Science.gov

Sample records for ii type-1 receptor

  1. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor-Dependent GLP-1 and PYY Secretion in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pais, Ramona; Rievaj, Juraj; Larraufie, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the key hormone mediator of the renin angiotensin system, which regulates blood pressure and fluid and electrolyte balance in the body. Here we report that in the colonic epithelium, the Ang II type 1 receptor is highly and exclusively expressed in enteroendocrine L cells, which produce the gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY (PYY). Ang II stimulated glucagon-like peptide-1 and PYY release from primary cultures of mouse and human colon, which was antagonized by the specific Ang II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan. Ang II raised intracellular calcium levels in L cells in primary cultures, recorded by live-cell imaging of L cells specifically expressing the fluorescent calcium sensor GCaMP3. In Ussing chamber recordings, Ang II reduced short circuit currents in mouse distal colon preparations, which was antagonized by candesartan or a specific neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibitor but insensitive to amiloride. We conclude that Ang II stimulates PYY secretion, in turn inhibiting epithelial anion fluxes, thereby reducing net fluid secretion into the colonic lumen. Our findings highlight an important role of colonic L cells in whole-body fluid homeostasis by controlling water loss through the intestine. PMID:27447725

  2. Enhancement of Adipocyte Browning by Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Tsukuda, Kana; Mogi, Masaki; Iwanami, Jun; Kanno, Harumi; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Wang, Xiao-Li; Bai, Hui-Yu; Shan, Bao-Shuai; Kukida, Masayoshi; Higaki, Akinori; Yamauchi, Toshifumi; Min, Li-Juan; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Browning of white adipose tissue (WAT) has been highlighted as a new possible therapeutic target for obesity, diabetes and lipid metabolic disorders, because WAT browning could increase energy expenditure and reduce adiposity. The new clusters of adipocytes that emerge with WAT browning have been named ‘beige’ or ‘brite’ adipocytes. Recent reports have indicated that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a role in various aspects of adipose tissue physiology and dysfunction. The biological effects of angiotensin II, a major component of RAS, are mediated by two receptor subtypes, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and type 2 receptor (AT2R). However, the functional roles of angiotensin II receptor subtypes in WAT browning have not been defined. Therefore, we examined whether deletion of angiotensin II receptor subtypes (AT1aR and AT2R) may affect white-to-beige fat conversion in vivo. AT1a receptor knockout (AT1aKO) mice exhibited increased appearance of multilocular lipid droplets and upregulation of thermogenic gene expression in inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) compared to wild-type (WT) mice. AT2 receptor-deleted mice did not show miniaturization of lipid droplets or alteration of thermogenic gene expression levels in iWAT. An in vitro experiment using adipose tissue-derived stem cells showed that deletion of the AT1a receptor resulted in suppression of adipocyte differentiation, with reduction in expression of thermogenic genes. These results indicate that deletion of the AT1a receptor might have some effects on the process of browning of WAT and that blockade of the AT1 receptor could be a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:27992452

  3. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Takezako, Takanobu; Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Node, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109(TM3), Phe182(ECL2), Gln257(TM6), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108(TM3), Ser109(TM3), Ala163(TM4), Phe182(ECL2), Lys199(TM5), Tyr292(TM7), and Asn295(TM7)), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R.

  4. Structure-Function Basis of Attenuated Inverse Agonism of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers for Active-State Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Hamiyet; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Node, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-independent signaling by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) can be activated in clinical settings by mechanical stretch and autoantibodies as well as receptor mutations. Transition of the AT1R to the activated state is known to lower inverse agonistic efficacy of clinically used AT1R blockers (ARBs). The structure-function basis for reduced efficacy of inverse agonists is a fundamental aspect that has been understudied not only in relation to the AT1R but also regarding other homologous receptors. Here, we demonstrate that the active-state transition in the AT1R indeed attenuates an inverse agonistic effect of four biphenyl-tetrazole ARBs through changes in specific ligand-receptor interactions. In the ground state, tight interactions of four ARBs with a set of residues (Ser109TM3, Phe182ECL2, Gln257TM6, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7) results in potent inverse agonism. In the activated state, the ARB-AT1R interactions shift to a different set of residues (Val108TM3, Ser109TM3, Ala163TM4, Phe182ECL2, Lys199TM5, Tyr292TM7, and Asn295TM7), resulting in attenuated inverse agonism. Interestingly, V108I, A163T, N295A, and F182A mutations in the activated state of the AT1R shift the functional response to the ARB binding toward agonism, but in the ground state the same mutations cause inverse agonism. Our data show that the second extracellular loop is an important regulator of the functional states of the AT1R. Our findings suggest that the quest for discovering novel ARBs, and improving current ARBs, fundamentally depends on the knowledge of the unique sets of residues that mediate inverse agonistic potency in the two states of the AT1R. PMID:26121982

  5. Activating types 1 and 2 angiotensin II receptors modulate the hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Ichiro; Inoue, Shinji; Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Ohtani, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Masao

    2013-01-01

    A local tissue-specific renin–angiotensin system (local RAS) has been identified in many organs. However, no report has described the role of a local RAS in the hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. To examine the role of a local RAS in the hypertrophic differentiation, we activated angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) separately in the cell line ATDC5, which involves differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Activation of AT1R suppressed and activation of AT2R enhanced the expression of markers of hypertrophic differentiation, including type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase 13 and runt-related transcription factor 2. PMID:23905010

  6. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C gene polymorphism and essential hypertension in San Luis.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Alicia Viviana; Arce, Maria Elena; Lopez, José Raul; Ciuffo, Gladys María

    2006-12-01

    Essential hypertension is considered a multifactorial trait resulting from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor mediates the vasoconstrictor and growth-promoting effects of Ang II. The A1166C polymorphism of the AT1 receptor gene may be associated with cardiovascular phenotypes, such as high arterial blood pressure, aortic stiffness, and increased cardiovascular risk. We investigated the association between this A1166C polymorphism and hypertension in hypertense and normotense subjects from San Luis (Argentina) by mismatch PCR-RFLP analysis. Hypertense patients exhibited significant increases in lipid related values and body mass index. The frequency of occurrence of the C1166 allele was higher among patients with hypertension (0.19) than in the control group (0.06). No significant association was found between this polymorphism and essential hypertension in the study population, although the AC genotype prevalence was higher in patients with hypertension and positive family history of hypertension (32%) than in control subjects (12%). Patients with the A1166C polymorphism exhibited higher levels of serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and BMI than in control subjects. Taken together the genotype and biochemical parameters and considering the restrictive selection criteria used, the present results suggest a correlation between AT1 A1166C gene polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease.

  7. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  8. Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein downregulates vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hirohide; Ichiki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Jiro; Takeda, Kotaro; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Toru; Narabayashi, Eriko; Kitamoto, Shiro; Tokunou, Tomotake; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) by hypoxia stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and increases the expression of target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. Although the systemic renin-angiotensin system is activated by hypoxia, the role of PHD in the regulation of the renin-angiotensin system remains unknown. We examined the effect of PHD inhibition on the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R). Hypoxia, cobalt chloride, and dimethyloxalylglycine, all known to inhibit PHD, reduced AT(1)R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of PHD2, a major isoform of PHDs, by RNA interference also reduced AT(1)R expression. Cobalt chloride diminished angiotensin II-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Cobalt chloride decreased AT(1)R mRNA through transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Oral administration of cobalt chloride (14 mg/kg per day) to C57BL/6J mice receiving angiotensin II infusion (490 ng/kg per minute) for 4 weeks significantly attenuated perivascular fibrosis of the coronary arteries without affecting blood pressure level. These data suggest that PHD inhibition may be beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting renin-angiotensin system via AT(1)R downregulation.

  9. Angiotensin II type 1a receptor signalling directly contributes to the increased arrhythmogenicity in cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yasuno, Shinji; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Yamada, Chinatsu; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Usami, Satoru; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Ueshima, Kenji; Harada, Masaki; Nishikimi, Toshio; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Angiotensin II has been implicated in the development of various cardiovascular ailments, including cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. The fact that inhibiting its signalling reduced the incidences of both sudden cardiac death and heart failure in several large-scale clinical trials suggests that angiotensin II is involved in increased cardiac arrhythmogenicity during the development of heart failure. However, because angiotensin II also promotes structural remodelling, including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, it has been difficult to assess its direct contribution to cardiac arrhythmogenicity independently of the structural effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We induced cardiac hypertrophy in wild-type (WT) and angiotensin II type 1a receptor knockout (AT1aR-KO) mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). The susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia (VT) assessed in an in vivo electrophysiological study was compared in the two genotypes. The effect of acute pharmacological blockade of AT1R on the incidences of arrhythmias was also assessed. KEY RESULTS As described previously, WT and AT1aR-KO mice with TAC developed cardiac hypertrophy to the same degree, but the incidence of VT was much lower in the latter. Moreover, although TAC induced an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of connexin 43, a critical component of gap junctional channels, and a reduction in ventricular levels of connexin 43 protein in both genotypes, the effect was significantly ameliorated in AT1aR-KO mice. Acute pharmacological blockade of AT1R also reduced the incidence of arrhythmias. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our findings demonstrate that AT1aR-mediated signalling makes a direct contribution to the increase in arrhythmogenicity in hypertrophied hearts independently of structural remodelling. PMID:23937445

  10. The role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in elderly patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G Neil; Chan, Paul; Tomlinson, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke and coronary events in elderly people and clinical trials have shown that treatment of hypertension with various drugs can result in a substantial reduction in cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events. The angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists are the newest class of antihypertensive agents to be used widely in clinical practice. AT1 receptor antagonists can generally be given once-daily. They are also extremely well tolerated with minimal first-dose hypotension and an incidence of adverse effects similar to that seen with placebo. Adverse event rates are significantly lower than with other classes of antihypertensive drugs including ACE inhibitors. These factors result in improved compliance and increased rates of continuance on therapy. AT1 receptor antagonists show similar efficacy in lowering blood pressure to other classes of antihypertensive agents and their antihypertensive effect is potentiated when they are given concomitantly with low-dose thiazide diuretics. AT1 receptor antagonists are eliminated predominantly by the hepatic route but most are not subject to extensive metabolism and interactions with other drugs are uncommon. This is an advantage in the elderly, who are often receiving multiple medications which increases the risk for adverse drug interactions. Dose adjustments are not usually required in the elderly unless there is plasma volume depletion. Although plasma AT1 receptor antagonist concentrations are generally higher in the elderly than in younger subjects, this pharmacokinetic difference may be balanced by decreased activation of the circulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the elderly. Recent clinical studies in high-risk hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy or in patients with diabetic nephropathy or heart failure have demonstrated that AT1 receptor antagonists can improve clinical outcomes to a similar or sometimes greater extent than other

  11. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers increase tolerance of cells to copper and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Spincemaille, Pieter; Chandhok, Gursimran; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut; Verbeek, Jef; Chaltin, Patrick; Cammue, Bruno P.; Cassiman, David; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The human pathology Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by toxic copper (Cu) accumulation in brain and liver, resulting in, among other indications, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis of hepatocytes. In an effort to identify novel compounds that can alleviate Cu-induced toxicity, we screened the Pharmakon 1600 repositioning library using a Cu-toxicity yeast screen. We identified 2 members of the drug class of Angiotensin II Type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) that could increase yeast tolerance to Cu, namely Candesartan and Losartan. Subsequently, we show that specific ARBs can increase yeast tolerance to Cu and/or the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (Cp). The latter also induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that specific ARBs can prevent the prevalence of Cu-induced apoptotic markers in yeast, with Candesartan Cilexetil being the ARB which demonstrated most pronounced reduction of apoptosis-related markers. Next, we tested the sensitivity of a selection of yeast knockout mutants affected in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Cu for Candesartan Cilexetil rescue in presence of Cu. These data indicate that Candesartan Cilexetil increases yeast tolerance to Cu irrespectively of major ROS-detoxifying proteins. Finally, we show that specific ARBs can increase mammalian cell tolerance to Cu, as well as decrease the prevalence of Cu-induced apoptotic markers. All the above point to the potential of ARBs in preventing Cu-induced toxicity in yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:28357214

  12. Dietary sodium intake regulates angiotensin II type 1, mineralocorticoid receptor, and associated signaling proteins in heart.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Vincent; Lapointe, Nathalie; Pojoga, Luminita; Yao, Tham; Tran, Loc; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2011-10-01

    Liberal or high-sodium (HS) intake, in conjunction with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increases cardiovascular (CV) damage. We tested the hypothesis that sodium intake regulates the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and associated signaling pathways in heart tissue from healthy rodents. HS (1.6% Na(+)) and low-sodium (LS; 0.02% Na(+)) rat chow was fed to male healthy Wistar rats (n=7 animals per group). Protein levels were assessed by western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. Fractionation studies showed that MR, AT(1)R, caveolin-3 (CAV-3), and CAV-1 were located in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. In healthy rats, consumption of an LS versus a HS diet led to decreased cardiac levels of AT(1)R and MR. Decreased sodium intake was also associated with decreased cardiac levels of CAV-1 and CAV-3, decreased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R-CAV-3 and MR-CAV-3 complexes, but increased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R/MR complexes. Furthermore, decreased sodium intake was associated with decreased cardiac extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated ERK (pERK), and pERK/ERK ratio; increased cardiac striatin; decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (peNOS), but increased peNOS/eNOS ratio; and decreased cardiac plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Dietary sodium restriction has beneficial effects on the cardiac expression of factors associated with CV injury. These changes may play a role in the cardioprotective effects of dietary sodium restriction.

  13. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers as a first choice in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Bae, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Lee, Won Kee; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Chae, Shung Chull

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have not been adequately evaluated in patients without left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or heart failure after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: Between November 2005 and January 2008, 6,781 patients who were not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or ARBs were selected from the Korean AMI Registry. The primary endpoints were 12-month major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death and recurrent AMI. Results: Seventy percent of the patients were Killip class 1 and had a LV ejection fraction ≥ 40%. The prescription rate of ARBs was 12.2%. For each patient, a propensity score, indicating the likelihood of using ARBs during hospitalization or at discharge, was calculated using a non-parsimonious multivariable logistic regression model, and was used to match the patients 1:4, yielding 715 ARB users versus 2,860 ACEI users. The effect of ARBs on in-hospital mortality and 12-month MACE occurrence was assessed using matched logistic and Cox regression models. Compared with ACEIs, ARBs significantly reduced in-hospital mortality(1.3% vs. 3.3%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.379; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.190 to0.756; p = 0.006) and 12-month MACE occurrence (4.6% vs. 6.9%; HR, 0.661; 95% CI, 0.457 to 0.956; p = 0.028). However, the benefit of ARBs on 12-month mortality compared with ACEIs was marginal (4.3% vs. 6.2%; HR, 0.684; 95% CI, 0.467 to 1.002; p = 0.051). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ARBs are not inferior to, and may actually be better than ACEIs in Korean patients with AMI. PMID:26701233

  14. Angiotensin-(1–7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-01-01

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1–7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1–7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1–7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7), high-dose Ang-(1–7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1–7) + PD123319. Ang-(1–7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1–7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1–7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell–endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1–7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26225830

  15. Angiotensin-(1-7) Suppresses Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth and Angiogenesis via Complex Interactions of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor, Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor and Mas Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Li, Bin; Wang, Ximing; Li, Guishuang; Shang, Rui; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Jiali; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2015-07-27

    We recently confirmed that angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue using a murine hepatoma model. Angiotensin(Ang)-(1-7) has been found beneficial in ameliorating lung cancer and prostate cancer. Which receptor of Ang-(1-7) is activated to mediate its effects is much speculated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Ang-(1-7) on hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as the probable mechanisms. H22 hepatoma-bearing mice were randomly divided into five groups for treatment: mock group, low-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7), high-dose Ang-(1-7) + A779 and high-dose Ang-(1-7) + PD123319. Ang-(1-7) treatment inhibited tumor growth time- and dose-dependently by arresting tumor proliferation and promoting tumor apoptosis as well as inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. The effects of Ang-(1-7) on tumor proliferation and apoptosis were reversed by coadministration with A779 or PD123319, whereas the effects on tumor angiogenesis were completely reversed by A779 but not by PD123319. Moreover, Ang-(1-7) downregulated AT1R mRNA, upregulated mRNA levels of Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R) and Mas receptor (MasR) and p38-MAPK phosphorylation and suppressed H22 cell-endothelial cell communication. Thus, Ang-(1-7) administration suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma via complex interactions of AT1R, AT2R and MasR and may provide a novel and promising approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Rational drug design and synthesis of molecules targeting the angiotensin II type 1 and type 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kellici, Tahsin F; Tzakos, Andreas G; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2015-03-02

    The angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 and type 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) orchestrate an array of biological processes that regulate human health. Aberrant function of these receptors triggers pathophysiological responses that can ultimately lead to death. Therefore, it is important to design and synthesize compounds that affect beneficially these two receptors. Cardiovascular disease, which is attributed to the overactivation of the vasoactive peptide hormone Αng II, can now be treated with commercial AT1R antagonists. Herein, recent achievements in rational drug design and synthesis of molecules acting on the two AT receptors are reviewed. Quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and molecular modeling on the two receptors aim to assist the search for new active compounds. As AT1R and AT2R are GPCRs and drug action is localized in the transmembrane region the role of membrane bilayers is exploited. The future perspectives in this field are outlined. Tremendous progress in the field is expected if the two receptors are crystallized, as this will assist the structure based screening of the chemical space and lead to new potent therapeutic agents in cardiovascular and other diseases.

  17. Hyperhomocysteinemia accelerates collagen accumulation in the adventitia of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries via angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dan; Sun, Ning-Ling

    2014-10-27

    Recent studies suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) increases collagen type I accumulation in rat vascular adventitia after balloon injury and that Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces collagen synthesis in vascular adventitial fibroblasts. Reports also indicate that Ang II type1 receptor (AT1R) activation, mediated by homocysteine (Hcy) may contribute to collagen type 1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. However, little is known about the possible mechanisms behind the relationship between Hcy and AT1R in adventitial remodeling. Thus, we investigated whether HHcy induces collagen accumulation via activation of AT1R in the adventitia. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into a control group and a 1% l-methionine-induced HHcy group. Balloon injury was performed after 12 experimental weeks and animals were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 28 days after injury. Collagen deposition and AT1R expression was measured with Western blot. Serum Hcy, adventitial collagen, and AT1R levels were higher in the HHcy group compared with the control group. Hcy time-dependently induced collagen type 1 and AT1R expression, with the highest induction observed at 48 h. Also, we observed that the AT1R blocker, valsartan, attenuated collagen type 1 and AT1R expression. HHcy exacerbates adventitial remodeling after balloon injury, and the underling mechanisms may be related to AT1R activity.

  18. Central angiotensin II stimulates cutaneous water intake behavior via an angiotensin II type-1 receptor pathway in the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Konno, Norifumi; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2010-08-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates oral water intake by causing thirst in all terrestrial vertebrates except anurans. Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through ventral skin. In this study, we examined the role of Ang II on the regulation of water-absorption behavior in the Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica). In fully hydrated frogs, intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intralymphatic sac (ILS) injection of Ang II significantly extended the residence time of water in a dose-dependent manner. Ang II-dependent water uptake was inhibited by ICV pretreatment with an angiotensin II type-1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonist but not a type-2 (AT(2)) receptor antagonist. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates water-absorption behavior in the tree frog via an AT(1)-like but not AT(2)-like receptor. We then cloned and characterized cDNA of the tree frog AT(1) receptor from the brain. The tree frog AT(1) receptor cDNA encodes a 361 amino acid residue protein, which is 87% identical to the toad (Bufo marinus) AT(1) receptor and exhibits the functional characteristics of an Ang II receptor. AT(1) receptor mRNAs were found to be present in a number of tissues including brain (especially in the diencephalon), lung, large intestine, kidney and ventral pelvic skin. When tree frogs were exposed to dehydrating conditions, AT(1) receptor mRNA significantly increased in the diencephalon and the rhombencephalon. These data suggest that central Ang II may control water intake behavior via an AT(1) receptor on the diencephalon and rhombencephalon in anuran amphibians and may have implications for water consumption in vertebrates.

  19. Selectively engaging β-arrestins at the angiotensin II type 1 receptor reduces blood pressure and increases cardiac performance.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; DeWire, Scott M; Yamashita, Dennis; Rominger, David H; Nguyen, Lisa; Schiller, Kevin; Whalen, Erin J; Gowen, Maxine; Lark, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    Biased G protein-coupled receptor ligands engage subsets of the receptor signals normally stimulated by unbiased agonists. However, it is unclear whether ligand bias can elicit differentiated pharmacology in vivo. Here, we describe the discovery of a potent, selective β-arrestin biased ligand of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. TRV120027 (Sar-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-D-Ala-OH) competitively antagonizes angiotensin II-stimulated G protein signaling, but stimulates β-arrestin recruitment and activates several kinase pathways, including p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Src, and endothelial nitric-oxide synthase phosphorylation via β-arrestin coupling. Consistent with β-arrestin efficacy, and unlike unbiased antagonists, TRV120027 increased cardiomyocyte contractility in vitro. In rats, TRV120027 reduced mean arterial pressure, as did the unbiased antagonists losartan and telmisartan. However, unlike the unbiased antagonists, which decreased cardiac performance, TRV120027 increased cardiac performance and preserved cardiac stroke volume. These striking differences in vivo between unbiased and β-arrestin biased ligands validate the use of biased ligands to selectively target specific receptor functions in drug discovery.

  20. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mingming; Zhao, Chengrui; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Li; Liu, Huirong; Ma, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb) based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII). Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients' sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases. PMID:27057554

  1. Telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevents the development of diabetes in male Spontaneously Diabetic Torii rats.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Fukui, Michiaki; Hosoda, Hiroko; Asano, Mai; Harusato, Ichiko; Tanaka, Muhei; Shiraishi, Emi; Senmaru, Takashi; Sakabe, Kazumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kitawaki, Jo; Fujinami, Aya; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto

    2009-03-01

    To assess the beneficial effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan on a non-obese animal model of reduced function and mass of islet beta-cells prior to the development of diabetes, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were treated with telmisartan at 8 weeks of age. At 24 weeks of age, the treatment with telmisartan dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, and high-dose (5 mg/kg/day) treated SDT rats did not developed diabetes. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that treatment with high-dose telmisartan reduced mRNA expression of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, components of NAD(P)H oxidase, transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the pancreas of male SDT rats. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses revealed that treatment with telmisartan also reduced expression of p47(phox). These results suggest that treatment with telmisartan reduces oxidative stress by local RAS activation and protects against islet beta-cell damage and dysfunction. These findings provide at least a partial explanation for the reduced incidence of new-onset diabetes that has been observed in several clinical trials involving angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors.

  2. Renoprotective effects of benidipine in combination with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker in hypertensive Dahl rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kozo; Sato, Hitoshi; Ina, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohno, Tetsuji; Shirakura, Shiro

    2003-08-01

    We examined the effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the calcium channel blockers benidipine and amlodipine, hydralazine, and the combination of candesartan and benidipine or amlodipine on blood pressure and renal function in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) hypertensive rats. Male DS rats (5 weeks of age) were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet, resulting in hypertension accompanied by glomerular sclerosis and an increased urinary albumin excretion. Drugs were orally administered from 2 to 6 weeks after the start of the feeding. Although candesartan (1 or 10 mg/kg) had little effect on the blood pressure, benidipine (4 mg/kg), amlodipine (4 mg/kg) and hydralazine (5 mg/kg) had similar hypotensive effects. Benidipine, but not amlodipine, hydralazine, or candesartan, significantly inhibited the increase in the albuminuria and glomerular sclerosis. The combination of candesartan (1 mg/kg) and benidipine (4 mg/kg) lowered the levels of blood pressure and albuminuria more effectively than the combination of candesartan (1 mg/kg) and amlodipine (4 mg/kg). These results indicate that benidipine is effective in preventing the impairment of renal function in DS hypertensive rats, and suggest that additional benefits can be expected by combination therapy with benidipine and an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker.

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase and beta-arrestin-mediated desensitization of the angiotensin II type 1A receptor elucidated by diacylglycerol dynamics.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Dewire, Scott M; Barnes, William G; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2006-11-24

    Receptor desensitization progressively limits responsiveness of cells to chronically applied stimuli. Desensitization in the continuous presence of agonist has been difficult to study with available assay methods. Here, we used a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based live cell assay for the second messenger diacylglycerol to measure desensitization of a model seven-transmembrane receptor, the Gq-coupled angiotensin II type 1(A) receptor, expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In response to angiotensin II, we observed a transient diacylglycerol response reflecting activation and complete desensitization of the receptor within 2-5 min. By utilizing a variety of approaches including graded tetracycline-inducible receptor expression, mutated receptors, and overexpression or short interfering RNA-mediated silencing of putative components of the cellular desensitization machinery, we conclude that the rate and extent of receptor desensitization are critically determined by the following: receptor concentration in the plasma membrane; the presence of phosphorylation sites on the carboxyl terminus of the receptor; kinase activity of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, but not of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 3, 5, or 6; and stoichiometric expression of beta-arrestin. The findings introduce the use of the biosensor diacylglycerol reporter as a powerful means for studying Gq-coupled receptor desensitization and document that, at the levels of receptor overexpression commonly used in such studies, the properties of the desensitization process are markedly perturbed and do not reflect normal cellular physiology.

  4. Differential Contribution of Transmembrane Domains IV, V, VI, and VII to Human Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Homomer Formation.

    PubMed

    Young, Brent M; Nguyen, Elaine; Chedrawe, Matthew A J; Rainey, Jan K; Dupré, Denis J

    2017-02-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in drug therapy and represent one of the largest families of drug targets. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is notable as it has a central role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Blockade of AT1R signaling has been shown to alleviate hypertension and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure. Despite this, it has become apparent that our initial understanding of AT1R signaling is oversimplified. There is considerable evidence to suggest that AT1R signaling is highly modified in the presence of receptor-receptor interactions, but there is very little structural data available to explain this phenomenon even with the recent elucidation of the AT1R crystal structure. The current study investigates the involvement of transmembrane domains in AT1R homomer assembly with the goal of identifying hydrophobic interfaces that contribute to receptor-receptor affinity. A recently published crystal structure of the AT1R was used to guide site-directed mutagenesis of outward-facing hydrophobic residues within the transmembrane region of the AT1R. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer was employed to analyze how receptor mutation affects the assembly of AT1R homomers with a specific focus on hydrophobic residues. Mutations within transmembrane domains IV, V, VI, and VII had no effect on angiotensin-mediated β-arrestin1 recruitment; however, they exhibited differential effects on the assembly of AT1R into oligomeric complexes. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrophobic amino acids at the AT1R transmembrane interface and provide the first glimpse of the requirements for AT1R complex assembly.

  5. A different role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor in the development and hypertrophy of plantaris muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Zempo, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Ogawa, Masahito; Watanabe, Ryo; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2016-02-01

    The role of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptors in muscle development and hypertrophy remains unclear. This study was designed to reveal the effects that a loss of AT1 receptors has on skeletal muscle development and hypertrophy in mice. Eight-week-old male AT1a receptor knockout (AT1a(-/-)) mice were used for this experiment. The plantaris muscle to body weight ratio, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, and number of muscle fibers of AT1a(-/-) mice was significantly greater than wild type (WT) mice in the non-intervention condition. Next, the functional overload (OL) model was used to induce plantaris muscle hypertrophy by surgically removing the two triceps muscles consisting of the calf, soleus, and gastrocnemius muscles in mice. After 14 days of OL intervention, the plantaris muscle weight, the amount of fiber, and the fiber area increased. However, the magnitude of the increment of plantaris weight was not different between the two strains. Agtr1a mRNA expression did not change after OL in WT muscle. Actually, the Agt mRNA expression level of WT-OL was lower than WT-Control (C) muscle. An atrophy-related gene, atrogin-1 mRNA expression levels of AT1a(-/-)-C, WT-OL, and AT1a(-/-)-OL muscle were lower than that of WT-C muscle. Our findings suggest that AT1 receptor contributes to plantaris muscle development via atrogin-1 in mice.

  6. Angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor-mediated accumulation of angiotensin II in tissues and its intracellular half-life in vivo.

    PubMed

    van Kats, J P; de Lannoy, L M; Jan Danser, A H; van Meegen, J R; Verdouw, P D; Schalekamp, M A

    1997-07-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is internalized by various cell types via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Little is known about the kinetics of this process in the whole animal and about the half-life of intact Ang II after its internalization. We measured the levels of 125I-Ang II and 125I-Ang I that were reached in various tissues and blood plasma during infusions of these peptides into the left cardiac ventricle of pigs. Steady-state concentrations of 125I-Ang II in skeletal muscle, heart, kidney, and adrenal were 8% to 41%, 64% to 150%, 340% to 550%, and 680% to 2100%, respectively, of the 125I-Ang II concentration in arterial blood plasma (ranges of six experiments). The tissue concentrations of 125I-Ang I were less than 5% of the arterial plasma concentrations. 125I-Ang II accumulation seen in heart, kidney, and adrenal was almost completely blocked by a specific Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist. Steady-state concentrations of 125I-Ang II were reached within 30 to 60 minutes in the tissues and within 5 minutes in blood plasma. The in vivo half-life of intact 125I-Ang II in heart, kidney, and adrenal was approximately 15 minutes, compared with 0.5 minute in the circulation. Thus, Ang II, but not Ang I, from the circulation is accumulated by some tissues, and this is mediated by AT1 receptors. The time course of this process and the long half-life of the accumulated Ang II support the contention that this Ang II has been internalized after its binding to the AT1 receptor, so that it is protected from rapid degradation by endothelial peptidases. The results of this study are in agreement with growing evidence of an important physiological role for internalized Ang II.

  7. Effects of ANG II type 1 and 2 receptors on oxidative stress, renal NADPH oxidase, and SOD expression.

    PubMed

    Chabrashvili, Tina; Kitiyakara, Chagriya; Blau, Jonathan; Karber, Alex; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2003-07-01

    Oxidative stress accompanies angiotensin (ANG) II infusion, but the role of ANG type 1 vs. type 2 receptors (AT1-R and AT2-R, respectively) is unknown. We infused ANG II subcutaneously in rats for 1 wk. Excretion of 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha (8-Iso) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) were related to renal cortical mRNA abundance for subunits of NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutases (SODs) using real-time PCR. Subsets of ANG II-infused rats were given the AT1-R antagonist candesartan cilexetil (Cand) or the AT2-R antagonist PD-123,319 (PD). Compared to vehicle (Veh), ANG II increased 8-Iso excretion by 41% (Veh, 5.4 +/- 0.8 vs. ANG II, 7.6 +/- 0.5 pg/24 h; P < 0.05). This was prevented by Cand (5.6 +/- 0.5 pg/24 h; P < 0.05) and increased by PD (15.8 +/- 2.0 pg/24 h; P < 0.005). There were similar changes in MDA excretion. Compared to Veh, ANG II significantly (P < 0.005) increased the renal cortical mRNA expression of p22phox (twofold), Nox-1 (2.6-fold), and Mn-SOD (1.5-fold) and decreased expression of Nox-4 (2.1-fold) and extracellular (EC)-SOD (2.1-fold). Cand prevented all of these changes except for the increase in Mn-SOD. PD accentuated changes in p22phox and Nox-1 and increased p67phox. We conclude that ANG II infusion stimulates oxidative stress via AT1-R, which increases the renal cortical mRNA expression of p22phox and Nox-1 and reduces abundance of Nox-4 and EC-SOD. This is offset by strong protective effects of AT2-R, which are accompanied by decreased expression of p22phox, Nox-1, and p67phox.

  8. Microvascular vasodilator properties of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Begorre, Marc-Antoine; Dib, Abdallah; Habchi, Khalil; Guihot, Anne-Laure; Bourreau, Jennifer; Vessieres, Emilie; Blondeau, Bertrand; Loufrani, Laurent; Chabbert, Marie; Henrion, Daniel; Fassot, Céline

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is associated with severe cardiovascular disorders involving the renin-angiotensin system, mainly through activation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). Although the type 2 receptor (AT2R) opposes the effects of AT1R, with vasodilator and anti-trophic properties, its role in diabetes is debatable. Thus we investigated AT2R-mediated dilatation in a model of type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin in 5-month-old male mice lacking AT2R (AT2R−/y). Glucose tolerance was reduced and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress (cyclooxygenase-2, gp91phox p22phox and p67phox) were increased in AT2R−/y mice compared to wild-type (WT) animals. Streptozotocin-induced hyperglycaemia was higher in AT2R−/y than in WT mice. Arterial gp91phox and MnSOD expression levels in addition to blood 8-isoprostane and creatinine were further increased in diabetic AT2R−/y mice compared to diabetic WT mice. AT2R-dependent dilatation in both isolated mesenteric resistance arteries and perfused kidneys was greater in diabetic mice than in non-diabetic animals. Thus, in type 1 diabetes, AT2R may reduce glycaemia and display anti-oxidant and/or anti-inflammatory properties in association with greater vasodilatation in mesenteric arteries and in the renal vasculature, a major target of diabetes. Therefore AT2R might represent a new therapeutic target in diabetes. PMID:28361992

  9. Structure of the human angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor bound to angiotensin II from multiple chemoselective photoprobe contacts reveals a unique peptide binding mode.

    PubMed

    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-03-22

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs.

  10. Effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade on kidney ischemia/reperfusion; a gender-related difference

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Fatemeh; Taheri, Pegah; Azimipoor, Mahdis; Ramtin, Sina; Hashemianfar, Mostafa; Momeni- Ashjerdi, Ali; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir; Nasri, Hamid; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury may be related to activity of reninangiotensin system (RAS), which is gender-related. In this study, it was attempted to compare the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade; losartan in I/R injury in male and female rats. Materials and Methods: Male and female Wistar rats were assigned as sham surgery, control I/R groups treated with vehicle, and case I/R groups treated with losartan (30 mg/kg). Vehicle and losartan were given 2 hours before bilateral kidney ischemia induced by clamping renal arteries for 45 minutes followed by 24 hours of renal reperfusion. Results: The I/R injury significantly increased the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr), and kidney tissue damage score in both genders. However, losartan decreased these values in female rats significantly (P < 0.05). This was not observed in male rats. Conclusion: Losartan protects the kidney from I/R injury in female but not in male rats possibly because of gender-related difference of RAS. PMID:27689110

  11. Impaired endocytosis in proximal tubule from subchronic exposure to cadmium involves angiotensin II type 1 and cubilin receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to low cadmium (Cd) levels produces urinary excretion of low molecular weight proteins, which is considered the critical effect of Cd exposure. However, the mechanisms involved in Cd-induced proteinuria are not entirely clear. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the possible role of megalin and cubilin (important endocytic receptors in proximal tubule cells) and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor on Cd-induced microalbuminuria. Methods Four groups of female Wistar rats were studied. Control (CT) group, vehicle-treated rats; LOS group, rats treated with losartan (an AT1 antagonist) from weeks 5 to 8 (10 mg/kg/day by gavage); Cd group, rats subchronically exposed to Cd (3 mg/kg/day by gavage) during 8 weeks, and Cd + LOS group, rats treated with Cd for 8 weeks and LOS from weeks 5–8. Kidney Cd content, glomerular function (evaluated by creatinine clearance and plasma creatinine), kidney injury and tubular function (evaluated by Kim-1 expression, urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and glucose, and microalbuminuria), oxidative stress (measured by lipid peroxidation and NAD(P)H oxidase activity), mRNA levels of megalin, expressions of megalin and cubilin (by confocal microscopy) and AT1 receptor (by Western blot), were measured in the different experimental groups. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis test using GraphPad Prism 5 software (Version 5.00). P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Administration of Cd (Cd and Cd + LOS groups) increased renal Cd content. LOS-treatment decreased Cd-induced microalbuminuria without changes in: plasma creatinine, creatinine clearance, urinary NAG and glucose, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of megalin and cubilin, neither protein expression of megalin nor AT1 receptor, in the different experimental groups studied. However, Cd exposure did induce the expression of the tubular injury marker Kim-1 and decreased

  12. Therapeutic Effect of Losartan, an Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Antagonist, on CCl4-Induced Skeletal Muscle Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ok-Kyung; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Eun-Joo; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β1 is known to inhibit muscle regeneration after muscle injury. However, it is unknown if high systemic levels of TGF-β can affect the muscle regeneration process. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of a CCl4 intra-peritoneal injection and losartan (an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist) on skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius muscle) injury and regeneration. Male C57BL/6 mice were grouped randomly as follows: control (n = 7), CCl4-treatment group (n = 7), and CCl4 + losartan treatment group (n = 7). After CCl4 treatment for a 16-week period, the animals were sacrificed and analyzed. The expression of dystrophin significantly decreased in the muscle tissues of the control group, as compared with that of the CCl4 + losartan group (p < 0.01). p(phospho)-Smad2/3 expression significantly increased in the muscles of the control group compared to that in the CCl4 + losartan group (p < 0.01). The expressions of Pax7, MyoD, and myogenin increased in skeletal muscles of the CCl4 + losartan group compared to the corresponding levels in the control group (p < 0.01). We hypothesize that systemically elevated TGF-β1 as a result of CCl4-induced liver injury causes skeletal muscle injury, while losartan promotes muscle repair from injury via blockade of TGF-β1 signaling. PMID:26867195

  13. Therapeutic Effect of Losartan, an Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Antagonist, on CCl₄-Induced Skeletal Muscle Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ok-Kyung; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Eun-Joo; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2016-02-08

    TGF-β1 is known to inhibit muscle regeneration after muscle injury. However, it is unknown if high systemic levels of TGF-β can affect the muscle regeneration process. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of a CCl₄ intra-peritoneal injection and losartan (an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist) on skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius muscle) injury and regeneration. Male C57BL/6 mice were grouped randomly as follows: control (n = 7), CCl₄-treatment group (n = 7), and CCl₄ + losartan treatment group (n = 7). After CCl₄ treatment for a 16-week period, the animals were sacrificed and analyzed. The expression of dystrophin significantly decreased in the muscle tissues of the control group, as compared with that of the CCl₄ + losartan group (p < 0.01). p(phospho)-Smad2/3 expression significantly increased in the muscles of the control group compared to that in the CCl₄ + losartan group (p < 0.01). The expressions of Pax7, MyoD, and myogenin increased in skeletal muscles of the CCl₄ + losartan group compared to the corresponding levels in the control group (p < 0.01). We hypothesize that systemically elevated TGF-β1 as a result of CCl₄-induced liver injury causes skeletal muscle injury, while losartan promotes muscle repair from injury via blockade of TGF-β1 signaling.

  14. Valsartan ameliorates ageing-induced aorta degeneration via angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated ERK activity.

    PubMed

    Shan, HaiYan; Zhang, Siyang; Li, Xuelian; Yu, Kai; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Xinyue; Jin, Bo; Bai, XiaoJuan

    2014-06-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays important roles in ageing-related disorders through its type 1 receptor (AT1 R). However, the role and underlying mechanisms of AT1R in ageing-related vascular degeneration are not well understood. In this study, 40 ageing rats were randomly divided into two groups: ageing group which received no treatment (ageing control), and valsartan group which took valsartan (selective AT1R blocker) daily for 6 months. 20 young rats were used as adult control. The aorta structure were analysed by histological staining and electron microscopy. Bcl-2/Bax expression in aorta was analysed by immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The expressions of AT1 R, AT2 R and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were detected. Significant structural degeneration of aorta in the ageing rats was observed, and the degeneration was remarkably ameliorated by long-term administration of valsartan. With ageing, the expression of AT1R was elevated, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was decreased and meanwhile, an important subgroup of MAPKs, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity was elevated. However, these changes in ageing rats could be reversed to some extent by valsartan. In vitro experiments observed consistent results as in vivo study. Furthermore, ERK inhibitor could also acquire partial effects as valsartan without affecting AT1R expression. The results indicated that AT1R involved in the ageing-related degeneration of aorta and AT1R-mediated ERK activity was an important mechanism underlying the process.

  15. Functional Interaction between Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 and Chemokine (C-C Motif) Receptor 2 with Implications for Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Robyn S.; See, Heng B.; Johnstone, Elizabeth K. M.; McCall, Elizabeth A.; Williams, James H.; Kelly, Darren J.; Pfleger, Kevin D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding functional interactions between G protein-coupled receptors is of great physiological and pathophysiological importance. Heteromerization provides one important potential mechanism for such interaction between different signalling pathways via macromolecular complex formation. Previous studies suggested a functional interplay between angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) and Chemokine (C-C motif) Receptor 2 (CCR2). However the molecular mechanisms are not understood. We investigated AT1-CCR2 functional interaction in vitro using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer in HEK293 cells and in vivo using subtotal-nephrectomized rats as a well-established model for chronic kidney disease. Our data revealed functional heteromers of these receptors resulting in CCR2-Gαi1 coupling being sensitive to AT1 activation, as well as apparent enhanced β-arrestin2 recruitment with agonist co-stimulation that is synergistically reversed by combined antagonist treatment. Moreover, we present in vivo findings where combined treatment with AT1- and CCR2-selective inhibitors was synergistically beneficial in terms of decreasing proteinuria, reducing podocyte loss and preventing renal injury independent of blood pressure in the subtotal-nephrectomized rat model. Our findings further support a role for G protein-coupled receptor functional heteromerization in pathophysiology and provide insights into previous observations indicating the importance of AT1-CCR2 functional interaction in inflammation, renal and hypertensive disorders. PMID:25807547

  16. Role of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hypertension in patients aged >or=65 years.

    PubMed

    Gradman, Alan H

    2009-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases with age, and hypertension affects approximately two-thirds of adults in the US aged >60 years. Blood pressure (BP) increases as a consequence of age-related structural changes in large arteries, which lead to loss of elasticity and reduced vascular compliance. Increased pulse wave velocity augments SBP, resulting in a high prevalence of isolated systolic hypertension. Because age itself elevates cardiovascular risk, effective treatment of hypertension in an older (aged >or=65 years) patient population prevents many more events per 1000 patients treated than treatment of younger hypertensive patients. Recommendations for treating hypertension are similar in older patients compared with the general population. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Detection, Prevention, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure recommends target BP goals of <140/90 mmHg for patients with uncomplicated hypertension, and <130/80 mmHg for those with diabetes mellitus or renal disease. Recent guidelines and position papers have extended these aggressive treatment goals to include patients with coronary artery disease, other types of vascular disease and heart failure. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of calcium channel antagonists (calcium channel blockers [CCBs]), low-dose diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) in reducing the risk of stroke and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes in older patients; beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are less effective in terms of endpoint reduction. The majority of older patients require two or more drugs to achieve BP goals. Despite active treatment, half of these patients do not achieve target BP, in part because of the reluctance of physicians to intensify treatment, a phenomenon referred to as 'clinical inertia'. ARBs are effective antihypertensive agents in older patients and have been shown

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibits angiotensin II receptor type 1 expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons via β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Wu, H; Yan, J-Q; Song, Z-B; Guo, Q-L

    2013-09-17

    Both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) axis play important roles in neuropathic pain and nociception. In the present study, we explored the interaction between the two systems by examining the mutual effects between TNF-α and the Ang II/AT1 receptor axis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Rat DRG neurons were treated with TNF-α in different concentrations for different lengths of time in the presence or absence of transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) inhibitor SPD304, β-catenin signaling inhibitor CCT031374, or different kinase inhibitors. TNF-α decreased the AT1 receptor mRNA level as well as the AT1a receptor promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner within 30 h, which led to dose-dependent inhibition of Ang II-binding AT1 receptor level on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml), SPD304 (50 μM), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD169316 (25 μM), and CCT031374 (50 μM) completely abolished the inhibitory effect of TNF-α on AT1 receptor expression. TNF-α dose-dependently increased soluble β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK-3β levels, which was blocked by SPD304 and PD169316. In DRG neurons treated with AT2 receptor agonist CGP421140, or Ang II with or without AT1 receptor antagonist losartan or AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319 for 30 h, we found that Ang II and Ang II+PD123319 significantly decreased TNF-α expression, whereas CPG421140 and Ang II+losartan increased TNF-α expression. In conclusion, we demonstrate that TNF-α inhibits AT1 receptor expression at the transcription level via TNFR1 in rat DRG neurons by increasing the soluble β-catenin level through the p38 MAPK/GSK-3β pathway. In addition, Ang II appears to inhibit and induce TNF-α expression via the AT1 receptor and the AT2 receptor in DRG neurons, respectively. This is the first evidence of crosstalk between TNF-α and the Ang II/AT receptor axis in DRG neurons.

  18. Dopamine 5 receptor mediates Ang II type 1 receptor degradation via a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in mice and human cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hewang; Armando, Ines; Yu, Peiying; Escano, Crisanto; Mueller, Susette C; Asico, Laureano; Pascua, Annabelle; Lu, Quansheng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Villar, Van Anthony M; Jones, John E; Wang, Zheng; Periasamy, Ammasi; Lau, Yuen-Sum; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio; Creswell, Karen; Guillemette, Gaétan; Sibley, David R; Eisner, Gilbert; Gildea, John J; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2008-06-01

    Hypertension is a multigenic disorder in which abnormal counterregulation between dopamine and Ang II plays a role. Recent studies suggest that this counterregulation results, at least in part, from regulation of the expression of both the antihypertensive dopamine 5 receptor (D5R) and the prohypertensive Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R). In this report, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro interaction between these GPCRs. Disruption of the gene encoding D5R in mice increased both blood pressure and AT1R protein expression, and the increase in blood pressure was reversed by AT1R blockade. Activation of D5R increased the degradation of glycosylated AT1R in proteasomes in HEK cells and human renal proximal tubule cells heterologously and endogenously expressing human AT1R and D5R. Confocal microscopy, Förster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy revealed that activation of D5R initiated ubiquitination of the glycosylated AT1R at the plasma membrane. The regulated degradation of AT1R via a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway by activation of D5R provides what we believe to be a novel mechanism whereby blood pressure can be regulated by the interaction of 2 counterregulatory GPCRs. Our results therefore suggest that treatments for hypertension might be optimized by designing compounds that can target the AT1R and the D5R.

  19. Imbalance of angiotensin type 1 receptor and angiotensin II type 2 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla: potential mechanism for sympathetic overactivity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lie; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Wei; Zucker, Irving H

    2008-10-01

    Upregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT(1)R) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contributes to the sympathoexcitation in the chronic heart failure (CHF). However, the role of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)R) is not clear. In this study, we measured AT(1)R and AT(2)R protein expression in the RVLM and determined their effects on renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate in anesthetized sham and CHF rats. We found that (1) although AT(1)R expression in the RVLM was upregulated, the AT(2)R was significantly downregulated (CHF: 0.06+/-0.02 versus sham: 0.15+/-0.02, P<0.05); (2) simultaneously stimulating RVLM AT(1)R and AT(2)R by angiotensin II evoked sympathoexcitation, hypertension, and tachycardia in both sham and CHF rats with greater responses in CHF; (3) stimulating RVLM AT1R with angiotensin II plus the specific AT(2)R antagonist PD123319 induced a larger sympathoexcitatory response than simultaneously stimulating AT(1)R and AT(2)R in sham rats, but not in CHF; (4) activating RVLM AT(2)R with CGP42112 induced a sympathoinhibition, hypotension, and bradycardia only in sham rats (renal sympathetic nerve activity: 36.4+/-5.1% of baseline versus 102+/-3.9% of baseline in artificial cerebrospinal fluid, P<0.05); (5) pretreatment with 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a general inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism, into the RVLM attenuates the CGP42112-induced sympathoinhibition. These results suggest that AT(2)R in the RVLM exhibits an inhibitory effect on sympathetic outflow, which is, at least partially, mediated by an arachidonic acid metabolic pathway. These data implicate a downregulation in the AT(2)R as a contributory factor in the sympathoexcitation in CHF.

  20. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, Adebowale Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  1. Novel leptin receptor mutation in NOD/LtJ mice suppresses type 1 diabetes progression: II. Immunologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Ho; Chen, Yi-Guang; Chen, Jing; Reifsnyder, Peter C; Serreze, David V; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Rodriguez, Michelle; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A; Leiter, Edward H

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we identified in normally type 1 diabetes-prone NOD/LtJ mice a spontaneous new leptin receptor (LEPR) mutation (designated Lepr(db-5J)) producing juvenile obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperleptinemia. This early type 2 diabetes syndrome suppressed intra-islet insulitis and permitted spontaneous diabetes remission. No significant differences in plasma corticosterone, splenic CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cell percentages, or functions of CD3(+) T-cells in vitro distinguished NOD wild-type from mutant mice. Yet splenocytes from hyperglycemic mutant donors failed to transfer type 1 diabetes into NOD.Rag1(-/-) recipients over a 13-week period, whereas wild-type donor cells did so. This correlated with significantly reduced (P < 0.01) frequencies of insulin and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein-reactive CD8(+) T-effector clonotypes in mutant mice. Intra-islet insulitis was also significantly suppressed in lethally irradiated NOD-Lepr(db-5J)/Lt recipients reconstituted with wild-type bone marrow (P < 0.001). In contrast, type 1 diabetes eventually developed when mutant marrow was transplanted into irradiated wild-type recipients. Mitogen-induced T-cell blastogenesis was significantly suppressed when splenic T-cells from both NOD/Lt and NOD-Lepr(db-5J)/Lt donors were incubated with irradiated mutant peritoneal exudate cells (P < 0.005). In conclusion, metabolic disturbances elicited by a type 2 diabetes syndrome (insulin and/or leptin resistance, but not hypercorticism) appear to suppress type 1 diabetes development in NOD-Lepr(db-5J)/Lt by inhibiting activation of T-effector cells.

  2. miR-802 regulates human angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Sarah E.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Martin, Mickey M.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2010-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin II (Ang II) can regulate intestinal fluid and electrolyte transport and control intestinal wall muscular activity. Ang II is also a proinflammatory mediator that participates in inflammatory responses such as apoptosis, angiogenesis, and vascular remodeling; accumulating evidence suggests that this hormone may be involved in gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation and carcinogenesis. Ang II binds to two distinct G protein-coupled receptor subtypes, the AT1R and AT2R, which are widely expressed in the GI system. Together these studies suggest that Ang II-AT1R/-AT2R actions may play an important role in GI tract physiology and pathophysiology. Currently it is not known whether miRNAs can regulate the expression of the human AT1R (hAT1R) in the GI system. PCR and in situ hybridization experiments demonstrated that miR-802 was abundantly expressed in human colon and intestine. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-802 could directly interact with the bioinformatics-predicted target site harbored within the 3′-untranslated region of the hAT1R mRNA. To validate that the levels of miR-802 were physiologically relevant in the GI system, we demonstrated that miR-802 “loss-of-function” experiments resulted in augmented hAT1R levels and enhanced Ang II-induced signaling in a human intestinal epithelial cell line. These results suggest that miR-802 can modulate the expression of the hAT1R in the GI tract and ultimately play a role in regulating the biological efficacy of Ang II in this system. PMID:20558762

  3. Genotoxicity of Advanced Glycation End Products: Involvement of Oxidative Stress and of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schupp, Nicole; Schinzel, Reinhard; Heidland, August; Stopper, Helga

    2005-06-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure, cancer incidence is increased. This may be related to an elevated level of genomic damage, which has been demonstrated by micronuclei formation as well as by comet assay analysis. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are markedly elevated in renal failure. In the comet assay, the model AGEs methylglyoxal- and carboxy(methyl)lysine-modified bovine serum albumin (BSA) induced significant DNA damage in colon, kidney, and liver cells. The addition of antioxidants prevented AGE-induced DNA damage, suggesting enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The coincubation with dimethylfumarate (DMF), an inhibitor of NF-κB translocation, reduced the genotoxic effect, thereby underscoring the key role of NF-κB in this process. One of the genes induced by NF-κB is angiotensinogen. The ensuing proteolytic activity yields angiotensin II, which evokes oxidative stress as well as proinflammatory responses. A modulator of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), the angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor 1 antagonist, candesartan, yielded a reduction of the AGE-induced DNA damage, connecting the two signal pathways, RAS and AGE signaling. We were able to identify important participants in AGE-induced DNA damage: ROS, NF-κB, and Ang II, as well as modulators to prevent this DNA damage: antioxidants, DMF, and AT1 antagonists.

  4. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockers suppress the cell proliferation effects of angiotensin II in breast cancer cells by inhibiting AT1R signaling.

    PubMed

    Du, Ning; Feng, Jiang; Hu, Li-Juan; Sun, Xin; Sun, Hai-Bing; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Yi-Ping; Ren, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Chronic stress and a high-fat diet are well-documented risk factors associated with the renin-angiotensin system in the development of breast cancer. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) is a novel component of the renin-angiotensin system. Several recent studies have focused on the function of AT1R in cell proliferation during cancer development. Thus, we hypothesized that angiotensin II (Ang Ⅱ) can promote proliferation of breast cancer via activated AT1R; the activation of AT1R may play an important role in promoting breast cancer growth, and AT1R blocker (ARB) may suppress the promotional effect on proliferation by antagonizing AT1R. The expression level of AT1R was found to be significantly upregulated in breast cancer cells by immunohistochemistry, but no correlation between AT1R expression and ER/PR/Her-2 expression was observed. The AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cell line exhibited high expression of AT1R protein, and we generated the AT1R(-)-MCF-7 cell line using RNA interference. ARBs, and in particular irbesartan, effectively inhibited the effects of Ang II on cell proliferation, cell cycle development and downstream AT1R signaling events, including the activation of the Ras-Raf-MAPK pathway and the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB. Irbesartan also significantly altered p53, PCNA and cyclin D1 expression, which was also influenced by activated AT1R in AT1R(+)-MCF-7 cells. These results suggest that ARBs may be useful as a novel preventive and therapeutic strategy for treating breast cancer.

  5. Immunohistochemical localization of angiotensin II receptor types 1 and 2 in the mesenteric artery from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Carmen; Leal, Sandra; Logan, Karen; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Soares, Ana Sofia; Rocha, Eduardo; Gonçalves, Jorge; Fresco, Paula

    2007-08-01

    Angiotensin II plays a crucial role in the control of blood pressure, acting at AT1 or AT2 receptors, and can act as a potent vasoconstrictor of the peripheral vasculature inducing hypertrophy, hyperplasia, or both, in resistance arteries. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the pattern of distribution of angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptors on mesenteric artery sections differs in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) versus their respective controls (Wistar-Kyoto [WKY] rats). Immunohistochemistry using anti-AT1 or anti-AT2 antibodies was performed on perfused-fixed/paraffin-embedded mesenteric arteries from SHR and WKY rats. 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB; activated by hydrogen peroxide) staining revealed distinct AT1 and AT2 labeling of all artery layers (adventitia, media and intima) from WKY rats, whereas in SHR an abundant AT1 labeling was found in both intima and adventitia and a sparser labeling in the media. There was a vast reduction of AT2 labeling throughout all layers. These results suggest a crucial role for AT2 receptors in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  6. Effect of sodium on vasoconstriction and angiotensin II type 1 receptor mRNA expression in cold-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Shanjun; Zhu, Jijun; van der Giet, Markus; Tepel, Martin

    2004-08-01

    Angiotensin II and sodium play an important pathogenetic role in several models of hypertension. Now, we investigated the effects of sodium on vasoconstriction and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor mRNA expression in aortic vessels from cold-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats on low sodium and high sodium diet were exposed to cold-stress for 8 weeks. The effects of angiotensin II infusion on mean arterial blood pressure were investigated in these rats. In addition, angiotensin II induced contraction was measured using aortic rings. Expression of AT1 receptor mRNA and AT2 receptor mRNA was assessed in aortic vessels by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After infusion of angiotensin II mean arterial blood pressure in cold-induced hypertensive rats on high sodium diet was significantly higher compared to cold-induced hypertensive rats on low sodium diet (p < 0.05). Angiotensin II-induced contraction of aortic rings was significantly higher in cold-induced hypertensive rats on high sodium diet compared to cold-induced hypertensive rats on low sodium diet (2.39 +/- 0.03 g vs. 2.21 +/- 0.04 g, n = 12, p < 0.01). Angiotensin AT1 receptor mRNA was significantly higher in cold-induced hypertensive rats on high sodium diet compared to cold-induced hypertensive rats on low sodium diet (p < 0.05). It is concluded that in this nongenetic, nonsurgical animal model of cold-induced hypertension increased vasoconstriction and increased AT1 receptor mRNA expression in aortic vessels are dependent on sodium intake.

  7. Enhancement by exogenous and locally generated angiotensin II of purinergic neurotransmission via angiotensin type 1 receptor in the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery

    PubMed Central

    Onaka, Uran; Fujii, Koji; Abe, Isao; Fujishima, Masatoshi

    1997-01-01

    Angiotensin II is known to enhance sympathetic neurotransmission in the vasculature by increasing the release of noradrenaline, but little is known about the effect on the co-released transmitter, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). In the present study we have examined the effect of angiotensin II on the excitatory junction potential (e.j.p.) elicited by repetitive field stimulation in the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery, to establish the angiotensin II receptor subtype involved in modulating the release of ATP and the role of the endothelium in converting angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Suramin (300 μM), a P2 purinoceptor antagonist, abolished both the e.j.ps and depolarizing response to α,β-methylene-ATP, a stable analogue of ATP, without affecting the resting membrane potential and noradrenaline-induced depolarization. Angiotensin II (0.1 μM) affected neither the resting membrane potential nor the amplitude of the first e.j.p., but increased the amplitudes of the subsequent e.j.ps. This enhancing effect of angiotensin II was abolished by CV-11974 (0.1 μM), an angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but unaffected by PD 123319 (1 μM), an angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist, or CGP 42112A (1 μM), AT2 receptor ligand. Angiotensin I (0.1 μM) exerted a similar effect on e.j.ps to that of angiotensin II. CV-11974 (0.1 μM) or temocaprilat (10 μM), an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, abolished the effect of angiotensin I. Removal of the endothelium did not alter the action of angiotensin I. The results of the present study indicate that the release of ATP from sympathetic nerves innervating the guinea-pig isolated mesenteric artery, as determined from the magnitude of the e.j.p., can be enhanced by angiotensin II via activation of prejunctional AT1 receptors. Qualitatively similar effects were observed with angiotensin I, which appears to be converted into angiotensin II by a subendothelial process

  8. Genetic polymorphism of ACE and the angiotensin II type1 receptor genes in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aim and Methods We investigated the association between polymorphisms of the angiotensin converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1) and angiotensin II type one receptor (AT1RA1166C) genes and the causation of renal disease in 76 advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) pediatric patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) or conservative treatment (CT). Serum ACE activity and creatine kinase-MB fraction (CK-MB) were measured in all groups. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was calculated according to echocardiographic measurements. Seventy healthy controls were also genotyped. Results The differences of D allele and DI genotype of ACE were found significant between MHD group and the controls (p = 0.0001). ACE-activity and LVMI were higher in MHD, while CK-MB was higher in CT patients than in all other groups. The combined genotype DD v/s ID+II comparison validated that DD genotype was a high risk genotype for hypertension .~89% of the DD CKD patients were found hypertensive in comparison to ~ 61% of patients of non DD genotype(p = 0.02). The MHD group showed an increased frequency of the C allele and CC genotype of the AT1RA1166C polymorphism (P = 0.0001). On multiple linear regression analysis, C-allele was independently associated with hypertension (P = 0.04). Conclusion ACE DD and AT1R A/C genotypes implicated possible roles in the hypertensive state and in renal damage among children with ESRD. This result might be useful in planning therapeutic strategies for individual patients. PMID:21859496

  9. Activation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor leads to movement of the sixth transmembrane domain: analysis by the substituted cysteine accessibility method.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stéphane S; Holleran, Brian J; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard

    2007-07-01

    The role of transmembrane domain six (TMD6) of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor, which is predicted to undergo conformational changes after agonist binding, was investigated using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method. Each residue in the Lys240-Leu265 fragment was mutated, one at a time, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the charged sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agent methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA). This treatment led to a significant reduction in binding of (125)I-[Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII to the F249C, H256C, T260C, and V264C mutant receptors, suggesting that these residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the AT(1) receptor. It is noteworthy that this pattern of acquired MTSEA sensitivity was altered for TMD6 cysteines engineered in a constitutively active AT(1) receptor. Indeed, mutant F249C was insensitive to MTSEA treatment, whereas the sensitivity of mutant V264C decreased. Under these conditions, one other mutant, F261C, was found to be sensitive to MTSEA treatment. Our results suggest that constitutive activation of the AT(1) receptor causes TMD6 to pivot. This movement moves the top (extracellular side) of TMD6 toward the binding pocket and simultaneously distances the bottom (intracellular side) away from the binding pocket. Using this approach, we identified key elements within TMD6 that contribute to the activation of class A GPCRs through structural rearrangements.

