; James, Calvin B.L.; Malgor, Ramiro; Kantake, Noriko; Mudd, William; Denlinger, Nathan; Nolan, Bret; Wen, Li; Schwartz, Frank L.

    2015-01-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVBs) are involved in triggering some cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for this remain elusive. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), a receptor that recognizes viral double-stranded RNA, is hypothesized to play a role in virus-induced T1DM, although this hypothesis is yet to be substantiated. The objective of this study was to directly investigate the role of TLR3 in CVB-triggered T1DM in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a mouse model of human T1DM that is widely used to study both spontaneous autoimmune and viral-induced T1DM. As such, we infected female wild-type (TLR3+/+) and TLR3 knockout (TLR3−/−) NOD mice with CVB4 and compared the incidence of diabetes in CVB4-infected mice with that of uninfected counterparts. We also evaluated the islets of uninfected and CVB4-infected wild-type and TLR3 knockout NOD mice by immunohistochemistry and insulitis scoring. TLR3 knockout mice were markedly protected from CVB4-induced diabetes compared with CVB4-infected wild-type mice. CVB4-induced T-lymphocyte-mediated insulitis was also significantly less severe in TLR3 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. No differences in insulitis were observed between uninfected animals, either wild-type or TLR3 knockout mice. These data demonstrate for the first time that TLR3 is 1) critical for CVB4-induced T1DM, and 2) modulates CVB4-induced insulitis in genetically prone NOD mice. PMID:25422874

  15. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief.

  16. Targeting the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 (TRPV1) Assembly Domain Attenuates Inflammation-induced Hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  17. Effects of Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Silencing in a Human Adrenocortical Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, T C; Jorge, A A; Montenegro, L R; Almeida, M Q; Ferraz-de-Souza, B; Nishi, M Y; Mendonca, B B; Latronico, A C

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, including adrenocortical tumors. The aim of the work was to investigate the effects of IGF-1R downregulation in a human adrenocortical cell line by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The human adrenocortical tumor cell line NCI H295R was transfected with 2 specific IGF1R siRNAs (# 1 and # 2) and compared with untreated cells and a negative control siRNA. IGF1R expression was determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRTPCR) and Western blot. The effects of IGF-1R downregulation on cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed. IGF-1R levels were significantly decreased in cells treated with IGF-1R siRNA # 1 or # 2. Relative expression of IGF1R mRNA decreased approximately 50% and Western blot analysis revealed a 30% of reduction in IGF-1R protein. Downregulation of this gene resulted in 40% reduction in cell growth in vitro and 45% increase in apoptosis using siRNA # 2. These findings demonstrate that decreasing IGF-1R mRNA and protein expression in NCI H295R cells can partially inhibit adrenal tumor cell growth in vitro. Targeting IGF1R is a promising therapy for pediatric malignant adrenocortical tumor and can still be an option for adult adrenocortical cancer based on personalized genomic tumor profiling. PMID:27246621

  18. The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor signalling system and targeted tyrosine kinase inhibition in cancer.

    PubMed

    Haisa, Minoru

    2013-04-01

    Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) signalling plays a critical role in normal cell growth, and in cancer development and progression. IGF1R and the insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2 (IGF1 and IGF2) are involved in various aspects of the malignant phenotype, suggesting that IGF1R is a potential target for cancer therapy. IGF1R is particularly important in the establishment and maintenance of the transformed phenotype, in mediating proliferation, and for the survival of tumour cells with anchorage-independent growth. IGF1R also exerts antiapoptotic activity and has a substantial influence on the control of the cell and body size. This property enables transformed cells to form macroscopic tumours and to survive the process of detachment required for metastasis. Pharmaceutical companies are investigating molecules that target IGF1R, including specific low molecular weight tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, both of which possess various advantages and display different activity profiles. This review article focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of low molecular weight IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is critical to pursue a thorough molecular analysis of the metabolic activity of IGF1R to avoid possible side-effects of its inhibition.

  19. Distinct effect of stress on 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and corticosteroid receptors in dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ergang, P; Kuželová, A; Soták, M; Klusoňová, P; Makal, J; Pácha, J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest the participation of the hippocampus in the feedback inhibition of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress response. This inhibition is mediated by glucocorticoid feedback due to the sensitivity of the hippocampus to these hormones. The sensitivity is determined by the expression of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11HSD1), an enzyme that regulates the conversion of glucocorticoids from inactive to active form. The goal of our study was to assess the effect of stress on the expression of 11HSD1, GR and MR in the ventral and dorsal region of the CA1 hippocampus in three different rat strains with diverse responses to stress: Fisher 344, Lewis and Wistar. Stress stimulated 11HSD1 in the ventral but not dorsal CA1 hippocampus of Fisher 344 but not Lewis or Wistar rats. In contrast, GR expression following stress was decreased in the dorsal but not ventral CA1 hippocampus of all three strains. MR expression was not changed in either the dorsal or ventral CA1 region. These results indicate that (1) depending on the strain, stress stimulates 11HSD1 in the ventral hippocampus, which is known to be involved in stress and emotion reactions whereas (2) independent of strain, stress inhibits GR in the dorsal hippocampus, which is predominantly involved in cognitive functions.

  20. Expression patterns of taste receptor type 1 subunit 3 and α-gustducin in the mouse testis during development.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Wei, Quanwei; Mao, Dagan; Shi, Fangxiong

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptor type 1 subunit 3 (T1R3) and its associated heterotrimeric G protein α-gustducin (Gα) are involved in sweet and umami sensing in taste cells. They are also strongly expressed in the testis and sperm, but their expression patterns and potential roles involved were previously unknown. In present study, we investigated the expression patterns of T1R3 and Gα in the mouse testis at critical stages of postnatal life, and throughout the spermatogenic cycle. Our results indicated that T1R3 and Gα exhibited a stage-dependent expression pattern during mouse development, and a cell-specific pattern during the spermatogenic cycle. Their expressions have been increased significantly from prepubertal to pubertal periods (P<005), and decreased significantly in aged mice (P<005). The changes were mainly attributed to the differential expression of T1R3 or Gα in elongated spermatids and Leydig cells at different stages of the spermatogenic cycle. In addition, the expression of T1R3 and Gα were first observed in residual bodies of spermatozoa and endothelial cells of blood vessels at post-pubertal mice, while Gα was located in apoptotic spermatogonia of postnatal mice. These novel expression patterns suggest a role of T1R3 and Gα in the onset of spermatogenesis, pace of spermatogenic cycle, and aging of the testis. PMID:26589384

  1. Interactions between Environmental Factors and Melatonin Receptor Type 1A Polymorphism in Relation to Oral Cancer Susceptibility and Clinicopathologic Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Lin, Yung-Wei; Lee, Liang-Ming; Chang, Junn-Liang; Weng, Wei-Chun; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the combined effect of melatonin receptor type 1A (MTNR1A) gene polymorphisms and exposure to environmental carcinogens on the susceptibility and clinicopathological characteristics of oral cancer. Methodology and Principal Findings Three polymorphisms of the MTNR1A gene from 618 patients with oral cancer and 560 non-cancer controls were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The CTA haplotype of the studied MTNR1A polymorphisms (rs2119882, rs13140012, rs6553010) was related to a higher risk of oral cancer. Moreover, MTNR1A gene polymorphisms exhibited synergistic effects of environmental factors (betel quid and tobacco use) on the susceptibility of oral cancer. Finally, oral-cancer patients with betel quid-chewing habit who had T/T allele of MTNR1A rs13140012 were at higher risk for developing an advanced clinical stage and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion These results support gene-environment interactions of MTNR1A polymorphisms with smoking and betel quid-chewing habits possibly altering oral-cancer susceptibility and metastasis. PMID:25806809

  2. Glucagon receptor antibody completely suppresses type 1 diabetes phenotype without insulin by disrupting a novel diabetogenic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, May-Yun; Yan, Hai; Shi, Zhiqing; Evans, Matthew R.; Yu, Xinxin; Lee, Young; Chen, Shiuhwei; Williams, Annie; Philippe, Jacques; Roth, Michael G.; Unger, Roger H.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin monotherapy can neither maintain normoglycemia in type 1 diabetes (T1D) nor prevent the long-term damage indicated by elevated glycation products in blood, such as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Here we find that hyperglycemia, when unaccompanied by an acute increase in insulin, enhances itself by paradoxically stimulating hyperglucagonemia. Raising glucose from 5 to 25 mM without insulin enhanced glucagon secretion ∼two- to fivefold in InR1-G9 α cells and ∼18-fold in perfused pancreata from insulin-deficient rats with T1D. Mice with T1D receiving insulin treatment paradoxically exhibited threefold higher plasma glucagon during hyperglycemic surges than during normoglycemic intervals. Blockade of glucagon action with mAb Ac, a glucagon receptor (GCGR) antagonizing antibody, maintained glucose below 100 mg/dL and HbA1c levels below 4% in insulin-deficient mice with T1D. In rodents with T1D, hyperglycemia stimulates glucagon secretion, up-regulating phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and enhancing hyperglycemia. GCGR antagonism in mice with T1D normalizes glucose and HbA1c, even without insulin. PMID:25675519

  3. Sunitinib Combined with Angiotensin-2 Type-1 Receptor Antagonists Induces More Necrosis: A Murine Xenograft Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Verhoest, Grégory; Dolley-Hitze, Thibault; Jouan, Florence; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Oger, Emmanuel; Bensalah, Karim; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Collet, Nicolas; Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Vigneau, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin-2 type-1 receptor antagonists not are only antihypertensive drugs but also can inhibit VEGF production. We hypothesised that adding telmisartan to sunitinib could potentiate the antiangiogenic effects. Material and Methods. 786-O cell lines were injected in nude mice. After tumor development, mice were divided into 4 groups: the first was the control group (DMSO), the second group was treated with sunitinib alone, the third group was treated with telmisartan alone, and the fourth group was treated with the combination. Drugs were orally administered every day for four weeks. Animals were sacrificed after treatment. Blood and tumor tissues were collected for analysis by immunohistochemistry, Western Blot, and ELISA methods. Results. All animals developed a ccRCC and ten in each group were treated. Using a kinetic model, tumors tended to grow slower in the combination group compared to others (P = 0.06). Compared to sunitinib alone, the addition of telmisartan significantly increased tissue necrosis (P = 0.038). Central microvascular density decreased (P = 0.0038) as well as circulating VEGF (P = 0.003). There was no significant variation in proliferation or apoptosis markers. Conclusion. The combination of sunitinib and telmisartan revealed an enhancement of the blockage of the VEGF pathway on renal tumor resulting in a decrease in neoangiogenesis and an increase in necrosis. PMID:24967411

  4. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  5. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor genes in Latvian patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rajalingham, Raja; Rumba, Ingrida; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2004-12-01

    T1DM is very common in Sweden and is positively associated with HLA class II genes. Approximately 89% of the newly diagnosed patients carry the high-risk HLA DR4-DQ8 and DR3-DQ2. The remaining 11% develop T1DM without them. This can be due to involvement of other genes and environmental factors. Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are important in antiviral and antitumor immunity. They are implicated in the etiology of autoimmune T1DM. Human NK cells express killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that belong to the polymorphic multigene family in chromosome 19q3.4. They modulate NK cell response by interacting with HLA class I. In addition, polymorphic MICA in HLA class I interacts with non-polymorphic NKG2D receptor on NK cells. We have studied, in addition to HLA-DR and -DQ, genes of the innate immune system MICA and KIR in Latvian patients (n = 98) with T1DM and controls (n = 100). They were genotyped using standard PCR-based typing methods. MICA allele 5 is positively associated with T1DM. KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 were both positively associated. Combined association of MICA4 and KIR2DL2 gave an odds ration (OR) of 26.7. However, the combined risk of KIR2DL2 and HLA class II genes, HLADR3 (OR = 73.4), DR4 (OR = 66.8), and DR3 and DR4 (OR = 88.3), was higher. The maximum risk was when KIR2DL2, MICA5, and DR3/DR4 were in combination. In conclusion, our results suggest that a balance between innate and acquired immunity is important, and an imbalance coud lead to T1DM.

  6. The blockade of GABAA receptors attenuates the inhibitory effect of orexin type 1 receptors antagonist on morphine withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Mahnaz; Azizi, Hossein; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Semnanian, Saeed

    2016-03-23

    The aim of present study was to investigate the involvement of orexin-A neuropeptide in naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome via modulating neurons bearing GABAA receptors. The locus coeruleus (LC) is a sensitive site for expression of the somatic aspects of morphine withdrawal. Intra-LC microinjection of GABAA receptor agonist attenuates morphine withdrawal signs in rats. Here we studied the influence of LC orexin type 1 receptors blockade by SB-334867 in presence of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome. Adult male Wistar rats, weighing 250-300 g, were rendered dependent on morphine by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of increasing morphine doses (6, 16, 26, 36, 46, 56 and 66 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg) at set intervals of 24 h for 7 days. On 8th day, naloxone (3 mg/kg, s.c.) was injected and the somatic signs of morphine withdrawal were evaluated. Intra-LC microinjections (0.2 μl) of either bicuculline (15 μM) or SB-334867 (3 mM) or a combination of both chemicals were done immediately before naloxone injection. Intra-LC microinjection of bicuculline (15 μM) had no significant effect on morphine withdrawal signs, whereas intra-LC microinjection of SB-334867 considerably attenuated morphine withdrawal signs. However, the effect of SB-334867 in attenuating naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal signs was blocked in presence of bicuculline. This finding, for the first time, indicated that orexin-A may participate in expression of naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome partly through decreasing the activity of neurons bearing GABAA receptors.

  7. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  8. Molecular mechanism of action of triazolobenzodiazepinone agonists of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Possible cooperativity across the receptor homo-dimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Lam, Polo C.H.; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2016-01-01

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of post-cibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none has yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally-related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs. PMID:26654202

  9. Downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor and nuclear factor-κB by sirtuin 1 contributes to renoprotection in unilateral ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shao-Yu; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Chen, Yung-Ming; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2016-01-01

    Activation of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) attenuates unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO)-induced inflammation and fibrosis, suggesting that Sirt1 may prevent tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In this study, we explored changes in the expression of Sirt1 in the kidneys of UUO-treated rats and evaluated the effects of Sirt1 activation or inhibition on renal pathology and mediators of UUO pathogenesis, especially angiotensin II and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, in rats and rat renal fibroblasts. Sirt1 expression increased in the obstructed kidney but not in the contralateral kidney and was mainly detected in tubulointerstitial cells. Resveratrol, a Sirt1 activator, decreased UUO-induced inflammation and fibrosis, while sirtinol, a Sirt1 inhibitor, enhanced UUO-induced inflammation. UUO increased renal angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), NF-κB, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and fibronectin expression. Resveratrol attenuated these UUO-induced changes, whereas sirtinol enhanced them, with the exception of fibronectin. In renal fibroblasts, Sirt1 overexpression reduced AT1R and NF-κB levels, while Sirt1 knockdown had the opposite effects. Sirtinol increased the levels of AT1R, NF-κB, MCP-1, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), while resveratrol reduced AT1R levels. Our results suggested that Sirt1 inhibited AT1R and NF-κB expression in renal fibroblasts and that these mechanisms may play roles in alleviating UUO-induced damages. PMID:27659793

  10. Genetic Mapping at 3-Kilobase Resolution Reveals Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Receptor 3 as a Risk Factor for Type 1 Diabetes in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Deutsch, Kerry; Li, Sarah; Siegel, Andrew F.; Bekris, Lynn M.; Einhaus, Derek C.; Sheridan, Colleen M.; Glusman, Gustavo; Hood, Leroy; Lernmark, Åke; Janer, Marta

    2006-01-01

    We mapped the genetic influences for type 1 diabetes (T1D), using 2,360 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in the 4.4-Mb human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus and the adjacent 493 kb centromeric to the MHC, initially in a survey of 363 Swedish T1D cases and controls. We confirmed prior studies showing association with T1D in the MHC, most significantly near HLA-DR/DQ. In the region centromeric to the MHC, we identified a peak of association within the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 3 gene (ITPR3; formerly IP3R3). The most significant single SNP in this region was at the center of the ITPR3 peak of association (P=1.7×10-4 for the survey study). For validation, we typed an additional 761 Swedish individuals. The P value for association computed from all 1,124 individuals was 1.30×10-6 (recessive odds ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–3.9). The estimated population-attributable risk of 21.6% (95% CI 10.0%–31.0%) suggests that variation within ITPR3 reflects an important contribution to T1D in Sweden. Two-locus regression analysis supports an influence of ITPR3 variation on T1D that is distinct from that of any MHC class II gene. PMID:16960798

  11. Interference to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in the absence of downmodulation of the principal virus receptor, CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Volsky, D J; Simm, M; Shahabuddin, M; Li, G; Chao, W; Potash, M J

    1996-01-01

    It is thought that interference during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is established by downmodulation of the principal virus receptor, CD4. Here we present evidence to the contrary. At various times after primary infection, we superinfected T cells in vitro by exposure to a genetically distinct viral clone or to a virus carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Replication of each virus strain was determined by restriction enzyme analysis of total cellular DNA, by PCR amplification of viral DNA, or by assay of cell extracts for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity. We found that efficient viral interference is established within 24 h of infection at a multiplicity of infection of 1. At that time, expression of viral structural proteins was low and infected cells displayed undiminished levels of surface CD4 and were fully susceptible to virus binding and fusion. Superinfection by either cell-free HIV-1 or cocultivation was blocked. Cells resistant to superinfection by HIV-1 remained susceptible to Moloney murine leukemia and vaccinia viruses. No interference was observed 4 h after primary infection or in cells infected with either UV-inactivated HIV-1 or a mutant virus defective in virus-cell fusion activity, indicating that binding of primary virus to CD4 is insufficient to prevent superinfection. The minimum viral requirements for this interference are that HIV-1 must be able to enter cells and synthesize viral DNA; Tat-mediated transcription is dispensable. Our results support the existence of a novel pathway to interference to HIV-1 infection, which we term postentry interference, which blocks superinfection during intracellular phases of the virus life cycle. PMID:8648718

  12. Expression and regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalei; Meng, Chenling; Wei, Quanwei; Shi, Fangxiong; Mao, Dagan

    2015-04-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) preferentially mediates the selective uptake of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol ester and the delivery of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. Although multiple analyses have investigated the function of SR-B1 in the liver, adrenal and ovary, its expression in rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle is lacking. In the present study, real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to investigate SR-B1 expression in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle. The results demonstrated that ovarian SR-B1 expression was in a stage-dependent manner, continuously increased from proestrus and kept elevated during metoestrus, while uterine SR-B1 expression decreased from proestrus to diestrus. To determine whether ovarian and uterine SR-B1 expression were affected by sex steroid hormones, immature rats were treated with 17 β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), or their antagonists from postnatal days 24-26. Results showed that the levels of SR-B1 mRNA and protein were significantly up-regulated by E2 in both the ovary and uterus. IHC results showed that SR-B1 was primarily localized in the oocytes, theca internal cells (T-I) of follicles, interstitial cells (IC) as well as corpus luteum (CL), but not granulosa cells (GC) in the ovary during the estrous cycle. Uterine SR-B1 was highly expressed in the endometrial luminal epithelial cells (LEC) and glandular epithelial cells (GEC) as well as in the circular muscle (CM) cells, and weak staining in stromal cells (SC) through estrous cycle. Taken together, SR-B1 expression in the ovary and uterus across the estrous cycle demonstrate that SR-B1 may be involved in uterine function, follicular development as well as luteal function.

  13. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-12-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in β-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with β-thalassemia major -preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes - is exciting.

  14. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Type 1 (CRHR1) Genetic Variation and Stress Interact to Influence Reward Learning

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Ryan; Santesso, Diane L.; Fagerness, Jesen; Perlis, Roy H.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2011-01-01

    Stress is a general risk factor for psychopathology but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain largely unknown. Animal studies and limited human research suggest that stress can induce anhedonic behavior. Moreover, emerging data indicate that genetic variation within the corticotropin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1) at rs12938031 may promote psychopathology, particularly in the context of stress. Using an intermediate phenotypic neurogenetics approach, we assessed how stress and CRHR1 genetic variation (rs12938031) influence reward learning, an important component of anhedonia. Psychiatrically healthy female participants (n = 75) completed a probabilistic reward learning task during stress and no-stress conditions while 128-channel event-related potentials were recorded. Fifty-six participants were also genotyped across CRHR1. Response bias, an individual’s ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, was the primary behavioral variable of interest. The feedback-related positivity (FRP) in response to reward feedback was used as a neural index of reward learning. Relative to the no-stress condition, acute stress was associated with blunted response bias as well as a smaller and delayed FRP (indicative of disrupted reward learning) and reduced anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex activation to reward. Critically, rs12938031 interacted with stress to influence reward learning: both behaviorally and neurally, A homozygotes showed stress-induced reward learning abnormalities. These findings indicate that acute, uncontrollable stressors reduce participants’ ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, and that such effects are modulated by CRHR1 genotype. Homozygosity for the A allele at rs12938031 may increase risk for psychopathology via stress-induced reward learning deficits. PMID:21917807

  15. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in β-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with β-thalassemia major –preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes – is exciting. PMID:25216685

  16. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) genetic variation and stress interact to influence reward learning.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Ryan; Santesso, Diane L; Fagerness, Jesen; Perlis, Roy H; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2011-09-14

    Stress is a general risk factor for psychopathology, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain largely unknown. Animal studies and limited human research suggest that stress can induce anhedonic behavior. Moreover, emerging data indicate that genetic variation within the corticotropin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1) at rs12938031 may promote psychopathology, particularly in the context of stress. Using an intermediate phenotypic neurogenetics approach, we assessed how stress and CRHR1 genetic variation (rs12938031) influence reward learning, an important component of anhedonia. Psychiatrically healthy female participants (n = 75) completed a probabilistic reward learning task during stress and no-stress conditions while 128-channel event-related potentials were recorded. Fifty-six participants were also genotyped across CRHR1. Response bias, an individual's ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, was the primary behavioral variable of interest. The feedback-related positivity (FRP) in response to reward feedback was used as a neural index of reward learning. Relative to the no-stress condition, acute stress was associated with blunted response bias as well as a smaller and delayed FRP (indicative of disrupted reward learning) and reduced anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex activation to reward. Critically, rs12938031 interacted with stress to influence reward learning: both behaviorally and neurally, A homozygotes showed stress-induced reward learning abnormalities. These findings indicate that acute, uncontrollable stressors reduce participants' ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, and that such effects are modulated by CRHR1 genotype. Homozygosity for the A allele at rs12938031 may increase risk for psychopathology via stress-induced reward learning deficits.

  17. Host Avian Beta-Defensin and Toll-Like Receptor Responses of Pigeons following Infection with Pigeon Paramyxovirus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Xu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting; Gao, Mengying; Wang, Qiuling; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality in pigeons caused by pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) highlights the need for new insights into the host immune response and novel treatment approaches. Host defense peptides (HDPs) are key components of the innate immune system. In this study, three novel avian β-defensins (AvBDs 2, 7, and 10) were characterized in pigeons and shown to possess direct antiviral activity against PPMV-1 in vitro. In addition, we evaluated the mRNA expression of these AvBDs and other immune-related genes in tissues of 2-month-old infected pigeons at 3 and 7 days postinfection. We observed that the expression of AvBD2 in the cecal tonsil, lungs, and proventriculus, as well as the expression of AvBD10 in the spleen, lungs, proventriculus, and kidneys, was upregulated in infected pigeons. Similarly, the expression of both Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 was increased in the spleen, trachea, and proventriculus, while TLR15 expression was increased only in the lungs of infected pigeons. In addition, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was upregulated in the spleen, the bursa of Fabricius, the trachea, and the proventriculus of infected pigeons. Furthermore, we observed a high correlation between the expression of AvBD2 and the expression of either TLR7 or TLR15, as well as between AvBD10 expression and either TLR3 or TLR7 expression in respective tissues. The results suggest that PPMV-1 infection can induce innate host responses characterized by the activation of TLRs, particularly TLR3 and TLR7, AvBDs (2 and 10), and iNOS in pigeons. PMID:26162868

  18. Drug-induced mild therapeutic hypothermia obtained by administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonist

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of mechanical/physical devices for applying mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only proven neuroprotective treatment for survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest. However, this type of therapy is cumbersome and associated with several side-effects. We investigated the feasibility of using a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist for obtaining drug-induced sustainable mild hypothermia. Methods First, we screened a heterogeneous group of TRPV1 agonists and secondly we tested the hypothermic properties of a selected candidate by dose-response studies. Finally we tested the hypothermic properties in a large animal. The screening was in conscious rats, the dose-response experiments in conscious rats and in cynomologus monkeys, and the finally we tested the hypothermic properties in conscious young cattle (calves with a body weight as an adult human). The investigated TRPV1 agonists were administered by continuous intravenous infusion. Results Screening: Dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), a component of chili pepper, displayed a desirable hypothermic profile with regards to the duration, depth and control in conscious rats. Dose-response experiments: In both rats and cynomologus monkeys DHC caused a dose-dependent and immediate decrease in body temperature. Thus in rats, infusion of DHC at doses of 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 mg/kg/h caused a maximal ΔT (°C) as compared to vehicle control of -0.9, -1.5, -2.0, and -4.2 within approximately 1 hour until the 6 hour infusion was stopped. Finally, in calves the intravenous infusion of DHC was able to maintain mild hypothermia with ΔT > -3°C for more than 12 hours. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis that infusion of dihydrocapsaicin is a candidate for testing as a primary or adjunct method of inducing and maintaining therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20932337

  19. Host Avian Beta-Defensin and Toll-Like Receptor Responses of Pigeons following Infection with Pigeon Paramyxovirus Type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Xu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting; Gao, Mengying; Wang, Qiuling; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Ma, Deying; Liu, Shengwang

    2015-09-01

    The high morbidity and mortality in pigeons caused by pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) highlights the need for new insights into the host immune response and novel treatment approaches. Host defense peptides (HDPs) are key components of the innate immune system. In this study, three novel avian β-defensins (AvBDs 2, 7, and 10) were characterized in pigeons and shown to possess direct antiviral activity against PPMV-1 in vitro. In addition, we evaluated the mRNA expression of these AvBDs and other immune-related genes in tissues of 2-month-old infected pigeons at 3 and 7 days postinfection. We observed that the expression of AvBD2 in the cecal tonsil, lungs, and proventriculus, as well as the expression of AvBD10 in the spleen, lungs, proventriculus, and kidneys, was upregulated in infected pigeons. Similarly, the expression of both Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 was increased in the spleen, trachea, and proventriculus, while TLR15 expression was increased only in the lungs of infected pigeons. In addition, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was upregulated in the spleen, the bursa of Fabricius, the trachea, and the proventriculus of infected pigeons. Furthermore, we observed a high correlation between the expression of AvBD2 and the expression of either TLR7 or TLR15, as well as between AvBD10 expression and either TLR3 or TLR7 expression in respective tissues. The results suggest that PPMV-1 infection can induce innate host responses characterized by the activation of TLRs, particularly TLR3 and TLR7, AvBDs (2 and 10), and iNOS in pigeons.

  20. The specific monomer/dimer equilibrium of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 is established in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Anke; Gibert, Arthur; Lampe, André; Grzesik, Paul; Rutz, Claudia; Furkert, Jens; Schmoranzer, Jan; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2014-08-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most important drug targets. Although the smallest functional unit of a GPCR is a monomer, it became clear in the past decades that the vast majority of the receptors form dimers. Only very recently, however, data were presented that some receptors may in fact be expressed as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that the interaction of the receptor protomers is dynamic. To date, equilibrium measurements were restricted to the plasma membrane due to experimental limitations. We have addressed the question as to where this equilibrium is established for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1. By developing a novel approach to analyze single molecule fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy data for intracellular membrane compartments, we show that the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 has a specific monomer/dimer equilibrium that is already established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It remains constant at the plasma membrane even following receptor activation. Moreover, we demonstrate for seven additional GPCRs that they are expressed in specific but substantially different monomer/dimer ratios. Although it is well known that proteins may dimerize in the ER in principle, our data show that the ER is also able to establish the specific monomer/dimer ratios of GPCRs, which sheds new light on the functions of this compartment.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1-deficiency enhances hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission: an in vivo microdialysis study in mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Peñalva, R G; Flachskamm, C; Zimmermann, S; Wurst, W; Holsboer, F; Reul, J M H M; Linthorst, A C E

    2002-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone plays an important role in the coordination of various responses to stress. Previous research has implicated both corticotropin-releasing hormone and the serotonergic system as causative factors in the development and course of stress-related psychiatric disorders such as major depression. To delineate the role of the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRH-R1) in the interactions between corticotropin-releasing hormone and serotonergic neurotransmission, in vivo microdialysis was performed in CRH-R1-deficient mice under basal (home cage) and stress (forced swimming) conditions. Hippocampal dialysates were used to measure extracellular levels of serotonin and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and free corticosterone levels to monitor the status of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Moreover, behavioural activity was assessed by visual observation and a scoring paradigm. Both wild-type and heterozygous mutant mice showed a clear diurnal rhythm in free corticosterone. Free corticosterone concentrations were, however, lower in heterozygous mutant mice than in wild-type animals and undetectable in homozygous CRH-R1-deficient mice. Homozygous CRH-R1-deficient mice showed enhanced hippocampal levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid but not of serotonin during the light and the dark phase of the diurnal cycle, which may point to an enhanced synthesis of serotonin in the raphe-hippocampal system. Moreover, the mutation resulted in higher behavioural activity in the home cage during the light but not during the dark period. Forced swimming caused a rise in hippocampal serotonin followed by a further increase after the end of the stress paradigm in all genotypes. Homozygous and heterozygous mutant mice showed, however, a significantly amplified serotonin response to the forced swimming as compared to wild-type control animals. We conclude that CRH-R1-deficiency results in reduced hypothalamic

  2. Biased Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Signaling Influences Neuronal Viability in a Cell Culture Model of Huntington Disease.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2016-03-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disorder with limited treatment options. Prior to motor symptom onset or neuronal cell loss in HD, levels of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) decrease in the basal ganglia. Decreasing CB1 levels are strongly correlated with chorea and cognitive deficit. CB1 agonists are functionally selective (biased) for divergent signaling pathways. In this study, six cannabinoids were tested for signaling bias in in vitro models of medium spiny projection neurons expressing wild-type (STHdh(Q7/Q7)) or mutant huntingtin protein (STHdh(Q111/Q111)). Signaling bias was assessed using the Black and Leff operational model. Relative activity [ΔlogR (τ/KA)] and system bias (ΔΔlogR) were calculated relative to the reference compound WIN55,212-2 for Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gβγ, and β-arrestin1 signaling following treatment with 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), anandamide (AEA), CP55,940, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and THC+CBD (1:1), and compared between wild-type and HD cells. The Emax of Gαi/o-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was 50% lower in HD cells compared with wild-type cells. 2-AG and AEA displayed Gαi/o/Gβγ bias and normalized CB1 protein levels and improved cell viability, whereas CP55,940 and THC displayed β-arrestin1 bias and reduced CB1 protein levels and cell viability in HD cells. CBD was not a CB1 agonist but inhibited THC-dependent signaling (THC+CBD). Therefore, enhancing Gαi/o-biased endocannabinoid signaling may be therapeutically beneficial in HD. In contrast, cannabinoids that are β-arrestin-biased--such as THC found at high levels in modern varieties of marijuana--may be detrimental to CB1 signaling, particularly in HD where CB1 levels are already reduced.

  3. Site-specific labeling of the type 1 ryanodine receptor using biarsenical fluorophores targeted to engineered tetracysteine motifs.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, James D; Mahalingam, Mohana

    2013-01-01

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is an intracellular Ca(2+) release channel that mediates skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. While the overall shape of RyR1 has been elucidated using cryo electron microscopic reconstructions, fine structural details remain elusive. To better understand the structure of RyR1, we have previously used a cell-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method using a fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) donor and a fluorescent acceptor, Cy3NTA that binds specifically to short poly-histidine 'tags' engineered into RyR1. However, the need to permeabilize cells to allow Cy3NTA entry as well as the noncovalent binding of Cy3NTA to the His tag limits future applications of this technique for studying conformational changes of the RyR. To overcome these problems, we used a dodecapeptide sequence containing a tetracysteine (Tc) motif to target the biarsenical fluorophores, FlAsH and ReAsH to RyR1. These compounds freely cross intact cell membranes where they then bind covalently to the tetracysteine motif. First, we used this system to conduct FRET measurements in intact cells by fusing a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) FRET donor to the N-terminus of RyR1 and then targeting the FRET acceptor, ReAsH to an adjacent Tc tag. Moderate energy transfer (∼33%) was observed whereas ReAsH incubation of a YFPRyR1 fusion protein lacking the Tc tag resulted in no detectable FRET. We also developed a FRET-based system that did not require RyR fluorescent protein fusions by labeling N-terminal Tc-tagged RyR1 with FlAsH, a FRET donor and then targeting the FRET acceptor Cy3NTA to an adjacent decahistidine (His10) tag. A high degree of energy transfer (∼66%) indicated proper binding of both compounds to these unique recognition sequences in RyR1. Thus, these two systems should provide unprecedented flexibility in future FRET-based structural determinations of RyR1.