  10. Human GRK4γ142V Variant Promotes Angiotensin II Type I Receptor-Mediated Hypertension via Renal Histone Deacetylase Type 1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zeng, Chunyu; Villar, Van Anthony M; Chen, Shi-You; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Wang, Xiaoyan; Asico, Laureano D; Jones, John E; Yang, Yu; Sanada, Hironobu; Felder, Robin A; Eisner, Gilbert M; Weir, Matthew R; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-02-01

    The influence of a single gene on the pathogenesis of essential hypertension may be difficult to ascertain, unless the gene interacts with other genes that are germane to blood pressure regulation. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4 (GRK4) is one such gene. We have reported that the expression of its variant hGRK4γ(142V) in mice results in hypertension because of impaired dopamine D1 receptor. Signaling through dopamine D1 receptor and angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) reciprocally modulates renal sodium excretion and blood pressure. Here, we demonstrate the ability of the hGRK4γ(142V) to increase the expression and activity of the AT1R. We show that hGRK4γ(142V) phosphorylates histone deacetylase type 1 and promotes its nuclear export to the cytoplasm, resulting in increased AT1R expression and greater pressor response to angiotensin II. AT1R blockade and the deletion of the Agtr1a gene normalize the hypertension in hGRK4γ(142V) mice. These findings illustrate the unique role of GRK4 by targeting receptors with opposite physiological activity for the same goal of maintaining blood pressure homeostasis, and thus making the GRK4 a relevant therapeutic target to control blood pressure.

  11. Depletion of Endothelial or Smooth Muscle Cell-Specific Angiotensin II Type 1a Receptors Does Not Influence Aortic Aneurysms or Atherosclerosis in LDL Receptor Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rateri, Debra L.; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Knight, Victoria; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Whole body genetic deletion of AT1a receptors in mice uniformly reduces hypercholesterolemia and angiotensin II-(AngII) induced atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). However, the role of AT1a receptor stimulation of principal cell types resident in the arterial wall remains undefined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells influences the development of atherosclerosis and AAAs. Methodology/Principal Findings AT1a receptor floxed mice were developed in an LDL receptor −/− background. To generate endothelial or smooth muscle cell specific deficiency, AT1a receptor floxed mice were bred with mice expressing Cre under the control of either Tie2 or SM22, respectively. Groups of males and females were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet for 3 months to determine effects on atherosclerosis. Deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effect on the size of atherosclerotic lesions. We also determined the effect of cell-specific AT1a receptor deficiency on atherosclerosis and AAAs using male mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet and infused with AngII (1,000 ng/kg/min). Again, deletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells had no discernible effects on either AngII-induced atherosclerotic lesions or AAAs. Conclusions Although previous studies have demonstrated whole body AT1a receptor deficiency diminishes atherosclerosis and AAAs, depletion of AT1a receptors in either endothelial or smooth muscle cells did not affect either of these vascular pathologies. PMID:23236507

  12. Leveraging NMR and X-ray Data of the Free Ligands to Build Better Drugs Targeting Angiotensin II Type 1 G-Protein Coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Kellici, Tahsin F; Ntountaniotis, Dimitrios; Kritsi, Eftichia; Zervou, Maria; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis; Potamitis, Constantinos; Durdagi, Serdar; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Ergun, Gizem; Gokdemir, Ebru; Halabalaki, Maria; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P; Liapakis, George; Tzakos, Andreas; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) has been recently crystallized. A new era has emerged for the structure-based rational drug design and the synthesis of novel AT1R antagonists. In this critical review, the X-ray crystallographic data of commercially available AT1R antagonists in free form are analyzed and compared with the conformational analysis results obtained using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling. The same AT1R antagonists are docked and compared in terms of their interactions in their binding site using homology models and the crystallized AT1R receptor. Various aspects derived from these comparisons regarding rational drug design are outlined.

  13. Age determines the magnitudes of angiotensin II-induced contractions, mRNA, and protein expression of angiotensin type 1 receptors in rat carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Zoltan; Cseplo, Peter; Ivic, Ivan; Matics, Robert; Hamar, Janos; Koller, Akos

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that aging alters angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vasomotor responses and expression of vascular mRNA and protein angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R). Thus, carotid arteries were isolated from the following age groups of rats: 8 days, 2-9 months, 12-20 months, and 20-30 months, and their vasomotor responses were measured in a myograph after repeated administrations of Ang II. Vascular relative AT1R mRNA level was determined by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and the AT1R protein density was measured by Western blot. Contractions to the first administration of Ang II increased from 8 days to 6 months and then they decreased to 30 months. In general, second administration of Ang II elicited reduced contractions, but they also increased from 8 days until 2 months and then they decreased to 30 months. Similarly the AT1R mRNA level increased from 8 days to 12 months and then decreased to 30 months. Similarly the AT1R protein density increased from 8 days until 16 months and then they decreased to 30 months. The pattern of these changes correlated with functional vasomotor data. We conclude that aging (newborn to senescence) has substantial effects on Ang II-induced vasomotor responses and AT1R signaling suggesting the importance of genetic programs.

  14. Involvement of Type 1 Angiontensin II Receptor (AT1) in Cardiovascular Changes Induced by Chronic Emotional Stress: Comparison between Homotypic and Heterotypic Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Ferreira, Willian; Vieira, Jonas O.; Almeida, Jeferson; Gomes-de-Souza, Lucas; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence has shown an important role of emotional stress in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, studies in animal models have demonstrated that daily exposure to different stressor (heterotypic stressor) evokes more severe changes than those resulting from repeated exposure to the same aversive stimulus (homotypic stressor), possibly due to the habituation process upon repeated exposure to the same stressor. Despite these pieces of evidence, the mechanisms involved in the stress-evoked cardiovascular dysfunction are poorly understood. Therefore, the present study investigated the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) acting on the type 1 Ang II receptor (AT1) in the cardiovascular dysfunctions evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic emotional stresses in rats. For this purpose, we compared the effect of the chronic treatment with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (30 mg/kg/day, p.o.) on the cardiovascular and autonomic changes evoked by the heterotypic stressor chronic variable stress (CVS) and the homotypic stressor repeated restraint stress (RRS). RRS increased the sympathetic tone to the heart and decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity, whereas CVS decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity. Additionally, both stressors impaired the baroreflex function. Alterations in the autonomic activity and the baroreflex impairment were inhibited by losartan treatment. Additionally, CVS reduced the body weight and increased the circulating corticosterone; however, these effects were not affected by losartan. In conclusion, these findings indicate the involvement of angiotensin II/AT1 receptors in the autonomic changes evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic stressors. Moreover, the present results provide evidence that the increase in the circulating corticosterone and body weight reduction evoked by heterotypic stressors are independent of AT1 receptors. PMID:27588004

  15. Detection of Nitric Oxide Induced by Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 Using Soluble Guanylate Cyclase beta1 Subunit Fused to a Yellow Fluorescent Protein, Venus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuichi; Ozawa, Kentaro; Komatsubara, Akira T; Zhao, Jing; Nishi, Mayumi; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important gaseous molecule involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we report the development of a high-affinity method to detect NO using soluble guanylate cyclase beta1 subunit fused to Venus, a variant of yellow fluorescent protein (sGC-Venus). We measured the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus with and without an NO donor using purified probes. At 560 nm emission, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was increased by approximately 2.5-fold by the NO donor, but the fluorescence intensities of sGC-Venus excited by other wavelengths showed much less of an increase or no significant increase. To measure NO in living cells, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was normalized to that at 488 nm excitation because it showed no significant difference with or without the NO donor. In HEK293 cells overexpressing the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor), the production of NO induced by activation of the AT1 receptor was detected using sGC-Venus. These data indicate that sGC-Venus will be a useful tool for visualizing intracellular NO in living cells and that NO might be a common tool to regulate GPCRs.

  16. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  17. In vivo imaging of oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice and its normalization by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker

    SciTech Connect

    Sonta, Toshiyo; Inoguchi, Toyoshi . E-mail: toyoshi@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yasukawa, Keiji; Inuo, Mieko; Tsubouchi, Hirotaka; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Utsumi, Hideo; Nawata, Hajime

    2005-05-06

    This study was undertaken to evaluate oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice by electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging technique. Oxidative stress in the kidney was evaluated as organ-specific reducing activity with the signal decay rates of carbamoyl-PROXYL probe using ESR imaging. The signal decay rates were significantly faster in corresponding image pixels of the kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice than in those of controls. This technique further demonstrated that administration of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/kg), completely restored the signal decay rates in the diabetic kidneys to control values. In conclusion, this study provided for the first time the in vivo evidence for increased oxidative stress in the kidneys of diabetic mice and its normalization by ARB as evaluated by ESR imaging. This technique would be useful as a means of further elucidating the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy.

  18. Neuronal angiotensin II type 1 receptor upregulation in heart failure: activation of activator protein 1 and Jun N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Lie; Roy, Shyamal K; Cornish, Kurtis G; Zucker, Irving H

    2006-10-27

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a leading cause of mortality in developed countries. Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in the development and progression of CHF. Many of the important functions of Ang II are mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R), including the increase in sympathetic nerve activity in CHF. However, the central regulation of the AT(1)R in the setting of CHF is not well understood. This study investigated the AT(1)R in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of rabbits with CHF, its downstream pathway, and its gene regulation by the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1). Studies were performed in 5 groups of rabbits: sham (n=5), pacing-induced (3 to 4 weeks) CHF (n=5), CHF with intracerebroventricular (ICV) losartan treatment (n=5), normal with ICV Ang II treatment (n=5), and normal with ICV Ang II plus losartan treatment (n=5). AT(1)R mRNA and protein expressions, plasma Ang II, and AP-1-DNA binding activity were significantly higher in RVLM of CHF compared with Sham rabbits (240.4+/-30.2%, P<0.01; 206.6+/-25.8%, P<0.01; 280+/-36.5%, P<0.05; 207+/-16.4%, P<0.01, respectively). Analysis of the stress-activated protein kinase/Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) pathway showed that phosphorylated c-Jun proteins, phosphorylated JNK proteins, and JNK activity increased significantly in RVLM of CHF compared with sham (262.9+/-48.1%, 213.8+/-27.7%, 148.2+/-10.1% of control, respectively). Importantly, ICV losartan in CHF rabbits attenuated these increases. ICV Ang II in normal rabbits simulated the molecular changes seen in CHF. This effect was blocked by concomitant ICV losartan. In addition, Ang II-induced AT(1)R expression was blocked by losartan and a JNK inhibitor, but not by extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38 MAP kinase inhibitors in a neuronal cell culture. These data suggest that central Ang II activates the AT(1)R, SAPK/JNK pathway. AP-1 may further regulate gene expression in RVLM in the CHF state.

  19. Impact of Angiotensin I-converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor Blockers on Survival of Patients with NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lili; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Ling; Wan, Huanying; Gao, Beili; Feng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II type-1 receptor blockers (ARBs) can decrease tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis and inhibit metastasis. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are found in approximately 30% of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in East Asia and in 10–15% of such patients in Western countries. We retrospectively identified 228 patients with histologically confirmed advanced NSCLC and 73 patients with early stage disease; 103 of these patients took antihypertensive drugs, and 112 received treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There was a significant difference in progression-free survival after first-line therapy (PFS1) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients treated with TKIs, there was a significant difference in PFS but not in overall survival (OS) between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. For the patients with advanced NSCLC, there was a significant difference in PFS1 between the ACEI/ARB group and the non-ACEI/ARB group. ACEI/ARB in combination with standard chemotherapy or TKIs had a positive effect on PFS1 or OS, regardless of whether the lung cancer was in the early or advanced stage. PMID:26883083

  20. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    PubMed Central

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile. PMID:27239293

  1. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar1,Ile8]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. PMID:25934394

  2. Paracrine Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Matrix Stiffness-Induced Cardiac Myofibroblast Differentiation via Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Smad7.

    PubMed

    Yong, Kar Wey; Li, Yuhui; Liu, Fusheng; Bin Gao; Lu, Tian Jian; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Ma, Yufei; Xu, Feng; Huang, Guoyou

    2016-10-05

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) hold great promise in cardiac fibrosis therapy, due to their potential ability of inhibiting cardiac myofibroblast differentiation (a hallmark of cardiac fibrosis). However, the mechanism involved in their effects remains elusive. To explore this, it is necessary to develop an in vitro cardiac fibrosis model that incorporates pore size and native tissue-mimicking matrix stiffness, which may regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. In the present study, collagen coated polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates were fabricated, in which the pore size was adjusted without altering the matrix stiffness. Stiffness is shown to regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation independently of pore size. Substrate at a stiffness of 30 kPa, which mimics the stiffness of native fibrotic cardiac tissue, was found to induce cardiac myofibroblast differentiation to create in vitro cardiac fibrosis model. Conditioned medium of hMSCs was applied to the model to determine its role and inhibitory mechanism on cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. It was found that hMSCs secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) to inhibit cardiac myofibroblast differentiation via downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and upregulation of Smad7. These findings would aid in establishment of the therapeutic use of hMSCs in cardiac fibrosis therapy in future.

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Combination Therapy Consisting of Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blocker, Calcium Channel Blocker and Hydrochlorothiazide in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Yuhei; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Motozato, Kota; Yoshimine, Yuka; Norimatsu, Kenji; Arimura, Tadaaki; Koyoshi, Rie; Morii, Joji; Kuwano, Takashi; Inoue, Ken; Shirotani, Tetsuro; Fujisawa, Kazuaki; Matsunaga, Eiyu; Saku, Keijiro

    2017-01-01

    Background Many patients continue to have high blood pressure (BP) even after treatment with high-dose (H)-angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)/calcium channel blocker (CCB) or middle-dose (M)-ARB/CCB/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ). Methods Thirty-two hypertensive patients who had the use of H-ARB/CCB or M-ARB/CCB/HCTZ were enrolled in this study. We applied a changeover with a switch to H-ARB (telmisartan 80 mg/day)/CCB (amlodipine 5 mg/day or nifedipine CR 40 mg/day)/HCTZ (12.5 mg/day). Results Systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) were significantly decreased in all patients and in the H-ARB/CCB and M-ARB/CCB/HCTZ groups after 3 months. Percentage (%) of patients who reached the target BP after 3 months (72%) in all patients was significantly higher than that at 0 months (19%). There were no serious adverse effects in any of the patients. Conclusions Combination therapy with H-ARB/CCB/HCTZ was associated with a significant reduction of BP. PMID:28090225

  4. Paracrine Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Matrix Stiffness-Induced Cardiac Myofibroblast Differentiation via Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Smad7

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kar Wey; Li, Yuhui; Liu, Fusheng; Bin Gao; Lu, Tian Jian; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Ma, Yufei; Xu, Feng; Huang, Guoyou

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) hold great promise in cardiac fibrosis therapy, due to their potential ability of inhibiting cardiac myofibroblast differentiation (a hallmark of cardiac fibrosis). However, the mechanism involved in their effects remains elusive. To explore this, it is necessary to develop an in vitro cardiac fibrosis model that incorporates pore size and native tissue-mimicking matrix stiffness, which may regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. In the present study, collagen coated polyacrylamide hydrogel substrates were fabricated, in which the pore size was adjusted without altering the matrix stiffness. Stiffness is shown to regulate cardiac myofibroblast differentiation independently of pore size. Substrate at a stiffness of 30 kPa, which mimics the stiffness of native fibrotic cardiac tissue, was found to induce cardiac myofibroblast differentiation to create in vitro cardiac fibrosis model. Conditioned medium of hMSCs was applied to the model to determine its role and inhibitory mechanism on cardiac myofibroblast differentiation. It was found that hMSCs secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) to inhibit cardiac myofibroblast differentiation via downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and upregulation of Smad7. These findings would aid in establishment of the therapeutic use of hMSCs in cardiac fibrosis therapy in future. PMID:27703175

  5. Angiotensin II type 1a receptors in subfornical organ contribute towards chronic intermittent hypoxia-associated sustained increase in mean arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashwini; Little, Joel T; Nedungadi, T Prashant; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Sleep apnea is associated with hypertension. The mechanisms contributing to a sustained increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) even during normoxic awake-state remain unknown. Rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia for 7 days, a model of the hypoxemia associated with sleep apnea, exhibit sustained increases in MAP even during the normoxic dark phase. Activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) hypertension. Since the subfornical organ (SFO) serves as a primary target for the central actions of circulating ANG II, we tested the effects of ANG II type 1a receptor (AT1aR) knockdown in the SFO on the sustained increase in MAP in this CIH model. Adeno-associated virus carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) and small-hairpin RNA against either AT1aR or a scrambled control sequence (SCM) was stereotaxically injected in the SFO of rats. After recovery, MAP, heart rate, respiratory rate, and activity were continuously recorded using radiotelemetry. In the normoxic groups, the recorded variables did not deviate from the baseline values. Both CIH groups exhibited significant increases in MAP during CIH exposures (P < 0.05). During the normoxic dark phase in the CIH groups, only the SCM-injected group exhibited a sustained increase in MAP (P < 0.05). The AT1aR-CIH group showed significant decreases in FosB/ΔFosB staining in the median preoptic nucleus and the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus compared with the SCM-CIH group. Our data indicate that AT1aRs in the SFO are critical for the sustained elevation in MAP and increased FosB/ΔFosB expression in forebrain autonomic nuclei associated with CIH.

  6. The Relationship between Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Repolarization Parameters after a First Anterior Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Unal; Nergiz, Sebnem; Karahan, M. Zulkif

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Genetic influence on T-wave peak to End (Tpe) time in patients with a first anterior acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is uncertain. A polymorphism in the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene was discovered recently. The polymorphism consists of an A or C variant, given three different possible genotypes: AA, AC, CC. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of polymorphism of the AT1R gene polymorphism on Tpe after a first anterior AMI. Subjects and Methods The subjects were 142 patients (110 men, 32 women, 58±13 years) with a first anterior AMI; ten patients were excluded from this study. Based on the polymorphism of the AT1R gene, they were classified into two groups: Group 1 (AA genotype) of 91 patients and group 2 (AC and CC genotype) of 41 patients. A 12-lead resting ECG was recorded at admission to the coronary care unit in patients with anterior AMI and were manually measured with a ruler. QTc, QTd, QTcd, Tpe, Tpe/QT parameters were measured. Results There was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics of patients (p>0.05). We found significant reduction in QTc, QTd, QTcd, Tpe, Tpe/QT indices Group 1 (AA genotype) (mean 66±28 ms) than group 2 (AC and CC genotype) (mean 95±34 ms) (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients with a first anterior AMI, AT1R gene polymorphisms may influence on repolarization parameters. Although further studies are required. PMID:27826337

  7. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists alleviate muscle pathology in the mouse model for laminin-α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Laminin-α2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) is a severe muscle-wasting disease for which no curative treatment is available. Antagonists of the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1), including the anti-hypertensive drug losartan, have been shown to block also the profibrotic action of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and thereby ameliorate disease progression in mouse models of Marfan syndrome. Because fibrosis and failure of muscle regeneration are the main reasons for the severe disease course of MDC1A, we tested whether L-158809, an analog derivative of losartan, could ameliorate the dystrophy in dyW/dyW mice, the best-characterized model of MDC1A. Methods L-158809 was given in food to dyW/dyW mice at the age of 3 weeks, and the mice were analyzed at the age of 6 to 7 weeks. We examined the effect of L-158809 on muscle histology and on muscle regeneration after injury as well as the locomotor activity and muscle strength of the mice. Results We found that TGF-β signaling in the muscles of the dyW/dyW mice was strongly increased, and that L-158809 treatment suppressed this signaling. Consequently, L-158809 reduced fibrosis and inflammation in skeletal muscle of dyW/dyW mice, and largely restored muscle regeneration after toxin-induced injury. Mice showed improvement in their locomotor activity and grip strength, and their body weight was significantly increased. Conclusion These data provide evidence that AT1 antagonists ameliorate several hallmarks of MDC1A in dyW/dyW mice, the best-characterized mouse model for this disease. Because AT1 antagonists are well tolerated in humans and widely used in clinical practice, these results suggest that losartan may offer a potential future treatment of patients with MDC1A. PMID:22943509

  8. Anti-Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Anti-Endothelial Cell Antibodies: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Pathological Findings in Allograft Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Philogene, Mary Carmelle; Bagnasco, Serena; Kraus, Edward S.; Montgomery, Robert A.; Dragun, Duska; Leffell, Mary S.; Zachary, Andrea A.; Jackson, Annette M.

    2017-01-01

    Background This is a cross-sectional study designed to evaluate the histologic characteristics of graft injury in the presence of anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor antibody (AT1R-Ab) and anti-endothelial cell antibody (AECA). Methods Non-HLA antibody testing was included in the posttransplant evaluation for 70 kidney recipients. Biopsies were performed for cause for 47 patients and as protocol for the remaining 23 patients. Biopsy-proven rejection was defined according to the Banff 2009-2013 criteria. AT1R-Ab was measured on an ELISA platform. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on AT1R-Ab levels (>17, 10-17, and <10 U/ml). AECA was evaluated using an endothelial cell crossmatch (ECXM) in patients whose HLA antibody level was insufficient to cause a positive flow cytometric crossmatch. Results AT1R-Ab levels were higher in patients diagnosed with antibody mediated rejection compared to those with no rejection (P = 0.004). Glomerulitis (g) and peritubular capillaritis (ptc) scores were independently correlated with increased AT1R-Ab concentrations in the presence or absence of HLA-DSA (P = 0.007 and 0.03 for g scores; p = 0.005 and 0.03 for ptc scores). Patients with a positive ECXM had higher AT1R-Ab levels compared to those with a negative ECXM (P = 0.005). Microcirculation inflammation (MCI = g + ptc score) was higher in patients with a positive ECXM and with AT1R-Ab >17 U/ml, although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.07). Conclusions The data show an association between non-HLA antibodies detected in the ECXM and AT1R ELISA and microvascular injury observed in antibody mediated rejection. PMID:27222934

  9. Intracerebroventricular losartan infusion modulates angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in the subfornical organ and drinking behaviour in bile-duct-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Walch, Joseph D; Carreño, Flávia Regina; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes congestive liver failure that initiates haemodynamic changes, including peripheral vasodilatation and generalized oedema. Peripheral vasodilatation is hypothesized to activate compensatory mechanisms, including increased drinking behaviour and neurohumoral activation. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA and protein in the lamina terminalis are associated with BDL-induced hyposmolality in the rat. All rats received either BDL or sham-ligation surgery. The rats were housed in metabolic chambers for measurement of fluid and food intake and urine output. Expression of AT(1)R in the lamina terminalis was assessed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Average baseline water intake increased significantly in BDL rats compared with sham-operated rats, and upregulation of AT(1)R protein and AT(1a)R mRNA were observed in the subfornical organ of BDL rats. Separate groups of BDL and sham-ligated rats were instrumented with minipumps filled with either losartan (2.0 μg μl(-1)) or 0.9% saline for chronic intracerebroventricular or chronic subcutaneous infusion. Chronic intracerebroventricular losartan infusion attenuated the increased drinking behaviour and prevented the increased abundance of AT(1)R protein in the subfornical organ in BDL rats. Chronic subcutaneous infusion did not affect water intake or AT(1)R abundance in the subfornical organ. The data presented here indicate a possible role of increased central AT(1)R expression in the regulation of drinking behaviour during congestive cirrhosis.

  10. Central Rho kinase inhibition restores baroreflex sensitivity and angiotensin II type 1 receptor protein imbalance in conscious rabbits with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Haack, Karla K V; Gao, Lie; Schiller, Alicia M; Curry, Pamela L; Pellegrino, Peter R; Zucker, Irving H

    2013-03-01

    The small GTPase RhoA and its associated kinase ROCKII are involved in vascular smooth muscle cell contraction and endothelial NO synthase mRNA destabilization. Overactivation of the RhoA/ROCKII pathway is implicated in several pathologies, including chronic heart failure (CHF), and may contribute to the enhanced sympathetic outflow seen in CHF as a result of decreased NO availability. Thus, we hypothesized that central ROCKII blockade would improve the sympathovagal imbalance in a pacing rabbit model of CHF in an NO-dependent manner. CHF was induced by rapid ventricular pacing and characterized by an ejection fraction of ≤45%. Animals were implanted with an intracerbroventricular cannula and osmotic minipump (rate, 1 μL/h) containing sterile saline, 1.5 µg/kg per day fasudil (Fas, a ROCKII inhibitor) for 4 days or Fas+100 µg/kg per day Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, a NO synthase inhibitor. Arterial baroreflex control was assessed by intravenous infusion of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Fas infusion significantly lowered resting heart rate by decreasing sympathetic and increasing vagal tone. Furthermore, Fas improved baroreflex gain in CHF in an NO-dependent manner. In CHF Fas animals, the decrease in heart rate in response to intravenous metoprolol was similar to Sham and was reversed by Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride. Fas decreased angiotensin II type 1 receptor and phospho-ERM protein expression and increased endothelial NO synthase expression in the brain stem of CHF animals. These data strongly suggest that central ROCKII activation contributes to cardiac sympathoexcitation in the setting of CHF and that central Fas restores vagal and sympathetic tone in an NO-dependent manner. ROCKII may be a new central therapeutic target in the setting of CHF.

  11. Discovery of a Series of Imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with Dual Activity at Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-[gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F.; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F.; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A.; Edmunds, Jeremy J.; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J.; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F.; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P.; Stoner, Chad

    2013-03-07

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPAR{gamma} confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPAR{gamma} activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC{sub 50} = 1.6 nM) with partial PPAR{gamma} agonism (EC{sub 50} = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  12. Discovery of a series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines with dual activity at angiotensin II type 1 receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Garcia, Agustin; Filzen, Gary F; Flynn, Declan; Bigge, Christopher F; Chen, Jing; Davis, Jo Ann; Dudley, Danette A; Edmunds, Jeremy J; Esmaeil, Nadia; Geyer, Andrew; Heemstra, Ronald J; Jalaie, Mehran; Ohren, Jeffrey F; Ostroski, Robert; Ellis, Teresa; Schaum, Robert P; Stoner, Chad

    2011-06-23

    Mining of an in-house collection of angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to identify compounds with activity at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) revealed a new series of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines 2 possessing activity at these two receptors. Early availability of the crystal structure of the lead compound 2a bound to the ligand binding domain of human PPARγ confirmed the mode of interaction of this scaffold to the nuclear receptor and assisted in the optimization of PPARγ activity. Among the new compounds, (S)-3-(5-(2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl)-2-ethyl-5-isobutyl-7-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (2l) was identified as a potent angiotensin II type I receptor blocker (IC(50) = 1.6 nM) with partial PPARγ agonism (EC(50) = 212 nM, 31% max) and oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of 2l was demonstrated in animal models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (ZDF rat). In the SHR, 2l was highly efficacious in lowering blood pressure, while robust lowering of glucose and triglycerides was observed in the male ZDF rat.

  13. Angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) regulates expansion, differentiation, and functional capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Filho, João Luiz; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia Sá

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and its receptor AT1 (AT1R), an important effector axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), have been demonstrated to regulate T-cell responses. However, these studies characterized Ang II and AT1R effects using pharmacological tools, which do not target only Ang II/AT1R axis. The specific role of AT1R expressed by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is unknown. Then we immunized transgenic mice expressing a T-cell receptor specific for SIINFEKL epitope (OT-I mice) with sporozoites of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei expressing the cytotoxic epitope SIINFEKL. Early priming events after immunization were not affected but the expansion and contraction of AT1R-deficient (AT1R−/−) OT-I cells was decreased. Moreover, they seemed more activated, express higher levels of CTLA-4, PD-1, LAG-3, and have decreased functional capacity during the effector phase. Memory AT1R−/− OT-I cells exhibited higher IL-7Rα expression, activation, and exhaustion phenotypes but less cytotoxic capacity. Importantly, AT1R−/− OT-I cells show better control of blood parasitemia burden and ameliorate mice survival during lethal disease induced by blood-stage malaria. Our study reveals that AT1R in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells regulates expansion, differentiation, and function during effector and memory phases of the response against Plasmodium, which could apply to different infectious agents. PMID:27782175

  14. Role of Mas receptor antagonist (A779) on pressure diuresis and natriuresis and renal blood flow in the absence of angiotensin II receptors type 1 and 2 in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, A; Oryan, S; Nematbakhsh, M

    2014-10-01

    Sexual differences in blood pressure are associated with angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) and its receptor and enzyme function targeting. Blockade of angiotensin II (AngII) receptors type 1 and 2 (AT1R and AT2R) inhibits some actions of Ang1-7. We described the role of Ang1-7 receptor (MasR) antagonist (A779) on kidney hemodynamics when AT1R and AT2R are blocked with losartan and PD123319. In anaesthetized male and female rats after blockade of both AT1R and AT2R, the renal perfusion pressure (RPP) was controlled in two levels of 80 and 100 mmHg via an adjustable clamp placed around the aorta above the level of the renal arteries. Then, the effects of saline vehicle and MasR blocker (A779) were tested on pressure natriuresis and diuresis, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR). In the absence of AT1R and AT2R; RVR, RBF/wet kidney tissue weight, and serum level of renin did not alter in both genders either MasR was blocked or not. However, urine flow rate (UF) and sodium excretion (UNaV) increased significantly at the pressure level of 100 mmHg in the presence of MasR in male (P<0.05) but not in female rats. When AT1R and AT2R were blocked, the impact of MasR is gender-related in pressure natriuresis and diuresis, and pressure natriuresis and diuresis in male rats (not female) increases in the presence of MasR.

  15. Targeting Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor (AT1R) Inhibits the Harmful Phenotype of Plasmodium-Specific CD8+ T Cells during Blood-Stage Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Filho, João L.; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana A. S.

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T-cell response is critical in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria during blood-stage. Our group and other have been shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) and its receptor AT1 (AT1R), a key effector axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), have immune regulatory effects on T cells. Previously, we showed that inhibition of AT1R signaling protects mice against the lethal disease induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection However, most of the Ang II/AT1R actions were characterized by using only pharmacological approaches, the effects of which may not always be due to a specific receptor blockade. In addition, the mechanisms of action of the AT1R in inducing the pathogenic activity of Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells during blood-stage were not determined. Here, we examined how angiotensin II/AT1R axis promotes the harmful response of Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T-cell during blood-stage by using genetic and pharmacological approaches. We evaluated the response of wild-type (WT) and AT1R−/− Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells in mice infected with a transgenic PbA lineage expressing ovalbumin; and in parallel infected mice receiving WT Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells were treated with losartan (AT1R antagonist) or captopril (ACE inhibitor). Both, AT1R−/− OT-I cells and WT OT-I cells from losartan- or captopril-treated mice showed lower expansion, reduced IL-2 production and IL-2Rα expression, lower activation (lower expression of CD69, CD44 and CD160) and lower exhaustion profiles. AT1R−/− OT-I cells also exhibit lower expression of the integrin LFA-1 and the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3, known to play a key role in the development of cerebral malaria. Moreover, AT1R−/− OT-I cells produce lower amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α and show lower degranulation upon restimulation. In conclusion, our results show the pivotal mechanisms of AT1R-induced harmful phenotype of Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cells during blood-stage malaria. PMID:28261571

  16. Targeting Angiotensin II Type-1 Receptor (AT1R) Inhibits the Harmful Phenotype of Plasmodium-Specific CD8(+) T Cells during Blood-Stage Malaria.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filho, João L; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Pinheiro, Ana A S

    2017-01-01

    CD8(+) T-cell response is critical in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria during blood-stage. Our group and other have been shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) and its receptor AT1 (AT1R), a key effector axis of renin-angiotensin system (RAS), have immune regulatory effects on T cells. Previously, we showed that inhibition of AT1R signaling protects mice against the lethal disease induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection However, most of the Ang II/AT1R actions were characterized by using only pharmacological approaches, the effects of which may not always be due to a specific receptor blockade. In addition, the mechanisms of action of the AT1R in inducing the pathogenic activity of Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells during blood-stage were not determined. Here, we examined how angiotensin II/AT1R axis promotes the harmful response of Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T-cell during blood-stage by using genetic and pharmacological approaches. We evaluated the response of wild-type (WT) and AT1R(-/-)Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice infected with a transgenic PbA lineage expressing ovalbumin; and in parallel infected mice receiving WT Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells were treated with losartan (AT1R antagonist) or captopril (ACE inhibitor). Both, AT1R(-/-) OT-I cells and WT OT-I cells from losartan- or captopril-treated mice showed lower expansion, reduced IL-2 production and IL-2Rα expression, lower activation (lower expression of CD69, CD44 and CD160) and lower exhaustion profiles. AT1R(-/-) OT-I cells also exhibit lower expression of the integrin LFA-1 and the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3, known to play a key role in the development of cerebral malaria. Moreover, AT1R(-/-) OT-I cells produce lower amounts of IFN-γ and TNF-α and show lower degranulation upon restimulation. In conclusion, our results show the pivotal mechanisms of AT1R-induced harmful phenotype of Plasmodium-specific CD8(+) T cells during blood-stage malaria.

  17. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 blockade decreases CTGF/CCN2-mediated damage and fibrosis in normal and dystrophic skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Morales, María Gabriela; Cabrera, Daniel; Vio, Carlos P; Brandan, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN-2) is mainly involved in the induction of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The levels of CTGF correlate with the degree and severity of fibrosis in many tissues, including dystrophic skeletal muscle. The CTGF overexpression in tibialis anterior skeletal muscle using an adenoviral vector reproduced many of the features observed in dystrophic muscles including muscle damage and regeneration, fibrotic response and decrease in the skeletal muscle strength. The renin–angiotensin system is involved in the genesis and progression of fibrotic diseases through its main fibrotic components angiotensin-II and its transducer receptor AT-1. The use of AT-1 receptor blockers (ARB) has been shown to decrease fibrosis. In this paper, we show the effect of AT-1 receptor blockade on CTGF-dependent biological activity in skeletal muscle cells as well as the response to CTGF overexpression in normal skeletal muscle. Our results show that in myoblasts ARB decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM protein levels, extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK-1/2) phosphorylation and stress fibres formation. In tibialis anterior muscle overexpressing CTGF using an adenovirus, ARB treatment decreased CTGF-mediated increase of ECM molecules, α-SMA and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation levels. Quite remarkable, ARB was able to prevent the loss of contractile force of tibialis anterior muscles overexpressing CTGF. Finally, we show that ARB decreased the levels of fibrotic proteins, CTGF and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation augmented in a dystrophic skeletal muscle from mdx mice. We propose that ARB is a novel pharmacological tool that can be used to decrease the fibrosis induced by CTGF in skeletal muscle associated with muscular dystrophies. PMID:21645240

  18. Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Chiriboga, A. Sebastian; Komorowski, Lars; Kümpfel, Tania; Probst, Christian; Hinson, Shannon R.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe retrospectively the clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1-IgG). Methods: Specimens of 9 patients evaluated on a service basis in the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory by tissue-based immunofluorescence assay (IFA) yielded a robust, synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with mGluR1-IgG (serum, 9; CSF, 2 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay (CBA) confirmed mGluR1 specificity in all 11 specimens. A further 2 patients were detected in Germany primarily by CBA. Results: The median symptom onset age for the 11 patients was 58 years (range 33–81 years); 6 were male. All 9 Mayo Clinic patients had subacute onset of cerebellar ataxia, 4 had dysgeusia, 1 had psychiatric symptoms, and 1 had cognitive impairment. All were evaluated for malignancy, but only 1 was affected (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma). One developed ataxia post–herpes zoster infection. Head MRIs were generally atrophic or normal-appearing, and CSF was inflammatory in just 1 of 5 tested, though mGluR1-IgG was detected in both specimens submitted. Five patients improved (attributable to immunotherapy in 4, spontaneously in 1), 3 stabilized (attributable to immunotherapy in 2, cancer therapy in 1), and 1 progressively declined (untreated). The 2 German patients had ataxia, but fulfilled multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria (1 relapsing-remitting, 1 progressive). However, both had histories of hematologic malignancy (acute lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma), and had mGluR1-IgG detected in serum by CBA (weakly positive on tissue-based IFA). Conclusions: mGluR1 autoimmunity represents a treatable form of cerebellar ataxia. Dysgeusia may be a diagnostic clue. Paraneoplastic, parainfectious, or idiopathic causes may occur. PMID:26888994

  19. Blood pressure, magnesium and other mineral balance in two rat models of salt-sensitive, induced hypertension: effects of a non-peptide angiotensin II receptor type 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rondón, Lusliany Josefina; Marcano, Eunice; Rodríguez, Fátima; del Castillo, Jesús Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is critically involved in regulating arterial blood pressure (BP). Inappropriate angiotensin type-1 receptor activation by angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is related to increased arterial BP. Mg has a role in BP; it can affect cardiac electrical activity, myocardial contractility, and vascular tone. To evaluate the relationship between high BP induced by a high sodium (Na) diet and Mg, and other mineral balances, two experimental rat models of salt-sensitive, induced-hypertension were used: Ang-II infused and Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We found that: 1) Ang-II infusion progressively increased BP, which was accompanied by hypomagnesuria and signs of secondary hyperaldosteronism; 2) an additive effect between Ang-II and a high Na load may have an effect on strontium (Sr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) balances; 3) Dahl SS rats fed a high Na diet had a slow pressor response, accompanied by altered Mg, Na, potassium (K), and phosphate (P) balances; and 4) losartan prevented BP increases induced by Ang II-NaCl, but did not modify mineral balances. In Dahl SS rats, losartan attenuated high BP and ameliorated magnesemia, Na and K balances. Mg metabolism maybe considered a possible defect in this strain of rat that may contribute to hypertension.

  20. Dlitiazem inhibits the oxidative stress induced by angiotensin II through growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a in human umbilicus vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingyun; Yang, Meng; Zuo, Shanru; Guan, Xiaofeng; Wang, Jianglin; Chen, Qingjie; Zuo, Xiaocong; Jia, Sujie; Guo, Ren

    2017-02-16

    Diltiazem has been used for post-transplant hypertension, but the mechanism underlying its protective effect of endothelial cells against angiotensin II (Ang II) - induced impairment remains unclear. Human umbilicus vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and divided into seven groups: control, Ang II (10(-6)M), diltiazem (10(-6)M), [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6(25μM), diltiazem (10(-6)M)+Ang II (10(-6)M), losartan (10(-6)M)+Ang II (10(-6)M), [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (25μM) + Dil(10(-6)M)+Ang II (10(-6)M) groups. Nitric oxide (NO) production, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, protein and mRNA expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and p47 phox subunit of NADPH were evaluated. Results indicated that pre- treatment with diltiazem significantly decreased the intracellular ROS levels and increased NO production. Treatment with 10(-6)M Ang II for 24h induced a significant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of eNOS, which was significantly increased by the pre-incubated with diltiazem (10(-6)M). Treatment with 10(-6)M Ang II for 24h induced a significant increase in the mRNA and protein levels of p47 phox subunit of NADHP oxidase, which was significantly decreased by the pre-incubated with diltiazem. However, all of these protective roles of diltiazem were attenuated by pre-incubation of [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6. The results reveal that diltiazem inhibits the Ang II - induced oxidative stress in HUVECs, which may be partly mediated by GHSR1a.

  1. Sex differences in NMDA GluN1 plasticity in rostral ventrolateral medulla neurons containing corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor following slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, T A; Dodos, M; Woods, C; Marques-Lopes, J; Justice, N J; Iadecola, C; Pickel, V M; Glass, M J; Milner, T A

    2015-10-29

    There are profound, yet incompletely understood, sex differences in the neurogenic regulation of blood pressure. Both corticotropin signaling and glutamate receptor plasticity, which differ between males and females, are known to play important roles in the neural regulation of blood pressure. However, the relationship between hypertension and glutamate plasticity in corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-receptive neurons in brain cardiovascular regulatory areas, including the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), is not understood. In the present study, we used dual-label immuno-electron microscopy to analyze sex differences in slow-pressor angiotensin II (AngII) hypertension with respect to the subcellular distribution of the obligatory NMDA glutamate receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in the RVLM and PVN. Studies were conducted in mice expressing the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) under the control of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) promoter (i.e., CRF1-EGFP reporter mice). By light microscopy, GluN1-immunoreactivity (ir) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons of the RVLM and PVN. Moreover, in both regions tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was found in CRF1-EGFP neurons. In response to AngII, male mice showed an elevation in blood pressure that was associated with an increase in the proportion of GluN1 on presumably functional areas of the plasma membrane (PM) in CRF1-EGFP dendritic profiles in the RVLM. In female mice, AngII was neither associated with an increase in blood pressure nor an increase in PM GluN1 in the RVLM. Unlike the RVLM, AngII-mediated hypertension had no effect on GluN1 localization in CRF1-EGFP dendrites in the PVN of either male or female mice. These studies provide an anatomical mechanism for sex-differences in the convergent modulation of RVLM catecholaminergic neurons by CRF and glutamate. Moreover, these results suggest that sexual dimorphism in

  2. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor: another arrow in the adipocytes' bow.

    PubMed

    Bellocchio, L; Cervino, C; Vicennati, V; Pasquali, R; Pagotto, U

    2008-05-01

    The endocannabinoid system has recently emerged as an important modulator of several functions of adipose tissue, including cell proliferation, differentiation and secretion. Here, we will review the effects of cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor activation/blockade in adipocytes by summarising the data in the literature since the discovery of the presence of this receptor in adipose tissue. We will also discuss our original data obtained in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells using WIN55 212, a CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist and SR141716 (rimonabant), a specific CB(1) receptor antagonist, respectively, in different experimental settings.

  3. DPP-4 inhibition with alogliptin on top of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade ameliorates albuminuria via up-regulation of SDF-1α in type 2 diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroki; Taniai, Hisanori; Murayama, Hiroko; Ohshiro, Haruyo; Hayashi, Hikaru; Sato, Seiko; Kikuchi, Nyuko; Komatsu, Taiga; Komatsu, Koga; Komatsu, Kanji; Narita, Takuma; Yamada, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor is a new class of anti-diabetic drug which exerts its glucose-lowering action by suppressing the degradation of a gut incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). To elucidate whether treatment with stronger DPP-4 inhibitor on top of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) provides greater renal protective effects, we performed a crossover study with two DPP-4 inhibitors, sitagliptin and alogliptin, in twelve type 2 diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy taking ARBs. This study consisted of three treatment periods: sitagliptin 50 mg/day for 4 weeks (first period), alogliptin 25 mg/day for 4 weeks (second period), and sitagliptin 50 mg/day for 4 weeks (third period). Significant changes in body mass index, blood pressure, serum lipids, serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and HbA1c were not observed among the three treatment periods. Reduced urinary levels of albumin and an oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), increased urinary cAMP levels, and elevated plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) which is a physiological substrate of DPP-4 were observed after the switch from sitagliptin to a stronger DPP-4 inhibitor alogliptin. Given a large body of evidence indicating anti-oxidative action of cAMP and up-regulation of cellular cAMP production by SDF-1α, the present results suggest that more powerful DPP-4 inhibition on top of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade would offer additional protection against early-stage diabetic nephropathy beyond that attributed to glycemic control, via reduction of renal oxidative stress by SDF-1α-cAMP pathway activation.

  4. Discoidin domain receptor 2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Cosmin; Iscru, Daniel F; Druhan, Lawrence J; Elton, Terry S; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2006-09-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are widely expressed cell-surface receptors, which bind to and are activated by collagens, including collagen type 1. Activation of DDRs and the resulting downstream signaling is known to regulate the extracellular matrix. However, little is known about how DDRs interact with collagen and its direct impact on collagen regulation. Here, we have established that by binding to collagen, the extracellular domain (ECD) of DDR2 inhibits collagen fibrillogenesis and alters the morphology of collagen type 1 fibers. Our in vitro assays utilized DDR2-Fc fusion proteins, which contain only the ECD of DDR2. Using surface plasmon resonance, we confirmed that further oligomerization of DDR2-Fc (by means of anti-Fc antibody) greatly enhances its binding to immobilized collagen type 1. Collagen turbidity measurements and biochemical assays indicated that DDR2 delays the formation of collagen fibrils. Atomic force microscopy of soluble collagen revealed that a predominately monomeric state of collagen was present with DDR2, while control solutions had an abundance of polymeric collagen. Transmission electron microscopy of collagen fibers, showed that the native periodic banded structure of collagen fibers was weakened and nearly absent in the presence of DDR2. Further, using a cell-based assay we demonstrate that overexpression of full length DDR2 inhibits fibrillogenesis of collagen type 1. Our results demonstrate a novel and important functional role of the DDR2 ECD that may contribute to collagen regulation via modulation of fibrillogenesis.

  5. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid (HETE)-dependent Hypertension in Human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A11 Transgenic Mice: NORMALIZATION OF BLOOD PRESSURE BY SODIUM RESTRICTION, HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE, OR BLOCKADE OF THE TYPE 1 ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR.

    PubMed

    Savas, Üzen; Wei, Shouzou; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Falck, John R; Guengerich, F Peter; Capdevila, Jorge H; Johnson, Eric F

    2016-08-05

    Male and female homozygous 129/Sv mice carrying four copies of the human cytochrome P450 4A11 gene (CYP4A11) under control of its native promoter (B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+)) develop hypertension (142 ± 8 versus 113 ± 7 mm Hg systolic blood pressure (BP)), and exhibit increased 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in kidney and urine. The hypertension is reversible by a low-sodium diet and by the CYP4A inhibitor HET0016. B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice display an 18% increase of plasma potassium (p < 0.02), but plasma aldosterone, angiotensin II (ANGII), and renin activities are unchanged. This phenotype resembles human genetic disorders with elevated activity of the sodium chloride co-transporter (NCC) and, accordingly, NCC abundance is increased by 50% in transgenic mice, and NCC levels are normalized by HET0016. ANGII is known to increase NCC abundance, and renal mRNA levels of its precursor angiotensinogen are increased 2-fold in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+), and blockade of the ANGII receptor type 1 with losartan normalizes BP. A pro-hypertensive role for 20-HETE was implicated by normalization of BP and reversal of renal angiotensin mRNA increases by administration of the 20-HETE antagonists 2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)acetate or (S)-2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)succinate. SGK1 expression is also increased in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice and paralleled increases seen for NCC. Losartan, HET0016, and 20-HETE antagonists each normalized SGK1 mRNA expression. These results point to a potential 20-HETE dependence of intrarenal angiotensinogen production and ANGII receptor type 1 activation that are associated with increases in NCC and SGK1 and identify elevated P450 4A11 activity and 20-HETE as potential risk factors for salt-sensitive human hypertension by perturbation of the renal renin-angiotensin axis.

  6. Multiple sleep alterations in mice lacking cannabinoid type 1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Bastianini, Stefano; Lo Martire, Viviana; Mazza, Roberta; Pagotto, Uberto; Quarta, Carmelo; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors are highly expressed in the brain and play a role in behavior control. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling is modulated by high-fat diet (HFD). We investigated the consequences of congenital lack of CB1 receptors on sleep in mice fed standard diet (SD) and HFD. CB1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed SD or HFD for 4 months (n = 9-10 per group). Mice were instrumented with electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic electrodes. Recordings were performed during baseline (48 hours), sleep deprivation (gentle handling, 6 hours), sleep recovery (18 hours), and after cage switch (insomnia model paradigm, 6 hours). We found multiple significant effects of genotype on sleep. In particular, KO spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) than WT during the dark (active) period but not during the light (rest) period, enhancing the day-night variation of wake-sleep amounts. KO had slower EEG theta rhythm during REMS. REMS homeostasis after sleep deprivation was less effective in KO than in WT. Finally, KO habituated more rapidly to the arousing effect of the cage-switch test than WT. We did not find any significant effects of diet or of diet x genotype interaction on sleep. The occurrence of multiple sleep alterations in KO indicates important roles of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in limiting arousal during the active period of the day, in sleep regulation, and in sleep EEG in mice.

  7. Microbiota regulates type 1 diabetes through Toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Michael P.; Volchkov, Pavel; Kobayashi, Koichi S.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of the innate immune adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) results in microbiota-dependent protection from the disease: MyD88-negative mice in germ-free (GF), but not in specific pathogen-free conditions develop the disease. These results could be explained by expansion of particular protective bacteria (“specific lineage hypothesis”) or by dominance of negative (tolerizing) signaling over proinflammatory signaling (“balanced signal hypothesis”) in mutant mice. Here we found that colonization of GF mice with a variety of intestinal bacteria was capable of reducing T1D in MyD88-negative (but not wild-type NOD mice), favoring the balanced signal hypothesis. However, the receptors and signaling pathways involved in prevention or facilitation of the disease remained unknown. The protective signals triggered by the microbiota were revealed by testing NOD mice lacking MyD88 in combination with knockouts of several critical components of innate immune sensing for development of T1D. Only MyD88- and TIR-domain containing adapter inducing IFN β (TRIF) double deficient NOD mice developed the disease. Thus, TRIF signaling (likely downstream of Toll-like receptor 4, TLR4) serves as one of the microbiota-induced tolerizing pathways. At the same time another TLR (TLR2) provided prodiabetic signaling by controlling the microbiota, as reduction in T1D incidence caused by TLR2 deletion was reversed in GF TLR2-negative mice. Our results support the balanced signal hypothesis, in which microbes provide signals that both promote and inhibit autoimmunity by signaling through different receptors, including receptors of the TLR family. PMID:26216961

  8. Activation of Neurotensin Receptor Type 1 Attenuates Locomotor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vadnie, Chelsea A.; Hinton, David J.; Choi, Sun; Choi, YuBin; Ruby, Christina L.; Oliveros, Alfredo; Prieto, Miguel L.; Park, Jun Hyun; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neurotensin (NT) suppresses locomotor activity. However, the brain regions that mediate the locomotor depressant effect of NT and receptor subtype-specific mechanisms involved are unclear. Using a brain-penetrating, selective NT receptor type 1 (NTS1) agonist PD149163, we investigated the effect of systemic and brain region-specific NTS1 activation on locomotor activity. Systemic administration of PD149163 attenuated the locomotor activity of C57BL/6J mice both in a novel environment and in their homecage. However, mice developed tolerance to the hypolocomotor effect of PD149163 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Since NTS1 is known to modulate dopaminergic signaling, we examined whether PD149163 blocks dopamine receptor-mediated hyperactivity. Pretreatment with PD149163 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited D2R agonist bromocriptine (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-mediated hyperactivity. D1R agonist SKF81297 (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hyperlocomotion was only inhibited by 0.1 mg/kg of PD149163. Since the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been implicated in the behavioral effects of NT, we examined whether microinjection of PD149163 into these regions reduces locomotion. Microinjection of PD149163 (2 pmol) into the NAc, but not the mPFC suppressed locomotor activity. In summary, our results indicate that systemic and intra-NAc activation of NTS1 is sufficient to reduce locomotion and NTS1 activation inhibits D2R-mediated hyperactivity. Our study will be helpful to identify pharmacological factors and a possible therapeutic window for NTS1-targeted therapies for movement disorders. PMID:24929110

  9. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast

  10. Dopamine modulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor in dorsal root ganglia neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Rebecchi, Mario; Kaczocha, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Key points Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors transduce noxious thermal stimuli and are responsible for the thermal hyperalgesia associated with inflammatory pain.A large population of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, including the C low threshold mechanoreceptors (C‐LTMRs), express tyrosine hydroxylase, and probably release dopamine.We found that dopamine and SKF 81297 (an agonist at D1/D5 receptors), but not quinpirole (an agonist at D2 receptors), downregulate the activity of TRPV1 channels in DRG neurons.The inhibitory effect of SKF 81297 on TRPV1 channels was strongly dependent on external calcium and preferentially linked to calcium–calmodulin‐dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII).We suggest that modulation of TRPV1 channels by dopamine in nociceptive neurons may represent a way for dopamine to modulate incoming noxious stimuli. Abstract The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor plays a key role in the modulation of nociceptor excitability. To address whether dopamine can modulate the activity of TRPV1 channels in nociceptive neurons, the effects of dopamine and dopamine receptor agonists were tested on the capsaicin‐activated current recorded from acutely dissociated small diameter (<27 μm) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Dopamine or SKF 81297 (an agonist at D1/D5 receptors), caused inhibition of both inward and outward currents by ∼60% and ∼48%, respectively. The effect of SKF 81297 was reversed by SCH 23390 (an antagonist at D1/D5 receptors), confirming that it was mediated by activation of D1/D5 dopamine receptors. In contrast, quinpirole (an agonist at D2 receptors) had no significant effect on the capsaicin‐activated current. Inhibition of the capsaicin‐activated current by SKF 81297 was mediated by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and highly dependent on external calcium. The inhibitory effect of SKF 81297 on the capsaicin‐activated current was not affected when

  11. Identification of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in dog hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Mercati, Francesca; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Pascucci, Luisa; Boiti, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2012-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there is an increasing interest in the study of the endo-cannabinoid system and the possible use of the cannabinoids for the treatment of several diseases. Cannabinoid receptors (CB) are widely distributed in human and laboratory animal tissues, justifying the involvement of the endo-cannabinoid system in a great number of metabolic ways. Since there are no data regarding cannabinoid receptors in hair follicles of domestic animals, we investigated the presence and localization of CB1 receptor in dog hair follicles. By using a goat anti-CB1 polyclonal antibody, we observed CB1 receptor in the proximal part of both primary and secondary hair follicles. Staining was localized in the inner root sheath cells. We suppose that the endo-cannabinoid system is involved in the molecular mechanisms regulating hair follicle activity in dog. The identification of CB1 receptor at the level of the inner root sheath may help in the understanding of hair follicle biology and the possibility that cannabinoid molecules could be considered as suitable therapeutic tools in dog.

  12. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor activity during Alzheimer's disease progression.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Iván; González de San Román, Estíbaliz; Giralt, M Teresa; Ferrer, Isidro; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The activity of CB1 cannabinoid receptors was studied in postmortem brain samples of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients during clinical deterioration. CB1 activity was higher at earlier AD stages in limited hippocampal areas and internal layers of frontal cortex, but a decrease was observed at the advanced stages. The pattern of modification appears to indicate initial hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system in brain areas that lack classical histopathological markers at earlier stages of AD, indicating an attempt to compensate for the initial synaptic impairment, which is then surpassed by disease progression. These results suggest that initial CB1 stimulation might have therapeutic relevance.

  13. Identification of Growth Hormone Receptor in Plexiform Neurofibromas of Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Karin Soares Gonçalves; Barboza, Eliane Porto; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of growth hormone receptor in plexiform neurofibromas of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. INTRODUCTION The development of multiple neurofibromas is one of the major features of neurofibromatosis type 1. Since neurofibromas commonly grow during periods of hormonal change, especially during puberty and pregnancy, it has been suggested that hormones may influence neurofibromatosis type 1 neurofibromas. A recent study showed that the majority of localized neurofibromas from neurofibromatosis type 1 patients have growth hormone receptor. METHODS Growth hormone receptor expression was investigated in 5 plexiform neurofibromas using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Four of the 5 plexiform neurofibromas were immunopositive for growth hormone receptor. CONCLUSION This study suggests that growth hormone may influence the development of plexiform neurofibromas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. PMID:18297205

  14. Post-natal development of type 1 cannabinoid receptor immunoreactivity in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yury M; Freund, Tamás F

    2003-09-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptors, selectively located on axon terminals of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus, are known to be involved in endocannabinoid-mediated retrograde synaptic signalling. The question arises whether type 1 cannabinoid receptors appear on these axons during early post-natal life, when GABAergic transmission is still depolarizing, and whether there are any developmental changes in the cellular or subcellular expression pattern. Here we demonstrate, using single and double immunocytochemical methods at the light and electron microscopic levels, that type 1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed only on the membrane of axon terminals and pre-terminal axons but not on the soma-dendritic membrane at all examined timepoints between post-natal days 0 and 20, similar to the adult distribution. All type 1 cannabinoid receptor-positive boutons formed symmetric synapses. Granular labelling in the somata was already strong at post-natal day 0 and corresponded to multivesicular bodies, lysosomes, Golgi apparatus and rough endoplasmic reticulum. The type 1 cannabinoid receptor-positive axons were shown to originate largely from cholecystokinin-immunoreactive basket and bistratified neurons throughout the hippocampus (90% of all type 1 cannabinoid receptor-containing cells) and dentate gyrus (70% of all type 1 cannabinoid receptor-containing cells). The remaining cells have not been identified but probably belong to the somatostatin- and/or neuropeptide Y-containing subsets, as cholecystokinin-negative, type 1 cannabinoid receptor-positive axons have been observed in strata moleculare and lacunosum-moleculare of the dentate gyrus and CA1-3, respectively, where these neurons are known to arborize. No cell types were found that expressed type 1 cannabinoid receptors transiently at some developmental stage. We conclude that the cellular and subcellular pattern of type 1 cannabinoid receptor expression during early post-natal life is similar to the adult

  15. Centrally Mediated Erectile Dysfunction in Rats with Type 1 Diabetes: Role of Angiotensin II and Superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. Apart from the peripheral actions, central mechanisms are also responsible for penile erection. Aim To determine the contribution of angiotensin (ANG) II in the dysfunction of central N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-nitric oxide (NO)-induced erectile responses in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic (T1D) rats. Methods Three weeks after streptozotocin injections, rats were randomly treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-enalapril, or the ANG II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol or vehicle via chronic intracerebroventricular infusion by osmotic mini-pump for 2 weeks. Main Outcome Measure Central NMDA receptor stimulation or the administration of the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced penile erectile responses and concurrent behavioral responses were monitored in conscious rats. Results Two weeks of enalapril, losartan or tempol treatment significantly improved the erectile responses to central microinjection of both NMDA and SNP in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of conscious T1D rats (NMDA responses – T1D+enalapril: 1.7 ± 0.6, T1D+losartan: 2.0 ± 0.3, T1D+tempol: 2.0 ± 0.6 vs. T1D+vehicle: 0.6 ± 0.3 penile erections/rat in the first 20 min, P < 0.05; SNP responses – T1D+enalapril: 0.9 ± 0.3, T1D+losartan: 1.3 ± 0.3, T1D+tempol: 1.4 ± 0.4 vs. T1D+vehicle: 0.4 ± 0.2 penile erections/rat in the first 20 min, P < 0.05). Concurrent behavioral responses including yawning and stretching, induced by central NMDA and SNP microinjections were also significantly increased in T1D rats after enalapril, losartan or tempol treatments. Neuronal NO synthase expression within the PVN was also significantly increased and superoxide production was reduced in T1D rats after these treatments. Conclusions These data strongly support the contention that enhanced ANG II mechanism/s within the PVN of T1D rats contributes

  16. Obtaining anti-type 1 melatonin receptor antibodies by immunization with melatonin receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nelia; Wijkhuisen, Anne; Savatier, Alexandra; Moulharat, Natacha; Ferry, Gilles; Léonetti, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs) specific to cell-surface receptors are attractive tools for studying the physiological role of such receptors or for controlling their activity. We sought to obtain such antibodies against the type 1 receptor for melatonin (MT1). For this, we injected mice with CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human MT1 (CHO-MT1-h), in the presence or absence of an adjuvant mixture containing Alum and CpG1018. As we previously observed that the immune response to a protein antigen is increased when it is coupled to a fusion protein, called ZZTat101, we also investigated if the association of ZZTat101 with CHO-MT1-h cells provides an immunogenic advantage. We measured similar levels of anti-CHO and anti-MT1-h Ab responses in animals injected with either CHO-MT1-h cells or ZZTat101/CHO-MT1-h cells, with or without adjuvant, indicating that neither the adjuvant mixture nor ZZTat101 increased the anti-cell immune response. Then, we investigated whether the antisera also recognized murine MT1 (MT1-m). Using cloned CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding MT1-m, we found that antisera raised against CHO-MT1-h cells also bound the mouse receptor. Altogether our studies indicate that immunizing approaches based on MT1-h-expressing CHO cells allow the production of polyclonal antibodies against MT1 receptors of different origins. This paves the way to preparation of MT1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

  17. POLLUTANT PARTICLES PRODUCE VASOCONSTRICTION AND ENHANCE MAPK SIGNALING VIA ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) is associated with acute cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but the mechanisms are not entirely clear. In this study, we hypothesized that PM may activate the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), a G protein-coupled receptor that regulates ...

  18. Regulation of central angiotensin type 1 receptors and sympathetic outflow in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Irving H; Schultz, Harold D; Patel, Kaushik P; Wang, Wei; Gao, Lie

    2009-11-01

    Angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT(1)Rs) play a critical role in a variety of physiological functions and pathophysiological states. They have been strongly implicated in the modulation of sympathetic outflow in the brain. An understanding of the mechanisms by which AT(1)Rs are regulated in a variety of disease states that are characterized by sympathoexcitation is pivotal in development of new strategies for the treatment of these disorders. This review concentrates on several aspects of AT(1)R regulation in the setting of chronic heart failure (CHF). There is now good evidence that AT(1)R expression in neurons is mediated by activation of the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1). This transcription factor and its component proteins are upregulated in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of animals with CHF. Because the increase in AT(1)R expression and transcription factor activation can be blocked by the AT(1)R antagonist losartan, a positive feedback mechanism of AT(1)R expression in CHF is suggested. Oxidative stress has also been implicated in the regulation of receptor expression. Recent data suggest that the newly discovered catabolic enzyme angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) may play a role in the modulation of AT(1)R expression by altering the balance between the octapeptide ANG II and ANG- (1-7). Finally, exercise training reduces both central oxidative stress and AT(1)R expression in animals with CHF. These data strongly suggest that multiple central and peripheral influences dynamically alter AT(1)R expression in CHF.