  4. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  5. FokI Polymorphism, Vitamin D Receptor, and Interleukin-1 Receptor Haplotypes Are Associated with Type 1 Diabetes in the Dalmatian Population

    PubMed Central

    Zemunik, Tatijana; Škrabić, Veselin; Boraska, Vesna; Diklić, Dijaneta; Terzić, Ivana Marinović; Čapkun, Vesna; Peruzović, Marijana; Terzić, Janoš

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin D and interleukin (IL)-1 have been suggested to function in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Therefore, we examined the influence of gene polymorphisms in vitamin D receptor (VDR) and interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1-R1) on susceptibility to T1DM in the Dalmatian population of South Croatia. We genotyped 134 children with T1DM and 132 controls; for FokI polymorphism studies, we extended the control group to an additional 102 patients. The VDR gene polymorphism FokI displayed unequal distribution (P = 0.0049) between T1DM and control groups, with the ff genotype occurring more frequently in T1DM individuals whereas the VDR gene polymorphism Tru9I did not differ in frequency between studied groups. All tested polymorphisms of the IL-1-R1 gene [PstI, HinfI, and AluI (promoter region) and PstI-e (exon 1B region)] displayed no differences between cases and controls. Haplotype analysis of the VDR gene (FokI, BsmI, ApaI, TaqI, Tru9I) and of the IL-1-R1 gene (PstI, HinfI, AluI, PstI-e) found haplotypes VDR FbATu (P = 0.0388) and IL-1-R1 phap’ (P = 0.0419) to be more frequent in T1DM patients whereas the BatU haplotype occurred more often in controls (P = 0.0064). Our findings indicate that the VDR FokI polymorphism and several VDR and IL-1-R1 haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to T1DM in the Dalmatian population. PMID:16258158

  6. β-arrestin-2-biased agonism of delta opioid receptors sensitizes transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew P; Szteyn, Kalina; Doyle, Allison P; Gomez, Ruben; Henry, Michael A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the signaling mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of chronic pain, the pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain has seen little advancement. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOPr) continue to be vital in the treatment of many forms of chronic pain, but side-effects limit their clinical utility and range from relatively mild, such as constipation, to major, such as addiction and dependence. Additionally, chronic activation of MOPr results in pain hypersensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), and we have shown recently that recruitment of β-arrestin2 to MOPr, away from transient potential vanilloid eceptor type 1 (TRPV1) in primary sensory neurons contributes to this phenomenon. The delta opioid receptor (DOPr) has become a promising target for the treatment of chronic pain, but little is known about the effects of chronic activation of DOPr on nociceptor sensitivity and OIH. Here we report that chronic activation of DOPr by the DOPr-selective agonist, SNC80, results in the sensitization of TRPV1 and behavioral signs of OIH via β-arrestin2 recruitment to DOPr and away from TRPV1. Conversely, chronic treatment with ARM390, a DOPr-selective agonist that does not recruit β-arrestin2, neither sensitized TRPV1 nor produced OIH. Interestingly, the effect of SNC80 to sensitize TRPV1 is species-dependent, as rats developed OIH but mice did not. Taken together, the reported data identify a novel side-effect of chronic administration of β-arrestin2-biased DOPr agonists and highlight the importance of potential species-specific effects of DOPr agonists.

  7. Purification and characterization of the human type 1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor from platelets and comparison with receptor subtypes in other normal and transformed blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, F; Matthews, E; Feinstein, M B

    1995-01-01

    We report the first purification of a native human form of the Ins(1,4,5)P3 (InsP3) receptor. This receptor, isolated from platelets, has an apparent molecular mass on SDS/PAGE of 252 kDa and is chromatographed by gel filtration as an oligomer of about 1 x 10(6) kDa. [3H]InsP3 bound to a single class of sites on the purified receptor protein with a Kd of 27 nM and a Bmax. of 2.2 nmol/mg of protein. The platelet InsP3 receptor, like the rodent cerebellar receptors, was identified immunochemically as a type 1 receptor, but unlike its brain counterparts bound poorly to concanavalin A and other lectins and was not significantly phosphorylated by protein kinase A. All cultured megakaryocytic leukaemia cell lines (e.g. Dami, CHRF-288 and Meg-01) and HEL cells were also immunopositive for type 1 receptor, which was substantially increased in some cases by DMSO or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) which induce further megakaryocytic differentiation. Normal mixed lymphocyte and granulocyte fractions and an enriched T-cell fraction from human blood had measurable InsP3-binding activity, but no detectable type 1 protein. In contrast, Jurkat E6-1 (T-cell lymphoma) cells and the transformed B-cell line RPMI 8392 were immunopositive for type 1 receptor. HL-60 (human promyelocytic leukaemia) cells had no detectable type 1 receptor unless they were stimulated to differentiate along monocyte/macrophage lines by PMA. We conclude that: (1) of the major normal blood cells only platelets contain type 1 InsP3 receptors; (2) some neoplastic transformed blood cell lines also express type 1 receptors, in contrast to their normal counterparts; and (3) increased levels of type 1 InsP3 receptor are induced in some transformed cells under conditions that favour their further terminal differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:8526862

  8. Association of rs5888 SNP in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 gene and serum lipid levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of rs5888 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) gene and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 598 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 585 subjects of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotypes of the SCARB1 rs5888 SNP were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein (Apo) AI were lower but ApoB was higher in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.05-0.001). The frequencies of C and T alleles were 78.3% and 21.7% in Bai Ku Yao, and 73.7% and 26.3% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The frequencies of CC, CT and TT genotypes were 60.0%, 36.6% and 3.4% in Bai Ku Yao, and 54.2%, 39.0% and 6.8% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The subjects with TT genotype in both ethnic groups had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all). Subgroup analyses showed that the subjects with TT genotype in Bai Ku Yao had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all), and the T allele carriers had higher TC, LDL-C and ApoB levels in females than the T allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for all). The participants with TT genotype in Han also had a lower tendency of HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the participants with CC or CT genotype, but the difference did not reach statistically significant (P = 0.063 and P = 0.086; respectively). The association of serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels and genotypes was confirmed by

  9. Localization of the ANG II type 2 receptor in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nora, E. H.; Munzenmaier, D. H.; Hansen-Smith, F. M.; Lombard, J. H.; Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Only functional studies have suggested the presence of the ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor in the microcirculation. To determine the distribution of this receptor in the rat skeletal muscle microcirculation, a polyclonal rabbit anti-rat antiserum was developed and used for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The antiserum was prepared against a highly specific and antigenic AT2-receptor synthetic peptide and was validated by competition and sensitivity assays. Western blot analysis demonstrated a prominent, single band at approximately 40 kDa in cremaster and soleus muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a wide distribution of AT2 receptors throughout the skeletal muscle microcirculation in large and small microvessels. Microanatomic studies displayed an endothelial localization of the AT2 receptor, whereas dual labeling with smooth muscle alpha-actin also showed colocalization of the AT2 receptor with vascular smooth muscle cells. Other cells associated with the microvessels also stained positive for AT2 receptors. Briefly, this study confirms previous functional data and localizes the AT2 receptor to the microcirculation. These studies demonstrate that the AT2 receptor is present on a variety of vascular cell types and that it is situated in a fashion that would allow it to directly oppose ANG II type 1 receptor actions.

  10. Angiotensin receptor type 1 and endothelin receptor type A on immune cells mediate migration and the expression of IL-8 and CCL18 when stimulated by autoantibodies from systemic sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Agonistic autoantibodies (Aabs) against the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1R) and the endothelin receptor type A (ETAR) have been identified in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). In our present study, we examined the expression of the AT1R and the ETAR in human immune cells and the pathological effects mediated through these receptors by their corresponding Aabs. Methods Protein expression of AT1R and ETAR on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals and SSc patients was analyzed using flow cytometry, and mRNA expression of both receptors in PBMCs from healthy donors was examined by real-time PCR. In addition, PBMCs from healthy donors were stimulated in vitro with affinity-purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) fractions from SSc patients positive for AT1R and ETAR Aabs, as well as with IgG from healthy donors serving as controls. Alterations in cell surface marker expression, cytokine secretion and chemotactic motility were analyzed using flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and chemotaxis assays, respectively. The results were correlated with the characteristics and clinical findings of the IgG donors. Results Both AT1R and ETAR were expressed on PBMCs in humans. Protein expression of both receptors was decreased in SSc patients compared with that of healthy donors and declined during the course of disease. IgG fractions of SSc patients positive for AT1R and ETAR Aabs induced T-cell migration in an Aab level–dependent manner. Moreover, IgG of SSc patients stimulated PBMCs to produce more interleukin 8 (IL-8) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 18 (CCL18) than did the IgG of healthy donors. All effects were significantly reduced by selective AT1R and ETAR antagonists. Statistical analysis revealed an association of SSc-IgG induced high IL-8 concentrations with an early disease stage and of high CCL18 concentrations with lung fibrosis onset and vascular complications in the respective IgG donors. Conclusion In

  11. Properly timed exposure to central ANG II prevents behavioral sensitization and changes in angiotensin receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Whalen, Philip E; Speth, Robert C; Clark, Stewart D; Daniels, Derek

    2014-12-15

    Previous studies show that the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) is susceptible to rapid desensitization, but that more chronic treatments that stimulate ANG II lead to sensitization of several responses. It is unclear, however, if the processes of desensitization and sensitization interact. To test for differences in AT1R expression associated with single or repeated injections of ANG II, we measured AT1R mRNA in nuclei that control fluid intake of rats given ANG II either in a single injection or divided into three injections spaced 20 min apart. Rats given a single injection of ANG II had more AT1R mRNA in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the periventricular tissue surrounding the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) than did controls. The effect was not observed, however, when the same cumulative dose of ANG II was divided into multiple injections. Behavioral tests found that single daily injections of ANG II sensitized the dipsogenic response to ANG II, but a daily regimen of four injections did not cause sensitization. Analysis of (125)I-Sar(1)-ANG II binding revealed a paradoxical decrease in binding in the caudal AV3V and dorsal median preoptic nucleus after 5 days of single daily injections of ANG II; however, this effect was absent in rats treated for 5 days with four daily ANG II injections. Taken together, these data suggest that a desensitizing treatment regimen prevents behavior- and receptor-level effects of repeated daily ANG II.

  12. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Vincenzo C.; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R.; Eikenboom, Jeroen C.; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C.; Watson, Steve P.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder. PMID:26630678

  14. New findings concerning vertebrate porin II--on the relevance of glycine motifs of type-1 VDAC.

    PubMed

    Thinnes, Friedrich P

    2013-04-01

    New findings concerning vertebrate porin part I was published in 1997, then summarizing early data and reflections regarding the molecular structure of vertebrate voltage-dependent anion-selective channels, VDAC/eukaryotic porin, and the extra-mitochondrial expression pattern of human type-1 VDAC. Meanwhile, endeavors of different laboratories confirmed and widened this beginning by encircling the function of the channels. Regarding the function of mitochondrial outer membrane-standing VDACs the channels are established parts of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and thus therapeutic targets in studies on several diseases: cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Down Syndrome, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, cystic fibrosis and malaria. Regarding cell membrane-integrated type-1 VDAC it has been documented by different approaches that this porin channel is engaged in cell volume regulation, trans-membrane electron transport and apoptosis. Furthermore, new data insinuate a bridging of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, putatively gaining relevance in Alzheimer research. Mammalian type-1 VDAC, a β-barrel, is basically built up by nineteen β-sheets connected by peptide stretches of varying lengths. The molecule also comprises an N-terminal stretch of some twenty amino acids which, according to biochemical data, traverses the channel lumen towards the cytosolic surface of outer mitochondrial membranes or the plasma lemma, respectively and works as voltage sensor in channel gating. In artificial lipid bilayers VDACs figure as anion or cation-channels, as VDACs are permeable to both cations and anions, with voltage shifts changing the relative permeability. Type-1 VDAC carries several motifs where glycine residues are in critical positions. Motifs of this type, on the on hand, are established nucleotide binding sites. On the other hand, the GxxxG motifs are also discussed as relevant peptide dimerization/aggregation/membrane perturbation motifs. Finally

  15. Mapping the binding surface of interleukin-8 complexed with an N-terminal fragment of the type 1 human interleukin-8 receptor.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1994-01-24

    Interleukin-8 and its receptors are key mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy has been utilized to map the binding surface on interleukin-8 (IL-8) for an N-terminal fragment of the human Type-1 IL-8 receptor. A peptide corresponding to residues 1-40 of the IL-8 type 1 receptor (IL8-r1) was titrated into a sample of uniformly 15N-labeled IL-8. IL8-r1 binds to IL-8 with a dissociation constant of 170 +/- 50 microM assuming the peptide binds with a stoichiometry of one peptide per IL-8 monomer, exchanges rapidly (> 900 s-1) between free and bound states, and selectively perturbs the chemical environment of several IL-8 residues. The binding surface on IL-8 suggested by our results is comprised of residues in strand beta 3 of the beta-sheet (Glu48 to Cys50), the turn preceding beta 3 (Ser44), the C-terminal alpha-helix (Val61) and the irregular N-terminal loop region (Thr12, Lys15, Phe17, His18, Lys20 and Phe21). The IL-8 dimer appears to present two symmetrical binding surfaces for the IL8-r1 peptide, suggesting two receptor peptides may bind per dimer. PMID:8307164

  16. Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors mediate the increase in TGF-beta1 in thyroid hormone-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Diniz, G P; Carneiro-Ramos, M S; Barreto-Chaves, M L M

    2007-04-01

    Increased thyroid hormone (TH) levels are known to induce cardiac hypertrophy. Some studies have provided evidence for a functional link between angiotensin II (ANG II) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) in the heart, both being able to also induce cardiac hypertrophy. However, the contribution of this growth factor activated directly by TH or indirectly by ANG II in cardiac hypertrophy development remains unknown. To analyze the possible role of TGF-beta1 in cardiac hypertrophy induced by TH and also to evaluate if the TGF-beta1 effect is mediated by ANG II receptors, we employed Wistar rats separated into control, hypothyroid (hypo) and hyperthyroid (T4 - 10) groups combined or not with ANG II receptor blockers (losartan or PD123319). Serum levels of T3 and T4, systolic pressure and heart rate confirmed the thyroid state of the groups. The T4 - 10 group presented a significant increase in cardiac TGF-beta1 levels; however, TGF-beta1 levels in the hypo group did not change in relation to the control. Inhibition of the increase in cardiac TGF-beta1 levels was observed in the groups treated with T4 in association with losartan or PD123319 when compared to the T4 - 10 group. These results demonstrate for the first time the TH-modulated induction of cardiac TGF-beta1 in cardiac hypertrophy, and that this effect is mediated by ANG II receptors. PMID:17206447

  17. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  18. Membrane Cholesterol Affects Stimulus-Activity Coupling in Type 1, but not Type 2, CCK Receptors: Use of Cell Lines with Elevated Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Harikumar, Kaleeckal G.; Potter, Ross M.; Patil, Achyut; Echeveste, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The lipid microenvironment of membrane proteins can affect their structure, function, and regulation. We recently described differential effects of acute modification of membrane cholesterol on the function of type 1 and 2 cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors. We now explore the regulatory impact of chronic cholesterol modification on these receptors using novel receptor-bearing cell lines with elevated membrane cholesterol. Stable CCK1R and CCK2R expression was established in clonal lines of 25RA cells having gain-of-function in SCAP [sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein] and SRD15 cells having deficiencies in Insig-1 and Insig-2 enzymes affecting HMG CoA reductase and SREBP. Increased cholesterol in the plasma membrane of these cells was directly demonstrated, and receptor binding and signaling characteristics were shown to reflect predicted effects on receptor function. In both environments, both types of CCK receptors were internalized and recycled normally in response to agonist occupation. No differences in receptor distribution within the membrane were appreciated at the light microscopic level in these CHO-derived cell lines. Fluorescence anisotropy was studied for these receptors occupied by fluorescent agonist and antagonist, as well as when tagged with YFP. These studies demonstrated increased anisotropy of the agonist ligand occupying the active state of the CCK1R in a cholesterol-enriched environment, mimicking fluorescence of the uncoupled, inactive state of this receptor, while there was no effect of increasing cholesterol on fluorescence at the CCK2R. These cell lines should be quite useful for examining the functional characteristics of potential drugs that might be used in an abnormal lipid environment. PMID:23306829

  19. A mean field model of ligand-protein interactions: implications for the structural assessment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease complexes and receptor-specific binding.

    PubMed Central

    Verkhivker, G M; Rejto, P A

    1996-01-01

    We propose a general mean field model of ligand-protein interactions to determine the thermodynamic equilibrium of a system at finite temperature. The method is employed in structural assessments of two human immuno-deficiency virus type 1 protease complexes where the gross effects of protein flexibility are incorporated by utilizing a data base of crystal structures. Analysis of the energy spectra for these complexes has revealed that structural and thermo-dynamic aspects of molecular recognition can be rationalized on the basis of the extent of frustration in the binding energy landscape. In particular, the relationship between receptor-specific binding of these ligands to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease and a minimal frustration principle is analyzed. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8552675

  20. Characterization of Angiotensin II Molecular Determinants Involved in AT1 Receptor Functional Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Domazet, Ivana; Holleran, Brian J; Richard, Alexandra; Vandenberghe, Camille; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard; Guillemette, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    The octapeptide angiotensin II (AngII) exerts a variety of cardiovascular effects through the activation of the AngII type 1 receptor (AT1), a G protein-coupled receptor. The AT1 receptor engages and activates several signaling pathways, including heterotrimeric G proteins Gq and G12, as well as the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 pathway. Additionally, following stimulation, βarrestin is recruited to the AT1 receptor, leading to receptor desensitization. It is increasingly recognized that specific ligands selectively bind and favor the activation of some signaling pathways over others, a concept termed ligand bias or functional selectivity. A better understanding of the molecular basis of functional selectivity may lead to the development of better therapeutics with fewer adverse effects. In the present study, we developed assays allowing the measurement of six different signaling modalities of the AT1 receptor. Using a series of AngII peptide analogs that were modified in positions 1, 4, and 8, we sought to better characterize the molecular determinants of AngII that underlie functional selectivity of the AT1 receptor in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The results reveal that position 1 of AngII does not confer functional selectivity, whereas position 4 confers a bias toward ERK signaling over Gq signaling, and position 8 confers a bias toward βarrestin recruitment over ERK activation and Gq signaling. Interestingly, the analogs modified in position 8 were also partial agonists of the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent ERK pathway via atypical PKC isoforms PKCζ and PKCι.

  1. Pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors causes a prolonged symptomatic benefit in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a genetic disorder characterized by severe ataxia associated with progressive loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. The mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptor plays a key role in mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum, and its dysfunction is linked to the pathophysiology of motor symptoms associated with SCA1. We used SCA1 heterozygous transgenic mice (Q154/Q2) as a model for testing the hypothesis that drugs that enhance mGlu1 receptor function may be good candidates for the medical treatment of SCA1. Results Symptomatic 30-week old SCA1 mice showed reduced mGlu1 receptor mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum. Interestingly, these mice also showed an intense expression of mGlu5 receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells, which normally lack these receptors. Systemic treatment of SCA1 mice with the mGlu1 receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), Ro0711401 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused a prolonged improvement of motor performance on the rotarod and the paw-print tests. A single injection of Ro0711401 improved motor symptoms for several days, and no tolerance developed to the drug. In contrast, the mGlu5 receptor PAM, VU0360172 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused only a short-lasting improvement of motor symptoms, whereas the mGlu1 receptor antagonist, JNJ16259685 (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), further impaired motor performance in SCA1 mice. The prolonged symptomatic benefit caused by Ro0711401 outlasted the time of drug clearance from the cerebellum, and was associated with neuroadaptive changes in the cerebellum, such as a striking reduction of the ectopically expressed mGlu5 receptors in Purkinje cells, increases in levels of total and Ser880-phosphorylated GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors, and changes in the length of spines in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. Conclusions These data demonstrate that pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 receptors causes a robust and sustained motor improvement in SCA

  2. Structural insights into transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) from homology modeling, flexible docking, and mutational studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoonji; Ryu, HyungChul; Kang, Dong Wook; Lee, Jeewoo; Lazar, Jozsef; Pearce, Larry V.; Pavlyukovets, Vladimir A.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Choi, Sun

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel composed of four monomers with six transmembrane helices (TM1-TM6). TRPV1 is found in the central and peripheral nervous system, and it is an important therapeutic target for pain relief. We describe here the construction of a tetrameric homology model of rTRPV1. We experimentally evaluated by mutational analysis the contribution of residues of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) contributing to ligand binding by the prototypical TRPV1 agonists capsaicin and resiniferatoxin. We then performed docking analysis using our homology model. The docking results with capsaicin and RTX showed that our homology model was reliable, affording good agreement with our mutation data. Additionally, the binding mode of a simplified RTX (sRTX) ligand as predicted by the modeling agreed well with those of capsaicin and RTX, accounting for the high binding affinity of the sRTX ligand for TRPV1. Through the homology modeling, docking and mutational studies, we obtained important insights into the ligand-receptor interactions at the molecular level which should prove of value in the design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:21448716

  3. The foot structure from the type 1 ryanodine receptor is required for functional coupling to store-operated channels.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Alicia; Diaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Antaramian, Anaid; Vaca, Luis

    2005-07-01

    In the present study we have explored structural determinants of the functional interaction between skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We have illustrated a functional interaction between TRPC1 channels and RyR1 for the regulation of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) initiated after releasing calcium from a caffeine-sensitive intracellular calcium pool. RNA interference experiments directed to reduce the amount of TRPC1 protein indicate that RyR1 associates to at least two different types of store-operated channels (SOCs), one dependent and one independent of TRPC1. In contrast, bradykinin-induced SOCE is completely dependent on the presence of TRPC1 protein, as we have previously illustrated. Removing the foot structure from RyR1 results in normal caffeine-induced release of calcium from internal stores but abolishes the activation of SOCE, indicating that this structure is require for functional coupling to SOCs. The footless RyR1 protein shows a different cellular localization when compared with wild type RyR1. The later protein shows a higher percentage of colocalization with FM-464, a marker of plasma membrane. The implications of the foot structure for the functional and physical coupling to TRPC and SOCs is discussed.

  4. Molecular characterization of a dual endothelin-1/Angiotensin II receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Opazo, N.; Hirayama, K.; Akimoto, K.; Herrera, V. L.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The molecular recognition theory (MRT) provides a conceptual framework that could explain the evolution of intermolecular and intramolecular interaction of peptides and proteins. As such, it predicts that binding sites of peptide hormones, and its receptor binding sites were originally encoded by and evolved from complementary strands of genomic DNA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the basis of principles underlying the MRT, we screened a rat brain complementary DNA library using an AngII followed by an endothelin-1 (ET-1) antisense oligonucleotide probe, expecting to isolate potential cognate receptors. RESULTS: An identical cDNA clone was isolated independently from both the AngII and ET-1 oligonucleotide screenings. Structural analysis revealed a receptor polypeptide containing a single predicted transmembrane region with distinct ET-1 and AngII putative binding domains. Functional analysis demonstrated ET-1- and AngII-specific binding as well as ET-1- and AngII-induced coupling to a Ca2+ mobilizing transduction system. Amino acid substitutions within the predicted ET-1 binding domain obliterate ET-1 binding while preserving AngII binding, thus defining the structural determinants of ET-1 binding within the dual ET-1/AngII receptor, as well as corroborating the dual nature of the receptor. CONCLUSIONS: Elucidation of the dual ET-1/AngII receptor provides further molecular genetic evidence in support of the molecular recognition theory and identifies for the first time a molecular link between the ET-1 and AngII hormonal systems that could underlie observed similar physiological responses elicited by ET-1 and AngII in different organ systems. The prominent expression of the ET-1/AngII receptor mRNA in brain and heart tissues suggests an important role in cardiovascular function in normal and pathophysiological states. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:9508787

  5. Prevalence of inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene deletion, the mutation for spinocerebellar ataxia type 15, in Japan screened by gene dosage.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Masato; Ishikawa, Kinya; Izumi, Yuishin; Takahashi, Makoto; Niimi, Yusuke; Sato, Nozomu; Onodera, Osamu; Kaji, Ryuji; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 15 (SCA15) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by late-onset, slowly progressive pure cerebellar ataxia. This disease is caused by a heterozygous deletion of the inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor type 1 (ITPR1) gene, suggesting that haploinsufficiency of the receptor function is the plausible disease mechanism. To clarify the prevalence of SCA15 in Japan, we designed four sets of probes and primers in different regions of ITPR1 and performed TaqMan PCR assay to search for gene deletions in 226 index SCA patients excluded for repeat expansion disorders. Deletion was found in only one patient, in whom gait ataxia started at 51 years of age and progressed to show cerebellar ataxia. This study demonstrates a simple but efficient method for screening ITPR1 deletion. We also conclude that ITPR1 gene deletions are much rare in Japan than in Europe, comprising only 0.3% in all SCAs in Japan.

  6. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 (LPA1) Plays a Functional Role in Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption Activity*

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Vales, Rùben Lopez; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1−/− mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1−/− mice but not in Lpar2−/− and Lpar3−/− animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1−/− osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP+ osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss. PMID:24429286

  7. Role of peripheral endothelin receptors in an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-I).

    PubMed

    Millecamps, Magali; Laferrière, Andre; Ragavendran, J Vaigunda; Stone, Laura S; Coderre, Terence J

    2010-10-01

    Chronic post-ischemic pain (CPIP) is an animal model of CRPS-I developed using a 3-h ischemia-reperfusion injury of the rodent hind paw. The contribution of local endothelin to nociception has been evaluated in CPIP mice by measuring sustained nociceptive behaviors (SNBs) following intraplantar injection of endothelin-1 or -2 (ET-1, ET-2). The effects of local BQ-123 (ETA-R antagonist), BQ-788 (ETB-R antagonist), IRL-1620 (ETB-R agonist) and naloxone (opioid antagonist) were assessed on ET-induced SNBs and/or mechanical and cold allodynia in CPIP mice. ETA-R and ETB-R expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Compared to shams, CPIP mice exhibited hypersensitivity to local ET-1 and ET-2. BQ-123 reduced ET-1- and ET-2-induced SNBs in both sham and CPIP animals, but not mechanical or cold allodynia. BQ-788 enhanced ET-1- and ET-2-induced SNBs in both sham and CPIP mice, and cold allodynia in CPIP mice. IRL-1620 displayed a non-opioid anti-nociceptive effect on ET-1- and ET-2-induced SNBs and mechanical allodynia in CPIP mice. The distribution of ETA-R and ETB-R was similar in plantar skin of sham and CPIP mice, but both receptors were over-expressed in plantar muscles of CPIP mice. This study shows that ETA-R and ETB-R have differing roles in nociception for sham and CPIP mice. CPIP mice exhibit more local endothelin-induced SNBs, develop a novel local ETB-R agonist-induced (non-opioid) analgesia, and exhibit over-expression of both receptors in plantar muscles, but not skin. The effectiveness of local ETB-R agonists as anti-allodynic treatments in CPIP mice holds promise for novel therapies in CRPS-I patients.

  8. An Orphan Seven-Transmembrane Domain Receptor Expressed Widely in the Brain Functions as a Coreceptor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Aimee L.; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Sharron, Matthew; Lee, Benhur; Yi, Yanji; Choe, Wonkyu; Kolson, Dennis L.; Mitrovic, Branka; Zhou, Yiqing; Faulds, Daryl; Collman, Ronald G.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Horuk, Richard; Doms, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Both CD4 and an appropriate coreceptor are necessary for infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and most strains of HIV-2. The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the major HIV-1 coreceptors, although some virus strains can also utilize alternative coreceptors such as CCR3 to infect cells. In contrast, most if not all simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains use CCR5 as a coreceptor, and many SIV strains can use CCR5 independently of CD4. In addition, several orphan seven-transmembrane receptors which can serve as HIV-1 and SIV coreceptors have been identified. Here we report that APJ, an orphan seven-transmembrane domain receptor with homology to the angiotensin receptor family, functions as a coreceptor for a number of HIV-1 and SIV strains. APJ was expressed widely in the human brain and in NT2N neurons. APJ transcripts were also detected by reverse transcription-PCR in the CD4-positive T-cell line C8166, but not in peripheral blood leukocytes, microglia, phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- or PHA/interleukin-2-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocytes, or monocyte-derived macrophages. The widespread distribution of APJ in the central nervous system coupled with its use as a coreceptor by some HIV-1 strains indicates that it may play a role in neuropathogenesis. PMID:9733831

  9. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide type 1 receptor (PPR) signaling in osteocytes regulates anabolic and catabolic skeletal responses to PTH.

    PubMed

    Saini, Vaibhav; Marengi, Dean A; Barry, Kevin J; Fulzele, Keertik S; Heiden, Erica; Liu, Xiaolong; Dedic, Christopher; Maeda, Akira; Lotinun, Sutada; Baron, Roland; Pajevic, Paola Divieti

    2013-07-12

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the only Food and Drug Administration-approved anabolic agent to treat osteoporosis; however, the cellular targets of PTH action in bone remain controversial. PTH modulates bone turnover by binding to the PTH/PTH-related peptide (PTHrP) type 1 receptor (PPR), a G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in bone and kidneys. Osteocytes, the most abundant cells in adult bone, also express PPR. However, the physiological relevance of PPR signaling in osteocytes remains to be elucidated. Toward this goal, we generated mice with PPR deletion in osteocytes (Ocy-PPRKO). Skeletal analysis of these mice revealed a significant increase in bone mineral density and trabecular and cortical bone parameters. Osteoblast activities were reduced in these animals, as demonstrated by decreased collagen type I α1 mRNA and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression. Importantly, when subjected to an anabolic or catabolic PTH regimen, Ocy-PPRKO animals demonstrated blunted skeletal responses. PTH failed to suppress SOST/Sclerostin or induce RANKL expression in Ocy-PPRKO animals compared with controls. In vitro, osteoclastogenesis was significantly impaired in Ocy-PPRKO upon PTH administration, indicating that osteocytes control osteoclast formation through a PPR-mediated mechanism. Taken together, these data indicate that PPR signaling in osteocytes is required for bone remodeling, and receptor signaling in osteocytes is needed for anabolic and catabolic skeletal responses.

  10. Involvement of the serotonergic type 1A (5-HT1A) receptor in the agranular insular cortex in the consolidation of memory for inhibitory avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Mello e Souza, T; Rodrigues, C; Souza, M M; Vinadé, E; Coitinho, A; Choi, H; Izquierdo, I

    2001-09-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were bilaterally implanted with indwelling cannulae in the agranular insular cortex of the prefrontal cortex. After recovery, animals were trained in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task (3.0-s, 0.4-mA footshock) and received, immediately after training, a 0.5-microl infusion of the serotonergic type 1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist dipropylamino-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) or of the 5- HT1A receptor antagonist 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-phthalimido)butyl] piperazine hydrobromide (NAN-190), or of vehicle alone (20% DMSO). Retention testing was carried out 24 h after training. 8-OH-DPAT (1.25 and 6.25 microg but not 0.0125 or 0.125 microg) was amnesic. NAN-190 was not effective at 0.125 or 1.25 microg any dose but reversed amnesia when given at 1.250 microg simultaneously with both effective doses of 8-OH-DPAT. These results show that an overactivation of 5-HT1A receptors in the agranular insular cortex impairs memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance, in rats, immediately after training. This suggests that these receptors of the insular cortex may modulate memory consolidation.

  11. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  12. The Relevance of Group II Glutamate Receptors Expression to Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Jonathan D; Mostofsky, David I

    2016-01-01

    The interface of receptor-mediated regulation of cellular signaling and neurological outputs remains an active field of investigation. The metabotropic G protein-coupled glutamate receptors, and in particular, the group II cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP)-lowering metabotropic glutamate receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors), have gained interest as therapeutic targets in different forms of neurological disorders. This review explores mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors expression, pharmacological activation, and signaling links to anxiety, as assessed in animal models and in clinical trials. PMID:27650988

  13. Alternate receptor usage of neuropilin-1 and glucose transporter protein 1 by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Qingwen; Alkhatib, Bashar; Cornetta, Kenneth; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2010-01-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that neuropilin 1 (NP-1) is involved in HTLV-1 entry; however, the role NP-1 plays in this process is not understood. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of human NP-1 but not NP-2 cDNA increased susceptibility to HTLV-1. SiRNA-mediated inhibition of NP-1 expression correlated with significant reduction of HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF{sub 165}) caused downmodulation of surface NP-1 and inhibited HTLV-1 infection of U87 cells. In contrast, VEGF{sub 165} partially inhibited infection of primary astrocytes and had no significant effect on infection of HeLa cells. VEGF{sub 165} and antibodies to the glucose transporter protein 1 (anti-GLUT-1) were both needed to block infection of primary astrocytes, however, only anti-GLUT-1 antibodies were sufficient to block infection of HeLa cells. HTLV-1 Env forms complexes with both NP-1 and GLUT-1 in primary human astrocytes. The alternate usage of these two cellular receptors may have important implications regarding HTLV-1 neuro-tropism.

  14. Angiotensin type 1a receptor-deficient mice develop diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction, which is prevented by renin-angiotensin system inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes-induced organ damage is significantly associated with the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Recently, several studies have demonstrated a change in the RAS from an extracellular to an intracellular system, in several cell types, in response to high ambient glucose levels. In cardiac myocytes, intracellular angiotensin (ANG) II synthesis and actions are ACE and AT1 independent, respectively. However, a role of this system in diabetes-induced organ damage is not clear. Methods To determine a role of the intracellular ANG II in diabetic cardiomyopathy, we induced diabetes using streptozotocin in AT1a receptor deficient (AT1a-KO) mice to exclude any effects of extracellular ANG II. Further, diabetic animals were treated with a renin inhibitor aliskiren, an ACE inhibitor benazeprilat, and an AT1 receptor blocker valsartan. Results AT1a-KO mice developed significant diastolic and systolic dysfunction following 10 wks of diabetes, as determined by echocardiography. All three drugs prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction in these animals, without affecting blood pressure or glucose levels. A significant down regulation of components of the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) was observed in diabetic animals, which was largely prevented by benazeprilat and valsartan, while aliskiren normalized kininogen expression. Conclusions These data indicated that the AT1a receptor, thus extracellular ANG II, are not required for the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The KKS might contribute to the beneficial effects of benazeprilat and valsartan in diabetic cardiomyopathy. A role of intracellular ANG II is suggested by the inhibitory effects of aliskiren, which needs confirmation in future studies. PMID:24215514

  15. Infectious properties of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants with distinct affinities for the CD4 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, E J; Madani, N; Kozak, S L; Kabat, D

    1997-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that primary patient isolates of T-cell-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 ) have lower affinities for CD4 than their laboratory-adapted derivatives, that this may partly result from tighter gp120-gp41 bonds that constrain the CD4 binding sites of the primary viruses, and that selection for increased CD4 affinity may be the principal factor in laboratory adaptation of HIV-1 (S. L. Kozak, E. J. Platt, N. Madani, F. E. Ferro, Jr., K. Peden, and D. Kabat, J. Virol. 71:873-882, 1997). These conclusions were based on studies with a panel of HeLa-CD4 cell clones that differ in CD4 levels over a broad range, with laboratory-adapted viruses infecting all clones with equal efficiencies and primary T-cell-tropic viruses infecting the clones in proportion to cellular CD4 levels. Additionally, all of the primary and laboratory-adapted T-cell-tropic viruses efficiently used CXCR-4 (fusin) as a coreceptor. To test these conclusions by an independent approach, we studied mutations in the laboratory-adapted virus LAV/IIIB that alter the CD)4 binding region of gp120 and specifically reduce CD4 affinities of free gp 120 by 85 to 98% (U. Olshevsky et al., J. Virol. 64:5701-5707, 1990). These mutations reduced virus titers to widely varying extents that ranged from severalfold to several orders of magnitude and converted infectivities on the HeLa-CD4 panel from CD4 independency to a high degree of CD4 dependency that resembled the behavior of primary patient viruses. The relative infectivities of the mutants correlated closely with their sensitivities to inactivation by soluble CD4 but did not correlate with the relative CD4 affinities of their free gp120s. Most of the mutations did not substantially alter envelope glycoprotein synthesis, processing, expression on cell surfaces, incorporation into virions, or rates of gp120 shedding from virions. However, one mutation (D457R) caused a decrease in gp160 processing by approximately 80%. The fact

  16. HLA class II gene associations in African American Type 1 diabetes reveal a protective HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Howson, J M M; Roy, M S; Zeitels, L; Stevens, H; Todd, J A

    2013-01-01

    Aims Owing to strong linkage disequilibrium between markers, pinpointing disease associations within genetic regions is difficult in European ancestral populations, most notably the very strong association of the HLA-DRB1*03-DQA1*05:01-DQB1*02:01 haplotype with Type 1 diabetes risk, which is assumed to be because of a combination of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1. In contrast, populations of African ancestry have greater haplotype diversity, offering the possibility of narrowing down regions and strengthening support for a particular gene in a region being causal. We aimed to study the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region in African American Type 1 diabetes. Methods Two hundred and twenty-seven African American patients with Type 1 diabetes and 471 African American control subjects were tested for association at the HLA class II genes, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and 5147 single nucleotide polymorphisms across the major histocompatibility complex region using logistic regression models. Population admixture was accounted for with principal components analysis. Results Single nucleotide polymorphism marker associations were explained by the HLA associations, with the major peak over the class II loci. The HLA association overall was extremely strong, as expected for Type 1 diabetes, even in African Americans in whom diabetes diagnosis is heterogeneous. In addition, there were unique features: the HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype was split into HLA-DRB1*03:01, which confers greatest susceptibility in these samples (odds ratio 3.17, 95% CI 1.72–5.83) and HLA-DRB1*03:02, an allele rarely observed in Europeans, which confers the greatest protection in these African American samples (odds ratio 0.22, 95% CI 0.09–0.55). Conclusions The unique diversity of the African HLA region we have uncovered supports a specific and major role for HLA-DRB1 in HLA-DRB1*03 haplotype-associated Type 1 diabetes risk. PMID:23398374

  17. Heavily reddened z ˜ 2 Type 1 quasars - II. H α star formation constraints from SINFONI IFU observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghband-Zadeh, S.; Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul C.; McMahon, Richard G.

    2016-06-01

    We use near-infrared integral field unit spectroscopy to search for H α emission associated with star formation in a sample of 28 heavily reddened (E(B - V) ≃ 0.5-1.9), hyperluminous (log({{L}}_{bol}/erg s^{-1})≃ 47-48) broad-line quasars at z ≃ 1.4-2.7. 16 of the 28 quasars show evidence for star formation with an average extinction-corrected star formation rate (SFR) of 320 ± 70 M⊙ yr-1. A stacked spectrum of the detections shows weak [N II], consistent with star formation as the origin of the narrow H α emission. The star-forming regions are spatially unresolved in 11 of the 16 detections and constrained to lie within ˜6 kpc of the quasar emission. In the five resolved detections we find the star-forming regions are extended on scales of ˜8 kpc around the quasar emission. The prevalence of high SFRs is consistent with the identification of the heavily reddened quasar population as representing a transitional phase from apparent `starburst galaxies' to optically luminous quasars. Upper limits are determined for 10 quasars in which star formation is undetected. In two of the quasars the SFR is constrained to be relatively modest, <50 M⊙ yr-1, but significantly higher levels of star formation could be present in the other eight quasars. The combination of the 16 strong star formation detections and the eight high SFR limits means that high levels of star formation may be present in the majority of the sample. Higher spatial resolution data, of multiple emission lines, will allow us to better understand the interplay between star formation and active galactic nucleus activity in these transitioning quasars.

  18. A covalently dimerized recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-15 variant identifies bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1B as a key cell surface receptor on ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Pulkki, Minna M; Mottershead, David G; Pasternack, Arja H; Muggalla, Pranuthi; Ludlow, Helen; van Dinther, Maarten; Myllymaa, Samu; Koli, Katri; ten Dijke, Peter; Laitinen, Mika; Ritvos, Olli

    2012-03-01

    Genetic studies have identified bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP15) as an essential regulator of female fertility in humans and in sheep. Oocyte-derived BMP15 is a noncovalently linked dimeric growth factor mediating its effects to ovarian somatic cells in a paracrine manner. Although receptor ectodomains capable of binding BMP15 have previously been reported, no cell surface receptor complex involved in BMP15 signaling has previously been characterized. Here we have expressed and purified recombinant human BMP15 noncovalent and covalent dimer variants. The biological effects of these BMP15 variants were assessed in cultured human granulosa-luteal cells or COV434 granulosa cell tumor cells using BMP-responsive transcriptional reporter assays and an inhibin B ELISA. Biochemical characterization of ligand-receptor interactions was performed with affinity-labeling experiments using [(125)I]iodinated BMP15 variants. Both ligand variants were shown to form homodimers and to stimulate Smad1/5/8 signaling and inhibin B production in human granulosa cells in a similar manner. [(125)I]Iodination of both ligands was achieved, but only the covalent dimer variant retained receptor binding capacity. The [(125)I]BMP15(S356C) variant bound preferentially to endogenous BMP receptor 1B (BMPR1B) and BMPR2 receptors on COV434 cells. Binding experiments in COS cells with overexpression of these receptors confirmed that the [(125)I]BMP15(S356C) variant binds to BMPR1B and BMPR2 forming the BMP15 signaling complex. The results provide the first direct evidence in any species on the identification of specific cell surface receptors for a member of the GDF9/BMP15 subfamily of oocyte growth factors. The fact that BMP15 uses preferentially BMPR1B as its type I receptor suggests an important role for the BMPR1B receptor in human female fertility. The result is well in line with the demonstration of ovarian failure in a recently reported human subject with a homozygous BMPR1B loss

  19. Orexin-A regulates cell apoptosis in human H295R adrenocortical cells via orexin receptor type 1 through the AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaocen; Zhao, Yuyan; Ju, Shujing; Guo, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the ability of orexin-A to regulate adrenocortical cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. In the present study, human H295R adrenocortical cells were exposed to orexin‑A (10‑10-10‑6 M), with orexin receptor type 1 (OX1 receptor) antagonist SB334867 or AKT antagonist PF‑04691502. It was found that orexin‑A stimulated H295R cell proliferation, reduced the pro‑apoptotic activity of caspase‑3 to protect against apoptotic cell death and increased cortisol secretion. Furthermore, phospho‑AKT protein was increased by orexin‑A. SB334867 (10‑6 M) and PF‑04691502 (10‑6 M) abolished the effects of orexin‑A (10‑6 M). These results suggested that the orexin‑A/OX1 receptor axis has a significant pro-survival function in adrenal cells, which is mediated by AKT activation. Further studies investigating the effects of orexin-A-upregulation may further elucidate the diverse biological effects of orexin-A in adrenal cells.

  20. Blockade of insulin-like growth factor type-1 receptor with cixutumumab (IMC-A12): a novel approach to treatment for multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Rowinsky, Eric K; Schwartz, Jonathan D; Zojwalla, Naseem; Youssoufian, Hagop; Fox, Floyd; Pultar, Philippe; Novosyadlyy, Ruslan; Cosaert, Jan; Ludwig, Dale L

    2011-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor type-1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays a central role in cell proliferation and survival and is overexpressed in many tumor types. Notably, IGF-1R-mediated signaling confers resistance to diverse cytotoxic, hormonal, and biologic agents, suggesting that therapies targeting IGF-1R may be effective against a broad range of human malignancies. Cixutumumab (IMC-A12; ImClone Systems) is a fully human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits IGF-1R signaling. Binding of cixutumumab to IGF-1R results in receptor internalization and degradation. Because cixutumumab is an IgG1 monoclonal antibody, it may induce additional cytotoxicity via immune effector mechanisms such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In preclinical studies, cixutumumab monotherapy resulted in growth inhibition of multiple experimental cancers. Moreover, cixutumumab safely enhanced the tumor growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of a broad range of chemotherapeutics, and modulated the action of agents that target hormone receptors and signal transduction, which may have implications for cancer therapy. Herein, we review published preclinical and clinical data for cixutumumab and provide a comprehensive overview of selected clinical studies.

  1. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Li, Peng-Yang; Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Lei; Yi, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are widely used drugs that are proven to reduce cardiovascular disease events; however, several recent meta-analyses yielded conflicting conclusions regarding the relationship between ARB and cancer incidence, especially when ARB are combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). We investigated the risk of cancer associated with ARB at different background ACEI levels. Search of PubMed and EMBASE (1966 to December 17, 2015) without language restriction. Randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) had at least 12 months of follow-up data and reported cancer incidence was included. Study characteristics, quality, and risk of bias were assessed by 2 reviewers independently. Nineteen RCTs including 148,334 patients were included in this study. Random-effects model meta-analyses were used to estimate the risk ratio (RR) of cancer risk. No excessive cancer risk was observed in our analyses of ARB alone versus placebo alone without background ACEI use (risk ratio [RR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.18, P = 0.05); ARB alone versus ACEI alone (RR 1.03, 95%CI 0.94–1.14, P = 0.50); ARB plus partial use of ACEI versus placebo plus partial use of ACEI (RR 0.97, 95%CI 0.90–1.04, P = 0.33); and ARB plus ACEI versus ACEI (RR 0.99, 95%CI 0.79–1.24, P = 0.95). Lack of long-term data, inadequate reporting of safety data, significant heterogeneity in underlying study populations, and treatment regimens. ARB have a neutral effect on cancer incidence in randomized trials. We observed no significant differences in cancer incidence when we compared ARB alone with placebo alone, ARB alone with ACEI alone, ARB plus partial use of ACEI with placebo plus partial use of ACEI, or ARB plus ACEI combination with ACEI. PMID:27149494

  2. Quantitation of HLA Class II Protein Incorporated into Human Immunodeficiency Type 1 Virions Purified by Anti-CD45 Immunoaffinity Depletion of Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Trubey, Charles M.; Chertova, Elena; Coren, Lori V.; Hilburn, Joanne M.; Hixson, Catherine V.; Nagashima, Kunio; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Ott, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Among the many host cell-derived proteins found in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HLA class II (HLA-II) appears to be selectively incorporated onto virions and may contribute to mechanisms of indirect imunopathogenesis in HIV infection and AIDS. However, the amount of HLA-II on the surface of HIV-1 particles has not been reliably determined due to contamination of virus preparations by microvesicles containing host cell proteins, including HLA-II. Even rigorous sucrose density centrifugation is unable to completely separate HIV-1 from microvesicles. CD45, a leukocyte integral membrane protein, is found on microvesicles, yet appears to be excluded from HIV-1 particles. Exploiting this observation, we have developed a CD45-based immunoaffinity depletion method for removing CD45-containing microvesicles that yields highly purified preparations of virions. Examination of CD45-depleted HIV-1MN by high-pressure liquid chromatography, protein sequencing, and amino acid analyses determined a molar ratio of HLA-II to Gag of 0.04 to 0.05 in the purified virions, corresponding to an estimated average of 50 to 63 native HLA-II complexes (i.e., a dimer of α and β heterodimers) per virion. These values are approximately 5- to 10-fold lower than those previously determined for other virion preparations that contained microvesicles. Our observations demonstrate the utility of CD45 immunoaffinity-based approaches for producing highly purified retrovirus preparations for applications that would benefit from the use of virus that is essentially free of microvesicles. PMID:14610192

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 and insulin receptor substrate 2 and their co-localization with liver-related neurons in the hypothalamus and brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Zsombok, Andrea; Gao, Hong; Miyata, Kayoko; Issa, Alexandra; Derbenev, Andrei V.

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis mainly via controlling the autonomic output to the visceral organs. The autonomic output is regulated by hormones and nutrients to maintain adequate energy and glucose homeostasis. Insulin action is mediated via insulin receptors (IR) resulting in phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRS) inducing activation of downstream pathways. Furthermore, insulin enhances transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) mediated currents. Activation of the TRPV1 receptor increases excitatory neurotransmitter release in autonomic centers of the brain, thereby impacting energy and glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study is to determine co-expression of IRS2 and TRPV1 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) in the mouse brain as well as expression of IRS2 and TRPV1 receptors at liver-related preautonomic neurons pre-labeled with a trans-neural, viral tracer (PRV-152). The data indicate that IRS2 and TRPV1 receptors are present and co-express in the PVN and the DMV. A large portion (over 50%) of the liver-related preautonomic DMV and PVN neurons expresses IRS2. Moreover, the majority of liver-related DMV and PVN neurons also express TRPV1 receptors, suggesting that insulin and TRPV1 actions may affect liver-related preautonomic neurons. PMID:21620379

  4. Asymmetric Synthesis of Conformationally Constrained Fingolimod Analogues—Discovery of an Orally Active Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Type-1 Agonist and Receptor Type-3 Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ran; Snyder, Ashley H.; Kharel, Yugesh; Schaffter, Lisa; Sun, Qin; Kennedy, Perry C.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Compound 1 (FTY720, Fingolimod) represents a new generation of immunosuppressant that modulates lymphocyte trafficking by interacting with the S1P1 receptor. Compound 1 also provides a template molecule for studying the molecular biology of S1P receptors and related enzymes (kinases and phosphatases). In this study, two conformationally constrained analogues of 1 (3a and 3c) were asymmetrically synthesized in high optical purity. In vitro assessment documented that both analogues are Sphk2 substrates, their phosphorylated species are potent S1P1 receptor agonists, and 3a-P is a potent S1P3 antagonist. After oral administration in mice, both compounds evoked lymphopenia, but their duration of action differed markedly. PMID:17994678

  5. Angiotensin II receptor alterations during pregnancy in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.P.; Venuto, R.C.

    1986-07-01

    Despite activation of the renin-angiotensin system during pregnancy, renal and peripheral vascular blood flows increase, and the systemic blood pressure and the pressor response to exogenous angiotensin II (Ang II) fall. Gestational alterations in Ang II receptors could contribute to these changes. Ang II binding parameters were determining utilizing SVI-Ang II in vascular (glomeruli and mesenteric arteries) and nonvascular (adrenal glomerulosa) tissues from 24- to 28-day pregnant rabbits. Comparisons were made utilizing tissues from nonpregnant rabbits. Binding site concentrations (N) and dissociation constants (K/sub d/) were obtained by Scatchard analyses of binding inhibition data. Meclofenamate (M) inhibits prostaglandin synthesis, reduces plasma renin activity, and enhances the pressor response to infused Ang II in pregnant rabbits. Administration of M to pregnant rabbits increased N in glomerular and in mesenteric artery membranes. These data demonstrate that Ang II receptors in glomeruli and mesenteric arteries are down regulated during gestation in rabbits. Elevated endogenous Ang II during pregnancy in rabbits may contribute to the down regulation of vascular Ang II receptors.

  6. A novel role for epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase and its downstream endoplasmic reticulum stress in cardiac damage and microvascular dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Galán, Maria; Kassan, Modar; Choi, Soo-Kyoung; Partyka, Megan; Trebak, Mohamed; Henrion, Daniel; Matrougui, Khalid

    2012-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFRtk) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are important factors in cardiovascular complications. Understanding whether enhanced EGFRtk activity and ER stress induction are involved in cardiac damage, and microvascular dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus is an important question that has remained unanswered. Cardiac fibrosis and microvascular function were determined in C57BL/6J mice injected with streptozotocin only or in combination with EGFRtk inhibitor (AG1478), ER stress inhibitor (Tudca), or insulin for 2 weeks. In diabetic mice, we observed an increase in EGFRtk phosphorylation and ER stress marker expression (CHOP, ATF4, ATF6, and phosphorylated-eIF2α) in heart and mesenteric resistance arteries, which were reduced with AG1478, Tudca, and insulin. Cardiac fibrosis, enhanced collagen type I, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 were decreased with AG1478, Tudca, and insulin treatments. The impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and -independent relaxation responses were also restored after treatments. The inhibition of NO synthesis reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation in control and treated streptozotocin mice, whereas the inhibition of NADPH oxidase improved endothelium-dependent relaxation only in streptozotocin mice. Moreover, in mesenteric resistance arteries, the mRNA levels of Nox2 and Nox4 and the NADPH oxidase activity were augmented in streptozotocin mice and reduced with treatments. This study unveiled novel roles for enhanced EGFRtk phosphorylation and its downstream ER stress in cardiac fibrosis and microvascular endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  7. The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, a growth factor for AIDS Kaposi sarcoma and cytokine-activated vascular cells, induces adhesion of the same cell types by using integrin receptors recognizing the RGD amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Barillari, G; Gendelman, R; Gallo, R C; Ensoli, B

    1993-01-01

    Spindle-shaped cells of vascular origin are the probable tumor cells of Kaposi sarcoma (KS). These cells, derived from patients with KS and AIDS, proliferate in response to extracellular Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Normal vascular cells, believed to be the progenitors of AIDS-KS cells, acquire spindle morphology and become responsive to the mitogenic effect of Tat after culture with inflammatory cytokines. Such cytokines are increased in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected people, suggesting that immune stimulation (rather than immune deficiency) is a component of AIDS-KS pathogenesis. Here we show that (i) Tat promotes adhesion of AIDS-KS and normal vascular cells; (ii) adhesion of normal vascular cells to Tat is induced by exposure of the cells to the same cytokines; (iii) adhesion is associated with the amino acid sequence RGD of Tat through a specific interaction with the integrin receptors alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha v beta 3, although it is augmented by the basic region; and (iv) the expression of both integrins is increased by the same cytokines that promote these cells to acquire spindle morphology and become responsive to the adhesion and growth effects of Tat. The results also suggest that RGD-recognizing integrins mediate the vascular cell-growth-promoting effect of Tat. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7690138

  8. Development of a Highly Selective Allosteric Antagonist Radioligand for the Type 1 Cholecystokinin Receptor and Elucidation of Its Molecular Basis of Binding

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Vattelana, Ashton M.; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Orry, Andrew J.; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Haines, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of ligand binding to receptors provides insights useful for rational drug design. This work describes development of a new antagonist radioligand of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R), (2-fluorophenyl)-2,3-dihydro-3-[(3-isoquinolinylcarbonyl)amino]-6-methoxy-2-oxo-l-H-indole-3-propanoate (T-0632), and exploration of the molecular basis of its binding. This radioligand bound specifically with high affinity within an allosteric pocket of CCK1R. T-0632 fully inhibited binding and action of CCK at this receptor, while exhibiting no saturable binding to the closely related type 2 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK2R). Chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs were used to explore the molecular basis of T-0632 binding. Exchanging exonic regions revealed the functional importance of CCK1R exon 3, extending from the bottom of transmembrane segment (TM) 3 to the top of TM5, including portions of the intramembranous pocket as well as the second extracellular loop region (ECL2). However, CCK1R mutants in which each residue facing the pocket was changed to that present in CCK2R had no negative impact on T-0632 binding. Extending the chimeric approach to ECL2 established the importance of its C-terminal region, and site-directed mutagenesis of each nonconserved residue in this region revealed the importance of Ser208 at the top of TM5. A molecular model of T-0632-occupied CCK1R was consistent with these experimental determinants, also identifying Met121 in TM3 and Arg336 in TM6 as important. Although these residues are conserved in CCK2R, mutating them had a distinct impact on the two closely related receptors, suggesting differential orientation. This establishes the molecular basis of binding of a highly selective nonpeptidyl allosteric antagonist of CCK1R, illustrating differences in docking that extend beyond determinants attributable to distinct residues lining the intramembranous pocket in the two receptor subtypes. PMID:25319540

  9. Tissue-specific up-regulation of arginase I and II induced by p38 MAPK mediates endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pernow, J; Kiss, A; Tratsiakovich, Y; Climent, B

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Emerging evidence suggests a selective up-regulation of arginase I in diabetes causing coronary artery disease; however, the mechanisms behind this up-regulation are still unknown. Activated p38 MAPK has been reported to increase arginase II in various cardiovascular diseases. We therefore tested the role of p38 MAPK in the regulation of arginase I and II expression and its effect on endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Experimental Approach Endothelial function was determined in septal coronary (SCA), left anterior descending coronary (LAD) and mesenteric (MA) arteries from healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats by wire myographs. Arginase activity and protein levels of arginase I, II, phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-endothelial NOS (eNOS) (Ser1177) were determined in these arteries from diabetic and healthy rats treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor in vivo. Key Results Diabetic SCA and MA displayed impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was prevented by arginase and p38 MAPK inhibition while LAD relaxation was not affected. Arginase I, phospho-p38 MAPK and eNOS protein expression was increased in diabetic coronary arteries. In diabetic MA, however, increased expression of arginase II and phospho-p38 MAPK, increased arginase activity and decreased expression of eNOS were observed. All these effects were reversed by p38 MAPK inhibition. Conclusions and Implications Diabetes-induced activation of p38 MAPK causes endothelial dysfunction via selective up-regulation of arginase I expression in coronary arteries and arginase II expression in MA. Therefore, regional differences appear to exist in the arginase isoforms contributing to endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26140333

  10. Angiotensin II receptors in rabbit renal preglomerular vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.P.; Venuto, R.C. )

    1988-07-01

    Controversy exists regarding the specific sites within the renal microcirculation affected by angiotensin II (ANG II). Under some conditions, ANG II can elicit direct vasoconstrictor responses in the preglomerular vessels and efferent arterioles. These experiments were designed to evaluate the binding of {sup 125}I-ANG II in preglomerular vessels. Arcuate and interlobular arteries, with attached proximal segments of afferent arterioles, were microdissected from rabbit renal cortexes. A membrane preparation was obtained from the pooled freshly dissected vessels and utilized in an ANG II radioreceptor assay on the same day. The dissociation of bound ANG II was enhanced in the presence of a nonhydrolyzable analogue of GTP. Linear Scatchard plots were obtained, indicating the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites. In conclusion, there is a single class of specific ANG II receptors in preglomerular vessels. The K{sub D} and N are similar, but the binding inhibition potencies of selected ANG analogues differ in renal and extrarenal vascular tissues. Intrarenal vascular receptors also appear to differ from glomerular receptors. Furthermore, these data support the concept that ANG II may affect renal vascular resistance at sites proximal to the distal afferent arterioles.

  11. Consolidation of Remote Fear Memories Involves Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) Receptor Type 1-Mediated Enhancement of AMPA Receptor GluR1 Signaling in the Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Thoeringer, Christoph K; Henes, Kathrin; Eder, Matthias; Dahlhoff, Maik; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M; Moosmang, Sven; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2012-01-01

    Persistent dreadful memories and hyperarousal constitute prominent psychopathological features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we used a contextual fear conditioning paradigm to demonstrate that conditional genetic deletion of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor 1 within the limbic forebrain in mice significantly reduced remote, but not recent, associative and non-associative fear memories. Per os treatment with the selective CRHR1 antagonist DMP696 (3 mg/kg) attenuated consolidation of remote fear memories, without affecting their expression and retention. This could be achieved, if DMP696 was administered for 1 week starting as late as 24 h after foot shock. Furthermore, by combining electrophysiological recordings and western blot analyses, we demonstrate a delayed-onset and long-lasting increase in AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluR1-mediated signaling in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus 1 month after foot shock. These changes were absent from CRHR1-deficient mice and after DMP696 treatment. Inactivation of hippocampal GluR1-containing AMPARs by antisense oligonucleotides or philantotoxin 433 confirmed the behavioral relevance of AMPA-type glutamatergic neurotransmission in maintaining the high levels of remote fear in shocked mice with intact CRHR1 signaling. We conclude that limbic CRHR1 receptors enhance the consolidation of remote fear memories in the first week after foot shock by increasing the expression of Ca2+-permeable GluR1-containing AMPARs in the DG. These findings suggest both receptors as rational targets for the prevention and therapy, respectively, of psychopathology associated with exaggerated fear memories, such as PTSD. PMID:22030710

  12. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    PubMed

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses.

  13. Comparison of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase and melatonin receptor type 1B immunoreactivity between young adult and aged canine spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Park, Joon Ha; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae-Chul; Yan, Bing Chun; Yong, Min Sik; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Hwang, In Koo; Moon, Seung Myung

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin affects diverse physiological functions through its receptor and plays an important role in the central nervous system. In the present study, we compared immunoreactivity patterns of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), an enzyme essential for melatonin synthesis, and melatonin receptor type 1B (MT2) in the spinal cord of young adult (2~3 years) and aged (10~12 years) beagle dogs using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. AANAT-specific immunoreactivity was observed in the nuclei of spinal neurons, and was significantly increased in aged dog spinal neurons compared to young adult spinal neurons. MT2-specific immunoreactivity was found in the cytoplasm of spinal neurons, and was predominantly increased in the margin of the neuron cytoplasm in aged spinal cord compared to that in the young adult dogs. These increased levels of AANAT and MT2 immunoreactivity in aged spinal cord might be a feature of normal aging and associated with a feedback mechanism that compensates for decreased production of melatonin during aging. PMID:24962405

  14. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Chronic psychosocial stress in male mice causes an up-regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein in the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Reber, Stefan O

    2013-07-01

    Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) show an exaggerated adrenal corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (elevated platform (EPF), 5 min) despite no difference from EPF-exposed single-housed control (SHC) mice in corticotropin (ACTH) secretion. In the present study, we asked the question whether this CSC-induced increase in adrenal capability to produce and secrete corticosterone is paralleled by an enhanced adrenal availability and/or mobilization capacity of the corticosterone precursor molecule cholesterol. Employing oil-red staining and western blot analysis we revealed comparable relative density of cortical lipid droplets and relative protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) between CSC and SHC mice. However, relative protein expression of the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) was increased following CSC exposure. Moreover, analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) revealed increased LDL-C levels in CSC mice. Together with the pronounced increase in adrenal weight, evidently mediated by hyperplasia of adrenocortical cells, these data strongly indicate an enhanced adrenal availability of and capacity to mobilize cholesterol in chronic psychosocially-stressed mice, contributing to their increased in vivo corticosterone response during acute heterotypic stressor exposure.

  16. A Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) – Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  17. Antagonism of corticotrophin-releasing factor type 1 receptors attenuates caloric intake of free feeding subordinate female rhesus monkeys in a rich dietary environment.

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Johnson, Z P; Higgins, M; Toufexis, D; Wilson, M E

    2015-01-01

    Social subordination in macaque females is a known chronic stressor and previous studies have shown that socially subordinate female rhesus monkeys consume fewer kilocalories than dominant animals when a typical laboratory chow diet is available. However, in a rich dietary environment that provides access to chow in combination with a more palatable diet (i.e. high in fat and refined sugar), subordinate animals consume significantly more daily kilocalories than dominant conspecifics. Substantial literature is available supporting the role of stress hormone signals in shaping dietary preferences and promoting the consumption of palatable, energy-dense foods. The present study was conducted using stable groups of adult female rhesus monkeys to test the hypothesis that pharmacological treatment with a brain penetrable corticotrophin-releasing factor type 1 receptor (CRF1) antagonist would attenuate the stress-induced consumption of a palatable diet among subordinate animals in a rich dietary environment but would be without effect in dominant females. The results show that administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced daily caloric intake of both available diets among subordinate females compared to dominant females. Importantly, multiple regression analyses showed that the attenuation in caloric intake in response to Antalarmin (Sigma-Aldrich, St Louis, MO, USA) was significantly predicted by the frequency of submissive and aggressive behaviour emitted by females, independent of social status. Taken together, the findings support the involvement of activation of CRF1 receptors in the stress-induced consumption of excess calories in a rich dietary environment and also support the growing literature concerning the importance of CRF for sustaining emotional feeding.

  18. Blockade of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM) Bombesin Receptor Type 1 Decreases Blood Pressure and Sympathetic Activity in Anesthetized Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Izabella S.; Mourão, Aline A.; da Silva, Elaine F.; Camargo, Amanda S.; Marques, Stefanne M.; Gomes, Karina P.; Fajemiroye, James O.; da Silva Reis, Angela A.; Rebelo, Ana C. S.; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L.; Rosa, Daniel A.; Freiria-Oliveira, André H.; Castro, Carlos H.; Colombari, Eduardo; Colugnati, Diego B.; Pedrino, Gustavo R.