  19. Effect of ghrelin receptor antagonist on meal patterns in cholecystokinin type 1 receptor null mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer; Martin, Elizabeth; Paulino, Gabriel; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-03

    Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express the cholecystokinin (CCK) type 1 receptor (CCK₁R) and, as predicted by the role of CCK in inducing satiation, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingest larger and longer meals. However, after a short fast, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting high fat (HF) diets initiate feeding earlier than wild-type mice. We hypothesized that the increased drive to eat in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice eating HF diet is mediated by ghrelin, a gut peptide that stimulates food intake. The decrease in time to first meal, and the increase in meal size and duration in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ compared to wild-type mice ingesting high fat (HF) diet were reversed by administration of GHSR1a antagonist D-(Lys3)-GHRP-6 (p<0.05). Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist significantly increased expression of the neuropeptide cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in VAN of HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ but not wild-type mice. Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist decreased neuronal activity measured by immunoreactivity for fos protein in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the arcuate nucleus of both HF-fed wild-type and CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice. The data show that hyperphagia in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting HF diet is reversed by blockade of the ghrelin receptor, suggesting that in the absence of the CCK₁R, there is an increased ghrelin-dependent drive to feed. The site of action of ghrelin receptors is unclear, but may involve an increase in expression of CART peptide in VAN in HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice.

  20. The activating receptor NKp46 is essential for the development of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gur, Chamutal; Porgador, Angel; Elboim, Moran; Gazit, Roi; Mizrahi, Saar; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Achdout, Hagit; Ghadially, Hormas; Dor, Yuval; Nir, Tomer; Doviner, Victoria; Hershkovitz, Oren; Mendelson, Michal; Naparstek, Yaakov; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2010-02-01

    The mechanism of action of natural killer (NK) cells in type 1 diabetes is still unknown. Here we show that the activating receptor NKp46 recognizes mouse and human ligands on pancreatic beta cells. NK cells appeared in the pancreas when insulitis progressed to type 1 diabetes, and NKp46 engagement by beta cells led to degranulation of NK cells. NKp46-deficient mice had less development of type 1 diabetes induced by injection of a low dose of streptozotocin. Injection of soluble NKp46 proteins into nonobese diabetic mice during the early phase of insulitis and the prediabetic stage prevented the development of type 1 diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that NKp46 is essential for the development of type 1 diabetes and highlight potential new therapeutic modalities for this disease.

  1. Angiotensin type 1 receptor resistance to blockade in the opossum proximal tubule cell due to variations in the binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Andresen, Bradley T; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Meuth, Alex; Sinak, Catherine; Mandavia, Chirag; Thekkumkara, Thomas; Speth, Robert C; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-04-15

    Blockade of the angiotensin (ANG) II receptor type 1 (AT(1)R) with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) is widely used in the treatment of hypertension. However, ARBs are variably effective in reducing blood pressure, likely due, in part, to polymorphisms in the ARB binding pocket of the AT(1)R. Therefore, we need a better understanding of variations/polymorphisms that alter binding of ARBs in heterogeneous patient populations. The opossum proximal tubule cell (OKP) line is commonly used in research to evaluate renal sodium handling and therefore blood pressure. Investigating this issue, we found natural sequence variations in the opossum AT(1)R paralleling those observed in the human AT(1)R. Therefore, we posited that these sequence variations may explain ARB resistance. We demonstrate that OKP cells express AT(1)R mRNA, bind (125)I-labeled ANG II, and exhibit ANG II-induced phosphorylation of Jak2. However, Jak2 phosphorylation is not inhibited by five different ARBs commonly used to treat hypertension. Additionally, nonradioactive ANG II competes (125)I-ANG II efficiently, whereas a 10-fold molar excess of olmesartan and the ANG II receptor type 2 blocker PD-123319 is unable to block (125)I-ANG II binding. In contrast, ANG II binding to OKP cells stably expressing rat AT(1A)Rs, which have a conserved AT(1)R-binding pocket with human AT(1)R, is efficiently inhibited by olmesartan. A novel observation was that resistance to ARB binding to opossum AT(1)Rs correlates with variations from the human receptor at positions 108, 163, 192, and 198 within the ARB-binding pocket. These observations highlight the potential utility of evaluating AT(1)R polymorphisms within the ARB-binding pocket in various hypertensive populations.

  2. Removal of melatonin receptor type 1 induces insulin resistance in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Emerging experimental evidence suggests that the hormone melatonin plays an important role in the regulation of glucose metabolisms. In this study, we report that removal of melatonin receptor type 1 (MT1) significantly impairs the ability of mice to metabolize glucose and such inability is probably due to an increased insulin resistance in these mice. Our data suggest that MT1 receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of T2D and open the door for a detailed exploration on the mechanisms by which MT1 receptors signaling may affect glucose metabolism.

  3. A novel role for calmodulin: Ca2+-independent inhibition of type-1 inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Cardy, T J; Taylor, C W

    1998-01-01

    Calmodulin inhibits both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) binding to, and IP3-evoked Ca2+ release by, cerebellar IP3 receptors [Patel, Morris, Adkins, O'Beirne and Taylor (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S.A. 94, 11627-11632]. In the present study, full-length rat type-1 and -3 IP3 receptors were expressed at high levels in insect Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells and the effects of calmodulin were examined. In the absence of Ca2+, calmodulin caused a concentration-dependent and reversible inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors by decreasing their apparent affinity for IP3. The effect was not reproduced by high concentrations of troponin C, parvalbumin or S-100. Increasing the medium free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]m) inhibited [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 receptors, but the further inhibition caused by a submaximal concentration of calmodulin was similar at each [Ca2+]m. In the absence of Ca2+, 125I-calmodulin bound to a single site on each type-1 receptor subunit and to an additional site in the presence of Ca2+. There was no detectable binding of 125I-calmodulin to type-3 receptors and binding of [3H]IP3 was insensitive to calmodulin at all [Ca2+]m. Both peptide and conventional Ca2+-calmodulin antagonists affected neither [3H]IP3 binding directly nor the inhibitory effect of calmodulin in the absence of Ca2+, but each caused a [Ca2+]m-dependent reversal of the inhibition of [3H]IP3 binding caused by calmodulin. Camstatin, a peptide that binds to calmodulin equally well in the presence or absence of Ca2+, reversed the inhibitory effects of calmodulin on [3H]IP3 binding at all [Ca2+]m. We conclude that calmodulin specifically inhibits [3H]IP3 binding to type-1 IP3 receptors: the first example of a protein regulated by calmodulin in an entirely Ca2+-independent manner. Inhibition of type-1 IP3 receptors by calmodulin may dynamically regulate their sensitivity to IP3 in response to the changes in cytosolic free calmodulin concentration thought to accompany stimulation

  4. THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE UV AND OPTICAL Fe ii EMISSION LINES IN TYPE 1 AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacević-Dojcinović, Jelena; Popović, Luka Č. E-mail: lpopovic@aob.bg.ac.rs

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the spectral properties of the UV (λλ2650–3050 Å) and optical (λλ4000–5500 Å) Fe ii emission features in a sample of 293 Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. We explore different correlations between their emission line properties, as well as the correlations with other emission lines from the spectral range. We find several interesting correlations and outline the most interesting results as follows. (i) There is a kinematical connection between the UV and optical Fe ii lines, indicating that the UV and optical Fe ii lines originate from the outer part of the broad line region, the so-called intermediate line region. (ii) The unexplained anticorrelations of the optical Fe ii equivalent width (EW Fe ii{sub opt}) versus EW [O iii] 5007 Å and EW Fe ii{sub opt} versus FWHM Hβ have not been detected for the UV Fe ii lines. (iii) The significant averaged redshift in the UV Fe ii lines, which is not present in optical Fe ii, indicates an inflow in the UV Fe ii emitting clouds, and probably their asymmetric distribution. (iv) Also, we confirm the anticorrelation between the intensity ratio of the optical and UV Fe ii lines and the FWHM of Hβ, and we find the anticorrelations of this ratio with the widths of Mg ii 2800 Å, optical Fe ii, and UV Fe ii. This indicates a very important role for the column density and microturbulence in the emitting gas. We discuss the starburst activity in high-density regions of young AGNs as a possible explanation of the detected optical Fe ii correlations and intensity line ratios of the UV and optical Fe ii lines.

  5. Opposing roles for cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB₁) and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1) on the modulation of panic-like responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Casarotto, Plínio C; Terzian, Ana Luisa B; Aguiar, Daniele C; Zangrossi, Hélio; Guimarães, Francisco S; Wotjak, Carsten T; Moreira, Fabrício A

    2012-01-01

    The midbrain dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) has an important role in orchestrating anxiety- and panic-related responses. Given the cellular and behavioral evidence suggesting opposite functions for cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB₁) and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1), we hypothesized that they could differentially influence panic-like reactions induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG. Drugs were injected locally and the expression of CB₁ and TRPV1 in this structure was assessed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The CB₁-selective agonist, ACEA (0.01, 0.05 and 0.5 pmol) increased the threshold for the induction of panic-like responses solely at the intermediary dose, an effect prevented by the CB₁-selective antagonist, AM251 (75 pmol). Panicolytic-like effects of ACEA at the higher dose were unmasked by pre-treatment with the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (0.1 nmol). Similarly to ACEA, capsazepine (1 and 10 nmol) raised the threshold for triggering panic-like reactions, an effect mimicked by another TRPV1 antagonist, SB366791 (1 nmol). Remarkably, the effects of both capsazepine and SB366791 were prevented by AM251 (75 pmol). These pharmacological data suggest that a common endogenous agonist may have opposite functions at a given synapse. Supporting this view, we observed that several neurons in the dPAG co-expressed CB₁ and TRPV1. Thus, the present work provides evidence that an endogenous substance, possibly anandamide, may exert both panicolytic and panicogenic effects via its actions at CB₁ receptors and TRPV1 channels, respectively. This tripartite set-point system might be exploited for the pharmacotherapy of panic attacks and anxiety-related disorders.

  6. RNF41 (Nrdp1) controls type 1 cytokine receptor degradation and ectodomain shedding.

    PubMed

    Wauman, Joris; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Vanderroost, Nele; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan

    2011-03-15

    Cytokines, such as interferons, erythropoietin, leptin and most interleukins, signal through type 1 cytokine receptors and activate the canonical JAK-STAT pathway. Aberrant cytokine signalling underlies numerous pathologies and adequate, temporary receptor activation is therefore under tight control. Negative-feedback mechanisms are very well studied, but cellular sensitivity also depends on the number of receptors exposed at the cell surface. This is determined by the equilibrium between receptor synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane, internalisation and recycling, degradation and ectodomain shedding, but the molecular basis of how cells establish steady state receptor levels is poorly understood. Here, we report that ring finger protein 41 (RNF41, also known as E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Nrdp1) interacts with JAK2-associated cytokine receptor complexes and modulates their cell surface exposure and signalling. Moreover, ectopic expression of RNF41 affected turnover of leptin, leukaemia inhibitory factor and interleukin-6 receptor in a dual way: it blocked intracellular cathepsin-L-dependent receptor cleavage and concomitantly enhanced receptor shedding by metalloproteases of the ADAM family. Receptor degradation and shedding are thus interconnected phenomena with a single protein, RNF41, determining the balance.

  7. RNF41 (Nrdp1) controls type 1 cytokine receptor degradation and ectodomain shedding

    PubMed Central

    Wauman, Joris; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Vanderroost, Nele; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines, such as interferons, erythropoietin, leptin and most interleukins, signal through type 1 cytokine receptors and activate the canonical JAK–STAT pathway. Aberrant cytokine signalling underlies numerous pathologies and adequate, temporary receptor activation is therefore under tight control. Negative-feedback mechanisms are very well studied, but cellular sensitivity also depends on the number of receptors exposed at the cell surface. This is determined by the equilibrium between receptor synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane, internalisation and recycling, degradation and ectodomain shedding, but the molecular basis of how cells establish steady state receptor levels is poorly understood. Here, we report that ring finger protein 41 (RNF41, also known as E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Nrdp1) interacts with JAK2-associated cytokine receptor complexes and modulates their cell surface exposure and signalling. Moreover, ectopic expression of RNF41 affected turnover of leptin, leukaemia inhibitory factor and interleukin-6 receptor in a dual way: it blocked intracellular cathepsin-L-dependent receptor cleavage and concomitantly enhanced receptor shedding by metalloproteases of the ADAM family. Receptor degradation and shedding are thus interconnected phenomena with a single protein, RNF41, determining the balance. PMID:21378310

  8. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  9. Rising stars: modulation of brain functions by astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Metna-Laurent, Mathilde; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The type-1-cannabinoid (CB1 ) receptor is amongst the most widely expressed G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. In few decades, CB1 receptors have been shown to regulate a large array of functions from brain cell development and survival to complex cognitive processes. Understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying these functions of CB1 is complex due to the heterogeneity of the brain cell types on which the receptor is expressed. Although the large majority of CB1 receptors act on neurons, early studies pointed to a direct control of CB1 receptors over astroglial functions including brain energy supply and neuroprotection. In line with the growing concept of the tripartite synapse highlighting astrocytes as direct players in synaptic plasticity, astroglial CB1 receptor signaling recently emerged as the mediator of several forms of synaptic plasticity associated to important cognitive functions. Here, we shortly review the current knowledge on CB1 receptor-mediated astroglial functions. This functional spectrum is large and most of the mechanisms by which CB1 receptors control astrocytes, as well as their consequences in vivo, are still unknown, requiring innovative approaches to improve this new cannabinoid research field.

  10. Binding site and subclass specificity of the herpes simplex virus type 1-induced Fc receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wiger, D; Michaelsen, T E

    1985-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity was detected by indirect immunofluorescence employing fluorochrome conjugated F(ab')2 antibody fragments on acetone-fixed cell cultures infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Using this method the Fc receptor-like activity seemed to be restricted to the IgG class of human immunoglobulins. While IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 myeloma proteins bind to this putative Fc gamma receptor at a concentration of 0.002 mg/ml, IgG3 myeloma proteins were without activity at 0.1 mg/ml. The binding activity was associated with the Fc fragments of IgG, while the pFc' fragments of IgG appeared to be unable to bind in this assay system. The reactivity and specificity of the HSV-1 Fc receptor was independent of both the type of tissue culture cells used and the strain of HSV-1 inducing the Fc receptor-like activity. The HSV-1-induced Fc receptor has a similar specificity for human immunoglobulin class and subclasses as staphylococcal Protein A. However, these two Fc receptors exhibit at least one striking difference. The IgG3 G3m(st) protein which binds to Protein A does not bind to HSV-1-induced Fc receptor. A possible reaction site for the HSV-1 Fc receptor on IgG could be at or near Asp 276. Images Figure 1 PMID:2982735

  11. Different Involvement of Type 1, 2, and 3 Ryanodine Receptors in Memory Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Quattrone, Alessandro; Vivoli, Elisa; Norcini, Monica; Bartolini, Alessandro; Ghelardini, Carla

    2008-01-01

    The administration of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) agonist 4-Cmc (0.003-9 nmol per mouse intracerebroventricularly [i.c.v.]) ameliorated memory functions, whereas the RyR antagonist ryanodine (0.0001-1 nmol per mouse i.c.v.) induced amnesia in the mouse passive avoidance test. The role of the type 1, 2, and 3 RyR isoforms in memory processes was…

  12. Toll-like receptor 3 gene polymorphisms in South African Blacks with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pirie, F J; Pegoraro, R; Motala, A A; Rauff, S; Rom, L; Govender, T; Esterhuizen, T M

    2005-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is the consequence of exposure of genetically susceptible individuals to specific environmental precipitants. The innate immune system provides the initial response to exogenous antigen and links with the adaptive immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the role of polymorphisms occurring in the cytoplasmic region of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 gene and immediate 5' sequence, in subjects of Zulu descent with type 1 diabetes in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Seventy-nine subjects with type 1 diabetes and 74 healthy normal glucose tolerant gender-matched control subjects were studied. Parts of exon 4 and exon 3/intron 3 of the TLR3 gene were studied by polymerase chain reaction, direct sequencing and restriction enzyme digestion with Bts 1. Of the nine polymorphisms studied, a significant association with type 1 diabetes was found for the major allele in the 2593 C/T polymorphism and for the minor alleles in the 2642 C/A and 2690 A/G polymorphisms, which were found to be in complete linkage disequilibrium. Correction of the P-values for the number of alleles studied, however, rendered the results no longer significant. These results suggest that polymorphisms in the TLR3 gene, which is part of the innate immune system, may be associated with type 1 diabetes in this population.

  13. Repression of host RNA polymerase II transcription by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, C A; Dahmus, M E; Rice, S A

    1997-01-01

    Lytic infection of mammalian cells with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) results in rapid repression of host gene expression and selective activation of the viral genome. This transformation in gene expression is thought to involve repression of host transcription and diversion of the host RNA polymerase (RNAP II) transcription machinery to the viral genome. However, the extent of virus-induced host transcription repression and the mechanisms responsible for these major shifts in transcription specificities have not been examined. To determine how HSV-1 accomplishes repression of host RNAP II transcription, we assayed transcription patterns on several cellular genes in cells infected with mutant and wild-type HSV-1. Our results suggest that HSV-1 represses RNAP II transcription on most cellular genes. However, each cellular gene we examined responds differently to the transcription repressive effects of virus infection, both quantitatively and with respect to the involvement of viral gene products. Virus-induced shutoff of host RNAP II transcription requires expression of multiple immediate-early genes. In contrast, expression of delayed-early and late genes and viral DNA replication appear to contribute little to repression of host cell RNAP II transcription. Modification of RNAP II to the intermediately phosphorylated (II(I)) form appears unlinked to virus-induced repression of host cell transcription. However, full repression of host transcription is correlated with depletion of the hyperphosphorylated (IIO) form of RNAP II. PMID:9032335

  14. Tumor-promoting effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Montagnani, Valentina; Podestà, Adriano; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Stecca, Barbara; Nieri, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The role of endocannabinoid system in melanoma development and progression is actually not fully understood. This study was aimed at clarifying whether cannabinoid-type 1 (CB1) receptor may function as tumor-promoting or -suppressing signal in human cutaneous melanoma. CB1 receptor expression was measured in human melanoma cell lines by real-time PCR. A genetic deletion of CB1 receptors in selected melanoma cells was carried out by using three different short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Performance of target gene silencing was verified by real-time PCR and Western blot. The effects of CB1 receptor silencing on cell growth, clonogenicity, migration capability, cell cycle progression, and activation of mitogenic signals was tested. Lentiviral shRNAs vectors targeting different regions of the human CB1 gene led to a significant reduction in CB1 receptor mRNA and a near complete loss of CB1 receptor protein, compared to control vector (LV-c). The number of viable cells, the colony-forming ability and cell migration were significantly reduced in cells transduced with CB1 lentiviral shRNAs compared to LV-c. Cell cycle analyses showed arrest at G1/S phase. p-Akt and p-ERK expression were decreased in transduced versus control cells. Findings of this study suggest that CB1 receptor might function as tumor-promoting signal in human cutaneous melanoma.

  15. THE NEURONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CANNABINOID RECEPTOR TYPE 1 IN THE TRIGEMINAL GANGLION OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    PRICE, T. J.; HELESIC, G.; PARGHI, D.; HARGREAVES, K. M.; FLORES, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoid compounds have been shown to produce antinociception and antihyperalgesia by acting upon cannabinoid receptors located in both the CNS and the periphery. A potential mechanism by which cannabinoids could inhibit nociception in the periphery is the activation of cannabinoid receptors located on one or more classes of primary nociceptive neurons. To address this hypothesis, we evaluated the neuronal distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of the adult rat through combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). CB1 receptor mRNA was localized mainly to medium and large diameter neurons of the maxillary and mandibular branches of the TG. Consistent with this distribution, in a de facto nociceptive sensory neuron population that exhibited vanilloid receptor type 1 immunoreactivity, colocalization with CB1 mRNA was also sparse (<5%). Furthermore, very few neurons (approximately 5%) in the peptidergic (defined as calcitonin gene-related peptide- or substance P-immunoreactive) or the isolectin B4-binding sensory neuron populations contained CB1 mRNA. In contrast, and consistent with the neuron-size distribution for CB1, nearly 75% of CB1-positive neurons exhibited N52-immunoreactivity, a marker of myelinated axons. These results indicate that in the rat TG, CB1 receptors are expressed predominantly in neurons that are not thought to subserve nociceptive neurotransmission in the noninjured animal. Taken together with the absence of an above background in situ signal for CB2 mRNA in TG neurons, these findings suggest that the peripherally mediated antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids may involve either as yet unidentified receptors or interaction with afferent neuron populations that normally subserve non-nociceptive functions. PMID:12849749

  16. Is the positivity of estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor different between type 1 and type 2 endometrial cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fang; Gao, Yifei; Ding, Jingxin; Chen, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a major cancer in women and traditionally divided into type 1 and type 2. It is well known that type 2 endometrial cancer has a poor prognosis. Studies have suggested that estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) positive are positively associated with endometrial cancer survive. However whether the positivity of ER or PR is different between cancer types has not been investigated yet. In this retrospective study, the positivity of ER or PR was analysed in 1054 women with primary diagnosed endometrial cancer taking into account cancer types and menopausal status from the largest university teaching women's hospital in China. The positivity of ER or PR (over 90%) was significantly higher in type 1 compared to that in type 2 endometrial cancer (71% or 64%) in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. There was no different in positivity of ER or PR in type 1 endometrial cancer between premenopausal and postmenopausal women. However, in type 2 endometrial cancer, the positivity of ER or PR in premenopausal women was significantly higher compared to that in postmenopausal women. Our data demonstrate that both ER and PR positivity are significantly higher in type 1 endometrial cancer (92%) compared to type 2 (72% ER positive, 65% PR positive). Menopausal status is not associated with the positivity of ER or PR in type 1 endometrial cancer. Our data may provide some novel insights why Asian women have better outcomes of endometrial cancer which was reported in the literature. PMID:27888807

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-II for Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gonder-Frederick, Linda A.; Schmidt, Karen M.; Vajda, Karen A.; Greear, Megan L.; Singh, Harsimran; Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Cox, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To perform the first comprehensive psychometric evaluation of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-II (HFS-II), a measure of the behavioral and affective dimensions of fear of hypoglycemia, using modern test-theory methods, including item-response theory (IRT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Surveys completed in four previous studies by 777 adults with type 1 diabetes were aggregated for analysis, with 289 subjects completing both subscales of the HFS-II and 488 subjects completing only the Worry subscale. The aggregated sample (53.3% female, 44.4% using insulin pumps) had a mean age of 41.9 years, diabetes duration of 23.8 years, HbA1c value of 7.7%, and 1.4 severe hypoglycemic episodes in the past year. Data analysis included exploratory factor analysis using polychoric correlations and IRT. Factors were analyzed for fit, trait-level locations, point-measure correlations, and separation values. RESULTS Internal and test-retest reliability was good, as well as convergent validity, as demonstrated by significant correlations with other measures of psychological distress. Scores were significantly higher in subjects who had experienced severe hypoglycemia in the past year. Factor analyses validated the two subscales of the HFS-II. Item analyses showed that 12 of 15 items on the Behavior subscale, and all of the items on the Worry subscale had good-fit statistics. CONCLUSIONS The HFS-II is a reliable and valid measure of the fear of hypoglycemia in adults with type 1 diabetes, and factor analyses and IRT support the two separate subscales of the survey. PMID:21346182

  18. Cannabinoid type-1 receptor signaling in central serotonergic neurons regulates anxiety-like behavior and sociability

    PubMed Central

    Häring, Martin; Enk, Vanessa; Aparisi Rey, Alejandro; Loch, Sebastian; Ruiz de Azua, Inigo; Weber, Tillmann; Bartsch, Dusan; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system possesses neuromodulatory functions by influencing the release of various neurotransmitters, including γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate. A functional interaction between eCBs and the serotonergic system has already been suggested. Previously, we showed that cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor mRNA and protein are localized in serotonergic neurons of the raphe nuclei, implying that the eCB system can modulate serotonergic functions. In order to substantiate the physiological role of the CB1 receptor in serotonergic neurons of the raphe nuclei, we generated serotonergic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neuron-specific CB1 receptor-deficient mice, using the Cre/loxP system with a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase under the control of the regulatory sequences of the tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2-CreERT2), thus, restricting the recombination to 5-HT neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). Applying several different behavioral paradigms, we revealed that mice lacking the CB1 receptor in serotonergic neurons are more anxious and less sociable than control littermates. Thus, we were able to show that functional CB1 receptor signaling in central serotonergic neurons modulates distinct behaviors in mice. PMID:26388750

  19. Distribution of angiotensin type 1a receptor containing cells in the brains of bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Andreina D.; Wang, Gang; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Gonzales, Keith L.; Speth, Robert C.; Van Kempen, Tracey A.; Marques-Lopes, Jose; Young, Colin N.; Butler, Scott D.; Davisson, Robin L.; Iadecola, Costantino; Pickel, Virginia M.; Pierce, Joseph P.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2012-01-01

    In the central nervous system, angiotensin II (AngII) binds to angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1R) to affect autonomic and endocrine functions as well as learning and memory. However, understanding the function of cells containing AT1Rs has been restricted by limited availability of specific antisera, difficulties discriminating AT1 receptor-immunoreactive cells in many brain regions and, the identification of AT1R-containing neurons for physiological and molecular studies. Here, we demonstrate that an Agtr1a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse line that expresses type A AT1Rs (AT1aRs) identified by enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) overcomes these shortcomings. Throughout the brain, AT1aR-EGFP was detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of cells, most of which were neurons. EGFP often extended into dendritic processes and could be identified either natively or with immunolabeling of EGFP. The distribution of AT1aR-EGFP cells in brain closely corresponded to that reported for AngII binding and AT1aR protein and mRNA. In particular, AT1aR-EGFP cells were in autonomic regions (e.g., hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, central nucleus of the amygdala, parabrachial nucleus, nuclei of the solitary tract and rostral ventrolateral medulla) and in regions involved in electrolyte and fluid balance (i.e., subfornical organ) and learning and memory (i.e., cerebral cortex and hippocampus). Additionally, dual label electron microscopic studies in select brain areas demonstrate that cells containing AT1aR-EGFP colocalize with AT1R-immunoreactivity. Assessment of AngII-induced free radical production in isolated EGFP cells demonstrated feasibility of studies investigating AT1aR signaling ex vivo. These findings support the utility of Agtr1a BAC transgenic reporter mice for future studies understanding the role of AT1 receptor containing cells in brain function. PMID:22922351

  20. Defective insulin secretion in pancreatic β cells lacking type 1 IGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Shouhong; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Nakae, Jun; Politi, Katerina; Kido, Yoshiaki; Fisher, Peter E.; Morroni, Manrico; Cinti, Saverio; White, Morris F.; Herrera, Pedro L.; Accili, Domenico; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2002-01-01

    Defective insulin secretion is a feature of type 2 diabetes that results from inadequate compensatory increase of β cell mass and impaired glucose-dependent insulin release. β cell proliferation and secretion are thought to be regulated by signaling through receptor tyrosine kinases. In this regard, we sought to examine the potential proliferative and/or antiapoptotic role of IGFs in β cells by tissue-specific conditional mutagenesis ablating type 1 IGF receptor (IGF1R) signaling. Unexpectedly, lack of functional IGF1R did not affect β cell mass, but resulted in age-dependent impairment of glucose tolerance, associated with a decrease of glucose- and arginine-dependent insulin release. These observations reveal a requirement of IGF1R-mediated signaling for insulin secretion. PMID:12370279

  1. Angiotensin type 1a receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus protect against diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Kloet, Annette D.; Pati, Dipanwita; Wang, Lei; Hiller, Helmut; Sumners, Colin; Frazier, Charles J.; Seeley, Randy J.; Herman, James P.; Woods, Stephen C.; Krause, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased levels of angiotensin-II (Ang-II), which activates angiotensin type-1a receptors (AT1a) to influence cardiovascular function and energy homeostasis. To test the hypothesis that specific AT1a within the brain control these processes, we utilized the Cre/lox system to delete AT1a from the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) of mice. PVN AT1a deletion did not affect body mass or adiposity when mice were maintained on standard chow. However, maintenance on a high-fat diet revealed a gene by environment interaction whereby mice lacking AT1a in the PVN had increased food intake and decreased energy expenditure that augmented body mass and adiposity relative to controls. Despite this increased adiposity, PVN AT1a deletion reduced systolic blood pressure, suggesting that this receptor population mediates the positive correlation between adiposity and blood pressure. Gene expression studies revealed that PVN AT1a deletion decreased hypothalamic expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and oxytocin, neuropeptides known to control food intake and sympathetic nervous system activity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings confirmed that PVN AT1a deletion eliminates responsiveness of PVN parvocellular neurons to Ang-II, and suggest that Ang-II responsiveness is increased in obese wild-type mice. Central inflammation is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders and PVN AT1a deletion reduced indices of hypothalamic inflammation. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that PVN AT1a regulate energy balance during environmental challenges that promote metabolic and cardiovascular pathologies. The implication is that the elevated Ang-II that accompanies obesity serves as a negative feedback signal that activates PVN neurons to alleviate weight gain. PMID:23486953

  2. Expression of type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor in the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Na; Wang, Xiyu; Fang, Xiucai; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Guo-Du; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2005-01-17

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, electrophysiological recording, and intraneuronal injection of the neuronal tracer biocytin were integrated in a study of the functional expression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in the guinea pig enteric nervous system. RT-PCR revealed expression of CRF1 receptor mRNA, but not CRF2, in both myenteric and submucosal plexuses. Immunoreactivity for the CRF1 receptor was distributed widely in the myenteric plexus of the stomach and small and large intestine and in the submucosal plexus of the small and large intestine. CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was coexpressed with calbindin, choline acetyltransferase, and substance P in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, CRF1 receptor immunoreactivity was found in neurons that expressed calbindin, substance P, choline acetyltransferase, or neuropeptide Y. Application of CRF evoked slowly activating depolarizing responses associated with elevated excitability in both myenteric and submucosal neurons. Histological analysis of biocytin-filled neurons revealed that both uniaxonal neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology responded to CRF. The CRF-evoked depolarizing responses were suppressed by the CRF1/CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin and the selective CRF1 receptor antagonist NBI27914 and were unaffected by the selective CRF2 receptor antagonist antisauvagine-30. The findings support the hypothesis that the CRF1 receptor mediates the excitatory actions of CRF on neurons in the enteric nervous system. Actions on enteric neurons might underlie the neural mechanisms by which stress-related release of CRF in the periphery alters intestinal propulsive motor function, mucosal secretion, and barrier functions.

  3. Largest vertebrate vomeronasal type 1 receptor gene repertoire in the semiaquatic platypus.

    PubMed

    Grus, Wendy E; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2007-10-01

    Vertebrate vomeronasal chemoreception plays important roles in many aspects of an organism's daily life, such as mating, territoriality, and foraging. Vomeronasal type 1 receptors (V1Rs) and vomeronasal type 2 receptors (V2Rs), 2 large families of G protein-coupled receptors, serve as vomeronasal receptors to bind to various pheromones and odorants. Contrary to the previous observations of reduced olfaction in aquatic and semiaquatic mammals, we here report the surprising finding that the platypus, a semiaquatic monotreme, has the largest V1R repertoire and nearly largest combined repertoire of V1Rs and V2Rs of all vertebrates surveyed, with 270 intact genes and 579 pseudogenes in the V1R family and 15 intact genes, 55 potentially intact genes, and 57 pseudogenes in the V2R family. Phylogenetic analysis shows a remarkable expansion of the V1R repertoire and a moderate expansion of the V2R repertoire in platypus since the separation of monotremes from placentals and marsupials. Our results challenge the view that olfaction is unimportant to aquatic mammals and call for further study into the role of vomeronasal reception in platypus physiology and behavior.

  4. Age-associated repression of type 1 inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor impairs muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bora; Lee, Seung-Min; Bahn, Young Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Kang, Moonkyung; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Eunhee; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and power decrease with age, leading to impairment of mobility and metabolism in the elderly. Ca2+ signaling is crucial for myoblast differentiation as well as muscle contraction through activation of transcription factors and Ca2+-dependent kinases and phosphatases. Ca2+ channels, such as dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two-pore channel (TPC) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (ITPR), function to maintain Ca2+ homeostasis in myoblasts. Here, we observed a significant decrease in expression of type 1 IP3 receptor (ITPR1), but not types 2 and 3, in aged mice skeletal muscle and isolated myoblasts, compared with those of young mice. ITPR1 knockdown using shRNA-expressing viruses in C2C12 myoblasts and tibialis anterior muscle of mice inhibited myotube formation and muscle regeneration after injury, respectively, a typical phenotype of aged muscle. This aging phenotype was associated with repression of muscle-specific genes and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. ERK inhibition by U0126 not only induced recovery of myotube formation in old myoblasts but also facilitated muscle regeneration after injury in aged muscle. The conserved decline in ITPR1 expression in aged human skeletal muscle suggests utility as a potential therapeutic target for sarcopenia, which can be treated using ERK inhibition strategies. PMID:27658230

  5. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (CD35) in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, J; Sadallah, S; Schifferli, J A; Villard, J; Nicod, L P

    1998-01-01

    Complement receptor type 1 (CR1) (CD35; C3b/C4b receptor) is a transmembrane protein of many haematopoietic cells. Once cleaved, soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) exerts opposite effects as a powerful inhibitor of complement. This study addressed both the question of whether sCR1 was found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of normals and patients with various inflammatory disease, and its possible origin. In this retrospective study covering specimen and clinical data of 124 patients with acute and chronic inflammatory lung pathologies, BAL supernatants were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique for sCR1. Correlations were made between the sCR1 levels obtained and the constituents of BAL. Human alveolar macrophages were cultivated in order to determine their secretory capacity of sCR1. Alveolar macrophages from normal subjects were shown to release sCR1 in vitro. In addition, sCR1 was present in BAL of normal controls and was significantly increased in acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), bacterial and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, as well as in chronic inflammatory diseases such as interstitial lung fibrosis and sarcoidosis. In BAL of ARDS, bacterial, and P. carinii pneumonia, there was a good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil counts. In sarcoidosis, a correlation was found with BAL lymphocyte counts. Serum sCR1 was not increased in patients compared to controls. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) is found in the bronchoalveolar lavage in health as well as in acute and chronic inflammatory disease. Alveolar macrophages are capable of releasing sCR1 in vitro and may be the main physiological source of sCR1 in the alveoli. The good correlation between sCR1 and the absolute neutrophil or lymphocyte numbers in bronchoalveolar lavage of inflammatory diseases suggests a predominant role of leucocytes for the release of sCR1 in such conditions. The release of this

  6. Ligand-induced internalization of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor independent of recognized signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Cawston, Erin E; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Miller, Laurence J

    2012-02-01

    distinct from that being studied. This interpretation was further supported by the inability of peptide 309-323 to inhibit its d-Trp-OPE-stimulated internalization. Thus the 309-323 region of the type 1 CCK receptor affects antagonist-stimulated internalization of this receptor, although its mechanism and interacting partner are not yet clear.

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits pre-osteoblast differentiation through its type-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sabiha; Zhang, Yan-Hong; Clohisy, John C; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2003-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine with a profound role in many skeletal diseases. The cytokine has been described as a mediator of bone loss in osteolysis and other inflammatory bone diseases. In addition to its known bone resorptive action, TNF reduces bone formation by inhibiting osteoblast differentiation. Using primary and transformed osteoblastic cells, we first document that TNF inhibits expression of alkaline phosphatase and matrix deposition, both considered markers of osteoblast differentiation. The effects are dose- and time-dependent. Core-binding factor A1 (cbfa1) is a transcription factor critical for osteoblast differentiation, and we show here that it is activated by the osteoblast differentiation agent, beta-glycerophosphate. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibitory effects of TNF were associated with altered activity of this transcription factor. Using retardation assays, we show that TNF significantly inhibits cbfal activation by beta-glycerophosphate, manifested by reduced DNA-binding activity. Next, we turned to determine the signaling pathway by which TNF inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Utilizing animals lacking individual TNF receptors, we document that TNFr1 is required for transmitting the cytokine's inhibitory effect. In the absence of this receptor, TNF failed to impact all osteoblast differentiation markers tested. In summary, TNF blocks expression of osteoblast differentiation markers and inhibits beta-glycerophosphate-induced activation of the osteoblast differentiation factor cbfa1. Importantly, these effects are mediated via a mechanism requiring the TNF type-1 receptor.

  8. Structure and function of the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Adams, T E; Epa, V C; Garrett, T P; Ward, C W

    2000-07-01

    The type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), a transmembrane tyrosine kinase, is widely expressed across many cell types in foetal and postnatal tissues. Activation of the receptor following binding of the secreted growth factor ligands IGF-1 and IGF-2 elicits a repertoire of cellular responses including proliferation, and the protection of cells from programmed cell death or apoptosis. As a result, signalling through the IGF-1R is the principal pathway responsible for somatic growth in foetal mammals, whereas somatic growth in postnatal animals is achieved through the synergistic interaction of growth hormone and the IGFs. Forced overexpression of the IGF-1R results in the malignant transformation of cultured cells: conversely, downregulation of IGF-1R levels can reverse the transformed phenotype of tumour cells, and may render them sensitive to apoptosis in vivo. Elevated levels of IGF-IR are observed in a variety of human tumour types, whereas epidemiological studies implicate the IGF-1 axis as a predisposing factor in the pathogenesis of human breast and prostate cancer. The IGF-1R has thus emerged as a therapeutic target for the development of antitumour agents. Recent progress towards the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the extracellular domain of the IGF-1R represents an opportunity for the rational assembly of small molecule antagonists of receptor function for clinical use.

  9. Activation of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 Contributes to Pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Nogueira, Eva; López-Serrano, Clara; Hernández, Joaquim; Lago, Natalia; Astudillo, Alma M.; Balsinde, Jesús; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodriguez; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular lipid mediator involved in many physiological functions that signals through six known G-protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–LPA6). A wide range of LPA effects have been identified in the CNS, including neural progenitor cell physiology, astrocyte and microglia activation, neuronal cell death, axonal retraction, and development of neuropathic pain. However, little is known about the involvement of LPA in CNS pathologies. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that LPA signaling via LPA1 contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord injury. LPA levels increase in the contused spinal cord parenchyma during the first 14 d. To model this potential contribution of LPA in the spinal cord, we injected LPA into the normal spinal cord, revealing that LPA induces microglia/macrophage activation and demyelination. Use of a selective LPA1 antagonist or mice lacking LPA1 linked receptor-mediated signaling to demyelination, which was in part mediated by microglia. Finally, we demonstrate that selective blockade of LPA1 after spinal cord injury results in reduced demyelination and improvement in locomotor recovery. Overall, these results support LPA–LPA1 signaling as a novel pathway that contributes to secondary damage after spinal cord contusion in mice and suggest that LPA1 antagonism might be useful for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study reveals that LPA signaling via LPA receptor type 1 activation causes demyelination and functional deficits after spinal cord injury. PMID:26180199

  10. Blocking 5-HT2 receptor restores cardiovascular disorders in type 1 experimental diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; Ferreira-Santos, Pedro; Aparicio, Rubén; Montero, María-José; Morán, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the serotonergic modulation, through selective 5-HT2 receptor blockade, restores cardiovascular disturbances in type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by alloxan (150 mg/kg, s.c.) and maintained for 4 weeks. 5-HT2 receptor was blocked by sarpogrelate (30 mg/kg.day; 14 days; p.o.). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), glycaemia and body weight (BW) were monitored periodically. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the study and the heart, right kidney and thoracic aorta were removed; plasma samples were also obtained. Left ventricular hypertrophy index (LVH) and renal hypertrophy index (RH) were determined. Vascular function was studied in aorta rings; additionally, superoxide anion (O2•−) production (by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence) and lipid peroxidation (by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay) were measured. Neither alloxan nor sarpogrelate treatments altered HR, LVH or endothelium-independent relaxation. SBP, glycaemia, BW, RH, O2•− production and lipid peroxidation were significantly altered in diabetic animals compared with controls. Sarpogrelate treatment considerably decreased SBP, RH, O2•− production and lipid peroxidation. Endothelium-dependent relaxation was severely reduced in diabetic animal aortas compared to controls; sarpogrelate treatment markedly improved it. Our outcomes show that selectively blocking 5-HT2 receptors has beneficial effects on impaired cardiovascular parameters in diabetes. PMID:27659784

  11. [SERUM LEVEL OF ENDOTHELIAL MONOCYTE ACTIVATING POLYPEPTIDE-II IN CHILDHOOD-ONSET TYPE 1 DIABETIC PATIENTS AND OBESE ADOLESCENTS].

    PubMed

    Mogylnytska, L A

    2015-01-01

    The atherosclerotic process begins in adolescence, and its progression is determined by the same risk factors as in adults. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is a multifunctional cytokine with proinflammatory and antiangiogenetic activity that may play a pathogenic role in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. The aim of our study was to determine the serum level of EMAP-II in childhood-onset type 1 diabetic patients and obese adolescents. We found increased of serum level of EMAP-II in childhood-onset type 1 diabetic patients and in patients with obesity that do not suffer from diabetes. Also, the level of EMAP-II correlated with the serum level of glycosylated hemoglobin and blood glucose, and key markers of lipid metabolism, body mass index. Increased serum level of EMAP-II may be one of the pathway of endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes.

  12. Rimonabant: a cannabinoid receptor type 1 blocker for management of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Eli V; Cannon, Christopher P

    2006-05-16

    Rimonabant is a first selective blocker of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) being developed for the treatment of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors, including abdominal obesity and smoking. In four large trials, after one year of treatment, rimonabant 20 mg led to greater weight loss and reduction in waist circumference compared with placebo. Therapy with rimonabant is also associated with favorable changes in serum lipid levels and an improvement in glycemic control in prediabetes patients and in type 2 diabetic patients. At the same dose, rimonabant significantly increased cigarette smoking quit rates as compared with placebo. Rimonabant seems to be well tolerated, with a primary side effect of mild nausea. As an agent with a novel mechanism of action, rimonabant has a potential to be a useful adjunct to lifestyle and behavior modification in treatment of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors, including abdominal obesity and smoking.

  13. Altered pattern of cannabinoid type 1 receptor expression in adipose tissue of dysmetabolic and overweight patients.

    PubMed

    Sarzani, Riccardo; Bordicchia, Marica; Marcucci, Pierfrancesco; Bedetta, Samuele; Santini, Silvia; Giovagnoli, Andrea; Scappini, Lorena; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Rappelli, Alessandro

    2009-03-01

    In overweight patients (OW), the increased peripheral activity of the endocannabinoid system in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) may be mediated by cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor expression. We determined whether CB1 receptor splice variants and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in perirenal and subcutaneous adipose tissues are associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene expression with multiple-primers real-time polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan; Applied Biosystem, Weiterstadt, Germany) was performed to study VAT and paired subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) mRNA from 36 consecutive patients undergoing nephrectomy. Cannabinoid type 1A and CB1E mRNAs variants with the longer version of exon 4 were expressed. The CB1 expression in perirenal VAT significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI). Paired subcutaneous/perirenal samples from normal-weight patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)) showed higher CB1 expression in SAT (P = .002), whereas in OW (BMI > or = 25 kg/m(2)), the higher CB1 expression was in VAT (P = .038). In unpaired samples, SAT of normal-weight patients had significantly higher CB1 mRNA levels compared with SAT of OW, whereas higher CB1 expression (P = .009) was found in VAT of OW (n = 25). Overweight patients with increased visceral CB1 expression had higher waist circumference (P < .01), insulin (P < .01), and homeostasis model assessment index (P < .01). In addition, patients with the MetS (n = 22) showed higher CB1 expression in perirenal adipose tissues (P = .007). Visceral adipose CB1 expression correlated with BMI. Overweight patients and those with MetS showed a CB1 expression pattern supporting a CB1-mediated overactivity of the endocannabinoid system in human VAT.

  14. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  15. The autoimmunity-associated gene PTPN22 potentiates toll-like receptor-driven, type 1 interferon-dependent immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaya; Shaked, Iftach; Stanford, Stephanie M; Zhou, Wenbo; Curtsinger, Julie M; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Shaheen, Zachary R; Cheng, Genhong; Sawatzke, Kristy; Campbell, Amanda M; Auger, Jennifer L; Bilgic, Hatice; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Schmeling, David O; Balfour, Henry H; Hasegawa, Kiminori; Chan, Andrew C; Corbett, John A; Binstadt, Bryce A; Mescher, Matthew F; Ley, Klaus; Bottini, Nunzio; Peterson, Erik J

    2013-07-25

    Immune cells sense microbial products through Toll-like receptors (TLR), which trigger host defense responses including type 1 interferons (IFNs) secretion. A coding polymorphism in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene is a susceptibility allele for human autoimmune and infectious disease. We report that Ptpn22 selectively regulated type 1 IFN production after TLR engagement in myeloid cells. Ptpn22 promoted host antiviral responses and was critical for TLR agonist-induced, type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of inflammation in colitis and arthritis. PTPN22 directly associated with TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) and promotes TRAF3 lysine 63-linked ubiquitination. The disease-associated PTPN22W variant failed to promote TRAF3 ubiquitination, type 1 IFN upregulation, and type 1 IFN-dependent suppression of arthritis. The findings establish a candidate innate immune mechanism of action for a human autoimmunity "risk" gene in the regulation of host defense and inflammation.

  16. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Frederick M; Linder, Kathryn M; Cardozo, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter.

  17. The dynamic nature of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Laprairie, RB; Kelly, MEM; Denovan-Wright, EM

    2012-01-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is an integral component of the endocannabinoid system that modulates several functions in the CNS and periphery. The majority of our knowledge of the endocannabinoid system involves ligand–receptor binding, mechanisms of signal transduction, and protein–protein interactions. In contrast, comparatively little is known about regulation of CB1 gene expression. The levels and anatomical distribution of CB1 mRNA and protein are developmental stage-specific and are dysregulated in several pathological conditions. Moreover, exposure to a variety of drugs, including cannabinoids themselves, alters CB1 gene expression and mRNA levels. As such, alterations in CB1 gene expression are likely to affect the optimal response to cannabinoid-based therapies, which are being developed to treat a growing number of conditions. Here, we will examine the regulation of CB1 mRNA levels and the therapeutic potential inherent in manipulating expression of this gene. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.167.issue-8 PMID:22924606

  18. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Frederick M.; Linder, Kathryn M.; Cardozo, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR) of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR) responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter. PMID:26379245

  19. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  20. Enhanced Functional Activity of the Cannabinoid Type-1 Receptor Mediates Adolescent Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kasanetz, Fernando; Lynch, Diane L.; Friemel, Chris M.; Lassalle, Olivier; Hurst, Dow P.; Steindel, Frauke; Monory, Krisztina; Schäfer, Carola; Miederer, Isabelle; Leweke, F. Markus; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Lutz, Beat; Reggio, Patricia H.; Manzoni, Olivier J.; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is characterized by drastic behavioral adaptations and comprises a particularly vulnerable period for the emergence of various psychiatric disorders. Growing evidence reveals that the pathophysiology of these disorders might derive from aberrations of normal neurodevelopmental changes in the adolescent brain. Understanding the molecular underpinnings of adolescent behavior is therefore critical for understanding the origin of psychopathology, but the molecular mechanisms that trigger adolescent behavior are unknown. Here, we hypothesize that the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) may play a critical role in mediating adolescent behavior because enhanced endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling has been suggested to occur transiently during adolescence. To study enhanced CB1R signaling, we introduced a missense mutation (F238L) into the rat Cnr1 gene that encodes for the CB1R. According to our hypothesis, rats with the F238L mutation (Cnr1F238L) should sustain features of adolescent behavior into adulthood. Gain of function of the mutated receptor was demonstrated by in silico modeling and was verified functionally in a series of biochemical and electrophysiological experiments. Mutant rats exhibit an adolescent-like phenotype during adulthood compared with wild-type littermates, with typical high risk/novelty seeking, increased peer interaction, enhanced impulsivity, and augmented reward sensitivity for drug and nondrug reward. Partial inhibition of CB1R activity in Cnr1F238L mutant rats normalized behavior and led to a wild-type phenotype. We conclude that the activity state and functionality of the CB1R is critical for mediating adolescent behavior. These findings implicate the eCB system as an important research target for the neuropathology of adolescent-onset mental health disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We present the first rodent model with a gain-of-function mutation in the cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R). Adult mutant rats exhibit an adolescent

  1. Aberrant Methylation Inactivates Somatostatin and Somatostatin Receptor Type 1 in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misawa, Kiyoshi; Misawa, Yuki; Kondo, Haruki; Mochizuki, Daiki; Imai, Atsushi; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Uehara, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Takeharu; Mineta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to define somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor type 1 (SSTR1) methylation profiles for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors at diagnosis and follow up and to evaluate their prognostic significance and value as a biomarker. Methods Gene expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter methylation status was determined by quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) in HNSCC. Results Methylation was associated with transcription inhibition. SST methylation in 81% of HNSCC tumor specimens significantly correlated with tumor size (P = 0.043), stage (P = 0.008), galanin receptor type 2 (GALR2) methylation (P = 0.041), and tachykinin-1 (TAC1) (P = 0.040). SSTR1 hypermethylation in 64% of cases was correlated with tumor size (P = 0.037), stage (P = 0.037), SST methylation (P < 0.001), and expression of galanin (P = 0.03), GALR2 (P = 0.014), TAC1 (P = 0.023), and tachykinin receptor type 1 (TACR1) (P = 0.003). SST and SSTR1 promoter hypermethylation showed highly discriminating receiver operator characteristic curve profiles, which clearly distinguished HNSCC from adjacent normal mucosal tissues. Concurrent hypermethylation of galanin and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.0001). Among patients with oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, methylation of both SST and SSTR1 promoters correlated with reduced disease-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.028). In multivariate logistic-regression analysis, concomitant methylation of galanin and SSTR1 was associated with an odds ratio for recurrence of 12.53 (95% CI, 2.62 to 59.8; P = 0.002). Conclusions CpG hypermethylation is a likely mechanism of SST and SSTR1 gene inactivation, supporting the hypothesis that SST and SSTR1 play a role in the tumorigenesis of HNSCC and that this hypermethylation may serve as an important biomarker. PMID:25734919

  2. Overactivation of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 and aquaporin-4 by hypoxia induces cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Jun; Yang, Jia-Fang; Kong, Fan-Ping; Ren, Ji-Long; Hao, Ke; Li, Min; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Xin-Can; Yu, Ri-Sheng; Li, Jun-Fa; Leng, Gareth; Chen, Xue-Qun; Du, Ji-Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a potentially life-threatening illness, but knowledge of its underlying mechanisms is limited. Here we report that hypobaric hypoxia induces rat cerebral edema and neuronal apoptosis and increases the expression of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1), aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the cortex. These effects, except for the increased expression of CRF itself, could all be blocked by pretreatment with an antagonist of the CRF receptor CRFR1. We also show that, in cultured primary astrocytes: (i) both CRFR1 and AQP4 are expressed; (ii) exogenous CRF, acting through CRFR1, triggers signaling of cAMP/PKA, intracellular Ca2+, and PKCε; and (iii) the up-regulated cAMP/PKA signaling contributes to the phosphorylation and expression of AQP4 to enhance water influx into astrocytes and produces an up-regulation of ET-1 expression. Finally, using CHO cells transfected with CRFR1+ and AQP4+, we show that transfected CRFR1+ contributes to edema via transfected AQP4+. In conclusion, hypoxia triggers cortical release of CRF, which acts on CRFR1 to trigger signaling of cAMP/PKA in cortical astrocytes, leading to activation of AQP4 and cerebral edema. PMID:25146699

  3. Angiotensin type 1a receptor deficiency decreases amyloid β-protein generation and ameliorates brain amyloid pathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Matsumoto, Yukino; Murakami, Saki; Sugakawa, Yusuke; Kami, Ayako; Tanabe, Chiaki; Maeda, Tomoji; Michikawa, Makoto; Komano, Hiroto; Zou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by neuronal loss and cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and lowering the generation of Aβ is a pivotal approach in the strategy of Alzheimer’s disease treatment. Midlife hypertension is a major risk factor for the future onset of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease and the use of some antihypertensive drugs may decrease the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it is largely unknown how the blood pressure regulation system is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we found that the deficiency of angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1a), a key receptor for regulating blood pressure, significantly decreased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. The lack of AT1a inhibited the endocleavage of presenilin-1 (PS1), which is essential for γ-secretase complex formation and Aβ generation. Notably, the ligand of AT1a, angiotensin II, enhanced Aβ generation, PS1 endocleavage and γ-secretase complex formation. Our results suggest that AT1a activation is closely associated with Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation by regulating γ-secretase complex formation. Thus, removal of life style factors or stresses that stimulate AT1a to elevate blood pressure may decrease Aβ generation and brain amyloid accumulation, thereby preventing the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26154270

  4. Cannabinoid type 1 receptors located on single-minded 1-expressing neurons control emotional behaviors.

    PubMed

    Dubreucq, S; Kambire, S; Conforzi, M; Metna-Laurent, M; Cannich, A; Soria-Gomez, E; Richard, E; Marsicano, G; Chaouloff, F

    2012-03-01

    This study has investigated the role of hypothalamic and amygdalar type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors in the emotional and neuroendocrine responses to stress. To do so, we used the Cre/loxP system to generate conditional mutant mice lacking the CB1 gene in neurons expressing the transcription factor single-minded 1 (Sim1). This choice was dictated by former evidence for Sim1-Cre transgenic mice bearing Cre activity in all areas expressing Sim1, which chiefly includes the hypothalamus (especially the paraventricular nucleus, the supraoptic nucleus, and the posterior hypothalamus) and the mediobasal amygdala. Genomic DNA analyses in Sim1-CB1(-/-) mice indicated that the CB1 allele was excised from the hypothalamus and the amygdala, but not from the cortex, the striatum, the thalamus, the nucleus accumbens, the brainstem, the hippocampus, the pituitary gland, and the spinal cord. Double-fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments further indicated that Sim1-CB1(-/-) mice displayed a weaker CB1 receptor mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the mediobasal part of the amygdala, compared to wild-type animals. Individually housed Sim1-CB1(-/-) mice and their Sim1-CB1(+/+) littermates were exposed to anxiety and fear memory tests under basal conditions as well as after acute/repeated social stress. A principal component analysis of the behaviors of Sim1-CB1(-/-) and Sim1-CB1(+/+) mice in anxiety tests (open field, elevated plus-maze, and light/dark box) revealed that CB1 receptors from Sim1-expressing neurons exert tonic, albeit opposite, controls of locomotor and anxiety reactivity to novel environments. No difference between genotypes was observed during the recall of contextual fear conditioning or during active avoidance learning. Sim1-CB1(-/-), but not Sim1-CB1(+/+), mice proved sensitive to an acute social stress as this procedure reverted the increased ambulation in the center of the open field. The stimulatory influence of

  5. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel prevents adipogenesis and obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Li; Yan Liu, Dao; Ma, Li Qun; Luo, Zhi Dan; Cao, Ting Bing; Zhong, Jian; Yan, Zhen Cheng; Wang, Li Juan; Zhao, Zhi Gang; Zhu, Shan Jun; Schrader, Mark; Thilo, Florian; Zhu, Zhi Ming; Tepel, Martin

    2007-04-13

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) by capsaicin prevents adipogenesis. TRPV1 channels in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes and visceral adipose tissue from mice and humans were detected by immunoblotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The effect of TRPV1 on cytosolic calcium was determined fluorometrically in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes and in human visceral fat tissue. Adipogenesis in stimulated 3T3-L1-preadipocytes was determined by oil red O-staining of intracellular lipid droplets, triglyceride levels, expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, and expression of fatty acid synthase. Long-term feeding experiments were undertaken in wild-type mice and TRPV1 knockout mice. We detected TRPV1 channels in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes and visceral adipose tissue from mice and humans. In vitro, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin dose-dependently induced calcium influx and prevented the adipogenesis in stimulated 3T3-L1-preadipocytes. RNA interference knockdown of TRPV1 in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes attenuated capsaicin-induced calcium influx, and adipogenesis in stimulated 3T3-L1-preadipocytes was no longer prevented. During regular adipogenesis TRPV1 channels were downregulated which was accompanied by a significant and time-dependent reduction of calcium influx. Compared with lean counterparts in visceral adipose tissue from obese db/db and ob/ob mice, and from obese human male subjects we observed a reduced TRVP1 expression. The reduced TRPV1 expression in visceral adipose tissue from obese humans was accompanied by reduced capsaicin-induced calcium influx. The oral administration of capsaicin for 120 days prevented obesity in male wild type mice but not in TRPV1 knockout mice assigned to high fat diet. We conclude that the activation of TRPV1 channels by capsaicin prevented adipogenesis and obesity.

  6. Expression of Interleukin-1 and Interleukin-1 Receptors Type 1 and Type 2 in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Oelmann, Elisabeth; Stein, Harald; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Herbst, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the IL-1-receptor type 1 (IL-1R1), IL-1 is required for initiation and maintenance of diverse activities of the immune system. A second receptor, IL-1R2, blocks IL-1 signal transduction. We studied expression of IL-1beta, IL-1R1, and IL-1R2 in 17 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL) by in situ hybridization (ISH). IL-1beta expressing cells, morphologically consistent with endothelial cells and fibroblasts, occurred in all HL tissues with elevated transcript levels in areas of active fibrosis. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells of all cases expressed low IL-1R1 transcript levels in some tumor cells, and high levels of IL-1R2 in large proportions of HRS cells. Only few bystander cells showed low levels of IL-1R1 and IL-1R2 RNA. Supernatants of 4 out of 7 HL-derived cell lines contained soluble IL-1R2 protein at high levels. HL patient sera carried variably amounts of IL-1R2 protein with significantly increased titers in patients with active disease compared to patients in complete remission and control individuals without HL. Western blots and co-immunoprecipitations showed binding of the IL-1R2 to the intracellular IL-1R-accessory protein (IL-1IRAcP). These data suggest functions of the IL-1R2 as a „decoy-receptor” sequestrating paracrine IL-1 extracellularly and intracellularly by engaging IL-1IRAcP, thus depriving IL1-R1 molecules of their extracellular and intracellular ligands. Expression of IL1-R2 by HRS cells seems to contribute to local and systemic modulation of immune function in HL. PMID:26406983

  7. Neurovascular microcirculatory vasodilation mediated by C-fibers and Transient receptor potential vanilloid-type-1 channels (TRPV 1) is impaired in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marche, P; Dubois, S; Abraham, P; Parot-Schinkel, E; Gascoin, L; Humeau-Heurtier, A; Ducluzeau, P H; Mahe, G

    2017-03-13

    Microvascular dysfunction may have an early onset in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and can precede major complications. Our objectives were to assess the endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh; and post-occlusive hyperemia, PORH), non-endothelial-dependent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) and neurovascular-dependent (local heating, LH and current induced vasodilation, CIV) microcirculatory vasodilation in T1D patients compared with matched control subjects using a laser speckle contrast imager. Seventeen T1D patients - matched with 17 subjects according to age, gender, Body-Mass-Index, and smoking status - underwent macro- and microvascular investigations. The LH early peak assessed the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels (TRPV1) mediated vasodilation, whereas the plateau assessed the Nitirc-Oxyde (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathways. PORH explored sensory nerves and (EDHF), while CIV assessed sensory nerves (C-fibers) and prostaglandin-mediated vasodilation. Using neurological investigations, we observed that C-fiber and A-delta fiber functions in T1D patients were similar to control subjects. PORH, CIV, LH peak and plateau vasodilations were significantly decreased in T1D patients compared to controls, whereas there was no difference between the two groups for ACh and SNP vasodilations. Neurovascular microcirculatory vasodilations (C-fibers and TRPV 1-mediated vasodilations) are impaired in TD1 patients whereas no abnormalities were found using clinical neurological investigations. Clinicaltrials: No. NCT02538120.

  8. Neurovascular microcirculatory vasodilation mediated by C-fibers and Transient receptor potential vanilloid-type-1 channels (TRPV 1) is impaired in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Marche, P.; Dubois, S.; Abraham, P.; Parot-Schinkel, E.; Gascoin, L.; Humeau-Heurtier, A.; Ducluzeau, PH.; Mahe, G.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction may have an early onset in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and can precede major complications. Our objectives were to assess the endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh; and post-occlusive hyperemia, PORH), non-endothelial-dependent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) and neurovascular-dependent (local heating, LH and current induced vasodilation, CIV) microcirculatory vasodilation in T1D patients compared with matched control subjects using a laser speckle contrast imager. Seventeen T1D patients - matched with 17 subjects according to age, gender, Body-Mass-Index, and smoking status - underwent macro- and microvascular investigations. The LH early peak assessed the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels (TRPV1) mediated vasodilation, whereas the plateau assessed the Nitirc-Oxyde (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathways. PORH explored sensory nerves and (EDHF), while CIV assessed sensory nerves (C-fibers) and prostaglandin-mediated vasodilation. Using neurological investigations, we observed that C-fiber and A-delta fiber functions in T1D patients were similar to control subjects. PORH, CIV, LH peak and plateau vasodilations were significantly decreased in T1D patients compared to controls, whereas there was no difference between the two groups for ACh and SNP vasodilations. Neurovascular microcirculatory vasodilations (C-fibers and TRPV 1-mediated vasodilations) are impaired in TD1 patients whereas no abnormalities were found using clinical neurological investigations. Clinicaltrials: No. NCT02538120. PMID:28287157

  9. P2X7 receptor knockout prevents streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Flávia Sarmento; Nanini, Hayandra Ferreira; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2016-01-05

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of islet of Langerhans β-cells. P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) modulate proinflammatory immune responses by binding extracellular ATP, a classic 'danger signal'. Here, we evaluated whether the P2X7R has a role in T1D development. P2X7(-/-) mice are resistant to TD1 induction by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, with no increase in blood glucose, decrease in insulin-positive cells, and pancreatic islet reduction, compared to WT (C57BL/6) mice. Also, the levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IFN-γ and NO) did not increase after STZ treatment in P2X7(-/-) animals, with reduced infiltration of CD4(+), CD8(+), B220(+), CD11b(+) and CD11c(+) cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes. Treatment with a P2X7 antagonist mimicked the effect of P2X7 knockout, preventing STZ-induced diabetes. Our results show that the absence of the P2X7R provides resistance in the induction of diabetes in this model, and suggest that therapy targeting the P2X7R may be useful against clinical T1D.