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS) promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT) rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1) the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); (2) the contribution of RVLM BBS type 1 receptors (BB1) to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg−1, i.v.) were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP), diaphragm (DIA) motor, and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM) nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05) and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 and 84.5 ± 18.1%, respectively; p < 0.05). In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7%; p < 0.05). BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM) reduced MAP (–19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05) and RSNA (−17.7 ± 3.8%; p < 0.05) in SHR, but not in NT rats (−2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; −2.7 ± 5.6%, respectively). These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR. PMID:27313544

  19. Antagonism of Corticotrophin-Releasing Factor Type 1 Receptors Attenuates Caloric Intake of Free Feeding Subordinate Female Rhesus Monkeys in a Rich Dietary Environment

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C J; Johnson, Z P; Higgins, M; Toufexis, D; Wilson, M E

    2015-01-01

    Social subordination in macaque females is a known chronic stressor and previous studies have shown that socially subordinate female rhesus monkeys consume fewer kilocalories than dominant animals when a typical laboratory chow diet is available. However, in a rich dietary environment that provides access to chow in combination with a more palatable diet (i.e. high in fat and refined sugar), subordinate animals consume significantly more daily kilocalories than dominant conspecifics. Substantial literature is available supporting the role of stress hormone signals in shaping dietary preferences and promoting the consumption of palatable, energy-dense foods. The present study was conducted using stable groups of adult female rhesus monkeys to test the hypothesis that pharmacological treatment with a brain penetrable corticotrophin-releasing factor type 1 receptor (CRF1) antagonist would attenuate the stress-induced consumption of a palatable diet among subordinate animals in a rich dietary environment but would be without effect in dominant females. The results show that administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced daily caloric intake of both available diets among subordinate females compared to dominant females. Importantly, multiple regression analyses showed that the attenuation in caloric intake in response to Antalarmin (Sigma-Aldrich, St Louis, MO, USA) was significantly predicted by the frequency of submissive and aggressive behaviour emitted by females, independent of social status. Taken together, the findings support the involvement of activation of CRF1 receptors in the stress-induced consumption of excess calories in a rich dietary environment and also support the growing literature concerning the importance of CRF for sustaining emotional feeding. PMID:25674637

  20. Blockade of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM) Bombesin Receptor Type 1 Decreases Blood Pressure and Sympathetic Activity in Anesthetized Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Izabella S; Mourão, Aline A; da Silva, Elaine F; Camargo, Amanda S; Marques, Stefanne M; Gomes, Karina P; Fajemiroye, James O; da Silva Reis, Angela A; Rebelo, Ana C S; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Rosa, Daniel A; Freiria-Oliveira, André H; Castro, Carlos H; Colombari, Eduardo; Colugnati, Diego B; Pedrino, Gustavo R

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS) promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT) rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1) the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); (2) the contribution of RVLM BBS type 1 receptors (BB1) to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg(-1), i.v.) were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP), diaphragm (DIA) motor, and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM) nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05) and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 and 84.5 ± 18.1%, respectively; p < 0.05). In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7%; p < 0.05). BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM) reduced MAP (-19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05) and RSNA (-17.7 ± 3.8%; p < 0.05) in SHR, but not in NT rats (-2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; -2.7 ± 5.6%, respectively). These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR. PMID:27313544

  1. A Stress-Related Peptide Bombesin Centrally Induces Frequent Urination through Brain Bombesin Receptor Types 1 and 2 in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Shimizu, Shogo; Higashi, Youichirou; Nakamura, Kumiko; Yoshimura, Naoki; Saito, Motoaki

    2016-03-01

    Stress exacerbates symptoms of bladder dysfunction including overactive bladder and bladder pain syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Bombesin-like peptides and bombesin receptor types 1 and 2 (BB1 and BB2, respectively) in the brain have been implicated in the mediation/integration of stress responses. In this study, we examined effects of centrally administered bombesin on micturition, focusing on their dependence on 1) the sympathoadrenomedullary system (a representative mechanism activated by stress exposure) and 2) brain BB receptors in urethane-anesthetized (1.0-1.2 g/kg, i.p.) male rats. Intracerebroventricularly administered bombesin significantly shortened intercontraction intervals (ICI) at both doses (0.1 and 1 nmol/animal) without affecting maximal voiding pressure. Bombesin at 1 nmol induced significant increments of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels, which were both abolished by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. On the other hand, adrenalectomy showed no effects on the bombesin-induced shortening of ICI. Much lower doses of bombesin (0.01 and 0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) dose-dependently shortened ICI. Pretreatment with either a BB1 receptor antagonist (BIM-23127; d-Nal-cyclo[Cys-Tyr-d-Trp-Orn-Val-Cys]-Nal-NH2; 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) or a BB2 receptor antagonist (BEA; H-d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-NHEt; 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.), respectively, suppressed the BB (0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced shortening of ICI, whereas each antagonist by itself (1 and 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) had no significant effects on ICI. Bombesin (0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) significantly reduced voided volume per micturition and bladder capacity without affecting postvoid residual volume or voiding efficiency. These results suggest that brain bombesin and BB receptors are involved in facilitation of the rat micturition reflex to induce bladder overactivity, which is independent of the sympathoadrenomedullary outflow modulation.

  2. Genetic analysis of type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling through insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shouhong; Szabolcs, Matthias; Cinti, Francesca; Perincheri, Suhdir; Accili, Domenico; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2010-12-24

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases regulates pancreatic β cell function. Inactivation of insulin receptor (InsR), IGF1 receptor (Igf1r), or Irs1 in β cells impairs insulin secretion. Conversely, Irs2 ablation impairs β cell replication. In this study, we examined aspects of the Igf1r regulatory signaling cascade in β cells. To examine genetically the involvement of Irs1 and Irs2 in Igf1r signaling, we generated double mutant mice lacking Igf1r specifically in pancreatic β cells in an Irs1- or Irs2-null background. We show that Igf1r/Irs1 double mutants do not differ phenotypically from Irs1 single mutants and exhibit hyperinsulinemia, while maintaining normal β cell mass and glucose tolerance. In contrast, lack of Igf1r function in β cells aggravates the consequences of Irs2 ablation in double mutants and results in lethal diabetes by 6 weeks of age. This additivity of phenotypic manifestations indicates that Irs2 serves a pathway that is largely independent of Igf1r signaling. Consistent with the view that the latter is the InsR pathway, we show that combined β cell-specific knock-out of both Insr and Igf1r results in a phenocopy of double mutants lacking Igf1r and Irs2. We conclude that Igf1r signals primarily through Irs1 and affects insulin secretion, whereas β cell proliferation is mainly regulated by InsR using Irs2 as a downstream signaling effector. The insulin and IGF pathways appear to control β cell functions independently and selectively.

  3. Heart failure therapeutics on the basis of a biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor. Rationale and design of the BLAST-AHF study (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Butler, Javed; Collins, Sean P; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Levy, Phillip D; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Soergel, David G; Teerlink, John R; Violin, Jonathan D; Voors, Adriaan A; Pang, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    The BLAST-AHF (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure) study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of TRV027, a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor, in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). AHF remains a major public health problem, and no currently-available therapies have been shown to favorably affect outcomes. TRV027 is a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor that antagonizes angiotensin-stimulated G-protein activation while stimulating β-arrestin. In animal models, these effects reduce afterload while increasing cardiac performance and maintaining stroke volume. In initial human studies, TRV027 appears to be hemodynamically active primarily in patients with activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, a potentially attractive profile for an AHF therapeutic. BLAST-AHF is an international prospective, randomized, phase IIb, dose-ranging study that will randomize up to 500 AHF patients with systolic blood pressure ≥120 mm Hg and ≤200 mm Hg within 24 h of initial presentation to 1 of 3 doses of intravenous TRV027 (1, 5, or 25 mg/h) or matching placebo (1:1:1:1) for at least 48 h and up to 96 h. The primary endpoint is a composite of 5 clinical endpoints (dyspnea, worsening heart failure, length of hospital stay, 30-day rehospitalization, and 30-day mortality) combined using an average z-score. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of dyspnea and change in amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. The BLAST-AHF study will assess the efficacy and safety of a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor in AHF.

  4. Heart failure therapeutics on the basis of a biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor. Rationale and design of the BLAST-AHF study (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Butler, Javed; Collins, Sean P; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Levy, Phillip D; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Soergel, David G; Teerlink, John R; Violin, Jonathan D; Voors, Adriaan A; Pang, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    The BLAST-AHF (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure) study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of TRV027, a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor, in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). AHF remains a major public health problem, and no currently-available therapies have been shown to favorably affect outcomes. TRV027 is a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor that antagonizes angiotensin-stimulated G-protein activation while stimulating β-arrestin. In animal models, these effects reduce afterload while increasing cardiac performance and maintaining stroke volume. In initial human studies, TRV027 appears to be hemodynamically active primarily in patients with activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, a potentially attractive profile for an AHF therapeutic. BLAST-AHF is an international prospective, randomized, phase IIb, dose-ranging study that will randomize up to 500 AHF patients with systolic blood pressure ≥120 mm Hg and ≤200 mm Hg within 24 h of initial presentation to 1 of 3 doses of intravenous TRV027 (1, 5, or 25 mg/h) or matching placebo (1:1:1:1) for at least 48 h and up to 96 h. The primary endpoint is a composite of 5 clinical endpoints (dyspnea, worsening heart failure, length of hospital stay, 30-day rehospitalization, and 30-day mortality) combined using an average z-score. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of dyspnea and change in amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. The BLAST-AHF study will assess the efficacy and safety of a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor in AHF. PMID:25650371

  5. Desensitisation of native and recombinant human urotensin-II receptors.

    PubMed

    Batuwangala, Madura S; Calo, Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo; Ng, Leong L; McDonald, John; Lambert, David G

    2009-11-01

    Human urotensin-II (U-II) is an 11-amino-acid cyclic peptide that activates a G(q)-coupled receptor named UT. Little is known about the desensitisation profile of this receptor as peptide binding is essentially irreversible. In the present study, we have examined the effects of U-II and carbachol on Ca(2+) signalling in SJCRH30 rhabdomyosarcoma (receptor density, B(max) approximately 0.1 pmol/mg protein) and human embroynic kidney (HEK)(hUT) (B(max) approximately 1.4 pmol/mg protein) cells expressing native and recombinant UT, respectively. In SJCRH30, HEK(hUT) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells induced to express native UT by treatment with 2 microg/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we have measured the effects of U-II treatment on UT mRNA. In SJCRH30 cells, primary stimulation with carbachol (250 microM) did not affect a secondary challenge with U-II (1 microM) and primary challenge with U-II did not affect a secondary challenge with carbachol. In contrast, in HEK(hUT) cells, primary stimulation with carbachol (250 microM) reduced a secondary challenge to U-II (1 microM) by 84% and primary challenge with U-II reduced a secondary challenge to carbachol by 76%. Pre-treatment of SJCRH30 cells with U-II reduced UT mRNA after 6 h and this returned to basal after 24 h. In recombinant HEK(hUT) cells, UT mRNA expression increased following a 6 h treatment with 1 microM U-II. U-II treatment of naïve un-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells was without effect. However, when UT expression is up-regulated following 15 h of LPS treatment, a 6 h U-II challenge reduced UT mRNA by 66%. In summary, we report differences in the desensitisation profiles of native and recombinant U-II receptors. Design and interpretation of functional experiments are hampered by irreversibility of U-II binding.

  6. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    SAAVEDRA, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT1 receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT1 receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood–brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurodegerative, mood and traumatic brain disorders, and cognitive decline. In rodents, ARBs (AT1 receptor blockers) ameliorate stress-induced disorders, anxiety and depression, protect cerebral blood flow during stroke, decrease brain inflammation and amyloid-β neurotoxicity and reduce traumatic brain injury. Direct anti-inflammatory protective effects, demonstrated in cultured microglia, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, neurons and human circulating monocytes, may result not only in AT1 receptor blockade, but also from PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) stimulation. Controlled clinical studies indicate that ARBs protect cognition after stroke and during aging, and cohort analyses reveal that these compounds significantly reduce the incidence and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. ARBs are commonly used for the therapy of hypertension, diabetes and stroke, but have not been studied in the context of neurodegenerative, mood or traumatic brain disorders, conditions lacking effective therapy. These compounds are well-tolerated pleiotropic neuroprotective agents with additional beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic profiles, and their use in central nervous system disorders offers a novel therapeutic approach of immediate translational value. ARBs should be tested for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, affective disorders, such as co-morbid cardiovascular disease and depression, and traumatic

  7. Brain penetration, target engagement, and disposition of the blood-brain barrier-crossing bispecific antibody antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Webster, Carl I; Caram-Salas, Nadia; Haqqani, Arsalan S; Thom, George; Brown, Lee; Rennie, Kerry; Yogi, Alvaro; Costain, Willard; Brunette, Eric; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2016-05-01

    Receptor mediated transcytosis harnessing the cellular uptake and transport of natural ligands across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been identified as a means for antibody delivery to the CNS. In this study, we characterized bispecific antibodies in which a BBB-crossing antibody fragment FC5 was used as a BBB carrier. Cargo antibodies were either a high-affinity, selective antibody antagonist of the metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (BBB-mGluR1), a widely abundant CNS target, or an IgG that does not bind the CNS target (BBB-NiP). Both BBB-NiP and BBB-mGluR1 demonstrated a similar 20-fold enhanced rate of transcytosis across an in vitro BBB model compared with mGluR1 IgG fused to a control antibody fragment. All 3 bispecific antibodies exhibited identical pharmacokinetics in vivo Comparative assessment of BBB-NiP and BBB-mGluR1 revealed that, whereas their serum pharmacokinetics and BBB penetration were identical, their central disposition (brain levels) and elimination (cerebrospinal fluid levels) were widely different, due to central target-mediated removal of the mGluR1-engaging antibody. Central mGluR1 target engagement after systemic administration was demonstrated by a dose-dependent inhibition of mGluR-1-mediated thermal hyperalgesia and by colocalization of the antibody with thalamic neurons involved in mGluR1-mediated pain processing. We demonstrate the feasibility of targeting central G-protein-coupled receptors using a BBB-crossing bispecific antibody approach and emerging principles that govern brain distribution and disposition of these antibodies. These data will be important for designing safe and selective CNS antibody therapeutics.-Webster, C. I., Caram-Salas, N., Haqqani, A. S., Thom, G., Brown, L., Rennie, K., Yogi, A., Costain, W., Brunette, E., Stanimirovic, D. B. Brain penetration, target engagement, and disposition of the blood-brain barrier-crossing bispecific antibody antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1.

  8. Cross talk between AT1 receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 in microglia contributes to angiotensin II-derived ROS production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Stranahan, Alexis M; Krause, Eric G; de Kloet, Annette D; Stern, Javier E

    2016-02-01

    ANG II is thought to increase sympathetic outflow by increasing oxidative stress and promoting local inflammation in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. However, the relative contributions of inflammation and oxidative stress to sympathetic drive remain poorly understood, and the underlying cellular and molecular targets have yet to be examined. ANG II has been shown to enhance Toll-like receptor (TLR)4-mediated signaling on microglia. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to determine whether ANG II-mediated activation of microglial TLR4 signaling is a key molecular target initiating local oxidative stress in the PVN. We found TLR4 and ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA expression in hypothalamic microglia, providing molecular evidence for the potential interaction between these two receptors. In hypothalamic slices, ANG II induced microglial activation within the PVN (∼65% increase, P < 0.001), an effect that was blunted in the absence of functional TLR4. ANG II increased ROS production, as indicated by dihydroethidium fluorescence, within the PVN of rats and mice (P < 0.0001 in both cases), effects that were also dependent on the presence of functional TLR4. The microglial inhibitor minocycline attenuated ANG II-mediated ROS production, yet ANG II effects persisted in PVN single-minded 1-AT1a knockout mice, supporting the contribution of a non-neuronal source (likely microglia) to ANG II-driven ROS production in the PVN. Taken together, these results support functional interactions between AT1 receptors and TLR4 in mediating ANG II-dependent microglial activation and oxidative stress within the PVN. More broadly, our results support a functional interaction between the central renin-angiotensin system and innate immunity in the regulation of neurohumoral outflows from the PVN.

  9. Angiotensin type 1 receptor blockage reduces l-dopa-induced dyskinesia in the 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease. Involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Ana; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Dominguez-Meijide, Antonio; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2014-11-01

    Non-neuronal factors such as angiogenesis and neuroinflammation may play a role in l-dopa induced dyskinesias (LID). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) have been found to be involved in LID. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is involved in the inflammatory response and VEGF synthesis via type 1 (AT1) receptors. However, it is not known whether the RAS plays a role in LID and whether AT1 antagonists could constitute a useful therapy against LID. In this study, we investigated whether manipulation of brain RAS is effective in preventing LID. Blocking AT1 receptors with candesartan significantly reduces LID in the 6-OHDA rat model. Chronic dopaminergic denervation induces an increase in striatal levels of VEGF and IL-1β. Dyskinetic animals showed significantly higher levels of VEGF and IL-1β in the lateral striatum and the substantia nigra, as revealed by western blot and real time-PCR analyses. Interestingly, animals treated with both candesartan and l-dopa displayed significantly lower levels of VEGF, IL-1β and dyskinesia than those treated with l-dopa alone. The stimulatory effect of angiotensin II (AII) on VEGF expression was confirmed by the addition of AII to primary mesencephalic cultures and intraventricular administration of AII in rats. The results of the present study reveal for the first time that blockage of AT-1 receptors reduces LID. A candesartan-induced decrease in VEGF and IL-1β may be responsible for the beneficial effects, suggesting the brain RAS as a new target for LID treatment in PD patients. PMID:25160895

  10. Tonic modulation of anxiety-like behavior by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) type 1 receptor (CRF1) within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in male mice: role of protein kinase A (PKA).

    PubMed

    Miguel, Tarciso Tadeu; Gomes, Karina Santos; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2014-07-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) have recently been receiving more attention from those interested in the neurobiology of anxiety. Here, we investigated the CRF pathway in the modulation of anxiety-like behaviors in male mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze (EPM), through intra-mPFC injections of CRF, CP376395 [N-(1-ethylpropyl)-3,6-dimethyl-2-(2,4,6-trimethylphenoxy)-4-pyridinamine hydrochloride, a CRF type 1 receptor antagonist (CR F1)] or H-89 [N-[2-[[3-(4-bromophenyl)-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride, a protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor]. We also investigated the effects of intra-mPFC injections of H-89 on the behavioral effects induced by CRF. Mice received bilateral intra-mPFC injections of CRF (0, 37.5, 75 or 150pmol), CP376395 (0, 0.75, 1.5 or 3nmol) or H-89 (0, 1.25, 2.5 or 5nmol) and were exposed to the EPM, to record conventional and complementary measures of anxiety for 5min. Results showed that while CRF (75 and 150pmol) produced an anxiogenic-like effect, CP376395 (all doses) and H-89 (5nmol) attenuated anxiety-like behavior. When injected before CRF (150pmol), intra-mPFC H-89 (2.5nmol, a dose devoid of intrinsic effects on anxiety) completely blocked the anxiogenic-like effects of CRF. These results suggest that (i) CRF plays a tonic anxiogenic-like role at CRF1 receptors within the mPFC, since their blockade per se attenuated anxiety indices and (ii) the anxiogenic-like effects following CRF1 receptor activation depend on cAMP/PKA cascade activation in this limbic forebrain area.

  11. Involvement of toll-like receptors 3 and 7/8 in the neuropathogenesis of bovine herpesvirus types 1 and 5.

    PubMed

    Rensetti, Daniel; Marin, Maia; Quintana, Silvina; Morán, Pedro; Verna, Andrea; Odeón, Anselmo; Pérez, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    Bovine herpesvirus types 1 (BoHV-1) and 5 (BoHV-5) are closely related alpha-herpesviruses. BoHV-5 is the causal agent of non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in calves. BoHV-1 causes respiratory disease, abortions, genital disorders and, occasionally, encephalitis in cattle. Both viruses are neurotropic and they share similar biological properties. Nevertheless, they differ in their ability to cause neurological disease. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the innate immune response to pathogens. In this study, the variations in the expression levels of TLRs were evaluated in different regions of the bovine central nervous system during the acute infection and reactivation of BoHV-1 and BoHV-5- infected cattle. With the exception of TLR9, significant up-regulation of all TLRs was detected following primary infection of neural tissues by both bovine alpha-herpesviruses. Furthermore, the stages of acute infection and reactivation were characterized by a distinguishable TLR expression pattern. Important differences in TLR expression upon infection of the central nervous system by BoHV-1 or BoHV-5 were not detected. The striking differences in TLR mRNA levels during acute infection and reactivation provide evidence that the innate immune response may be involved in the clinical outcomes observed at each stage. Further research is required to analyze the mechanisms that initiate TLR activation and the signaling cascade mediated by each TLR to elucidate the precise role these receptors play in bovine herpesvirus encephalitis. PMID:27473967

  12. Overexpression in Escherichia coli, folding, purification, and characterization of the first three short consensus repeat modules of human complement receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Dodd, I; Mossakowska, D E; Camilleri, P; Haran, M; Hensley, P; Lawlor, E J; McBay, D L; Pindar, W; Smith, R A

    1995-12-01

    We have developed a simple expression, isolation, and folding protocol for an SCR oligomer comprising the first three SCRs of complement receptor Type 1 (C3b/C4b receptor, CD35). A T7 RNA polymerase expression system in Escherichia coli was used to express the oligomer as inclusion bodies. The oligomer was recovered from solubilized inclusion bodies using batch adsorption on SP-Sepharose. The oligomer was folded by one-step dilution in 20 mM ethanolamine/1 mM EDTA supplemented with 1 mM GSH/0.5 mM GSSG. The folded material was processed to a concentrated (> 20 mg/ml), usable product of greater than 98% purity using a combination of ultrafiltration, ammonium sulfate treatment, hydrophobic interaction, and size-exclusion chromatography. The yield of folded material varied between 6 and 15 mg/liter culture. The oxidation states of the 12 cysteine residues in SCR(1-3) were identified by HPLC of peptide fragments from a tryptic digest using dual UV/fluorescence detection, collection of selected peaks, and N-terminal sequencing. This methodology confirmed the expected location of disulfide bridges. Equilibrium and velocity sedimentation studies are interpreted in terms of a single sedimenting species with molecular weights of 21,629 and 21,063 by these respective techniques. These values compare to the predicted molecular weight, from amino acid composition, of 21,817. The hydrodynamic properties of the molecule indicate that it is asymmetric with an axial ratio of 1:5.2 or equivalent dimensions of 21 x 110 A. SCR(1-3) has an unusual CD spectrum exhibiting a broad maximum at 220-230 nm and a minimum at 190 nm. There was little evidence of classical secondary structure. The product exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of complement-mediated lysis of sensitized sheep red blood cells.

  13. Characterization of interleukin-1β in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation and DNA methylation in interleukin-1 receptor type 1 knockout (IL-1R1(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fung-Yu; Chan, Annie On-On; Lo, Regina Cheuk-Lam; Rashid, Asif; Wong, Danny Ka-Ho; Cho, Chi-Hin; Lai, Ching-Lung; Yuen, Man-Fung

    2013-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and is associated with aberrant DNA methylation and gastric diseases. Here, we investigated the role of IL-1β in H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and DNA methylation using IL-1 receptor type 1 knockout (IL-1R1(-/-)) mice, and compared the therapeutic efficacy of antimicrobial therapy with IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). IL-1R1(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were infected with H. pylori for 16, 24 and 32 weeks. Infected WT mice at 24 weeks were given either antimicrobial therapy or IL-1ra. Comparing to the IL-1R1(-/-) mice, infected WT mice with functional IL-1β signaling had higher gastritis scores, higher IL-1β and iNOS mRNA expression, higher nitric oxide (NO) production and increased frequency of E-cadherin (E-cad) methylation at all the time points analyzed. IL-1β release was significantly elevated in infected WT mice than normal controls at 16 weeks post-infection (p<0.005). Treatment of infected mice with antimicrobial therapy and IL-1ra significantly reduced the degree of gastritis (p<0.005; p<0.05, respectively), iNOS expression (p<0.0001; p<0.01, respectively) and NO production (both p<0.001) compared with untreated controls. Mice receiving antimicrobial therapy had significantly lower IL-1β expression than untreated controls (p<0.0001). Both treatments reduced the incidence of E-cad methylation in infected mice compared with controls, however, no statistical significance was observed. There was no significant alteration of total DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity. These results demonstrated that IL-1β played a crucial role in H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and DNA methylation. H. pylori eradication and IL-1ra administration could ameliorate inflammatory stress.

  14. Role of amino-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) channel gating.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Oba, Toshiharu; Oyamada, Hideto; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Ogawa, Yasuo

    2011-10-14

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a Ca(2+) release channel found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and plays a pivotal role in excitation-contraction coupling. The RyR1 channel is activated by a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor upon depolarization of the transverse tubule, or by Ca(2+) itself, i.e. Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). The molecular events transmitting such signals to the ion gate of the channel are unknown. The S4-S5 linker, a cytosolic loop connecting the S4 and S5 transmembrane segments in six-transmembrane type channels, forms an α-helical structure and mediates signal transmission in a wide variety of channels. To address the role of the S4-S5 linker in RyR1 channel gating, we performed alanine substitution scan of N-terminal half of the putative S4-S5 linker (Thr(4825)-Ser(4829)) that exhibits high helix probability. The mutant RyR1 was expressed in HEK cells, and CICR activity was investigated by caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release, single-channel current recordings, and [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Four mutants (T4825A, I4826A, S4828A, and S4829A) had reduced CICR activity without changing Ca(2+) sensitivity, whereas the L4827A mutant formed a constitutive active channel. T4825I, a disease-associated mutation for malignant hyperthermia, exhibited enhanced CICR activity. An α-helical wheel representation of the N-terminal S4-S5 linker provides a rational explanation to the observed activities of the mutants. These results suggest that N-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker may form an α-helical structure and play an important role in RyR1 channel gating.

  15. Reduced proximal tubule angiotensin II receptor expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H F; Burns, K D; Harris, R C

    1994-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by alterations in the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system, including decreases in glomerular angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor density. Since Ang II regulates proximal tubule transport function, the present studies examined whether diabetes altered expression of proximal tubule receptors. In basolateral membranes from 14 day streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, specific binding of 125I Ang II was decreased to 53 +/- 8% of control (3.2 +/- 0.5 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/mg protein; N = 7; P < 0.02). Similarly, in proximal tubule brush border membranes from diabetic animals, specific binding was decreased to 63 +/- 11% of control (1.1 +/- 0.2 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 fmol/mg protein; N = 9; P < 0.05). Concomitant insulin treatment reversed the decrease in specific binding of 125I Ang II to basolateral membranes (109 +/- 26% of control; N = 3) and to brush border membranes (85 +/- 17% of control; N = 6). In order to determine if changes in expression of type-1 Ang II receptors (AT1R) accompanied the changes in binding, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of AT1R mRNA was performed and expressed as the ratio of the amplified AT1R to that of an Msc1/Msc1 internal deletion mutant and normalized to that of beta-actin. In total RNA from proximal tubule suspensions of diabetic animals, AT1R mRNA expression decreased by 38% (21 +/- 3 vs. 13 +/- 2 cpm AT1R/cpm deletion mutant/cpm beta actin/10(6); N = 4; P < 0.0025). Insulin treatment reverted AT1R mRNA expression to control levels (22 +/- 3 cpm AT1R/cpm deletion mutant/cpm beta actin/10(6); P < 0.001 compared to the untreated group).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7700017

  16. Female protection from slow-pressor effects of angiotensin II involves prevention of ROS production independent of NMDA receptor trafficking in hypothalamic neurons expressing angiotensin 1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Marques-Lopes, Jose; Lynch, Mary-Katherine; Van Kempen, Tracey A; Waters, Elizabeth M; Wang, Gang; Iadecola, Costantino; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2015-03-01

    Renin–angiotensin system overactivity, upregulation of postsynaptic NMDA receptor function, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are hallmarks of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced hypertension, which is far more common in young males than in young females. We hypothesize that the sex differences in hypertension are related to differential AngII-induced changes in postsynaptic trafficking of the essential NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit and ROS production in PVN cells expressing angiotensin Type 1a receptor (AT1aR). We tested this hypothesis using slow-pressor (14-day) infusion of AngII (600 ng/kg/min) in mice, which elicits hypertension in males but not in young females. Two-month-old male and female transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in AT1aR-containing cells were used. In males, but not in females, AngII increased blood pressure and ROS production in AT1aR–EGFP PVN cells at baseline and following NMDA treatment. Electron microscopy showed that AngII increased cytoplasmic and total GluN1–silver-intensified immunogold (SIG) densities and induced a trend toward an increase in near plasmalemmal GluN1–SIG density in AT1aR–EGFP dendrites of males and females. Moreover, AngII decreased dendritic area and diameter in males, but increased dendritic area of small (<1 µm) dendrites and decreased diameter of large (>1 µm) dendrites in females. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that AT1aR and estrogen receptor β do not colocalize, suggesting that if estrogen is involved, its effect is indirect. These data suggest that the sexual dimorphism in AngII-induced hypertension is associated with sex differences in ROS production in AT1aR-containing PVN cells but not with postsynaptic NMDA receptor trafficking. PMID:25559190

  17. A meta-analysis of association of vitamin D receptor BsmI gene polymorphism with the risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wei-Hong; Wang, Han-Xiao; Qiu, Jun-Lin; Huang, Xue-Bin; Huang, Yan; Wu, Nian-Rong; Liang, Hua-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Association between vitamin D receptor (VDR) BsmI (rs1544410) gene polymorphism and the risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from the published reports are still conflicting. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between VDR BsmI gene polymorphism and the risk of T1DM using meta-analysis method. The association studies were identified from PubMed, and Cochrane Library on 1 December 2013, and eligible investigations were included and synthesized using meta-analysis method. Twenty-three reports were recruited into this meta-analysis for the association of VDR BsmI gene polymorphism with T1DM susceptibility. In overall populations, bb genotype was associated with T1DM, but the B allele and BB genotype were not. In Asians and Latino population, B allele and bb genotype were associated with TIDM risk, but BB genotype was not. In Caucasians, VDR BsmI gene polymorphism was not associated with the T1DM risk. In Africans, B allele and BB genotype were associated with T1DM risk, but the bb genotype was not. However, the sample size for Latino population and Africans was small. In conclusion, VDR BsmI B allele, bb genotype was associated with T1DM risk in Asians, and bb genotype was associated with T1DM risk in overall populations. However, more studies should be conducted to confirm it.

  18. The Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1 (MEN1) Tumor Suppressor Regulates Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ-Dependent Adipocyte Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Dreijerink, Koen M. A.; Varier, Radhika A.; van Beekum, Olivier; Jeninga, Ellen H.; Höppener, Jo W. M.; Lips, Cornelis J. M.; Kummer, J. Alain; Kalkhoven, Eric; Timmers, H. T. Marc

    2009-01-01

    Menin, the product of the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1) tumor suppressor gene, is involved in activation of gene transcription as part of an MLL1 (mixed-lineage leukemia 1)/MLL2 (KMT2A/B)-containing protein complex which harbors methyltransferase activity for lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). As MEN1 patients frequently develop lipomas and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is expressed in several MEN1-related tumor types, we investigated regulation of PPARγ activity by menin. We found that menin is required for adipocyte differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells and PPARγ-expressing mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Menin augments PPARγ target gene expression through recruitment of H3K4 methyltransferase activity. Menin interacts directly with the activation function 2 transcription activation domain of PPARγ in a ligand-independent fashion. Ligand-dependent coactivation, however, is dependent on the LXXLL motif of menin and the intact helix 12 of PPARγ. We propose that menin is an important factor in PPARγ-mediated adipogenesis and that loss of PPARγ function may contribute to lipoma development in MEN1 patients. PMID:19596783

  19. The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) tumor suppressor regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-dependent adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dreijerink, Koen M A; Varier, Radhika A; van Beekum, Olivier; Jeninga, Ellen H; Höppener, Jo W M; Lips, Cornelis J M; Kummer, J Alain; Kalkhoven, Eric; Timmers, H T Marc

    2009-09-01

    Menin, the product of the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1) tumor suppressor gene, is involved in activation of gene transcription as part of an MLL1 (mixed-lineage leukemia 1)/MLL2 (KMT2A/B)-containing protein complex which harbors methyltransferase activity for lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). As MEN1 patients frequently develop lipomas and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is expressed in several MEN1-related tumor types, we investigated regulation of PPARgamma activity by menin. We found that menin is required for adipocyte differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells and PPARgamma-expressing mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Menin augments PPARgamma target gene expression through recruitment of H3K4 methyltransferase activity. Menin interacts directly with the activation function 2 transcription activation domain of PPARgamma in a ligand-independent fashion. Ligand-dependent coactivation, however, is dependent on the LXXLL motif of menin and the intact helix 12 of PPARgamma. We propose that menin is an important factor in PPARgamma-mediated adipogenesis and that loss of PPARgamma function may contribute to lipoma development in MEN1 patients.

  20. Long-term oral administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine extends life span in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Akira; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2015-04-10

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by extension of a CAG repeat in the Sca1gene. Although the mechanisms underlying the symptoms of SCA1 have not been determined, aberrant neuronal activation potentially contributes to the neuronal cell death characteristic of the disease. Here we examined the potential involvement of extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation in the pathogenesis of SCA1 by administering memantine, a low-affinity noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist, in SCA1 knock-in (KI) mice. In KI mice, the exon in the ataxin 1 gene is replaced with abnormally expanded 154CAG repeats. Memantine was administered orally to the SCA1 KI mice from 4 weeks of age until death. The treatment significantly attenuated body-weight loss and prolonged the life span of SCA1 KI mice. Furthermore, memantine significantly suppressed the loss of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and motor neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, which are critical for motor function and parasympathetic function, respectively. These findings support the contribution of aberrant activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs to neuronal cell death in SCA1 KI mice and suggest that memantine may also have therapeutic benefits in human SCA1 patients.

  1. Huntingtin and huntingtin-associated protein 1 influence neuronal calcium signaling mediated by inositol-(1,4,5) triphosphate receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tie-Shan; Tu, Huiping; Chan, Edmond Y W; Maximov, Anton; Wang, Zhengnan; Wellington, Cheryl L; Hayden, Michael R; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2003-07-17

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion (exp) in huntingtin (Htt). The type 1 inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R1) is an intracellular calcium (Ca2+) release channel that plays an important role in neuronal function. In a yeast two-hybrid screen with the InsP3R1 carboxy terminus, we isolated Htt-associated protein-1A (HAP1A). We show that an InsP3R1-HAP1A-Htt ternary complex is formed in vitro and in vivo. In planar lipid bilayer reconstitution experiments, InsP3R1 activation by InsP3 is sensitized by Httexp, but not by normal Htt. Transfection of full-length Httexp or caspase-resistant Httexp, but not normal Htt, into medium spiny striatal neurons faciliates Ca2+ release in response to threshold concentrations of the selective mGluR1/5 agonist 3,5-DHPG. Our findings identify a novel molecular link between Htt and InsP3R1-mediated neuronal Ca2+ signaling and provide an explanation for the derangement of cytosolic Ca2+ signaling in HD patients and mouse models.