  10. Astrocytic expression of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in rat and human sclerotic hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xian-Dong; Wei, Dong; Li, Juan; Kang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Chen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Liu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), which is traditionally located on axon terminals, plays an important role in the pathology of epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases by modulating synaptic transmission. Using the pilocarpine model of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures, which mimics the main features of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in humans, we examined the expression of CB1R in hippocampal astrocytes of epileptic rats. Furthermore, we also examined the expression of astrocytic CB1R in the resected hippocampi from patients with medically refractory mesial TLE. Using immunofluorescent double labeling, we found increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in hippocampi of epileptic rats, whereas expression of astrocytic CB1R was not detectable in hippocampi of saline treated animals. Furthermore, CB1R was also found in some astrocytes in sclerotic hippocampi in a subset of patients with intractable mesial TLE. Detection with immune electron microscopy showed that the expression of CB1R was increased in astrocytes of epileptic rats and modest levels of CB1R were also found on the astrocytic membrane of sclerotic hippocampi. These results suggest that increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in sclerotic hippocampi might be involved in the cellular basis of the effects of cannabinoids on epilepsy. PMID:25031702

  11. Sialyl Lewis(x) hybridized complement receptor type 1 moderates acid aspiration injury.

    PubMed

    Kyriakides, C; Wang, Y; Austen, W G; Favuzza, J; Kobzik, L; Moore, F D; Hechtman, H B

    2001-12-01

    The potentially enhanced anti-inflammatory effects of the sialyl Lewis(x) (sLe(x))-decorated version of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) in moderating acid aspiration injury are examined. HCl was instilled in tracheostomy tubes placed in mice, and extravasation of (125)I-labeled albumin in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was used to calculate the vascular permeability index (PI). Neutrophil counts in BAL fluid and immunohistochemistry were performed. PI was moderated by 82% after treatment with sCR1sLe(x) compared with 54% in sCR1-untreated mice (P < 0.05). Respective reductions in PI in mice treated 0.5 and 1 h after acid aspiration with sCR1sLe(x) of 70 and 57% were greater than the decreases in PI of 45 and 38% observed in respective sCR1-treated groups (P < 0.05). BAL fluid neutrophil counts in sCR1sLe(x)-treated mice were significantly less than those in sCR1-treated animals, which were similar to those in untreated mice. Immunohistochemistry stained for sCR1 only on the pulmonary vascular endothelium of sCR1sLe(x)- but not sCR1-treated mice. In conclusion, sCR1sLe(x) moderates permeability by antagonizing complement activation and neutrophil adhesion. Delayed complement and neutrophil antagonism significantly reduces injury.

  12. Soluble human complement receptor type 1 inhibits complement-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Swift, A J; Collins, T S; Bugelski, P; Winkelstein, J A

    1994-09-01

    Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) is a powerful inhibitor of complement activation. Because of this ability, sCR1 may prove to be an important therapeutic agent that can be used to block the immunopathologic effects of uncontrolled complement activation in a variety of clinically significant disorders. Although several previous studies have examined the ability of sCR1 to inhibit complemented-mediated immunopathologic damage, there is no information on its ability to interfere with the host's defense against infection. In the current experiments sCR1 exerted a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on the phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro. Not only di sCR1 inhibit complement-dependent opsonization of the pneumococcus but at higher concentrations it also inhibited the ingestion of bacteria which had been previously opsonized. Furthermore, when rats were injected with sCR1, it inhibited both their serum hemolytic activity and serum opsonic activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Finally, for rats treated with sCR1, the 50% lethal dose was S. pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These data demonstrate that sCR1 significantly inhibits complement-mediated host against bacterial infection.

  13. Green tea catechins are potent sensitizers of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Ward, Chris W; Padilla, Isela T; Cabrales, Elaine; Lopez, José R; Eltit, José M; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2010-08-15

    Catechins, polyphenols extracted from green tea leaves, have a broad range of biological activities although the specific molecular mechanisms responsible are not known. At the high experimental concentrations typically used polyphenols bind to membrane phospholipid and also are easily auto-oxidized to generate superoxide anion and semiquinones, and can adduct to protein thiols. We report that the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a molecular target that responds to nanomolar (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG). Single channel analyses demonstrate EGCG (5-10nM) increases channel open probability (Po) twofold, by lengthening open dwell time. The degree of channel activation is concentration-dependent and is rapidly and fully reversible. Four related catechins, EGCG, ECG, EGC ((-)-epigallocatechin) and EC ((-)-epicatechin) showed a rank order of activity toward RyR1 (EGCG>ECG>EGC>EC). EGCG and ECG enhance the sensitivity of RyR1 to activation by < or =100microM cytoplasmic Ca(2+) without altering inhibitory potency by >100microM Ca(2+). EGCG as high as 10microM in the extracellular medium potentiated Ca(2+) transient amplitudes evoked by electrical stimuli applied to intact myotubes and adult FDB fibers, without eliciting spontaneous Ca(2+) release or slowing Ca(2+) transient recovery. The results identify RyR1 as a sensitive target for the major tea catechins EGCG and ECG, and this interaction is likely to contribute to their observed biological activities.

  14. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release: activation of type 1 ryanodine receptor by endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Iino, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs), located in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) membrane, are required for intracellular Ca2+ release that is involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In addition to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release in cardiac cells and voltage-induced Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle cells, we recently identified another mode of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization mediated by RyR, i.e., nitric oxide-induced Ca2+ release (NICR), in cerebellar Purkinje cells. NICR is evoked by neuronal activity, is dependent on S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) and is involved in the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) of cerebellar synapses. In this addendum, we examined whether peroxynitrite, which is produced by the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide, may also have an effect on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 and the cerebellar LTP. We found that scavengers of peroxynitrite have no significant effect either on the Ca2+ release via RyR1 or on the cerebellar LTP. We also found that an application of a high concentration of peroxynitrite does not reproduce neuronal activity-dependent Ca2+ release in Purkinje cells. These results support that NICR is induced by endogenous nitric oxide produced by neuronal activity through S-nitrosylation of RyR1.

  15. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Zhencheng; Liu Daoyan; Zhang Lili; Shen Chenyi; Ma Qunli; Cao Tingbing; Wang Lijuan; Nie Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu Zhiming . E-mail: zhuzm@yahoo.com

    2007-03-09

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{delta} (PPAR-{delta})-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-{delta}. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-{delta} by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 {+-} 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-{delta} significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 {+-} 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-{delta}. Both CB1 and PPAR-{delta} are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor.

  16. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  17. β-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated Cardiac Contractility is Inhibited via Vasopressin Type 1A-Receptor-Dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Douglas G.; Zhu, Weizhong; Myers, Valerie D.; Barr, Larry A.; Gao, Erhe; Li, Xue; Song, Jianliang; Carter, Rhonda L.; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Yu, Daohai; Troupes, Constantine D.; Grisanti, Laurel A.; Coleman, Ryan C.; Koch, Walter J.; Houser, Steven R.; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Feldman, Arthur M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Enhanced arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels are associated with increased mortality during end-stage human heart failure (HF), and cardiac AVP type 1A receptor (V1AR) expression becomes increased. Additionally, mice with cardiac-restricted V1AR overexpression develop cardiomyopathy and decreased β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) responsiveness. This led us to hypothesize that V1AR signaling regulated βAR responsiveness and in doing so contributes to HF development. Methods and Results Transaortic constriction resulted in decreased cardiac function and βAR density and increased cardiac V1AR expression, effects reversed by a V1AR-selective antagonist. Molecularly, V1AR stimulation led to decreased βAR ligand affinity, as well as βAR-induced Ca2+ mobilization and cAMP generation in isolated adult cardiomyocytes, effects recapitulated via ex vivo Langendorff analysis. V1AR-mediated regulation of βAR responsiveness was demonstrated to occur in a previously unrecognized Gq protein-independent/GRK-dependent manner. Conclusions This newly discovered relationship between cardiac V1AR and βAR may be informative for the treatment of patients with acute decompensated HF and elevated AVP. PMID:25205804

  18. Stimulation of α₁-adrenoceptor or angiotensin type 1 receptor enhances DNA synthesis in human-induced pluripotent stem cells via Gq-coupled receptor-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Goshima, Hazuki; Ozawa, Ayako; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of either α₁-adrenoceptor or angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT₁ receptor) induces proliferation of mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Both α₁-adrenoceptor and AT₁ receptor are guanine nucleotide-binding protein q polypeptide (Gq)-coupled receptors. However, it is not fully understood whether stimulation of these Gq-coupled receptors exert a similar effect in human iPS cells, i.e. proliferation of human iPS cells. In this study, we evaluated the involvement of α₁-adrenoceptor and AT₁ receptor in the DNA synthesis of human iPS cells. Treatment with either l-phenylephrine (a selective α₁-adrenoceptor agonist) or angiotensin II (Ang II) significantly increased DNA synthesis in human iPS cells. Enhanced DNA synthesis was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor, or phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Treatment with either l-phenylephrine or Ang II significantly increased Akt and p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against Gq significantly inhibited DNA synthesis and phosphorylation of Akt and p44/42 MAPK enhanced by l-phenylephrine or Ang II. These results suggest that stimulation of α₁-adrenoceptor or AT₁ receptor may enhance DNA synthesis in human iPS cells via Gq-coupled receptor-dependent signaling pathways.

  19. A type 1 cholecystokinin receptor mutant that mimics the dysfunction observed for wild type receptor in a high cholesterol environment.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aditya J; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Miller, Laurence J

    2014-06-27

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates the type 1 CCK receptor (CCK1R) to elicit satiety after a meal. Agonists with this activity, although potentially useful for treatment of obesity, can also have side effects and toxicities of concern, making the development of an intrinsically inactive positive allosteric modulator quite attractive. Positive allosteric modulators also have the potential to correct the defective receptor-G protein coupling observed in the high membrane cholesterol environment described in metabolic syndrome. Current model systems to study CCK1R in such an environment are unstable and expensive to maintain. We now report that the Y140A mutation within a cholesterol-binding motif and the conserved, class A G protein-coupled receptor-specific (E/D)RY signature sequence results in ligand binding and activity characteristics similar to wild type CCK1R in a high cholesterol environment. This is true for natural CCK, as well as ligands with distinct chemistries and activity profiles. Additionally, the Y140A construct also behaved like CCK1R in high cholesterol in regard to its internalization, sensitivity to a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, and anisotropy of a bound fluorescent CCK analog. Chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs that systematically changed the residues in the allosteric ligand-binding pocket were studied in the presence of Y140A. This established increased importance of unique residues within TM3 and reduced the importance of TM2 for binding in the presence of this mutation, with the agonist trigger likely pulled away from its Leu(356) target on TM7. The distinct conformation of this intramembranous pocket within Y140A CCK1R provides an opportunity to normalize this by using a small molecule allosteric ligand, thereby providing safe and effective correction of the coupling defect in metabolic syndrome.

  20. Increased transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in hypertrophic heart.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Schulz, Nico; Gergs, Ulrich; Neumann, Joachim; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Gollasch, Maik; Tepel, Martin

    2010-10-08

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels in hypertrophic hearts from transgenic mice showing overexpression of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein phosphatase 2A alpha (PP2Ac alpha) with wild-type mice and with TRPV1-/- mice. Transcripts of TRPV1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), discoidin domain receptor family, member 2 (DDR-2), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), GATA 4, and regulatory microRNA (miR-21) were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Ventricle-to-body-weight-ratio was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice and TRPV1-/- mice (8.6±1.3mg/g; 5.4±0.3mg/g; and 5.4±0.4mg/g; respectively; p<0.05 by Kruskal-Wallis test). TRPV1 transcripts were significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice (1.7±0.2 arbitrary units vs. 0.8±0.1 arbitrary units; p<0.05). TRPV1 protein expression was also significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. A significant linear correlation was observed between TRPV1 transcripts and the ventricle-to-body-weight-ratio (Spearman r=0.78; p<0.05). The expression of DDR-2 was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice and TRPV1 knockout mice. The expression of miR21 was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared with TRPV1-/- mice (0.103±0.018 (PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice); 0.089±0.009 (wild-type mice); and 0.045±0.013 (TRPV1-/- mice), respectively; p<0.05). Masson Goldner staining revealed that PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice showed increased heart fibrosis compared with TRPV1 knockout mice. The study suggests an important role of TRPV1 in the pathogenesis of genetically associated heart hypertrophy.

  1. Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors on Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Neurons Contribute to the Expression of Conditioned Fear

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Robert C.; Garrett, Jacob C.; Keifer, Orion P.; Linares, Andrea; Couling, Leena; Speth, Robert C.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Marvar, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1aR) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1aR signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1aR gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1aR(−/−)). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety, and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1aR(−/−) mice exhibit less freezing than wild type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression—an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction. PMID:26257395

  2. Angiotensin type 1a receptors on corticotropin-releasing factor neurons contribute to the expression of conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Hurt, R C; Garrett, J C; Keifer, O P; Linares, A; Couling, L; Speth, R C; Ressler, K J; Marvar, P J

    2015-09-01

    Although generally associated with cardiovascular regulation, angiotensin II receptor type 1a (AT1a R) blockade in mouse models and humans has also been associated with enhanced fear extinction and decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity, respectively. The mechanisms mediating these effects remain unknown, but may involve alterations in the activities of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing cells, which are known to be involved in fear regulation. To test the hypothesis that AT1a R signaling in CRFergic neurons is involved in conditioned fear expression, we generated and characterized a conditional knockout mouse strain with a deletion of the AT1a R gene from its CRF-releasing cells (CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) ). These mice exhibit normal baseline heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and locomotion, and freeze at normal levels during acquisition of auditory fear conditioning. However, CRF-AT1a R((-/-)) mice exhibit less freezing than wild-type mice during tests of conditioned fear expression-an effect that may be caused by a decrease in the consolidation of fear memory. These results suggest that central AT1a R activity in CRF-expressing cells plays a role in the expression of conditioned fear, and identify CRFergic cells as a population on which AT1 R antagonists may act to modulate fear extinction.

  3. Angiotensin 2 type 1 receptor blockade different affects postishemic kidney injury in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Miloradović, Zoran; Ivanov, Milan; Jovović, Đurđica; Karanović, Danijela; Vajić, Una Jovana; Marković-Lipkovski, Jasmina; Mihailović-Stanojević, Nevena; Milanović, Jelica Grujić

    2016-12-01

    Many studies demonstrated that angiotensin 2 type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockade accelerates renal recovery in post-ischaemic kidney but there are many controversies related to its net effect on kidney structure and function. During the past years, our research group was trying to define the pathophysiological significance of the renin-angiotensin system on post-ischemic acute renal failure (ARF) development in normotensive Wistar as well as hypertensive rats (SHR). This review mostly summarizes our experience in that field. Our previous studies in normotensive rats revealed that AT1R blockade, except slightly renal vascular resistance improvement, had no other obvious beneficial effects, and therefore implies angiotensin 2 (Ang-2) overexpression as non-dominant on kidney reperfusion injuries development. Similarly it was observed in Wistar rats with induced mild (L-NAME, 3 mg/kg b.w.) nitric oxide (NO) deficiency. Expectably, in strong induced (L-NAME, 10 mg/kg b.w.) NO deficiency associated with ARF, massive tubular injuries indicate harmful effects of AT1R blockade, implying strongly disturbed glomerular filtration and suggesting special precaution related to AT1R blockers usage. Opposite to previous, by our opinion, AT1R antagonism promises new advance in treatment of essentially hypertensive subjects who develop ARF. Increased glomerular filtration, diminished oxidative stress, and most importantly improved tubular structure in postishemic SHR treated with AT1R blocker losartan, implicate Ang-2 over production as potently agent in the kidney ischemic injury, partly trough generation of reactive oxygen species. These data contribute understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating illness in hypertensive surroundings.

  4. Sulforaphane-induced apoptosis involves the type 1 IP3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hudecova, Sona; Markova, Jana; Simko, Veronika; Csaderova, Lucia; Stracina, Tibor; Sirova, Marta; Fojtu, Michaela; Svastova, Eliska; Gronesova, Paulina; Pastorek, Michal; Novakova, Marie; Cholujova, Dana; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorekova, Silvia; Sedlak, Jan; Krizanova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    In this study we show that anti-tumor effect of sulforaphane (SFN) is partially realized through the type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R1). This effect was verified in vitro on three different stable cell lines and also in vivo on the model of nude mice with developed tumors. Early response (6 hours) of A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells to SFN treatment involves generation of mitochondrial ROS and increased transcription of NRF2 and its downstream regulated genes including heme oxygenase 1, NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1, and KLF9. Prolonged SFN treatment (24 hours) upregulated expression of NRF2 and IP3R1. SFN induces a time-dependent phosphorylation wave of HSP27. Use of IP3R inhibitor Xestospongin C (Xest) attenuates both SFN-induced apoptosis and the level of NRF2 protein expression. In addition, Xest partially attenuates anti-tumor effect of SFN in vivo. SFN-induced apoptosis is completely inhibited by silencing of IP3R1 gene but only partially blocked by silencing of NRF2; silencing of IP3R2 and IP3R3 had no effect on these cells. Xest inhibitor does not significantly modify SFN-induced increase in the rapid activity of ARE and AP1 responsive elements. We found that Xest effectively reverses the SFN-dependent increase of nuclear content and decrease of reticular calcium content. In addition, immunofluorescent staining with IP3R1 antibody revealed that SFN treatment induces translocation of IP3R1 to the nucleus. Our results clearly show that IP3R1 is involved in SFN-induced apoptosis through the depletion of reticular calcium and modulation of transcription factors through nuclear calcium up-regulation. PMID:27528021

  5. Type 1 and 3 inositol trisphosphate receptors are required for extra-embryonic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Keiko; Nakazawa, Maki; Yamagishi, Chihiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The embryonic-maternal interface of the placental labyrinth, allantois, and yolk sac are vital during embryogenesis; however, the precise mechanism underlying the vascularization of these structures remains unknown. Herein we focus on the role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R), which are intracellular Ca(2+) release channels, in placentation. Double knockout (DKO) of type 1 and 3 IP3Rs (IP3R1 and IP3R3, respectively) in mice resulted in embryonic lethality around embryonic day (E) 11.5. Because IP3R1 and IP3R3 were co-expressed in endothelial cells in the labyrinth, allantois, and yolk sac, we investigated extra-embryonic vascular development in IP3R1- and IP3R3-DKO mice. The formation of chorionic plates and yolk sac vessels seemed dysregulated around the timing of the chorio-allantoic attachment, immediately followed by the disorganization of allantoic vessels, the decreased expression of the spongiotrophoblast cell marker Tpbpa and the growth retardation of the embryos in DKO mice. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry demonstrated downregulation of a vascular endothelial marker, CD31, in labyrinth embryonic vessels and poor elongation of extra-embryonic mesoderm into the labyrinth layer in DKO placenta, whereas the branching of the DKO chorionic trophoblast was initiated. In addition, allantoic and yolk sac vessels in extra-embryonic tissues were less remodeled in DKO mice. In vitro endothelial cord formation and migration activities of cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein were downregulated under the inhibition of IP3R. Our results suggest that IP3R1 and IP3R3 are required for extra-embryonic vascularization in the placenta, allantois, and yolk sac. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of IP3/IP3Rs signaling in the development of the vasculature at the embryonic-maternal interface.

  6. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation.

  7. Dynamic regulation of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel activity by Homer 1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Tu, Jiancheng; Pouliquin, Pierre; Cabrales, Elaine; Shen, Xiaohua; Dulhunty, Angela; Worley, Paul F; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2008-03-01

    Homer, a family of scaffolding proteins originally identified in neurons, is also expressed in skeletal muscle. Previous studies showed that splice variants of Homer 1 (H1) amplify the gain of the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel complex. Using [3H]ryanodine ([3H]Ry) to probe the conformational state of RyR1, the actions of long- and short-forms of H1 are examined singly and in combination. At < or =200 nM, H1 long-forms (H1b or H1c possessing coiled-coil (CC) domains) and short-forms (H1a or H1EVH1 lacking CC domains) enhance specific [3H]Ry binding to RyR1. However, at a concentration > 200 nM, either H1 form completely inhibited [3H]Ry binding. Importantly, the combinations of H1c+H1EVH1, or H1b+H1a acted in an additive manner to enhance or inhibit [3H]Ry-binding activity. H1a and H1c individually or in combination produced the same dynamic pattern in regulating purified RyR1 channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers. In combination, their net action on RyR1 channels depends on total concentrations of H1. These data provide a mechanism by which constitutively and transiently expressed H1 forms can tightly regulate RyR1 channel activity in response to changing levels of expression and degradation of H1 proteins.

  8. Organization of Ca2+ stores in myeloid cells: association of SERCA2b and the type-1 inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Favre, C J; Jerström, P; Foti, M; Stendhal, O; Huggler, E; Lew, D P; Krause, K H

    1996-05-15

    In this study, we have analysed the relationship between Ca2+ pumps and Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ channels in myeloid cells. To study whether sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)-type Ca(2+)-ATPases are responsible for Ca2+ uptake into Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ stores, we used the three structurally unrelated inhibitors thapsigargin, 2,5-di-t-butylhydroquinone and cyclopiazonic acid. In HL-60 cells, all three compounds precluded formation of the phosphorylated intermediate of SERCA-type Ca(2+)-ATPases. They also decreased, in parallel, ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation and the amount of Ins(1,4,5)P3-releasable Ca2+. Immunoblotting with subtype-directed antibodies demonstrated that HL-60 cells contain the Ca2+ pump SERCA2 (subtype b), and the Ca(2+)-release-channel type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor. In subcellular fractionation studies, SERCA2 and type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor co-purified. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that both type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor and SERCA2 were evenly distributed throughout the cell in moving neutrophils. During phagocytosis both proteins translocated to the periphagosomal space. Taken together, our results suggest that in myeloid cells (i) SERCA-type Ca(2+)-ATPases function as Ca2+ pumps of Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ stores, and (ii) SERCA2 and type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor reside either in the same or two tightly associated subcellular compartments.

  9. Organization of Ca2+ stores in myeloid cells: association of SERCA2b and the type-1 inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Favre, C J; Jerström, P; Foti, M; Stendhal, O; Huggler, E; Lew, D P; Krause, K H

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we have analysed the relationship between Ca2+ pumps and Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ channels in myeloid cells. To study whether sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)-type Ca(2+)-ATPases are responsible for Ca2+ uptake into Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ stores, we used the three structurally unrelated inhibitors thapsigargin, 2,5-di-t-butylhydroquinone and cyclopiazonic acid. In HL-60 cells, all three compounds precluded formation of the phosphorylated intermediate of SERCA-type Ca(2+)-ATPases. They also decreased, in parallel, ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation and the amount of Ins(1,4,5)P3-releasable Ca2+. Immunoblotting with subtype-directed antibodies demonstrated that HL-60 cells contain the Ca2+ pump SERCA2 (subtype b), and the Ca(2+)-release-channel type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor. In subcellular fractionation studies, SERCA2 and type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor co-purified. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that both type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor and SERCA2 were evenly distributed throughout the cell in moving neutrophils. During phagocytosis both proteins translocated to the periphagosomal space. Taken together, our results suggest that in myeloid cells (i) SERCA-type Ca(2+)-ATPases function as Ca2+ pumps of Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ stores, and (ii) SERCA2 and type-1 Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor reside either in the same or two tightly associated subcellular compartments. PMID:8645196

  10. Coxsackie–adenovirus receptor expression is enhanced in pancreas from patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hodik, M; Anagandula, M; Fuxe, J; Krogvold, L; Dahl-Jørgensen, K; Hyöty, H; Sarmiento, L; Frisk, G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives One of the theories connecting enterovirus (EV) infection of human islets with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is the development of a fertile field in the islets. This implies induction of appropriate proteins for the viral replication such as the coxsackie–adenovirus receptor (CAR). The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent CAR is expressed in human islets of Langerhans, and what conditions that would change the expression. Design Immunohistochemistry for CAR was performed on paraffin-embedded pancreatic tissue from patients with T1D (n=9 recent onset T1D, n=4 long-standing T1D), islet autoantibody-positive individuals (n=14) and non-diabetic controls (n=24) individuals. The expression of CAR was also examined by reverse transcription PCR on microdissected islets (n=5), exocrine tissue (n=5) and on explanted islets infected with EV or exposed to chemokines produced by EV-infected islet cells. Results An increased frequency of patients with T1D and autoantibody-positive individuals expressed CAR in the pancreas (p<0.039). CAR staining was detected more frequently in pancreatic islets from patients with T1D and autoantibody-positive subjects (15/27) compared with (6/24) non-diabetic controls (p<0.033). Also in explanted islets cultured in UV-treated culture medium from coxsackievirus B (CBV)-1-infected islets, the expression of the CAR gene was increased compared with controls. Laser microdissection of pancreatic tissue revealed that CAR expression was 10-fold higher in endocrine compared with exocrine cells of the pancreas. CAR was also expressed in explanted islets and the expression level decreased with time in culture. CBV-1 infection of explanted islets clearly decreased the expression of CAR (p<0.05). In contrast, infection with echovirus 6 did not affect the expression of CAR. Conclusions CAR is expressed in pancreatic islets of patients with T1D and the expression level of CAR is increased in explanted islets exposed to proinflammatory

  11. The effect of soluble complement receptor type 1 on hyperacute xenograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, S K; Baldwin, W M; Marsh, H C; Lin, S S; Yeh, C G; Bollinger, R R

    1991-11-01

    In the guinea pig-to-rat model of hyperacute xenograft (Xg) rejection, the effect of complement inhibition using systemically administered soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) on discordant cardiac Xg survival was investigated. In PBS-treated control Xg recipients (n = 13), hyperacute rejection was rapid, with a mean Xg survival of 17 +/- 4 min. Therapy with sCR1 prolonged survival of cardiac Xgs in a dose-dependent manner. A 3 mg/kg bolus of sCR1 (n = 4) prolonged Xg survival to 64 +/- 29 min (not significant). Increasing the sCR1 dose to 5.9 mg/kg (n = 4) significantly delayed Xg rejection to 71 +/- 17 min (P-0.026, log-rank test vs. control). In 10 recipients treated with 15 mg/kg sCR1, mean Xg survival was further prolonged to 189 +/- 36 min (P-0.0004) with no adverse effects. While 2 of 8 recipients receiving 60 mg/kg sCR1 died with functioning Xgs at 30 and 300 min due to anastomotic bleeding, Xg survival averaged over 12 hr (747 +/- 100 min, P-0.0004) in the remaining 6 recipients. sCR1 administration significantly inhibited serum complement activity in a parallel dose-dependent fashion, with the 60 mg/kg dose reducing complement activity by 95 +/- 1 and 96 +/- 1% five and 30 min following Xg reperfusion, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed rat IgM bound to all cardiac Xgs in control as well as sCR1-treated recipients. In addition, serial histologic examination of cardiac Xgs harvested within 21 min of graft reperfusion revealed occlusive platelet aggregates within the coronary vessels as well as interstitial hemorrhage and myocardial necrosis in Xgs from control recipients, all of which were only minimally present in Xgs from recipients treated with sCR1. These studies show that complement inhibition with sCR1 significantly delays hyperacute cardiac Xg rejection in this discordant model and may be an important component in a therapeutic protocol for xenotransplantation.

  12. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV-1) channels contribute to cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J; Fieger, Sarah M

    2010-11-01

    The initial, rapid increase in skin blood flow in response to direct application of heat is thought to be mediated by an axon reflex, which is dependent on intact cutaneous sensory nerves. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV-1) channels, which are putative channels located on sensory nerves, would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans. Ten subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres which were randomly assigned one of four treatments: (1) vehicle control (90% propylene glycol + 10% lactated Ringer solution); (2) 20 mm capsazepine to inhibit TRPV-1 channels; (3) 10 mm l-NAME to inhibit NO synthase; and (4) combined 20 mm capsazepine + 10 mm l-NAME. Following baseline measurements, the temperature of skin heaters was increased from 33°C to 42°C at a rate of 1.0°C every 10 s and local temperature was held at 42°C for 20-30 min until a stable plateau in skin blood flow was achieved. An index of skin blood flow was measured directly over each microdialysis site via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Beat-by-beat blood pressure was measured via photoplethysmography and verified via automated brachial auscultation. At the end of the local heating protocol, temperature of the heaters was increased to 43°C and 28 mm nitroprusside was infused to achieve maximal vasodilatation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (%CVCmax). Initial peak in capsazepine (44 ± 4%CVCmax), l-NAME (56 ± 4%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (32 ± 6%CVCmax) sites was significantly attenuated compared to control (87 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). The plateau phase of thermal hyperaemia was significantly attenuated in capsazepine (73 ± 6%CVCmax), l-NAME (47 ± 5%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (31 ± 7%CVCmax) sites compared to control (92 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). These data suggest TRPV-1

  13. Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Varga, Angelika; Selvarajah, Srikumaran; Jenes, Agnes; Dienes, Beatrix; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Kulik, Akos; Veress, Gabor; Brain, Susan D.; Baker, David; Urban, Laszlo; Mackie, Ken; Nagy, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both capsaicin and the endogenous TRPV1 and CB1 receptor ligand anandamide (ACR neurons). Blocking or deleting the CB1 receptor only reduces both anandamide- and capsaicin-evoked responses in ACR neurons. Deleting the CB1 receptor also reduces the proportion of ACR neurons without any effect on the overall number of capsaicin-responding cells. Regarding the distribution pattern of the two receptors, neurons express CB1 and TRPV1 receptors either isolated in low densities or in close proximity with medium/high densities. We suggest that spatial distribution of the CB1 receptor and TRPV1 contributes to the complexity of their functional interaction. PMID:27653550

  14. Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Varga, Angelika; Selvarajah, Srikumaran; Jenes, Agnes; Dienes, Beatrix; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Kulik, Akos; Veress, Gabor; Brain, Susan D; Baker, David; Urban, Laszlo; Mackie, Ken; Nagy, Istvan

    2016-09-22

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both capsaicin and the endogenous TRPV1 and CB1 receptor ligand anandamide (ACR neurons). Blocking or deleting the CB1 receptor only reduces both anandamide- and capsaicin-evoked responses in ACR neurons. Deleting the CB1 receptor also reduces the proportion of ACR neurons without any effect on the overall number of capsaicin-responding cells. Regarding the distribution pattern of the two receptors, neurons express CB1 and TRPV1 receptors either isolated in low densities or in close proximity with medium/high densities. We suggest that spatial distribution of the CB1 receptor and TRPV1 contributes to the complexity of their functional interaction.

  15. Pilot Phase II Trial of Imatinib Mesylate in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 patients with Plexiform Neurofibromas

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Kent A.; Nalepa, Grzegorz; Yang, Feng-Chun; Bowers, Daniel C.; Ho, Chang Y.; Hutchins, Gary D.; Croop, James M.; Vik, Terry A.; Denne, Scott C.; Parada, Luis F.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Walsh, Laurence E.; Yu, Menggang; Pradhan, Kamnesh R.; Edwards-Brown, Mary K.; Cohen, Mervyn D.; Fletcher, James W.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Staser, Karl W.; Lee, Melissa W.; Sherman, Marcie R.; Davis, Cynthia J.; Miller, Lucy C.; Ingram, David A.; Clapp, D. Wade

    2016-01-01

    : 10 – 48%) experienced ≥ 20% decrease in volume of one or more plexiform tumours and 30% of study patients had symptomatic improvement. We noted significant inter-patient and intra-patient heterogeneity of plexiform neurofibroma response. Toxicity of drug was comparable to previous reports in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The most common adverse events were reversible skin rash (5 patients) and edema with weight gain (6 patients). More serious adverse events included reversible grade 3 neutropenia (2 patients) and grade 4 transaminitis (one patient). INTERPRETATION Imatinib mesylate caused disease regression in 26% of evaluable patients with clinically significant plexiform neurofibromas due to neurofibromatosis type 1. These results warrant confirmation in a larger multi-institutional clinical trial aimed at this patient population. These findings provide the first demonstration of radiographic volumetric tumour reduction in response to medical therapy in patients with NF1 plexiform neurofibromas using imatinib mesylate based on studies in a pre-clinical genetic mouse model. These translational studies form the framework whereby other agents may be tested/compared to imatinib in the pre-clinical model and moved into the clinic advancing development of more effective therapies for NF1-related plexiform neurofibromas. PMID:23099009

  16. The Relationship between Serum Carbonic Anhydrase I-II Autoantibody Levels and Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Türk, Adem; Mollamehmetoğlu, Süleyman; Alver, Ahmet; Menteşe, Ahmet; Nuhoğlu, İrfan; Erem, Cihangir; İmamoğlu, Halil İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between serum carbonic anhydrase I-II (CA-I and II) autoantibody levels and diabetic retinopathy (DRP) in cases with type 1 diabetes. Materials and Methods: A total of 37 type-1 diabetic patients, 17 with DRP (group 1) and 20 without (group 2), and 38 healthy control subjects (group 3) were included. CA-I and CA-II autoantibody levels were measured in serum samples obtained from each of the three groups and compared statistically. Additionally, the correlation between CA-I and CA-II autoantibody levels and the presence of diabetic macular edema was examined. Results: Mean measured CA-I autoantibody levels were 0.145±0.072, 0.117±0.047, and 0.138±0.061 ABSU in group 1, group 2, and group 3, respectively (p=0.327). The average CA-II autoantibody levels achieved in the same groups were 0.253±0.174, 0.155±0.137, and 0.131±0.085 ABSU, respectively (p=0.005). No significant difference was obtained between the subgroups of group 1, with macular edema (n=8) and without (n=9), in terms of both CA-I and CA-II autoantibody levels (p=0.501, p=0.178, respectively). Conclusion: A significant correlation was observed between the development of DRP and serum CA-II autoantibody levels in type 1 diabetic cases. However, there was no correlation between the autoantibody levels and the presence of diabetic macular edema in cases with DRP.

  17. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  18. Angiotensin type-1 receptor inhibition is neuroprotective to amacrine cells in a rat model of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Downie, Laura E; Hatzopoulos, Kate M; Pianta, Michael J; Vingrys, Algis J; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L; Kalloniatis, Michael; Fletcher, Erica L

    2010-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is characterized by deficits in the scotopic pathway, although the cellular locus for these deficits is not clear. Here we examined neurochemical and cellular changes that develop during oxygen-induced retinopathy, a model of ROP. In addition, we examined whether treatment with the angiotensin II type-1 receptor inhibitor, valsartan, prevented these changes. Newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed from postnatal day (P) 0 to 11 to 80%:20% O(2) (22:2 hr/day) and then room air until P18. Valsartan (40 mg/kg/day) was administered from P12-P18. Pattern recognition analysis of overlapping amino acid profiles was used to provide a statistically robust and spatially complete classification of neural elements for each experimental condition. Classification yielded 12 neuronal theme classes in controls and nine classes following ROP. ROP was associated with a reduction in the number of amacrine and bipolar cell theme classes. The reduction in theme classes was confirmed as true neuronal loss by quantifying anatomical changes and using an apoptotic marker. ROP was associated with shifts in amino acid levels across all neuronal populations except for horizontal cells. A reduction in the density of glycine-immunoreactive amacrine cells, and particularly parvalbumin-immunoreactive AII amacrine cells, was observed following ROP. Valsartan treatment during ROP prevented loss of theme classes and loss of AII amacrine cells. This study suggests that deficits in scotopic vision during ROP may be associated with loss of AII amacrine cells. In addition, this study highlights the potential of AT(1)R blockade in preventing neuronal anomalies in this condition.

  19. Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and binding mode modeling of benzimidazole derivatives targeting the cannabinoid receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Bustos, Christian; Lagos, Carlos F; Romero-Parra, Javier; Zárate, Ana M; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Pessoa-Mahana, Hernán; Recabarren-Gajardo, Gonzalo; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Tapia, Ricardo A; Pessoa-Mahana, C David

    2015-02-01

    A series of N-acyl-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazoles were designed based on a CoMFA model for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) ligands. Compounds were synthesized and radioligand binding affinity assays were performed. Eight novel benzimidazoles exhibited affinity for the CB1 receptor in the nanomolar range, and the most promising derivative compound 5 displayed a K(i) value of 1.2 nM when compared to CP55,940. These results confirm our previously reported QSAR model on benzimidazole derivatives, providing new information for the development of small molecules with high CB1 affinity.

  20. Microinjection of orexin-A into the rat locus coeruleus nucleus induces analgesia via cannabinoid type-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Hossein Mohammad-Pour; Azizi, Hossein; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Reza, Mani Ali; Semnanian, Saeed

    2015-10-22

    Locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus is involved in noradrenergic descending pain modulation. LC receives dense orexinergic projections from the lateral hypothalamus. Orexin-A and -B are hypothalamic peptides which modulate a variety of brain functions via orexin type-1 (OX1) and orexin type-2 (OX2) receptors. Previous studies have shown that activation of OX1 receptors induces endocannabinoid synthesis and alters synaptic neurotransmission by retrograde signaling via affecting cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors. In the present study the interaction of orexin-A and endocannabinoids was examined at the LC level in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Pain was induced by formalin (2%) injection into the hind paw. Intra-LC microinjection of orexin-A decreased the nociception score during both phases of formalin test. Furthermore, intra-LC microinjection of either SB-334867 (OX1 receptor antagonist) or AM251 (CB1 receptor antagonist) increased flinches and also the nociception score during phase 1, 2 and the inter-phase of formalin test. The analgesic effect of orexin-A was diminished by prior intra-LC microinjection of either SB-334867 or AM251. This data show that, activation of OX1 receptors in the LC can induce analgesia and also the blockade of OX1 or CB1 receptors is associated with hyperalgesia during formalin test. Our findings also suggest that CB1 receptors may modulate the analgesic effect of orexin-A. These results outline a new mechanism by which orexin-A modulates the nociceptive processing in the LC nucleus.

  1. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-IL; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y.L.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ -binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism. PMID:26348907

  2. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism.

  3. Molecular determinants of the species selectivity of neurokinin type 1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pradier, L; Habert-Ortoli, E; Emile, L; Le Guern, J; Loquet, I; Bock, M D; Clot, J; Mercken, L; Fardin, V; Garret, C

    1995-02-01

    Most nonpeptide neurokinin (NK)1 antagonists display a marked difference in affinity for rat versus human NK1 receptors. The molecular basis for the species selectivity of RP67580 and CP96,345 has been previously addressed [J. Biol. Chem. 267:25668-25671 (1992); J. Biol. Chem. 268:2319-2323 (1993)]. We are extending these previous results to additional NK1 antagonists, which are members of different chemical families. Included is a new perhydroisoindolol, RPR100893, which unlike its parent compound (RP67580) is human receptor selective. Chimeric rat/human NK1 receptors, as well as rat and human mutant NK1 receptors, were constructed and expressed in COS-1 cells, and affinities for substance P and the various antagonists were determined in binding studies. With human receptor-selective antagonists, the rat R290(S-->I) mutation was the most effective in increasing antagonist affinity (from 7- to 23-fold). Combination with the R116(L-->V) mutation led to an additional increase in affinity for trans-4-hydroxy-1-(1H-indol-3-ylcarbonyl)-L-prolyl-N- methyl-N-(phenylmethyl)-L-tyrosineamide (a derivative of FK888) and to nearly full human receptor affinity for RPR100893 and (+/-)-CP99,994. Based on the gains in affinities, these results confirm and extend the role of residues 116 and 290 of the NK1 receptor in the species selectivity of these three new human receptor-selective NK1 antagonists. In comparison, the affinity of RP67580, the least selective molecule, was most affected by changes at position 116, and combination with mutations at either position 97 (V-->E) or position 290 led to the human receptor phenotype. For the heterosteroid KAN610857, modifications of the rat receptor at positions 97 and 290, and to a lesser degree position 116, were the most effective in reducing affinity. Two double-mutants [R(97,290) and R(116,290)], although different from those identified for RP67580, also displayed human receptor-like affinity. Therefore, the molecular determinants of

  4. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  5. 17beta-estradiol deficiency reduces potassium excretion in an angiotensin type 1 receptor-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Falconetti, Celine; Roesch, Darren M; Mulroney, Susan E; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2007-07-01

    This study examined the effects of ovariectomy (OVX) and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) replacement (OVX + E(2)) on renal function in Sprague-Dawley rats. OVX caused a 40% decrease in the fractional excretion of potassium (FE(K(+))) that was prevented by E(2) replacement [Sham, 24.2 +/- 2.9%; OVX, 14.5 +/- 2.1% (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 26.2 +/- 2.7%; n = 7-11] and that corresponded to significant increases in plasma potassium [(in mmol/l): Sham, 3.15 +/- 0.087; OVX, 3.42 +/- 0.048 (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 3.19 +/- 0.11; n = 7-11]. No effects of OVX were detected on plasma levels of sodium and aldosterone. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) densities in ovariectomized rats were 1.4-fold and 1.3-fold higher in glomerular [maximum binding capacity (B(max); in fmol/mg protein): Sham, 482 +/- 21; OVX, 666 +/- 20 (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 504 +/- 26; n = 7-11] and proximal tubular [B(max) (in fmol/mg protein): Sham, 721 +/- 16; OVX, 741 +/- 24 (P < 0.05 vs. OVX + E(2)); and OVX + E(2), 569 +/- 23; n = 7-11] membranes compared with E(2) replete animals, respectively. Both the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril and the AT(1)R antagonist losartan prevented the OVX-induced decrease in the FE(K(+)) and the increase in renal AT(1)R densities, suggesting that E(2) deficiency reduces potassium excretion in an ANG II/AT(1)R-dependent manner. These findings may have implications for renal function in postmenopausal women as well as contribute to the reasons underlying the age-induced increase in susceptibility to hypertension-associated disease in women.

  6. A type 1 serine/threonine kinase receptor that can dorsalize mesoderm in Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, D; Gurdon, J B

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned a type I serine/threonine kinase receptor, XTrR-I, from Xenopus. XTrR-I (Xenopus transforming growth factor beta-related receptor type I) is expressed in all regions of embryos throughout early development. Overexpression of this receptor does not affect ectoderm or endoderm but dorsalizes the mesoderm such that muscle appears in ventral mesoderm and notochord appears in lateral mesoderm normally fated to become muscle. In addition, overexpression of XTrR-I in UV-treated embryos is able to cause formation of a partial dorsal axis. These results suggest that XTrR-I encodes a receptor which responds in normal development to a transforming growth factor beta-like ligand so as to promote dorsalization. Its function would therefore be to direct mesodermalized tissue into muscle or notochord. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7604016

  7. Voltage-gated ion channel Kv4.3 is associated with Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors and regulates angiotensin receptor type 1 signaling to small G-protein Rap.

    PubMed

    Potapova, Irina A; Cohen, Ira S; Doronin, Sergey V

    2007-09-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.3 was coexpressed with its beta-subunit Kv channel-interacting protein 2 and the angiotensin type 1 receptor in HEK-293 cells. Proteomic analysis of proteins coimmunoprecipitated with Kv4.3 revealed that Kv4.3 is associated with Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors MR-GEF and EPAC-1. Previously, we demonstrated that Kv4.3 interacts with the angiotensin type 1 receptor in HE293 cells and cardiac myocytes. On the basis of this, we investigated the angiotensin type 1 receptor signaling to small G-proteins Ras and Rap-1 in the presence and absence of the Kv4.3-Kv channel-interacting protein 2 macromolecular complex. Ras activation was not significantly affected by coexpression of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2. Ras exhibited a rapid activation-inactivation pattern with maximum activity at 2.5 min after addition of angiotensin II. In contrast, activation of Rap-1 was affected dramatically by coexpression of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2 with the angiotensin type 1 receptor. In the absence of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2, stimulation of the angiotensin type 1 receptor resulted in steady activation of Rap-1 that reached a plateau 25 min after addition of angiotensin II. In the presence of Kv4.3 and Kv channel-interacting protein 2, Rap-1 reaches a maximum activity 2.5 min after addition of angiotensin II and then deactivates rapidly, demonstrating a pattern of activation similar to that of Ras. Our findings show that Kv4.3 regulates angiotensin type 1 receptor signaling to the small G-protein Rap-1.

  8. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis In A Young Child With Histological Evidence On Brain Biopsy Of Coexistent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Ellul, Mark A; Griffiths, Michael J; Iyer, Anand; Avula, Shivaram; Defres, Sylviane; Baborie, Atik; Vincent, Angela; Martin, Natalie G; Sadarangani, Manish; Pollard, Andrew J; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    We report a 3-year-old boy with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis with a typical syndrome of movement disorder and encephalopathy and evidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 infection on brain biopsy. HSV type 1 infection and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis are temporally linked in some cases: this case suggests that prodromal HSV type-1 infection may be clinically subtle and easily missed.

  9. Monoglyceride lipase deficiency causes desensitization of intestinal cannabinoid receptor type 1 and increased colonic μ-opioid receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Taschler, U; Eichmann, T O; Radner, F P W; Grabner, G F; Wolinski, H; Storr, M; Lass, A; Schicho, R; Zimmermann, R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) degrades 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), an endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors (CB1/2). Because the CB1 receptor is involved in the control of gut function, we investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of MGL on intestinal motility. Furthermore, we determined whether defective 2-AG degradation affects μ-opioid receptorreceptor) signalling, a parallel pathway regulating gut motility. Experimental Approach Gut motility was investigated by monitoring Evans Blue transit and colonic bead propulsion in response to MGL inhibition and CB1 receptor or μ receptor stimulation. Ileal contractility was investigated by electrical field stimulation. CB1 receptor expression in ileum and colon was assessed by immunohistochemical analyses. Key Results Pharmacological inhibition of MGL slowed down whole gut transit in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. Conversely, genetic deletion of MGL did not affect gut transit despite increased 2-AG levels. Notably, MGL deficiency caused complete insensitivity to CB1 receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of whole gut transit and ileal contractility suggesting local desensitization of CB1 receptors. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses of myenteric ganglia of MGL-deficient mice revealed that CB1 receptors were trapped in endocytic vesicles. Finally, MGL-deficient mice displayed accelerated colonic propulsion and were hypersensitive to μ receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. This phenotype was reproduced by chronic pharmacological inhibition of MGL. Conclusion and Implications Constantly elevated 2-AG levels induce severe desensitization of intestinal CB1 receptors and increased sensitivity to μ receptor-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. These changes should be considered when cannabinoid-based drugs are used in the therapy of gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26075589

  10. Distinct subsynaptic localization of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses in the rodent cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Mahnaz; Kasugai, Yu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Bertaso, Federica; Raynaud, Fabrice; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Kaufmann, Walter A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Ferraguti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1) receptors play a pivotal role in different forms of synaptic plasticity in the cerebellar cortex, e.g. long-term depression at glutamatergic synapses and rebound potentiation at GABAergic synapses. These various forms of plasticity might depend on the subsynaptic arrangement of the receptor in Purkinje cells that can be regulated by protein-protein interactions. This study investigated, by means of the freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling method, the subcellular localization of mGlu1 receptors in the rodent cerebellum and whether Homer proteins regulate their subsynaptic distribution. We observed a widespread extrasynaptic localization of mGlu1 receptors and confirmed their peri-synaptic enrichment at glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, we detected mGlu1 receptors within the main body of GABAergic synapses onto Purkinje cell dendrites. Although Homer proteins are known to interact with the mGlu1 receptor C-terminus, we could not detect Homer3, the most abundant Homer protein in the cerebellar cortex, at GABAergic synapses by pre-embedding and post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. We then hypothesized a critical role for Homer proteins in the peri-junctional localization of mGlu1 receptors at glutamatergic synapses. To disrupt Homer-associated protein complexes, mice were tail-vein injected with the membrane-permeable dominant-negative TAT-Homer1a. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labelling analysis showed no significant alteration in the mGlu1 receptor distribution pattern at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses, suggesting that other scaffolding proteins are involved in the peri-synaptic confinement. The identification of interactors that regulate the subsynaptic localization of the mGlu1 receptor at neurochemically distinct synapses may offer new insight into its trafficking and intracellular signalling.

  11. Interaction between G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 and Tyrosinase: Implications for Understanding Ocular Albinism Type 1.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Schiedel, Anke C; Manga, Prashiela

    2017-02-01

    Developmental eye defects in X-linked ocular albinism type 1 are caused by G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) mutations. Mutations result in dysfunctional melanosome biogenesis and macromelanosome formation in pigment cells, including melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. GPR143, primarily expressed in pigment cells, localizes exclusively to endolysosomal and melanosomal membranes unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, which localize to the plasma membrane. There is some debate regarding GPR143 function and elucidating the role of this receptor may be instrumental for understanding neurogenesis during eye development and for devising therapies for ocular albinism type I. Many G protein-coupled receptors require association with other proteins to function. These G protein-coupled receptor-interacting proteins also facilitate fine-tuning of receptor activity and tissue specificity. We therefore investigated potential GPR143 interaction partners, with a focus on the melanogenic enzyme tyrosinase. GPR143 coimmunoprecipitated with tyrosinase, while confocal microscopy demonstrated colocalization of the proteins. Furthermore, tyrosinase localized to the plasma membrane when coexpressed with a GPR143 trafficking mutant. The physical interaction between the proteins was confirmed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This interaction may be required in order for GPR143 to function as a monitor of melanosome maturation. Identifying tyrosinase as a potential GPR143 binding protein opens new avenues for investigating the mechanisms that regulate pigmentation and neurogenesis.

  12. Altered Morphine-Induced Analgesia in Neurotensin Type 1 Receptor Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roussy, Geneviève; Beaudry, Hélène; Lafrance, Mylène; Belleville, Karine; Beaudet, Nicolas; Wada, Keiji; Gendron, Louis; Sarret, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Both neurotensin (NT) and opioid agonists have been shown to induce antinociception in rodents after central administration. Besides, previous studies have revealed the existence of functional interactions between NT and opioid systems in the regulation of pain processing. We recently demonstrated that NTS1 receptors play a key role in the mediation of the analgesic effects of NT in long-lasting pain. In the present study, we therefore investigated whether NTS1 gene deletion affected the antinociceptive action of mu opioid drugs. To this end, pain behavioral responses to formalin were determined following systemic administration of morphine in both male and female NTS1 knockout mice. Acute injection of morphine (2 or 5 mg/kg) produced strong antinociceptive effects in both male and female wild-type littermates, with no significant sex differences. On the other hand, morphine analgesia was considerably reduced in NTS1-deficient mice of both sexes compared to their respective controls, indicating that the NTS1 receptor actively participates in mu opioid alleviating pain. By examining specifically the flinching, licking and biting nociceptive behaviors, we also showed that the functional crosstalk between NTS1 and mu opioid receptors influences the supraspinally-mediated behaviors. Interestingly, sexual dimorphic action of morphine-induced pain inhibition was found in NTS1 null mice in the formalin test, suggesting that the endogenous NT system interacts differently with the opioid network in male and female mice. Altogether, these results demonstrated that NTS1 receptor activation operates downstream to the opioidergic transmission and that NTS1-selective agonists combined with morphine may act synergistically to reduce persistent pain. PMID:20727387

  13. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-González, Maria; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  14. Evidence of a role for nonmuscle myosin II in herpes simplex virus type 1 egress.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Hans; Elliott, Gill; O'Hare, Peter

    2002-04-01

    After cell entry, herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles are transported through the host cell cytoplasm to nuclear pores. Following replication, newly synthesized virus particles are transported back to the cell periphery via a complex pathway including a cytoplasmic phase involving some form of unenveloped particle. These various transport processes are likely to make use of one or more components of the cellular cytoskeletal systems and associated motor proteins. Here we report that the HSV type 1 (HSV-1) major tegument protein, VP22, interacts with the actin-associated motor protein nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMIIA). HSV-1 infection resulted in reorganization of NMIIA, inducing retraction of NMIIA from the cell periphery and condensation into a spoke-like distribution around the nucleus along with a second effect of accumulation in a perinuclear cluster. VP22 did not appear to colocalize with the reorganized cagelike distribution of NMIIA. However, VP22 has been previously reported to localize in a perinuclear vesicular pattern, and significant overlap was observed between this pattern and the perinuclear clusters of NMIIA. Inhibition of the ATPase activity of NMIIA with the myosin-specific inhibitor butanedione monoxime impaired the formation of the perinuclear vesicular VP22 accumulations and also the release of virus into the extracellular medium while having much less effect on the yield of cell-associated virus. Virus infection frequently results in the induction of highly extended processes emanating from the infected cell, and we observed that VP22-containing particles line up along NMIIA-containing filaments which run through these protrusions.

  15. The association of the IVS1-397T>C estrogen receptor α polymorphism with the regulatory conditions in longstanding type 1 diabetic girls.

    PubMed

    Ryba, Monika; Malinowska, Ewa; Rybarczyk-Kapturska, Karolina; Brandt, Agnieszka; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata; Myśliwska, Jolanta

    2011-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes is considered as pluricausal disease, whose etiology involves genetic predisposition as well as environmental factors that contribute to disease progression and pathogenesis. Women are believed to be more susceptible to develop autoimmune diseases, which may depend in part on the influence of sex hormones on the immune system. It was shown that estrogens may protect against the development of autoimmune disease by inducing the expansion of regulatory T cell pool and upregulating Foxp3 expression. Foxp3 is a transcription factor that controls the development and suppressive function of naturally occurring regulatory T cells CD4(+)Foxp3(+). Longstanding diabetes type 1 has features of low-grade chronic inflammation which may influence regulatory T cell subset by reducing their numbers or/and inhibiting their suppressive potential. As diabetic type 1 patients are differentiated with regard to metabolic factors, level of glycemic control and systemic inflammatory state, we aimed to examine if this can be associated with IVSI-397T>C estrogen receptor α polymorphism. We examined 93 young regularly menstruating girls with diagnosed type 1 diabetes and 49 healthy age-matched control individuals. The PvuII polymorphism of the ER-α gene was analyzed as well as the serum TNF level and the level of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in these individuals. Girls with type 1 diabetes had lower level of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs than their healthy counterparts. Regulatory T cells from these patients showed also lower expression of Foxp3 than Tregs in healthy, control group. In addition, DM1 girls bearing the CC genotypes showed the highest level of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and the lowest TNF serum level in comparison to girls carrying CT or TT genotype. The CC DM1 carriers had also higher serum level of estrogens than girls bearing CT or TT genotype. We propose that different variants of IVS1-397 estrogen receptor α polymorphism may become additional genetic factor that

  16. Modulatory effect of insulin on T cell receptor mediated calcium signaling is blunted in long lasting type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Demkow, Urszula; Winklewski, Paweł; Ciepiela, Olga; Popko, Katarzyna; Lipińska, Anna; Kucharska, Anna; Michalska, Beata; Wąsik, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Insulin significantly influences Ca(2+) signals evoked by various stimulants. In type 1 recent onset diabetes mellitus the proliferative response of T cells is significantly decreased. The number of clinical trials exploring the role of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) as a therapeutic agent in recent onset diabetes mellitus type 1 is increasing last years. Therefore, a better understanding of the interplay between T cell receptor (TCR) dependent Ca(2+) increase, and insulin is of vital clinical significance. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of insulin on TCR evoked Ca(2+) responses in T lymphocytes obtained from healthy volunteers and patients suffering from long lasting diabetes mellitus type 1. Analysis was performed with use of the flow cytometer. We demonstrated that T cells ability to mobilize Ca(2+) was significantly reduced in long lasting diabetes mellitus type 1. Ca(2+) decrease achieved by the long term incubation with anti-CD3 mAb in T cells from healthy volunteers was restored by insulin. Strong interrelationship between baseline Ca(2+) level and plateau phase response to TCR stimulation was observed in the cytoplasm of cells pre-incubated with insulin from both healthy subjects and diabetic patients (r = 0.95, p < 0.0001 and r = 0.94, p < 0.0001, respectively). We postulate the existence of the interplay between TCR mediated activation and insulin. The TCR-insulin interplay is blunted in long lasting diabetes mellitus type 1. These observations may have an important implication for future therapeutic options in diabetes.

  17. Homing receptor expression is deviated on CD56+ blood lymphocytes during pregnancy in Type 1 diabetic women.

    PubMed

    Burke, Suzanne D; Seaward, Alexandra V C; Ramshaw, Heather; Smith, Graeme N; Virani, Sophia; Croy, Barbara A; Lima, Patricia D A

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is characterized by an augmented pro-inflammatory immune state. This contributes to the increased risk for gestational complications observed in T1DM mothers. In normal pregnancies, critical immunological changes occur, including the massive recruitment of lymphocytes, particularly CD56bright NK cells, into early decidua basalis and a 2nd trimester shift towards Type 2 immunity. Decidual CD56bright NK cells arise at least partly from circulating progenitors expressing adhesion molecules SELL and ITGA4 and the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4. In vitro studies show that T1DM reduces interactions between blood CD56+ NK cells and decidual endothelial cells by reducing SELL and ITGA4-based interactions. To address the mechanisms by which specific lymphocyte subsets may be recruited from the circulation during pregnancy and whether these mechanisms are altered in T1DM, flow cytometry was used to examine eight peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (Type 1 (IL18R1+) and Type 2 (IL1RL1+) CD56bright NK, CD56dim NK, NKT and T cells) from control and T1DM women. Blood was collected serially over pregnancy and postpartum, and lymphocytes were compared for expression of homing receptors SELL, ITGA4, CXCR3, and CXCR4. The decline of Type 1/Type 2 immune cells in normal pregnancy was driven by an increase in Type 2 cells that did not occur in T1DM. CD56bright NK cells from control women had the highest expression of all four receptors with greatest expression in 2nd trimester. At this time, these receptors were expressed at very low levels by CD56bright NK cells from TIDM patients. Type 1/Type 2 NKT cell ratios were not influenced by either pregnancy or TIDM. Our results suggest that T1DM alters immunological balances during pregnancy with its greatest impact on CD56bright NK cells. This implicates CD56bright NK cells in diabetic pregnancy complications.

  18. Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 promotes adipogenesis via interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Peng; Chen, Yi; Ji, Ning; Lin, Yunfeng; Yuan, Quan; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) is an essential enzyme for taurine biosynthesis and the biodegradation of toxic cysteine. As previously suggested, Cdo1 may be a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation, but the role of Cdo1 in adipogenesis has yet been reported. In this study, we found that the expression of Cdo1 is dramatically elevated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes and mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs). Conversely, knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation in 3T3-L1 cells and mBMSCs. Mechanistically, we found Cdo1 interacted with Pparγ in response to adipogenic stimulus. Further, depletion of Cdo1 reduced the recruitment of Pparγ to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4. Collectively, our finding indicates that Cdo1 may be a co-activator of Pparγ in adipogenesis, and may contribute to the development of disease associated with excessive adipose tissue. - Highlights: • Cdo1expression is highly up-regulated during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 and mBMSCs. • Depletion of Cdo1 inhibited expression of adipogenic specific genes and lipid droplet formation. • Cdo1interacts with Pparγ during adipogenesis. • Knockdown of Cdo1 inhibited Pparγ binding to the promoters of C/EBPα and Fabp4.

  19. Absence of NMDA receptor antibodies in the rare association between Type 1 Narcolepsy and Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Dauvilliers, Y.; Gaig, C.; Barateau, L.; Graus, F.; Iranzo, A.; Lopez, R.; Santamaria, J.

    2016-01-01

    Frequency and mechanisms underlying the association between narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) and psychosis remain unclear with potential role for a common immune pathway. We estimated the frequency of psychosis and its characteristics in NT1 at two European sleep centers (France, n = 381; Spain, n = 161) and measured IgG autoantibodies that recognize the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR in 9 patients with NT1 with psychosis, and 25 NT1 patients without psychosis. Ten NT1 patients (6 in France, 4 in Spain) were diagnosed with comorbid psychosis, a frequency of 1.8%. One patient reported psychotic symptoms few months before narcolepsy onset, two patients few months after onset, and one patient one year after onset but after modafinil introduction. The six remaining patients reported long delays between NT1 and psychosis onset. Half the patients, mostly male adults, reported onset or worsening of psychotic symptoms after medication. We found no IgG antibodies to NR1/NR2B heteromers of the NMDARs in patients with NT1 with or without psychosis. To conclude, psychosis is rare in NT1, with limited evidence for a key impact of stimulants, and no association with anti-NMDAR antibodies. However, dramatic NT1 and schizophrenia exists especially in early onset NT1, which may lead to inappropriate diagnosis and management. PMID:27143278

  20. Novel neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene mutation associated with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pei; Su, Yi-Ning; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Wang-Tso

    2010-12-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor and nerve growth factor, as reported in previous studies. This report is of a 6-month-old male infant with typical symptoms and signs of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis. He had a homozygous insertion mutation with c.2086_2087 ins C of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1) gene with both parents as heterozygous carriers. This mutation may have a strong relation to hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV Taiwanese patients. This is the youngest reported patient in Taiwan and first reported with congenital insensitivity to pain with mutation of NTRK1 gene inherited from the parents. Early diagnosis may provide appropriate medical care and education for these children and their families for better prognosis.

  1. Generation and Characterization of Mice Expressing a Conditional Allele of the Interleukin-1 Receptor Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Matthew J.; Zhu, Chong-Bin; Quinlan, Meagan A.; Botschner, David A.; Baganz, Nicole L.; Lindler, Kathryn M.; Thome, Jason G.; Hewlett, William A.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β exert powerful pro-inflammatory actions throughout the body, mediated primarily by the intracellular signaling capacity of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1). Although Il1r1 knockout mice have been informative with respect to a requirement for IL-1R1 signaling in inflammatory events, the constitutive nature of gene elimination has limited their utility in the assessment of temporal and spatial patterns of cytokine action. To pursue such questions, we have generated C57Bl/6J mice containing a floxed Il1r1 gene (Il1r1loxP/loxP), with loxP sites positioned to flank exons 3 and 4 and thereby the ability to spatially and temporally eliminate Il1r1 expression and signaling. We found that Il1r1loxP/loxP mice breed normally and exhibit no gross physical or behavioral phenotypes. Moreover, Il1r1loxP/loxP mice exhibit normal IL-1R1 receptor expression in brain and spleen, as well as normal IL-1R1-dependent increases in serum IL-6 following IL-1α injections. Breeding of Il1r1loxP/loxP mice to animals expressing a cytomegalovirus (CMV)-driven Cre recombinase afforded efficient excision at the Il1r1 locus. The Il1r1loxP/loxP line should be a valuable tool for the assessment of contributions made by IL-1R1 signaling in diverse cell types across development. PMID:26930558

  2. Leukotriene E4 is a full functional agonist for human cysteinyl leukotriene type 1 receptor-dependent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Holly R.; Fuerst, Elisabeth; Branchett, William; Lee, Tak H.; Cousins, David J.; Woszczek, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) the most stable of the cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) binds poorly to classical type 1 (CysLT1) and 2 (CysLT2) receptors although it induces potent responses in human airways in vivo, such as bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammatory cell influx suggesting the presence of a novel receptor that preferentially responds to LTE4. To identify such a receptor two human mast cell lines, LAD2 and LUVA, were selected that differentially responded to LTE4 when analysed by intracellular signalling and gene expression. Comparative transcriptome analysis and recombinant gene overexpression experiments revealed CysLT1 as a receptor responsible for potent LTE4-induced response in LAD2 but not in LUVA cells, an observation confirmed further by gene knockdown and selective inhibitors. Lentiviral overexpression of CysLT1 in LUVA cells augmented intracellular calcium signalling induced by LTE4 but did not restore full agonist responses at the gene expression level. Our data support a model where both an increased expression of Gαq-coupled CysLT1, and sustained intracellular calcium mobilisation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation, are required for LTE4-mediated regulation of gene expression in human cells. Our study shows for the first time that CysLT1 expression is critically important for responsiveness to LTE4 within a human cell system. PMID:26830450

  3. Therapeutic Elimination of the Type 1 Interferon Receptor for Treating Psoriatic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jun; Gober, Michael; Yang, Xiaoping; Katlinski, Kanstantsin V; Marshall, Christine M; Sharma, Meena; Werth, Victoria P; Baker, Darren P; Rui, Hallgeir; Seykora, John T; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2016-10-01

    Phototherapy with UV light is a standard treatment for psoriasis, yet the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects are not well understood. Studies in human and mouse keratinocytes and in the skin tissues from human patients and mice showed that UV treatment triggers ubiquitination and downregulation of the type I IFN receptor chain IFNAR1, leading to suppression of IFN signaling and an ensuing decrease in the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The severity of imiquimod-induced psoriasiform inflammation was greatly exacerbated in skin of mice deficient in IFNAR1 ubiquitination (Ifnar1(SA)). Furthermore, these mice did not benefit from UV phototherapy. Pharmacologic induction of IFNAR1 ubiquitination and degradation by an antiprotozoal agent halofuginone also relieved psoriasiform inflammation in wild-type but not in Ifnar1(SA) mice. These data identify downregulation of IFNAR1 by UV as a major mechanism of the UV therapeutic effects against the psoriatic inflammation and provide a proof of principle for future development of agents capable of inducing IFNAR1 ubiquitination and downregulation for the treatment of psoriasis.

  4. Cannabinoid receptor type 1- and 2-mediated increase in cyclic AMP inhibits T cell receptor-triggered signaling.

    PubMed

    Börner, Christine; Smida, Michal; Höllt, Volker; Schraven, Burkhart; Kraus, Jürgen

    2009-12-18

    The aim of this study was to characterize inhibitory mechanisms on T cell receptor signaling mediated by the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Both receptors are coupled to G(i/o) proteins, which are associated with inhibition of cyclic AMP formation. In human primary and Jurkat T lymphocytes, activation of CB1 by R(+)-methanandamide, CB2 by JWH015, and both by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced a short decrease in cyclic AMP lasting less than 1 h. However, this decrease was followed by a massive (up to 10-fold) and sustained (at least up to 48 h) increase in cyclic AMP. Mediated by the cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase A and C-terminal Src kinase, the cannabinoids induced a stable phosphorylation of the inhibitory Tyr-505 of the leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck). By thus arresting Lck in its inhibited form, the cannabinoids prevented the dephosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-505 in response to T cell receptor activation, which is necessary for the subsequent initiation of T cell receptor signaling. In this way the cannabinoids inhibited the T cell receptor-triggered signaling, i.e. the activation of the zeta-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa, the linker for activation of T cells, MAPK, the induction of interleukin-2, and T cell proliferation. All of the effects of the cannabinoids were blocked by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM281 and AM630. These findings help to better understand the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids and explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in the treatment of T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis.

  5. Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Type 1/Indian Hedgehog Expression Is Preserved in the Growth Plate of Human Fetuses Affected with Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Type 3 Activating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Sarah; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence; Bonaventure, Jacky; Silve, Caroline

    2002-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor type 3 (FGFR3) and Indian hedgehog (IHH)/parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related peptide receptor type 1 (PTHR1) systems are both essential regulators of endochondral ossification. Based on mouse models, activation of the FGFR3 system is suggested to regulate the IHH/PTHR1 pathway. To challenge this possible interaction in humans, we analyzed the femoral growth plates from fetuses carrying activating FGFR3 mutations (9 achondroplasia, 21 and 8 thanatophoric dysplasia types 1 and 2, respectively) and 14 age-matched controls by histological techniques and in situ hybridization using riboprobes for human IHH, PTHR1, type 10 and type 1 collagen transcripts. We show that bone-perichondrial ring enlargement and growth plate increased vascularization in FGFR3-mutated fetuses correlate with the phenotypic severity of the disease. PTHR1 and IHH expression in growth plates, bone-perichondrial rings and vascular canals is not affected by FGFR3 mutations, irrespective of the mutant genotype and age, and is in keeping with cell phenotypes. These results indicate that in humans, FGFR3 signaling does not down-regulate the main players of the IHH/PTHR1 pathway. Furthermore, we show that cells within the bone-perichondrial ring in controls and patients express IHH, PTHR1, and type 10 and type 1 collagen transcripts, suggesting that bone-perichondrial ring formation involves cells of both chondrocytic and osteoblastic phenotypes. PMID:12368206

  6. Role of fosaprepitant, a neurokinin Type 1 receptor antagonist, in morphine-induced antinociception in rats

    PubMed Central

    Prasoon, Pranav; Gupta, Shivani; Kumar, Rahul; Gautam, Mayank; Kaler, Saroj; Ray, Subrata Basu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Opioids such as morphine form the cornerstone in the treatment of moderate to severe pain. However, opioids also produce serious side effects such as tolerance. Fosaprepitant is a substance P (SP) receptor antagonist, which is used for treating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. SP is an important neuropeptide mediating transmission of pain at the spinal level. Thus, it was hypothesized that combining morphine with fosaprepitant would increase the antinociceptive effect of morphine. The objectives were to evaluate the effect of fosaprepitant on morphine-induced antinociception in rats and to investigate its mechanism of action. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with morphine (10 mg/kg twice daily) and/or fosaprepitant (30 mg/kg once daily) for 7 days. Pain threshold was assessed by the hot plate test. Expression of SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the spinal cords of these rats was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Morphine administration resulted in an antinociceptive effect compared to the control group (day 1 and to a lesser extent on day 4). The decreased antinociception despite continued morphine treatment indicated development of tolerance. Co-administration of fosaprepitant attenuated tolerance to morphine (days 1 and 3) and increased the antinociceptive effect compared to control group (days 1–4). Expression of SP was increased in the morphine + fosaprepitant group. Conclusions: The results show that fosaprepitant attenuates the development of tolerance to morphine and thereby, increases the antinociceptive effect. This is likely linked to decreased release of SP from presynaptic terminals. PMID:27756950

  7. The ocular albinism type 1 protein, an intracellular G protein-coupled receptor, regulates melanosome transport in pigment cells.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Ilaria; Bagnato, Paola; Palmigiano, Angela; Innamorati, Giulio; Rotondo, Giuseppe; Altimare, Domenico; Venturi, Consuelo; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Coppola, Massimiliano; Marigo, Valeria; Incerti, Barbara; Ballabio, Andrea; Surace, Enrico M; Tacchetti, Carlo; Bennett, Dorothy C; Schiaffino, Maria Vittoria

    2008-11-15

    The protein product of the ocular albinism type 1 gene, named OA1, is a pigment cell-specific G protein-coupled receptor exclusively localized to intracellular organelles, namely lysosomes and melanosomes. Loss of OA1 function leads to the formation of macromelanosomes, suggesting that this receptor is implicated in organelle biogenesis, however the mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of the disease remains obscure. We report here the identification of an unexpected abnormality in melanosome distribution both in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and skin melanocytes of Oa1-knock-out (KO) mice, consisting in a displacement of the organelles from the central cytoplasm towards the cell periphery. Despite their depletion from the microtubule (MT)-enriched perinuclear region, Oa1-KO melanosomes were able to aggregate at the centrosome upon disruption of the actin cytoskeleton or expression of a dominant-negative construct of myosin Va. Consistently, quantification of organelle transport in living cells revealed that Oa1-KO melanosomes displayed a severe reduction in MT-based motility; however, this defect was rescued to normal following inhibition of actin-dependent capture at the cell periphery. Together, these data point to a defective regulation of organelle transport in the absence of OA1 and imply that the cytoskeleton might represent a downstream effector of this receptor. Furthermore, our results enlighten a novel function for OA1 in pigment cells and suggest that ocular albinism type 1 might result from a different pathogenetic mechanism than previously thought, based on an organelle-autonomous signalling pathway implicated in the regulation of both membrane traffic and transport.

  8. CCDI: a new ligand that modulates mammalian type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1)

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chengju; Shao, Chun Hong; Padanilam, Christina; Ezell, Edward; Singh, Jaipaul; Kutty, Shelby; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are Ca2+-release channels on the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum that modulate a wide array of physiological functions. Three RyR isoforms are present in cells: RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3. To date, there are no reports on ligands that modulate RyR in an isoform-selective manner. Such ligands are not only valuable research tools, but could serve as intermediates for development of therapeutics. Experimental approach Pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide were allowed to react in carbon tetrachloride for 24 h at low temperatures and pressures. The chemical structures of the two products isolated were elucidated using NMR spectrometry, mass spectrometry and elemental analyses. [3H]-ryanodine binding, lipid bilayer and time-lapsed confocal imaging were used to determine their effects on RyR isoforms. Key results The major product, 2-cyclohexyl-3-cyclohexylimino-2, 3, dihydro–pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazol-1-one (CCDI) dose-dependently potentiated Ca2+-dependent binding of [3H]-ryanodine to RyR1, with no significant effects on [3H]-ryanodine binding to RyR2 or RyR3. CCDI also reversibly increased the open probability (Po) of RyR1 with minimal effects on RyR2 and RyR3. CCDI induced Ca2+ transients in C2C12 skeletal myotubes, but not in rat ventricular myocytes. This effect was blocked by pretreating cells with ryanodine. The minor product 2-cyclohexyl-pyrrolo[1,2-c]imidazole-1,3-dione had no effect on either [3H]-ryanodine binding or Po of RyR1, RyR2 and RyR3. Conclusions and implications A new ligand that preferentially modulates RyR1 was identified. In addition to being an important research tool, the pharmacophore of this small molecule could serve as a template for the synthesis of other isoform-selective modulators of RyRs. PMID:24819467

  9. Interaction between protein kinase Cmu and the vanilloid receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Kedei, Noemi; Wang, Min; Wang, Q Jane; Huppler, Anna R; Toth, Attila; Tran, Richard; Blumberg, Peter M

    2004-12-17

    The capsaicin receptor VR1 is a polymodal nociceptor activated by multiple stimuli. It has been reported that protein kinase C plays a role in the sensitization of VR1. Protein kinase D/PKCmu is a member of the protein kinase D serine/threonine kinase family that exhibits structural, enzymological, and regulatory features distinct from those of the PKCs, with which they are related. As part of our effort to optimize conditions for evaluating VR1 pharmacology, we found that treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells heterologously expressing rat VR1 (CHO/rVR1) with butyrate enhanced rVR1 expression and activity. The expression of PKCmu and PKCbeta1, but not of other PKC isoforms, was also enhanced by butyrate treatment, suggesting the possibility that these two isoforms might contribute to the enhanced activity of rVR1. In support of this hypothesis, we found the following. 1) Overexpression of PKCmu enhanced the response of rVR1 to capsaicin and low pH, and expression of a dominant negative variant of PKCmu reduced the response of rVR1. 2) Reduction of endogenous PKCmu using antisense oligonucleotides decreased the response of exogenous rVR1 expressed in CHO cells as well as of endogenous rVR1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons. 3) PKCmu localized to the plasma membrane when overexpressed in CHO/rVR1 cells. 4) PKCmu directly bound to rVR1 expressed in CHO cells as well as to endogenous rVR1 in dorsal root ganglia or to an N-terminal fragment of rVR1, indicating a direct interaction between PKCmu and rVR1. 5) PKCmu directly phosphorylated rVR1 or a longer N-terminal fragment (amino acids 1-118) of rVR1 but not a shorter one (amino acids 1-99). 6) Mutation of S116A in rVR1 blocked both the phosphorylation of rVR1 by PKCmu and the enhancement by PKCmu of the rVR1 response to capsaicin. We conclude that PKCmu functions as a direct modulator of rVR1.

  10. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  11. Alterations in Natural Killer Cell Receptor Profiles During HIV Type 1 Disease Progression Among Chronically Infected South African Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ambrose H.W.; Williams, Katie; Reddy, Sharon; Wilson, Douglas; Giddy, Janet; Alter, Galit; Ghebremichael, Musie; Carrington, Mary N.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies suggest that innate immune responses by natural killer (NK) cells play a significant role in restricting human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. Our aim was to characterize changes in NK cells associated with HIV-1 clade C disease progression. Here we used multiparametric flow cytometry (LSRII) to quantify phenotype and function of NK cells in a cross-sectional analysis of cryopreserved blood samples from a cohort of 41 chronically HIV-1-infected, treatment-naive adult South Africans. These individuals ranged in disease severity from early (CD4 count >500) to advanced HIV-1 disease (CD4 count <50). We found that the frequency of NK cells expressing KIR2DL1, an inhibitory receptor, and/or KIR2DS1, an activating receptor, tended to decrease with increasing HIV-1 viral load. We also discovered a significant increase (p < 0.05) in overall NK cell degranulation with disease progression. We found that acutely activated NK cells (CD69pos) were deficient in NKp46 expression ex vivo. In conclusion, we observed that with viremia and advanced HIV-1 disease, activated NK cells lack NKp46 expression, and KIR2DS1pos and/ or KIR2DL1pos NK cells are reduced in frequency. These findings suggest that modulation of receptor expression on NK cells may play a role in HIV-1 pathogenesis, and provide new insights on immunological changes in advanced HIV-1 disease. PMID:20380481

  12. The role of Toll-like receptors and vitamin D in diabetes mellitus type 1--a review.

    PubMed

    Adamczak, D M; Nowak, J K; Frydrychowicz, M; Kaczmarek, M; Sikora, J

    2014-08-01

    It is widely accepted that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease resulting from an interaction between immunologic, genetic and environmental factors. However, the exact mechanism leading to the development of T1DM remains incomplete. There is a large body of evidence pointing towards the important role of toll-like receptor (TLR) activation and vitamin D deficiency in T1DM pathogenesis. In this article, we review the available data on the influence of TLRs' level of activation and vitamin D status on the risk of the development of T1DM in humans and rodent models. We also summarize the current information regarding the interactions between TLRs' level of activation, vitamin D status and various environmental factors, such as enteroviral infections, the gut microbiota and breastfeeding substitution, among others. Our results stipulate that vitamin D seems to protect against T1DM by reducing the TLRs' level of activation.

  13. Acute upregulation of neuronal mitochondrial type-1 cannabinoid receptor and it's role in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis after TBI.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Lv, Xiao-Ai; Dai, Qun; Ge, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jie

    2016-08-02

    Metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to subsequent neurodegeneration. They are all regulated by mechanisms centered around mitochondrion. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) enriched on neuronal plasma membrane. Recent evidences point to the substantial presence of CB1 receptors on neuronal mitochondrial outer membranes (mtCB1) and the activation of mtCB1 influences aerobic respiration via inhibiting mitochondrial cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/complex I pathway. The expression and role of neuronal mtCB1 under TBI are unknown. Using TBI models of cultured neurons, wild type and CB1 knockout mice, we found mtCB1 quickly upregulated after TBI. Activation of mtCB1 promoted metabolic defects accompanied with ATP shortage but protected neurons from apoptosis. Selective activation of plasma membrane CB1 showed no effects on neuronal metabolism and apoptosis. Activation of mtCB1 receptors inhibited mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I and resulted in exacerbated metabolic defects accompanied with a higher ratio of ATP reduction to oxygen consumption decrease as well as neuronal apoptosis. Further research found the remarkable accumulation of protein kinase B (AKT) on neuronal mitochondria following TBI and the activation of mtCB1 upregulated mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity. Upregulation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity showed anti-apoptosis effects and alleviated ATP shortage in metabolic defects. Taken together, we have identified mtCB1 quickly upregulate after TBI and a dual role the mtCB1 might play in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by TBI: the inhibition of mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I aggravates metabolic defects, energy insufficiency as well as neuronal apoptosis, but the coactivation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V mitigates energy insufficiency and neuronal apoptosis.

  14. Increase of cardiac M2-muscarinic receptor gene expression in type-1 but not in type-2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Liang-Ming; Chang, Cheng Kuei; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Kou, Dai-Huang; Liu, I-Min; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2008-08-22

    Changes of cardiac M2-muscarinic receptor (M2-mAChR) gene expression was investigated in type-1 like diabetic rats induced by intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and type-2 like diabetic rats induced by fed with fructose-rich chow. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) in STZ-diabetic rats was significantly lower than that in age-matched non-diabetic rats, while the SBP in type-2 like diabetic rats was higher than in non-diabetic rats. Also, the mRNA or protein level of cardiac M2-mAChR in STZ-diabetic rats was markedly higher than non-diabetic rats, but it was not observed in type-2 like diabetic rats as compared to age-matched non-diabetic rats. Arecaidine propargyl ester (APE), the agonist of M2-mAChR, produced a marked reduction of heart rate in STZ-diabetic rats but made less influence on heart rate in fructose-fed rats or non-diabetic rats. The results suggest that cardiac M2-mAChR gene expression is raised in type-1 like diabetic rats but not in type-2 like diabetic rats, this difference mainly due to hyperglycemia, for the production of hypotension in diabetic disorders.

  15. Monomeric ß-amyloid interacts with type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors to provide energy supply to neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Maria L.; Tomasello, Marianna F.; Pandini, Giuseppe; Caraci, Filippo; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Busceti, Carla; Di Pietro, Paola; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Attanasio, Francesco; Chiechio, Santina; Bagnoli, Silvia; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Vigneri, Riccardo; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2015-01-01

    ß-amyloid (Aß1−42) is produced by proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane type-1 protein, amyloid precursor protein. Under pathological conditions, Aß1−42self-aggregates into oligomers, which cause synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss, and are considered the culprit of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, Aß1−42 is mainly monomeric at physiological concentrations, and the precise role of monomeric Aß1−42 in neuronal function is largely unknown. We report that the monomer of Aß1−42 activates type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors and enhances glucose uptake in neurons and peripheral cells by promoting the translocation of the Glut3 glucose transporter from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In neurons, activity-dependent glucose uptake was blunted after blocking endogenous Aß production, and re-established in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid Aß. APP-null neurons failed to enhance depolarization-stimulated glucose uptake unless exogenous monomeric Aß1−42 was added. These data suggest that Aß1−42 monomers were critical for maintaining neuronal glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, exogenous Aß1−42 monomers were able to rescue the low levels of glucose consumption observed in brain slices from AD mutant mice. PMID:26300732

  16. Plant-derived cannabinoids modulate the activity of transient receptor potential channels of ankyrin type-1 and melastatin type-8.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Vellani, Vittorio; Schiano-Moriello, Aniello; Marini, Pietro; Magherini, Pier Cosimo; Orlando, Pierangelo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2008-06-01

    The plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), cannabidiol (CBD), and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were previously shown to activate transient receptor potential channels of both vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), respectively. Furthermore, the endocannabinoid anandamide is known to activate TRPV1 and was recently found to antagonize the menthol- and icilin-sensitive transient receptor potential channels of melastatin type 8 (TRPM8). In this study, we investigated the effects of six phytocannabinoids [i.e., CBD, THC, CBD acid, THC acid, cannabichromene (CBC), and cannabigerol (CBG)] on TRPA1- and TRPM8-mediated increase in intracellular Ca2+ in either HEK-293 cells overexpressing the two channels or rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. All of the compounds tested induced TRPA1-mediated Ca2+ elevation in HEK-293 cells with efficacy comparable with that of mustard oil isothiocyanates (MO), the most potent being CBC (EC(50) = 60 nM) and the least potent being CBG and CBD acid (EC(50) = 3.4-12.0 microM). CBC also activated MO-sensitive DRG neurons, although with lower potency (EC(50) = 34.3 microM). Furthermore, although none of the compounds tested activated TRPM8-mediated Ca2+ elevation in HEK-293 cells, they all, with the exception of CBC, antagonized this response when it was induced by either menthol or icilin. CBD, CBG, THC, and THC acid were equipotent (IC(50) = 70-160 nM), whereas CBD acid was the least potent compound (IC(50) = 0.9-1.6 microM). CBG inhibited Ca2+ elevation also in icilin-sensitive DRG neurons with potency (IC(50) = 4.5 microM) similar to that of anandamide (IC(50) = 10 microM). Our findings suggest that phytocannabinoids and cannabis extracts exert some of their pharmacological actions also by interacting with TRPA1 and TRPM8 channels, with potential implications for the treatment of pain and cancer.

  17. Ca2+ release in muscle fibers expressing R4892W and G4896V type 1 ryanodine receptor disease mutants.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Romain; Legrand, Claude; Groom, Linda; Dirksen, Robert T; Jacquemond, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The large and rapidly increasing number of potentially pathological mutants in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) prompts the need to characterize their effects on voltage-activated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle. Here we evaluated the function of the R4892W and G4896V RyR1 mutants, both associated with central core disease (CCD) in humans, in myotubes and in adult muscle fibers. For both mutants expressed in RyR1-null (dyspedic) myotubes, voltage-gated Ca(2+) release was absent following homotypic expression and only partially restored following heterotypic expression with wild-type (WT) RyR1. In muscle fibers from adult WT mice, both mutants were expressed in restricted regions of the fibers with a pattern consistent with triadic localization. Voltage-clamp-activated confocal Ca(2+) signals showed that fiber regions endowed with G4896V-RyR1s exhibited an ∼30% reduction in the peak rate of SR Ca(2+) release, with no significant change in SR Ca(2+) content. Immunostaining revealed no associated change in the expression of either α1S subunit (Cav1.1) of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) or type 1 sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA1), indicating that the reduced Ca(2+) release resulted from defective RyR1 function. Interestingly, in spite of robust localized junctional expression, the R4892W mutant did not affect SR Ca(2+) release in adult muscle fibers, consistent with a low functional penetrance of this particular CCD-associated mutant.

  18. Enhanced peripheral dopamine impairs post-ischemic healing by suppressing angiotensin receptor type 1 expression in endothelial cells and inhibiting angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chandrani; Ganju, Ramesh K; Pompili, Vincent J; Chakroborty, Debanjan

    2017-02-01

    Increased circulating catecholamines have been linked with cardiovascular anomalies as well as with peripheral vascular diseases. Although the roles of epinephrine and norepinephrine have received considerable attention, the role of the other catecholamine, dopamine, has been less studied. Since dopamine is a potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and as angiogenesis is essential for ischemic healing, we therefore studied the role played by dopamine during ischemic healing using dopamine D2 receptor knockout (KOD2) mice. Although concentration of dopamine and its rate-limiting enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase, was considerably high in the muscle tissues of wild-type and KOD2 mice with unilateral hind limb ischemia (HLI), recovery was significantly faster in the KOD2 mice compared to the wild-type controls, thereby indicating that peripheral dopamine might have a role in this healing process. In addition, we observed significant differences in post-ischemic angiogenesis between these two groups. Our study further revealed that elevated dopamine independently suppressed activation of local tissue-based renin-angiotensin system (RAS), a critical growth factor system stimulating angiogenesis in ischemia. Angiotensin II (ATII) and its receptor, angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1R), are the key players in RAS-mediated angiogenesis. Dopamine acting through its D2 receptors in endothelial cells inhibited ATII-mediated angiogenesis by suppressing the expression of AT1R in these cells. This study thus for the first time demonstrates the role played by dopamine in prolonging post-ischemic recovery. Therefore, pharmacological intervention inhibiting the action of dopamine holds promise as future therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HLI and other peripheral arterial diseases.

  19. Dysfunctionally phosphorylated type 1 insulin receptor substrate in neural-derived blood exosomes of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Boxer, Adam; Schwartz, Janice B.; Abner, Erin L.; Biragyn, Arya; Masharani, Umesh; Frassetto, Lynda; Petersen, Ronald C.; Miller, Bruce L.; Goetzl, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance causes diminished glucose uptake in similar regions of the brain in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Brain tissue studies suggested that insulin resistance is caused by low insulin receptor signaling attributable to its abnormal association with more phospho (P)-serine-type 1 insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1) and less P-tyrosine-IRS-1. Plasma exosomes enriched for neural sources by immunoabsorption were obtained once from 26 patients with AD, 20 patients with DM2, 16 patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and matched case control subjects. At 2 time points, they were obtained from 22 others when cognitively normal and 1 to 10 yr later when diagnosed with AD. Mean exosomal levels of extracted P-serine 312-IRS-1 and P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1 by ELISA and the ratio of P-serine 312-IRS-1 to P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1 (insulin resistance factor, R) for AD and DM2 and P-serine 312-IRS-1 and R for FTD were significantly different from those for case control subjects. The levels of R for AD were significantly higher than those for DM2 or FTD. Stepwise discriminant modeling showed correct classification of 100% of patients with AD, 97.5% of patients with DM2, and 84% of patients with FTD. In longitudinal studies of 22 patients with AD, exosomal levels of P-serine 312-IRS-1, P-pan-tyrosine-IRS-1, and R were significantly different 1 to 10 yr before and at the time of diagnosis compared with control subjects. Insulin resistance reflected in R values from this blood test is higher for patients with AD, DM2, and FTD than case control subjects; higher for patients with AD than patients with DM2 or FTD; and accurately predicts development of AD up to 10 yr prior to clinical onset.—Kapogiannis, D., Boxer, A., Schwartz, J. B., Abner, E. L., Biragyn, A., Masharani, U., Frassetto, L., Petersen, R. C., Miller, B. L., Goetzl, E. J. Dysfunctionally phosphorylated type 1 insulin receptor substrate in neural-derived blood exosomes of

  20. Cannabinoids increase type 1 cannabinoid receptor expression in a cell culture model of striatal neurons: implications for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-09-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed at high levels in the striatum. Activation of CB1 increases expression of neuronal trophic factors and inhibits neurotransmitter release from GABA-ergic striatal neurons. CB1 mRNA levels can be elevated by treatment with cannabinoids in non-neuronal cells. We wanted to determine whether cannabinoid treatment could induce CB1 expression in a cell culture model of striatal neurons and, if possible, determine the molecular mechanism by which this occurred. We found that treatment of STHdh(7/7) cells with the cannabinoids ACEA, mAEA, and AEA produced a CB1receptor-dependent increase in CB1 promoter activity, mRNA, and protein expression. This response was Akt- and NF-κB-dependent. Because decreased CB1 expression is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD), we wanted to determine whether cannabinoids could increase CB1 expression in STHdh(7/111) and (111/111) cells expressing the mutant huntingtin protein. We observed that cannabinoid treatment increased CB1 mRNA levels approximately 10-fold in STHdh(7/111) and (111/111) cells, compared to vehicle treatment. Importantly, cannabinoid treatment improved ATP production, increased the expression of the trophic factor BDNF-2, and the mitochondrial regulator PGC1α, and reduced spontaneous GABA release, in HD cells. Therefore, cannabinoid-mediated increases in CB1 levels could reduce the severity of some molecular pathologies observed in HD.

  1. Inhibitory effect of positively charged triazine antagonists of prokineticin receptors on the transient receptor vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Lee, Jae Yeol; Vázquez-Romero, Ana; Garrido, Maria; Messeguer, Angel; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Zamponi, Gerald W; Deplano, Alessandro; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Balboni, Gianfranco; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    Four positively charged compounds, previously shown to produce analgesic activity by interacting with prokineticin receptor or T-type calcium channels, were tested for their ability to inhibit capsaicin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) in HEK-293 cells stably transfected with the human recombinant TRPV1, with the goal of identifying novel TRPV1 open-pore inhibitors. KYS-05090 showed the highest potency as a TRPV1 antagonist, even higher than that of the open-pore triazine inhibitor 8aA. The latter showed quite remarkable agonist/desensitizer activity at the rat recombinant TRPM8 channel. The activity of KYS-05090 and the other compounds was selective because none of these compounds was able to modulate the rat TRPA1 channel. Open-pore inhibitors of TRPV1 may be a new class of multi-target analgesics with lesser side effects, such as loss of acute pain sensitivity and hyperthermia, than most TRPV1 antagonists developed so far.

  2. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  3. [Challenge of creating single-agents for the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes by targeting retinoid X receptor].

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    It might be seen as reckless to challenge to create single-agents for the treatment of both type 1 diabetes caused by the destruction of the Langerhans β cells in pancreas by excessive autoimmunity, and type 2 diabetes caused by the obesity. However, we hypothesized that retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists, which are researched for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, will also be useful like metformin, which shows insulin-sparing effect in type 1 diabetes. This is because PPARγ/RXR is known to be a target of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are used for the treatment of insulin resistance, LXR/RXR is reported to be involved in glucose/lipid metabolism, and these heterodimers can be activated by RXR agonists alone (permissive mechanism). However, repeated administration of RXR agonists can elevate blood triglyceride and induce hypothyroidism. In this study, we performed systematic conversion of the alkoxy side chain of 5a (6-[ethyl-(3-isopropoxy-4-isopropylphenyl)amino] nicotinic acid: NEt-3IP) and evaluated the RXR-, PPAR/RXR- and LXR/RXR-agonist activities of the products. The cyclopropylmethoxy analog (5c) showed similar RXR- and LXR/RXR-agonistic activities to the benzyloxy analog (5i) and n-propoxy analog (5k), but exhibited more potent PPAR/RXR-agonistic activity than 5i or 5k. Differential modulation of RXR heterodimer-activating ability by conversion of the alkoxy group located in the lipophilic domain of the RXR-agonist common structure is expected to be a useful approach in the design of new RXR agonists for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

  4. Altered expression of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor in the Ngsk Prnp deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, H P; Choi, J K; Shin, H Y; Jeon, Y C; Jeong, B H; Lee, H G; Kim, J I; Choi, E K; Carp, R I; Kim, Y S

    2010-05-19

    Doppel protein (Dpl) is a paralog of the cellular form of prion protein (PrP(C)). Its ectopic expression in the CNS elicits significant cerebellar Purkinje cell degeneration in some lines of PrP knockout mice. However, little is known about the Dpl-mediated neurodegenerative mechanism. To understand the molecular and intracellular pathways underlying Purkinje cell degeneration, here, we investigated the regulation of calcium-release channel protein, type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP(3)R1) gene in Ngsk mice. These knockout mice express high levels of Dpl and eventually develop cerebellar degeneration. We observed that the expression level of IP(3)R1 gene is reduced in the cerebella of Ngsk mice as early as 3 months of age compared with age-matched controls along with the reduction in DNA binding activity of nuclear factor of activated-T cells (NFAT) which is transcription factor of IP(3)R1. Notably, expression of PrP restored the reduced DNA binding activity of NFATc4 by Dpl. Reduced expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ionotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 or B (GluR2), which are regulated by NFATc4, were also restored by PrP expression. In light of these findings, we suggest a mechanism for Dpl-mediated Purkinje cell degeneration linked to reduced gene expression of proteins related to neuronal activity. Decrease in IP(3)R1 gene expression may lead to functional deficits and ultimately death of Purkinje cells in Ngsk mice.

  5. Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptors Reduce Membrane Fluidity of Capacitated Boar Sperm by Impairing Their Activation by Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Barboni, Barbara; Bernabò, Nicola; Palestini, Paola; Botto, Laura; Pistilli, Maria Gabriella; Charini, Marco; Tettamanti, Enzo; Battista, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    Background Mammalian spermatozoa acquire their full fertilizing ability (so called capacitation) within the female genital tract, where they are progressively exposed to inverse gradients of inhibiting and stimulating molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present research, the effect on this process of anandamide, an endocannabinoid that can either activate or inhibit cannabinoid receptors depending on its concentration, and bicarbonate, an oviductal activatory molecule, was assessed, in order to study the role exerted by the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) in the process of lipid membrane remodeling crucial to complete capacitation. To this aim, boar sperm were incubated in vitro under capacitating conditions (stimulated by bicarbonate) in the presence or in the absence of methanandamide (Met-AEA), a non-hydrolysable analogue of anandamide. The CB1R involvement was studied by using the specific inhibitor (SR141716) or mimicking its activation by adding a permeable cAMP analogue (8Br-cAMP). By an immunocytochemistry approach it was shown that the Met-AEA inhibits the bicarbonate-dependent translocation of CB1R from the post-equatorial to equatorial region of sperm head. In addition it was found that Met-AEA is able to prevent the bicarbonate-induced increase in membrane disorder and the cholesterol extraction, both preliminary to capacitation, acting through a CB1R-cAMP mediated pathway, as indicated by MC540 and filipin staining, EPR spectroscopy and biochemical analysis on whole membranes (CB1R activity) and on membrane enriched fraction (C/P content and anisotropy). Conclusions/Significance Altogether, these data demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system strongly inhibits the process of sperm capacitation, acting as membrane stabilizing agent, thus increasing the basic knowledge on capacitation-related signaling and potentially opening new perspectives in diagnostics and therapeutics of male infertility. PMID:21829686

  6. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Mediates Collagen-Induced Activation of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Majkowska, Iwona; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Ito, Noriko; Gray, Nathanael S; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-07

    Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-bound MMP that is highly expressed in cells with invading capacity including fibroblasts and invasive cancer cell. A potential physiological stimulus for MT1-MMP expression is fibrillar collagen, and it has been shown that it upregulates both MT1-MMP gene and functions in various cell types. However, the mechanisms of collagen-mediated MT1-MMP activation is not clearly understood. In this study we identified discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a crucial receptor that mediates this process in human fibroblasts. Knocking down DDR2, but not β1 integrin subunit, a common subunit for all collagen-binding integrins, inhibited collagen-induced activation of proMMP-2 and upregulation of MT1-MMP at the gene and protein level. Interestingly DDR2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of DDR2 also inhibited MT1-MMP-dependent cellular degradation of collagen film, suggesting that cell surface collagen degradation by MT1-MMP involves DDR2-mediated collagen signalling. This DDR2-mediated mechanism is only present in non-transformed mesenchymal cells, as collagen-induced MT1-MMP activation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and MT1-MMP function in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were not affected by DDR kinase inhibition. DDR2 activation was found to be noticeably more effective when cells were stimulated by collagen without non-helical telopeptides region compared to intact collagen fibrils. Those data suggest that DDR2 is a microenvironmental sensor that regulates fibroblasts migration in collagen-rich environment.

  7. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle; Lutz, Beat

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL

  8. Modulation of Type-1 and Type-2 Cannabinoid Receptors by Saffron in a Rat Model of Retinal Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maccarone, Rita; Rapino, Cinzia; Zerti, Darin; di Tommaso, Monia; Battista, Natalia; Di Marco, Stefano; Bisti, Silvia; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies demonstrated that saffron (Crocus sativus) given as a dietary supplement counteracts the effects of bright continuous light (BCL) exposure in the albino rat retina, preserving both morphology and function and probably acting as a regulator of programmed cell death [1]. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether the neuroprotective effect of saffron on rat retina exposed to BCL is associated with a modulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS). To this aim, we used eight experimental groups of Sprague-Dawley rats, of which six were exposed to BCL for 24 hours. Following retinal function evaluation, retinas were quickly removed for biochemical and morphological analyses. Rats were either saffron-prefed or intravitreally injected with selective type-1 (CB1) or type-2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptor antagonists before BCL. Prefeeding and intravitreally injections were combined in two experimental groups before BCL. BCL exposure led to enhanced gene and protein expression of retinal CB1 and CB2 without affecting the other ECS elements. This effect of BCL on CB1 and CB2 was reversed by saffron treatment. Selective CB1 and CB2 antagonists reduced photoreceptor death, preserved morphology and visual function of retina, and mitigated the outer nuclear layer (ONL) damage due to BCL. Of interest, CB2-dependent neuroprotection was more pronounced than that conferred by CB1. These data suggest that BCL modulates only distinct ECS elements like CB1 and CB2, and that saffron and cannabinoid receptors could share the same mechanism in order to afford retinal protection. PMID:27861558

  9. Toll-Like Receptor 3 Is Critical for Coxsackievirus B4-Induced Type 1 Diabetes in Female NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thuma, Jean R.; Courreges, Maria C.; Benencia, Fabian; James, Calvin B.L.; Malgor, Ramiro; Kantake, Noriko; Mudd, William; Denlinger, Nathan; Nolan, Bret; Wen, Li; Schwartz, Frank L.

    2015-01-01

    Group B coxsackieviruses (CVBs) are involved in triggering some cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for this remain elusive. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), a receptor that recognizes viral double-stranded RNA, is hypothesized to play a role in virus-induced T1DM, although this hypothesis is yet to be substantiated. The objective of this study was to directly investigate the role of TLR3 in CVB-triggered T1DM in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, a mouse model of human T1DM that is widely used to study both spontaneous autoimmune and viral-induced T1DM. As such, we infected female wild-type (TLR3+/+) and TLR3 knockout (TLR3−/−) NOD mice with CVB4 and compared the incidence of diabetes in CVB4-infected mice with that of uninfected counterparts. We also evaluated the islets of uninfected and CVB4-infected wild-type and TLR3 knockout NOD mice by immunohistochemistry and insulitis scoring. TLR3 knockout mice were markedly protected from CVB4-induced diabetes compared with CVB4-infected wild-type mice. CVB4-induced T-lymphocyte-mediated insulitis was also significantly less severe in TLR3 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. No differences in insulitis were observed between uninfected animals, either wild-type or TLR3 knockout mice. These data demonstrate for the first time that TLR3 is 1) critical for CVB4-induced T1DM, and 2) modulates CVB4-induced insulitis in genetically prone NOD mice. PMID:25422874

  10. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor ligands display functional selectivity in a cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Dupré, Denis J; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2014-09-05

    Modulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) activity has been touted as a potential means of treating addiction, anxiety, depression, and neurodegeneration. Different agonists of CB1 are known to evoke varied responses in vivo. Functional selectivity is the ligand-specific activation of certain signal transduction pathways at a receptor that can signal through multiple pathways. To understand cannabinoid-specific functional selectivity, different groups have examined the effect of individual cannabinoids on various signaling pathways in heterologous expression systems. In the current study, we compared the functional selectivity of six cannabinoids, including two endocannabinoids (2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA)), two synthetic cannabinoids (WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940), and two phytocannabinoids (cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) on arrestin2-, Gα(i/o)-, Gβγ-, Gα(s)-, and Gα(q)-mediated intracellular signaling in the mouse STHdh(Q7/Q7) cell culture model of striatal medium spiny projection neurons that endogenously express CB1. In this system, 2-AG, THC, and CP55,940 were more potent mediators of arrestin2 recruitment than other cannabinoids tested. 2-AG, AEA, and WIN55,212-2, enhanced Gα(i/o) and Gβγ signaling, with 2-AG and AEA treatment leading to increased total CB1 levels. 2-AG, AEA, THC, and WIN55,212-2 also activated Gα(q)-dependent pathways. CP55,940 and CBD both signaled through Gα(s). CP55,940, but not CBD, activated downstream Gα(s) pathways via CB1 targets. THC and CP55,940 promoted CB1 internalization and decreased CB1 protein levels over an 18-h period. These data demonstrate that individual cannabinoids display functional selectivity at CB1 leading to activation of distinct signaling pathways. To effectively match cannabinoids with therapeutic goals, these compounds must be screened for their signaling bias.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) depresses n-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated current in cultured rat hippocampal neurons via CRH receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hui; Zhang, Yanmin; Sun, Jihu; Gao, Lu; Ma, Bei; Lu, Jianqiang; Ni, Xin

    2008-03-01

    CRH, the primary regulator of the neuroendocrine responses to stress, has been shown to modulate synaptic efficacy and the process of learning and memory in hippocampus. However, effects of CRH on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, the key receptor for synaptic plasticity, remain unclear. In primary cultured hippocampal neurons, using the technique of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that CRH (1 pmol/liter to 10 nmol/liter) inhibited NMDA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reversed by the CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) antagonist antalarmin but not by the CRHR2 antagonist astressin-2B, suggesting that CRHR1 mediated the inhibitory effect of CRH. Investigations on the signaling pathways of CRH showed that CRH dose-dependently induced phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-beta3 expression and increased intracellular cAMP content in these cells. Blocking PLC activity with U73122 prevented CRH-induced depression of NMDA current, whereas blocking protein kinase A (H89) and adenylate cyclase (SQ22536) failed to affect the CRH-induced depression of NMDA current. Application of inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist, Ca(2+) chelators or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also mainly blocked CRH-induced depression of NMDA currents, suggesting involvement of PLC/IP(3)R/Ca(2+)and PLC/PKC signaling pathways in CRH down-regulation of NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that CRH may exert neuromodulatory actions on hippocampus through regulating NMDA receptor function.

  12. Targeting the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 (TRPV1) Assembly Domain Attenuates Inflammation-induced Hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  13. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief.

  14. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel regulates diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjung; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Lee, Yongjin; Azuma, Yoshihiro; Wang, Hsun-Fan; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    Insulin resistance is a major characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Recent studies have shown a metabolic role of capsaicin that may be mediated via the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel. In this study, TRPV1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice (as controls) were fed a high-fat diet (HFD), and metabolic studies were performed to measure insulin and leptin action. The TRPV1 KO mice became more obese than the WT mice after HFD, partly attributed to altered energy balance and leptin resistance in the KO mice. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiment showed that the TRPV1 KO mice were more insulin resistant after HFD because of the ∼40% reduction in glucose metabolism in the white and brown adipose tissue, compared with that in the WT mice. Leptin treatment failed to suppress food intake, and leptin-mediated hypothalamic signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activity was blunted in the TRPV1 KO mice. We also found that the TRPV1 KO mice were more obese and insulin resistant than the WT mice at 9 mo of age. Taken together, these results indicate that lacking TRPV1 exacerbates the obesity and insulin resistance associated with an HFD and aging, and our findings further suggest that TRPV1 has a major role in regulating glucose metabolism and hypothalamic leptin's effects in obesity.

  15. Antiinflammatory effects of soluble complement receptor type 1 promote rapid recovery of ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Eror, A T; Stojadinovic, A; Starnes, B W; Makrides, S C; Tsokos, G C; Shea-Donohue, T

    1999-02-01

    We examined the effect of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) on mucosal injury and inflammation in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion. Groups of vehicle- and sCR1-treated rats underwent 30 min of mesenteric ischemia followed by 60 or 120 min of reperfusion. When compared to vehicle-treated rats, treatment with sCR1 (12 mg/kg) prior to 120 min of reperfusion significantly reduced mucosal injury, neutrophil infiltration, leukotriene B4 production, and restored villus height to control levels. The protective effect of sCR1 evident at 120 min of reperfusion was not observed at 60 min of reperfusion despite rapid inactivation of complement. These data suggest that complement inhibition minimized mucosal disruption by facilitating mucosal restitution or interrupting the inflammatory process. Delayed administration of sCR1 for 30 or 60 min into the reperfusion period progressively reduced the protection. sCR1-mediated rapid recovery of rat intestine after ischemia/reperfusion underscores the fundamental role of complement activation in neutrophil-mediated tissue injury.

  16. Type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor regulates cerebellar circuits by maintaining the spine morphology of purkinje cells in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Takeyuki; Hisatsune, Chihiro; Le, Tung Dinh; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Hirono, Moritoshi; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Nagao, Soichi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2013-07-24

    The structural maintenance of neural circuits is critical for higher brain functions in adulthood. Although several molecules have been identified as regulators for spine maintenance in hippocampal and cortical neurons, it is poorly understood how Purkinje cell (PC) spines are maintained in the mature cerebellum. Here we show that the calcium channel type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R1) in PCs plays a crucial role in controlling the maintenance of parallel fiber (PF)-PC synaptic circuits in the mature cerebellum in vivo. Significantly, adult mice lacking IP3R1 specifically in PCs (L7-Cre;Itpr1(flox/flox)) showed dramatic increase in spine density and spine length of PCs, despite having normal spines during development. In addition, the abnormally rearranged PF-PC synaptic circuits in mature cerebellum caused unexpectedly severe ataxia in adult L7-Cre;Itpr1(flox/flox) mice. Our findings reveal a specific role for IP3R1 in PCs not only as an intracellular mediator of cerebellar synaptic plasticity induction, but also as a critical regulator of PF-PC synaptic circuit maintenance in the mature cerebellum in vivo; this mechanism may underlie motor coordination and learning in adults.

  17. AMPA receptors in post-mortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics: a whole-hemisphere autoradiography study.

    PubMed

    Kärkkäinen, Olli; Kupila, Jukka; Häkkinen, Merja; Laukkanen, Virpi; Tupala, Erkki; Kautiainen, Hannu; Tiihonen, Jari; Storvik, Markus

    2013-12-30

    Dysfunction of the brain glutamate system has been associated with alcoholism. Ionotropic glutamatergic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) play an important role in both neurotransmission and post-synaptic plasticity. Alterations in AMPAR densities may also play a role in the neurobiological changes associated with alcoholism. In the present study, [(3)H] AMPA binding density was evaluated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dentate gyrus and hippocampus of Cloninger type 1 (n=9) and 2 (n=8) alcoholics, and compared with non-alcoholic control subjects (n=10) by post-mortem whole-hemisphere autoradiography. The [(3)H] AMPA binding density was significantly higher in the ACC of early onset type 2 alcoholics when compared with controls (p=0.011). There was also a significant negative correlation between [(3)H] AMPA binding and previously published results of dopamine transporter (DAT) density in the ACC in these same brain samples (R=-0.95, p=0.001). Although preliminary, and from a relatively small diagnostic group, the present results help to further explain the pathology of alcohol dependence and impulsive behaviour in type 2 alcoholics.

  18. Effects of Toll-like receptor 3 on herpes simplex virus type-1-infected mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuning; Shi, Lihong; Zhang, Haoyun; Li, Ruifang; Liang, Ruiwen; Liu, Zhijun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection on the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β), as well as to clarify the functions of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) infected with HSV-1. In HSV-1-infected cultured NSCs, immunofluorescence, reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and ELISA were performed to reveal the expression patterns of TLR3, IRF3, and IFN-β. Then, lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was used to block the expression of TLR3, and its effect on host resistance to HSV-1 infection was investigated. Under uninfected conditions, NSCs expressed TLR3 and phosphorylated IRF3, but after infection, the expression level of TLR3 was upregulated and the phosphorylation level of IRF3 in the nucleus was significantly enhanced, while IFN-β was also expressed. After TLR3 expression was blocked by lentivirus-mediated RNAi, IRF3 phosphorylation and IFN-β expression were downregulated. Therefore, HSV-1 upregulated the expression of TLR3 in NSCs and promoted nuclear translocation after IRF3 was phosphorylated to induce IFN-β expression. TLR3 exhibited an anti-HSV-1 infection capacity via innate immune functions.

  19. Functional Role of Intracellular Calcium Receptor Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Type 1 in Rat Hippocampus after Neonatal Anoxia.

    PubMed

    Ikebara, Juliane Midori; Takada, Silvia Honda; Cardoso, Débora Sterzeck; Dias, Natália Myuki Moralles; de Campos, Beatriz Crossiol Vicente; Bretherick, Talitha Amanda Sanches; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Ferraz, Mariana Sacrini Ayres; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Anoxia is one of the most prevalent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in preterm neonates, constituting an important public health problem due to permanent neurological sequelae observed in patients. Oxygen deprivation triggers a series of simultaneous cascades, culminating in cell death mainly located in more vulnerable metabolic brain regions, such as the hippocampus. In the process of cell death by oxygen deprivation, cytosolic calcium plays crucial roles. Intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are important regulators of cytosolic calcium levels, although the role of these receptors in neonatal anoxia is completely unknown. This study focused on the functional role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (IP3R1) in rat hippocampus after neonatal anoxia. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decrease of IP3R1 gene expression 24 hours after neonatal anoxia. We detected that IP3R1 accumulates specially in CA1, and this spatial pattern did not change after neonatal anoxia. Interestingly, we observed that anoxia triggers translocation of IP3R1 to nucleus in hippocampal cells. We were able to observe that anoxia changes distribution of IP3R1 immunofluorescence signals, as revealed by cluster size analysis. We next examined the role of IP3R1 in the neuronal cell loss triggered by neonatal anoxia. Intrahippocampal injection of non-specific IP3R1 blocker 2-APB clearly reduced the number of Fluoro-Jade C and Tunel positive cells, revealing that activation of IP3R1 increases cell death after neonatal anoxia. Finally, we aimed to disclose mechanistics of IP3R1 in cell death. We were able to determine that blockade of IP3R1 did not reduced the distribution and pixel density of activated caspase 3-positive cells, indicating that the participation of IP3R1 in neuronal cell loss is not related to classical caspase-mediated apoptosis. In summary, this study may contribute to new perspectives in the investigation of

  20. Insulin-like growth factor type-1 receptor down-regulation associated with dwarfism in Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Blum, J W; Elsasser, T H; Greger, D L; Wittenberg, S; de Vries, F; Distl, O

    2007-10-01

    Perturbations in endocrine functions can impact normal growth. Endocrine traits were studied in three dwarf calves exhibiting retarded but proportionate growth and four phenotypically normal half-siblings, sired by the same bull, and four unrelated control calves. Plasma 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and thyroxine concentrations in dwarfs and half-siblings were in the physiological range and responded normally to injected thyroid-releasing hormone. Plasma glucagon concentrations were different (dwarfs, controls>half-siblings; P<0.05). Plasma growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin concentrations in the three groups during an 8-h period were similar, but integrated GH concentrations (areas under concentration curves) were different (dwarfs>controls, P<0.02; half-siblings>controls, P=0.08). Responses of GH to xylazine and to a GH-releasing-factor analogue were similar in dwarfs and half-siblings. Relative gene expression of IGF-1, IGF-2, GH receptor (GHR), insulin receptor, IGF-1 type-1 and -2 receptors (IGF-1R, IGF-2R), and IGF binding proteins were measured in liver and anconeus muscle. GHR mRNA levels were different in liver (dwarfs

  1. Functional Role of Intracellular Calcium Receptor Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Type 1 in Rat Hippocampus after Neonatal Anoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ikebara, Juliane Midori; Takada, Silvia Honda; Cardoso, Débora Sterzeck; Dias, Natália Myuki Moralles; de Campos, Beatriz Crossiol Vicente; Bretherick, Talitha Amanda Sanches; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Ferraz, Mariana Sacrini Ayres

    2017-01-01

    Anoxia is one of the most prevalent causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in preterm neonates, constituting an important public health problem due to permanent neurological sequelae observed in patients. Oxygen deprivation triggers a series of simultaneous cascades, culminating in cell death mainly located in more vulnerable metabolic brain regions, such as the hippocampus. In the process of cell death by oxygen deprivation, cytosolic calcium plays crucial roles. Intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are important regulators of cytosolic calcium levels, although the role of these receptors in neonatal anoxia is completely unknown. This study focused on the functional role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (IP3R1) in rat hippocampus after neonatal anoxia. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decrease of IP3R1 gene expression 24 hours after neonatal anoxia. We detected that IP3R1 accumulates specially in CA1, and this spatial pattern did not change after neonatal anoxia. Interestingly, we observed that anoxia triggers translocation of IP3R1 to nucleus in hippocampal cells. We were able to observe that anoxia changes distribution of IP3R1 immunofluorescence signals, as revealed by cluster size analysis. We next examined the role of IP3R1 in the neuronal cell loss triggered by neonatal anoxia. Intrahippocampal injection of non-specific IP3R1 blocker 2-APB clearly reduced the number of Fluoro-Jade C and Tunel positive cells, revealing that activation of IP3R1 increases cell death after neonatal anoxia. Finally, we aimed to disclose mechanistics of IP3R1 in cell death. We were able to determine that blockade of IP3R1 did not reduced the distribution and pixel density of activated caspase 3-positive cells, indicating that the participation of IP3R1 in neuronal cell loss is not related to classical caspase-mediated apoptosis. In summary, this study may contribute to new perspectives in the investigation of

  2. The blockade of GABAA receptors attenuates the inhibitory effect of orexin type 1 receptors antagonist on morphine withdrawal syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Davoudi, Mahnaz; Azizi, Hossein; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Semnanian, Saeed

    2016-03-23

    The aim of present study was to investigate the involvement of orexin-A neuropeptide in naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome via modulating neurons bearing GABAA receptors. The locus coeruleus (LC) is a sensitive site for expression of the somatic aspects of morphine withdrawal. Intra-LC microinjection of GABAA receptor agonist attenuates morphine withdrawal signs in rats. Here we studied the influence of LC orexin type 1 receptors blockade by SB-334867 in presence of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome. Adult male Wistar rats, weighing 250-300 g, were rendered dependent on morphine by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of increasing morphine doses (6, 16, 26, 36, 46, 56 and 66 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg) at set intervals of 24 h for 7 days. On 8th day, naloxone (3 mg/kg, s.c.) was injected and the somatic signs of morphine withdrawal were evaluated. Intra-LC microinjections (0.2 μl) of either bicuculline (15 μM) or SB-334867 (3 mM) or a combination of both chemicals were done immediately before naloxone injection. Intra-LC microinjection of bicuculline (15 μM) had no significant effect on morphine withdrawal signs, whereas intra-LC microinjection of SB-334867 considerably attenuated morphine withdrawal signs. However, the effect of SB-334867 in attenuating naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal signs was blocked in presence of bicuculline. This finding, for the first time, indicated that orexin-A may participate in expression of naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome partly through decreasing the activity of neurons bearing GABAA receptors.

  3. Type 1 diabetes in Jewish Ethiopian immigrants in Israel: HLA class II immunogenetics and contribution of new environment.

    PubMed

    Zung, A; Elizur, M; Weintrob, N; Bistritzer, T; Hanukoglu, A; Zadik, Z; Phillip, M; Miller, K; Koren, I; Brautbar, C; Israel, S

    2004-12-01

    The interrelationship between human leukocyte antigen immunogenetics and environmental factors and their contribution to the emergence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) were studied in Jewish immigrants from Ethiopia in Israel. This community displays high incidence of T1D, and is unique both by its ethnic segregation and its rapid exposure to a new environment after the immigration. The study population consisted of 152 Ethiopian Jews living in Israel, 33 with T1D and 119 unrelated controls. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptible and protective alleles in the Jewish Ethiopian patients were similar to those in patients of other ethnic groups in Israel and in non-Jewish Ethiopian patients, with a few exceptions. Three haplotypes were markedly associated with diabetes in Jewish Ethiopian patients: DRB1*0301 DQA1*05 DQB1*02 (OR 4.4, p < 0.001); DRB1*0404 DQA1 03 DQB1*0302 (OR 19.2, p = 0.006), and DRB1*0405 DQA1*03 DQB1*0302 (OR 87.8, p < 0.001). The highly susceptible allele DRB1*0301 was more common in the general Ethiopian population (25.2%) than in all other ethnic groups in Israel, which may render this community prone to the disease. The age at onset of disease in patients with two susceptible haplotypes was negatively correlated with the duration of living in Israel (r = -0.621, p = 0.04). We concluded that ongoing exposure of genetically predisposed immigrants from Ethiopia to diabetogenic environmental factors eventually leads to a high incidence of overt diabetes in this ethnic group.

  4. Deficient liver regeneration after carbon tetrachloride injury in mice lacking type 1 but not type 2 tumor necrosis factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y.; Fausto, N.

    1998-01-01

    Signaling by tumor necrosis factor type 1 receptor (TNFR-1) is required for the initiation of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Using knockout mice that lack either TNFR-1 or TNFR-2, we determined whether signaling through TNF receptors is important for liver injury and hepatocyte proliferation induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Lack of TNFR-1 inhibited hepatocyte DNA synthesis after CCl4 injection. At 44 hours after the injection, replication of hepatocytes in TNFR-1 was 50% to 90% lower than in wild-type (WT) animals, depending on the dose injected. In WT animals, hepatocyte replication was essentially completed by 4 days after CCl4 injection, but replication at a low level persisted in TNFR-1 mice for at least 2 weeks. TNFR-1 knockout mice had little detectable NF-kappa B and STAT3 binding during the first 5 hours after CCl4, high plasma TNF, and reduced levels of plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and liver IL-6 mRNA. Injection of IL-6 30 minutes before CCl4 administration corrected the deficiency of hepatocyte replication at 44 hours and restored STAT3 binding to normal levels. In contrast, mice lacking TNFR-2 did not differ significantly from WT mice in NF-kappa B and STAT3 binding, IL-6 and TNF levels, or hepatocyte replication. Although AP-1 binding was induced in WT TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 knockout mice, binding in TNFR-2 knockouts was lower than in WT mice. C/EBP binding was much lower in TNFR-1 and TNFR-2 knockout mice than in WT mice. As assessed by morphological analysis and alanine aminotransferase levels, the acute injury caused by CCl4 appeared to be similar in the three groups of animals, but subsequent regeneration was impaired in mice lacking TNFR-1. We conclude that a TNFR-1 signaling pathway involving NF-kappa B, IL-6, and STAT3 is an important component of the hepatocyte mitogenic response induced by CCl4 injury in mouse liver. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 12 PMID:9626061

  5. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  6. Functional and biochemical properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 channels from heterozygous R163C malignant hyperthermia-susceptible mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Barrientos, Genaro C; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Yang, Tianzhong; Padilla, Isela T; Truong, Kim; Allen, Paul D; Lopez, José R; Pessah, Isaac N

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) confer malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. How inherent impairments in Ca(2+) channel regulation affect skeletal muscle function in myotubes and adult fibers under basal (nontriggering) conditions are not understood. Myotubes, adult flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers, and sarcoplasmic reticulum skeletal membranes were isolated from heterozygous knockin R163C and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT myotubules, R163C myotubes have reduced Ca(2+) transient amplitudes in response to electrical field pulses; however, R163C FDB fibers do not differ in their responses to electrical stimuli, despite heightened cellular cytoplasmic resting Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](rest)) and sensitivity to halothane. Immunoblotting of membranes from each genotype shows similar expression of RyR1, FK506 binding protein 12 kDa, and Ca(2+)-ATPase, but RyR1 (2844)Ser phosphorylation in R163C muscle is 31% higher than that of WT muscle (p < 0.001). RyR1 channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers reveal ∼65% of R163C channels exhibit ≥2-fold greater open probability (P(o)) than WT, with prolonged mean open dwell times and shortened closed dwell times. [(3)H]Ryanodine (Ry) binding and single-channel analyses show that R163C-RyR1 has altered regulation compared with WT: 1) 3-fold higher sensitivity to Ca(2+) activation; 2) 2-fold greater [(3)H]Ry receptor occupancy; 3) comparatively higher channel activity, even in reducing glutathione buffer; 4) enhanced RyR1 activity both at 25 and 37°C; and 5) elevated cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)](rest). R163C channels are inherently more active than WT channels, a functional impairment that cannot be reversed by dephosphorylation with protein phosphatase. Dysregulated R163C channels produce a more overt phenotype in myotubes than in adult fibers in the absence of triggering agents, suggesting tighter negative regulation of R163C-RyR1 within the Ca(2+) release unit of adult fibers.