  2. Sporadic infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by missense mutations of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Masayuki; Ohba, Chihiro; Iai, Mizue; Hirabayashi, Shinichi; Osaka, Hitoshi; Hiraide, Takuya; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene (ITPR1) have been identified in families with early-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 (SCA29) and late-onset SCA15, but have not been found in sporadic infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia. We examined if mutations of ITPR1 are also involved in sporadic infantile-onset SCA. Sixty patients with childhood-onset cerebellar atrophy of unknown etiology and their families were examined by whole-exome sequencing. We found de novo heterozygous ITPR1 missense mutations in four unrelated patients with sporadic infantile-onset, nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia. Patients displayed nystagmus, tremor, and hypotonia from very early infancy. Nonprogressive ataxia, motor delay, and mild cognitive deficits were common clinical findings. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy. ITPR1 missense mutations cause infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia. ITPR1-related SCA includes sporadic infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia as well as SCA15 and SCA29.

  3. High-content RNAi screening identifies the Type 1 inositol triphosphate receptor as a modifier of TDP-43 localization and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hwa; Zhan, Lihong; Hanson, Keith A; Tibbetts, Randal S

    2012-11-15

    Cytosolic aggregation of the nuclear RNA-binding protein (RBP) TDP-43 (43 kDa TAR DNA-binding domain protein) is a suspected direct or indirect cause of motor neuron deterioration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In this study, we implemented a high-content, genome-wide RNAi screen to identify pathways controlling TDP-43 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. We identified ∼60 genes whose silencing increased the cytosolic localization of TDP-43, including nuclear pore complex components and regulators of G2/M cell cycle transition. In addition, we identified the type 1 inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (ITPR1), an IP3-gated, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident Ca(2+) channel, as a strong modulator of TDP-43 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Knockdown or chemical inhibition of ITPR1 induced TDP-43 nuclear export in immortalized cells and primary neurons and strongly potentiated the recruitment of TDP-43 to Ubiquilin-positive autophagosomes, suggesting that diminished ITPR1 function leads to autophagosomal clearance of TDP-43. The functional significance of the TDP-43-ITPR1 genetic interaction was tested in Drosophila, where mutant alleles of ITPR1 were found to significantly extended lifespan and mobility of flies expressing TDP-43 under a motor neuron driver. These combined findings implicate IP3-gated Ca(2+) as a key regulator of TDP-43 nucleoplasmic shuttling and proteostasis and suggest pharmacologic inhibition of ITPR1 as a strategy to combat TDP-43-induced neurodegeneration in vivo.

  4. Plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), TNF-α soluble receptor type 1 (sTNFR I) and IL-22 in human leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Nateghi Rostami, M; Seyyedan Jasbi, E; Khamesipour, A; Miramin Mohammadi, A

    2015-09-01

    The role of pro-inammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in human leishmaniasis is not fully understood. We analyzed the alterations in the plasma levels of TNF- α, soluble TNF receptor type 1 (sTNFR I), IL-17 and IL-22 in the volunteers with leishmaniasis. Blood samples were collected from patients with active cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), the same CL patients after standard antimonial therapy as healed CL, active visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and healed VL volunteers. Levels of the cytokines were titrated on plasma samples by sandwich ELISA method. The mean level of TNF-α was significantly higher in active CL patients than healthy controls (P<0.001) and significantly reduced after treatment in the same volunteers (P<0.001). The mean level of sTNFR I was significantly higher in active CL patients than healthy controls (P<0.05). The mean level of IL-22 in plasma of the AVL patients was significantly higher than that of healthy control group (P<0.05). There is a negative correlation between the levels of TNF-α and sTNFR I and healing of CL. Measurement of cytokines in plasma samples is more feasible than cell culture in evaluation of immune response in human leishmaniasis.

  5. Angiotensin type 1a receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus control cardiovascular reactivity and anxiety-like behavior in male mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hiller, Helmut; Smith, Justin A; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G

    2016-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that deletion of angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1a) from the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN) attenuates anxiety-like behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, and cardiovascular reactivity. We used the Cre/LoxP system to generate male mice with AT1a specifically deleted from the PVN. Deletion of the AT1a from the PVN reduced anxiety-like behavior as indicated by increased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. In contrast, PVN AT1a deletion had no effect on HPA axis activation subsequent to an acute restraint challenge but did reduce hypothalamic mRNA expression for corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). To determine whether PVN AT1a deletion inhibits cardiovascular reactivity, we measured systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability (HRV) using telemetry and found that PVN AT1a deletion attenuated restraint-induced elevations in systolic blood pressure and elicited changes in HRV indicative of reduced sympathetic nervous activity. Consistent with the decreased HRV, PVN AT1a deletion also decreased adrenal weight, suggestive of decreased adrenal sympathetic outflow. Interestingly, the altered stress responsivity of mice with AT1a deleted from the PVN was associated with decreased hypothalamic microglia and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Collectively, these results suggest that deletion of AT1a from the PVN attenuates anxiety, CRH gene transcription, and cardiovascular reactivity and reduced brain inflammation may contribute to these effects. PMID:27468749

  6. Human inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate type-1 receptor, InsP3R1: structure, function, regulation of expression and chromosomal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, N; Makino, Y; Clark, R A; Pearson, D W; Mattei, M G; Guénet, J L; Ohama, E; Fujino, I; Miyawaki, A; Furuichi, T

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones encoding an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (InsP3R1) from human uteri and a leukaemic cell line, HL-60. Northern-blot analysis showed that approx. 10 kb of InsP3R1 mRNA is expressed in human uteri, oviducts and HL-60 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of human InsP3R1 (2695 amino acids) has 99% identity with that of the mouse SI-/SII- splicing counterpart. Western-blot analysis with anti-(mouse InsP3R1) antibodies showed that InsP3R1 protein of human uteri and oviducts of approx 220 kDa is immunostained. Northern-blot analysis of HL-60 cell differentiation along the neutrophilic lineage induced by retinoic acid or dimethylsulphoxide showed an accompanying enhanced expression of InsP3R1 mRNA. Immunohistochemical analysis of the cerebella of spinocerebellar degeneration patients showed a variable loss of Purkinje cells with an altered pattern of immunostaining. The InsP3R1 gene (Insp3r1) was localized to the 3P25-26 region of human chromosome 3. The data presented here clearly show that InsP3R1 exists widely in human tissues and may play critical roles in various kinds of cellular functions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7945203

  7. The ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) G-protein-coupled receptor functions with MART-1 at early stages of melanogenesis to control melanosome identity and composition.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Francesca; Bonetti, Ciro; Surace, Enrico M; Marigo, Valeria; Raposo, Graça

    2009-12-01

    OA1 (GPR143; GPCR, G-protein-coupled receptor), the protein product of the ocular albinism type 1 gene, encodes a pigment-cell-specific GPCR that localizes intracellularly to melanosomes. OA1 mutations result in ocular albinism due to alterations in melanosome formation, suggesting that OA1 is a key player in the biogenesis of melanosomes. To address the function of OA1 in melanosome biogenesis, we have used siRNA inactivation and combined morphological and biochemical methods to investigate melanosome ultrastructure, melanosomal protein localization and expression in human pigmented melanocytic cells. OA1 loss of function leads to decreased pigmentation and causes formation of enlarged aberrant premelanosomes harboring disorganized fibrillar structures and displaying proteins of mature melanosomes and lysosomes at their membrane. Moreover, we show that OA1 interacts biochemically with the premelanosomal protein MART-1. Inactivation of MART-1 by siRNA leads to a decreased stability of OA1 and is accompanied by similar defects in premelanosome biogenesis and composition. These data show for the first time that melanosome composition and identity are regulated at early stages by OA1 and that MART-1 likely acts as an escort protein for this GPCR. PMID:19717472

  8. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  9. Osmoregulatory thirst in mice lacking the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and/or type 4 (TRPV4) receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsman, Brian; Cowles, James; Lay, Jennifer; Simmonds, Sarah S; Browning, Kirsteen N; Stocker, Sean D

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies suggest the ability of the central nervous system to detect changes in osmolality is mediated by products of the genes encoding the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid-4 (TRPV4) channel. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether deletion of TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels altered thirst responses to cellular dehydration in mice. Injection of 0.5 or 1.0 M NaCl produced dose-dependent increases in cumulative water intakes of wild-type (WT), TRPV1-/-, TRPV4-/-, and TRPV1-/-V4-/- mice. However, there were no differences in cumulative water intakes between WT versus any other strain despite similar increases in plasma electrolytes and osmolality. Similar results were observed after injection of hypertonic mannitol. This was a consistent finding regardless of the injection route (intraperitoneal vs. subcutaneous) or timed access to water (delayed vs. immediate). There were also no differences in cumulative intakes across strains after injection of 0.15 M NaCl or during a time-controlled period (no injection). Chronic hypernatremia produced by sole access to 2% NaCl for 48 h also produced similar increases in water intake across strains. In a final set of experiments, subcutaneous injection of 0.5 M NaCl produced similar increases in the number of Fos-positive nuclei within the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median preoptic nucleus across strains but significantly smaller number in the subfornical organ of WT versus TRPV1-/-V4-/- mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels are not the primary mechanism by which the central nervous system responds to cellular dehydration during hypernatremia or hyperosmolality to increase thirst.

  10. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E.; Mecawi, André S.; Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase‐mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ► Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ► RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation.

  11. The immunoexpression of androgen receptor, estrogen receptors alpha and beta, vanilloid type 1 receptor and cytochrome p450 aromatase in rats testis chronically treated with letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Pilutin, Anna; Misiakiewicz-Has, Kamila; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Marchlewicz, Mariola; Wiszniewska, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of testis is under hormonal control and any disturbance of hormonal homeostasis can lead to morphological and physiological changes. Therefore the aim of the study was to investigate the expression of androgen and estrogen receptors (AR, ERs), vanilloid receptor (TRPV1), cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom), as well as apoptosis of cells in testis of adult rats chronically treated with letrozole (LT), a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor, for 6 months. The testicular tissues were fixed in Bouin's fixative and embedded in paraffin. Immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies (abs) against AR, ERa, P450arom, and polyclonalabs against ERβ, TRPV1, caspase-3 was applied. Long-lasting estradiol deficiency, as an effect of LT treatment, produced changes in the morphology of testis and altered the expression of the studied receptors in cells of the seminiferous tubules and rate of cell apoptosis. The immunostaining for AR was found in the nuclei of Sertoli cells and the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes in III-IV stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. The intensity of staining for P450arom was lower in the testis of LT-treated rats as compared to control animals. The immunofluorescence of ERα and ERβ was observed exclusively in the nuclei of Leydig cells of LT-treated rats. There were no changes in localization of TRPV1, however, the intensity of reaction was stronger in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium after LT treatment. The apoptosis in both groups of animals was observed within the population of spermatocytes and spermatids in II and III stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. In testis of LT-treated rats the immunoexpression of caspase-3 was additionally found in the germ cells in I and IV stages, and Sertoli, myoid and Leydig cells. In conclusion, our results underline the important role of letrozole treatment in the proper function of male reproductive system, and additionally demonstrate that hormonal imbalance can

  12. Angiotensin II induces membrane trafficking of natively expressed transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels in hypothalamic 4B cells.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashwini; Bachelor, Martha; Park, Yong H; Carreno, Flavia R; Nedungadi, T Prashant; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid family type 4 (TRPV4) channels are expressed in central neuroendocrine neurons and have been shown to be polymodal in other systems. We previously reported that in the rodent, a model of dilutional hyponatremia associated with hepatic cirrhosis, TRPV4 expression is increased in lipid rafts from the hypothalamus and that this effect may be angiotensin dependent. In this study, we utilized the immortalized neuroendocrine rat hypothalamic 4B cell line to more directly test the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) on TRPV4 expression and function. Our results demonstrate the expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) transcripts, for sex-determining region Y (SRY) (male genotype), arginine vasopressin (AVP), TRPV4, and ANG II type 1a and 1b receptor in 4B cells. After a 1-h incubation in ANG II (100 nM), 4B cells showed increased TRPV4 abundance in the plasma membrane fraction, and this effect was prevented by the ANG II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan (1 μM) and by a Src kinase inhibitor PP2 (10 μM). Ratiometric calcium imaging experiments demonstrated that ANG II incubation potentiated TRPV4 agonist (GSK 1016790A, 20 nM)-induced calcium influx (control 18.4 ± 2.8% n = 5 and ANG II 80.5 ± 2.4% n = 5). This ANG II-induced increase in calcium influx was also blocked by 1 μM losartan and 10 μM PP2 (losartan 26.4 ± 3.8% n = 5 and PP2 19.7 ± 3.9% n = 5). Our data suggests that ANG II can increase TRPV4 channel membrane expression in 4B cells through its action on AT1R involving a Src kinase pathway. PMID:25080500

  13. A mouse monoclonal antibody against dengue virus type 1 Mochizuki strain targeting envelope protein domain II and displaying strongly neutralizing but not enhancing activity.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji

    2013-12-01

    Dengue fever and its more severe form, dengue hemorrhagic fever, are major global concerns. Infection-enhancing antibodies are major factors hypothetically contributing to increased disease severity. In this study, we generated 26 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the dengue virus type 1 Mochizuki strain. We selected this strain because a relatively large number of unique and rare amino acids were found on its envelope protein. Although most MAbs showing neutralizing activities exhibited enhancing activities at subneutralizing doses, one MAb (D1-IV-7F4 [7F4]) displayed neutralizing activities without showing enhancing activities at lower concentrations. In contrast, another MAb (D1-V-3H12 [3H12]) exhibited only enhancing activities, which were suppressed by pretreatment of cells with anti-FcγRIIa. Although antibody engineering revealed that antibody subclass significantly affected 7F4 (IgG3) and 3H12 (IgG1) activities, neutralizing/enhancing activities were also dependent on the epitope targeted by the antibody. 7F4 recognized an epitope on the envelope protein containing E118 (domain II) and had a neutralizing activity 10- to 1,000-fold stronger than the neutralizing activity of previously reported human or humanized neutralizing MAbs targeting domain I and/or domain II. An epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that a dengue virus-immune population possessed antibodies sharing an epitope with 7F4. Our results demonstrating induction of these antibody species (7F4 and 3H12) in Mochizuki-immunized mice may have implications for dengue vaccine strategies designed to minimize induction of enhancing antibodies in vaccinated humans. PMID:24049185

  14. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na+, Ca2+ and K+. The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca2+-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  15. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo Del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-09-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+). The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of N (ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca(2+)-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  16. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  17. Early decrease of type 1 cannabinoid receptor binding and phosphodiesterase 10A activity in vivo in R6/2 Huntington mice.

    PubMed

    Ooms, Maarten; Rietjens, Roma; Rangarajan, Janaki Raman; Vunckx, Kathleen; Valdeolivas, Sara; Maes, Frederik; Himmelreich, Uwe; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; Bormans, Guy; Van Laere, Koen; Casteels, Cindy

    2014-12-01

    Several lines of evidence imply early alterations in endocannabinoid and phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) signaling in Huntington disease (HD). Using [(18)F]MK-9470 and [(18)F]JNJ42259152 small-animal positron emission tomography (PET), we investigated for the first time cerebral changes in type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor binding and PDE10A levels in vivo in presymptomatic, early symptomatic, and late symptomatic HD (R6/2) mice, in relation to glucose metabolism ([(18)F]FDG PET), brain morphology (magnetic resonance imaging) and motor function. Ten R6/2 and 16 wild-type (WT) mice were investigated at 3 different time points between the age of 4 and 13 weeks. Parametric CB1 receptor and PDE10A images were anatomically standardized to Paxinos space and analyzed voxelwise. Volumetric microMRI imaging was performed to assess HD pathology. In R6/2 mice, CB1 receptor binding was decreased in comparison with WT in a cluster comprising the bilateral caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamic nucleus at week 5 (-8.1% ± 2.6%, p = 1.7 × 10(-5)). Longitudinal follow-up showed further progressive decline compared with controls in a cluster comprising the bilateral hippocampus, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, superior colliculus, thalamic nucleus, and cerebellum (late vs. presymptomatic age: -13.7% ± 3.1% for R6/2 and +1.5% ± 4.0% for WT, p = 1.9 × 10(-5)). In R6/2 mice, PDE10A binding potential also decreased over time to reach significance at early and late symptomatic HD (late vs. presymptomatic age: -79.1% ± 1.9% for R6/2 and +2.1% ± 2.7% for WT, p = 1.5 × 10(-4)). The observed changes in CB1 receptor and PDE10A binding were correlated to anomalies exhibited by R6/2 animals in motor function, whereas no correlation was found with magnetic resonance imaging-based striatal volume. Our findings point to early regional dysfunctions in endocannabinoid and PDE10A signaling, involving the caudate-putamen and lateral globus pallidus, which may play a role

  18. Influence of dietary sodium restriction on angiotensin II receptors in rat adrenals.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, J G; Bird, I M; Briere, N; Martel, D; Ducharme, L

    1997-12-01

    We studied the distribution of angiotensin II (AII) receptors type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) and the effects of a low sodium intake on these two subtypes of receptors in male rat adrenals. Binding studies on adrenal slices, on cell membranes and on cell suspensions were performed using [125I]AII and specific analogs for AT1 (Losartan) and AT2 (PD 123319) receptors. The distribution of AT1 was also studied by immunofluorescence. Complementary approaches were necessary to reach our goal. Indeed, by autoradiography on adrenal slices, [125I]AII was shown to bind to the zona glomerulosa (ZG) and to the medulla (M). When coincubated with [125I]AII, PD 123319 displaced [125I]AII from the medulla and from the ZG, indicating the presence of AT2 receptors in both zones. Losartan partially displaced [125I]AII from the ZG, indicating the presence of AT1 receptors in that zone. Furthermore, the labeling intensity of the medulla (AT2 receptors) was much stronger in adrenal sections from rats kept on a low sodium regimen than from controls. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that AT1 receptors were located mainly in the ZG of control rats. After sodium restriction, AT1 receptors appeared to be uniformly distributed within an enlarged ZG; furthermore AT1 receptor-positive cells were found to a limited degree in the zona fasciculata and possibly in the zona reticularis, and a greater number of these positive cells appeared in these zones under sodium restriction. Cell suspensions from rats fed a low sodium diet showed a 2.7- and 2.1-fold increase in total AII receptors in adrenal ZG and ZFR + M cells when compared with controls. Based on Losartan displacement, we calculated that [125I]AII bound to AT1 and to AT2 receptors was increased in both ZG and ZFR + M cell preparations under sodium restriction. Results of binding studies on cell membranes were also indicative of an increasing effect of sodium restriction on AT1 and AT2 receptors binding capacity. Furthermore, Northern

  19. Detection of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor in various adipose tissue depots of dairy cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Friedauer, K; Dänicke, S; Schulz, K; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2015-10-01

    Early lactating cows mobilize adipose tissue (AT) to provide energy for milk yield and maintenance and are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired immune response. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), mainly the trans-10, cis-12 isomer, reduce milk fat synthesis and may attenuate negative energy balance. Circulating glucocorticoids (GC) are increased during parturition in dairy cows and mediate differentiating and anti-inflammatory effects via glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the presence of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1). Activated GC are the main ligands for both receptors in AT; therefore, we hypothesized that tissue-specific GC metabolism is effected by varying amounts of GR, MR and 11βHSD1 and/or their localization within AT depots. Furthermore, the lipolytic and antilipogenic effects of CLA might influence the GC/GR/MR system in AT. Therefore, we aimed to localize GR and MR as well as the expression pattern and activity of 11βHSD1 in different AT depots during early lactation in dairy cows and to identify potential effects of CLA. Primiparous German Holstein cows were divided into a control (CON) and a CLA group. From day 1 post-partum (p.p.) until sample collection, the CLA group was fed with 100 g/d CLA (contains 10 g each of the cis-9, trans-11 and the trans-10, cis-12-CLA isomers). CON cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 1, 42 and 105 p.p., while CLA cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 42 and 105 p.p. Subcutaneous fat from tailhead, withers and sternum, and visceral fat from omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal depots were sampled. The localization of GR and 11βHSD1 in mature adipocytes - being already differentiated - indicates that GC promote other effects via GR than differentiation. Moreover, MR were observed in the stromal vascular cell fraction and positively related to the pre-adipocyte marker Pref-1. However, only marginal CLA effects were observed in this study.

  20. Detection of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor in various adipose tissue depots of dairy cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Friedauer, K; Dänicke, S; Schulz, K; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2015-10-01

    Early lactating cows mobilize adipose tissue (AT) to provide energy for milk yield and maintenance and are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired immune response. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), mainly the trans-10, cis-12 isomer, reduce milk fat synthesis and may attenuate negative energy balance. Circulating glucocorticoids (GC) are increased during parturition in dairy cows and mediate differentiating and anti-inflammatory effects via glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the presence of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1). Activated GC are the main ligands for both receptors in AT; therefore, we hypothesized that tissue-specific GC metabolism is effected by varying amounts of GR, MR and 11βHSD1 and/or their localization within AT depots. Furthermore, the lipolytic and antilipogenic effects of CLA might influence the GC/GR/MR system in AT. Therefore, we aimed to localize GR and MR as well as the expression pattern and activity of 11βHSD1 in different AT depots during early lactation in dairy cows and to identify potential effects of CLA. Primiparous German Holstein cows were divided into a control (CON) and a CLA group. From day 1 post-partum (p.p.) until sample collection, the CLA group was fed with 100 g/d CLA (contains 10 g each of the cis-9, trans-11 and the trans-10, cis-12-CLA isomers). CON cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 1, 42 and 105 p.p., while CLA cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 42 and 105 p.p. Subcutaneous fat from tailhead, withers and sternum, and visceral fat from omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal depots were sampled. The localization of GR and 11βHSD1 in mature adipocytes - being already differentiated - indicates that GC promote other effects via GR than differentiation. Moreover, MR were observed in the stromal vascular cell fraction and positively related to the pre-adipocyte marker Pref-1. However, only marginal CLA effects were observed in this study. PMID

  1. Interactions of thyroid hormone receptor with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat and the HIV-1 Tat transactivator.

    PubMed Central

    Desai-Yajnik, V; Hadzic, E; Modlinger, P; Malhotra, S; Gechlik, G; Samuels, H H

    1995-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T3) receptor (T3R) regulates the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) by binding to and activating thyroid hormone response elements (TREs) embedded within the viral NF-kappa B and Sp1 motifs. The TREs within the NF-kappa B sites are necessary for activation by T3 in the absence of Tat, while those in the Sp1 motifs function as TREs only when Tat is expressed, suggesting that Tat and T3R interact in the cell. Transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR by T3R alpha and several receptor mutants revealed that the 50-amino-acid N-terminal A/B region of T3R alpha, known to interact with the basal transcription factor TFIIB, is critical for activation of both Tat-dependent and Tat-independent responsive sequences of the LTR. A single amino acid change in the highly conserved tau 1 region in the ligand-binding domain of T3R alpha eliminates Tat-independent but not Tat-dependent activation of the HIV-1 LTR by T3. Ro 5-3335 [7-chloro-5-(2-pyrryl)-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2(H)-one], which inhibits Tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1, also inhibits the functional interaction between Tat and T3R alpha. Binding studies with glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins and Western (immunoblot) analysis indicate that T3R alpha interacts with Tat through amino acids within the DNA-binding domain of T3R alpha. Mutational analysis revealed that amino acid residues in the basic and C-terminal regions of Tat are required for the binding of Tat to T3R alpha, while the N terminus of Tat is not required. These studies provide functional and physical evidence that stimulation of the HIV-1 LTR by T3 involves an interaction between T3R alpha and Tat. Our results also suggest a model in which multiple domains of T3R alpha interact with Tat and other factors to form transcriptionally important complexes. PMID:7609079

  2. Abilities of candesartan and other AT(1) receptor blockers to impair angiotensin II-induced AT(1) receptor activation after wash-out.

    PubMed

    Kiya, Yoshihiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Matsuo, Yoshino; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Saku, Keijiro

    2012-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) binds to Ang II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and evokes cell signaling, and subsequently stimulates vasoconstriction and cell proliferation, which eventually lead to cardiovascular disease. Since most AT(1) receptor blockers (ARBs) have molecular (differential) effects, we evaluated the specific features of candesartan and compared the abilities of candesartan and other ARBs (olmesartan, telmisartan, valsartan, irbesartan and losartan) to bind to and activate AT(1) receptors using a cell-based wash-out assay. Each ARB blocked Ang II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and inositol phosphate production to different degrees after wash-out. In addition, a small difference in the molecular structure, i.e. a carboxyl group, between candesartan and candesartan-7H was associated with a difference in the degree of this blocking effect. In addition, interaction between Gln(257) in the AT(1) receptor and the carboxyl group of candesartan may be partially associated with the effect of candesartan after wash-out. Although our findings regarding the molecular effects of ARB are based on basic research, these findings may lead to an exciting new area in the clinical application of ARBs. PMID:21824992

  3. Altered serotonergic neurotransmission but normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity in mice chronically treated with the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 antagonist NBI 30775.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Akihiko; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Reul, Johannes M H M; Holsboer, Florian; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2003-12-01

    Antagonists of the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRH-R1) are regarded as promising tools for the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders. Owing to the intricate relationship between CRH and serotonin (5-HT), we studied the effects of chronic oral treatment of C57Bl6/N mice with the CRH-R1 antagonist NBI 30775 (formerly known as R121919) on hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission during basal (on 15th day of treatment) and stress (forced swimming; on 16th day of treatment) conditions by in vivo microdialysis. Given the important role of CRH in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and behavior, the effects of NBI 30775 on dialysate-free corticosterone levels, and on home cage and forced swimming-related behavior were also assessed. Chronic administration of NBI 30775 (18.4+/-0.9 mg/kg/day) did not result in alterations in food consumption and body weight. NBI 30775 caused complex changes in hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission. Whereas no effects on the diurnal rhythms of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were found, the responses of the neurotransmitter and its metabolite to 10 min of forced swim stress were reduced and prolonged, respectively. NBI 30775 did not change free corticosterone levels over the diurnal rhythm. Moreover, NBI 30775-treated mice showed a similar forced swim stress-induced increase in corticosterone as observed in the control group. No effects of NBI 30775 on home cage, and swim stress-related active behaviors (climbing, swimming) and immobility were found. Thus, whereas chronic antagonism of CRH-R1 did not compromise HPA axis performance and behavior, distinct changes in serotonergic neurotransmission developed. Owing to the important role of 5-HT in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders, the latter observation may contribute to the therapeutical efficacy of CRH-R1 antagonists in these illnesses. PMID:12915860

  4. Corticotrophin-Releasing Hormone Type 1 Receptor Gene (CRHR1) Variants Predict Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Onset and Course in Pediatric Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amstadter, Ananda B.; Nugent, Nicole R.; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Miller, Alisa; Siburian, Richie; Moorjani, Priya; Haddad, Stephen; Basu, Aditi; Fagerness, Jesen; Saxe, Glenn; Smoller, Jordan W.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common and disabling anxiety disorder that may occur in the aftermath of exposure to potentially traumatic life events. PTSD is moderately heritable, but few specific molecular variants accounting for this heritability have been identified. Genes regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, such as corticotrophin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1), have been implicated in traumatic-stress related phenotypes but have yet to be studied in relation to PTSD. The present study sought to examine the relation between 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CRHR1 gene and posttraumatic stress symptoms in a prospective study of pediatric injury patients (n = 103) who were first assessed in the acute aftermath of their injury at the hospital. Results indicated that multiple SNPs were associated with acute symptoms at a univariate level, and after correction for multiple testing, rs12944712 was significantly related to acute PTSD symptoms. Longitudinal latent growth curve analyses suggest that rs12944712 is also related to both acute symptom level and trajectory of symptoms over time. The present study adds support for the role of CRHR1 in the stress response following potentially traumatic event exposure in youth. It should be noted that the sample size in this study was small, and therefore statistical power was low; following, results from this study should be considered preliminary. Although results are not definitive, the findings from this study warrant future replication studies on how variation in this gene relates to response to traumatic event exposure in youth. PMID:21508513

  5. Distribution of type 1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing neurons in the septal-hypothalamic region of the mouse: colocalization with GABAergic and glutamatergic markers.

    PubMed

    Hrabovszky, Erik; Wittmann, Gábor; Kalló, Imre; Füzesi, Tamás; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2012-04-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the principal mediator of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling in the brain. In this study, we addressed the topographic distribution and amino acid neurotransmitter phenotype of endocannabinoid-sensitive hypothalamic neurons in mice. The in situ hybridization detection of CB1 mRNA revealed high levels of expression in the medial septum (MS) and the diagonal band of Broca (DBB), moderate levels in the preoptic area and the hypothalamic lateroanterior (LA), paraventricular (Pa), ventromedial (VMH), lateral mammillary (LM), and ventral premammillary (PMV) nuclei, and low levels in many other hypothalamic regions including the suprachiasmatic (SCh) and arcuate (Arc) nuclei. This regional distribution pattern was compared with location of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic cell groups, as identified by the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and type 2 vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT2) mRNAs, respectively. The MS, DBB, and preoptic area showed overlaps between GABAergic and CB1-expressing neurons, whereas hypothalamic sites with moderate CB1 signals, including the LA, Pa, VMH, LM, and PMV, were dominated by glutamatergic neurons. Low CB1 mRNA levels were also present in other glutamatergic and GABAergic regions. Dual-label in situ hybridization experiments confirmed the cellular co-expression of CB1 with both glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. In this report we provide a detailed anatomical map of hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic systems whose neurotransmitter release is controlled by retrograde endocannabinoid signaling from hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic target neurons. This neuroanatomical information contributes to an understanding of the role that the endocannabinoid system plays in the regulation of endocrine and metabolic functions.

  6. Role of TEFFECTOR/MEMORY Cells, TBX21 Gene Expression and T-Cell Homing Receptor on Type 1 Reaction in Borderline Lepromatous Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvim, Iris Maria Peixoto; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Lara, Flávio Alves; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Esquenazi, Danuza

    2016-01-01

    In spite of hyporesponsivity to Mycobacterium leprae, borderline lepromatous (BL) patients show clinical and immunological instability, and undergo frequent acute inflammatory episodes such as type 1 reaction (T1R), which may cause nerve damages. This work focused on the participation of T cell subsets from blood and skin at T1R onset. We observed a significantly increased ex vivo frequency of both effector and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in T1R group. Besides, ex vivo frequency of T cell homing receptor, the Cutaneous Leukocyte-associated Antigen (CLA) was significantly increased in T cells from T1R patients. M. leprae induced a higher frequency of CD4+ TEM and CD8+ TEF cells, as well as of CD8+/TEMRA (terminally differentiated effector T cells) subset, which expressed high CD69+. The presence of IFN-γ‒producing-CD4+ TEF and naïve and effector CD8+ T lymphocytes was significant in T1R. TBX21 expression was significantly higher in T1R, while BL showed increased GATA3 and FOXP3 expression. In T1R, TBX21 expression was strongly correlated with CD8+/IFN-γ‒ T cells frequency. The number of double positive CD8+/CLA+ and CD45RA+/CLA+ cells was significantly higher in skin lesions from T1R, in comparison with non-reactional BL group. The observed increase of ex vivo T cells at T1R onset suggests intravascular activation at the beginning of reactional episodes. The antigen-specific response in T1R group confirmed the higher number of CD8+/CLA+ and CD45RA+/CLA+ cells in T1R lesions suggests possible migration of these cells activated by M. leprae components inside the vascular compartment to skin and participation in T1R physiopathology. PMID:27764137

  7. Myeloid Cell Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Modulates Cytokine Production but Not Atherogenesis in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vallerie, Sara N.; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Kanter, Jenny E.; Breyer, Richard M.; Andreasson, Katrin I.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is associated with cardiovascular complications induced by atherosclerosis. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is often raised in states of inflammation, including diabetes, and regulates inflammatory processes. In myeloid cells, a key cell type in atherosclerosis, PGE2 acts predominately through its Prostaglandin E Receptor 4 (EP4; Ptger4) to modulate inflammation. The effect of PGE2-mediated EP4 signaling specifically in myeloid cells on atherosclerosis in the presence and absence of diabetes is unknown. Because diabetes promotes atherosclerosis through increased arterial myeloid cell accumulation, we generated a myeloid cell-targeted EP4-deficient mouse model (EP4M-/-) of T1DM-accelerated atherogenesis to investigate the relationship between myeloid cell EP4, inflammatory phenotypes of myeloid cells, and atherogenesis. Diabetic mice exhibited elevated plasma PGE metabolite levels and elevated Ptger4 mRNA in macrophages, as compared with non-diabetic littermates. PGE2 increased Il6, Il1b, Il23 and Ccr7 mRNA while reducing Tnfa mRNA through EP4 in isolated myeloid cells. Consistently, the stimulatory effect of diabetes on peritoneal macrophage Il6 was mediated by PGE2-EP4, while PGE2-EP4 suppressed the effect of diabetes on Tnfa in these cells. In addition, diabetes exerted effects independent of myeloid cell EP4, including a reduction in macrophage Ccr7 levels and increased early atherogenesis characterized by relative lesional macrophage accumulation. These studies suggest that this mouse model of T1DM is associated with increased myeloid cell PGE2-EP4 signaling, which is required for the stimulatory effect of diabetes on IL-6, markedly blunts the effect of diabetes on TNF-α and does not modulate diabetes-accelerated atherogenesis. PMID:27351842

  8. Enhanced T cell responses to IL-6 in type 1 diabetes are associated with early clinical disease and increased IL-6 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Hundhausen, Christian; Roth, Alena; Whalen, Elizabeth; Chen, Janice; Schneider, Anya; Long, S Alice; Wei, Shan; Rawlings, Rebecca; Kinsman, MacKenzie; Evanko, Stephen P; Wight, Thomas N; Greenbaum, Carla J; Cerosaletti, Karen; Buckner, Jane H

    2016-09-14

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key pathogenic cytokine in multiple autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, suggesting that dysregulation of the IL-6 pathway may be a common feature of autoimmunity. The role of IL-6 in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is not well understood. We show that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT1 responses to IL-6 are significantly enhanced in CD4 and CD8 T cells from individuals with T1D compared to healthy controls. The effect is IL-6-specific because it is not seen with IL-10 or IL-27 stimulation, two cytokines that signal via STAT3. An important determinant of enhanced IL-6 responsiveness in T1D is IL-6 receptor surface expression, which correlated with phospho-STAT3 levels. Further, reduced expression of the IL-6R sheddase ADAM17 in T cells from patients indicated a mechanistic link to enhanced IL-6 responses in T1D. IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation was inversely correlated with time from diagnosis, suggesting that dysregulation of IL-6 signaling may be a marker of early disease. Finally, whole-transcriptome analysis of IL-6-stimulated CD4(+) T cells from patients revealed previously unreported IL-6 targets involved in T cell migration and inflammation, including lymph node homing markers CCR7 and L-selectin. In summary, our study demonstrates enhanced T cell responses to IL-6 in T1D due, in part, to an increase in IL-6R surface expression. Dysregulated IL-6 responsiveness may contribute to diabetes through multiple mechanisms including altered T cell trafficking and indicates that individuals with T1D may benefit from IL-6-targeted therapeutic intervention such as the one that is being currently tested (NCT02293837). PMID:27629486

  9. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology. PMID:9801454

  10. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology.