  7. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) genetic variation and stress interact to influence reward learning.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Ryan; Santesso, Diane L; Fagerness, Jesen; Perlis, Roy H; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2011-09-14

    Stress is a general risk factor for psychopathology, but the mechanisms underlying this relationship remain largely unknown. Animal studies and limited human research suggest that stress can induce anhedonic behavior. Moreover, emerging data indicate that genetic variation within the corticotropin-releasing hormone type 1 receptor gene (CRHR1) at rs12938031 may promote psychopathology, particularly in the context of stress. Using an intermediate phenotypic neurogenetics approach, we assessed how stress and CRHR1 genetic variation (rs12938031) influence reward learning, an important component of anhedonia. Psychiatrically healthy female participants (n = 75) completed a probabilistic reward learning task during stress and no-stress conditions while 128-channel event-related potentials were recorded. Fifty-six participants were also genotyped across CRHR1. Response bias, an individual's ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, was the primary behavioral variable of interest. The feedback-related positivity (FRP) in response to reward feedback was used as a neural index of reward learning. Relative to the no-stress condition, acute stress was associated with blunted response bias as well as a smaller and delayed FRP (indicative of disrupted reward learning) and reduced anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortex activation to reward. Critically, rs12938031 interacted with stress to influence reward learning: both behaviorally and neurally, A homozygotes showed stress-induced reward learning abnormalities. These findings indicate that acute, uncontrollable stressors reduce participants' ability to modulate behavior as a function of reward, and that such effects are modulated by CRHR1 genotype. Homozygosity for the A allele at rs12938031 may increase risk for psychopathology via stress-induced reward learning deficits.

  8. Host Avian Beta-Defensin and Toll-Like Receptor Responses of Pigeons following Infection with Pigeon Paramyxovirus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Xu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting; Gao, Mengying; Wang, Qiuling; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality in pigeons caused by pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) highlights the need for new insights into the host immune response and novel treatment approaches. Host defense peptides (HDPs) are key components of the innate immune system. In this study, three novel avian β-defensins (AvBDs 2, 7, and 10) were characterized in pigeons and shown to possess direct antiviral activity against PPMV-1 in vitro. In addition, we evaluated the mRNA expression of these AvBDs and other immune-related genes in tissues of 2-month-old infected pigeons at 3 and 7 days postinfection. We observed that the expression of AvBD2 in the cecal tonsil, lungs, and proventriculus, as well as the expression of AvBD10 in the spleen, lungs, proventriculus, and kidneys, was upregulated in infected pigeons. Similarly, the expression of both Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 was increased in the spleen, trachea, and proventriculus, while TLR15 expression was increased only in the lungs of infected pigeons. In addition, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was upregulated in the spleen, the bursa of Fabricius, the trachea, and the proventriculus of infected pigeons. Furthermore, we observed a high correlation between the expression of AvBD2 and the expression of either TLR7 or TLR15, as well as between AvBD10 expression and either TLR3 or TLR7 expression in respective tissues. The results suggest that PPMV-1 infection can induce innate host responses characterized by the activation of TLRs, particularly TLR3 and TLR7, AvBDs (2 and 10), and iNOS in pigeons. PMID:26162868

  9. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in β-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with β-thalassemia major –preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes – is exciting. PMID:25216685

  10. A variably spliced region in the type 1 ryanodine receptor may participate in an inter-domain interaction.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takashi; Pace, Suzy M; Wei, Lan; Beard, Nicole A; Dirksen, Robert T; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine residues that are variably spliced in the juvenile and adult isoforms of the skeletal-muscle RyR1 (type 1 ryanodine receptor). The juvenile ASI(-) splice variant is less active than the adult ASI(+) variant and is overexpressed in patients with DM (myotonic dystrophy) [Kimura, Nakamori, Lueck, Pouliquin, Aoike, Fujimura, Dirksen, Takahashi, Dulhunty and Sakoda (2005) Hum. Mol. Genet. 14, 2189-2200]. In the present study, we explore the ASI region using synthetic peptides corresponding to rabbit RyR1 residues Thr3471-Gly3500 either containing [PASI(+)] or lacking [PASI(-)] the ASI residues. Both peptides increased [3H]ryanodine binding to rabbit RyR1s, increased Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reti-culum vesicles and increased single RyR1 channel activity. The peptide PASI(-) was more active in each case than PASI(+). [3H]Ryanodine binding to recombinant ASI(+)RyR1 or ASI(-)-RyR1 was enhanced more by PASI(-) than PASI(+), with the greatest increase seen when PASI(-) was added to ASI(-)RyR1. The activation of the RyR channels is consistent with the hypo-thesis that the peptides interrupt an inhibitory inter-domain inter-action and that PASI(-) is more effective at interrupting this interaction than PASI(+). We therefore suggest that the ASI(-) sequence interacts more tightly than the ASI(+) sequence with its binding partner, so that the ASI(-)RyR1 is more strongly inhibited (less active) than the ASI(+)RyR1. Thus the affinity of the binding partners in this inter-domain interaction may deter-mine the activities of the mature and juvenile isoforms of RyR1 and the stronger inhibition in the juvenile isoform may contribute to the myopathy in DM.

  11. Role of adiponectin in the metabolic effects of cannabinoid type 1 receptor blockade in mice with diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Grzegorz; Earley, Brian J.; Zhou, Liang; Jourdan, Tony; Szanda, Gergö; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George

    2013-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone adiponectin promotes fatty acid oxidation and improves insulin sensitivity and thus plays a key role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis. Chronic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor blockade also increases lipid oxidation and improves insulin sensitivity in obese individuals or animals, resulting in reduced cardiometabolic risk. Chronic CB1 blockade reverses the obesity-related decline in serum adiponectin levels, which has been proposed to account for the metabolic effects of CB1 antagonists. Here, we investigated the metabolic actions of the CB1 inverse agonist rimonabant in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese adiponectin knockout (Adipo−/−) mice and their wild-type littermate controls (Adipo+/+). HFD-induced obesity and its hormonal/metabolic consequences were indistinguishable in the two strains. Daily treatment of obese mice with rimonabant for 7 days resulted in significant and comparable reductions in body weight, serum leptin, free fatty acid, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in the two strains. Rimonabant treatment improved glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity to the same extent in Adipo+/+ and Adipo−/− mice, whereas it reversed the HFD-induced hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular damage only in the former. The adiponectin-dependent, antisteatotic effect of rimonabant was mediated by reduced uptake and increased β-oxidation of fatty acids in the liver. We conclude that reversal of the HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and fibrosis by chronic CB1 blockade, but not the parallel reduction in adiposity and improved glycemic control, is mediated by adiponectin. PMID:24381003

  12. Fate of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor and nuclear lamins in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Scott, E S; O'Hare, P

    2001-09-01

    During herpesvirus egress, capsids bud through the inner nuclear membrane. Underlying this membrane is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments with which it is tightly associated. Details of alterations to the lamina and the inner nuclear membrane during infection and the mechanisms involved in capsid transport across these structures remain unclear. Here we describe the fate of key protein components of the nuclear envelope and lamina during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We followed the distribution of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR) and lamins A and B(2) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live infected cells. Together with additional results from indirect immunofluorescence, our studies reveal major morphologic distortion of nuclear-rim LBR and lamins A/C, B(1), and B(2). By 8 h p.i., we also observed a significant redistribution of LBR-GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it colocalized with a subpopulation of cytoplasmic glycoprotein B by immunofluorescence. In addition, analysis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that LBR-GFP exhibited increased diffusional mobility within the nuclear membrane of infected cells. This is consistent with the disruption of interactions between LBR and the underlying lamina. In addition to studying stably expressed GFP-lamins by fluorescence microscopy, we studied endogenous A- and B-type lamins in infected cells by Western blotting. Both approaches reveal a loss of lamins associated with virus infection. These data indicate major disruption of the nuclear envelope and lamina of HSV-1-infected cells and are consistent with a virus-induced dismantling of the nuclear lamina, possibly in order to gain access to the inner nuclear membrane.

  13. Activation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Xapelli, Sara; Agasse, Fabienne; Sardà-Arroyo, Laura; Bernardino, Liliana; Santos, Tiago; Ribeiro, Filipa F; Valero, Jorge; Bragança, José; Schitine, Clarissa; de Melo Reis, Ricardo A; Sebastião, Ana M; Malva, João O

    2013-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the modulation of adult neurogenesis. Here, we describe the effect of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) activation on self-renewal, proliferation and neuronal differentiation in mouse neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ) stem/progenitor cell cultures. Expression of CB1R was detected in SVZ-derived immature cells (Nestin-positive), neurons and astrocytes. Stimulation of the CB1R by (R)-(+)-Methanandamide (R-m-AEA) increased self-renewal of SVZ cells, as assessed by counting the number of secondary neurospheres and the number of Sox2+/+ cell pairs, an effect blocked by Notch pathway inhibition. Moreover, R-m-AEA treatment for 48 h, increased proliferation as assessed by BrdU incorporation assay, an effect mediated by activation of MAPK-ERK and AKT pathways. Surprisingly, stimulation of CB1R by R-m-AEA also promoted neuronal differentiation (without affecting glial differentiation), at 7 days, as shown by counting the number of NeuN-positive neurons in the cultures. Moreover, by monitoring intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in single cells following KCl and histamine stimuli, a method that allows the functional evaluation of neuronal differentiation, we observed an increase in neuronal-like cells. This proneurogenic effect was blocked when SVZ cells were co-incubated with R-m-AEA and the CB1R antagonist AM 251, for 7 days, thus indicating that this effect involves CB1R activation. In accordance with an effect on neuronal differentiation and maturation, R-m-AEA also increased neurite growth, as evaluated by quantifying and measuring the number of MAP2-positive processes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CB1R activation induces proliferation, self-renewal and neuronal differentiation from mouse neonatal SVZ cell cultures.

  14. Host Avian Beta-Defensin and Toll-Like Receptor Responses of Pigeons following Infection with Pigeon Paramyxovirus Type 1.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Xu, Qianqian; Zhang, Tingting; Gao, Mengying; Wang, Qiuling; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Ma, Deying; Liu, Shengwang

    2015-09-01

    The high morbidity and mortality in pigeons caused by pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 (PPMV-1) highlights the need for new insights into the host immune response and novel treatment approaches. Host defense peptides (HDPs) are key components of the innate immune system. In this study, three novel avian β-defensins (AvBDs 2, 7, and 10) were characterized in pigeons and shown to possess direct antiviral activity against PPMV-1 in vitro. In addition, we evaluated the mRNA expression of these AvBDs and other immune-related genes in tissues of 2-month-old infected pigeons at 3 and 7 days postinfection. We observed that the expression of AvBD2 in the cecal tonsil, lungs, and proventriculus, as well as the expression of AvBD10 in the spleen, lungs, proventriculus, and kidneys, was upregulated in infected pigeons. Similarly, the expression of both Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR7 was increased in the spleen, trachea, and proventriculus, while TLR15 expression was increased only in the lungs of infected pigeons. In addition, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was upregulated in the spleen, the bursa of Fabricius, the trachea, and the proventriculus of infected pigeons. Furthermore, we observed a high correlation between the expression of AvBD2 and the expression of either TLR7 or TLR15, as well as between AvBD10 expression and either TLR3 or TLR7 expression in respective tissues. The results suggest that PPMV-1 infection can induce innate host responses characterized by the activation of TLRs, particularly TLR3 and TLR7, AvBDs (2 and 10), and iNOS in pigeons.

  15. N-terminal and central segments of the type 1 ryanodine receptor mediate its interaction with FK506-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Girgenrath, Tanya; Mahalingam, Mohana; Svensson, Bengt; Nitu, Florentin R; Cornea, Razvan L; Fessenden, James D

    2013-05-31

    We used site-directed labeling of the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements to map RyR1 sequence elements forming the binding site of the 12-kDa binding protein for the immunosuppressant drug, FK506. This protein, FKBP12, promotes the RyR1 closed state, thereby inhibiting Ca(2+) leakage in resting muscle. Although FKBP12 function is well established, its binding determinants within the RyR1 protein sequence remain unresolved. To identify these sequence determinants using FRET, we created five single-Cys FKBP variants labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 (denoted D-FKBP) and then targeted these D-FKBPs to full-length RyR1 constructs containing decahistidine (His10) "tags" placed within N-terminal (amino acid residues 76-619) or central (residues 2157-2777) regions of RyR1. The FRET acceptor Cy3NTA bound specifically and saturably to these His tags, allowing distance analysis of FRET measured from each D-FKBP variant to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag. Results indicate that D-FKBP binds proximal to both N-terminal and central domains of RyR1, thus suggesting that the FKBP binding site is composed of determinants from both regions. These findings further imply that the RyR1 N-terminal and central domains are proximal to one another, a core premise of the domain-switch hypothesis of RyR function. We observed FRET from GFP fused at position 620 within the N-terminal domain to central domain His-tagged sites, thus further supporting this hypothesis. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that N-terminal and central domain elements are closely apposed near the FKBP binding site within the RyR1 three-dimensional structure.

  16. Dorsomedial hypothalamus CRF type 1 receptors selectively modulate inhibitory avoidance responses in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mariana S C F; Pereira, Bruno A; Céspedes, Isabel C; Nascimento, Juliana O G; Bittencourt, Jackson C; Viana, Milena B

    2014-09-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) plays a critical role in the mediation of physiological and behavioral responses to stressors. In the present study, we investigated the role played by the CRF system within the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) in the modulation of anxiety- and panic-related responses. Male Wistar rats were administered into the DMH with CRF (125 and 250 ng/0.2 μl, experiment 1) or with the CRFR1 antagonist antalarmin (25 ng/0.2 μl, experiment 2) and 10 min later tested in the elevated T-maze (ETM) for inhibitory avoidance and escape measurements. In clinical terms, these responses have been respectively related to generalized anxiety and panic disorder. To further verify if the anxiogenic effects of CRF were mediated by CRFR1 activation, we also investigated the effects of the combined treatment with CRF (250 ng/0.2 μl) and antalarmin (25 ng/0.2 μl) (experiment 3). All animals were tested in an open field, immediately after the ETM, for locomotor activity assessment. Results showed that 250 ng/0.2μl of CRF facilitated ETM avoidance, an anxiogenic response. Antalarmin significantly decreased avoidance latencies, an anxiolytic effect, and was able to counteract the anxiogenic effects of CRF. None of the compounds administered altered escape responses or locomotor activity measurements. These results suggest that CRF in the DMH exerts anxiogenic effects by activating type 1 receptors, which might be of relevance to the physiopathology of generalized anxiety disorder.

  17. Expression and regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalei; Meng, Chenling; Wei, Quanwei; Shi, Fangxiong; Mao, Dagan

    2015-04-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) preferentially mediates the selective uptake of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol ester and the delivery of cholesterol for steroidogenesis. Although multiple analyses have investigated the function of SR-B1 in the liver, adrenal and ovary, its expression in rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle is lacking. In the present study, real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to investigate SR-B1 expression in the rat ovary and uterus during the estrous cycle. The results demonstrated that ovarian SR-B1 expression was in a stage-dependent manner, continuously increased from proestrus and kept elevated during metoestrus, while uterine SR-B1 expression decreased from proestrus to diestrus. To determine whether ovarian and uterine SR-B1 expression were affected by sex steroid hormones, immature rats were treated with 17 β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P4), or their antagonists from postnatal days 24-26. Results showed that the levels of SR-B1 mRNA and protein were significantly up-regulated by E2 in both the ovary and uterus. IHC results showed that SR-B1 was primarily localized in the oocytes, theca internal cells (T-I) of follicles, interstitial cells (IC) as well as corpus luteum (CL), but not granulosa cells (GC) in the ovary during the estrous cycle. Uterine SR-B1 was highly expressed in the endometrial luminal epithelial cells (LEC) and glandular epithelial cells (GEC) as well as in the circular muscle (CM) cells, and weak staining in stromal cells (SC) through estrous cycle. Taken together, SR-B1 expression in the ovary and uterus across the estrous cycle demonstrate that SR-B1 may be involved in uterine function, follicular development as well as luteal function.

  18. Molecular mechanism of action of triazolobenzodiazepinone agonists of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Possible cooperativity across the receptor homo-dimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Aditya J.; Lam, Polo C.H.; Orry, Andrew; Abagyan, Ruben; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2016-01-01

    The type 1 cholecystokinin receptor (CCK1R) has multiple physiologic roles relating to nutrient homeostasis, including mediation of post-cibal satiety. This effect has been central in efforts to develop agonists of this receptor as part of a program to manage and/or prevent obesity. While a number of small molecule CCK1R agonists have been developed, none has yet been approved for clinical use, based on inadequate efficacy, side effects, or the potential for toxicity. Understanding the molecular details of docking and mechanism of action of these ligands can be helpful in the rational refinement and enhancement of small molecule drug candidates. In the current work, we have defined the mechanism of binding and activity of two triazolobenzodiazepinones, CE-326597 and PF-04756956, which are reported to be full agonist ligands. To achieve this, we utilized receptor binding with a series of allosteric and orthosteric radioligands at structurally-related CCK1R and CCK2R, as well as chimeric CCK1R/CCK2R constructs exchanging residues in the allosteric pocket, and assessment of biological activity. These triazolobenzodiazepinones docked within the intramembranous small molecule allosteric ligand pocket, with higher affinity binding to CCK2R than CCK1R, yet with biological activity exclusive to or greatly enhanced at CCK1R. These ligands exhibited cooperativity with benzodiazepine binding across the CCK1R homodimeric complex, resulting in their ability to inhibit only a fraction of the saturable binding of a benzodiazepine radioligand, unlike other small molecule antagonists and agonists of this receptor. This may contribute to the understanding of the unique short duration and reversible gallbladder contraction observed in vivo upon administration of these drugs. PMID:26654202

  19. Angiotensin II activates endothelial constitutive nitric oxide synthase via AT1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Hirata, Y; Emori, T; Imai, T; Marumo, F

    1996-09-01

    To determine whether angiotensin (ANG) II, a vasoconstrictor hormone, activates constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) in endothelial cells (ECs), we investigated the cellular mechanism by which ANG II induces nitric oxide (NO) formation in cultured bovine ECs. ANG II rapidly (within 1 min) and dose-dependently (10(-9)-10(-6) M) increased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production. This effect of ANG II was abolished by a NOS inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. An ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist (DuP 753), but not an ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist (PD 123177), dose-dependently inhibited ANG II-induced NOx production. A Ca(2+)-channel blocker (barnidipine) failed to affect ANG II-induced NOx production, whereas an intracellular Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA) and a calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) abolished NOx production induced by ANG II. A protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (H-7) and down-regulation of endogenous PKC after pretreatment with phorbol ester decreased NOx production stimulated by ANG II. ANG II transiently stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation, and increased cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations; these effects were blocked by DuP 753. Our data demonstrate that ANG II stimulates NO release by activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cNOS via AT1 receptors in bovine ECs.

  20. Resolving ligand hyperfine couplings of type 1 and 2 Cu(II) in ascorbate oxidase by high field pulse EPR correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Alexey; Pecht, Israel; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2010-01-07

    Ascorbate oxidase contains two paramagnetic Cu(ii) binding sites, type 1 (T1) and type 2 (T2) and in both sites the Cu(ii) is coordinated to histidine residues. We use several pulse EPR techniques at high field (95 GHz) to determine ligand (1)H and (14)N hyperfine couplings in the two sites and identify the T1 signals by a new triple resonance correlation technique named THYCOS.

  1. The specific monomer/dimer equilibrium of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 is established in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Anke; Gibert, Arthur; Lampe, André; Grzesik, Paul; Rutz, Claudia; Furkert, Jens; Schmoranzer, Jan; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2014-08-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most important drug targets. Although the smallest functional unit of a GPCR is a monomer, it became clear in the past decades that the vast majority of the receptors form dimers. Only very recently, however, data were presented that some receptors may in fact be expressed as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that the interaction of the receptor protomers is dynamic. To date, equilibrium measurements were restricted to the plasma membrane due to experimental limitations. We have addressed the question as to where this equilibrium is established for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1. By developing a novel approach to analyze single molecule fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy data for intracellular membrane compartments, we show that the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 has a specific monomer/dimer equilibrium that is already established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It remains constant at the plasma membrane even following receptor activation. Moreover, we demonstrate for seven additional GPCRs that they are expressed in specific but substantially different monomer/dimer ratios. Although it is well known that proteins may dimerize in the ER in principle, our data show that the ER is also able to establish the specific monomer/dimer ratios of GPCRs, which sheds new light on the functions of this compartment.

  2. Biased Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Signaling Influences Neuronal Viability in a Cell Culture Model of Huntington Disease.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2016-03-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disorder with limited treatment options. Prior to motor symptom onset or neuronal cell loss in HD, levels of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) decrease in the basal ganglia. Decreasing CB1 levels are strongly correlated with chorea and cognitive deficit. CB1 agonists are functionally selective (biased) for divergent signaling pathways. In this study, six cannabinoids were tested for signaling bias in in vitro models of medium spiny projection neurons expressing wild-type (STHdh(Q7/Q7)) or mutant huntingtin protein (STHdh(Q111/Q111)). Signaling bias was assessed using the Black and Leff operational model. Relative activity [ΔlogR (τ/KA)] and system bias (ΔΔlogR) were calculated relative to the reference compound WIN55,212-2 for Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gβγ, and β-arrestin1 signaling following treatment with 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), anandamide (AEA), CP55,940, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and THC+CBD (1:1), and compared between wild-type and HD cells. The Emax of Gαi/o-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was 50% lower in HD cells compared with wild-type cells. 2-AG and AEA displayed Gαi/o/Gβγ bias and normalized CB1 protein levels and improved cell viability, whereas CP55,940 and THC displayed β-arrestin1 bias and reduced CB1 protein levels and cell viability in HD cells. CBD was not a CB1 agonist but inhibited THC-dependent signaling (THC+CBD). Therefore, enhancing Gαi/o-biased endocannabinoid signaling may be therapeutically beneficial in HD. In contrast, cannabinoids that are β-arrestin-biased--such as THC found at high levels in modern varieties of marijuana--may be detrimental to CB1 signaling, particularly in HD where CB1 levels are already reduced.

  3. Designing calcium release channel inhibitors with enhanced electron donor properties: stabilizing the closed state of ryanodine receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanping; Yaeger, Daniel; Owen, Laura J; Escobedo, Jorge O; Wang, Jialu; Singer, Jeffrey D; Strongin, Robert M; Abramson, Jonathan J

    2012-01-01

    New drugs with enhanced electron donor properties that target the ryanodine receptor from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1) are shown to be potent inhibitors of single-channel activity. In this article, we synthesize derivatives of the channel activator 4-chloro-3-methyl phenol (4-CmC) and the 1,4-benzothiazepine channel inhibitor 4-[-3{1-(4-benzyl) piperidinyl}propionyl]-7-methoxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,4-benzothiazepine (K201, JTV519) with enhanced electron donor properties. Instead of activating channel activity (~100 μM), the 4-methoxy analog of 4-CmC [4-methoxy-3-methyl phenol (4-MmC)] inhibits channel activity at submicromolar concentrations (IC(50) = 0.34 ± 0.08 μM). Increasing the electron donor characteristics of K201 by synthesizing its dioxole congener results in an approximately 16 times more potent RyR1 inhibitor (IC(50) = 0.24 ± 0.05 μM) compared with K201 (IC(50) = 3.98 ± 0.79 μM). Inhibition is not caused by an increased closed time of the channel but seems to be caused by an open state block of RyR1. These alterations to chemical structure do not influence the ability of these drugs to affect Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase type 1. Moreover, the FKBP12 protein, which stabilizes RyR1 in a closed configuration, is shown to be a strong electron donor. It seems as if FKBP12, K201, its dioxole derivative, and 4-MmC inhibit RyR1 channel activity by virtue of their electron donor characteristics. These results embody strong evidence that designing new drugs to target RyR1 with enhanced electron donor characteristics results in more potent channel inhibitors. This is a novel approach to the design of new, more potent drugs with the aim of functionally modifying RyR1 single-channel activity.

  4. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  5. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Sealfon, Stuart C; González-Maeso, Javier

    2009-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most common mental illnesses, with hereditary and environmental factors important for its etiology. All antipsychotics have in common a high affinity for monoaminergic receptors. Whereas hallucinations and delusions usually respond to typical (haloperidol-like) and atypical (clozapine-like) monoaminergic antipsychotics, their efficacy in improving negative symptoms and cognitive deficits remains inadequate. In addition, devastating side effects are a common characteristic of monoaminergic antipsychotics. Recent biochemical, preclinical and clinical findings support group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 and mGluR3) as a new approach to treat schizophrenia. This paper reviews the status of general knowledge of mGluR2 and mGluR3 in the psychopharmacology, genetics and neuropathology of schizophrenia.

  6. Evaluation of a corticotropin releasing hormone type 1 receptor antagonist in women with posttraumatic stress disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacologic treatment options for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are limited in number and effectiveness. Medications currently in use to treat PTSD were originally approved based on their efficacy in other disorders, such as major depression. Substantial research in PTSD suggests that increased activity of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-containing circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. This Phase II trial aims to evaluate the efficacy of a CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) antagonist in the treatment of PTSD. Methods/design Currently untreated adult women, ages 18 to 65 years, with a primary psychiatric diagnosis of PTSD of at least 3 months’ duration, are being enrolled in a parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of GSK561679, a novel CRHR1 receptor antagonist. GSK561679 (or matching placebo) is prescribed at a fixed dose of 350 mg nightly for six weeks. The primary trial hypothesis is that GSK561679 will reduce symptoms of PTSD, as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), significantly more than placebo after six weeks of treatment. Putative biological markers of PTSD which may influence treatment response are measured prior to randomization and after five weeks’ exposure to the study medication, including: fear conditioning and extinction using psychophysiological measures; variants of stress-related genes and gene expression profiles; and indices of HPA axis reactivity. In addition, the impact of PTSD and treatment on neuropsychological performance and functional capacity are assessed at baseline and after the fifth week of study medication. After completion of the six-week double blind treatment period, subjects enter a one-month follow-up period to monitor for sustained response and resolution of any adverse effects. Discussion Considerable preclinical and human research supports the hypothesis that alterations in central

  7. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and PACAP-receptor type 1 expression in rat and human placenta.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, M L; Modesti, A; Palumbo, C; Ulisse, S; Fabbri, A; Piccione, E; Frajese, G; Moretti, C

    2000-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), the new hypophysiotropic factor member of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/secretin/glucagon/GHRH family of neuropeptides, exerts its biological action by interacting with both PACAP-selective type I receptors (PAC1) and type II receptors (VPAC1), which bind both PACAP and VIP. The placenta is a site of production of hypophysiotropic factors that participate in the control of local hormone production, as well as the respective hypothalamic-pituitary neurohormones. In the present study, we show the expression of PACAP gene and irPACAP distribution within rat and human placental tissues, by means of RT-PCR and immunohystochemical experiments. In both rat and human placenta, we evaluated the expression of PAC1 gene by Northern hybridization analysis performed with a 32P-labeled 706 nt complementary DNA probe, derived from the full-length coding region of the rPAC1 complementary DNA. The results of these experiments demonstrate the presence, in both human and rat placenta, of a 7.5-kb transcript similar in size to those detected in the ovary, brain, and hypothalamus. Alternative splicing of two exons occurs in human and rat PAC1 gene generating splice variants with variable tissue-specific expression. To ascertain which of the splice variants were expressed in placental tissue we performed RT-nested PCR using primers flanking the insertion sequence termed hip/hop cassette in rat or SV1/SV2 box in human gene. Electrophoretic analysis of the PCR products showed a different pattern of expression of messenger RNA splicing variants in human and rat placenta. In particular, the rat placenta expresses the short PAC1 receptor (PAC1short), the rPAC1-hip or hop (which are indistinguishable with the primers used), and the rPAC1-hip-hop, whereas the human placenta expresses only the PAC1SV1 (or SV2) variant, structurally homologous to the rat PAC1 hip (or hop). Sequence analysis of the human PCR-amplified PAC1

  8. The Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor in Brain Functions: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Guimond, Marie-Odile; Gallo-Payet, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the main active product of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), mediating its action via two major receptors, namely, the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor and the type 2 (AT2) receptor. Recent results also implicate several other members of the renin-angiotensin system in various aspects of brain functions. The first aim of this paper is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the properties and signaling of the AT2 receptor, its expression in the brain, and its well-established effects. Secondly, we will highlight the potential role of the AT2 receptor in cognitive function, neurological disorders and in the regulation of appetite and the possible link with development of metabolic disorders. The potential utility of novel nonpeptide selective AT2 receptor ligands in clarifying potential roles of this receptor in physiology will also be discussed. If confirmed, these new pharmacological tools should help to improve impaired cognitive performance, not only through its action on brain microcirculation and inflammation, but also through more specific effects on neurons. However, the overall physiological relevance of the AT2 receptor in the brain must also consider the Ang IV/AT4 receptor. PMID:23320146

  9. Decreased IGF Type 1 Receptor Signaling in Mammary Epithelium during Pregnancy Leads to Reduced Proliferation, Alveolar Differentiation, and Expression of Insulin Receptor Substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhaoyu; Shushanov, Sain; LeRoith, Derek

    2011-01-01

    The IGFs and the IGF type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) are essential mediators of normal mammary gland development in mice. IGF-I and the IGF-1R have demonstrated functions in formation and proliferation of terminal end buds and in ductal outgrowth and branching during puberty. To study the functions of IGF-1R during pregnancy and lactation, we established transgenic mouse lines expressing a human dominant-negative kinase dead IGF-1R (dnhIGF-1R) under the control of the whey acidic protein promoter. We provide evidence that the IGF-1R pathway is necessary for normal epithelial proliferation and alveolar formation during pregnancy. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the whey acidic protein-dnhIGF-1R transgene causes a delay in alveolar differentiation including lipid droplet formation, lumen expansion, and β-casein protein expression. Analysis of IGF-1R signaling pathways showed a decrease in P-IGF-1R and P-Akt resulting from expression of the dnhIGF-1R. We further demonstrate that disruption of the IGF-1R decreases mammary epithelial cell expression of the signaling intermediates insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and IRS-2. No alterations were observed in downstream signaling targets of prolactin and progesterone, suggesting that activation of the IGF-1R may directly regulate expression of IRS-1/2 during alveolar development and differentiation. These data show that IGF-1R signaling is necessary for normal alveolar proliferation and differentiation, in part, through induction of signaling intermediates that mediate alveolar development. PMID:21628386

  10. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  11. Type-1, but Not Type-5, Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors are Coupled to Polyphosphoinositide Hydrolysis in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria Rosaria; Di Menna, Luisa; Scarselli, Pamela; Mascio, Giada; Madonna, Michele; Notartomaso, Serena; Puliti, Aldamaria; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-04-01

    mGlu1 and mGlu5 metabotropic glutamate receptors are expressed in the vertebrate retina, and are co-localized in some retinal neurons. It is believed that both receptors are coupled to polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in the retina and their function may diverge in some cells because of a differential engagement of downstream signaling molecules. Here, we show that it is only the mGlu1 receptor that is coupled to PI hydrolysis in the retina. We used either bovine retinal slices or intact mouse retinas challenged with the mixed mGlu1/5 receptor agonist, DHPG. In both models, DHPG-stimulated PI hydrolysis was abrogated by the selective mGlu1 receptor antagonist, JNJ16259685, but was insensitive to the mGlu5 receptor antagonist, MPEP. In addition, the PI response to DHPG was unchanged in the retina of mGlu5(-/-) mice but was abolished in the retina of crv4 mice lacking mGlu1 receptors. Stimulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by DHPG in intact mouse retinas were also entirely mediated by mGlu1 receptors. Our data provide the first example of a tissue in which a biochemically detectable PI response is mediated by mGlu1, but not mGlu5, receptors. Hence, bovine retinal slices might be used as a model for the functional screening of mGlu1 receptor ligands. In addition, the mGlu1 receptor caters the potential as a drug target in the experimental treatment of degenerative disorders of the retina.

  12. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30{sup II}-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M.; Datta, Antara; Hiraragi, Hajime; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D. . E-mail: lairmore.1@osu.edu

    2006-10-25

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13{sup II} and p30{sup II}, which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30{sup II}, a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30{sup II} motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30{sup II}, a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30{sup II} to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30{sup II}-dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30{sup II}-mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30{sup II} modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation.

  13. Localization of the ANG II type 2 receptor in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nora, E. H.; Munzenmaier, D. H.; Hansen-Smith, F. M.; Lombard, J. H.; Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Only functional studies have suggested the presence of the ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor in the microcirculation. To determine the distribution of this receptor in the rat skeletal muscle microcirculation, a polyclonal rabbit anti-rat antiserum was developed and used for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The antiserum was prepared against a highly specific and antigenic AT2-receptor synthetic peptide and was validated by competition and sensitivity assays. Western blot analysis demonstrated a prominent, single band at approximately 40 kDa in cremaster and soleus muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a wide distribution of AT2 receptors throughout the skeletal muscle microcirculation in large and small microvessels. Microanatomic studies displayed an endothelial localization of the AT2 receptor, whereas dual labeling with smooth muscle alpha-actin also showed colocalization of the AT2 receptor with vascular smooth muscle cells. Other cells associated with the microvessels also stained positive for AT2 receptors. Briefly, this study confirms previous functional data and localizes the AT2 receptor to the microcirculation. These studies demonstrate that the AT2 receptor is present on a variety of vascular cell types and that it is situated in a fashion that would allow it to directly oppose ANG II type 1 receptor actions.

  14. Properly timed exposure to central ANG II prevents behavioral sensitization and changes in angiotensin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Santollo, Jessica; Whalen, Philip E.; Speth, Robert C.; Clark, Stewart D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) is susceptible to rapid desensitization, but that more chronic treatments that stimulate ANG II lead to sensitization of several responses. It is unclear, however, if the processes of desensitization and sensitization interact. To test for differences in AT1R expression associated with single or repeated injections of ANG II, we measured AT1R mRNA in nuclei that control fluid intake of rats given ANG II either in a single injection or divided into three injections spaced 20 min apart. Rats given a single injection of ANG II had more AT1R mRNA in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the periventricular tissue surrounding the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) than did controls. The effect was not observed, however, when the same cumulative dose of ANG II was divided into multiple injections. Behavioral tests found that single daily injections of ANG II sensitized the dipsogenic response to ANG II, but a daily regimen of four injections did not cause sensitization. Analysis of 125I-Sar1-ANG II binding revealed a paradoxical decrease in binding in the caudal AV3V and dorsal median preoptic nucleus after 5 days of single daily injections of ANG II; however, this effect was absent in rats treated for 5 days with four daily ANG II injections. Taken together, these data suggest that a desensitizing treatment regimen prevents behavior- and receptor-level effects of repeated daily ANG II. PMID:25354729

  15. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  16. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R; Eikenboom, Jeroen C; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C; Watson, Steve P; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder.

  18. Extended in vivo half-life of human soluble complement receptor type 1 fused to a serum albumin-binding receptor.

    PubMed

    Makrides, S C; Nygren, P A; Andrews, B; Ford, P J; Evans, K S; Hayman, E G; Adari, H; Uhlén, M; Toth, C A

    1996-04-01

    A new approach has been used to extend the T(1/2) of human soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) in rats. The albumin-binding domains B2A3 (BA) and B1A2B2A3 (BABA) from Streptococcal protein G were fused to the carboxyl terminus of sCR1, and the recombinant genes were expressed and amplified in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Western blot analysis and surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated the binding of rat serum albumin to both sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA but not to sCR1. The in vitro complement inhibitory activity of the fusion proteins was shown to be similar to that of sCR1, indicating that neither the albumin-binding domains nor the presence of bovine serum albumin interfere with sCR1 function. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed that the T(1/2) of the distribution phase (T(1/2alpha)) was 3.3, 20.0 and 6.0 min for sCR1, sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA, respectively. The T(1/2) of the elimination phase (T(1/2beta)) was 103, 297 and 170 min for sCR1, sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA, respectively. The plasma elimination of sCR1-BA and sCR1-BABA was significantly (P < .05) prolonged as compared to sCR1. The proteins showed similar tissue distribution; at 4-hr postdosing, the highest levels of 125I-radioactivity per gram of tissue were localized in the urine, blood, liver, stomach, and small intestine.

  19. In vitro transcription of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is RNA polymerase II dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Lenzmeier, B A; Nyborg, J K

    1997-01-01

    The HTLV-1 promoter directs RNA polymerase II transcription of viral genomic RNA in vivo. However, it has been reported that in vitro, a unique RNA polymerase, with characteristics of RNA polymerases II and III, is capable of HTLV-1 transcription (G. Piras, F. Kashanchi, M. F. Radonovich, J. F. Duvall, and J. N. Brady, J. Virol. 68:6170-6179, 1994). To further characterize the polymerase involved in HTLV-1 transcription in vitro, runoff transcription assays were performed with a variety of extracts and RNA polymerase inhibitors. Under all in vitro reaction conditions tested, RNA polymerase II appeared to be the only polymerase capable of correct transcriptional initiation from the HTLV-1 promoter. Synthesis of the specific HTLV-1 RNA transcript showed sensitivities to the RNA polymerase inhibitors tagetitoxin and alpha-amanitin that are consistent with RNA polymerase II transcription. Together, these data indicate that in vitro, as in vivo, the HTLV-1 promoter directs transcription by RNA polymerase II. PMID:9032404

  20. Enhanced purinoceptor-mediated Ca2+ signalling in L-fibroblasts overexpressing type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R J; Challiss, J; Nahorski, S R

    1999-01-01

    Mouse L-fibroblast cells stably transfected with either type 1 Ins(1, 4,5)P(3) receptor (InsP(3)R) cDNA (L15) or the vector control (Lvec) have been used to investigate the functional consequences of increased InsP(3)R density on receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling. L15 cells express approx. 8-fold higher levels of the type 1 InsP(3)R compared with Lvec cells, which endogenously express essentially only the type 1 InsP(3)R protein. Stimulation of Lvec and L15 cells with UTP or ATP increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration to a greater extent in L15 cells at all agonist concentrations. UTP and ATP were equipotent, suggestive of the presence of endogenous cell-surface metabotropic P2Y(2)-purinoceptors. In both cell clones the purinoceptors were coupled via pertussis-toxin-insensitive G-protein(s) to phospholipase C activation, resulting in similar concentration-dependent accumulations of InsP(3). Single-cell microfluorimetry revealed that overexpression of InsP(3)Rs reduced the threshold for purinoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling. L-fibroblasts also exhibited temporally complex sinusoidal cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in response to submaximal agonist concentrations, with significant increases in oscillatory frequencies exhibited by cells overexpressing InsP(3)Rs. Sustainable oscillatory responses were dependent on Ca(2+) entry and, at higher agonist concentrations, cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations were superseded by biphasic peak-and-plateau Ca(2+) responses. Overexpression of InsP(3)Rs in L15 cells resulted in a 4-fold reduction in the threshold for this change in the temporal pattern of Ca(2+) mobilization. These data provide the first direct evidence demonstrating that altering the expression of the type 1 InsP(3)R significantly affects receptor-mediated InsP(3)-induced Ca(2+) mobilization. PMID:10417348

  1. Effects of human T-lymphotropic virus type II on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 phenotypic evolution.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, P C; Hershow, R C; Lal, R B; Dezzutti, C S

    2001-08-01

    Phenotypic change and broader coreceptor usage by HIV-1 have been associated with disease progression. HIV-1 coreceptor usage by primary isolates obtained from HIV-1-infected and HIV-1/HTLV-II-coinfected individuals was determined. HIV-1 was isolated from 15 of 20 HIV-1-infected and 17 of 24 HIV-1/HTLV-II-coinfected individuals. None of the isolates from either the HIV-1-infected or the coinfected group infected CCR5delta32 PBMCs, suggesting that they all were R5-tropic. Further, both spontaneous and PHA-stimulated production of MIP-1beta and RANTES were similar in HIV-1-infected and coinfected individuals. These data indicate that coinfection with HTLV-II has no effect on HIV-1 coreceptor usage or ex vivo beta-chemokine production.

  2. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  3. Isolation and characterization of two alternatively spliced complementary DNAs encoding a Xenopus laevis angiotensin II receptor.

    PubMed

    Nishimatsu, S; Koyasu, N; Sugaya, T; Ohnishi, J; Yamagishi, T; Murakami, K; Miyazaki, H

    1994-08-02

    We have isolated two cDNAs of 1.7 and 3.0 kb, produced by alternative splicing, that encode a angiotensin II (AII) receptor from a Xenopus laevis heart cDNA library. The two clones had identical coding regions with each other and were found to belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily like the mammalian type 1 AII receptors (AT1); their amino acid sequence was 68.7% homologous with the human AT1 receptor sequence. However, there was a 1.3 kb insertion at the 3'-untranslated region of the longer clone. The insertion contained 9 repeats of an ATTTA motif, suggesting that the two mRNAs undergo distinct post-transcriptional regulation by virtue of a difference in their stability. Although the Xenopus receptor exhibited distinct specificities for AII receptor antagonists compared with mammalian AII receptors, several common characteristics, including the effect of dithiothreitol and guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), demonstrated that the cloned receptor is a counterpart of the mammalian AT1 receptor. Moreover, the cloned receptor was expressed most abundantly in the Xenopus heart, which is inconsistent with the tissue distribution of mammalian AII receptors. This indicated that the Xenopus heart, unlike that of mammals, plays a major role in the AII-dependent regulation of blood pressure and extracellular fluid volume.

  4. Serum Level of Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products Is Associated with A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 10 in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alan C. H.; Lam, Joanne K. Y.; Shiu, Sammy W. M.; Wong, Ying; Betteridge, D. John; Tan, Kathryn C. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, and soluble forms of the receptor (sRAGE) can counteract the detrimental action of the full-length receptor by acting as decoy. Soluble RAGE is produced by alternative splicing [endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE)] and/or by proteolytic cleavage of the membrane-bound receptor. We have investigated the role of A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) in the ectodomain shedding of RAGE. Methods Constitutive and insulin-induced shedding of RAGE in THP-1 macrophages by ADAM10 was evaluated using an ADAM10-specific metalloproteinase inhibitor. Serum ADAM10 level was measured in type 1 diabetes and control subjects, and the association with serum soluble RAGE was determined. Serum total sRAGE and esRAGE were assayed by ELISA and the difference between total sRAGE and esRAGE gave an estimated measure of soluble RAGE formed by cleavage (cRAGE). Results RAGE shedding (constitutive and insulin-induced) was significantly reduced after inhibition of ADAM10 in macrophages, and insulin stimulated ADAM10 expression and activity. Diabetic subjects have higher serum total sRAGE and esRAGE (p<0.01) than controls, and serum ADAM10 was also increased (p<0.01). Serum ADAM10 correlated with serum cRAGE in type 1 diabetes (r = 0.40, p<0.01) and in controls (r = 0.31. p<0.01) but no correlations were seen with esRAGE. The association remained significant after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, smoking status and HbA1c. Conclusion Our data suggested that ADAM10 contributed to the shedding of RAGE. Serum ADAM10 level was increased in type 1 diabetes and was a significant determinant of circulating cRAGE. PMID:26325204

  5. Something old, something new and something borrowed: emerging paradigm of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling regulation.

    PubMed

    Girnita, Leonard; Worrall, Claire; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Seregard, Stefan; Girnita, Ada

    2014-07-01

    The insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) plays a key role in the development and progression of cancer; however, therapeutics targeting it have had disappointing results in the clinic. As a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), IGF-1R is traditionally described as an ON/OFF system, with ligand stabilizing the ON state and exclusive kinase-dependent signaling activation. Newly added to the traditional model, ubiquitin-mediated receptor downregulation and degradation was originally described as a response to ligand/receptor interaction and thus inseparable from kinase signaling activation. Yet, the classical model has proven over-simplified and insufficient to explain experimental evidence accumulated over the last decade, including kinase-independent signaling, unbalanced signaling, or dissociation between signaling and receptor downregulation. Based on the recent findings that IGF-1R "borrows" components of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, including β-arrestins and G-protein-related kinases, we discuss the emerging paradigm for the IGF-1R as a functional RTK/GPCR hybrid, which integrates the kinase signaling with the IGF-1R canonical GPCR characteristics. The contradictions to the classical IGF-1R signaling concept as well as the design of anti-IGF-1R therapeutics treatment are considered in the light of this paradigm shift and we advocate recognition of IGF-1R as a valid target for cancer treatment.

  6. Reversal of type 1 diabetes by a new MHC II-peptide chimera: "Single-epitope-mediated suppression" to stabilize a polyclonal autoimmune T-cell process.

    PubMed

    Lin, Marvin; Stoica-Nazarov, Cristina; Surls, Jacqueline; Kehl, Margaret; Bona, Constantin; Olsen, Cara; Brumeanu, Teodor D; Casares, Sofia

    2010-08-01

    Polyclonality of self-reactive CD4(+) T cells is the hallmark of several autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes. We have previously reported that a soluble dimeric MHC II-peptide chimera prevents and reverses type 1 diabetes induced by a monoclonal diabetogenic T-cell population in double Tg mice [Casares, S. et al., Nat. Immunol. 2002. 3: 383-391]. Since most of the glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)-specific CD4(+) T cells in the NOD mouse are tolerogenic but unable to function in an autoimmune environment, we have activated a silent, monoclonal T-regulatory cell population (GAD65(217-230)-specific CD4(+) T cells) using a soluble I-A(αβ) (g7)/GAD65(217-230)/Fcγ2a dimer, and measured the effect on the ongoing polyclonal diabetogenic T-cell process. Activated GAD65(217-230)-specific T cells and a fraction of the diabetogenic (B(9-23)-specific) T cells were polarized toward the IL-10-secreting T-regulatory type 1-like function in the pancreas of diabetic NOD mice. More importantly, this led to the reversal of hyperglycemia for more than 2 months post-therapy in 80% of mice in the context of stabilization of pancreatic insulitis and improved insulin secretion by the β cells. These findings argue for the stabilization of a polyclonal self-reactive T-cell process by a single epitope-mediated bystander suppression. Dimeric MHC class II-peptide chimeras-like approach may provide rational grounds for the development of more efficient antigen-specific therapies in type 1 diabetes.

  7. Pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptors causes a prolonged symptomatic benefit in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a genetic disorder characterized by severe ataxia associated with progressive loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. The mGlu1 metabotropic glutamate receptor plays a key role in mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the cerebellum, and its dysfunction is linked to the pathophysiology of motor symptoms associated with SCA1. We used SCA1 heterozygous transgenic mice (Q154/Q2) as a model for testing the hypothesis that drugs that enhance mGlu1 receptor function may be good candidates for the medical treatment of SCA1. Results Symptomatic 30-week old SCA1 mice showed reduced mGlu1 receptor mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum. Interestingly, these mice also showed an intense expression of mGlu5 receptors in cerebellar Purkinje cells, which normally lack these receptors. Systemic treatment of SCA1 mice with the mGlu1 receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM), Ro0711401 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused a prolonged improvement of motor performance on the rotarod and the paw-print tests. A single injection of Ro0711401 improved motor symptoms for several days, and no tolerance developed to the drug. In contrast, the mGlu5 receptor PAM, VU0360172 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), caused only a short-lasting improvement of motor symptoms, whereas the mGlu1 receptor antagonist, JNJ16259685 (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), further impaired motor performance in SCA1 mice. The prolonged symptomatic benefit caused by Ro0711401 outlasted the time of drug clearance from the cerebellum, and was associated with neuroadaptive changes in the cerebellum, such as a striking reduction of the ectopically expressed mGlu5 receptors in Purkinje cells, increases in levels of total and Ser880-phosphorylated GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors, and changes in the length of spines in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. Conclusions These data demonstrate that pharmacological enhancement of mGlu1 receptors causes a robust and sustained motor improvement in SCA

  8. [Unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor detected in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 1 and hypergastrinemia].

    PubMed

    Marín-Oyaga, V; Tirado-Hospital, J L; Cuenca-Cuenca, J I; Guerrero-Vázquez, R; Luján-Rodríguez, D; Vázquez-Albertino, R

    2013-03-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) is characterized by the presence of tumors in parathyroid glands, anterior pituitary gland, endocrine pancreas and duodenum. However, other tumors may also occur. One of them is the carcinoid tumor, which in this context, is more common in the gastrointestinal tract. Less common is the presence of carcinoid tumors of bronchial origin, which with histologic confirmation, may occur in 5-8% of cases and that appears more frequently in patients with hypergastrinemia. We report a patient with MEN1 syndrome, hypergastrinemia and an incidental finding in a somatostatin receptor scintigraphy of an unsuspected bronchial carcinoid tumor that was confirmed histologically.

  9. Interrelationship of dendritic cells, type 1 interferon system, regulatory T cells and toll-like receptors and their role in lichen planus and lupus erythematosus -- a literature review.

    PubMed

    Trucci, Victoria Martina; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Figueiredo, Maria Antonia; Cherubini, Karen

    2013-10-01

    There is evidence that the activation of some receptors of the toll-like family (TLRs) of the innate immune system, and also changes in expression levels of forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) protein, which is found in regulatory T cells (Tregs), could be involved in the development of autoimmunity. We present here a literature review focusing on the interrelationship of dendritic cells, TLRs, Tregs and type 1 interferon in autoimmune diseases, with special interest in lichen planus and lupus erythematosus. Understanding the specific role of each of these factors would help elucidate the obscure aetiology of such diseases and open new perspectives for their management and treatment.

  10. The foot structure from the type 1 ryanodine receptor is required for functional coupling to store-operated channels.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Alicia; Diaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Antaramian, Anaid; Vaca, Luis

    2005-07-01

    In the present study we have explored structural determinants of the functional interaction between skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We have illustrated a functional interaction between TRPC1 channels and RyR1 for the regulation of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) initiated after releasing calcium from a caffeine-sensitive intracellular calcium pool. RNA interference experiments directed to reduce the amount of TRPC1 protein indicate that RyR1 associates to at least two different types of store-operated channels (SOCs), one dependent and one independent of TRPC1. In contrast, bradykinin-induced SOCE is completely dependent on the presence of TRPC1 protein, as we have previously illustrated. Removing the foot structure from RyR1 results in normal caffeine-induced release of calcium from internal stores but abolishes the activation of SOCE, indicating that this structure is require for functional coupling to SOCs. The footless RyR1 protein shows a different cellular localization when compared with wild type RyR1. The later protein shows a higher percentage of colocalization with FM-464, a marker of plasma membrane. The implications of the foot structure for the functional and physical coupling to TRPC and SOCs is discussed.

  11. Structural insights into transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) from homology modeling, flexible docking, and mutational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoonji; Ryu, HyungChul; Kang, Dong Wook; Lee, Jeewoo; Lazar, Jozsef; Pearce, Larry V.; Pavlyukovets, Vladimir A.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Choi, Sun

    2011-04-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel composed of four monomers with six transmembrane helices (TM1-TM6). TRPV1 is found in the central and peripheral nervous system, and it is an important therapeutic target for pain relief. We describe here the construction of a tetrameric homology model of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1). We experimentally evaluated by mutational analysis the contribution of residues of rTRPV1 contributing to ligand binding by the prototypical TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). We then performed docking analysis using our homology model. The docking results with capsaicin and RTX showed that our homology model was reliable, affording good agreement with our mutation data. Additionally, the binding mode of a simplified RTX (sRTX) ligand as predicted by the modeling agreed well with those of capsaicin and RTX, accounting for the high binding affinity of the sRTX ligand for TRPV1. Through the homology modeling, docking and mutational studies, we obtained important insights into the ligand-receptor interactions at the molecular level which should prove of value in the design of novel TRPV1 ligands.

  12. Frontrunners of T cell activation: Initial, localized Ca2+ signals mediated by NAADP and the type 1 ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Insa M A; Diercks, Björn-Philipp; Gattkowski, Ellen; Czarniak, Frederik; Kempski, Jan; Werner, René; Schetelig, Daniel; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Schumacher, Valéa; von Osten, Manuel; Lodygin, Dimitri; Flügel, Alexander; Fliegert, Ralf; Guse, Andreas H

    2015-10-13

    The activation of T cells is the fundamental on switch for the adaptive immune system. Ca(2+) signaling is essential for T cell activation and starts as initial, short-lived, localized Ca(2+) signals. The second messenger nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) forms rapidly upon T cell activation and stimulates early Ca(2+) signaling. We developed a high-resolution imaging technique using multiple fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes to characterize these early signaling events and investigate the channels involved in NAADP-dependent Ca(2+) signals. In the first seconds of activation of either primary murine T cells or human Jurkat cells with beads coated with an antibody against CD3, we detected Ca(2+) signals with diameters close to the limit of detection and that were close to the activation site at the plasma membrane. In Jurkat cells in which the ryanodine receptor (RyR) was knocked down or in primary T cells from RyR1(-/-) mice, either these early Ca(2+) signals were not detected or the number of signals was markedly reduced. Local Ca(2+) signals observed within 20 ms upon microinjection of Jurkat cells with NAADP were also sensitive to RyR knockdown. In contrast, TRPM2 (transient receptor potential channel, subtype melastatin 2), a potential NAADP target channel, was not required for the formation of initial Ca(2+) signals in primary T cells. Thus, through our high-resolution imaging method, we characterized early Ca(2+) release events in T cells and obtained evidence for the involvement of RyR and NAADP in such signals.

  13. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor Type 1 (LPA1) Plays a Functional Role in Osteoclast Differentiation and Bone Resorption Activity*

    PubMed Central

    David, Marion; Machuca-Gayet, Irma; Kikuta, Junichi; Ottewell, Penelope; Mima, Fuka; Leblanc, Raphael; Bonnelye, Edith; Ribeiro, Johnny; Holen, Ingunn; Vales, Rùben Lopez; Jurdic, Pierre; Chun, Jerold; Clézardin, Philippe; Ishii, Masaru; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a natural bioactive lipid that acts through six different G protein-coupled receptors (LPA1–6) with pleiotropic activities on multiple cell types. We have previously demonstrated that LPA is necessary for successful in vitro osteoclastogenesis of bone marrow cells. Bone cells controlling bone remodeling (i.e. osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes) express LPA1, but delineating the role of this receptor in bone remodeling is still pending. Despite Lpar1−/− mice displaying a low bone mass phenotype, we demonstrated that bone marrow cell-induced osteoclastogenesis was reduced in Lpar1−/− mice but not in Lpar2−/− and Lpar3−/− animals. Expression of LPA1 was up-regulated during osteoclastogenesis, and LPA1 antagonists (Ki16425, Debio0719, and VPC12249) inhibited osteoclast differentiation. Blocking LPA1 activity with Ki16425 inhibited expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cell cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein and interfered with the fusion but not the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. Similar to wild type osteoclasts treated with Ki16425, mature Lpar1−/− osteoclasts had reduced podosome belt and sealing zone resulting in reduced mineralized matrix resorption. Additionally, LPA1 expression markedly increased in the bone of ovariectomized mice, which was blocked by bisphosphonate treatment. Conversely, systemic treatment with Debio0719 prevented ovariectomy-induced cancellous bone loss. Moreover, intravital multiphoton microscopy revealed that Debio0719 reduced the retention of CX3CR1-EGFP+ osteoclast precursors in bone by increasing their mobility in the bone marrow cavity. Overall, our results demonstrate that LPA1 is essential for in vitro and in vivo osteoclast activities. Therefore, LPA1 emerges as a new target for the treatment of diseases associated with excess bone loss. PMID:24429286

  14. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage.

    PubMed

    Villapol, Sonia; Balarezo, María G; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2015-11-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article.Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan's blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking and

  15. Neurorestoration after traumatic brain injury through angiotensin II receptor blockage

    PubMed Central

    Balarezo, María G.; Affram, Kwame; Saavedra, Juan M.; Symes, Aviva J.

    2015-01-01

    See Moon (doi:10.1093/awv239) for a scientific commentary on this article. Traumatic brain injury frequently leads to long-term cognitive problems and physical disability yet remains without effective therapeutics. Traumatic brain injury results in neuronal injury and death, acute and prolonged inflammation and decreased blood flow. Drugs that block angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R, encoded by AGTR1) (ARBs or sartans) are strongly neuroprotective, neurorestorative and anti-inflammatory. To test whether these drugs may be effective in treating traumatic brain injury, we selected two sartans, candesartan and telmisartan, of proven therapeutic efficacy in animal models of brain inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders and stroke. Using a validated mouse model of controlled cortical impact injury, we determined effective doses for candesartan and telmisartan, their therapeutic window, mechanisms of action and effect on cognition and motor performance. Both candesartan and telmisartan ameliorated controlled cortical impact-induced injury with a therapeutic window up to 6 h at doses that did not affect blood pressure. Both drugs decreased lesion volume, neuronal injury and apoptosis, astrogliosis, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory signalling, and protected cerebral blood flow, when determined 1 to 3 days post-injury. Controlled cortical impact-induced cognitive impairment was ameliorated 30 days after injury only by candesartan. The neurorestorative effects of candesartan and telmisartan were reduced by concomitant administration of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, encoded by PPARG) antagonist T0070907, showing the importance of PPARγ activation for the neurorestorative effect of these sartans. AT1R knockout mice were less vulnerable to controlled cortical impact-induced injury suggesting that the sartan’s blockade of the AT1R also contributes to their efficacy. This study strongly suggests that sartans with dual AT1R blocking

  16. One week treatment with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra leads to a sustained improvement in insulin sensitivity in insulin resistant patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    van Asseldonk, Edwin J P; van Poppel, Pleun C M; Ballak, Dov B; Stienstra, Rinke; Netea, Mihai G; Tack, Cees J

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation associated with obesity is involved in the development of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that anti-inflammatory treatment with the Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra would improve insulin sensitivity. In an open label proof-of-concept study, we included overweight patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes with an HbA1c level over 7.5%. Selecting insulin resistant patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes allowed us to study the effects of anakinra on insulin sensitivity. Patients were treated with 100mg anakinra daily for one week. Insulin sensitivity, insulin need and blood glucose profiles were measured before, after one week and after four weeks of follow-up. Fourteen patients completed the study. One week of anakinra treatment led to an improvement of insulin sensitivity, an effect that was sustained for four weeks. Similarly, glucose profiles, HbA1c levels and insulin needs improved. In conclusion, one week of treatment with anakinra improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  17. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  18. Mapping sites of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D that permit insertions and impact gD and gB receptors usage

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qing; Kopp, Sarah; Connolly, Sarah A.; Muller, William J.; Longnecker, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of four glycoproteins essential for HSV entry and cell fusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the plasticity of gD to tolerate insertion or deletion mutations and to construct an oncolytic HSV-1 that utilizes the disialoganglioside GD2 as a HSV-1 entry receptor. We found that the N-terminus of gD tolerates long insertions, whereas residues adjacent to the gD Ig-like V-type core tolerated shorter insertions (up to 15 amino acids), but not greater than 60 amino acids. Recombinant HSV-1 containing the ch14.18 single chain variable fragment (scFv) at the N-terminus of gD failed to mediate entry, even though the ch14.18 scFv-gD chimera Fc bound to neuroblastoma cells expressing GD2. Finally, we found that hyperfusogenic gB mutants enhanced fusion to a greater degree with the gB receptor the paired immunoglobulin-like type 2 receptor alpha (PILRα) than with gD receptors HVEM and nectin-1. Hyperfusogenic gB could restore the fusion function with PILRα when a gD constructed contained only the “profusion domain” (PFD), suggesting the hyperfusogenic form of gB may regulate fusion of PILRα via a novel mechanism through gH/gL and the gD PFD. PMID:28255168

  19. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  20. Alternate receptor usage of neuropilin-1 and glucose transporter protein 1 by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Qingwen; Alkhatib, Bashar; Cornetta, Kenneth; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2010-01-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that neuropilin 1 (NP-1) is involved in HTLV-1 entry; however, the role NP-1 plays in this process is not understood. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of human NP-1 but not NP-2 cDNA increased susceptibility to HTLV-1. SiRNA-mediated inhibition of NP-1 expression correlated with significant reduction of HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF{sub 165}) caused downmodulation of surface NP-1 and inhibited HTLV-1 infection of U87 cells. In contrast, VEGF{sub 165} partially inhibited infection of primary astrocytes and had no significant effect on infection of HeLa cells. VEGF{sub 165} and antibodies to the glucose transporter protein 1 (anti-GLUT-1) were both needed to block infection of primary astrocytes, however, only anti-GLUT-1 antibodies were sufficient to block infection of HeLa cells. HTLV-1 Env forms complexes with both NP-1 and GLUT-1 in primary human astrocytes. The alternate usage of these two cellular receptors may have important implications regarding HTLV-1 neuro-tropism.

  1. Linagliptin blocks renal damage in type 1 diabetic rats by suppressing advanced glycation end products-receptor axis.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, S; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S-I

    2014-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) play a role in diabetic nephropathy. We have recently found that linagliptin, an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) suppresses the AGE-induced oxidative stress generation and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) gene expression in endothelial cells. However, whether linagliptin could have beneficial effects on experimental diabetic nephropathy in a glucose-lowering independent manner remains unknown. To address the issue, this study examined the effects of linagliptin on renal damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Serum levels of DPP-4 were significantly elevated in diabetic rats compared with control rats. Although linagliptin treatment for 2 weeks did not improve hyperglycemia in diabetic rats, linagliptin significantly reduced AGEs levels, RAGE gene expression, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic rats. Furthermore, linagliptin significantly reduced albuminuria, renal ICAM-1 mRNA levels, and lymphocyte infiltration into the glomeruli of diabetic rats. Our present study suggests that linagliptin could exert beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy partly by blocking the AGE-RAGE-evoked oxidative stress generation in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Inhibition of DPP-4 by linagliptin might be a promising strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 (PAC1) receptor is expressed during embryonic development of the earthworm.