  11. Complement receptor type 1 (CR1/CD35) expressed on activated human CD4+ T cells contributes to generation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Török, Katalin; Dezső, Balázs; Bencsik, András; Uzonyi, Barbara; Erdei, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The role of complement in the regulation of T cell immunity has been highlighted recently by several groups. We were prompted to reinvestigate the role of complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) [corrected] in human T cells based on our earlier data showing that activated human T cells produce C3 (Torok et al. (2012) [48]) and also by results demonstrating that engagement of Membrane Cofactor Protein (MCP, CD46) induces a switch of anti-CD35-activated [corrected] helper T cells into regulatory T cells (Kemper et al. (2003) [17]). We demonstrate here that co-ligation of CD46 and CD35, [corrected] the two C3b-binding structures present on activated CD4+ human T cells significantly enhances CD25 expression, elevates granzyme B production and synergistically augments cell proliferation. The role of CR1 in the development of the Treg phenotype was further confirmed by demonstrating that its engagement enhances IL-10 production and reduces IFNγ release by the activated CD4+ T cells in the presence of excess IL-2. The functional in vivo relevance of our findings was highlighted by the immunohistochemical staining of tonsils, revealing the presence of CD4/CD35 [corrected] double positive lymphocytes mainly in the inter-follicular regions where direct contact between CD4+ T cells and B lymphocytes occurs. Regarding the in vivo relevance of the complement-dependent generation of regulatory T cells in secondary lymphoid organs we propose a scenario shown in the figure. The depicted process involves the sequential binding of locally produced C3 fragments to CD46 and CD35 [corrected] expressed on activated T cells, which - in the presence of excess IL-2 - leads to the development of Treg cells.

  12. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor Figitumumab (CP-751,871) in Combination with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Daniel D.; Pollak, Michael N.; Cohen, Roger B.; Eisenberg, Peter D.; Haluska, Paul; Yin, Donghua; Lipton, Allan; Demers, Laurence; Leitzel, Kim; Hixon, Mary L.; Terstappen, Leon W.; Garland, Linda; Paz-Ares, Luis G.; Cardenal, Felipe; Langer, Corey J.; Gualberto, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This phase 1 study was conducted to determine the recommended phase 2 dose of the selective insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-IR) inhibitor figitumumab (F, CP-751,871) given in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods Patients received paclitaxel 200 mg/m2, carboplatin (area under the curve of 6), and F (0.05–20 mg/kg) q3 weeks for up to six cycles. Patients with objective response or stable disease were eligible to receive additional cycles of single agent F until disease progression. Safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic endpoints were investigated. Results Forty-two patients, including 35 with stages IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), were enrolled in eight dose escalation cohorts. A maximum tolerated dose was not identified. Severe adverse events possibly related to F included fatigue, diarrhea, hyperglycemia, gamma glutamyl transpeptidase elevation, and thrombocytopenia (one case each). F plasma exposure parameters increased with dose. Fifteen objective responses (RECIST) were reported, including two complete responses in NSCLC and ovarian carcinoma. Notably, levels of bioactive IGF-1 seemed to influence response to treatment with objective responses in patients with a high baseline-free IGF-1 to IGF binding protein-3 ratio seen only in the 10 and 20 mg/kg dosing cohorts. Conclusions F was well tolerated in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin. Based on its favorable safety, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties, the maximal feasible dose of 20 mg/kg has been selected for further investigation. PMID:19745765

  13. Aging-related impairment of urine-concentrating mechanisms correlates with dysregulation of adrenocortical angiotensin type 1 receptors in male Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Xie; Speth, Robert C; Verbalis, Joseph G; Stein, Lauren M; Yosten, Gina L C; Samson, Willis K; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2016-03-15

    To investigate age-associated impairments in fluid homeostasis, 4-mo (young) and 32-mo (old) Fischer 344/BN male rats were studied before and after a dietary sodium load. Transferring young rats from a low-sodium (LS) to a high-sodium (HS) diet increased water intake and urine volume by 1.9- and 3.0-fold, respectively, while urine osmolality and plasma aldosterone decreased by 33 and 98%. Concomitantly, adrenocortical angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) density decreased by 35%, and AT1bR mRNA decreased by 39%; no changes were observed in AT1aR mRNA. In contrast, the increase in water intake (1.4-fold) was lower in the old rats, and there was no effect of the HS diet on urine volume or urine osmolality. AT1R densities were 29% less in the old rats before transferring to the HS diet, and AT1R densities were not reduced as rapidly in response to a HS diet compared with the young animals. After 6 days on the HS diet, plasma potassium was lowered by 26% in the old rats, whereas no change was detected in the young rats. Furthermore, while plasma aldosterone was substantially decreased after 2 days on the HS diet in both young and old rats, plasma aldosterone was significantly lower in the old compared with the young animals after 2 wk on the LS diet. These findings suggest that aging attenuates the responsiveness of the adrenocortical AT1R to a sodium load through impaired regulation of AT1bR mRNA, and that this dysregulation contributes to the defects in water and electrolyte homeostasis observed in aging.

  14. A small difference in the molecular structure of angiotensin II receptor blockers induces AT1 receptor-dependent and -independent beneficial effects

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Masahiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Kiya, Yoshihiro; Tominaga, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshino; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Saku, Keijiro

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs) induce multiple pharmacological beneficial effects, but not all ARBs have the same effects and the molecular mechanisms underlying their actions are not certain. In this study, irbesartan and losartan were examined because of their different molecular structures (irbesartan has a cyclopentyl group whereas losartan has a chloride group). We analyzed the binding affinity and production of inositol phosphate (IP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and adiponectin. Compared with losartan, irbesartan showed a significantly higher binding affinity and slower dissociation rate from the AT1 receptor and a significantly higher degree of inverse agonism and insurmountability toward IP production. These effects of irbesartan were not seen with the AT1-Y113A mutant receptor. On the basis of the molecular modeling of the ARBs–AT1 receptor complex and a mutagenesis study, the phenyl group at Tyr113 in the AT1 receptor and the cyclopentyl group of irbesartan may form a hydrophobic interaction that is stronger than the losartan–AT1 receptor interaction. Interestingly, irbesartan inhibited MCP-1 production more strongly than losartan. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation that was independent of the AT1 receptor in the human coronary endothelial cells. In addition, irbesartan, but not losartan, induced significant adiponectin production that was mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and this effect was not mediated by the AT1 receptor. In conclusion, irbesartan induced greater beneficial effects than losartan due to small differences between their molecular structures, and these differential effects were both dependent on and independent of the AT1 receptor. PMID:20668453

  15. Direct and indirect interactions between cannabinoid CB1 receptor and group II metabotropic glutamate receptor signalling in layer V pyramidal neurons from the rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Jean-Gaël; Auclair, Nathalie; Roisin, Marie-Paule; Otani, Satoru; Valjent, Emmanuel; Caboche, Jocelyne; Soubrie, Philippe; Crepel, Francis

    2003-03-01

    At proximal synapses from layer V pyramidal neurons from the rat prefrontal cortex, activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (group II mGlu) by (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine (DCG IV) induced a long-lasting depression of excitatory postsynaptic currents. Paired-pulse experiments suggested that the depression was expressed presynaptically. Activation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) by WIN 55,212-2 occluded the DCG IV-induced depression in a mutually occlusive manner. At the postsynaptic level, WIN 55,212-2 and DCG IV were also occlusive for the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. The postsynaptic localization of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase was confirmed by immunocytochemistry after activation of CB1 receptors. However, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in layer V pyramidal neurons was dependent on the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, consequently to a release of glutamate in the local network. Group II mGlu were also shown to be involved in long-term changes in synaptic plasticity induced by high frequency stimulations. The group II mGlu antagonist (RS)-alpha-methylserine-O-phosphate monophenyl ester (MSOPPE) favoured long-term depression. However, no interaction was found between MSOPPE, WIN 55,212-2 and the CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A on the modulation of long-term depression or long-term potentiation and the effects of these drugs were rather additive. We suggest that CB1 receptor and group II mGlu signalling may interact through a presynaptic mechanism in the induction of a DCG IV-induced depression. Postsynaptically, an indirect interaction occurs for activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. However, none of these interactions seem to play a role in synaptic plasticities induced with high frequency stimulations.

  16. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: a role for angiotensin type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E; Mecawi, André S; Batalhão, Marcelo E; Carnio, Evelin C; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H; Touyz, Rhian M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT₁ receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase-mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT₁-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage.

  17. Role of agonistic autoantibodies against type-1 angiotensin II receptor in the pathogenesis of retinopathy in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yuxian; Wang, Xiaofang; Zheng, Yanqian; Jin, Zhu; Zhi, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying AT1-AA-induced retinopathy in severe preeclampsia by measuring the positive rate and titer of AT1-AA in plasma from women with severe preeclampsia and normal pregnant women to see whether AT1-AA titer was correlated with the grade of retinopathy. A preeclampsia rat model was also established by intravenous injection of AT1-AA extracted from the plasma of patient suffering from severe preeclampsia. The results showed that the plasma titer and positive rate of AT1-AA were significantly higher in women with severe preeclampsia than normal pregnant women. The antibody titer in cases of severe preeclampsia was associated with the grade of retinopathy, and positively correlated with the level of TNF-α and VEGF. The animal experiment results showed that the modeled rats presented symptoms very similar to symptoms of human preeclampsia, including retinopathy. Ocular fundus examination showed retinal microvascular abnormalities, hemorrhaging and leakage in the severe preeclampsia. Morphological changes included edema, thickening of the INL and ONL, and pigment atrophy. TNF-α and VEGF levels were increased in the vitreous humor and retina of the model rats. Our studies results suggest that abnormal expression of AT1-AA could induce damage to retinal capillary endothelial cells and increase vascular permeability, resulting in retinopathy. PMID:27381670

  18. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes in rat renal preglomerular vessels.

    PubMed

    De León, H; Garcia, R

    1992-01-01

    A simple technique to isolate rat renal preglomerular vessels is described. Kidneys were pressed against a 0.3 mm stainless steel grid. The whole vascular tree, including the interlobar, arcuate, and interlobular arteries, as well as the afferent arterioles, remained on the grid surface from where they were recovered. Extensive washing yielded a highly pure preparation of renal microvessels. Radioligand binding experiments were performed to characterize 125I-[Sar1,Ile8]-ANG II binding sites in preglomerular microvessel membranes. Equilibrium saturation binding experiments revealed the presence of one group of high affinity receptors (Kd = 1.22 +/- 0.171 nM; Bmax = 209 +/- 14 fmol/mg protein). Competitive inhibition experiments with two highly specific nonpeptide ANG II antagonists, losartan (DuP 753), which is specific for the AT1 receptor subtype, and PD123319, which is specific for the AT2 subtype, demonstrated that the large majority of, if not all, ANG II receptors in rat renal preglomerular vessels correspond to the AT1 subtype. PMID:1299411

  19. Type 1 diabetes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, E; Matsuura, N; Eguchi, K

    2006-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a multifactorial disease which results from a T-cell-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells in genetically predisposed individuals. The risk for individuals of developing type 1 diabetes varies remarkably according to country of residence and race. Japan has one of the lowest incidence rates of type 1 diabetes in the world, and recognises at least three subtypes of the condition: acute-onset ('classical'), slow-onset, and fulminant type 1 diabetes. The incidence rate of type 1 diabetes in children aged 0-14 years in Japan increased over the period from 1973-1992, but remained constant over the last decade, averaging 2.37 cases per 100,000 persons per year; the incidence does not appear to have increased in older age groups. Although there are few reports regarding the incidence and prevalence of type 1 diabetes in adult-onset patients, it appears that the prevalence of type 1 diabetes in adults is more than twice that in childhood-onset patients and that two-thirds of them have a slow-onset form of type 1 diabetes. Differences and similarities in the association of MHC and non-MHC genes with type 1 diabetes are observed in Japan and in countries with Caucasoid populations. Highly susceptible class II HLA haplotypes identified in patients of Caucasoid origin are rarely seen in Japanese patients, whereas protective haplotypes are universal. Non-MHC genes associated with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in both Japanese and Caucasoid patients include polymorphisms in the insulin gene, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) gene, the interleukin-18 (IL18) gene and the major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) gene. Fulminant type 1 diabetes is a unique subtype of type 1 diabetes that accounts for about 20% of acute-onset type 1 diabetes, and is seen mainly in adults. The challenge for the future is to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of beta cell destruction, including the genetic or

  20. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  1. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics - II. The Conditional Luminosity Functions of Type 2 and Type 1 Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    The orientation-based unification model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) posits that the principle difference between obscured (Type 2) and unobscured (Type 1) AGNs is the line-of-sight into the central engine. If this model is correct than there should be no difference in many of the properties of AGN host galaxies (e.g., the mass of the surrounding dark matter haloes). However, recent clustering analyses of Type 1 and Type 2 AGNs have provided some evidence for a difference in the halo mass, in conflict with the orientation-based unified model. In this work, a method to compute the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs is presented. The CLF allows many fundamental halo properties to be computed as a function of AGN luminosity, which we apply to the question of the host halo masses of Type 1 and 2 AGNs. By making use of the total AGN CLF, the Type 1 X-ray luminosity function, and the luminosity-dependent Type 2 AGN fraction, the CLFs of Type 1 and 2 AGNs are calculated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9. At both z, there is no statistically significant difference in the mean halo mass of Type 2 and 1 AGNs at any luminosity. There is marginal evidence that Type 1 AGNs may have larger halo masses than Type 2s, which would be consistent with an evolutionary picture where quasars are initially obscured and then subsequently reveal themselves as Type 1s. As the Type 1 lifetime is longer, the host halo will increase somewhat in mass during the Type 1 phase. The CLF technique will be a powerful way to study the properties of many AGNs subsets (e.g., radio-loud, Compton-thick) as future wide-area X-ray and optical surveys substantially increase our ability to place AGNs in their cosmological context.

  2. Transforming growth factor receptor type II (ec-TβR II) behaves as a halophile.

    PubMed

    Saini, Komal; Khan, M Ashhar I; Chakrapani, Sumit; Deep, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    The members of transforming growth factor β family (TGF-β) are multifunctional proteins but their main role is to control cell proliferation and differentiation. Polypeptides of TGF-β family function by binding to two related, functionally distinct transmembrane receptor kinases, first to the type II (TβR II) followed by type I receptor (TβR I). The paper describes, in details, the stability of wt-ec-TβR II under different conditions. The stability of wt-ec-TβR II was observed at different pH and salt concentration using fluorescence spectroscopy. Stability of ec-TβR II decreases with decrease in pH. Interestingly, the addition of salt increases the stability of the TβRII at pH 5.0 as observed for halophiles. Computational analysis using DELPHI suggests that this is probably due to the decrease in repulsion between negatively charged residues at surface on the addition of salt. This is further confirmed by the change in the stability of receptor on mutation of some of the residues (D32A) at surface.

  3. Knockdown of interleukin-1 receptor type-1 on endothelial cells attenuated stress-induced neuroinflammation and prevented anxiety-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Wohleb, Eric S; Patterson, Jenna M; Sharma, Vikram; Quan, Ning; Godbout, Jonathan P; Sheridan, John F

    2014-02-12

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a prominent role in stress-induced behavioral changes. In a model of repeated social defeat (RSD), elevated IL-1β expression in the brain was associated with recruitment of primed macrophages that were necessary for development of anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, microglia activation and anxiety-like behavior associated with RSD did not occur in IL-1 receptor type-1 knock-out (IL-1R1(KO)) mice. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the role of IL-1 signaling in RSD-induced macrophage trafficking to the brain and anxiety-like behavior. Initial studies revealed that RSD did not increase circulating myeloid cells in IL-1R1(KO) mice, resulting in limited macrophage trafficking to the brain. In addition, IL-1R1(KO) bone marrow-chimera mice showed that IL-1R1 expression was essential for macrophage trafficking into the brain. To differentiate cellular mediators of stress-induced IL-1 signaling, endothelial-specific IL-1R1 knock-down (eIL-1R1kd) mice were used. Both wild-type (WT) and eIL-1R1kd mice had increased circulating monocytes, recruitment of macrophages to the brain, and altered microglia activation after RSD. Nonetheless, RSD-induced expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 mRNA in brain CD11b(+) cells was attenuated in eIL-1R1kd mice compared with WT. Moreover, anxiety-like behavior did not develop in eIL-1R1kd mice. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that there was limited RSD-induced priming of myeloid cells in IL-1R1(KO) mice and disrupted propagation of neuroinflammatory signals in the brain of eIL-1R1kd mice. Furthermore, these data showed that transduction of IL-1 signaling by endothelial cells potentiates stress-induced neuroinflammation and promotes anxiety-like behavior.

  4. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility arising from altered resting coupling between the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel and the type 1 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eltit, Jose Miguel; Bannister, Roger A.; Moua, Ong; Altamirano, Francisco; Hopkins, Philip M.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.; López, Jose R.; Beam, Kurt G.; Allen, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility is a dominantly inherited disorder in which volatile anesthetics trigger aberrant Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle and a potentially fatal rise in perioperative body temperature. Mutations causing MH susceptibility have been identified in two proteins critical for excitation–contraction (EC) coupling, the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and CaV1.1, the principal subunit of the L-type Ca2+ channel. All of the mutations that have been characterized previously augment EC coupling and/or increase the rate of L-type Ca2+ entry. The CaV1.1 mutation R174W associated with MH susceptibility occurs at the innermost basic residue of the IS4 voltage-sensing helix, a residue conserved among all CaV channels [Carpenter D, et al. (2009) BMC Med Genet 10:104–115.]. To define the functional consequences of this mutation, we expressed it in dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes. Unlike previously described MH-linked mutations in CaV1.1, R174W ablated the L-type current and had no effect on EC coupling. Nonetheless, R174W increased sensitivity of Ca2+ release to caffeine (used for MH diagnostic in vitro testing) and to volatile anesthetics. Moreover, in CaV1.1 R174W-expressing myotubes, resting myoplasmic Ca2+ levels were elevated, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores were partially depleted, compared with myotubes expressing wild-type CaV1.1. Our results indicate that CaV1.1 functions not only to activate RyR1 during EC coupling, but also to suppress resting RyR1-mediated Ca2+ leak from the SR, and that perturbation of CaV1.1 negative regulation of RyR1 leak identifies a unique mechanism that can sensitize muscle cells to MH triggers. PMID:22547813

  5. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells in Phenotypic Screening: A Transforming Growth Factor-β Type 1 Receptor Kinase Inhibitor Induces Efficient Cardiac Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Drowley, Lauren; Koonce, Chad; Peel, Samantha; Jonebring, Anna; Plowright, Alleyn T; Kattman, Steven J; Andersson, Henrik; Anson, Blake; Swanson, Bradley J; Wang, Qing-Dong; Brolen, Gabriella

    2016-02-01

    Several progenitor cell populations have been reported to exist in hearts that play a role in cardiac turnover and/or repair. Despite the presence of cardiac stem and progenitor cells within the myocardium, functional repair of the heart after injury is inadequate. Identification of the signaling pathways involved in the expansion and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) will broaden insight into the fundamental mechanisms playing a role in cardiac homeostasis and disease and might provide strategies for in vivo regenerative therapies. To understand and exploit cardiac ontogeny for drug discovery efforts, we developed an in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CPC model system using a highly enriched population of KDR(pos)/CKIT(neg)/NKX2.5(pos) CPCs. Using this model system, these CPCs were capable of generating highly enriched cultures of cardiomyocytes under directed differentiation conditions. In order to facilitate the identification of pathways and targets involved in proliferation and differentiation of resident CPCs, we developed phenotypic screening assays. Screening paradigms for therapeutic applications require a robust, scalable, and consistent methodology. In the present study, we have demonstrated the suitability of these cells for medium to high-throughput screens to assess both proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Using this CPC model system and a small directed compound set, we identified activin-like kinase 5 (transforming growth factor-β type 1 receptor kinase) inhibitors as novel and potent inducers of human CPC differentiation to cardiomyocytes. Significance: Cardiac disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, with no treatment available that can result in functional repair. This study demonstrates how differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells can be used to identify and isolate cell populations of interest that can translate to the adult human heart. Two separate examples of phenotypic

  6. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility arising from altered resting coupling between the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel and the type 1 ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Eltit, Jose Miguel; Bannister, Roger A; Moua, Ong; Altamirano, Francisco; Hopkins, Philip M; Pessah, Isaac N; Molinski, Tadeusz F; López, Jose R; Beam, Kurt G; Allen, Paul D

    2012-05-15

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility is a dominantly inherited disorder in which volatile anesthetics trigger aberrant Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle and a potentially fatal rise in perioperative body temperature. Mutations causing MH susceptibility have been identified in two proteins critical for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and Ca(V)1.1, the principal subunit of the L-type Ca(2+) channel. All of the mutations that have been characterized previously augment EC coupling and/or increase the rate of L-type Ca(2+) entry. The Ca(V)1.1 mutation R174W associated with MH susceptibility occurs at the innermost basic residue of the IS4 voltage-sensing helix, a residue conserved among all Ca(V) channels [Carpenter D, et al. (2009) BMC Med Genet 10:104-115.]. To define the functional consequences of this mutation, we expressed it in dysgenic (Ca(V)1.1 null) myotubes. Unlike previously described MH-linked mutations in Ca(V)1.1, R174W ablated the L-type current and had no effect on EC coupling. Nonetheless, R174W increased sensitivity of Ca(2+) release to caffeine (used for MH diagnostic in vitro testing) and to volatile anesthetics. Moreover, in Ca(V)1.1 R174W-expressing myotubes, resting myoplasmic Ca(2+) levels were elevated, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores were partially depleted, compared with myotubes expressing wild-type Ca(V)1.1. Our results indicate that Ca(V)1.1 functions not only to activate RyR1 during EC coupling, but also to suppress resting RyR1-mediated Ca(2+) leak from the SR, and that perturbation of Ca(V)1.1 negative regulation of RyR1 leak identifies a unique mechanism that can sensitize muscle cells to MH triggers. PMID:22547813

  7. The blockade of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 and fatty acid amide hydrolase decreases symptoms and central sequelae in the medial prefrontal cortex of neuropathic rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain is a chronic disease resulting from dysfunction within the "pain matrix". The basolateral amygdala (BLA) can modulate cortical functions and interactions between this structure and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are important for integrating emotionally salient information. In this study, we have investigated the involvement of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and the catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the morphofunctional changes occurring in the pre-limbic/infra-limbic (PL/IL) cortex in neuropathic rats. Results The effect of N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT), a hybrid FAAH inhibitor and TPRV1 channel antagonist, was tested on nociceptive behaviour associated with neuropathic pain as well as on some phenotypic changes occurring on PL/IL cortex pyramidal neurons. Those neurons were identified as belonging to the BLA-mPFC pathway by electrical stimulation of the BLA followed by hind-paw pressoceptive stimulus application. Changes in their spontaneous and evoked activity were studied in sham or spared nerve injury (SNI) rats before or after repeated treatment with AA-5-HT. Consistently with the SNI-induced changes in PL/IL cortex neurons which underwent profound phenotypic reorganization, suggesting a profound imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory responses in the mPFC neurons, we found an increase in extracellular glutamate levels, as well as the up-regulation of FAAH and TRPV1 in the PL/IL cortex of SNI rats. Daily treatment with AA-5-HT restored cortical neuronal activity, normalizing the electrophysiological changes associated with the peripheral injury of the sciatic nerve. Finally, a single acute intra-PL/IL cortex microinjection of AA-5-HT transiently decreased allodynia more effectively than URB597 or I-RTX, a selective FAAH inhibitor or a TRPV1 blocker, respectively. Conclusion These data suggest a possible involvement of endovanilloids in the cortical plastic changes

  8. Involvement of the V1/V2 variable loop structure in the exposure of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 epitopes induced by receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R; Moore, J; Accola, M; Desjardin, E; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1995-01-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to the cellular receptor CD4 has been suggested to induce conformational changes in the viral envelope glycoproteins that promote virus entry. Conserved, discontinuous epitopes on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein recognized by the 17b, 48d, and A32 antibodies are preferentially exposed upon the binding of soluble CD4 (sCD4). The binding of the 17b and 48d antibodies to the gp120 glycoprotein can also be enhanced by the binding of the A32 antibody. Here we constructed HIV-1 gp120 mutants in which the variable segments of the V1/V2 and V3 structures were deleted, individually or in combination, while the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes were retained. The effects of the variable loop deletions on the function of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins and on the exposure of epitopes induced by sCD4 or A32 binding to the monomeric gp120 glycoprotein were examined. The variable-loop-deleted envelope glycoproteins were able to mediate virus entry, albeit at lower efficiencies than those of the wild-type glycoproteins. Thus, the V1/V2 and V3 variable sequences contribute to the efficiency of HIV-1 entry but are not absolutely required for the process. Neither the V1/V2 nor V3 loops were necessary for the increase in exposure of the 17b/48d epitopes induced by binding of the A32 monoclonal antibody. By contrast, induction of the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes by sCD4 binding apparently involves a movement of the V1/V2 loops, which in the absence of CD4 partially mask these epitopes on the native gp120 monomer. The results obtained with a mutant glycoprotein containing a deletion of the V1 loop alone indicated that the contribution of the V2 loop to these phenomena was more significant than that of the V1 sequences. These results suggest that the V1/V2 loops, which have been previously implicated in CD4-modulated, postattachment steps in HIV-1 entry, contribute to CD4-induced gp120 conformational changes detected by the 17b, 48d, and A

  9. Tissue factor and Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 in hyperglycaemia-hyperinsulinaemia. Effects in healthy subjects, and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anamika; Boden, Guenther; Rao, A Koneti

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients have an increased incidence of cardiovascular events. Blood tissue factor-procoagulant activity (TF-PCA), the initiating mechanism for blood coagulation, is elevated in DM. We have shown that hyperglycaemia (HG), hyperinsulinaemia (HI) and combined HG+HI (induced using 24-hour infusion clamps) increases TF-PCA in healthy and type 2 DM (T2DM) subjects, but not in type 1 DM (T1DM) subjects. The mechanisms for this are unknown. DM patients have elevated plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand. We postulated that TLR4 plays a role in modulating TF levels. We studied the effect of HG+HI on TLR4 and TF-PCA in vivo during 24-hour HG+HI infusion clamps in healthy subjects, and T1DM and T2DM subjects, and in vitro in blood. In vivo, in healthy subjects, 24-hour HG + HI infusion increased TLR4 six-fold, which correlated with TF-PCA (r= 0.91, p<0.0001). T2DM patients showed smaller increases in both. In T1DM subjects, TLR4 declined (50%, p<0.05) and correlated with TF-PCA (r=0.55; p<0.05). In vitro, HG (200 mg/dl added glucose) and HI (1-100 nM added insulin) increased TF-PCA in healthy subjects (~2-fold, 2-4 hours). Insulin inhibited by ~30% LPS-induced increase in TF-PCA and high glucose reversed it. TLR4 levels paralleled TF-PCA (r=0.71, p<0.0001); HG and HI increased TLR4 and insulin inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 increase. This is first evidence that even in healthy subjects, HG of short duration increases TLR4 and TF-PCA, key players in inflammation and thrombosis. TLR4-TF interplay is strikingly different in non-diabetic, T1DM and T2DM subjects.

  10. Spatial association of prolyl oligopeptidase, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate type 1 receptor, substance P and its neurokinin-1 receptor in the rat brain: an immunohistochemical colocalization study.

    PubMed

    Myöhänen, T T; Venäläinen, J I; Garcia-Horsman, J A; Männistö, P T

    2008-06-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase which hydrolyzes proline-containing peptides shorter than 30 amino acids. It has been suggested that POP is associated with cognitive functions, possibly via the cleavage of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP). Recently, several studies have also linked POP to the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) signaling. However, the neuroanatomical interactions between these substances are not known. We used double-labeled immunofluorescence to determine the POP colocalization with SP, SP receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor, NK-1R) and IP(3) type 1 receptor (IP(3)R1) in the rat brain. Furthermore, since striatal and cortical GABAergic neurons are involved in SP neurotransmission, we studied the coexpression of POP, SP and GABA by triple-labeled immunofluorescence. POP was moderately present in IP(3)R1-containing cells in cortex; the colocalization was particularly high in the thalamus, hippocampal CA1 field and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Colocalization of POP with SP and NK1-receptor was infrequent throughout the brain, though some POP and SP coexpression was observed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. We also found that POP partially colocalized with SP-containing GABAergic neurons in striatum and cortex. Our findings support the view that POP is at least spatially associated with the IP(3)-signaling in the thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellar Purkinje cells. This might point to a role for POP in the regulation of long-term potentiation and/or depression. Moreover, the low degree of colocalization of POP, SP and its NK-1R suggests that a transport system is needed either for POP or SP to make hydrolysis possible and that POP may act both intra- and extracellularly.

  11. Testicular gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown constitutively impairs diurnal testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its specific receptor (GnRHR-II) are highly expressed in the testis, suggesting an important role in testis biology. Gene coding errors prevent the production of GnRH-II and GnRHR-II in many species, but both genes are functional in swine. We have demo...

  12. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  13. A Novel Approach to Identify Two Distinct Receptor Binding Surfaces of Insulin-like Growth Factor II*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Ong, Shee Chee; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Forbes, Briony E.

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the residues important for the interaction of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) with the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin, to which IGF-II is homologous, is proposed to cross-link opposite halves of the IR dimer through two receptor binding surfaces, site 1 and site 2. In the present study we have analyzed the contribution of IGF-II residues equivalent to insulin's two binding surfaces toward the interaction of IGF-II with the IGF-1R and IR. Four “site 1” and six “site 2” analogues were produced and analyzed in terms of IGF-1R and IR binding and activation. The results show that Val43, Phe28, and Val14 (equivalent to site 1) are critical to IGF-1R and IR binding, whereas mutation to alanine of Gln18 affects only IGF-1R and not IR binding. Alanine substitutions at Glu12, Asp15, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 analogues resulted in significant (>2-fold) decreases in affinity for both the IGF-1R and IR. Furthermore, taking a novel approach using a monomeric, single-chain minimized IGF-1R we have defined a distinct second binding surface formed by Glu12, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 that potentially engages the IGF-1R at one or more of the FnIII domains. PMID:19139090

  14. Proliferative responses to altered 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) type 2 expression in human breast cancer cells are dependent on endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1 and the oestradiol receptors.