    PubMed

    Boros, Akos; Somogyi, Ildikó; Engelmann, Péter; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dóra; Pollák, Edit; Molnár, László

    2010-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)-like molecules have been shown to be present in cocoon albumin and in Eisenia fetida embryos at an early developmental stage (E1) by immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay. Here, we focus on detecting the stage at which PAC1 receptor (PAC1R)-like immunoreactivity first appears in germinal layers and structures, e.g., various parts of the central nervous system (CNS), in developing earthworm embryos. PAC1R-like immunoreactivity was revealed by Western blot and Far Western blot as early as the E2 developmental stage, occurring in the ectoderm and later in specific neurons of the developing CNS. Labeled CNS neurons were first seen in the supraesophageal ganglion (brain) and subsequently in the subesophageal and ventral nerve cord ganglia. Ultrastructurally, PAC1Rs were located mainly on plasma membranes and intracellular membranes, especially on cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, PACAP-like compounds probably influence the differentiation of germinal layers (at least the ectoderm) and of some neurons and might act as signaling molecules during earthworm embryonic development.

  3. Myometrial angiotensin II receptor subtypes change during ovine pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B E; Ipson, M A; Shaul, P W; Kamm, K E; Rosenfeld, C R

    1993-01-01

    Although regulation of angiotensin II receptor (AT) binding in vascular and uterine smooth muscle is similar in nonpregnant animals, studies suggest it may differ during pregnancy. We, therefore, examined binding characteristics of myometrial AT receptors in nulliparous (n = 7), pregnant (n = 24, 110-139 d of gestation), and postpartum (n = 21, 5 to > or = 130 d) sheep and compared this to vascular receptor binding. We also determined if changes in myometrial binding reflect alterations in receptor subtype. By using plasma membrane preparations from myometrium and medial layer of abdominal aorta, we determined receptor density and affinity employing radioligand binding; myometrial AT receptor subtypes were assessed by inhibiting [125I]-ANG II binding with subtype-specific antagonists. Compared to nulliparous ewes, myometrial AT receptor density fell approximately 90% during pregnancy (1,486 +/- 167 vs. 130 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein) and returned to nulliparous values > or = 4 wk postpartum; vascular binding was unchanged. Nulliparous myometrium expressed predominantly AT2 receptors (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%), whereas AT1 receptors predominated during pregnancy (AT1/AT2 congruent to 80%/20%). By 5 d postpartum AT1/AT2 congruent to 40%/60%, and > 4 wk postpartum AT2 receptors again predominated (AT1/AT2 congruent to 15%/85%). In studies of ANG II-induced force generation, myometrium from pregnant ewes (n = 10) demonstrated dose-dependent increases in force (P < 0.001), which were inhibited with an AT1 receptor antagonist. Postpartum myometrial responses were less at doses > or = 10(-9) M (P < 0.05) and unaffected by AT2 receptor antagonists. Vascular and myometrial AT receptor binding are differentially regulated during ovine pregnancy, the latter primarily reflecting decreases in AT2 receptor expression. This is the first description of reversible changes in AT receptor subtype in adult mammals. PMID:8227339

  4. Oxidative DNA Damage in Kidneys and Heart of Hypertensive Mice Is Prevented by Blocking Angiotensin II and Aldosterone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Susanne; Amann, Kerstin; Mandel, Philipp; Zimnol, Anna; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recently, we could show that angiotensin II, the reactive peptide of the blood pressure-regulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system, causes the formation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in kidneys and hearts of hypertensive mice. To further investigate on the one hand the mechanism of DNA damage caused by angiotensin II, and on the other hand possible intervention strategies against end-organ damage, the effects of substances interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system on angiotensin II-induced genomic damage were studied. Methods In C57BL/6-mice, hypertension was induced by infusion of 600 ng/kg • min angiotensin II. The animals were additionally treated with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker eplerenone and the antioxidant tempol. DNA damage and the activation of transcription factors were studied by immunohistochemistry and protein expression analysis. Results Administration of angiotensin II led to a significant increase of blood pressure, decreased only by candesartan. In kidneys and hearts of angiotensin II-treated animals, significant oxidative stress could be detected (1.5-fold over control). The redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB were activated in the kidney by angiotensin II-treatment (4- and 3-fold over control, respectively) and reduced by all interventions. In kidneys and hearts an increase of DNA damage (3- and 2-fold over control, respectively) and of DNA repair (3-fold over control) was found. These effects were ameliorated by all interventions in both organs. Consistently, candesartan and tempol were more effective than eplerenone. Conclusion Angiotensin II-induced DNA damage is caused by angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated formation of oxidative stress in vivo. The angiotensin II-mediated physiological increase of aldosterone adds to the DNA-damaging effects. Blocking angiotensin II and mineralocorticoid receptors therefore

  5. Silencing of the scavenger receptor (Class B - Type 1) gene using siRNA-loaded chitosan nanaoparticles in a HepG2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Farid, Mariane M; Hathout, Rania M; Fawzy, Mahmoud; Abou-Aisha, Khaled

    2014-11-01

    Gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) has gained increasing interest through the past few decades. However, the partial negative charge and the susceptibility to degradation by nucleases have hampered its use in a naked form. In this study, we investigated the use of chitosan nanoparticles as non-viral delivery carriers of siRNA. As a model target, we selected the scavenger receptor (SR-B1), due to its proposed involvement in hepatitis C virus (HCV) internalization. Low molecular weight (LMW) chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by simple ionic gelation using sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a cross-linking agent; a fixed chitosan and TPP concentration of 0.1% was used, and a chitosan to TPP weight ratios of 3:1, 5:1, and 9:1 were investigated. Nanoparticle uptake efficiency was measured using FITC-labeled chitosan nanoparticles and silencing of scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) in HepG2 cell line was tested using Western blot analysis. Nanoparticles produced were spherical in shape with an optimum particle size and distribution. The uptake of FITC-labeled nanoparticles by HepG2 cells was found to be both concentration and time dependent. Furthermore, Western Blot analysis showed that SR-B1 siRNA was able to silence the scavenger receptor for up to 96 h of incubation with HepG2 cells.

  6. Orexin-A regulates cell apoptosis in human H295R adrenocortical cells via orexin receptor type 1 through the AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaocen; Zhao, Yuyan; Ju, Shujing; Guo, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the ability of orexin-A to regulate adrenocortical cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. In the present study, human H295R adrenocortical cells were exposed to orexin‑A (10‑10-10‑6 M), with orexin receptor type 1 (OX1 receptor) antagonist SB334867 or AKT antagonist PF‑04691502. It was found that orexin‑A stimulated H295R cell proliferation, reduced the pro‑apoptotic activity of caspase‑3 to protect against apoptotic cell death and increased cortisol secretion. Furthermore, phospho‑AKT protein was increased by orexin‑A. SB334867 (10‑6 M) and PF‑04691502 (10‑6 M) abolished the effects of orexin‑A (10‑6 M). These results suggested that the orexin‑A/OX1 receptor axis has a significant pro-survival function in adrenal cells, which is mediated by AKT activation. Further studies investigating the effects of orexin-A-upregulation may further elucidate the diverse biological effects of orexin-A in adrenal cells.

  7. Tissue-specific up-regulation of arginase I and II induced by p38 MAPK mediates endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pernow, J; Kiss, A; Tratsiakovich, Y; Climent, B

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Emerging evidence suggests a selective up-regulation of arginase I in diabetes causing coronary artery disease; however, the mechanisms behind this up-regulation are still unknown. Activated p38 MAPK has been reported to increase arginase II in various cardiovascular diseases. We therefore tested the role of p38 MAPK in the regulation of arginase I and II expression and its effect on endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Experimental Approach Endothelial function was determined in septal coronary (SCA), left anterior descending coronary (LAD) and mesenteric (MA) arteries from healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar rats by wire myographs. Arginase activity and protein levels of arginase I, II, phospho-p38 MAPK and phospho-endothelial NOS (eNOS) (Ser1177) were determined in these arteries from diabetic and healthy rats treated with a p38 MAPK inhibitor in vivo. Key Results Diabetic SCA and MA displayed impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, which was prevented by arginase and p38 MAPK inhibition while LAD relaxation was not affected. Arginase I, phospho-p38 MAPK and eNOS protein expression was increased in diabetic coronary arteries. In diabetic MA, however, increased expression of arginase II and phospho-p38 MAPK, increased arginase activity and decreased expression of eNOS were observed. All these effects were reversed by p38 MAPK inhibition. Conclusions and Implications Diabetes-induced activation of p38 MAPK causes endothelial dysfunction via selective up-regulation of arginase I expression in coronary arteries and arginase II expression in MA. Therefore, regional differences appear to exist in the arginase isoforms contributing to endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26140333

  8. CA150, a nuclear protein associated with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme, is involved in Tat-activated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Suñé, C; Hayashi, T; Liu, Y; Lane, W S; Young, R A; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    Maximal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression requires specific cellular factors in addition to the virus-encoded trans-activator protein Tat and the RNA element TAR. We developed a functional assay, based on transcriptional activation in vitro, to identify these cellular factors. Here, we describe the purification and molecular cloning of CA150, a nuclear protein that is associated with the human RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and is involved in Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional activation. The sequence of CA150 contains an extensive glutamine- and alanine-rich repeat that is found in transcriptional modulators such as GAL11 and SSN6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zeste in Drosophila melanogaster. Immunodepletion of CA150 abolished Tat trans activation in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of a mutant CA150 protein specifically and dramatically decreased Tat-mediated activation of the HIV-1 promoter in vivo, strongly suggesting a role for CA150 in HIV-1 gene regulation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that both CA150 and Tat associate with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Furthermore, we found that functional Tat associates with the holoenzyme whereas activation-deficient Tat mutants do not. Thus, we propose that Tat action is transduced via an RNA polymerase II holoenzyme that contains CA150. PMID:9315662

  9. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacts with c-Maf to promote the differentiation of type 1 regulatory T cells induced by IL-27.

    PubMed

    Apetoh, Lionel; Quintana, Francisco J; Pot, Caroline; Joller, Nicole; Xiao, Sheng; Kumar, Deepak; Burns, Evan J; Sherr, David H; Weiner, Howard L; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2010-09-01

    Type 1 regulatory T cells (Tr1 cells ) that produce interleukin 10 (IL-10) are instrumental in the prevention of tissue inflammation, autoimmunity and graft-versus-host disease. The transcription factor c-Maf is essential for the induction of IL-10 by Tr1 cells, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of these cells remain unclear. Here we show that the ligand-activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which was induced by IL-27, acted in synergy with c-Maf to promote the development of Tr1 cells. After T cell activation under Tr1-skewing conditions, the AhR bound to c-Maf and promoted transactivation of the Il10 and Il21 promoters, which resulted in the generation of Tr1 cells and the amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Manipulating AhR signaling could therefore be beneficial in the resolution of excessive inflammatory responses.

  10. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation of the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene in two siblings with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Li, Haibo; Xiang, Jingjing; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Qin; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Minjuan; Sun, Miao; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the aetiology of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) in two Chinese siblings with typical CIPA symptoms including insensitivity to pain, inability to sweat, and self-mutilating behaviours. Methods Clinical examination and genetic testing were conducted of all available family members, and the findings were used to create a pedigree. Mutation screening using PCR amplification and DNA Sanger sequencing of the entire neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 gene ( NTRK1) including intron-exon boundaries was used to identify mutations associated with CIPA. Results A novel nonsense mutation (c.7C > T, p. Arg3Ter) and a known splice-site mutation (c.851-33 T > A) were detected in NTRK1 and shown to be associated with CIPA. Conclusion Our findings expand the known mutation spectrum of NTRK1 and provide insights into the aetiology of CIPA.

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 gene variants at position 1858 are associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in Estonian population.

    PubMed

    Douroudis, K; Prans, E; Haller, K; Nemvalts, V; Rajasalu, T; Tillmann, V; Kisand, K; Uibo, R

    2008-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is considered an important regulator of T-cell activation. Polymorphisms within the PTPN22 gene have been suggested to confer susceptibility to autoimmune endocrine disorders. To evaluate the impact of a functional variation in the PTPN22 gene in type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the PTPN22 C1858T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was studied in the population of Estonian origin, including 170 T1D patients, 244 T2D patients and 230 controls. Using two methods for PTPN22 C1858T detection in parallel, we found that not only T1D but also T2D is associated with the PTPN22 1858T allele. The role of PTPN22 gene in the pathogenesis of T2D is yet unclear and needs further investigation.

  12. Malignant hyperthermia and the clinical significance of type-1 ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) variants: proceedings of the 2013 MHAUS Scientific Conference.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Sheila; Kraeva, Natalia; Muldoon, Sheila M; Dowling, James; Ho, Clara; Petre, Maria-Alexandra; Parness, Jerome; Dirksen, Robert T; Rosenberg, Henry

    2014-11-01

    The Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States and the Department of Anesthesia at the University of Toronto sponsored a Scientific Conference on November 1-2, 2013 in Toronto, ON, Canada. The multidisciplinary group of experts, including clinicians, geneticists, and physiologists involved in research related to malignant hyperthermia (MH), shared new insights into the pathophysiology of diseases linked to the type-1 ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) as well as the relationship between MH and "awake MH" conditions, such as exertional rhabdomyolysis and exertional heat illness. In addition, the molecular genetics of MH and clinical issues related to the diagnosis and management of disorders linked to RYR1 were presented. The conference also honoured Dr. David H. MacLennan for his contributions to our understanding of the genetics, pathogenesis, and treatment of MH and other RYR1-related myopathies. This report represents a summary of the proceedings of this conference.

  13. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the second extracellular loop of type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor revealed residues critical for peptide binding.

    PubMed

    Gkountelias, Kostas; Tselios, Theodoros; Venihaki, Maria; Deraos, George; Lazaridis, Iakovos; Rassouli, Olga; Gravanis, Achille; Liapakis, George

    2009-04-01

    Upon binding of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) analog sauvagine to the type 1 CRF receptor (CRF(1)), the amino-terminal portion of the peptide has been shown to lie near Lys257 in the receptor's second extracellular loop (EL2). To test the hypothesis that EL2 residues play a role in the binding of sauvagine to CRF(1) we carried out an alanine-scanning mutagenesis study to determine the functional role of EL2 residues (Leu251 to Val266). Only the W259A, F260A, and W259A/F260A mutations reduced the binding affinity and potency of sauvagine. In contrast, these mutations did not seem to significantly alter the overall receptor conformation, in that they left unchanged the affinities of the ligands astressin and antalarmin that have been suggested to bind to different regions of CRF(1). The W259A, F260A, and W259A/F260A mutations also decreased the affinity of the endogenous ligand, CRF, implying that these residues may play a common important role in the binding of different peptides belonging to CRF family. Parallel amino acid deletions of the two peptides produced ligands with various affinities for wild-type CRF(1) compared with the W259A, F260A, and W259A/F260A mutants, supporting the interaction between the amino-terminal residues 8 to 10 of sauvagine and the corresponding region in CRF with EL2 of CRF(1). This is the first time that a specific region of CRF(1) has been implicated in detailed interactions between the receptor and the amino-terminal portion of peptides belonging to the CRF family.

  14. Structure-activity relationship for noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyl congeners toward the ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ channel complex type 1 (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Pessah, Isaac N; Hansen, Larry G; Albertson, Timothy E; Garner, C Edwin; Ta, Tram Anh; Do, Zung; Kim, Kyung Ho; Wong, Patty W

    2006-01-01

    Ryanodine receptor isoforms are expressed in both excitable and nonexcitable tissues where they form microsomal Ca2+ release channels broadly involved in shaping cellular signaling. In this report, we provide a detailed structure-activity relationship (SAR) for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and metabolites necessary for enhancing ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) activity using [3H]ryanodine ([3H]Ry) binding analysis. The 2,3,6-Cl PCB configuration is most important for optimal recognition by the RyR1 complex and/or critical for sensitizing its activation. Para substitution(s) diminishes the activity with para-chloro having a higher potency than the corresponding para-hydroxy derivative. The addition of a more bulky para-methyl-sulfonyl group eliminates the activity toward RyR1, supporting the importance of the para positions in binding RyR1. The requirement for an intact major T cell immunophilin FKBP12-RyR1 complex was observed with each of 12 active PCB congeners indicating a common mechanism requiring an immunophilin-regulated Ca2+ release channel. An excellent correlation between the relative potencies for doubling [3H]Ry binding and the corresponding initial rates of PCB-induced Ca2+ efflux indicates that [3H]Ry binding analysis provides a measure of dysregulation of microsomal Ca2+ transport. The SAR for activating RyR1 is consistent with those previously reported in several in vivo and in vitro studies, suggesting that a common mechanism may contribute to the toxicity of noncoplanar PCBs. A practical application of the receptor-based screen developed here with RyR1 is that it provides a quantitative SAR that may be useful in predicting biological activity and risk of mixtures containing noncoplanar PCB congeners that have low or a lack of aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity.

  15. Role of Mas receptor antagonist (A779) in renal hemodynamics in condition of blocked angiotensin II receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, A; Oryan, S; Nematbakhsh, M

    2016-03-01

    The vasodilatory effect of angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) is exerted in the vascular bed via Mas receptor (MasR) gender dependently. However, the crosstalk between MasR and angiotensin II (Ang II) types 1 and 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) may change some actions of Ang 1-7 in renal circulation. In this study by blocking AT1R and AT2R, the role of MasR in kidney hemodynamics was described. In anaesthetized male and female Wistar rats, the effects of saline as vehicle and MasR blockade (A779) were tested on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal perfusion pressure (RPP), renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR) when both AT1R and AT2R were blocked by losartan and PD123319, respectively. In male rats, when AT1R and AT2R were blocked, there was a tendency for the increase in RBF/wet kidney tissue weight (RBF/KW) to be elevated by A779 as compared with the vehicle (P=0.08), and this was not the case in female rats. The impact of MasR on renal hemodynamics appears not to be sexual dimorphism either when Ang II receptors were blocked. It seems that co-blockade of all AT1R, AT2R, and MasR may alter RBF/ KW in male more than in female rats. These findings support a crosstalk between MasR and Ang II receptors in renal circulation.

  16. Cannabinoid type 1 and type 2 receptor antagonists prevent attenuation of serotonin-induced reflex apneas by dronabinol in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Calik, Michael W; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in Americans is 9% and increasing. Increased afferent vagal activation may predispose to OSA by reducing upper airway muscle activation/patency and disrupting respiratory rhythmogenesis. Vagal afferent neurons are inhibited by cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors in animal models of vagally-mediated behaviors. Injections of dronabinol, a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, into the nodose ganglia reduced serotonin (5-HT)-induced reflex apneas. It is unknown what role CB1 and/or CB2 receptors play in reflex apnea. Here, to determine the independent and combined effects of activating CB1 and/or CB2 receptors on dronabinol's attenuating effect, rats were pre-treated with CB1 (AM251) and/or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, instrumented with bilateral electrodes to monitor genioglossus electromyogram (EMGgg) and a piezoelectric strain gauge to monitor respiratory pattern. Following intraperitoneal treatment with AM251 and/or AM630, or with vehicle, serotonin was intravenously infused into a femoral vein to induce reflex apnea. After baseline recordings, the nodose ganglia were exposed and 5-HT-induced reflex apneas were again recorded to confirm that the nerves remained functionally intact. Dronabinol was injected into each nodose ganglion and 5-HT infusion was repeated. Prior to dronabinol injection, there were no significant differences in 5-HT-induced reflex apneas or phasic and tonic EMGgg before or after surgery in the CB1, CB2, combined CB1/CB2 antagonist, and vehicle groups. In the vehicle group, dronabinol injections reduced 5-HT-induced reflex apnea duration. In contrast, dronabinol injections into nodose ganglia of the CB1, CB2, and combined CB1/CB2 groups did not attenuate 5-HT-induced reflex apnea duration. However, the CB1 and CB2 antagonists had no effect on dronabinol's ability to increase phasic EMGgg. These findings underscore

  17. Repeated Low-Dose Administration of the Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibitor JZL184 Retains Cannabinoid Receptor Type 1–Mediated Antinociceptive and Gastroprotective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Wise, Laura E.; Ramesh, Divya; Abdullah, Rehab; Selley, Dana E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2013-01-01

    The monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitor 4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184) produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. However, repeated administration of high-dose JZL184 (40 mg/kg) causes dependence, antinociceptive tolerance, cross-tolerance to the pharmacological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists, and cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) downregulation and desensitization. This functional CB1 receptor tolerance poses a hurdle in the development of MAGL inhibitors for therapeutic use. Consequently, the present study tested whether repeated administration of low-dose JZL184 maintains its antinociceptive actions in the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve neuropathic pain model and protective effects in a model of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug–induced gastric hemorrhages. Mice given daily injections of high-dose JZL184 (≥16 mg/kg) for 6 days displayed decreased CB1 receptor density and function in the brain, as assessed in [3H]SR141716A binding and CP55,940 [(−)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexanol]-stimulated guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding assays, respectively. In contrast, normal CB1 receptor expression and function were maintained following repeated administration of low-dose JZL184 (≤8 mg/kg). Likewise, the antinociceptive and gastroprotective effects of high-dose JZL184 underwent tolerance following repeated administration, but these effects were maintained following repeated low-dose JZL184 treatment. Consistent with these observations, repeated high-dose JZL184, but not repeated low-dose JZL184, elicited cross-tolerance to the common pharmacological effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. This same pattern of effects was found in a rimonabant [(5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide)]-precipitated withdrawal model of cannabinoid

  18. Augmented cocaine seeking in response to stress or CRF delivered into the ventral tegmental area following long-access self-administration is mediated by CRF receptor type 1 but not CRF receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Blacktop, Jordan M; Seubert, Chad; Baker, David A; Ferda, Nathan; Lee, Geng; Graf, Evan N; Mantsch, John R

    2011-08-03

    Stressful events are determinants of relapse in recovering cocaine addicts. Excessive cocaine use may increase susceptibility to stressor-induced relapse through alterations in brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) regulation of neurocircuitry involved in drug seeking. We previously reported that the reinstatement of cocaine seeking by a stressor (footshock) is CRF dependent and is augmented in rats that self-administered cocaine under long-access (LgA; 6 h daily) conditions for 14 d when compared with rats provided shorter daily cocaine access [short access (ShA) rats; 2 h daily]. Further, we have demonstrated that reinstatement in response to intracerebroventricular CRF administration is heightened in LgA rats. This study examined the role of altered ventral tegmental area (VTA) responsiveness to CRF in intake-dependent increases in CRF- and stress-induced cocaine seeking. Bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF (250 or 500 ng/side) produced reinstatement in LgA but not ShA rats. In LgA rats, intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement was blocked by administration of the CRF-receptor type 1 (CRF-R1) antagonist antalarmin (500 ng/side) or CP-376395 (500 ng/side), but not the CRF-R2 antagonist astressin-2B (500 ng or 1 μg/side) or antisauvagine-30 (ASV-30; 500 ng/side) into the VTA. Likewise, intra-VTA antalarmin, but not astressin-2B, blocked footshock-induced reinstatement in LgA rats. By contrast, neither intra-VTA antalarmin nor CP-376395 altered food-reinforced lever pressing. Intra-VTA injection of the CRF-R1-selective agonist cortagine (100 ng/side) but not the CRF-R2-selective agonist rat urocortin II (rUCN II; 250 ng/side) produced reinstatement. These findings reveal that excessive cocaine use increases susceptibility to stressor-induced relapse in part by augmenting CRF-R1-dependent regulation of addiction-related neurocircuitry in the VTA.

  19. Ubiquitination of the peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 receptor, Pex5p, suggests the presence of a quality control mechanism during peroxisomal matrix protein import.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Jan A K W; Emmrich, Kerstin; Meyer, Helmut E; Kunau, Wolf-H

    2005-01-21

    PEX genes encode proteins (peroxins) that are required for the biogenesis of peroxisomes. One of these peroxins, Pex5p, is the receptor for matrix proteins with a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1), which shuttles newly synthesized proteins from the cytosol into the peroxisome matrix. We observed that in various Saccharomyces cerevisiae pex mutants disturbed in the early stages of PTS1 import, the steady-state levels of Pex5p are enhanced relative to wild type controls. Furthermore, we identified ubiquitinated forms of Pex5p in deletion mutants of those PEX genes that have been implicated in recycling of Pex5p from the peroxisomal membrane into the cytosol. Pex5p ubiquitination required the presence of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4p and the peroxins that are required during early stages of PTS1 protein import. Finally, we provide evidence that the proteasome is involved in the turnover of Pex5p in wild type yeast cells, a process that requires Ubc4p and occurs at the peroxisomal membrane. Our data suggest that during receptor recycling a portion of Pex5p becomes ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. We propose that this process represents a conserved quality control mechanism in peroxisome biogenesis.

  20. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    PubMed

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-07

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses.

  1. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) CD4 receptor and its central role in promotion of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bour, S; Geleziunas, R; Wainberg, M A

    1995-01-01

    Interactions between the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 and the cell surface receptor CD4 are responsible for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into host cells in the vast majority of cases. HIV-1 replication is commonly followed by the disappearance or receptor downmodulation of cell surface CD4. This potentially renders cells nonsusceptible to subsequent infection by HIV-1, as well as by other viruses that use CD4 as a portal of entry. Disappearance of CD4 from the cell surface is mediated by several different viral proteins that act at various stages through the course of the viral life cycle, and it occurs in T-cell lines, peripheral blood CD4+ lymphocytes, and monocytes of both primary and cell line origin. At the cell surface, gp120 itself and in the form of antigen-antibody complexes can trigger cellular pathways leading to CD4 internalization. Intracellularly, the mechanisms leading to CD4 downmodulation by HIV-1 are multiple and complex; these include degradation of CD4 by Vpu, formation of intracellular complexes between CD4 and the envelope precursor gp160, and internalization by the Nef protein. Each of the above doubtless contributes to the ultimate depletion of cell surface CD4, although the relative contribution of each mechanism and the manner in which they interact remain to be definitively established. PMID:7708013

  2. Chronic psychosocial stress in male mice causes an up-regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein in the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Reber, Stefan O

    2013-07-01

    Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) show an exaggerated adrenal corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (elevated platform (EPF), 5 min) despite no difference from EPF-exposed single-housed control (SHC) mice in corticotropin (ACTH) secretion. In the present study, we asked the question whether this CSC-induced increase in adrenal capability to produce and secrete corticosterone is paralleled by an enhanced adrenal availability and/or mobilization capacity of the corticosterone precursor molecule cholesterol. Employing oil-red staining and western blot analysis we revealed comparable relative density of cortical lipid droplets and relative protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) between CSC and SHC mice. However, relative protein expression of the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) was increased following CSC exposure. Moreover, analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) revealed increased LDL-C levels in CSC mice. Together with the pronounced increase in adrenal weight, evidently mediated by hyperplasia of adrenocortical cells, these data strongly indicate an enhanced adrenal availability of and capacity to mobilize cholesterol in chronic psychosocially-stressed mice, contributing to their increased in vivo corticosterone response during acute heterotypic stressor exposure.

  3. Exclusion of the locus for autosomal recessive pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 from the mineralocorticoid receptor gene region on human chromosome 4q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E.; Hanukoglu, A.; Rees, M.; Thompson, R.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1995-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA1) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by salt-wasting in infancy arising from target organ unresponsiveness to mineralocorticoids. Clinical expression of the disease varies from severely affected infants who may die to apparently asymptomatic individuals. Inheritance is Mendelian and may be either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive. A defect in the mineralocortiocoid receptor has been implicated as a likely cause of PHA1. The gene for human mineralocorticoid receptor (MLR) has been cloned and physically mapped to human chromosome 4q31.1-31.2. The etiological role of MLR in autosomal recessive PHA1 was investigated by performing linkage analysis between PHA1 and three simple sequence length polymorphisms (D4S192, D4S1548, and D4S413) on chromosome 4q in 10 consanguineous families. Linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal recessive inheritance with full penetrance and zero phenocopy rate using the MLINK program for two-point analysis and the HOMOZ program for multipoint analysis. Lod scores of less than -2 were obtained over the whole region from D4S192 to D4S413 encompassing MLR. This provides evidence against MLR as the site of mutations causing PHA1 in the majority of autosomal recessive families. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Effects of Long-term Blockade of Vasopressin Receptor Types 1a and 2 on Cardiac and Renal Damage in a Rat Model of Hypertensive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tomoyuki; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Heitaro; Morooka, Hanako; Akahoshi, Yasumitsu; Fujiki, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2015-11-01

    The effects of chronic blockade of vasopressin type 1a receptors (V1aR) and the additive effects of a type 2 receptor (V2R) antagonist on the treatment of hypertension-induced heart failure and renal injury remain to be unknown. In this study, Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats were chronically treated with a vehicle (CONT), a V1aR antagonist (OPC21268; OPC), a V2R antagonist (tolvaptan; TOLV), or a combination of OPC21268 and tolvaptan (OPC/TOLV) from the pre-hypertrophic stage (6 weeks). No treatment altered blood pressure during the study. Significant improvements were seen in median survival for the OPC and TOLV, and the OPC/TOLV showed a further improvement in Kaplan-Meier analysis. Echocardiography showed suppressed left ventricular hypertrophy in the OPC and OPC/TOLV at 11 weeks with improved function in all treatment groups by 17 weeks. In all treatment groups, improvements were seen in the following: myocardial histological changes, creatinine clearance, urinary albumin excretion, and renal histopathologic damage. Also, key mRNA levels were suppressed (eg, endothelin-1 and collagen). In conclusion, chronic V1aR blockade ameliorated disease progression in this rat model, with additive benefits from the combination of V1aR and V2R antagonists. It was associated with protection of both myocardial and renal damage, independent of blood pressure.

  5. Muscarinic Receptors Types 1 and 2 in the Preoptic-Anterior Hypothalamic Areas Regulate Ovulation Unequally in the Rat Oestrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    López-Ramírez, Yadira L.; López-Ramírez, Kayro; Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Flores, Angélica; Mendoza-Garcés, Luciano; Librado-Osorio, Raúl A.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger; Domínguez, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors types 1 (m1AChR) and 2 (m2AChR) in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamus areas (POA-AHA) were counted, and the effects of blocking these receptors on spontaneous ovulation were analysed throughout the rat oestrous cycle. Rats in each phase of the oestrous cycle were assigned to the following experiments: (1) an immunohistochemical study of the number of cells expressing m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA and (2) analysis of the effects of the unilateral blockade of the m1AChR (pirenzepine, PZP) or m2AChR (methoctramine, MTC) on either side of the POA-AHA on the ovulation rate. The number of m2AChR-immunoreactive cells was significantly higher at 09:00 h on each day of the oestrous cycle in the POA-AHA region, while no changes in the expression profile of m1AChR protein were observed. The ovulation rate in rats treated with PZP on the oestrous day was lower than that in the vehicle group. Animals treated on dioestrous-1 with PZP or MTC had a higher ovulation rate than those in the vehicle group. In contrast, on dioestrous-2, the MTC treatment decreased the ovulation rate. These results suggest that m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA could participate in the regulation of spontaneous ovulation in rats.

  6. A soluble deletion mutant of the human complement receptor type 1, which lacks the C4b binding site, is a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway.

    PubMed

    Scesney, S M; Makrides, S C; Gosselin, M L; Ford, P J; Andrews, B M; Hayman, E G; Marsh, H C

    1996-08-01

    The human complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35), is a single-chain glycoprotein consisting of 30 repeating homologous protein domains known as short consensus repeats (SCR) followed by transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The SCR themselves, considered in groups of seven, form long homologous repeats (LHR) which have been designated LHR-A, -B, -C, and -D for the most common human allotype of CR1. A soluble deletion mutant of CR1 which lacks the first seven N-terminal SCR (LHR-A) as well as the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains was produced and characterized. The resulting protein, designated sCR1[desLHR-A], lacks the C4b binding site found in LHR-A, but retains the two C3b binding sites found in LHR-B and -C, respectively. The functional activities of sCR1[desLHR-A] were quantitatively compared in vitro to those of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which has been shown to retain all known functions of the native cell surface receptor. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 competed equally for the binding of dimeric C3b to erythrocyte CR1. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were similar in their capacity to serve as a cofactor in the factor I-mediated degradation of the C3b and C4b alpha chains. sCR1[desLHR-A] and sCR1 were comparable in their capacity to inhibit erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production mediated by the alternative complement pathway. sCR1[desLHR-A], however, was significantly less effective an inhibitor of erythrocyte lysis and anaphylatoxin production than sCR1 under conditions which allow classical pathway activation. These results demonstrate sCR1[desLHR-A] to be a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in vitro.

  7. Blockade of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM) Bombesin Receptor Type 1 Decreases Blood Pressure and Sympathetic Activity in Anesthetized Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Izabella S.; Mourão, Aline A.; da Silva, Elaine F.; Camargo, Amanda S.; Marques, Stefanne M.; Gomes, Karina P.; Fajemiroye, James O.; da Silva Reis, Angela A.; Rebelo, Ana C. S.; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L.; Rosa, Daniel A.; Freiria-Oliveira, André H.; Castro, Carlos H.; Colombari, Eduardo; Colugnati, Diego B.; Pedrino, Gustavo R.

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS) promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT) rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1) the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); (2) the contribution of RVLM BBS type 1 receptors (BB1) to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg−1, i.v.) were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP), diaphragm (DIA) motor, and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM) nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05) and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 and 84.5 ± 18.1%, respectively; p < 0.05). In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7%; p < 0.05). BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM) reduced MAP (–19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05) and RSNA (−17.7 ± 3.8%; p < 0.05) in SHR, but not in NT rats (−2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; −2.7 ± 5.6%, respectively). These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR. PMID:27313544

  8. Antagonism of Corticotrophin-Releasing Factor Type 1 Receptors Attenuates Caloric Intake of Free Feeding Subordinate Female Rhesus Monkeys in a Rich Dietary Environment

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C J; Johnson, Z P; Higgins, M; Toufexis, D; Wilson, M E

    2015-01-01

    Social subordination in macaque females is a known chronic stressor and previous studies have shown that socially subordinate female rhesus monkeys consume fewer kilocalories than dominant animals when a typical laboratory chow diet is available. However, in a rich dietary environment that provides access to chow in combination with a more palatable diet (i.e. high in fat and refined sugar), subordinate animals consume significantly more daily kilocalories than dominant conspecifics. Substantial literature is available supporting the role of stress hormone signals in shaping dietary preferences and promoting the consumption of palatable, energy-dense foods. The present study was conducted using stable groups of adult female rhesus monkeys to test the hypothesis that pharmacological treatment with a brain penetrable corticotrophin-releasing factor type 1 receptor (CRF1) antagonist would attenuate the stress-induced consumption of a palatable diet among subordinate animals in a rich dietary environment but would be without effect in dominant females. The results show that administration of the CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced daily caloric intake of both available diets among subordinate females compared to dominant females. Importantly, multiple regression analyses showed that the attenuation in caloric intake in response to Antalarmin (Sigma-Aldrich, St Louis, MO, USA) was significantly predicted by the frequency of submissive and aggressive behaviour emitted by females, independent of social status. Taken together, the findings support the involvement of activation of CRF1 receptors in the stress-induced consumption of excess calories in a rich dietary environment and also support the growing literature concerning the importance of CRF for sustaining emotional feeding. PMID:25674637

  9. A Membrane-Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) – Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Axis Regulates Collagen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Assent, Delphine; Bourgot, Isabelle; Hennuy, Benoît; Geurts, Pierre; Noël, Agnès; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Maquoi, Erik

    2015-01-01

    During tumour dissemination, invading breast carcinoma cells become confronted with a reactive stroma, a type I collagen-rich environment endowed with anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. To develop metastatic capabilities, tumour cells must acquire the capacity to cope with this novel microenvironment. How cells interact with and respond to their microenvironment during cancer dissemination remains poorly understood. To address the impact of type I collagen on the fate of tumour cells, human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were cultured within three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3D COL1). Using this experimental model, we have previously demonstrated that membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), a proteinase overexpressed in many aggressive tumours, promotes tumour progression by circumventing the collagen-induced up-regulation of BIK, a pro-apoptotic tumour suppressor, and hence apoptosis. Here we performed a transcriptomic analysis to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating 3D COL1-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Control and MT1-MMP expressing MCF-7 cells were cultured on two-dimensional plastic plates or within 3D COL1 and a global transcriptional time-course analysis was performed. Shifting the cells from plastic plates to 3D COL1 activated a complex reprogramming of genes implicated in various biological processes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a 3D COL1-mediated alteration of key cellular functions including apoptosis, cell proliferation, RNA processing and cytoskeleton remodelling. By using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors, we identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a receptor tyrosine kinase specifically activated by collagen, as the initiator of 3D COL1-induced apoptosis. Our data support the concept that MT1-MMP contributes to the inactivation of the DDR1-BIK signalling axis through the cleavage of collagen fibres and/or the alteration of DDR1 receptor signalling unit, without triggering a

  10. A Stress-Related Peptide Bombesin Centrally Induces Frequent Urination through Brain Bombesin Receptor Types 1 and 2 in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Shogo; Higashi, Youichirou; Nakamura, Kumiko; Yoshimura, Naoki; Saito, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    Stress exacerbates symptoms of bladder dysfunction including overactive bladder and bladder pain syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Bombesin-like peptides and bombesin receptor types 1 and 2 (BB1 and BB2, respectively) in the brain have been implicated in the mediation/integration of stress responses. In this study, we examined effects of centrally administered bombesin on micturition, focusing on their dependence on 1) the sympathoadrenomedullary system (a representative mechanism activated by stress exposure) and 2) brain BB receptors in urethane-anesthetized (1.0–1.2 g/kg, i.p.) male rats. Intracerebroventricularly administered bombesin significantly shortened intercontraction intervals (ICI) at both doses (0.1 and 1 nmol/animal) without affecting maximal voiding pressure. Bombesin at 1 nmol induced significant increments of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels, which were both abolished by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. On the other hand, adrenalectomy showed no effects on the bombesin-induced shortening of ICI. Much lower doses of bombesin (0.01 and 0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) dose-dependently shortened ICI. Pretreatment with either a BB1 receptor antagonist (BIM-23127; d-Nal-cyclo[Cys-Tyr-d-Trp-Orn-Val-Cys]-Nal-NH2; 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) or a BB2 receptor antagonist (BEA; H-d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-NHEt; 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.), respectively, suppressed the BB (0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)–induced shortening of ICI, whereas each antagonist by itself (1 and 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) had no significant effects on ICI. Bombesin (0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) significantly reduced voided volume per micturition and bladder capacity without affecting postvoid residual volume or voiding efficiency. These results suggest that brain bombesin and BB receptors are involved in facilitation of the rat micturition reflex to induce bladder overactivity, which is independent of the sympathoadrenomedullary outflow modulation. PMID:26729307

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of myostatin/TGF-β receptor/pSmad3 signaling rescues muscle regenerative responses in mouse model of type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaemin; Conboy, Michael J; Conboy, Irina M

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To study the influence of acute experimental diabetes on the regenerative potential of muscle stem (satellite) cells in mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6 young mice were injected with a single dose of streptozotocin (STZ, 180 mg/kg, ip) to induce diabetes. The diabetic mice were treated with insulin (0.75 U/kg, ip), follistatin (12 μg/kg, im) or Alk5 inhibitor (5 μmol/L per kg, sc) once a day. On the first day when high glucose levels were found, cardiotoxin (CTX) was focally injected into tibialis anterior and gastronemius muscles of the mice. The muscles were harvested 3 d and 5 d after CTX injection, and myofibers and satellite cells were isolated. Quantitative ex-vivo and in-vivo assays of myogenic potential were used to evaluate the muscle regenerative responses. Results: The satellite cells from the diabetic mice 3 d after CTX injection fail to activate, and the repair of muscle deteriorates, resembling that observed in old control mice. Furthermore, the satellite cells have excessive levels of myostatin, TGF-β receptor 1, pSmad3 and the cell cycle inhibitor p15, while the level of TGF-β1 remain unchanged. Treatment of the diabetic mice with insulin rescued muscle regenerative responses, and restored the expression levels of myostatin, TGF-β receptor 1, pSmad3, and p15 to those similar of healthy controls. Treatment of the diabetic mice with the myostatin antagonist follistatin, or with the Alk5 inhibitor of TGF-β receptor 1 (which did not diminish the blood glucose levels) rescued muscle regenerative responses and attenuated the myostatin/TGFβ receptor/pSmad3 signaling. Conclusion: The muscle regenerative responses are incapacitated and repair of the tissue fails within hours after the initiation of hyperglycemia in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, but stem cell function is rescued by insulin, as well as follistatin or an Alk5 inhibitor that blocks TGF-β receptor signaling. PMID:23770987

  12. Heart failure therapeutics on the basis of a biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor. Rationale and design of the BLAST-AHF study (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure).

    PubMed

    Felker, G Michael; Butler, Javed; Collins, Sean P; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Levy, Phillip D; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Soergel, David G; Teerlink, John R; Violin, Jonathan D; Voors, Adriaan A; Pang, Peter S

    2015-03-01

    The BLAST-AHF (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure) study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of TRV027, a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor, in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). AHF remains a major public health problem, and no currently-available therapies have been shown to favorably affect outcomes. TRV027 is a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor that antagonizes angiotensin-stimulated G-protein activation while stimulating β-arrestin. In animal models, these effects reduce afterload while increasing cardiac performance and maintaining stroke volume. In initial human studies, TRV027 appears to be hemodynamically active primarily in patients with activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, a potentially attractive profile for an AHF therapeutic. BLAST-AHF is an international prospective, randomized, phase IIb, dose-ranging study that will randomize up to 500 AHF patients with systolic blood pressure ≥120 mm Hg and ≤200 mm Hg within 24 h of initial presentation to 1 of 3 doses of intravenous TRV027 (1, 5, or 25 mg/h) or matching placebo (1:1:1:1) for at least 48 h and up to 96 h. The primary endpoint is a composite of 5 clinical endpoints (dyspnea, worsening heart failure, length of hospital stay, 30-day rehospitalization, and 30-day mortality) combined using an average z-score. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of dyspnea and change in amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. The BLAST-AHF study will assess the efficacy and safety of a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor in AHF.

  13. Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Juan M

    2012-11-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT(1) receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT(1) receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood-brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurodegerative, mood and traumatic brain disorders, and cognitive decline. In rodents, ARBs (AT(1) receptor blockers) ameliorate stress-induced disorders, anxiety and depression, protect cerebral blood flow during stroke, decrease brain inflammation and amyloid-β neurotoxicity and reduce traumatic brain injury. Direct anti-inflammatory protective effects, demonstrated in cultured microglia, cerebrovascular endothelial cells, neurons and human circulating monocytes, may result not only in AT(1) receptor blockade, but also from PPARγ (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ) stimulation. Controlled clinical studies indicate that ARBs protect cognition after stroke and during aging, and cohort analyses reveal that these compounds significantly reduce the incidence and progression of Alzheimer's disease. ARBs are commonly used for the therapy of hypertension, diabetes and stroke, but have not been studied in the context of neurodegenerative, mood or traumatic brain disorders, conditions lacking effective therapy. These compounds are well-tolerated pleiotropic neuroprotective agents with additional beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic profiles, and their use in central nervous system disorders offers a novel therapeutic approach of immediate translational value. ARBs should be tested for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease, affective disorders, such as co-morbid cardiovascular disease and depression, and traumatic

  14. Glycine transporter type 1 blockade changes NMDA receptor-mediated responses and LTP in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells by altering extracellular glycine levels

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Marzia; Gorfinkel, Yelena; Halman, Samantha; Lowe, John A; Periyalwar, Pranav; Schmidt, Christopher J; Bergeron, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region requires the activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). NMDAR activation in turn requires membrane depolarization as well as the binding of glutamate and its coagonist glycine. Previous pharmacological studies suggest that the glycine transporter type 1 (GlyT1) maintains subsaturating concentrations of glycine at synaptic NMDARs. Antagonists of GlyT1 increase levels of glycine in the synaptic cleft and, like direct glycine site agonists, can augment NMDAR currents and NMDAR-mediated functions such as LTP. In addition, stimulation of the glycine site initiates signalling through the NMDAR complex, priming the receptors for clathrin-dependent endocytosis. We have used a new potent GlyT1 antagonist, CP-802,079, with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in acute rat hippocampal slices to determine the effect of GlyT1 blockade on LTP. Reverse microdialysis experiments in the hippocampus of awake, freely moving rats, showed that this drug elevated only the extracellular concentration of glycine. We found that CP-802,079, sarcosine and glycine significantly increased the amplitude of the NMDAR currents and LTP. In contrast, application of higher concentrations of CP-802,079 and glycine slightly reduced NMDAR currents and did not increase LTP. Overall, these data suggest that the level of glycine present in the synaptic cleft tightly regulates the NMDAR activity. This level is kept below the ‘set point’ of the NMDAR internalization priming mechanism by the presence of GlyT1-dependent uptake. PMID:15064326

  15. Role of amino-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) channel gating.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Oba, Toshiharu; Oyamada, Hideto; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Ogawa, Yasuo

    2011-10-14

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a Ca(2+) release channel found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and plays a pivotal role in excitation-contraction coupling. The RyR1 channel is activated by a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor upon depolarization of the transverse tubule, or by Ca(2+) itself, i.e. Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). The molecular events transmitting such signals to the ion gate of the channel are unknown. The S4-S5 linker, a cytosolic loop connecting the S4 and S5 transmembrane segments in six-transmembrane type channels, forms an α-helical structure and mediates signal transmission in a wide variety of channels. To address the role of the S4-S5 linker in RyR1 channel gating, we performed alanine substitution scan of N-terminal half of the putative S4-S5 linker (Thr(4825)-Ser(4829)) that exhibits high helix probability. The mutant RyR1 was expressed in HEK cells, and CICR activity was investigated by caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release, single-channel current recordings, and [(3)H]ryanodine binding. Four mutants (T4825A, I4826A, S4828A, and S4829A) had reduced CICR activity without changing Ca(2+) sensitivity, whereas the L4827A mutant formed a constitutive active channel. T4825I, a disease-associated mutation for malignant hyperthermia, exhibited enhanced CICR activity. An α-helical wheel representation of the N-terminal S4-S5 linker provides a rational explanation to the observed activities of the mutants. These results suggest that N-terminal half of the S4-S5 linker may form an α-helical structure and play an important role in RyR1 channel gating.

  16. Surinabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, inhibits Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced central nervous system and heart rate effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E; Roy, Christine; Ferron, Geraldine; Turpault, Sandrine; Poitiers, Franck; Pinquier, Jean-Louis; van Hasselt, Johan G C; Zuurman, Lineke; Erwich, Frank A S; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-01-01

    Aim Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and associated risk factors. Surinabant is a high affinity CB1 antagonist in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of inhibition by surinabant of CNS effects and heart rate induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans. Methods This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, four period six sequence crossover study. Thirty healthy young male occasional cannabis users (<1 per week) were included. A single oral dose of surinabant (5, 20 or 60 mg) or placebo was administered followed 1.5 h later by four intrapulmonary THC doses (2, 4, 6 and 6 mg) or vehicle, administered at 1 h intervals. The wash-out period was 14–21 days. Subjective and objective pharmacodynamic (PD) measurements were performed. A population PK–PD model for THC and surinabant quantified PK and PD effects. Results Surinabant 20 and 60 mg inhibited all THC-induced PD effects in a similar range for both doses with inhibition ratios ranging from 68.3% (95% CI = 32.5, 104.2; heart rate) to 91.1% (95% CI = 30.3, 151.8; body sway). IC50 ranged from 22.0 ng ml−1 [relative standard error (RSE) = 45.2%; body sway] to 58.8 ng ml−1 (RSE = 44.2%; internal perception). Surinabant 5 mg demonstrated no significant effects. Conclusions The dose-related inhibition by surinabant, without any effect of its own, suggests that this compound behaves as a CB1 receptor antagonist in humans at these concentrations. A single surinabant dose between 5 to 20 mg and above was able to antagonize THC-induced effects in humans. PMID:23278647

  17. The type 1 Interleukin 1 receptor is not required for the death of murine hippocampal dentate granule cells and microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Harry, G. Jean; Funk, Jason; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Aoyama, Mineyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in the inflammatory process, neuronal death, and glia response have been observed under manipulation of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine and subsequent signaling through the type 1 IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1). To investigate the influence of IL-1R1 activation in the pathophysiology of a chemical-induced injury to the murine hippocampus, we examined the level and pattern of neuronal death and neuroinflammation in 25-day-old male mice exposed to trimethyltin hydroxide (2.0 mg/kg, i.p.). In IL-1R1 null (IL-1R1−/−) mice, the pattern and severity of dentate granule cell death was similar as compared to wild type mice. In both groups of mice, mRNA levels for TNFα and MIP-1α were elevated and the early activation of microglia, including their ability to progress to a phagocytic phenotype, was maintained. Compared to WT mice, IL-1R1−/− mice displayed a limited glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) astrocytic response, as well as a preferential induction in mRNA levels of Fas signaling components. Cumulatively, these results indicate that IL-1R1 activation is not necessary for TMT-induced death of dentate granule neurons or local activation of microglia; however, IL-1R1 signaling is involved in mediating the structural response of astrocytes to injury and may also regulate apoptotic mechanisms by influencing Fas signaling components. PMID:18191113

  18. FGF receptor-4 (FGFR4) polymorphism acts as an activity switch of a membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-FGFR4 complex.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Nami; Varjosalo, Markku; Meller, Pipsa; Lohi, Jouko; Chan, Kui Ming; Zhou, Zhongjun; Alitalo, Kari; Taipale, Jussi; Keski-Oja, Jorma; Lehti, Kaisa

    2010-09-07

    Tumor cells use membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) for invasion and metastasis. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie MT1-MMP regulation in cancer have remained unclear. Using a systematic gain-of-function kinome screen for MT1-MMP activity, we have here identified kinases that significantly enhance MT1-MMP activity in tumor cells. In particular, we discovered an MT1-MMP/FGF receptor-4 (FGFR4) membrane complex that either stimulates or suppresses MT1-MMP and FGFR4 activities, depending on a tumor progression-associated polymorphism in FGFR4. The FGFR4-R388 allele, linked to poor cancer prognosis, increased collagen invasion by decreasing lysosomal MT1-MMP degradation. FGFR4-R388 induced MT1-MMP phosphorylation and endosomal stabilization, and surprisingly, the increased MT1-MMP in return enhanced FGFR4-R388 autophosphorylation. A phosphorylation-defective MT1-MMP was stabilized on the cell surface, where it induced simultaneous FGFR4-R388 internalization and dissociation of cell-cell junctions. In contrast, the alternative FGFR4-G388 variant down-regulated MT1-MMP, and the overexpression of MT1-MMP and particularly its phosphorylation-defective mutant vice versa induced FGFR4-G388 degradation. These results provide a mechanistic basis for FGFR4-R388 function in cancer invasion.

  19. Construction of the plasmid, expression by Chinese hamster ovary cell, purification and characterization of the first three short consensus repeat modules of human complement receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Takagawa, Hiroaki; Iwakaji, Hirofumi; Miyagawa, Shuji; Wang, Pi-Chao; Ishii, Noriyuki

    2009-04-01

    Short consensus repeat (SCR1-3), the first three SCR modules from N-terminus of type 1 complement receptor (CR1), is expected to accelerate dissociation of complement components and suppress complement activity by binding the main component of complement C4b. In order to clarify the three-dimensional structure, which triggers the activity of SCR1-3 on complement, we constructed an over-expression system in CHO DG44 cells which facilitated mass production of SCR1-3. The mass production was achieved by a two-stage culture system and optimum culture conditions using ASF104N medium and MTX-, NaBu-containing alpha-MEM/10% FBS medium, respectively. The constructed gene of SCR1-3 was confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequence analysis, and the expressed protein by CHO DG44 cells was confirmed by western blotting. The expressed SCR1-3 was proved containing N-linked sugar chain, an important factor to the proper expression of protein, by the cleavage with glycosidase of N-linked oligosaccharide (PNGase F). The suppression effect of the yield protein on complement-mediated inflammation was investigated by haemolytic assay and necrosis assay of stromal cells. Both assays showed that SCR1-3 possessed complement control activity. However, residing sugar chain on SCR1-3 did not show significant difference in the complement control activity.

  20. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) in chronic liver diseases: serum levels at different stages of liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Di Bona, D; Montalto, G; Clemenza, L; Bascone, F; Accardo, P; Bellavia, D; Craxì, A; Brai, M

    1998-10-01

    Complement receptor type 1 (CR1) is an integral membrane protein of many haematopoietic cells and plays an important role in the clearance of complement-associated immune complexes, favouring their transport to liver and spleen macrophages. A small amount of soluble CR1 (sCR1) is also found in plasma and might originate directly from release of leucocytes and other circulating cells. In previous studies, an increase in serum sCR1 level has been observed in liver cirrhosis and end-stage renal failure. High levels have also been found in patients with some haematologic malignancies. sCR1 serum levels were measured using a specific double sandwich ELISA assay. The present study demonstrates the correlation between mean serum sCR1 concentrations and disease severity in patients with chronic liver disease. In patients with liver cirrhosis, grouped according to the Child-Pugh classification, sCR1 rose as liver function decreased. The presence of neoplastic growth in the liver apparently does not play a role in the increase of sCR1. Serum sCR1 was not elevated in other solid malignancies. Since sCR1 accumulates in liver diseases, evaluation of its serum levels could be useful as a liver function test.

  1. Nitric Oxide-induced Activation of the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Is Critical for Epileptic Seizure-induced Neuronal Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Okubo, Yohei; Nakaune, Takuya; Suzuki, Junji; Shibata, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Koyama, Ryuta; Murayama, Takashi; Ito, Akihiro; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Saito, Nobuhito; Kakizawa, Sho; Iino, Masamitsu

    2016-09-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening emergency that can cause neurodegeneration with debilitating neurological disorders. However, the mechanism by which convulsive SE results in neurodegeneration is not fully understood. It has been shown that epileptic seizures produce markedly increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain, and that NO induces Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), which occurs through S-nitrosylation of the intracellular Ca(2+) release channel. Here, we show that through genetic silencing of NO-induced activation of the RyR1 intracellular Ca(2+) release channel, neurons were rescued from seizure-dependent cell death. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR1, was protective against neurodegeneration caused by SE. These results demonstrate that NO-induced Ca(2+) release via RyR is involved in SE-induced neurodegeneration, and provide a rationale for the use of RyR1 inhibitors for the prevention of brain damage following SE.

  2. The glucocorticoid receptor type II complex is a target of the HIV-1 vpr gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Refaeli, Y; Levy, D N; Weiner, D B

    1995-01-01

    The vpr gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes a 15-kDa virion-associated protein that functions as a regulator of cellular processes linked to the HIV life cycle. We report the interaction of a 41-kDa cytosolic viral protein R interacting protein 1 (Rip-1) with Vpr in vitro. Rip-1 displays a wide tissue distribution, including relevant targets of HIV infection. Vpr protein induced nuclear translocation of Rip-1, as did glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-II-stimulating steroids. Importantly, Vpr and Rip-1 coimmunoprecipitated with the human GR as part of an activated receptor complex. Vpr complementation of a vpr mutant virus was also mimicked by GR-II-stimulating steroids. Vpr and GR-II actions were inhibited by mifepristone, a GR-II pathway inhibitor. Together these data directly link the activity of the vpr gene product to the glucocorticoid steroid pathway and provide a biochemical mechanism for the cellular and viral activity of Vpr, as well as suggest that a unique class of antivirals, which includes mifepristone (RU486), may influence HIV-1 replication. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7724608

  3. Acute ethanol intake induces superoxide anion generation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in rat aorta: A role for angiotensin type 1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yogi, Alvaro; Callera, Glaucia E.; Mecawi, André S.; Batalhão, Marcelo E.; Carnio, Evelin C.; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Queiroz, Regina H.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with increase in blood pressure, through unknown mechanisms. We hypothesized that acute ethanol intake enhances vascular oxidative stress and induces vascular dysfunction through renin–angiotensin system (RAS) activation. Ethanol (1 g/kg; p.o. gavage) effects were assessed within 30 min in male Wistar rats. The transient decrease in blood pressure induced by ethanol was not affected by the previous administration of losartan (10 mg/kg; p.o. gavage), a selective AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist. Acute ethanol intake increased plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) and angiotensin II (ANG II) levels. Ethanol induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels, NAD(P)H oxidase‐mediated vascular generation of superoxide anion and p47phox translocation (cytosol to membrane). These effects were prevented by losartan. Isolated aortas from ethanol-treated rats displayed increased p38MAPK and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Losartan inhibited ethanol-induced increase in the phosphorylation of these kinases. Ethanol intake decreased acetylcholine-induced relaxation and increased phenylephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-intact aortas. Ethanol significantly decreased plasma and aortic nitrate levels. These changes in vascular reactivity and in the end product of endogenous nitric oxide metabolism were not affected by losartan. Our study provides novel evidence that acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and induces vascular oxidative stress and redox-signaling activation through AT{sub 1}-dependent mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of RAS in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage. -- Highlights: ► Acute ethanol intake stimulates RAS activity and vascular oxidative stress. ► RAS plays a role in acute ethanol-induced oxidative damage via AT{sub 1} receptor activation.

  4. 3-Substituted pyrazole analogs of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB₁) receptor antagonist rimonabant: cannabinoid agonist-like effects in mice via non-CB₁, non-CB₂ mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Selley, Dana E; Wang, Pinglang; Kottani, Rudresha; Gadthula, Srinivas; Mahadeven, Anu

    2012-02-01

    The prototypic cannabinoid type 1 (CB₁) receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, is comprised of a pyrazole core surrounded by a carboxyamide with terminal piperidine group (3-substituent), a 2,4-dichlorophenyl group (1-substituent), a 4-chlorophenyl group (5-substituent), and a methyl group (4-substituent). Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis has suggested that the 3-position may be involved in receptor recognition and agonist activity. The goal of the present study was to develop CB₁-selective compounds and explore further the SAR of 3-substitution on the rimonabant template. 3-Substituted analogs with benzyl and alkyl amino, dihydrooxazole, and oxazole moieties were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Several notable patterns emerged. First, most of the analogs exhibited CB₁ selectivity, with many lacking affinity for the CB₂ receptor. Affinity tended to be better when [³H]5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716), rather than [³H](-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4(1,1-dimethyl-heptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxy-propyl)cyclohexanol (CP55,940), was used as the binding radioligand. Second, many of the analogs produced an agonist-like profile of effects in mice (i.e., suppression of activity, antinociception, hypothermia, and immobility); however, their potencies were not well correlated with their CB₁ binding affinities. Further assessment of selected analogs showed that none were effective antagonists of the effects of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol in mice, their agonist-like effects were not blocked by rimonabant, they were active in vivo in CB₁⁻/⁻ mice, and they failed to stimulate guanosine-5'-O-(3-[³⁵S]thio)-triphosphate binding. Several analogs were inverse agonists in the latter assay. Together, these results suggest that this series of 3-substituted pyrazole analogs represent a novel class of CB₁-selective cannabinoids that produce agonist

  5. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  6. Interleukin 1 type 1 receptor restore: a genetic mouse model for studying interleukin 1 receptor-mediated effects in specific cell types.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Chen, Qun; Belevych, Natalya; Mckim, Daniel B; Tarr, Andrew J; Coppola, Vincenzo; Nath, Nikitaa; Nemeth, Daniel P; Syed, Zunera W; Sheridan, John F; Godbout, Jonathan P; Zuo, Jian; Quan, Ning

    2015-02-18

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediates diverse neurophysiological and neuropathological effects in the CNS through type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1R1). However, identification of IL-1R1-expressing cell types and cell-type-specific functions of IL-1R1 remains challenging. In this study, we created a novel genetic mouse model in which IL-1R1 gene expression is disrupted by an intronic insertion of a loxP flanked disruptive sequence that can be deleted by Cre recombinase, resulting in restored IL-1R1 gene expression under its endogenous promoters. A second mutation was introduced at stop codon of the IL-1R1 gene to allow tracking of the restored IL-1R1 protein by a 3HA tag and IL-1R1 mRNA by tdTomato fluorescence. These animals were designated as IL-1R1(r/r) and exhibited an IL-1R1 knock-out phenotype. We used IL-1R1 globally restored mice (IL-1R1(GR/GR)) as an IL-1R1 reporter and observed concordant labeling of IL-1R1 mRNA and protein in brain endothelial cells. Two cell-type-specific IL-1R1 restore lines were generated: Tie2Cre-IL-1R1(r/r) and LysMCre-IL-1R1(r/r). Brain endothelial COX-2 expression, CNS leukocyte infiltration, and global microglia activation induced by intracerebroventricular injection of IL-1β were not observed in IL-1R1(r/r) or LysMCre-IL-1R1(r/r) mice, but were restored in Tie2Cre-IL-1R1(r/r) mice. These results reveal IL-1R1 expression in endothelial cells alone is sufficient to mediate these central IL-1-induced responses. In addition, ex vivo IL-1β stimulation increased IL-1β expression in bone marrow cells in wild-type, Tie2Cre-IL-1R1(r/r), and LysMCre-IL-1R1(r/r), but not IL-1R1(r/r) mice. These results demonstrate this IL-1R1 restore model is a valuable tool for studying cell-type-specific functions of IL-1R1.