    PubMed

    Jansson, A; Gunnarsson, C; Stål, O

    2006-09-01

    The primary source of oestrogen in premenopausal women is the ovary but, after menopause, oestrogen biosynthesis in peripheral tissue is the exclusive site of formation. An enzyme group that affects the availability of active oestrogens is the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) family. In breast cancer, 17HSD type 1 and type 2 have been mostly investigated and seem to be the principal 17HSD enzymes involved thus far. The question whether 17HSD type 1 or type 2 is of greatest importance in breast tumour development is still not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate how the loss of 17HSD type 2 expression, using siRNA in the non-tumour breast epithelial cells HMEC (human mammal epithelial cells) and MCF10A, and gain of 17HSD type 2 expression, using transient transfection in the breast cancer derived cell lines MCF7 and T47D, affect oestradiol conversion and proliferation rate measured as S-phase fraction. We further investigated how this was related to the endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1 and oestradiol receptors in the examined cell lines. The oestradiol level in the medium changed significantly in the MCF7 transfected cells and the siRNA-treated HMEC cells, but not in T47D or MCF10A. The S-phase fraction decreased in the 17HSD type 2-transfected MCF7 cells and the siRNA-treated HMEC cells. The results seemed to be dependent on the endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1 and the oestradiol receptors. In conclusion, we found that high or low levels of 17HSD type 2 affected the oestradiol concentration significantly. However, the response was dependent on the endogenous expression of 17HSD type 1. Expression of 17HSD type 1 seems to be dominant to 17HSD type 2. Therefore, it may be important to investigate a ratio between 17HSD type 1 and 17HSD type 2.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H-l; Zhu, W-b; Wu, D; Da, Y-j; Yan, Y-J; Bian, J; Chen, Z-l

    2014-12-01

    The design, synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of (2 R,6 S)-4-({1-[2-(1 H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl]-1 H-indol-4-yl}methyl)-2,6-dimethylmorpholine, compound 1, as a novel angiotensin II receptor antagonist is outlined. Radioligand binding assays showed that 1 displayed a high affinity for the angiotensin II type 1receptor with IC50 value of 0.82 nM. It acted as a potent anti-hypertensive derivative (maximal reduction of mean arterial pressure of 47 mm Hg at 10 mg/kg po in spontaneously hypertensive rat producing a dose-dependent fall in blood pressure following oral administration lasting beyond 10 h. Acute toxicity tests measured the LD50 of 1 value as 2431.7 mg/kg, which is higher than Losartan (LD50=2248 mg/kg). In addition further testing showed that 1 also demonstrated efficient anti-proliferative activity in vitro and anti-prostate cancer activity in vivo were also found. Taken together this compound could be considered as an effective and durable anti-hypertension drug candidate with additional anti-prostate cancer activity. These encouraging results are deserved of further investigation towards its use for therapeutic benefit. PMID:24573978

  16. Designing bifunctional NOP receptor-mu opioid receptor ligands from NOP-receptor selective scaffolds. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Journigan, V. Blair; Polgar, Willma; Khroyan, Taline V.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2014-01-01

    The nociceptin opioid receptor (NOP) and its endogenous peptide ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ have been shown to modulate the pharmacological effects of the classical opioid receptor system. Suppression of opioid-induced reward associated with mu-opioid receptor (MOP)-mediated analgesia, without decreasing anti-nociceptive efficacy, can potentially be achieved with NOP agonists having bifunctional agonist activity at MOP, to afford ‘non-addicting’ analgesics. In Part II of this series, we describe a continuing structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of the NOP-selective piperidin-4-yl-1,3-dihydroindol-2-one scaffold, to obtain bifunctional activity at MOP, and a suitable ratio of NOP/MOP agonist activity that produces a non-addicting analgesic profile. The SAR reported here is focused on the influence of various piperidine nitrogen aromatic substituents on the ratio of binding affinity and intrinsic activity at both the NOP and MOP receptors. PMID:24657054

  17. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and PKC-{alpha} are involved in the inhibitory effects of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngiotensinII subtype AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, on AngiotensinII-induced vascular contraction in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Wang Wei; Wang Qiujuan Wu Jinhui; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming

    2007-12-07

    The vasoactive peptide AngiotensinII (AngII) is an important factor in the cardiovascular system, exerting most of its effects through AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}). Ib, a new nonpeptide AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, has been observed to play a positive role in the treatment of hypertension in preclinical tests. In this study, the inhibitory effects of Ib on AngII-induced vascular contraction in vitro were investigated, and its molecular mechanisms were further explored. In endothelium-denuded aortic rings from rabbits, Ib produced a rightward shift in the concentration-response curve for AngII with a decrease in the maximal contractile response and the pD{sub 2}{sup '} was 7.29. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was inhibited by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. Ib could inhibit both AngII-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization from internal stores and Ca{sup 2+} influx. Moreover, the translocation of PKC-{alpha} stimulated by AngII was inhibited by Ib. Thus, the inhibitory effects of Ib might be related with the depression on AngII-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and translocation of PKC-{alpha} through blocking AT{sub 1} receptors.

  18. Modulatory Role of Postsynaptic 5-Hydroxytryptamine Type 1A Receptors in (±)-8-Hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin-Induced Hyperphagia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Brosda, Jan; Müller, Nadine; Bert, Bettina; Fink, Heidrun

    2015-07-15

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) is involved in the control of food intake. The ingestive effects of 5-HT are mediated by various receptor subtypes, among others the 5-HT1A receptor. While the involvement of presynaptic 5-HT1A receptors is regarded as certain, the role of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors is rather vague. Here, we studied the role of the 5-HT1A receptor on feeding in non-food-deprived and food-deprived (young adult and adult, both sexes) wild-type NMRI mice as well as transgenic NMRI mice, which are characterized by a distinct overexpression of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. The known hyperphagic effect of the 5-HT1A receptor full agonist 8-OH-DPAT ((±)-8-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin) in non-food-deprived animals was demonstrated in male NMRI wild-type mice and could be antagonized by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. In transgenic mice, this hyperphagic response was induced at lower doses, with an earlier onset and even in females. However, in adult male transgenic mice, the hyperphagic effect did not occur. In food-deprived NMRI wild-type as well as transgenic mice, 8-OH-DPAT first induced a hypophagic and subsequently a hyperphagic effect. Again, in transgenic animals most responses occurred at lower doses and with an earlier onset. The results indicate that postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors exert a modulatory function in food intake in free-feeding and fasted mice, which for the first time shows an involvement of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in feeding behavior. Understanding the function of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors may help to achieve new insights into the regulation of food intake and foster prospective treatment strategies for eating disorders.

  19. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  20. G-Protein binding domains of the angiotensin II AT1A receptors mapped with synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kai, H; Alexander, R W; Ushio-Fukai, M; Lyons, P R; Akers, M; Griendling, K K

    1998-01-01

    The vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1AR) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily. We mapped the G-protein binding domains of the AT1AR using synthetic peptides selected from the receptor sequence, which interfere with AT1AR-G-protein coupling. Membrane GTPase activity was used as a measure of the functional coupling in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Peptides corresponding to the N-terminal region of the second intracellular loop (residues 125-137), the N-terminal region of the third intracellular loop (217-227) and the juxtamembranous region of the C-terminal tail (304-316) inhibited angiotensin II-induced GTPase activation by 30%, 30%, and 70%, respectively. The latter two domains (217-227 and 304-316) are predicted to form amphiphilic alpha-helices. Only the peptide representing residues 217-227 stimulated basal activity (45%). No synthetic peptide had a significant effect on either the number or the affinity of the AT1AR binding. These observations indicate that domains of the second and third regions and the cytoplasmic tail of the AT1AR interact with G-proteins, and that multiple contacts with these receptor domains may be important for binding and activation of the G-proteins. PMID:9620883

  1. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan attenuates aortic stiffening and remodelling in STZ-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention or attenuation of diabetic vascular complications includes anti-hypertensive treatment with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors on account of their protective effects beyond blood pressure reduction. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), on blood pressure, aortic stiffening, and aortic remodelling in experimental type 1 diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) (65 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. One diabetic group was treated for 10 weeks with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day p/o). Pressure-independent aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured under anaesthesia after intravenous infusion of phenylephrine and nitroglycerine. Aortic wall samples were collected for histomorphometrical analysis. Results Untreated diabetes imposed differential effects on aortic stiffening, as demonstrated by increased isobaric PWV over a range of high blood pressures, but not at lower blood pressures. This was associated with loss and disruption of elastin fibres and an increase in collagen fibres in the aortic media. Treatment with telmisartan decreased resting blood pressure, reduced aortic stiffness, and partially prevented the degradation of elastin network within the aortic wall. Conclusions Telmisartan improved the structural and functional indices of aortic stiffening induced by untreated STZ-diabetes, demonstrating the importance of ARBs in the therapeutic approach to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:24920962

  2. Effects of Urotensin II Receptor Antagonist, GSK1440115, in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Alison; Kumar, Sanjay; Behm, David J.; Mahar, Kelly M.; Noble, Robert B.; Throup, John P.; Russ, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Urotensin II (U-II) is highly expressed in the human lung and has been implicated in regulating respiratory physiology in preclinical studies. Our objective was to test antagonism of the urotensin (UT) receptor by GSK1440115, a novel, competitive, and selective inhibitor of the UT receptor, as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of asthma. Methods: Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of single doses of GSK1440115 (1–750 mg) were assessed in a Phase I, placebo controlled study in 70 healthy subjects. In a Phase Ib study, 12 asthmatic patients were randomized into a two-period, single-blind crossover study and treated with single doses of 750 mg GSK1440115 or placebo and given a methacholine challenge. Results: Administration of GSK1440115 was safe and well-tolerated in healthy subjects and asthmatic patients. In both studies, there was a high degree of variability in the observed PK following oral dosing with GSK1440115 at all doses. There was a marked food effect in healthy subjects at the 50 mg dose. In the presence of food at the 750 mg dose, the time to maximal concentration was between 2 and 6 h and the terminal half-life was short at approximately 2 h. All asthmatic patients maintained greater than the predicted concentration levels necessary to achieve predicted 96% receptor occupancy for ≥3 h (between 4 and 7 h post-dose). There were no apparent trends or relationships between the systemic plasma exposure of GSK1440115 and pharmacodynamic endpoints, PC20 after methacholine challenge and FEV1, in asthmatics. Conclusion: While GSK1440115 was safe and well-tolerated, it did not induce bronchodilation in asthmatics, or protect against methacholine-induced bronchospasm, suggesting that acute UT antagonism is not likely to provide benefit as an acute bronchodilator in this patient population. PMID:23641215

  3. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy.

  4. Differential brain angiotensin-II type I receptor expression in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Braga, Valdir A

    2011-09-01

    Blood-borne angiotensin-II (Ang-II) has profound effects in the brain. We tested the hypothesis that Ang-II-dependent hypertension involves differential Ang-II type I (AT(1)) receptors expression in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Male Wistar rats were implanted with 14-day osmotic minipump filled with Ang-II (150 ng/kg/min) or saline. AT(1) receptor mRNA levels were detected in the SFO and RVLM by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Ang-II caused hypertension (134 ± 10 mmHg vs. 98 ± 9 mmHg, n = 9, p < 0.05). RT-PCR revealed that Ang-II infusion induced increased AT(1) receptor mRNA levels in RVLM and decreased in SFO. Our data suggest that Ang-II-induced hypertension involves differential expression of brain AT(1) receptors. PMID:21897104

  5. 6-Alkoxy-5-aryl-3-pyridinecarboxamides, a new series of bioavailable cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists including peripherally selective compounds.

    PubMed

    Röver, Stephan; Andjelkovic, Mirjana; Bénardeau, Agnès; Chaput, Evelyne; Guba, Wolfgang; Hebeisen, Paul; Mohr, Susanne; Nettekoven, Matthias; Obst, Ulrike; Richter, Wolfgang F; Ullmer, Christoph; Waldmeier, Pius; Wright, Matthew B

    2013-12-27

    We identified 6-alkoxy-5-aryl-3-pyridinecarboxamides as potent CB1 receptor antagonists with high selectivity over CB2 receptors. The series was optimized to reduce lipophilicity compared to rimonabant to achieve peripherally active molecules with minimal central effects. Several compounds that showed high plasma exposures in rats were evaluated in vivo to probe the contribution of central vs peripheral CB1 agonism to metabolic improvement. Both rimonabant and 14g, a potent brain penetrant CB1 receptor antagonist, significantly reduced the rate of body weight gain. However, 14h, a molecule with markedly reduced brain exposure, had no significant effect on body weight. PK studies confirmed similarly high exposure of both 14h and 14g in the periphery but 10-fold lower exposure in the brain for 14h. On the basis of these data, which are consistent with reported effects in tissue-specific CB1 receptor KO mice, we conclude that the metabolic benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists are primarily centrally mediated as originally believed.

  6. Type 1 diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... your diabetes. But, you are the most important person in managing your diabetes. You should know the basic steps ... to your doctor before starting any exercise program. People with type 1 ... MANAGING YOUR BLOOD SUGAR Checking your blood sugar level ...

  7. Type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Mark A; Eisenbarth, George S; Michels, Aaron W

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of type 1 diabetes has grown substantially, particularly with regard to disease prediction and heterogeneity, pancreatic pathology, and epidemiology. Technological improvements in insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help patients with type 1 diabetes manage the challenge of lifelong insulin administration. Agents that show promise for averting debilitating disease-associated complications have also been identified. However, despite broad organisational, intellectual, and fiscal investments, no means for preventing or curing type 1 diabetes exists, and, globally, the quality of diabetes management remains uneven. This Seminar discusses current progress in epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of type 1 diabetes, and prospects for an improved future for individuals with this disease. PMID:23890997

  8. Molecular recognition of metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 (mGluR1): synergistic understanding with free energy perturbation and linear response modeling.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung-gu; Das, Payel; McGrane, Scott J; Martin, Alan J; Huynh, Tien; Royyuru, Ajay K; Taylor, Andrew J; Jones, Paul G; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-06-19

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) constitute an important family of the G-protein coupled receptors. Due to their widespread distribution in the central nervous system (CNS), these receptors are attractive candidates for understanding the molecular basis of various cognitive processes as well as for designing inhibitors for relevant psychiatric and neurological disorders. Despite many studies on drugs targeting the mGluR receptors to date, the molecular level details on the ligand binding dynamics still remain unclear. In this study, we performed in silico experiments for mGluR1 with 29 different ligands including known synthetic agonists and antagonists as well as natural amino acids. The ligand-receptor binding affinities were estimated by the use of atomistic simulations combined with the mathematically rigorous, Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method, which successfully recognized the native agonist l-glutamate among the highly favorable binders, and also accurately distinguished antagonists from agonists. Comparative contact analysis also revealed the binding mode differences between natural and non-natural amino acid-based ligands. Several factors potentially affecting the ligand binding affinity and specificity were identified including net charges, dipole moments, and the presence of aromatic rings. On the basis of these findings, linear response models (LRMs) were built for different sets of ligands that showed high correlations (R(2) > 0.95) to the corresponding FEP binding affinities. These results identify some key factors that determine ligand-mGluR1 binding and could be used for future inhibitor designs and support a role for in silico modeling for understanding receptor ligand interactions.

  9. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor mediates depot-specific effects on differentiation, inflammation and oxidative metabolism in inguinal and epididymal white adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, I V; Perwitz, N; Drenckhan, M; Lehnert, H; Klein, J

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The endocannabinoid system is a major component in the control of energy metabolism. Cannabinoid 1 (CB1)-receptor blockade induces weight loss and reduces the risk to develop the metabolic syndrome with its associated cardiovascular complications. These effects are mediated by central and peripheral pathways. Interestingly, weight loss is mainly achieved by a reduction of visceral fat mass. We analyzed fat depot-specific differences on adipocyte differentiation, inflammation and oxidative metabolism in CB1-receptor knockout cells. Materials and methods: We used newly generated epididymal/inguinal adipose cell lines from CB1-receptor knockout mice. Differences in differentiation were measured by fat-specific Oil Red O staining and quantitative analysis of key differentiation markers. Induction of apoptosis was evaluated by cell death detection and investigation of p53 phosphorylation. Inflammation markers were quantified by real-time PCR. For analyzing the process of transdifferentiation we measured oxygen consumption and mitochondrial biogenesis. Results: Differentiation was reduced in visceral adipocytes from CB1-receptor knockout mice as compared with wild-type controls. Moreover, we found an induction of apoptosis in these cells. In contrast, subcutaneous adipocytes from CB1-receptor knockout mice showed an accelerated differentiation and a reduced rate of apoptosis. Inflammation was increased in visceral fat cells, as analyzed by the expression pattern of interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-α, whereas in subcutaneous adipocytes these markers were decreased. Furthermore, subcutaneous CB1-receptor knockout cells were more sensitive toward a conversion into a brown fat phenotype. Uncoupling protein-1 as well as PGC-1α expression was significantly elevated. This was accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found depot-specific effects on

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel potent angiotensin II receptor antagonists with anti-hypertension effect.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong-yan; Da, Ya-jing; Zheng, Hao; Yang, Xiao-xia; Jia, Lin; Wen, Cai-hong; Liang, Li-sha; Tian, Juan; Chen, Zhi-long

    2012-04-15

    A series of novel angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists were prepared. Radioligand binding assay suggested that compounds 1b and 1c could be recognized by the AT(1) receptor with an IC(50) value of 1.6 ± 0.09 nM and 2.64 ± 0.7 nM, respectively. In vivo anti-hypertension experiments showed that compounds (1a, 1b, 1c, 1e) elicited a significant decrease in SBP and DBP of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). The antihypertensive effects maintained for 10 h, which indicated that these compounds had a favorable blood pressure-lowering effect. Acute toxicity testing suggested that the LD(50) value of compound 1b was 2316.8 mg/kg which was lower than valsartan (LD(50)=307.50 mg/kg) but higher than losartan (LD(50)=2248 mg/kg). So they could be considered as novel anti-hypertension candidates and deserved for further investigation. PMID:22410249

  11. The effect of angiotensin II receptor blockers on hyperuricemia

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Marissa L.; Cruz, Jennifer L.; Vanderman, Adam J.; Brown, Jamie N.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to explore the efficacy of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) for the treatment of hyperuricemia in individuals diagnosed with gout or hyperuricemia defined as ⩾7 mg/dl at baseline. A literature search of MEDLINE (1946 to June 2015) and EMBASE (1947 to June 2015) was conducted. The following search terms were used: ‘uric acid’, ‘urate transporter’, ‘gout’, ‘angiotensin II receptor blockers’, ‘hyperuricemia’ and the names for individual ARBs, as well as any combinations of these terms. Studies were excluded that did not explore fractional excretion or serum uric acid as an endpoint, if patients did not have a diagnosis of gout or hyperuricemia at baseline, or if they were non-English language. A total of eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Of the eight studies identified, six explored ARB monotherapy and two studies investigated ARBs as adjunct therapy. Losartan demonstrated statistically significant reductions in serum uric acid levels or increases in fractional excretion of uric acid in all studies, whereas no other ARB reached statistical benefit. The effect of ARBs on the occurrence of gout attacks or other clinical outcomes were not represented. Four studies evaluated safety effects of these agents indicating abnormalities such as minor changes in lab values. In conclusion, losartan is the only ARB that has consistently demonstrated a significant reduction in serum uric acid levels, although the significance of impacting clinical outcomes remains unknown. Losartan appears to be a safe and efficacious agent to lower serum uric acid levels in patients with hyperuricemia. PMID:26568810

  12. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  13. Angiotensin II receptor blockers for the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    See, S

    2001-11-01

    The rising incidence of stroke, congestive heart failure (CHF) and end stage renal disease (ESRD) has signalled a need to increase awareness, treatment and control of hypertension. There continues to be a need for effective antihypertensive medications since hypertension is a major precursor to various forms of cardiovascular disease. The renin-angiotensin (AT) aldosterone system (RAAS) is a key component to the development of hypertension and can be one target of drug therapy. Angotensin II (ATII) receptor blockers (ARBs) are the most recent class of agents available to treat hypertension, which work by by inhibiting ATII at the receptor level. Currently, national consensus guidelines recommend that ARBs should be reserved for hypertensive patients who cannot tolerate angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (ACEIs). ARBs, however, are moving to the forefront of therapy with a promising role in the area of renoprotection and CHF. Recent trials such as the The Renoprotective Effect of the Angiotensin-Receptor Antagonist Irbesartan in Patients with Nephropathy Due to Type 2 Diabetes Trial (IDNT), the Effect of Irbesartan on the Development of Diabetic Nephropathy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes (IRMA2), and The Effects of Losartan on Renal and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Nephropathy (RENAAL) study have demonstrated the renoprotective effects of ARBs in patients with Type 2 diabetes. The Valsartan Heart Failure Trial (Val-HeFT) adds to the growing body of evidence that ARBs may improve morbidity and mortality in CHF patients. As a class, ARBs are well tolerated and have a lower incidence of cough and angioedema compared to ACEIs. This article reviews the differences among the ARBs, existing efficacy data in hypertension, and explores the role of ARBs in CHF and renal disease.

  14. Role of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/C-C chemokine receptor 2 signaling pathway in transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ablation-induced renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingjun; Xu, Hui; Cui, Lin; Liu, Weihong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Shen, Si; Wang, Donna H

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies indicate that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel may act as a potential regulator of monocyte/macrophage recruitment to reduce renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension. This study tests the hypothesis that deletion of TRPV1 exaggerates salt-sensitive hypertension-induced renal injury due to enhanced inflammatory responses via monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-dependent pathways. Wild type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1−/−) mice were subjected to uninephrectomy and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment for four weeks with or without the selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393. DOCA-salt treatment increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) to the same degree in both strains, but increased urinary excretion of albumin and 8-isoprostane and decreased creatinine clearance with greater magnitude in TRPV1−/− mice compared to WT mice. DOCA-salt treatment also caused renal glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial injury, collagen deposition, monocyte/macrophage infiltration, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and NF-κB activation in greater degree in TRPV1−/− mice compared to WT mice. Blockade of the CCR2 with RS504393 (4 mg/kg/day) had no effect on SBP in DOCA-salt-treated WT or TRPV1−/− mice compared to their respective controls. However, treatment with RS504393 ameliorated renal dysfunction and morphological damage, and prevented the increase in monocyte/macrophage infiltration, cytokine/chemokine production, and NF-κB activity in both DOCA-salt hypertensive strains with a greater effect in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1−/− mice compared to DOCA-salt-treated WT mice. No differences in CCR2 protein expression in kidney were found between DOCA-salt-treated WT and TRPV1−/− mice with or without RS504393 treatment. Our studies for the first time indicate that deletion of TRPV1 aggravated renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension via

  15. Complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) is a potent inhibitor of B-cell functions in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Kremlitzka, Mariann; Polgár, Anna; Fülöp, Lívia; Kiss, Emese; Poór, Gyula; Erdei, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of B cells, complement activation and subsequent immune complex deposition has all been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although the reduced expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) on the B cells of RA patients has been known for a long time, their exact role in B-cell tolerance and autoimmunity is not yet fully understood. To get a deeper insight into the possible mechanisms, we studied the expression and function of CR1 and CR2 on various subsets of B cells of healthy donors and RA patients at various stages of the disease by FACS analysis, (3)H-thymidine incorporation and ELISA. We found that CD19(+)CD27(-) naive B cells up-regulate the expression of the inhibitory CR1 during differentiation to CD19(+)CD27(+) memory B cells both in healthy donors and in RA patients, whereas the expression of the activatory CR2 is down-regulated. This clearly demonstrates that the expression of these two antagonistic complement receptors is regulated differentially during the development of human B cells, a phenomenon which may influence the maintenance of peripheral B-cell tolerance. Our functional studies show that after clustering CR1 both by its natural ligand and To5 mAb, the inhibitory function of CD35 is maintained in RA patients, despite its significantly reduced expression compared with healthy individuals. Besides blocking B-cell receptor-induced proliferation, CR1 inhibits the differentiation of B cells to plasmablasts and their immunoglobulin production. Since the reduced expression of CR1 in RA patients does not affect its inhibitory function, this receptor might serve as a new target for therapeutical interventions. PMID:22962438

  16. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Yun, Young-Jin; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Min-Soo; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor microenvironments polarize neutrophils to protumoral phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) antagonist attenuate tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils toward an antitumoral phenotype. The ACEis or AGTR1 antagonist enhanced hypersegmentation of human neutrophils and increased neutrophil cytotoxicity against tumor cells. This neutrophil hypersegmentation was dependent on the mTOR pathway. In a murine tumor model, ACEis and AGTR1 antagonist attenuated tumor growth and enhanced neutrophil hypersegmentation. ACEis inhibited tumor-induced polarization of neutrophils to a protumoral phenotype. Neutrophil depletion reduced the antitumor effect of ACEi. Together, these data suggest that the modulation of Ang II pathway attenuates tumor growth via polarization of neutrophils to an antitumoral phenotype. PMID:26942086

  17. CRF receptor type 1 (but not type 2) located within the amygdala plays a role in the modulation of anxiety in mice exposed to the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Ana Cláudia; Gomes, Karina Santos; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2016-05-01

    The amygdala (Amy) is an important center that processes threatening stimuli. Among the neurotransmitters implicated in the control of emotional states, the corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) is an important modulator, acting at CRF1 and CRF2 receptors. Few studies have investigated the role of CRF and its receptors in the Amy on anxiety in mice. Here, we investigated the effects of intra-Amy (aimed at the basolateral nucleus) injections of CRF (37.5 and 75pmol/0.1μl), urocortin 3 (UCn3, a selective CRF2 agonist; 4, 8, 16 or 24pmol/0.1μl), CP376395 (a selective CRF1 antagonist; 0.375, 0.75 or 1.5nmol/0.1μl), antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30, a selective CRF2 antagonist; 1 or 3nmol/0.1μl) on the behavior of mice exposed to the elevated plus maze (EPM). Both spatiotemporal (e.g., percentage of open-arm entries and percentage of open-arm time; %OE and %OT) and complementary [e.g., frequency of protected and unprotected stretched attend postures (pSAP and uSAP) and head dips (pHD and uHD); frequency and time spent on open arm end exploration (OAEE)] measures were recorded during a 5-min test in the EPM. While intra-Amy injections of CRF decreased %OE, %OT and OAEE, suggesting an anxiogenic-like action, UCn3 (all doses) did not change any behavior. In contrast, injections of CP376395 (0.75nmol) produced an anxiolytic-like effect, by increasing %OT and OAEE and decreasing pSAP and pHD. Neither spatiotemporal nor complementary measures were changed by intra-Amy ASV-30. These results suggest that CRF plays a marked anxiogenic role at CRF1 receptors in the amygdala of mice exposed to the EPM.

  18. The types II and III transforming growth factor-beta receptors form homo-oligomers

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Affinity-labeling experiments have detected hetero-oligomers of the types I, II, and III transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) receptors which mediate intracellular signaling by TGF-beta, but the oligomeric state of the individual receptor types remains unknown. Here we use two types of experiments to show that a major portion of the receptor types II and III forms homo-oligomers both in the absence and presence of TGF-beta. Both experiments used COS-7 cells co-transfected with combinations of these receptors carrying different epitope tags at their extracellular termini. In immunoprecipitation experiments, radiolabeled TGF-beta was bound and cross-linked to cells co-expressing two differently tagged type II receptors. Sequential immunoprecipitations using anti-epitope monoclonal antibodies showed that type II TGF-beta receptors form homo-oligomers. In cells co- expressing epitope-tagged types II and III receptors, a low level of co- precipitation of the ligand-labeled receptors was observed, indicating that some hetero-oligomers of the types II and III receptors exist in the presence of ligand. Antibody-mediated cross-linking studies based on double-labeling immunofluorescence explored co-patching of the receptors at the cell surface on live cells. In cells co-expressing two differently tagged type II receptors or two differently tagged type III receptors, forcing one receptor into micropatches by IgG induced co- patching of the receptor carrying the other tag, labeled by noncross- linking monovalent Fab'. These studies showed that homo-oligomers of the types II and III receptors exist on the cell surface in the absence or presence of TGF-beta 1 or -beta 2. In cells co-expressing types II and III receptors, the amount of heterocomplexes at the cell surface was too low to be detected in the immunofluorescence co-patching experiments, confirming that hetero-oligomers of the types II and III receptors are minor and probably transient species. PMID:8027173

  19. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown on testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-I), the second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II; His5, Trp7, Tyr8) is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin secretion. In addition, GnRH-II is ubiquitously expressed, with transcript levels highest in tissues outside of the brain. A receptor speci...

  20. Divergent effects of corticotropin releasing hormone on endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase are associated with different expression of CRH type 1 and 2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cantarella, Giuseppina; Lempereur, Laurence; Lombardo, Gabriella; Chiarenza, Andrea; Pafumi, Carlo; Zappalà, Giovanna; Bernardini, Renato

    2001-01-01

    Endothelium is a target for an array of factors involved in inflammation. Endothelial cells express receptors for CRH, a neuropeptide produced during inflammation. We report both the concentration-dependent inhibitory effect of CRH upon cytokine-stimulated nitrite release by H5V murine endothelioma cells, and its stimulatory one in HUVEC cells.Western blot analysis showed that CRH inhibits cytokine-stimulated iNOS protein in H5V cells, and, instead, potentiated it in HUVEC cells.H5V cells expressed both CRH receptors (CRH-R1 and R2) mRNAs, whereas HUVEC cells expressed the CRH-R2 mRNA solely.CRH increased medium nitrites and iNOS protein expression in H5V cells pretreated with the selective CRH-R1 antagonist CP 154,526. However, the selective CRH-R2 antagonist anti-Svg-30 failed to produce similar effects. In fact, anti-Svg-30 inhibited CRH-induced increase of nitrite release and iNOS expression in HUVEC cells.Our results confirm the activating role of CRH on endothelial cells, although it suggests its possible inhibitory role in the late phase of the inflammatory response. NO-mediated effects of CRH on endothelial cells could be exploited in therapeutic strategies related to inflammatory and/or degenerative diseases. PMID:11606324

  1. Positron emission tomographic imaging of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor system with [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528): improvements in image quantification using wild-type and knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Herance, Raúl; Rojas, Santiago; Abad, Sergio; Jiménez, Xavier; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Millán, Olga; Martín-García, Elena; Burokas, Aurelijus; Serra, Miquel Àngel; Maldonado, Rafael; Pareto, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assessed the feasibility of using positron emission tomography (PET) and the tracer [¹¹C]OMAR ([¹¹C]JHU75528), an analogue of rimonabant, to study the brain cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor system. Wild-type (WT) and CB1 knockout (KO) animals were imaged at baseline and after pretreatment with blocking doses of rimonabant. Brain uptake in WT animals was higher (50%) than in KO animals in baseline conditions. After pretreatment with rimonabant, WT uptake lowered to the level of KO animals. The results of this study support the feasibility of using PET with the radiotracer [¹¹C]JHU75528 to image the brain CB1 receptor system in mice. In addition, this methodology can be used to assess the effect of new drugs in preclinical studies using genetically manipulated animals.

  2. DFG-out Mode of Inhibition by an Irreversible Type-1 Inhibitor Capable of Overcoming Gate-Keeper Mutations in FGF Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistance acquisition through kinase gate-keeper mutations is a major hurdle in the clinic. Here, we determined the first crystal structures of the human FGFR4 kinase domain (FGFR4K) alone and complexed with ponatinib, a promiscuous type-2 (DFG-out) kinase inhibitor, and an oncogenic FGFR4K harboring the V550L gate-keeper mutation bound to FIIN-2, a new type-1 irreversible inhibitor. Remarkably, like ponatinib, FIIN-2 also binds in the DFG-out mode despite lacking a functional group necessary to occupy the pocket vacated upon the DFG-out flip. Structural analysis reveals that the covalent bond between FIIN-2 and a cysteine, uniquely present in the glycine-rich loop of FGFR kinases, facilitates the DFG-out conformation, which together with the internal flexibility of FIIN-2 enables FIIN-2 to avoid the steric clash with the gate-keeper mutation that causes the ponatinib resistance. The structural data provide a blueprint for the development of next generation anticancer inhibitors through combining the salient inhibitory mechanisms of ponatinib and FIIN-2. PMID:25317566

  3. Crystal Structure of Dengue Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and its Implication for Receptor Binding, Membrane Fusion and Antibody Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, V.; Dessau, M; Kucera, K; Anthony, K; Ledizet, M; Modis, Y

    2009-01-01

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the pH sensor that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  4. The neuromedin B receptor antagonist, BIM-23127, is a potent antagonist at human and rat urotensin-II receptors.

    PubMed

    Herold, Christopher L; Behm, David J; Buckley, Peter T; Foley, James J; Wixted, William E; Sarau, Henry M; Douglas, Stephen A

    2003-05-01

    The functional activity of the peptidic neuromedin B receptor antagonist BIM-23127 was investigated at recombinant and native urotensin-II receptors (UT receptors). Human urotensin-II (hU-II) promoted intracellular calcium mobilization in HEK293 cells expressing the human UT (hUT) or rat UT (rUT) receptors with pEC(50) values of 9.80+/-0.34 (n=6) and 9.06+/-0.32 (n=4), respectively. While BIM-23127 alone had no effect on calcium responses in either cell line, it was a potent and competitive antagonist at both hUT (pA(2)=7.54+/-0.14; n=3) and rUT (pA(2)=7.70+/-0.05; n=3) receptors. Furthermore, BIM-23127 reversed hU-II-induced contractile tone in the rat-isolated aorta with a pIC(50) of 6.66+/-0.04 (n=4). In conclusion, BIM- 23127 is the first hUT receptor antagonist identified to date and should not be considered as a selective neuromedin B receptor antagonist. PMID:12770925

  5. Differential regulation of the InsP₃ receptor type-1 and -2 single channel properties by InsP₃, Ca²⁺ and ATP.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Larry E; Yule, David I

    2012-07-15

    An elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels as a result of InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) activity represents a ubiquitous signalling pathway controlling a wide variety of cellular events. InsP3R activity is tightly controlled by the levels of the primary ligands, InsP3, Ca2+ and ATP. Importantly, InsP3Rs are regulated by Ca2+ i in a biphasic manner. Ca2+ release through all InsP3R family members is also modulated dramatically by ATP, albeit with sub-type-specific properties. To ascertain if a common mechanism can account for ATP and Ca2+ regulation of these InsP3R family members, we examined the effects of [ATP] on the Ca2+ dependency of rat InsP3R-1 (rInsP3R-1) and mouse InsP3R-2 (mInsP3R-2) activity expressed in DT40-3KO cells. We used the on-nucleus patch clamp recording technique with various [ATP], [InsP3] and [Ca2+] in the patch pipette and measured single InsP3R channel activity in stably transfected DT40 cells. Under identical conditions, at saturating [InsP3] and [ATP], the activity of rInsP3R-1 and mInsP3R-2 was essentially identical in terms of single channel conductance, maximal achievable open probability (Po) and the [Ca2+] required for activation and inhibition of activity. However, in contrast to rInsP3R-1 at saturating [InsP3], the activity of mInsP3R-2 was unaffected by [ATP]. At lower [InsP3], ATP had dramatic effects on mInsP3R-2 Po, but unlike the rInsP3R-1, this did not occur by altering the relative Ca2+ dependency, but by simply increasing the maximally achievable Po at a particular [InsP3] and [Ca2+]. [InsP3] did not alter the biphasic regulation of activity by Ca2+ in either rInsP3R-1 or mInsP3R-2. Analysis of the single channel kinetics indicated that Ca2+ and ATP modulate the Po predominately by facilitating extended bursting activity of the channel but the underlying biophysical mechanism appears to be distinct for each receptor. Subtype-specific regulation of InsP3R channel activity probably contributes to the fidelity of Ca2+ signalling in

  6. Anti-tumor activity of arjunolic acid against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro through blocking TGF-β type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M H

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate therapeutic potential of arjunolic acid (AA), in Terminalia Arjuna bark, on Ehrlich Ascites carcinoma (EAC) in-vivo and in-vitro. EAC was induced in fifty female Swiss albino mice. Two doses of AA was used 100 and 250mg/kg. Arjunulic acid reduced tumor volume and cells count. AA decreased EAC cells viability and increased cell toxicity. Moreover, AA reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, TGF-β, TGF-β type I receptor and latency-associated peptide levels associated with elevated IL-10 in-vivo and in-vitro. In conclusion, AA produced antitumor activity against EAC by increasing cytotoxicity and apoptosis and partially blocking the TGF-βR1 and affecting inflammatory cytokine levels. PMID:27470335

  7. Substance P-induced vasodilatation is mediated by the neurokinin type 1 receptor but does not contribute to basal vascular tone in man

    PubMed Central

    Newby, David E; Sciberras, David G; Ferro, Charles J; Gertz, Barry J; Sommerville, David; Majumdar, Anup; Lowry, Richard C; Webb, David J

    1999-01-01

    Aims Following intravenous administration of its prodrug, L-758,298, we assessed the pharmacodynamics of L-754,030, a novel and highly selective NK1 receptor antagonist, by examining systemic haemodynamics and the blood flow responses to intra-arterial substance P infusion. Methods Sixteen healthy male volunteers participated in a double-blind, randomised, placebo controlled crossover trial of L-758 298. Forearm blood flow was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography during intrabrachial substance P infusion (0.125–128 pmol min−1). In part 1, eight subjects received substance P infusions before and during placebo, 0.25 mg, 1 mg or 5 mg of L-758 298. In part 2, eight subjects received substance P infusions 24 h after placebo or 1.43 mg of L-758 298. Results L-758 298 caused dose dependent inhibition of substance P induced vasodilatation (P < 0.001). Placebo adjusted differences (95% CI) in baseline forearm blood flow, mean arterial pressure and heart rate showed no relevant changes with 5 mg of L-758 298 (>1400–fold shift in substance P response): 0.00 (−0.49 to +0.49) ml 100 ml−1 min−1, 1.0 (−3.2 to +5.2) mmHg and 1.9 (−5.9 to +9.7) beats min−1, respectively. Twenty-four hours after 1.43 mg of L-758,298, there was ~34–fold shift in response to substance P induced vasodilatation (P < 0.008) at plasma L-754 030 concentrations of 2–3 ng ml−1. L-758 298 was generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. Conclusions Substance P induced forearm vasodilatation is mediated by the endothelial cell NK1 receptor in man but endogenous substance P does not appear to contribute to the maintenance of peripheral vascular tone or systemic blood pressure. PMID:10510144

  8. Inclusion of Strep-Tag II in design of antigen receptors for T cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingfeng; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Cabanov, Alexandra; Kosasih, Paula; Hill, Tyler; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-01-01

    The tactical introduction of Strep-tag II into synthetic antigen receptors provides engineered T cells with a marker for identification and rapid purification, and a functional element for selective antibody coated microbead-driven large-scale expansion. Such receptor designs can be applied to chimeric antigen receptors of different ligand specificities and costimulatory domains, and to T cell receptors to facilitate cGMP manufacturing of adoptive T cell therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. PMID:26900664

  9. Rab GTPases bind at a common site within the angiotensin II type I receptor carboxyl-terminal tail: evidence that Rab4 regulates receptor phosphorylation, desensitization, and resensitization.

    PubMed

    Esseltine, Jessica L; Dale, Lianne B; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2011-01-01

    The human angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT₁R) is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily and represents an important target for cardiovascular therapeutic intervention. Agonist-activation of the AT₁R induces β-arrestin-dependent endocytosis to early endosomes in which the receptor resides as a protein complex with the Rab GTPase Rab5. In the present study, we examined whether other Rab GTPases that regulate receptor trafficking through endosomal compartments also bind to the AT₁R. We find that Rab4, Rab7, and Rab11 all bind to the last 10 amino acid residues of the AT₁R carboxyl-terminal tail. Rab11 binds AT₁R more effectively than Rab5, whereas Rab4 binds less effectively than Rab5. Alanine scanning mutagenesis reveals that proline 354 and cysteine 355 contribute to Rab protein binding, and mutation of these residues does not affect G protein coupling. We find that the Rab GTPases each compete with one another for receptor binding and that although Rab4 interacts poorly with the AT₁R, it effectively displaces Rab11 from the receptor. In contrast, Rab11 overexpression does not prevent Rab4 binding to the AT₁R. Overexpression of wild-type Rab4, but not Rab11, facilitates AT₁R dephosphorylation, and a constitutively active Rab4-Q67L mutant reduces AT₁R desensitization and promotes AT₁R resensitization. Taken together, our data indicate that multiple Rab GTPases bind to a motif localized to the distal end of the AT₁R tail and that increased Rab4 activity may contribute to the regulation AT₁R desensitization and dephosphorylation.

  10. Selective knockdown of AT1 receptors by RNA interference inhibits Val5-ANG II endocytosis and NHE-3 expression in immortalized rabbit proximal tubule cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao C.; Zhuo, Jia L.

    2008-01-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis of extracellular ANG II has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of proximal tubule cell (PTC) function. Using immortalized rabbit PTCs as an in vitro cell culture model, we tested the hypothesis that extracellular ANG II is taken up by PTCs through angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1; or AT1a) receptor-mediated endocytosis and that inhibition of ANG II endocytosis using a selective AT1 receptor small-interfering RNA (siRNA; AT1R siRNA) or endocytotic inhibitors exerts a physiological effect on total and apical sodium and hydrogen exchanger isoform 3 (NHE-3) protein abundance. Western blots and live cell imaging with FITC-labeled ANG II confirmed that transfection of PTCs with a human specific AT1R siRNA for 48 h selectively knocked down AT1 receptor protein by 76 ± 5% (P < 0.01), whereas transfection with a scrambled siRNA had little effect. In nontransfected PTCs, exposure to extracellular ANG II (1 nM) for 60 min at 37°C increased intracellular ANG II accumulation by 67% (control: 566 ± 55 vs. ANG II: 943 ± 160 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05) and induced mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation (163 ± 15% of control, P < 0.01). AT1R siRNA reduced ANG II endocytosis to a level similar to losartan, which blocks cell surface AT1 receptors (557 ± 37 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05 vs. ANG II), or to colchicine, which disrupts cytoskeleton microtubules (613 ± 12 pg/mg protein, P < 0.05 vs. ANG II). AT1R siRNA, losartan, and colchicine all attenuated ANG II-induced ERK1/2 activation and total cell lysate and apical membrane NHE-3 abundance. The scrambled siRNA had no effect on ANG II endocytosis, ERK1/2 activation, or NHE-3 expression. These results suggest that AT1 receptor-mediated endocytosis of extracellular ANG II may regulate proximal tubule sodium transport by increasing total and apical NHE-3 proteins. PMID:17428839

  11. Blockade of Urotensin II Receptor Prevents Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ae; Lee, Dong Gil; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoactive peptide and mitogenic agent to induce proliferation of various cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we examined the effects of a novel UII receptor (UT) antagonist, KR-36676, on vasoconstriction of aorta and proliferation of aortic SMCs. In rat aorta, UII-induced vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In primary human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs), UII-induced cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, KR-36676 decreased UII-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and UII-induced cell proliferation was also significantly inhibited by a known ERK inhibitor U0126. In mouse carotid ligation model, intimal thickening of carotid artery was dramatically suppressed by oral treatment with KR-36676 (30 mg/ kg/day) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated group. From these results, it is indicated that KR-36676 suppress UII-induced proliferation of VSMCs at least partially through inhibition of ERK activation, and that it also attenuates UII-induced vasoconstriction and vascular neointima formation. Our study suggest that KR-36676 may be an attractive candidate for the pharmacological management of vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582556

  12. Blockade of Urotensin II Receptor Prevents Vascular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ae; Lee, Dong Gil; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2016-09-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoactive peptide and mitogenic agent to induce proliferation of various cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we examined the effects of a novel UII receptor (UT) antagonist, KR-36676, on vasoconstriction of aorta and proliferation of aortic SMCs. In rat aorta, UII-induced vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In primary human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs), UII-induced cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, KR-36676 decreased UII-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and UII-induced cell proliferation was also significantly inhibited by a known ERK inhibitor U0126. In mouse carotid ligation model, intimal thickening of carotid artery was dramatically suppressed by oral treatment with KR-36676 (30 mg/ kg/day) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated group. From these results, it is indicated that KR-36676 suppress UII-induced proliferation of VSMCs at least partially through inhibition of ERK activation, and that it also attenuates UII-induced vasoconstriction and vascular neointima formation. Our study suggest that KR-36676 may be an attractive candidate for the pharmacological management of vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582556

  13. Comparing Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers on Benefits Beyond Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is one of the main regulators of blood pressure, renal hemodynamics, and volume homeostasis in normal physiology, and contributes to the development of renal and cardiovascular (CV) diseases. Therefore, pharmacologic blockade of RAAS constitutes an attractive strategy in preventing the progression of renal and CV diseases. This concept has been supported by clinical trials involving patients with hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and heart failure, and those after myocardial infarction. The use of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in clinical practice has increased over the last decade. Since their introduction in 1995, seven ARBs have been made available, with approved indications for hypertension and some with additional indications beyond blood pressure reduction. Considering that ARBs share a similar mechanism of action and exhibit similar tolerability profiles, it is assumed that a class effect exists and that they can be used interchangeably. However, pharmacologic and dosing differences exist among the various ARBs, and these differences can potentially influence their individual effectiveness. Understanding these differences has important implications when choosing an ARB for any particular condition in an individual patient, such as heart failure, stroke, and CV risk reduction (prevention of myocardial infarction). A review of the literature for existing randomized controlled trials across various ARBs clearly indicates differences within this class of agents. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of ARBs in the prevention and reduction of CV rates of morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients. PMID:20524096

  14. Functional Role of Residues Corresponding to Helical Domain II (Amino Acids 35 to 46) of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satya P.; Tomkowicz, Brian; Lai, Derhsing; Cartas, Maria; Mahalingam, Sundarasamy; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.; Murali, Ramachandran; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy

    2000-01-01

    Vpr, encoded by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome, contains 96 amino acids and is a multifunctional protein with features which include cell cycle arrest at G2, nuclear localization, participation in transport of the preintegration complex, cation channel activity, oligomerization, and interaction with cellular proteins, in addition to its incorporation into the virus particles. Recently, structural studies based on nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Vpr contains a helix (HI)-turn-helix (HII) core at the amino terminus and an amphipathic helix (HIII) in the middle region. Though the importance of helical domains HI and HIII has been defined with respect to Vpr functions, the role of helical domain HII is not known. To address this issue, we constructed a series of mutants in which the HII domain was altered by deletion, insertion, and/or substitution mutagenesis. To enable the detection of Vpr, the sequence corresponding to the Flag epitope (DYKDDDDK) was added, in frame, to the Vpr coding sequences. Mutants, expressed through the in vitro transcription/translation system and in cells, showed an altered migration corresponding to deletions in Vpr. Substitution mutational analysis of residues in HII showed reduced stability for VprW38S-FL, VprL42G-FL, and VprH45W-FL. An assay involving cotransfection of NLΔVpr proviral DNA and a Vpr expression plasmid was employed to analyze the virion incorporation property of Vpr. Mutant Vpr containing deletions and specific substitutions (VprW38S-FL, VprL39G-FL, VprL42G-FL, VprG43P-FL, and VprI46G-FL) exhibited a negative virion incorporation phenotype. Further, mutant Vpr-FL containing deletions also failed to associate with wild-type Vpr, indicating a possible defect in the oligomerization feature of Vpr. Subcellular localization studies indicated that mutants VprΔ35-50-H-FL, VprR36W-FL, VprL39G-FL, and VprI46G-FL exhibited both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization, unlike

  15. Functional role of residues corresponding to helical domain II (amino acids 35 to 46) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr.

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Tomkowicz, B; Lai, D; Cartas, M; Mahalingam, S; Kalyanaraman, V S; Murali, R; Srinivasan, A

    2000-11-01

    Vpr, encoded by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genome, contains 96 amino acids and is a multifunctional protein with features which include cell cycle arrest at G(2), nuclear localization, participation in transport of the preintegration complex, cation channel activity, oligomerization, and interaction with cellular proteins, in addition to its incorporation into the virus particles. Recently, structural studies based on nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Vpr contains a helix (HI)-turn-helix (HII) core at the amino terminus and an amphipathic helix (HIII) in the middle region. Though the importance of helical domains HI and HIII has been defined with respect to Vpr functions, the role of helical domain HII is not known. To address this issue, we constructed a series of mutants in which the HII domain was altered by deletion, insertion, and/or substitution mutagenesis. To enable the detection of Vpr, the sequence corresponding to the Flag epitope (DYKDDDDK) was added, in frame, to the Vpr coding sequences. Mutants, expressed through the in vitro transcription/translation system and in cells, showed an altered migration corresponding to deletions in Vpr. Substitution mutational analysis of residues in HII showed reduced stability for VprW38S-FL, VprL42G-FL, and VprH45W-FL. An assay involving cotransfection of NLDeltaVpr proviral DNA and a Vpr expression plasmid was employed to analyze the virion incorporation property of Vpr. Mutant Vpr containing deletions and specific substitutions (VprW38S-FL, VprL39G-FL, VprL42G-FL, VprG43P-FL, and VprI46G-FL) exhibited a negative virion incorporation phenotype. Further, mutant Vpr-FL containing deletions also failed to associate with wild-type Vpr, indicating a possible defect in the oligomerization feature of Vpr. Subcellular localization studies indicated that mutants VprDelta35-50-H-FL, VprR36W-FL, VprL39G-FL, and VprI46G-FL exhibited both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization

  16. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene (CART1) expression through CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) in chicken anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Mo, Chunheng; Cai, Guoqing; Huang, Long; Deng, Qiuyang; Lin, Dongliang; Cui, Lin; Wang, Yajun; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide(s) is generally viewed as neuropeptide(s) and can control food intake in vertebrates, however, our recent study revealed that CART1 peptide is predominantly expressed in chicken anterior pituitary, suggesting that cCART1 peptide is a novel pituitary hormone in chickens and its expression is likely controlled by hypothalamic factor(s). To test this hypothesis, in this study, we examined the spatial expression of CART1 in chicken anterior pituitary and investigated the effect of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on pituitary cCART1 expression. The results showed that: 1) CART1 is expressed in both caudal and cephalic lobes of chicken anterior pituitary, revealed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blot and immuno-histochemical staining; 2) CRH potently stimulates cCART1 mRNA expression in cultured chick pituitary cells, as examined by qPCR, and this effect is blocked by CP154526 (and not K41498), an antagonist specific for chicken CRH type I receptor (cCRHR1), suggesting that cCRHR1 expressed on corticotrophs mediates this action; 3) the stimulatory effect of CRH on pituitary cCART1 expression is inhibited by pharmacological drugs targeting the intracellular AC/cAMP/PKA, PLC/IP3/Ca(2+), and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. This finding, together with the functional coupling of these signaling pathways to cCRHR1 expressed in CHO cells demonstrated by luciferase reporter assay systems, indicates that these intracellular signaling pathways coupled to cCRHR1 can mediate CRH action. Collectively, our present study offers the first substantial evidence that hypothalamic CRH can stimulate pituitary CART1 expression via activation of CRHR1 in a vertebrate species.

  17. Phospholipase D2 Localizes to the Plasma Membrane and Regulates Angiotensin II Receptor Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guangwei; Huang, Ping; Liang, Bruce T.; Frohman, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a key facilitator of multiple types of membrane vesicle trafficking events. Two PLD isoforms, PLD1 and PLD2, exist in mammals. Initial studies based on overexpression studies suggested that in resting cells, human PLD1 localized primarily to the Golgi and perinuclear vesicles in multiple cell types. In contrast, overexpressed mouse PLD2 was observed to localize primarily to the plasma membrane, although internalization on membrane vesicles was observed subsequent to serum stimulation. A recent report has suggested that the assignment of PLD2 to the plasma membrane is in error, because the endogenous isoform in rat secretory cells was imaged and found to be present primarily in the Golgi apparatus. We have reexamined this issue by using a monoclonal antibody specific for mouse PLD2, and find, as reported initially using overexpression studies, that endogenous mouse PLD2 is detected most readily at the plasma membrane in multiple cell types. In addition, we report that mouse, rat, and human PLD2 when overexpressed all similarly localize to the plasma membrane in cell lines from all three species. Finally, studies conducted using overexpression of wild-type active or dominant-negative isoforms of PLD2 and RNA interference-mediated targeting of PLD2 suggest that PLD2 functions at the plasma membrane to facilitate endocytosis of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. PMID:14718562

  18. Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein interacts with the type II interleukin-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, D; Lundkvist, J; Layé, S; Bartfai, T

    1998-06-16

    Stably transfected HEK-293 cells express on their surface the murine type II IL-1 receptor (mIL-1RII) as demonstrated by FACS analysis using the mAb 4E2, however binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to these cells is nearly absent. Saturable high affinity binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta is observed when the murine IL-1 receptor accessory protein (mIL-1RAcP) is coexpressed with mIL-1RII. Binding of [125I]-hrIL-1beta to mIL-1RII-mIL-1RAcP complex can be inhibited either with antibodies to mIL-1RII (mAb 4E2), or by antibodies to mIL-1RAcP (mAb 4C5). The number of high affinity binding sites in cells stably transfected with the cDNA for mIL-1RII is dependent on the dose of cDNA for mIL-1RAcP used to transfect the cells. The high affinity complex between mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP is not preformed by interaction between the intracellular domains of these two transmembrane proteins, rather it appears to require the extracellular portions of mIL-1RII and mIL-1RAcP and the presence of a ligand. We suggest that in addition to its earlier described decoy receptor role, IL-1RII may modulate the responsiveness of cells to IL-1 by binding the IL-1RAcP in unproductive/non-signalling complexes and thus reducing the number of signalling IL-1RI-IL-1RAcP-agonist complexes when IL-1 is bound.

  19. Loss of inhibition by brain natriuretic peptide over P2X3 receptors contributes to enhanced spike firing of trigeminal ganglion neurons in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    PubMed

    Marchenkova, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) play an important role in pain pathologies, including migraine. In trigeminal neurons, P2X3Rs are constitutively downregulated by endogenous brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). In a mouse knock-in (KI) model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 with upregulated calcium CaV2.1 channel function, trigeminal neurons exhibit hyperexcitability with gain-of-function of P2X3Rs and their deficient BNP-mediated inhibition. We studied whether the absent BNP-induced control over P2X3Rs activity in KI cultures may be functionally expressed in altered firing activity of KI trigeminal neurons. Patch-clamp experiments investigated the excitability of wild-type and KI trigeminal neurons induced by either current or agonists for P2X3Rs or transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors. Consistent with the constitutive inhibition of P2X3Rs by BNP, sustained pharmacological block of BNP receptors selectively enhanced P2X3R-mediated excitability of wild-type neurons without affecting firing evoked by the other protocols. This effect included increased number of action potentials, lower spike threshold and shift of the firing pattern distribution toward higher spiking activity. Thus, inactivation of BNP signaling transformed the wild-type excitability phenotype into the one typical for KI. BNP receptor block did not influence excitability of KI neurons in accordance with the lack of BNP-induced P2X3R modulation. Our study suggests that, in wild-type trigeminal neurons, negative control over P2X3Rs by the BNP pathway is translated into tonic suppression of P2X3Rs-mediated excitability. Lack of this inhibition in KI cultures results in a hyperexcitability phenotype and might contribute to facilitated trigeminal pain transduction relevant for migraine. PMID:27346147

  20. Identical de novo Mutation in the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Gene Associated with Fatal, Stress-induced Malignant Hyperthermia in Two Unrelated Families

    PubMed Central

    Groom, Linda; Muldoon, Sheila M.; Tang, Zhen Zhi; Brandom, Barbara W.; Bayarsaikhan, Munkhuu; Bina, Saiid; Lee, Hee-Suk; Qiu, X; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Dirksen, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mutations in the type I ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) result in malignant hyperthermia, a pharmacogenetic disorder typically triggered by administration of anesthetics. However, cases of sudden death during exertion, heat challenge, and febrile illness in the absence of triggering drugs have been reported. The underlying causes of such drug-free fatal “awake” episodes are unknown. METHODS De novo R3983C variant in RYR1 was identified in two unrelated children that experienced fatal, nonanesthetic awake episodes associated with febrile illness and heat stress. One of the children also possessed a second novel maternally-inherited D4505H variant located on a separate haplotype. Effects of all possible heterotypic expression conditions on RYR1 sensitivity to caffeine-induced Ca2+ release were determined in expressing RyR1-null myotubes. RESULTS Compared to wild-type RYR1 alone (EC50 = 2.85 ± 0.49 mM), average (±SEM) caffeine sensitivity of Ca2+ release was modestly increased following coexpression with either R3983C (EC50 = 2.00 ± 0.39 mM) or D4505H (EC50 = 1.64 ± 0.24 mM). Remarkably, coexpression of wild-type RYR1 with the double mutant in cis (R3983C-D4505H) produced a significantly stronger sensitization of caffeine-induced Ca2+ release (EC50 = 0.64 ± 0.17 mM) compared to that observed following coexpression of the two variants on separate subunits (EC50 = 1.53 ± 0.18 mM). CONCLUSIONS The R3983C mutation potentiates D4505H-mediated sensitization of caffeine-induced RYR1 Ca2+ release when the mutations are in cis (on the same subunit), but not when present on separate subunits. Nevertheless, coexpression of the two variants on separate subunits still resulted in a ~2-fold increase in caffeine sensitivity, consistent with the observed awake episodes and heat sensitivity. PMID:21918424

  1. Hippocampal type I and type II corticosteroid receptors are differentially regulated by chronic prazosin treatment.

    PubMed

    Kabbaj, M; Le Moal, M; Maccari, S

    1996-08-01

    Two types of hippocampal corticosteroid receptors play an important role in regulating the secretion of corticosterone: type I receptors are thought to regulate both the basal and stress induced release of corticosterone whereas type II receptors seem to be involved only in the stress response. Although these receptors are known to be regulated by circulating levels of corticosterone, there is also evidence for a direct neural control independent of hormonal influences. Furthermore, several studies suggest differential regulation of type I and type II corticosteroid receptors, with greater hormonal control of type II and greater neural control of type I. In order to investigate this theory of differential regulation of type I and type II corticosteroid receptors, we studied the effect of chronic treatment with either vehicle or the alpha 1 noradrenergic antagonist prazosin (0.5 mg/kg, i.p), on hippocampal corticosteroid receptors. Rats in one group had intact adrenal glands, whereas rats in a second group were adrenalectomized, their plasma corticosterone levels being maintained in the physiological range by implantation of corticosterone pellets. Thus, in the first group, the effects of drug-induced changes in both noradrenergic transmission and corticosterone secretion on corticosteroid receptors were investigated, whereas in the second group, the influence of altered noradrenergic transmission was effectively isolated. The results of this experiment show that, in comparison to the vehicle treatment, chronic treatment with the alpha 1 receptor antagonist prazosin decreased the number of type I corticosteroid receptors in adrenalectomized animals with corticosterone substitutive therapy. This effect on type I was not evident in adrenal-intact animals. In contrast, the prazosin treatment reduced the number of type II corticosteroid receptors in adrenal-intact animals, but not in adrenalectomized animals with corticosterone substitutive therapy. It has also been

  2. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  3. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Sheffler, Douglas J; Pinkerton, Anthony B; Dahl, Russell; Markou, Athina; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2011-08-17

    Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consist of the metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu(2)) and metabotropic glutamate 3 (mGlu(3)) receptor subtypes which modulate glutamate transmission by second messenger activation to negatively regulate the activity of adenylyl cyclase. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the perisynaptic extracellular region triggers mGlu(2) and mGlu(3) receptors to inhibit further release of glutamate. There is growing evidence that the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by small molecule modulators of Group II mGlu receptors has significant potential for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. This review provides an overview of recent progress on the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of positive and negative allosteric modulators of the Group II mGlu receptors. PMID:22860167

  4. Recent Progress in the Synthesis and Characterization of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors consist of the metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) and metabotropic glutamate 3 (mGlu3) receptor subtypes which modulate glutamate transmission by second messenger activation to negatively regulate the activity of adenylyl cyclase. Excessive accumulation of glutamate in the perisynaptic extracellular region triggers mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors to inhibit further release of glutamate. There is growing evidence that the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission by small molecule modulators of Group II mGlu receptors has significant potential for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. This review provides an overview of recent progress on the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of positive and negative allosteric modulators of the Group II mGlu receptors. PMID:22860167

  5. Heterogeneity of angiotensin II receptors in membranes of developing rat metanephros.

    PubMed

    Uva, B; Vallarino, M; Ghiani, P

    1985-10-01

    Specific and high affinity binding sites for angiotensin II were demonstrated in the membranes of the developing rat metanephros during the second half of pregnancy and in the newborn by binding studies with 125I angiotensin II. Only one type of angiotensin receptor was found during intrauterine life while after birth two classes of angiotensin receptors were present in the membranes of the cortical renal tissue.

  6. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  7. Angiotensin II receptor binding in the rat hypothalamus and circumventricular organs during dietary sodium deprivation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Mendelsohn, F A

    1989-10-01

    The effect of dietary sodium intake on angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor binding in the rat brain was studied using quantitative in vitro autoradiography. After 2 weeks of sodium deprivation, the peripheral angiotensin system was activated as shown by increased plasma renin activity (4-fold) and plasma aldosterone concentration (approximately 40-fold). At the same time, Ang II receptor binding in the adrenal glomerulosa zone increased by 40%. Frozen brain sections prepared from 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 control, 6 sodium-deprived) were incubated with 125I[Sar1, Ile8] Ang II, exposed to X-ray film, and Ang II receptor binding in individual brain nuclei was quantitated by computerized densitometry. Ang II binding in the area postrema was significantly suppressed in the sodium-deprived rats (60% of control; p less than 0.05). No change was observed in the other circumventricular organs studied, the subfornical organ or organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Ang II binding in the solitary tract nucleus was not affected by the dietary salt treatment. In the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, there was a small (9%) but significant (p less than 0.001) increase in Ang II receptor binding in the sodium-deprived group. However, no change was observed in the hypothalamic median preoptic or suprachiasmatic nuclei, areas with similarly high Ang II receptor binding. These results suggest that only a limited subset of brain Ang II receptors respond to sodium deprivation and do so in a region-specific manner. These results support evidence that the central angiotensin system may contribute to the regulation of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.

  8. Hippocampal type I and type II corticosteroid receptors are modulated by central noradrenergic systems.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Mormède, P; Piazza, P V; Simon, H; Angelucci, L; Le Moal, M

    1992-01-01

    The effects of corticosteroids on various brain functions, including the negative feedback control of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, are mediated by two types of receptors (type I, or mineralocorticoid, and type II, or glucocorticoid) in the central nervous system. Although receptor numbers are thought to be regulated by circulating levels of corticosterone, there may be a direct neural control of corticosteroid receptors. In the present experiments, we demonstrate that 6-OHDA lesioning of noradrenergic (NA) ascending pathways in the pedunculus cerebellaris superior (PCS) reduces corticosterone secretion in response to novelty and increases the number of hippocampal type I corticosteroid receptors in rats 24 hr after adrenalectomy. The same lesion in adrenalectomized animals in which corticosterone levels were maintained within normal limits by corticosterone replacement implants also led to an increase in the number of type I corticosterone receptors and a decrease in the apparent affinity (Kd) of type II receptors in the hippocampus. These results suggest that the NA system may regulate HPA axis activity via a direct control of the number of type I receptors and the apparent affinity of type II receptors in the hippocampus. The possibility that there is a neural control of corticosteroid receptors may throw light on mechanisms controlling HPA axis activity and may suggest other approaches to the treatment of dysregulation of the HPA axis observed during stress and in certain psychopathological conditions. PMID:1332096

  9. LY354740 is a potent and highly selective group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist in cells expressing human glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, D D; Johnson, B G; Wright, R A; Salhoff, C R; Mayne, N G; Wu, S; Cockerman, S L; Burnett, J P; Belegaje, R; Bleakman, D; Monn, J A

    1997-01-01

    The novel compound LY354740 is a conformationally constrained analog of glutamate, which was designed for interaction at metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. In this paper the selectivity of LY354740 for recombinant human mGlu receptor subtypes expressed in non-neuronal (RGT) cells is described. At human mGlu2 receptors, LY354740 produced > 90% suppression of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation with an EC50 of 5.1 +/- 0.3 nM. LY354740 was six-fold less potent in activating human mGlu3 receptors (EC50 = 24.3 +/- 0.5 nM). LY354740 inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation in human mGlu2 receptor-expressing cells was blocked by competitive mGlu receptor antagonists, including (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and LY307452 ((2S,4S)-2-amino-4-(4,4-diphenylbut-1-yl)-pentane-1,5-dioic acid). LY354740 had no agonist or antagonist activities at cells expressing human mGlu4 or mGlu7 (group III mGlu receptors) (EC50 > 100,000 nM). When tested at group I phosphoinositide-coupled human mGlu receptors (mGlu1a and mGlu5a), LY354740 did not activate or inhibit mGlu receptor agonist-evoked phosphoinositide hydrolysis at up to 100,000 nM. Electrophysiological experiments also demonstrated that LY354740 also had no appreciable activity in cells expressing human recombinant AMPA (GluR4) and kainate (GluR6) receptors. Thus, LY354740 is a highly potent, efficacious and selective group II (mGlu2/3) receptor agonist, useful to explore the functions of these receptors in situ. PMID:9144636

  10. The human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus type 1 p12I proteins bind the interleukin-2 receptor beta and gammac chains and affects their expression on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, J C; Crownley, R W; Fullen, J; Leonard, W J; Franchini, G

    1996-01-01

    p12I is a small hydrophobic protein encoded by the human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) that interacts with the 16-kDa component of the H+ vacuolar ATPase and cooperates with bovine papillomavirus 1 E5 oncoprotein in cell transformation. Just as an important step in E5 action appears to be its binding to the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, it was found that p12I binds specifically to both the beta and gamma(c) chains of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). The IL-2R beta and gamma(c) chains associated with p12I are endoglycosidase-H sensitive, suggesting that their interaction occurs in a pre-Golgi compartment. p12I stabilizes the immature forms of the IL-2R beta and gamma(c) chains and decreases their cell surface expression. The interactions of p12I with IL-2R beta and gamma(c) may have important implications in the immunosuppressive effect of HTLV-1 in vivo as well as in the ligand-independent HTLV-1-mediated T-cell proliferation. PMID:8648694

  11. Gamma Interferon (IFN-γ) Receptor Null-Mutant Mice Are More Susceptible to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection than IFN-γ Ligand Null-Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Edouard; Tanamachi, Becky; Openshaw, Harry; Mann, Jeff; Clarke, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Mouse strains with null mutations in the gamma interferon gene (Ifng) or the gamma interferon receptor gene (Ifngr) have been engineered. The use of these strains as animal models of viral and bacterial infections has enhanced our understanding of the role of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in the host immune response. However, direct comparisons between Ifng−/− (GKO) and Ifngr−/− (RGKO) mice have been problematic because previously available strains of these mice have had different genetic backgrounds (i.e., C57BL/6 and BALB/c for GKO mice and 129/Sv//Ev for RGKO mice). To enable direct comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections in GKO and RGKO mice, we introduced the IFN-γ null mutation into the 129/Sv//Ev background. We report that, after HSV-1 inoculation, mortality was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice (38 versus 23%, P = 0.0001). Similarly, the mortality from vaccinia virus challenge was significantly greater in RGKO mice than in GKO mice. With differences in genetic background excluded as a confounding issue, these results are consistent with the existence of an alternative ligand(s) for the IFN-γ receptor that is also capable of mediating protection against viral challenge. PMID:10233988