  7. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na+, Ca2+ and K+. The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca2+-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  8. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  10. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  11. Detection of 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor in various adipose tissue depots of dairy cows supplemented with conjugated linoleic acids.

    PubMed

    Friedauer, K; Dänicke, S; Schulz, K; Sauerwein, H; Häussler, S

    2015-10-01

    Early lactating cows mobilize adipose tissue (AT) to provide energy for milk yield and maintenance and are susceptible to metabolic disorders and impaired immune response. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), mainly the trans-10, cis-12 isomer, reduce milk fat synthesis and may attenuate negative energy balance. Circulating glucocorticoids (GC) are increased during parturition in dairy cows and mediate differentiating and anti-inflammatory effects via glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the presence of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1). Activated GC are the main ligands for both receptors in AT; therefore, we hypothesized that tissue-specific GC metabolism is effected by varying amounts of GR, MR and 11βHSD1 and/or their localization within AT depots. Furthermore, the lipolytic and antilipogenic effects of CLA might influence the GC/GR/MR system in AT. Therefore, we aimed to localize GR and MR as well as the expression pattern and activity of 11βHSD1 in different AT depots during early lactation in dairy cows and to identify potential effects of CLA. Primiparous German Holstein cows were divided into a control (CON) and a CLA group. From day 1 post-partum (p.p.) until sample collection, the CLA group was fed with 100 g/d CLA (contains 10 g each of the cis-9, trans-11 and the trans-10, cis-12-CLA isomers). CON cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 1, 42 and 105 p.p., while CLA cows (n = 5 each) were slaughtered on day 42 and 105 p.p. Subcutaneous fat from tailhead, withers and sternum, and visceral fat from omental, mesenteric and retroperitoneal depots were sampled. The localization of GR and 11βHSD1 in mature adipocytes - being already differentiated - indicates that GC promote other effects via GR than differentiation. Moreover, MR were observed in the stromal vascular cell fraction and positively related to the pre-adipocyte marker Pref-1. However, only marginal CLA effects were observed in this study.

  12. 71-Kilodalton Heat Shock Cognate Protein Acts as a Cellular Receptor for Syncytium Formation Induced by Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Yasuko; Ishida, Chuzo; Inoue, Yukiko; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Maeda, Yoshiaki

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported that the region corresponding to amino acids 197 to 216 of the gp46 surface glycoprotein (gp46-197) served as a binding domain for the interaction between gp46 and trypsin-sensitive membrane components of the target cell, leading to syncytium formation induced by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-bearing cells. Our new evidence shows that the 71-kDa heat shock cognate protein (HSC70) acts as a cellular receptor for syncytium formation. Using affinity chromatography with the peptide gp46-197, followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we isolated three components (bands A, B, and C) from MOLT-4 cell lysate which exhibited specific interactions with gp46 and inhibitory activities for syncytium formation induced by HTLV-1-bearing cells. Band A and B components were identified as HSC70 and β-actin, respectively, through amino acid sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry and immunostaining with specific monoclonal antibodies. Band C is likely to be a nonprotein component, because full activity for syncytium formation was seen after extensive trypsin digestion. Anti-HSC70 monoclonal antibody clearly blocked syncytium formation in a coculture of HTLV-1-bearing cells and indicator cells, whereas no inhibition was seen with anti-β-actin monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis indicated that anti-HSC70 antibody reacted with MOLT-4 cells. Thus, we propose that HSC70 expressed on the target cell surface acts as a cellular acceptor to gp46 exposed on the HTLV-1-infected cell for syncytium formation, thereby leading to cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1. PMID:9420256

  13. Conformation-dependent stability of junctophilin 1 (JP1) and ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel complex is mediated by their hyper-reactive thiols.

    PubMed

    Phimister, Andrew J; Lango, Jozsef; Lee, Eun Hui; Ernst-Russell, Michael A; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Ma, Jianjie; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2007-03-23

    Junctophilin 1 (JP1), a 72-kDa protein localized at the skeletal muscle triad, is essential for stabilizing the close apposition of T-tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes to form junctions. In this study we report that rapid and selective labeling of hyper-reactive thiols found in both JP1 and ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) with 7-diethylamino-3-(4'-maleimidylphenyl)-4-methylcoumarin, a fluorescent thiol-reactive probe, proceeded 12-fold faster under conditions that minimize RyR1 gating (e.g. 10 mM Mg2+) compared with conditions that promote high channel activity (e.g. 100 microM Ca2+, 10 mM caffeine, 5 mM ATP). The reactivity of these thiol groups was very sensitive to oxidation by naphthoquinone, H2O2, NO, or O2, all known modulators of the RyR1 channel complex. Using preparative SDS-PAGE, in-gel tryptic digestion, high pressure liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing, we identified 7-diethylamino-3-(4'-maleimidylphenyl)-4-methylcoumarin-thioether adducts on three cysteine residues of JP1 (101, 402, and 627); the remaining five cysteines of JP1 were unlabeled. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated a physical interaction between JP1 and RyR1 that, like thiol reactivity, was sensitive to RyR1 conformation and chemical status of the hyper-reactive cysteines of JP1 and RyR1. These findings support a model in which JP1 interacts with the RyR1 channel complex in a conformationally sensitive manner and may contribute integral redox-sensing properties through reactive sulfhydryl chemistry.

  14. Pharmacokinetic/pharmaco–dynamic modelling and simulation of the effects of different cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonists on Δ9‐tetrahydrocannabinol challenge tests

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E.; Oyetayo, Olubukayo‐Opeyemi; Heuberger, Jules; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Stevens, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Aim The severe psychiatric side effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists hampered their wide development but this might be overcome by careful management of drug development with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analyses. PK/PD models suitable for direct comparison of different CB1 antagonists in Δ9‐tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) challenge tests in healthy volunteer were constructed. Methods The pharmacokinetic models of THC and four CB1 antagonists were built separately. THC‐induced effects on heart rate and the visual analogue scale of feeling high in healthy volunteers and inhibitive effects of CB1 antagonists on THC‐induced effects were modelled in PD models linked to the PK models. Simulations were then applied to evaluate the reduction rate of each antagonist on the reversal of the THC‐induced effect in a unified simulation scenario. Results The final PK model of THC and antagonists was a two compartment model. An Emax model and logistic regression model were used for effect measures and the antagonist effect was added in these models in a competitive binding manner. t 1/2ke0 ranged from 0.00462 to 63.7 h for heart rate and from 0.964 to 150 h for VAS. IC 50 ranged from 6.42 to 202 ng ml−1 for heart rate and from 12.1 to 376 ng ml−1 for VAS. Benchmark simulation showed different dose–efficacy profiles of two efficacy measures for each CB1 antagonist. Conclusions PK/PD modelling and simulation approach was suitable for describing and predicting heart rate and feeling high for CB1 antagonists in THC challenge tests. Direct comparison of four antagonists based on simulated efficacy profiles might be of benefit to guide future studies. PMID:26617196

  15. Role of TEFFECTOR/MEMORY Cells, TBX21 Gene Expression and T-Cell Homing Receptor on Type 1 Reaction in Borderline Lepromatous Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alvim, Iris Maria Peixoto; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Lara, Flávio Alves; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Esquenazi, Danuza

    2016-01-01

    In spite of hyporesponsivity to Mycobacterium leprae, borderline lepromatous (BL) patients show clinical and immunological instability, and undergo frequent acute inflammatory episodes such as type 1 reaction (T1R), which may cause nerve damages. This work focused on the participation of T cell subsets from blood and skin at T1R onset. We observed a significantly increased ex vivo frequency of both effector and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in T1R group. Besides, ex vivo frequency of T cell homing receptor, the Cutaneous Leukocyte-associated Antigen (CLA) was significantly increased in T cells from T1R patients. M. leprae induced a higher frequency of CD4+ TEM and CD8+ TEF cells, as well as of CD8+/TEMRA (terminally differentiated effector T cells) subset, which expressed high CD69+. The presence of IFN-γ‒producing-CD4+ TEF and naïve and effector CD8+ T lymphocytes was significant in T1R. TBX21 expression was significantly higher in T1R, while BL showed increased GATA3 and FOXP3 expression. In T1R, TBX21 expression was strongly correlated with CD8+/IFN-γ‒ T cells frequency. The number of double positive CD8+/CLA+ and CD45RA+/CLA+ cells was significantly higher in skin lesions from T1R, in comparison with non-reactional BL group. The observed increase of ex vivo T cells at T1R onset suggests intravascular activation at the beginning of reactional episodes. The antigen-specific response in T1R group confirmed the higher number of CD8+/CLA+ and CD45RA+/CLA+ cells in T1R lesions suggests possible migration of these cells activated by M. leprae components inside the vascular compartment to skin and participation in T1R physiopathology. PMID:27764137

  16. An IgM-kappa rat monoclonal antibody specific for the type 1 sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptor with antagonist and agonist activities.

    PubMed

    Goetzl, Edward J; Dembrow, Dale; Van Brocklyn, James R; Gráler, Markus; Huang, Mei-Chuan

    2004-04-30

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) type 1G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1 GPCRs) are specific high-affinity transducers for this lipid growth factor and cellular mediator. S1P1 GPCRs are widely-expressed and physiologically critical in the cardiovascular and immune systems. Functional rat monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been generated against human S1P1 GPCRs expressed in rat null-cell transductants to provide bioavailable agents capable of stimulating or suppressing the S1P-S1P1 GPCR axis. The rat IgM-kappa anti-S1P1 GPCR MoAb designated 4B5.2 binds specifically to native human or mouse S1P1 GPCRs in cell membranes, but not to solubilized and denatured S1P1 GPCRs. Specific binding of 32P-S1P to cellular S1P1 GPCRs is not blocked by 4B5.2. T cell chemotactic responses to S1P and S1P suppression of T cell chemotaxis to chemokines both are inhibited selectively by 4B5.2. In contrast, generation of gamma-interferon by stimulated T cells is diminished by 4B5.2 as by S1P. T cell S1P1 GPCR-selective antagonist and agonist effects of 4B5.2 in vivo may alter immune responses as distinctively as the available poly-S1P GPCR-directed pharmacological agents, without the undesirable side-effects attributable to actions of these agents on other S1P GPCRs.

  17. The I4895T Mutation in the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Induces Fiber-Type Specific Alterations in Skeletal Muscle that Mimic Premature Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Simona; Loy, Ryan E.; Dirksen, Robert T.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The I4898T (IT) mutation in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is linked to a form of central core disease (CCD) in humans and results in a non leaky channel and excitation-contraction uncoupling. We characterized age- and fiber type-dependent alterations in muscle ultrastructure, as well as the magnitude and spatiotemporal properties of evoked Ca2+ release in heterozygous Ryr1I4895T/WT (IT/+) knock-in mice on a mixed genetic background. The results indicate a classical but mild CCD phenotype that includes muscle weakness and the presence of mitochondrial-deficient areas in type I fibers. Electrically-evoked Ca2+ release is significantly reduced in single FDB fibers from young and old IT/+ mice. Structural changes are strongly fiber type-specific, affecting type I and IIB/IIX fibers in very distinct ways, and sparing type IIA fibers. Ultrastructural alterations in our IT/+ mice are also present in wild type, but at a lower frequency and older ages, suggesting that the disease mutation on the mixed background promotes an acceleration of normal age-dependent changes. The observed functional and structural alterations and their similarity to age-associated changes are entirely consistent with the known properties of the mutated channel, which result in reduced calcium release as is also observed in normal aging muscle. In strong contrast to these observations, a subset of patients with the analogous human heterozygous mutation and IT/+ mice on an inbred 129S2/SvPasCrl background exhibit a more severe disease phenotype, which is not directly consistent with the mutated channel properties. PMID:20961389

  18. T-Cell Receptor/CD28 Engagement When Combined with Prostaglandin E2 Treatment Leads to Potent Activation of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Ève; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J.; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2003-01-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE2-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE2 treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56lck and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE2-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus. PMID:14512564

  19. T-cell receptor/CD28 engagement when combined with prostaglandin E2 treatment leads to potent activation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J

    2003-10-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE(2) treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56(lck) and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus.

  20. Characterization of N-linked oligosaccharides bearing sialyl lewis x moieties on an alternatively glycosylated form of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1).

    PubMed

    Picard, M D; Pettey, C L; Marsh, H C; Thomas, L J

    2000-02-01

    We sought to produce a complement inhibitory protein possessing oligosaccharides specifically modified to contain the sialyl Lewis x (sLe(x)) moiety. This modified glycoprotein could combine anti-complement activity with the ability to inhibit selectin-mediated interactions and concentrate this activity to sites of activated endothelium where selectins are upregulated. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), previously shown to be effective in inhibiting the complement cascade, was produced in a cell line capable of adding fucose to N-linked oligosaccharides in the alpha1-3 linkage, which is necessary for sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoprotein purified from these cells was designated sCR1sLe(x), and may prove to be more effective than sCR1 in some clinical applications. Detailed analysis and characterization of sCR1sLe(x) was performed to confirm that the N-linked oligosaccharides possessed sLe(x) moieties and also to determine the extent of sLe(x) glycosylation. The glycoproteins were characterized by oligosaccharide profiling, sequencing, linkage analysis and quantified by differential enzymic digestion, using fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. The major glycans were identified as biantennary oligosaccharides (including sialylated and non-core fucosylated glycans). The linkages of sialic acid and the branched fucose were analysed by digestion with linkage-specific enzymes and subsequent separation by electrophoresis. All data were consistent with the presence of sLe(x) moieties on the N-linked oligosaccharides of sCR1sLe(x). sCR1sLe(x) is a prime example of a recombinant protein expressed with oligosaccharides engineered for a specific biological function, and produced using a commercially viable method.

  1. Overexpression of ryanodine receptor type 1 enhances mitochondrial fragmentation and Ca2+-induced ATP production in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    O-Uchi, Jin; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen; Bisetto, Sara; Gross, Polina; Chen, Ming; Kettlewell, Sarah; Park, Jongsun; Oyamada, Hideto; Smith, Godfrey L; Murayama, Takashi; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2013-12-01

    Ca(+) influx to mitochondria is an important trigger for both mitochondrial dynamics and ATP generation in various cell types, including cardiac cells. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx is mainly mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Growing evidence also indicates that mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx mechanisms are regulated not solely by MCU but also by multiple channels/transporters. We have previously reported that skeletal muscle-type ryanodine receptor (RyR) type 1 (RyR1), which expressed at the mitochondrial inner membrane, serves as an additional Ca(2+) uptake pathway in cardiomyocytes. However, it is still unclear which mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx mechanism is the dominant regulator of mitochondrial morphology/dynamics and energetics in cardiomyocytes. To investigate the role of mitochondrial RyR1 in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology/function in cardiac cells, RyR1 was transiently or stably overexpressed in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts. We found that overexpressed RyR1 was partially localized in mitochondria as observed using both immunoblots of mitochondrial fractionation and confocal microscopy, whereas RyR2, the main RyR isoform in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum, did not show any expression at mitochondria. Interestingly, overexpression of RyR1 but not MCU or RyR2 resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation. These fragmented mitochondria showed bigger and sustained mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients compared with basal tubular mitochondria. In addition, RyR1-overexpressing cells had a higher mitochondrial ATP concentration under basal conditions and showed more ATP production in response to cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation compared with nontransfected cells as observed by a matrix-targeted ATP biosensor. These results indicate that RyR1 possesses a mitochondrial targeting/retention signal and modulates mitochondrial morphology and Ca(2+)-induced ATP production in cardiac H9c2 myoblasts.

  2. Divergent Activity Profiles of Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Channels Carrying Malignant Hyperthermia and Central Core Disease Mutations in the Amino-Terminal Region.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Oyamada, Hideto; Suzuki, Junji; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Oguchi, Katsuji; Iino, Masamitsu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and is mutated in several diseases, including malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD). Most MH and CCD mutations cause accelerated Ca2+ release, resulting in abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle. However, how specific mutations affect the channel to produce different phenotypes is not well understood. In this study, we have investigated 11 mutations at 7 different positions in the amino (N)-terminal region of RyR1 (9 MH and 2 MH/CCD mutations) using a heterologous expression system in HEK293 cells. In live-cell Ca2+ imaging at room temperature (~25 °C), cells expressing mutant channels exhibited alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., an enhanced sensitivity to caffeine, a depletion of Ca2+ in the ER and an increase in resting cytoplasmic Ca2+. RyR1 channel activity was quantitatively evaluated by [3H]ryanodine binding and three parameters (sensitivity to activating Ca2+, sensitivity to inactivating Ca2+ and attainable maximum activity, i.e., gain) were obtained by fitting analysis. The mutations increased the gain and the sensitivity to activating Ca2+ in a site-specific manner. The gain was consistently higher in both MH and MH/CCD mutations. Sensitivity to activating Ca2+ was markedly enhanced in MH/CCD mutations. The channel activity estimated from the three parameters provides a reasonable explanation to the pathological phenotype assessed by Ca2+ homeostasis. These properties were also observed at higher temperatures (~37 °C). Our data suggest that divergent activity profiles may cause varied disease phenotypes by specific mutations. This approach should be useful for diagnosis and treatment of diseases with mutations in RyR1.

  3. Calcium-dependent energetics of calmodulin domain interactions with regulatory regions of the Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (RyR1).

    PubMed

    Newman, Rhonda A; Sorensen, Brenda R; Kilpatrick, Adina M; Shea, Madeline A

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) allosterically regulates the homo-tetrameric human Ryanodine Receptor Type 1 (hRyR1): apo CaM activates the channel, while (Ca(2+))4-CaM inhibits it. CaM-binding RyR1 residues 1975-1999 and 3614-3643 were proposed to allow CaM to bridge adjacent RyR1 subunits. Fluorescence anisotropy titrations monitored the binding of CaM and its domains to peptides encompassing hRyR(11975-1999) or hRyR1(3614-3643). Both CaM and its C-domain associated in a calcium-independent manner with hRyR1(3614-3643) while N-domain required calcium and bound ~250-fold more weakly. Association with hRyR1(11975-1999) was weak. Both hRyR1 peptides increased the calcium-binding affinity of both CaM domains, while maintaining differences between them. These energetics support the CaM C-domain association with hRyR1(3614-3643) at low calcium, positioning CaM to respond to calcium efflux. However, the CaM N-domain affinity for hRyR(11975-1999) alone was insufficient to support CaM bridging adjacent RyR1 subunits. Other proteins or elements of the hRyR1 structure must contribute to the energetics of CaM-mediated regulation.

  4. Clustering, cosmology and a new era of black hole demographics- II. The conditional luminosity functions of Type 2 and Type 1 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    The orientation-based unification model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) posits that the principle difference between obscured (Type 2) and unobscured (Type 1) AGNs is the line of sight into the central engine. If this model is correct then there should be no difference in many of the properties of AGN host galaxies (e.g. the mass of the surrounding dark matter haloes). However, recent clustering analyses of Type 1 and Type 2 AGNs have provided some evidence for a difference in the halo mass, in conflict with the orientation-based unified model. In this work, a method to compute the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs is presented. The CLF allows many fundamental halo properties to be computed as a function of AGN luminosity, which we apply to the question of the host halo masses of Type 1 and 2 AGNs. By making use of the total AGN CLF, the Type 1 X-ray luminosity function, and the luminosity-dependent Type 2 AGN fraction, the CLFs of Type 1 and 2 AGNs are calculated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9. At both z, there is no statistically significant difference in the mean halo mass of Type 2 and 1 AGNs at any luminosity. There is marginal evidence that Type 1 AGNs may have larger halo masses than Type 2s, which would be consistent with an evolutionary picture where quasars are initially obscured and then subsequently reveal themselves as Type 1s. As the Type 1 lifetime is longer, the host halo will increase somewhat in mass during the Type 1 phase. The CLF technique will be a powerful way to study the properties of many AGNs subsets (e.g. radio-loud, Compton-thick) as future wide-area X-ray and optical surveys substantially increase our ability to place AGNs in their cosmological context.

  5. Role of agonistic autoantibodies against type-1 angiotensin II receptor in the pathogenesis of retinopathy in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yuxian; Wang, Xiaofang; Zheng, Yanqian; Jin, Zhu; Zhi, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism underlying AT1-AA-induced retinopathy in severe preeclampsia by measuring the positive rate and titer of AT1-AA in plasma from women with severe preeclampsia and normal pregnant women to see whether AT1-AA titer was correlated with the grade of retinopathy. A preeclampsia rat model was also established by intravenous injection of AT1-AA extracted from the plasma of patient suffering from severe preeclampsia. The results showed that the plasma titer and positive rate of AT1-AA were significantly higher in women with severe preeclampsia than normal pregnant women. The antibody titer in cases of severe preeclampsia was associated with the grade of retinopathy, and positively correlated with the level of TNF-α and VEGF. The animal experiment results showed that the modeled rats presented symptoms very similar to symptoms of human preeclampsia, including retinopathy. Ocular fundus examination showed retinal microvascular abnormalities, hemorrhaging and leakage in the severe preeclampsia. Morphological changes included edema, thickening of the INL and ONL, and pigment atrophy. TNF-α and VEGF levels were increased in the vitreous humor and retina of the model rats. Our studies results suggest that abnormal expression of AT1-AA could induce damage to retinal capillary endothelial cells and increase vascular permeability, resulting in retinopathy. PMID:27381670

  6. Phase I study of humanized monoclonal antibody AVE1642 directed against the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), administered in combination with anticancer therapies to patients with advanced solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, V. M.; Middleton, M. R.; Protheroe, A. S.; Tolcher, A.; Dieras, V.; Sessa, C.; Bahleda, R.; Blay, J.-Y.; LoRusso, P.; Mery-Mignard, D.; Soria, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) mediates resistance to chemotherapy and targeted agents. This study assessed the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and tolerability of humanized IGF-1R antibody AVE1642 with other cancer treatments. Patients Patients with advanced solid tumors received three weekly AVE1642 dosed at 6 mg/kg, chosen following previous study, with 75 (cohort A) or 100 mg/m2 (B) docetaxel, 1250 mg/m2 gemcitabine/100 mg erlotinib (C1), or 60 mg/m2 doxorubicin (D1). Blood samples were assayed for PK, IGFs, and IGF-BP3. Results Fifty-eight patients received 317 AVE1642 infusions. The commonest adverse events were diarrhea (37/58 patients), asthenia (34/58), nausea (30/58), and stomatitis (21/58). Dose-limiting toxic effects in cohorts C1 (diarrhea) and D1 (neutropenia) prompted addition of cohorts C2 (1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine/75 mg erlotinib) and D2 (50 mg/m2 doxorubicin). Grade 3–4 hyperglycemia (three cases) accompanied steroid premedication for docetaxel administration. No PK interactions were detected. There were three partial responses in cohorts B (melanoma) and C (leiomyosarcoma, two cases) and 22 stabilizations ≥12 weeks, giving a control rate of 25/57 (44%). On treatment IGF-II rose by 68 ± 25 ng/ml in patients discontinuing treatment <12 weeks, and fell by 55.5 ± 21 ng/ml with disease control (P < 0.001). Conclusion AVE1642 was tolerable with 75–100 mg/m2 docetaxel and 1000 mg/m2 gemcitabine/75 mg erlotinib, achieving durable disease control in 44%, with an association between IGF-II and response. PMID:23104723

  7. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  8. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  9. Involvement of the V1/V2 variable loop structure in the exposure of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 epitopes induced by receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, R; Moore, J; Accola, M; Desjardin, E; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1995-01-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to the cellular receptor CD4 has been suggested to induce conformational changes in the viral envelope glycoproteins that promote virus entry. Conserved, discontinuous epitopes on the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein recognized by the 17b, 48d, and A32 antibodies are preferentially exposed upon the binding of soluble CD4 (sCD4). The binding of the 17b and 48d antibodies to the gp120 glycoprotein can also be enhanced by the binding of the A32 antibody. Here we constructed HIV-1 gp120 mutants in which the variable segments of the V1/V2 and V3 structures were deleted, individually or in combination, while the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes were retained. The effects of the variable loop deletions on the function of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins and on the exposure of epitopes induced by sCD4 or A32 binding to the monomeric gp120 glycoprotein were examined. The variable-loop-deleted envelope glycoproteins were able to mediate virus entry, albeit at lower efficiencies than those of the wild-type glycoproteins. Thus, the V1/V2 and V3 variable sequences contribute to the efficiency of HIV-1 entry but are not absolutely required for the process. Neither the V1/V2 nor V3 loops were necessary for the increase in exposure of the 17b/48d epitopes induced by binding of the A32 monoclonal antibody. By contrast, induction of the 17b, 48d, and A32 epitopes by sCD4 binding apparently involves a movement of the V1/V2 loops, which in the absence of CD4 partially mask these epitopes on the native gp120 monomer. The results obtained with a mutant glycoprotein containing a deletion of the V1 loop alone indicated that the contribution of the V2 loop to these phenomena was more significant than that of the V1 sequences. These results suggest that the V1/V2 loops, which have been previously implicated in CD4-modulated, postattachment steps in HIV-1 entry, contribute to CD4-induced gp120 conformational changes detected by the 17b, 48d, and A

  10. Malignant hyperthermia susceptibility arising from altered resting coupling between the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel and the type 1 ryanodine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Eltit, Jose Miguel; Bannister, Roger A.; Moua, Ong; Altamirano, Francisco; Hopkins, Philip M.; Pessah, Isaac N.; Molinski, Tadeusz F.; López, Jose R.; Beam, Kurt G.; Allen, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) susceptibility is a dominantly inherited disorder in which volatile anesthetics trigger aberrant Ca2+ release in skeletal muscle and a potentially fatal rise in perioperative body temperature. Mutations causing MH susceptibility have been identified in two proteins critical for excitation–contraction (EC) coupling, the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and CaV1.1, the principal subunit of the L-type Ca2+ channel. All of the mutations that have been characterized previously augment EC coupling and/or increase the rate of L-type Ca2+ entry. The CaV1.1 mutation R174W associated with MH susceptibility occurs at the innermost basic residue of the IS4 voltage-sensing helix, a residue conserved among all CaV channels [Carpenter D, et al. (2009) BMC Med Genet 10:104–115.]. To define the functional consequences of this mutation, we expressed it in dysgenic (CaV1.1 null) myotubes. Unlike previously described MH-linked mutations in CaV1.1, R174W ablated the L-type current and had no effect on EC coupling. Nonetheless, R174W increased sensitivity of Ca2+ release to caffeine (used for MH diagnostic in vitro testing) and to volatile anesthetics. Moreover, in CaV1.1 R174W-expressing myotubes, resting myoplasmic Ca2+ levels were elevated, and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores were partially depleted, compared with myotubes expressing wild-type CaV1.1. Our results indicate that CaV1.1 functions not only to activate RyR1 during EC coupling, but also to suppress resting RyR1-mediated Ca2+ leak from the SR, and that perturbation of CaV1.1 negative regulation of RyR1 leak identifies a unique mechanism that can sensitize muscle cells to MH triggers. PMID:22547813

  11. Roles of dorsal column pathway and transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 in augmentation of cerebral blood flow by upper cervical spinal cord stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Farber, J P; Wu, M; Foreman, R D; Qin, C

    2008-04-09

    Clinical and basic studies have indicated that upper cervical spinal cord stimulation (cSCS) significantly increases cerebral blood flow (CBF), but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This investigation was conducted to differentiate between stimulation of dorsal column fibers and upper cervical spinal cord cell bodies in cSCS-induced increases in CBF and decreases in cerebrovascular resistance (CVR). cSCS (50 Hz, 0.2 ms, 1 min) was applied on the left C1-C2 dorsal column of pentobarbital anesthetized, ventilated and paralyzed male rats. Laser Doppler flowmetry probes were placed bilaterally over the parietal cortex, and arterial pressure was monitored. cSCS at 30%, 60%, and 90% of motor threshold (MT) produced vasodilation bilaterally in cerebral cortices. Subsequently, cSCS was applied at 90% MT, and ipsilateral responses were recorded. Ibotenic acid (0.3 mg/ml, 0.1 ml) placed on dorsal surface of C1-C2 (n=7) to suppress cell body activity, did not affect cSCS-induced %DeltaCBF (42.5+/-8.1% vs. 36.8+/-7.1%, P>0.05) and %DeltaCVR (-19.4+/-4.2% vs. -15.2+/-5.6%, P>0.05). However, bilateral transection of the dorsal column at rostral C1 (n=8) abolished cSCS-induced changes in CBF and CVR. Also, rostral C1 transection (n=7) abolished cSCS-induced changes in CBF and CVR. Resinferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist, was used to inactivate TRPV1 containing nerve fibers/cell bodies. RTX (2 microg/ml, 0.1 ml) placed on the C1-C2 spinal cord (n=7) did not affect cSCS-induced %DeltaCBF (60.2+/-8.1% vs. 46.3+/-7.7%, P>0.05) and %DeltaCVR (-25.5+/-3.5% vs. -21.4+/-8.9%, P>0.05). However, i.v. RTX (2 microg/kg, n=9) decreased cSCS-induced %DeltaCBF from 65.0+/-9.5% to 27.4+/-7.2% (P<0.05) and %DeltaCVR from -28.0+/-7.6% to -14.8+/-4.2% (P<0.05). These results indicated that cSCS-increases in CBF and decreases in CVR occurred via rostral spinal dorsal column fibers and did not depend upon C1-C2 cell bodies. Also

  12. Effect of repetitive high-dose treatment with soluble complement receptor type 1 and cobra venom factor on discordant xenograft survival.

    PubMed

    Candinas, D; Lesnikoski, B A; Robson, S C; Miyatake, T; Scesney, S M; Marsh, H C; Ryan, U S; Dalmasso, A P; Hancock, W W; Bach, F H

    1996-08-15

    Hyperacute xenograft rejection may be modified by the activation and depletion of complement (C) using cobra venom factor (CVF). This method of prolonging xenograft survival is toxic and associated with systemic inflammation, which may potentially contribute to the pathologic features of delayed xenograft rejection. Soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) inhibits both the classical and alternative C pathways and thus limits the production of proinflammatory products such as the anaphylatoxins. Hence, we investigated the effects of various sCR1 and CVF regimens, and combinations thereof, in the discordant guinea pig-to-Lewis rat cardiac xenograft model. Mean graft survival time (MST) was significantly prolonged with repetitive dosing (MST=22 hr) or continuous infusion of sCR1 (MST=32 hr) as compared with unmodified controls (MST=15 min). However, sCR1 did not prevent intragraft deposition of C3 or neutrophil infiltration and resulted in only partial inhibition of C-mediated hemolytic activity in vitro. Grafts in rats treated with a single dose of CVF (MST=67 hr) or repetitive doses of CVF (MST=69 hr) survived significantly longer than those treated with sCR1 alone, and lacked C3 deposition or neutrophil accumulation. Sera from these animals were completely depleted of C-mediated hemolytic activity. Animals treated with a single dose of CVF, or sCRI plus a single dose of CVF (MST=64 hr), had similar xenograft survival times. However, immunohistologic studies showed that addition of sCR1 to a single dose of CVF resulted in decreased macrophage activation and reduced levels of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta) within xenografts as compared with that in recipients treated with CVF alone. Such decreased macrophage activation may result from the binding of C4b by sCR1, since combination therapy was associated with decreased intragraft C4b as compared with either therapy alone. High doses of sCR1 were well tolerated by rats and significantly

  13. Tissue factor and Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 in hyperglycaemia-hyperinsulinaemia. Effects in healthy subjects, and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anamika; Boden, Guenther; Rao, A Koneti

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) patients have an increased incidence of cardiovascular events. Blood tissue factor-procoagulant activity (TF-PCA), the initiating mechanism for blood coagulation, is elevated in DM. We have shown that hyperglycaemia (HG), hyperinsulinaemia (HI) and combined HG+HI (induced using 24-hour infusion clamps) increases TF-PCA in healthy and type 2 DM (T2DM) subjects, but not in type 1 DM (T1DM) subjects. The mechanisms for this are unknown. DM patients have elevated plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand. We postulated that TLR4 plays a role in modulating TF levels. We studied the effect of HG+HI on TLR4 and TF-PCA in vivo during 24-hour HG+HI infusion clamps in healthy subjects, and T1DM and T2DM subjects, and in vitro in blood. In vivo, in healthy subjects, 24-hour HG + HI infusion increased TLR4 six-fold, which correlated with TF-PCA (r= 0.91, p<0.0001). T2DM patients showed smaller increases in both. In T1DM subjects, TLR4 declined (50%, p<0.05) and correlated with TF-PCA (r=0.55; p<0.05). In vitro, HG (200 mg/dl added glucose) and HI (1-100 nM added insulin) increased TF-PCA in healthy subjects (~2-fold, 2-4 hours). Insulin inhibited by ~30% LPS-induced increase in TF-PCA and high glucose reversed it. TLR4 levels paralleled TF-PCA (r=0.71, p<0.0001); HG and HI increased TLR4 and insulin inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 increase. This is first evidence that even in healthy subjects, HG of short duration increases TLR4 and TF-PCA, key players in inflammation and thrombosis. TLR4-TF interplay is strikingly different in non-diabetic, T1DM and T2DM subjects.

  14. Kinetic, pharmacological and activity-dependent separation of two Ca2+ signalling pathways mediated by type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat Purkinje neurones

    PubMed Central

    Canepari, Marco; Ogden, David

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1) in Purkinje neurones (PNs) are important for motor learning and coordination. Here, two divergent mGluR1 Ca2+-signalling pathways and the associated membrane conductances were distinguished kinetically and pharmacologically after activation by 1-ms photorelease of l-glutamate or by bursts of parallel fibre (PF) stimulation. A new, mGluR1-mediated transient K+ conductance was seen prior to the slow EPSC (sEPSC). It was seen only in PNs previously allowed to fire spontaneously or held at depolarized potentials for several seconds and was slowly inhibited by agatoxin IVA, which blocks P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. It peaked in 148 ms, had well-defined kinetics and, unlike the sEPSC, was abolished by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122. It was blocked by the BK Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker iberiotoxin and unaffected by apamin, indicating selective activation of BK channels by PLC-dependent store-released Ca2+. The K+ conductance and underlying transient Ca2+ release showed a highly reproducible delay of 99.5 ms following PF burst stimulation, with a precision of 1–2 ms in repeated responses of the same PN, and a subsequent fast rise and fall of Ca2+ concentration. Analysis of Ca2+ signals showed that activation of the K+ conductance by Ca2+ release occured in small dendrites and subresolution structures, most probably spines. The results show that PF burst stimulation activates two pathways of mGluR1 signalling in PNs. First, transient, PLC-dependent Ca2+ release from stores with precisely reproducible timing and second, slower Ca2+ influx in the cation-permeable sEPSC channel. The priming by prior Ca2+ influx in P/Q-type Ca2+ channels may determine the path of mGluR1 signalling. The precise timing of PLC-mediated store release may be important for interactions of PF mGluR1 signalling with other inputs to the PN. PMID:16497716

  15. Testicular gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown constitutively impairs diurnal testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II) and its specific receptor (GnRHR-II) are highly expressed in the testis, suggesting an important role in testis biology. Gene coding errors prevent the production of GnRH-II and GnRHR-II in many species, but both genes are functional in swine. We have demo...

  16. Characterization of the Igf-II Binding Site of the IGF-II/MAN-6-P Receptor Extracellular Domain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmroudi, Farideh

    1995-01-01

    In mammals, insulin-like growth factor II (IGF -II) and glycoproteins bearing the mannose 6-phosphate (Man -6-P) recognition marker bind with high affinity to the same receptor. The functional consequences of IGF-II binding to the receptor at the cell surface are not clear. In these studies, we sought to broaden our understanding of the functional regions of the receptor regarding its IGF -II binding site. The IGF-II binding/cross-linking domain of the IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor was mapped by sequencing receptor fragments covalently attached to IGF-II. Purified rat placental or bovine liver receptors were affinity-labeled, with ^{125}I-IGF-II and digested with endoproteinase Glu-C. Analysis of digests by gel electrophoresis revealed a major radiolabeled band of 18 kDa, which was purified by gel filtration chromatography followed by reverse-phase HPLC and electroblotting. Sequence analysis revealed that, the peptide S(H)VNSXPMF, located within extracellular repeat 10 and beginning with serine 1488 of the bovine receptor, was the best candidate for the IGF-II cross-linked peptide. These data indicated that residues within repeats 10-11 were important for IGF -II binding. To define the location of the IGF-II binding site further, a nested set of six human receptor cDNA constructs was designed to produce epitope-tagged fusion proteins encompassing the region between repeats 8 and 11 of the human IGF-II/Man-6-P receptor extracellular domain. These truncated receptors were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, immunoprecipitated and analyzed for their abilities to bind and cross-link to IGF-II. All of the constructs were capable of binding/cross-linking to IGF-II, except for the 9.0-11 construct. Displacement curve analysis indicated that the truncated receptors were approximately equivalent in IGF-II binding affinity, but were of 5- to 10-fold lower affinity than full-length receptors. Sequencing of the 9.0-11 construct indicated the presence of a point mutation

  17. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  18. Angiotensin II type 2 receptors and nitric oxide sustain oxygenation in the clipped kidney of early Goldblatt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Connors, Stephanie G; Mendonca, Margarida; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2008-02-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) decrease the glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow in the clipped kidneys of early 2-kidney, 1-clip Goldblatt hypertensive rats, but the consequences for oxygenation are unclear. We investigated the hypothesis that angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptors or NO synthase mediate renal oxygenation responses to ACEI. Three weeks after left renal artery clipping, kidney function, oxygen (O(2)) use, renal blood flow, renal cortical blood flow, and renal cortical oxygen tension (Po(2)) were measured after acute administration of an ACEI (enalaprilat) and after acute administration of ACEI following acute administration of an angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptor blocker (candesartan or PD-123,319) or an NO synthase blocker (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester with control of renal perfusion pressure) and compared with mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure to the levels after ACEI. The basal renal cortical Po(2) of clipped kidneys was significantly lower than contralateral kidneys (35+/-1 versus 51+/-1 mm Hg; n=40 each). ACEI lowered renal venous Po(2), cortical Po(2), renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and cortical blood flow and increased the renal vascular resistance in the clipped kidney, whereas mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure was ineffective. PD-123,319 and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not candesartan, reduced the Po(2) of clipped kidneys and blocked the fall in Po(2) with acute ACEI administration. In conclusion, oxygen availability in the clipped kidney is maintained by angiotensin II generation, angiotensin II type 2 receptors, and NO synthase. This discloses a novel mechanism whereby angiotensin can prevent hypoxia in a kidney challenged with a reduced perfusion pressure.

  19. Effect of dietary fiber on the level of free angiotensin II receptor blocker in vitro.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Tamezane, Yui; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakagawa, Minami; Imai, Kimie; Nakanishi, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs), such as losartan potassium (LO), candesartan (CA), and telmisartan (TE), and dietary fiber was studied as to the level of free ARB in vitro. When ARB was incubated with soluble (sodium alginate, pectin, and glucomannan) or insoluble (cellulose and chitosan) dietary fiber, the levels of free LO, TE, and CA decreased. This resulted only from mixing the dietary fiber with the ARBs and differed among the types of dietary fiber, and the pH and electrolytes in the mixture. The levels of free LO and TE tended to decrease with a higher concentration of sodium chloride in pH 1.2 fluid. These results suggest that it is important to pay attention to the possible interactions between ARBs and dietary fiber.

  20. A Novel Approach to Identify Two Distinct Receptor Binding Surfaces of Insulin-like Growth Factor II*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Ong, Shee Chee; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Forbes, Briony E.

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the residues important for the interaction of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) with the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin, to which IGF-II is homologous, is proposed to cross-link opposite halves of the IR dimer through two receptor binding surfaces, site 1 and site 2. In the present study we have analyzed the contribution of IGF-II residues equivalent to insulin's two binding surfaces toward the interaction of IGF-II with the IGF-1R and IR. Four “site 1” and six “site 2” analogues were produced and analyzed in terms of IGF-1R and IR binding and activation. The results show that Val43, Phe28, and Val14 (equivalent to site 1) are critical to IGF-1R and IR binding, whereas mutation to alanine of Gln18 affects only IGF-1R and not IR binding. Alanine substitutions at Glu12, Asp15, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 analogues resulted in significant (>2-fold) decreases in affinity for both the IGF-1R and IR. Furthermore, taking a novel approach using a monomeric, single-chain minimized IGF-1R we have defined a distinct second binding surface formed by Glu12, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 that potentially engages the IGF-1R at one or more of the FnIII domains. PMID:19139090

  1. Possible involvement of type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors up-regulated by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in mouse nucleus accumbens neurons in the development of methamphetamine-induced place preference.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, K; Mizuno, K; Ohkuma, S

    2012-12-27

    Little is known about regulatory mechanisms of type 1 inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (IP(3)R-1) expression in conditioned place preference by methamphetamine (METH), though significant enhancement of IP(3)R-1 expression in the mouse frontal cortex and limbic forebrain by intermittent administration of cocaine is reported. The present study investigated the role and regulation of IP(3)R-1 in mice with METH-induced place preference. Injection of IP(3)R antagonists with different chemical structures, 2-aminophenoxyethane-borate and xestospongin C, into the mouse nucleus accumbens (NAcc) dose-dependently inhibited METH-induced place preference. The levels of IP(3)R-1 protein in the NAcc of METH-conditioned mice significantly increased, which was completely abolished by microinjection of SCH23390 and raclopride, selective dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor (D1 and D2DR) antagonists respectively, into the mouse NAcc. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed co-localization of immunoreactivity for IP(3)R-1 and those for D1 and D2DRs in the NAcc. These findings suggest that IP(3)R-1 could be involved in the development of METH-induced place preference and that D1 and D2DRs in the NAcc of mice showing METH-induced place preference play possible regulatory roles in IP(3)R-1 expression.

  2. A combined optical and X-ray study of unobscured type 1 active galactic nuclei - II. Relation between X-ray emission and optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chichuan; Ward, Martin; Done, Chris

    2012-06-01

    In this second paper in a series of three, we study the properties of the various emission features and underlying continuum in the optical spectra of type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the unobscured hard X-ray emission as a diagnostic. We introduce the use of the 'correlation spectrum technique' (CST) for the first time. We use this to show the strength of the correlation between the hard X-ray luminosity and each wavelength of the optical spectrum. This shows that for broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies all the strong emission lines (the broad component of Hα and Hβ, [Ne III] λλ3869/3967, [O I] λλ6300/6364, [O II] λλ3726/3729 and [O III] λλ4959/5007) and the optical underlying continuum all strongly correlate with the hard X-ray emission. In contrast, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies show a stronger correlation in the optical continuum but a weaker correlation in the lines. A cross-correlation with luminosity between the various Balmer line components and the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) components shows that the best correlation exists between the hard X-ray component and the broad component (BC) of the Balmer lines. Such a correlation is weaker for the intermediate (IC) and narrow components, which supports the view that the broad-line region (BLR) has the closest link with the AGN's compact X-ray emission. The equivalent widths of the Balmer line IC and BC are found to correlate with ?, ?, Balmer line full width at half-maximum (FWHM) and black hole mass. There is a non-linear dependence of the Balmer line IC and BC luminosities with ? and L5100, which suggests that a second-order factor such as the intermediate-line region (ILR) and BLR covering factors affect the Balmer line component luminosities. The Balmer decrement is found to decrease from ˜5 in the line core to ˜2 in the extended wings, with mean decrements of 2.1 in the BLR and 4.8 in the ILR. This suggests different physical conditions in these regions, such as

  3. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and PKC-{alpha} are involved in the inhibitory effects of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngiotensinII subtype AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, on AngiotensinII-induced vascular contraction in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Wang Wei; Wang Qiujuan Wu Jinhui; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming

    2007-12-07

    The vasoactive peptide AngiotensinII (AngII) is an important factor in the cardiovascular system, exerting most of its effects through AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}). Ib, a new nonpeptide AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, has been observed to play a positive role in the treatment of hypertension in preclinical tests. In this study, the inhibitory effects of Ib on AngII-induced vascular contraction in vitro were investigated, and its molecular mechanisms were further explored. In endothelium-denuded aortic rings from rabbits, Ib produced a rightward shift in the concentration-response curve for AngII with a decrease in the maximal contractile response and the pD{sub 2}{sup '} was 7.29. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was inhibited by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. Ib could inhibit both AngII-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization from internal stores and Ca{sup 2+} influx. Moreover, the translocation of PKC-{alpha} stimulated by AngII was inhibited by Ib. Thus, the inhibitory effects of Ib might be related with the depression on AngII-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and translocation of PKC-{alpha} through blocking AT{sub 1} receptors.

  4. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  5. The angiotensin receptor type 1-Gq protein-phosphatidyl inositol phospholipase Cbeta-protein kinase C pathway is involved in activation of proximal tubule Na+-ATPase activity by angiotensin(1-7) in pig kidneys.

    PubMed

    Lara, Lucienne S; Correa, Juliana S; Lavelle, Anouchka B; Lopes, Anibal G; Caruso-Neves, Celso

    2008-05-01

    In a previous study, we observed that angiotensin(1-7) (Ang(1-7)) stimulates proximal tubule Na+-ATPase activity through the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1R). Here we aimed to study the signalling pathways involved. Our results show that the stimulatory effect of Ang(1-7) on Na+-ATPase activity through AT1R involves a Gq protein-phosphatidyl inositol-phospholipase Cbeta (PI-PLCbeta) pathway because: (1) the effect was reversed by GDPbetaS, a non-hydrolysable GDP analogue, and by a monoclonal Gq protein antibody; (2) the effect was similar and not additive to that of GTPgammaS, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue; (3) Ang(1-7) induced a rapid decrease (30 s) in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate levels, a PI-PLCbeta substrate; and (4) U73122, a specific inhibitor of PI-PLCbeta, abolished Ang(1-7)-induced stimulation of Na+-ATPase activity. Angiotensin(1-7) increased the protein kinase C (PKC) activity similarly to phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKC. This effect was reversed by losartan, a specific antagonist of AT1R. The stimulatory effects of Ang(1-7) and PMA on Na+-ATPase activity are similar, non-additive and reversed by calphostin C, a specific inhibitor of PKC. A catalytic subunit of PKC (PKC-M) increased the Na+-ATPase activity. These data show that Ang(1-7) stimulates Na+-ATPase activity through the AT1R-Gq protein-PI-PLCbeta-PKC pathway. This effect is similar to that described for angiotensin II, showing for the first time that these compounds could have similar effects in the renal system.

  6. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan attenuates aortic stiffening and remodelling in STZ-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention or attenuation of diabetic vascular complications includes anti-hypertensive treatment with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors on account of their protective effects beyond blood pressure reduction. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), on blood pressure, aortic stiffening, and aortic remodelling in experimental type 1 diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) (65 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. One diabetic group was treated for 10 weeks with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day p/o). Pressure-independent aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured under anaesthesia after intravenous infusion of phenylephrine and nitroglycerine. Aortic wall samples were collected for histomorphometrical analysis. Results Untreated diabetes imposed differential effects on aortic stiffening, as demonstrated by increased isobaric PWV over a range of high blood pressures, but not at lower blood pressures. This was associated with loss and disruption of elastin fibres and an increase in collagen fibres in the aortic media. Treatment with telmisartan decreased resting blood pressure, reduced aortic stiffness, and partially prevented the degradation of elastin network within the aortic wall. Conclusions Telmisartan improved the structural and functional indices of aortic stiffening induced by untreated STZ-diabetes, demonstrating the importance of ARBs in the therapeutic approach to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:24920962

  7. Nigral dopamine type-1 receptors are reduced in Huntington's disease: A postmortem autoradiographic study using ( sup 3 H)SCH 23390 and correlation with ( sup 3 H)forskolin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Wagster, M.V.; Folstein, S.; Price, D.L.; Hedreen, J.C.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1990-11-01

    Intrastriatal injection of excitatory amino acids, particularly quinolinic acid, has been proposed as an animal model of Huntington's disease. Such neurotoxic lesions of caudate-putamen result in marked dopamine type-1 (D1) receptor losses in the injected nuclei as well as in the ipsilateral substantia nigra pars reticulata. Postmortem human substantia nigra from Huntington's disease brains and from control brains were examined using in vitro autoradiography. A marked reduction in ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390 binding (labeling D1 receptors) in the substantia nigra of postmortem brains of Huntington's patients was identified, thus paralleling the alterations seen in the animal models. A positive, statistically significant correlation was also encountered between D1 receptor binding (labeled by ({sup 3}H)SCH 23390) and ({sup 3}H)forskolin binding (which identifies adenylate cyclase, a second messenger system linked to D1 receptor activation). The results suggest that in the human--as in lower vertebrates--D1 receptors are located on striatonigral terminals and that D1 receptor loss tends to be paralleled by a reduction in adenylate cyclase. Radioactive agents selective for the D1 receptor may prove useful in future studies of Huntington's disease using positron emission tomography scanning.

  8. Scavenger Receptor Class B Type 1 Deletion Led to Coronary Atherosclerosis and Ischemic Heart Disease in Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor Knockout Mice on Modified Western-type Diet

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiawei; Guo, Xin; Wang, Mengyu; Dong, Chengyan; Gao, Mingming; Wang, Huan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Yuhui; Wang, Fan; Liu, George

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE) or low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) knockout (KO) mice are generally resistant to developing coronary atherosclerosis (CA) and ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, studies have demonstrated the occurrence of spontaneous CA and IHD in scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI)/apoE double KO (dKO) mice, which suggests that SR-BI could be a potential target for the prevention and therapy of CA and IHD. This possibility was later investigated in SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice, but no signs of CA or IHD was identified when mice were fed a normal western-type diet. Here we explored whether SR-BI deletion could result in CA and IHD in LDL-R KO mice when fed a modified western-type diet containing higher (0.5%) cholesterol. Methods: Cardiac functions were detected by electrocardiography, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), echocardiography (Echo) and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. CA was visualized by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: After 12 weeks on the modified diet, SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice developed cardiac ischemia/infarction, together with systolic dysfunction and left ventricular dilatation. CA was most severe at the aortic sinus level to an extent that no dKO mice survived to 20 weeks on the modified diet. None of control mice, however, developed CA or IHD. Conclusions: SR-BI deletion led to CA and IHD in LDL-R KO mice when fed the modified western-type diet. We established SR-BI/LDL-R dKO mice as a diet-induced murine model of human IHD and developed detection methods, using a combination of SPECT and Echo, for effective in vivo evaluation of cardiac functions. PMID:27373983

  9. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. PMID:26648693

  10. Macrocyclic receptor showing extremely high Sr(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Ca(II) selectivities with potential application in chelation treatment of metal intoxication.

    PubMed

    Ferreirós-Martínez, Raquel; Esteban-Gómez, David; Tóth, Éva; de Blas, Andrés; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Rodríguez-Blas, Teresa

    2011-04-18

    Herein we report a detailed investigation of the complexation properties of the macrocyclic decadentate receptor N,N'-Bis[(6-carboxy-2-pyridil)methyl]-4,13-diaza-18-crown-6 (H(2)bp18c6) toward different divalent metal ions [Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Sr(II), and Ca(II)] in aqueous solution. We have found that this ligand is especially suited for the complexation of large metal ions such as Sr(II) and Pb(II), which results in very high Pb(II)/Ca(II) and Pb(II)/Zn(II) selectivities (in fact, higher than those found for ligands widely used for the treatment of lead poisoning such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (edta)), as well as in the highest Sr(II)/Ca(II) selectivity reported so far. These results have been rationalized on the basis of the structure of the complexes. X-ray crystal diffraction, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as theoretical calculations at the density functional theory (B3LYP) level have been performed. Our results indicate that for large metal ions such as Pb(II) and Sr(II) the most stable conformation is Δ(δλδ)(δλδ), while for Ca(II) our calculations predict the Δ(λδλ)(λδλ) form being the most stable one. The selectivity that bp18c6(2-) shows for Sr(II) over Ca(II) can be attributed to a better fit between the large Sr(II) ions and the relatively large crown fragment of the ligand. The X-ray crystal structure of the Pb(II) complex shows that the Δ(δλδ)(δλδ) conformation observed in solution is also maintained in the solid state. The Pb(II) ion is endocyclically coordinated, being directly bound to the 10 donor atoms of the ligand. The bond distances to the donor atoms of the pendant arms (2.55-2.60 Å) are substantially shorter than those between the metal ion and the donor atoms of the crown moiety (2.92-3.04 Å). This is a typical situation observed for the so-called hemidirected compounds, in which the Pb(II) lone pair is stereochemically active. The X-ray structures of the Zn(II) and Cd(II) complexes show that

  11. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to both induction and maintenance of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor-induced long-lasting mechanical allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokai, Masafumi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia, suggesting an important role of PACAP–PACAP receptors signaling system in the modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission. We have previously reported that a single intrathecal injection of PACAP or a PACAP specific (PAC1) receptor selective agonist, maxadilan, in mice induced dose-dependent aversive behaviors, which lasted more than 30 min, and suggested that the maintenance of the nociceptive behaviors was associated with the spinal astrocytic activation. Results We found that a single intrathecal administration of PACAP or maxadilan also produced long-lasting hind paw mechanical allodynia, which persisted at least 84 days without affecting thermal nociceptive threshold. In contrast, intrathecal application of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide did not change mechanical threshold, and substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or N-methyl-D-aspartate induced only transient mechanical allodynia, which disappeared within 21 days. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses with an astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein, revealed that the spinal PAC1 receptor stimulation caused sustained astrocytic activation, which also lasted more than 84 days. Intrathecal co-administration of L-α-aminoadipate, an astroglial toxin, with PACAP or maxadilan almost completely prevented the induction of the mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, intrathecal treatment of L-α-aminoadipate at 84 days after the PAC1 stimulation transiently reversed the mechanical allodynia accompanied by the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression level. Conclusion Our data suggest that spinal astrocytic activation triggered by the PAC1 receptor stimulation contributes to both induction and maintenance of the long-term mechanical allodynia. PMID:27175011

  12. Use of Enterally Delivered Angiotensin II Type Ia Receptor Antagonists to Reduce the Severity of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Koga, Hiroyuki; Larsen, Scott D.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Turbiak, Anjanette J.; Jin, Xiaohong; Lucas, Peter C.; Lipka, Elke; Hillfinger, John; Kim, Jae Seung

    2011-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces inflammation in several organ systems. Having found a fourfold increase in angiotensin II type Ia receptor expression in a dextran sodium sulfate colitis model, we targeted blockade with angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists to prevent colitis development. Because hypotension is a major complication of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists use, we hypothesized that use of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists compounds which lack cell membrane permeability, and thus enteric absorption, would allow for direct enteral delivery at far higher concentrations than would be tolerated systemically, yet retain efficacy. Methods Based on the structure of the angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist losartan, deschloro-losartan was synthesized, which has extremely poor cell membrane permeability. Angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy was evaluated by determining the ability to block NF-κB activation in vitro. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in mice and angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy delivered transanally was assessed. Results In vitro, deschloro-losartan demonstrated near equal angiotensin II type Ia receptor blockade compared to losartan as well as another angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist, candesartan. In the dextran sodium sulfate model, each compound significantly improved clinical and histologic scores and epithelial cell apoptosis. Abundance of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL6 mRNA were significantly decreased with each compound. In vitro and in vivo intestinal drug absorption, as well as measures of blood pressure and mucosal and colonic blood flow, showed significantly lower uptake of deschloro-losartan compared to losartan and candesartan. Conclusions This study demonstrated efficacy of high-dose angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists in this colitis model. We postulate that a specially designed angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist with

  13. Properties of angiotensin II receptors in glial cells from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Pulakat, L; Río, C; Valcárcel, C; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    The existence and the properties of angiotensin II receptors in the adult bovine and human corpus callosum (CC) were investigated by using Xenopus oocytes and primary glial cell cultures. In oocytes injected with CC mRNA, angiotensin II elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate/Ca(2+)-receptor-channel coupling system. The receptors expressed in oocytes and in CC cultures were pharmacologically similar to the AT1 receptor type as assayed by binding. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies in sections from CC and in glial cultures revealed that the receptors were molecularly related to the AT1 receptor and that they were present in astrocytes. In these cells, activation of the receptors with angiotensin II increased de novo DNA synthesis, promoted the release of aldosterone, and induced c-Fos expression. These findings indicate that CC astrocytes possess functional AT1 receptors that participate in various physiological processes. Images PMID:8170986

  14. Clinical Profile of Eprosartan: A Different Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Blankestijn, P. J; Rupp, H

    2008-01-01

    Rationale. The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important. Angiotensin II receptor blocker drugs (ARBs) have provided a useful class of anti-hypertensive drugs. Eprosartan is a relatively new ARB which is chemically distinct (non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole) from all other ARBs (biphenyl tetrazoles). An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system. Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs. The distinct properties of this non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole ARB might be relevant in the effort to reduce cardiovascular risk, also beyond its blood pressure lowering capacity. PMID:18855637

  15. Angiotensin II regulates brain (pro)renin receptor expression through activation of cAMP response element-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Wencheng; Liu, Jiao; Hammond, Sean L; Tjalkens, Ronald B; Saifudeen, Zubaida; Feng, Yumei

    2015-07-15

    We reported that brain (pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression levels are elevated in DOCA-salt-induced hypertension; however, the underlying mechanism remained unknown. To address whether ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) signaling is involved in this regulation, we implanted a DOCA pellet and supplied 0.9% saline as the drinking solution to C57BL/6J mice. Sham pellet-implanted mice that were provided regular drinking water served as controls. Concurrently, mice were intracerebroventricularly infused with the AT1R blocker losartan, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor captopril, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 3 wk. Intracerebroventricular infusion of losartan or captopril attenuated DOCA-salt-induced PRR mRNA elevation in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, suggesting a role for ANG II/AT1R signaling in regulating PRR expression during DOCA-salt hypertension. To test which ANG II/AT1R downstream transcription factors were involved in PRR regulation, we treated Neuro-2A cells with ANG II with or without CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) or AP-1 (activator protein-1) inhibitors, or CREB siRNA. CREB and AP-1 inhibitors, as well as CREB knockdown abolished ANG II-induced increases in PRR levels. ANG II also induced PRR upregulation in primary cultured neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ANG II treatment increased CREB binding to the endogenous PRR promoter in both cultured neurons and hypothalamic tissues of DOCA-salt hypertensive mice. This increase in CREB activity was reversed by AT1R blockade. Collectively, these findings indicate that ANG II acts via AT1R to upregulate PRR expression both in cultured cells and in DOCA-salt hypertensive mice by increasing CREB binding to the PRR promoter.

  16. HLA Class II Alleles Susceptibility Markers of Type 1 Diabetes Fail to Specify Phenotypes of Ketosis-Prone Diabetes in Adult Tunisian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Laadhar, Lilia; Harzallah, Fatma; Zitouni, Mondher; Kallel-Sellami, Maryam; Fekih, Moncef; Kaabachi, Naziha; Slimane, Hádia; Makni, Sondès

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to characterize the different subgroups of ketosis-prone diabetes (KPD) in a sample of Tunisian patients using the Aβ scheme based on the presence or absence of β-cell autoantibodies (A+ or A−) and β-cell functional reserve (β+ or β−) and we investigated whether HLA class II alleles could contribute to distinct KPD phenotypes. We enrolled 43 adult patients with a first episode of ketosis. For all patients we evaluated clinical parameters, β-cell autoimmunity, β-cell function and HLA class II alleles. Frequency distribution of the 4 subgroups was 23.3% A+β−, 23.3% A−β−, 11.6% A+β+ and 41.9% A−β+. Patients from the group A+β− were significantly younger than those from the group A−β− (P = .002). HLA susceptibility markers were significantly more frequent in patients with autoantibodies (P = .003). These patients also had resistance alleles but they were more frequent in A+β+ than A+β− patients (P = .04). Insulin requirement was not associated to the presence or the absence of HLA susceptibility markers. HLA class II alleles associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes have not allowed us to further define Tunisian KPD groups. However, high prevalence of HLA resistance alleles in our patients may reflect a particular genetic background of Tunisian KPD population. PMID:21461382

  17. pK(a) determination of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II) by spectrofluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, E; González, L; Alonso, R M; Jiménez, R M

    2001-10-01

    The acid-base equilibrium constants of a new family of antihypertensive drugs, the angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA II), Losartan, Irbesartan, Valsartan, Candesartan cilexetil, its metabolite Candesartan M1 and Telmisartan were determined by spectrofluorimetry. Relative fluorescent intensity (I(F,rel))-pH data were treated by graphical (derivatives and curve-fitting) and numerical methods (LETAGROP SPEFO). The resultant pK(a) values at an ionic strength of 0.5 M were (3.15+/-0.07) for Losartan, (4.70+/-0.06) for Irbesartan, (4.90+/-0.09) for Valsartan, (6.0+/-0.1) for Candesartan cilexetil, (3.9+/-0.1) for Candesartan M1, and (4.45+/-0.09) for Telmisartan.

  18. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothe