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Sample records for ii viral fusion

  1. Viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a "fusion loop" or "fusion peptide") engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics.

  2. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  3. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  4. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  5. Reduction of Influenza Virus Envelope's Fusogenicity by Viral Fusion Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rowse, Michael; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Yamauchi, Yohei; Wang, Guoxin; Luo, Ming

    2016-01-01

    During cell entry of an enveloped virus, the viral membrane must be fused with the cellular membrane. The virus envelope has a unique structure consisting of viral proteins and a virus-specific lipid composition, whereas the host membrane has its own structure with host membrane proteins. Compound 136 was previously found to bind in close proximity to the viral envelope and inhibit influenza virus entry. We showed here that the 136-treated influenza virus still caused hemolysis. When liposomes were used as the target membrane for 136-treated viruses, aberrant fusion occurred; few liposomes fused per virion, and glycoproteins were not distributed evenly across fusion complexes. Additionally, large fusion aggregates did not form, and in some instances, neck-like structures were found. Based on previous results and hemolysis, fusion inhibition by 136 occurs post-scission but prior to lipid mixing. PMID:27622947

  6. Hantavirus Gc glycoprotein: evidence for a class II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Gonzalez, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2005-11-01

    Hantavirus cell entry is promoted by its envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, through cell attachment and by fusion between viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. However, the role of Gn and Gc in receptor binding and cell fusion has not yet been defined. In this work, a sequence presenting characteristics similar to those of class II fusion peptides (FPs) of alphavirus E1 and flavivirus E proteins is identified within the hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. A three-dimensional comparative molecular model based on crystallographic data of tick-borne encephalitis virus E protein is proposed for the Andes virus (ANDV) Gc ectodomain, which supports a feasible class II fusion-protein fold. In vitro experimental evidence is provided for the binding activity of the ANDV FP candidate to artificial membranes, as demonstrated by fluorescence anisotropy assays. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Gc glycoprotein of hantaviruses and of other members of the family Bunyaviridae directs the viral fusion activity and that it may be classified as a class II viral fusion protein.

  7. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Katarzyna E.; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J.; Kasson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol’s ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  8. Premature activation of the paramyxovirus fusion protein before target cell attachment with corruption of the viral fusion machinery.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Palermo, Laura M; Yokoyama, Christine C; Orefice, Gianmarco; Fornabaio, Micaela; Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E; Greengard, Olga; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the childhood pathogen human parainfluenza virus type 3, enter host cells by fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. This fusion results from the concerted action of its two envelope glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion protein (F). The receptor-bound HN triggers F to undergo conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We proposed that, if the fusion process could be activated prematurely before the virion reaches the target host cell, infection could be prevented. We identified a small molecule that inhibits paramyxovirus entry into target cells and prevents infection. We show here that this compound works by an interaction with HN that results in F-activation prior to receptor binding. The fusion process is thereby prematurely activated, preventing fusion of the viral membrane with target cells and precluding viral entry. This first evidence that activation of a paramyxovirus F can be specifically induced before the virus contacts its target cell suggests a new strategy with broad implications for the design of antiviral agents.

  9. Dynamic Viral Glycoprotein Machines: Approaches for Probing Transient States That Drive Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    The fusion glycoproteins that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses undergo dramatic conformational changes in the course of engaging with target cells through receptor interactions and during cell entry. These refolding events ultimately drive the fusion of viral and cellular membranes leading to delivery of the genetic cargo. While well-established methods for structure determination such as X-ray crystallography have provided detailed structures of fusion proteins in the pre- and post-fusion fusion states, to understand mechanistically how these fusion glycoproteins perform their structural calisthenics and drive membrane fusion requires new analytical approaches that enable dynamic intermediate states to be probed. Methods including structural mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy have begun to provide new insight into pathways of conformational change and fusion protein function. In combination, the approaches provide a significantly richer portrait of viral fusion glycoprotein structural variation and fusion activation as well as inhibition by neutralizing agents. Here recent studies that highlight the utility of these complementary approaches will be reviewed with a focus on the well-characterized influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion glycoprotein system. PMID:26761026

  10. Dynamic Viral Glycoprotein Machines: Approaches for Probing Transient States That Drive Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalie K; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-01-11

    The fusion glycoproteins that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses undergo dramatic conformational changes in the course of engaging with target cells through receptor interactions and during cell entry. These refolding events ultimately drive the fusion of viral and cellular membranes leading to delivery of the genetic cargo. While well-established methods for structure determination such as X-ray crystallography have provided detailed structures of fusion proteins in the pre- and post-fusion fusion states, to understand mechanistically how these fusion glycoproteins perform their structural calisthenics and drive membrane fusion requires new analytical approaches that enable dynamic intermediate states to be probed. Methods including structural mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy have begun to provide new insight into pathways of conformational change and fusion protein function. In combination, the approaches provide a significantly richer portrait of viral fusion glycoprotein structural variation and fusion activation as well as inhibition by neutralizing agents. Here recent studies that highlight the utility of these complementary approaches will be reviewed with a focus on the well-characterized influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion glycoprotein system.

  11. Roles of the Putative Integrin-Binding Motif of the Human Metapneumovirus Fusion (F) Protein in Cell-Cell Fusion, Viral Infectivity, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongwei; Zhang, Yu; Cai, Hui; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.; Peeples, Mark E.; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a relatively recently identified paramyxovirus that causes acute upper and lower respiratory tract infection. Entry of hMPV is unusual among the paramyxoviruses, in that fusion is accomplished by the fusion (F) protein without the attachment glycoprotein (G protein). It has been suggested that hMPV F protein utilizes integrin αvβ1 as a cellular receptor. Consistent with this, the F proteins of all known hMPV strains possess an integrin-binding motif (329RGD331). The role of this motif in viral entry, infectivity, and pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we show that α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and hMPV infection. Mutational analysis found that residues R329 and G330 in the 329RGD331 motif are essential for cell-cell fusion, whereas mutations at D331 did not significantly impact fusion activity. Furthermore, fusion-defective RGD mutations were either lethal to the virus or resulted in recombinant hMPVs that had defects in viral replication in cell culture. In cotton rats, recombinant hMPV with the R329K mutation in the F protein (rhMPV-R329K) and rhMPV-D331A exhibited significant defects in viral replication in nasal turbinates and lungs. Importantly, inoculation of cotton rats with these mutants triggered a high level of neutralizing antibodies and protected against hMPV challenge. Taken together, our data indicate that (i) α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and viral replication, (ii) the first two residues in the RGD motif are essential for fusion activity, and (iii) inhibition of the interaction of the integrin-RGD motif may serve as a new target to rationally attenuate hMPV for the development of live attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is one of the major causative agents of acute respiratory disease in humans. Currently, there is no vaccine or antiviral drug for hMPV. hMPV enters host cells via a unique mechanism, in that viral

  12. Fusion Power Demonstrations I and II

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this report we present a summary of the first phase of the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. During this first phase, we investigated two configurations, performed detailed studies of major components, and identified and examined critical issues. In addition to these design specific studies, we also assembled a mirror-systems computer code to help optimize future device designs. The two configurations that we have studied are based on the MARS magnet configuration and are labeled FPD-I and FPD-II. The FPD-I configuration employs the same magnet set used in the FY83 FPD study, whereas the FPD-II magnets are a new, much smaller set chosen to help reduce the capital cost of the system. As part of the FPD study, we also identified and explored issues critical to the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). These issues involve subsystems or components, which because of their cost or state of technology can have a significant impact on our ability to meet FPD's mission requirements on the assumed schedule. General Dynamics and Grumman Aerospace studied two of these systems, the high-field choke coil and the halo pump/direct converter, in great detail and their findings are presented in this report.

  13. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments. PMID:27410740

  14. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments.

  15. Viral fusion protein transmembrane domain adopts β-strand structure to facilitate membrane topological changes for virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Michelle W; Waring, Alan J; Wong, Gerard C L; Hong, Mei

    2015-09-01

    The C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins such as HIV gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is traditionally viewed as a passive α-helical anchor of the protein to the virus envelope during its merger with the cell membrane. The conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of these fusion protein TMDs have so far eluded high-resolution structure characterization because of their highly hydrophobic nature. Using magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we show that the TMD of the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein adopts lipid-dependent conformations and interactions with the membrane and water. In phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes, the TMD is predominantly α-helical, but in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) membranes, the TMD changes significantly to the β-strand conformation. Measured order parameters indicate that the strand segments are immobilized and thus oligomerized. (31)P NMR spectra and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data show that this β-strand-rich conformation converts the PE membrane to a bicontinuous cubic phase, which is rich in negative Gaussian curvature that is characteristic of hemifusion intermediates and fusion pores. (1)H-(31)P 2D correlation spectra and (2)H spectra show that the PE membrane with or without the TMD is much less hydrated than PC and PG membranes, suggesting that the TMD works with the natural dehydration tendency of PE to facilitate membrane merger. These results suggest a new viral-fusion model in which the TMD actively promotes membrane topological changes during fusion using the β-strand as the fusogenic conformation.

  16. Identification of viral membrane proteins required for cell fusion and viral dissemination that are modified during vaccinia virus persistence.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M A; Paez, E

    1994-01-01

    Wild-type vaccinia virus WR strain forms non-fusogenic (F-) large plaques and is hemagglutinin positive (HA+) under normal conditions of virus infection. We have analyzed a collection of spontaneous, highly attenuated mutants of vaccinia virus isolated from persistently infected Friend erythroleukemia cells (E. Paez, S. Dallo, and M. Esteban, J. Virol. 61, 2642-2647, 1987) for the ability to express HA during virus infection. After 14 cell passages, all the mutants isolated were hemadsorption negative (HAD-) and did not synthesize a HA that could be recognized by anti-HA monoclonal antibodies. All these HA- mutants induced extensive cell-cell fusion (F+), with the exception of two mutants (65-16 and 101-14) isolated from late cell passages. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HA gene in these two mutants confirmed the HA- phenotype. A frameshift mutation very close to the initiation codon resulted in premature translational termination. The truncated gene now only encodes the first 25 amino acids. Analysis of progeny from "wild-type," like early serial passage virus (5-3) X mutant back crosses, shows that for one late passage non-fusogenic small-plaque mutant (101-14) among large plaque progeny there is good correspondence between the ability to fuse and the absence of a viral HA and that each large plaque mutant contains a normal 14 kDa membrane protein. However, with a second serial passage mutant 65-16, which, like 101-14, is a nonfusogenic small-plaque variant, there is again an excellent correlation between the inability to synthesize HA and the ability to fuse, but there is no correlation of plaque size with a normal 14 kDa viral membrane protein, as most large plaque mutants encode a larger, i.e., 17 kDa protein. Rescue experiments of 65-16 with bona fide cloned 14 kDa protein gene confirm that the ability to regulate plaque size and cell fusion in this mutant is due to a protein other than the 14 kDa protein. Marker rescue experiments indicated that the map

  17. Differential cholesterol binding by class II fusion proteins determines membrane fusion properties.

    PubMed

    Umashankar, M; Sánchez-San Martín, Claudia; Liao, Maofu; Reilly, Brigid; Guo, Alice; Taylor, Gwen; Kielian, Margaret

    2008-09-01

    The class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses mediate virus infection by driving the fusion of the virus membrane with that of the cell. These fusion proteins are triggered by low pH, and their structures are strikingly similar in both the prefusion dimer and the postfusion homotrimer conformations. Here we have compared cholesterol interactions during membrane fusion by these two groups of viruses. Using cholesterol-depleted insect cells, we showed that fusion and infection by the alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus were strongly promoted by cholesterol, with similar sterol dependence in laboratory and field isolates and in viruses passaged in tissue culture. The E1 fusion protein from SFV bound cholesterol, as detected by labeling with photocholesterol and by cholesterol extraction studies. In contrast, fusion and infection by numerous strains of the flavivirus dengue virus (DV) and by yellow fever virus 17D were cholesterol independent, and the DV fusion protein did not show significant cholesterol binding. SFV E1 is the first virus fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol. Taken together, our results reveal important functional differences conferred by the cholesterol-binding properties of class II fusion proteins.

  18. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-06-05

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection.

  19. The β-Lactamase Assay: Harnessing a FRET Biosensor to Analyse Viral Fusion Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel M.; Padilla-Parra, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    The β-lactamase (BlaM) assay was first revealed in 1998 and was demonstrated to be a robust Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based reporter system that was compatible with a range of commonly-used cell lines. Today, the BlaM assay is available commercially as a kit and can be utilised readily and inexpensively for an array of experimental procedures that require a fluorescence-based readout. One frequent application of the BlaM assay is the measurement of viral fusion—the moment at which the genetic material harboured within virus particles is released into the cytosol following successful entry. The flexibility of the system permits evaluation of not only total fusion levels, but also the kinetics of fusion. However, significant variation exists in the scientific literature regarding the methodology by which the assay is applied to viral fusion analysis, making comparison between results difficult. In this review we draw attention to the disparity of these methodologies and examine the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. Successful strategies shown to render viruses compatible with BlaM-based analyses are also discussed. PMID:27347948

  20. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  1. Submodeling Simulations in Fusion Welds: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-11-01

    In part I, three-dimensional transient non-linear sub modeling heat transfer simulations were performed to study the thermal histories and thermal cycles that occur during the welding process at the macro, meso and micro scales. In the present work, the corresponding non-uniform temperature changes were imposed as load conditions on structural calculations to study the evolution of localized plastic strains and residual stresses at these sub-level scales. To reach the goal, a three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic model (ABAQUS code) was developed. The sub-modeling technique proposed to be used in coupling phase-field (and/or digital microstructures) codes with finite element codes, was used to mesh a local part of the model with a refined mesh based on interpolation of the solution from an initial, relatively coarse, macro global model. The meso-sub-model is the global model for the subsequent micro sub-model. The strategy used to calculate temperatures, strains and residual stresses at the macro, meso and micro scale level, is very flexible to be used to any number of levels. The objective of this research was to initiate the development of microstructural models to identify fusion welding process parameters for preserving the single crystal nature of gas turbine blades during repair procedures. The multi-scale submodeling approach can be used to capture weld pool features at the macro-meso scale level, and micro residual stress and secondary dendrite arm spacing features at the micro scale level.

  2. Membrane Fusion Mediated Targeted Cytosolic Drug Delivery Through scFv Engineered Sendai Viral Envelopes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M; Mani, P; Pratheesh, P; Chandra, S; Jeyakkodi, M; Chattopadhyay, P; Sarkar, D P; Sinha, S

    2015-01-01

    Antibody targeted cytoplasmic delivery of drugs is difficult to achieve as antigen-antibody interaction results in the payload being directed to the endosomal compartment. However, Sendai viral envelopes can bring about cytoplasmic delivery due to F-protein mediated membrane fusion. In this study we have generated and fused a recombinant scFv directed to the onco-fetal antigen, the Placental isozyme of Alkaline Phosphatase (PAP) with the trans-membrane and part of the cytoplasmic domain of the Sendai F protein (F(TMC)). Reconstituted virosomes, having both the fusion protein as well as the native F-protein were able to specifically bind and deliver drugs to PAP expressing cells. About 75% of the delivery was cytoplasmic in nature. Hence, this immuno-virosome, which is devoid of the comparatively more toxic HN protein, has the novel ability to combine specific antibody mediated targeting with cytoplasmic delivery. The scFv ensured specific binding to PAP expressing cells, without cross reacting with the other isozymes of alkaline phosphatase. The advantages of cytoplasmic delivery would include reduced degradation and lowered immunogenicity of the payload and carrier. The ubiquitous expression of PAP on a variety of cancers like seminoma, choriocarcinoma, cervical and breast cancers also suggests its potential usefulness in a number of malignancies.

  3. Clustering and Mobility of HIV-1 Env at Viral Assembly Sites Predict Its Propensity To Induce Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nathan H.; Chan, Jany; Lambelé, Marie

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates virus attachment to and fusion with target cell membranes, and yet, while Env is still situated at the plasma membrane of the producer cell and before its incorporation into newly formed particles, Env already interacts with the viral receptor CD4 on target cells, thus enabling the formation of transient cell contacts that facilitate the transmission of viral particles. During this first encounter with the receptor, Env must not induce membrane fusion, as this would prevent the producer cell and the target cell from separating upon virus transmission, but how Env's fusion activity is controlled remains unclear. To gain a better understanding of the Env regulation that precedes viral transmission, we examined the nanoscale organization of Env at the surface of producer cells. Utilizing superresolution microscopy (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy [STORM]) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we quantitatively assessed the clustering and dynamics of Env upon its arrival at the plasma membrane. We found that Gag assembly induced the aggregation of small Env clusters into larger domains and that these domains were completely immobile. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Env abrogated Gag's ability to induce Env clustering and restored Env mobility at assembly sites, both of which correlated with increased Env-induced fusion of infected and uninfected cells. Hence, while Env trapping by Gag secures Env incorporation into viral particles, Env clustering and its sequestration at assembly sites likely also leads to the repression of its fusion function, and thus, by preventing the formation of syncytia, Gag helps to secure efficient transfer of viral particles to target cells. PMID:23637402

  4. Interaction between the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Glycoproteins of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type III Regulates Viral Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Palmer, Samantha G.; Porotto, Matteo; Palermo, Laura M.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Wilson, Ian A.; Moscona, Anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses, enveloped RNA viruses that include human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), cause the majority of childhood viral pneumonia. HPIV3 infection starts when the viral receptor-binding protein engages sialic acid receptors in the lung and the viral envelope fuses with the target cell membrane. Fusion/entry requires interaction between two viral surface glycoproteins: tetrameric hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion protein (F). In this report, we define structural correlates of the HN features that permit infection in vivo. We have shown that viruses with an HN-F that promotes growth in cultured immortalized cells are impaired in differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE) and in vivo and evolve in HAE into viable viruses with less fusogenic HN-F. In this report, we identify specific structural features of the HN dimer interface that modulate HN-F interaction and fusion triggering and directly impact infection. Crystal structures of HN, which promotes viral growth in vivo, show a diminished interface in the HN dimer compared to the reference strain’s HN, consistent with biochemical and biological data indicating decreased dimerization and decreased interaction with F protein. The crystallographic data suggest a structural explanation for the HN’s altered ability to activate F and reveal properties that are critical for infection in vivo. IMPORTANCE Human parainfluenza viruses cause the majority of childhood cases of croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia worldwide. Enveloped viruses must fuse their membranes with the target cell membranes in order to initiate infection. Parainfluenza fusion proceeds via a multistep reaction orchestrated by the two glycoproteins that make up its fusion machine. In vivo, viruses adapt for survival by evolving to acquire a set of fusion machinery features that provide key clues about requirements for infection in human beings. Infection of the lung by parainfluenzavirus is determined by

  5. Full-length trimeric influenza virus hemagglutinin II membrane fusion protein and shorter constructs lacking the fusion peptide or transmembrane domain: Hyperthermostability of the full-length protein and the soluble ectodomain and fusion peptide make significant contributions to fusion of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U; Prabodha Ekanayaka, E A; Komanduru, Sweta S; Weliky, David P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus is a class I enveloped virus which is initially endocytosed into a host respiratory epithelial cell. Subsequent reduction of the pH to the 5-6 range triggers a structural change of the viral hemagglutinin II (HA2) protein, fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, and release of the viral nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. HA2 contains fusion peptide (FP), soluble ectodomain (SE), transmembrane (TM), and intraviral domains with respective lengths of ∼ 25, ∼ 160, ∼ 25, and ∼ 10 residues. The present work provides a straightforward protocol for producing and purifying mg quantities of full-length HA2 from expression in bacteria. Biophysical and structural comparisons are made between full-length HA2 and shorter constructs including SHA2 ≡ SE, FHA2 ≡ FP+SE, and SHA2-TM ≡ SE+TM constructs. The constructs are helical in detergent at pH 7.4 and the dominant trimer species. The proteins are highly thermostable in decylmaltoside detergent with Tm>90 °C for HA2 with stabilization provided by the SE, FP, and TM domains. The proteins are likely in a trimer-of-hairpins structure, the final protein state during fusion. All constructs induce fusion of negatively-charged vesicles at pH 5.0 with much less fusion at pH 7.4. Attractive protein/vesicle electrostatics play a role in fusion, as the proteins are positively-charged at pH 5.0 and negatively-charged at pH 7.4 and the pH-dependence of fusion is reversed for positively-charged vesicles. Comparison of fusion between constructs supports significant contributions to fusion from the SE and the FP with little effect from the TM.

  6. RNA polymerase II is aberrantly phosphorylated and localized to viral replication compartments following herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, S A; Long, M C; Lam, V; Spencer, C A

    1994-01-01

    During lytic infection, herpes simplex virus subverts the host cell RNA polymerase II transcription machinery to efficiently express its own genome while repressing the expression of most cellular genes. The mechanism by which RNA polymerase II is directed to the viral delayed-early and late genes is still unresolved. We report here that RNA polymerase II is preferentially localized to viral replication compartments early after infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Concurrent with recruitment of RNA polymerase II into viral compartments is a rapid and aberrant phosphorylation of the large subunit carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). Aberrant phosphorylation of the CTD requires early viral gene expression but is not dependent on viral DNA replication or on the formation of viral replication compartments. Localization of RNA polymerase II and modifications to the CTD may be instrumental in favoring transcription of viral genes and repressing specific transcription of cellular genes. Images PMID:8289400

  7. Contribution of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sukun; Hu, Kai; He, Siyi; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Mudan; Huang, Xin; Du, Tao; Zheng, Chunfu; Liu, Yalan; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-09-15

    HSV-2 is the major cause of genital herpes and its infection increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. HSV-2 glycoprotein B together with glycoproteins D, H and L are indispensable for viral entry, of which gB, as a class III fusogen, plays an essential role. HSV-2 gB has seven potential N-linked glycosylation (N-CHO) sites, but their significance has yet to be determined. For the first time, we systematically analyzed the contributions of N-linked glycans on gB to cell–cell fusion and viral entry. Our results demonstrated that, of the seven potential N-CHO sites on gB, mutation at N390, N483 or N668 decreased cell–cell fusion and viral entry, while mutation at N133 mainly affected protein expression and the production of infectious virus particles by blocking the transport of gB from the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi. Our findings highlight the significance of N-linked glycans on HSV-2 gB expression and function. - Highlights: • N-linked glycan at N133 is important for gB intracellular trafficking and maturation. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal cell–cell fusion. • N-linked glycans at N390, N483 and N668 on gB are necessary for optimal viral entry.

  8. Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher . E-mail: chris.aiken@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-03-15

    HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4{sup +} T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  9. Inhibition of Nipah Virus Infectin In Vivo: Targeting an Early Stage of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation during Viral Entry

    SciTech Connect

    M Porotto; B Rockx; C Yokoyama; A Talekar; I DeVito; l Palermo; J Liu; R Cortese; M Lu; et al.

    2011-12-31

    In the paramyxovirus cell entry process, receptor binding triggers conformational changes in the fusion protein (F) leading to viral and cellular membrane fusion. Peptides derived from C-terminal heptad repeat (HRC) regions in F have been shown to inhibit fusion by preventing formation of the fusogenic six-helix bundle. We recently showed that the addition of a cholesterol group to HRC peptides active against Nipah virus targets these peptides to the membrane where fusion occurs, dramatically increasing their antiviral effect. In this work, we report that unlike the untagged HRC peptides, which bind to the postulated extended intermediate state bridging the viral and cell membranes, the cholesterol tagged HRC-derived peptides interact with F before the fusion peptide inserts into the target cell membrane, thus capturing an earlier stage in the F-activation process. Furthermore, we show that cholesterol tagging renders these peptides active in vivo: the cholesterol-tagged peptides cross the blood brain barrier, and effectively prevent and treat in an established animal model what would otherwise be fatal Nipah virus encephalitis. The in vivo efficacy of cholesterol-tagged peptides, and in particular their ability to penetrate the CNS, suggests that they are promising candidates for the prevention or therapy of infection by Nipah and other lethal paramyxoviruses.

  10. RTNS-II - a fusion materials research tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, C. M.; Heikkinen, D. W.

    1982-09-01

    Rotating Target Neutron Source-II (RTNS-II) is a national facility for fusion materials research. It contains two 14 MeV neutron sources. Deuterons are accelerated to ˜ 400 keV and transported to a rotating titanium tritide target. Present source strength is greater than 1 × 10 13 n/s and source diameter is 1 cm fwhm. An air-levitated vacuum seal permits rotation of the target at 5000 rpm with negligible impact on accelerator vacuum system gas load. Targets are cooled by chilled water flowing through internal channels in a copper alloy substrate. Substrates are produced by solid-state diffusion bonding of two sheets, one containing etched cooling channels. An electroforming process is being developed which will reduce substrate cost and improve reliability. Titanium tritide coating thickness is ˜ 10 μm giving an initial tritium inventory for the present 23 cm diameter targets of 3.7 × 10 7 MBq. Operating interval between target changes is typically about 80 h. Thirteen laboratories and universities have participated in the experimental program at RTNS-II. Most measurements have been directed at understanding defect production and low-dose damage microstructure. The principal diagnostic tools have been cryogenic resistivity measurements, mechanical properties assessment and transmission electron microscopy. Some engineering tests have been conducted in support of near-term magnetic confinement experiments and of reactor materials which will see small lifetime doses.

  11. A Stable Prefusion Intermediate of the Alphavirus Fusion Protein Reveals Critical Features of Class II Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Claudia Sánchez-San; Sosa, Hernando

    2009-01-01

    Summary Alphaviruses infect cells via a low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the class II virus fusion protein E1, an elongated molecule with three extramembrane domains (DI–III). E1 drives fusion by inserting its fusion peptide loop into the target membrane and refolding to a hairpin-like trimer in which DIII moves toward the target membrane and packs against the central trimer. Three-dimensional structures provide static pictures of prefusion and postfusion E1 but do not explain this transition. Using truncated forms of E1, we reconstituted a low-pH-dependent intermediate composed of trimers of DI/II. Unexpectedly, DI/II trimers were stable in the absence of DIII. Once formed at a low pH, DI/II trimers efficiently and specifically bound recombinant DIII through a pH-independent reaction. Even in the absence of DIII, DI/II trimers interacted to form hexagonal lattices and to cause membrane deformation and tubulation. These studies identify a prefusion intermediate in class II membrane fusion. PMID:19064260

  12. Comparison of type I and type II bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in swine.

    PubMed

    Walz, P H; Baker, J C; Mullaney, T P; Kaneene, J B; Maes, R K

    1999-04-01

    Some isolates of type II bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are capable of causing severe clinical disease in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection has been reported in pigs, but the ability of these more virulent isolates of type II BVDV to induce severe clinical disease in pigs is unknown. It was our objective to compare clinical, virologic, and pathologic findings between type I and type II BVDV infection in pigs. Noninfected control and BVDV-infected 2-month-old pigs were used. A noncytopathic type I and a noncytopathic type II BVDV isolate were chosen for evaluation in feeder age swine based upon preliminary in vitro and in vivo experiments. A dose titration study was performed using 4 groups of 4 pigs for each viral isolate. The groups were inoculated intranasally with either sham (control), 10(3), 10(5), or 10(7) TCID50 of virus. The pigs were examined daily and clinical findings were recorded. Antemortem and postmortem samples were collected for virus isolation. Neither the type I nor type II BVDV isolates resulted in clinical signs of disease in pigs. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from antemortem and postmortem samples from groups of pigs receiving the 10(5) and the 10(7) TCID50 dose of the type I BVDV isolate. In contrast, BVDV was only isolated from postmortem samples in the group of pigs receiving the 10(7) TCID50 dose of the type II BVDV isolate. Type I BVDV was able to establish infection in pigs at lower doses by intranasal instillation than type II BVDV. Infection of pigs with a type II isolate of BVDV known to cause severe disease in calves did not result in clinically apparent disease in pigs.

  13. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  14. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses. PMID:27752100

  15. Characterization of a highly conserved domain within the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein S2 domain with characteristics of a viral fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Madu, Ikenna G; Roth, Shoshannah L; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-08-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of alpha-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae.

  16. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Domain within the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein S2 Domain with Characteristics of a Viral Fusion Peptide▿

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Roth, Shoshannah L.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Many viral fusion proteins are primed by proteolytic cleavage near their fusion peptides. While the coronavirus (CoV) spike (S) protein is known to be cleaved at the S1/S2 boundary, this cleavage site is not closely linked to a fusion peptide. However, a second cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). Here, we investigated whether this internal cleavage of S2 exposes a viral fusion peptide. We show that the residues immediately C-terminal to the SARS-CoV S2 cleavage site SFIEDLLFNKVTLADAGF are very highly conserved across all CoVs. Mutagenesis studies of these residues in SARS-CoV S, followed by cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for residues L803, L804, and F805 in membrane fusion. Mutation of the most N-terminal residue (S798) had little or no effect on membrane fusion. Biochemical analyses of synthetic peptides corresponding to the proposed S2 fusion peptide also showed an important role for this region in membrane fusion and indicated the presence of α-helical structure. We propose that proteolytic cleavage within S2 exposes a novel internal fusion peptide for SARS-CoV S, which may be conserved across the Coronaviridae. PMID:19439480

  17. A multiepitope fusion antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and homologous bovine viral diarrhea virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashish, Emad A; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Chase, Christopher C; Isaacson, Richard E; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-07-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens. PMID:23697572

  18. A multiepitope fusion antigen elicits neutralizing antibodies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and homologous bovine viral diarrhea virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashish, Emad A; Zhang, Chengxian; Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Chase, Christopher C; Isaacson, Richard E; Zhou, Guoqiang; Zhang, Weiping

    2013-07-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most important bovine diseases. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are the major causes of diarrhea in calves and cattle. ETEC expressing K99 (F5) fimbriae and heat-stable type Ia (STa) toxin are the leading bacteria causing calf diarrhea, and BVDV causes diarrhea and other clinical illnesses in cattle of all ages. It is reported that maternal immunization with K99 fimbrial antigens provides passive protection to calves against K99 fimbrial ETEC and that BVDV major structural protein E2 elicits antibodies neutralizing against BVDV viral infection. Vaccines inducing anti-K99 and anti-STa immunity would protect calves more effectively against ETEC diarrhea, and those also inducing anti-E2 neutralizing antibodies would protect calves and cattle against diarrhea caused by both ETEC and BVDV. In this study, we used the ETEC K99 major subunit FanC as a backbone, genetically embedded the STa toxoid STaP12F and the most-antigenic B-cell epitope and T-cell epitope predicted from the BVDV E2 glycoprotein into FanC for the multivalent antigen FanC-STa-E2, and examined immunogenicity of this multivalent antigen to assess vaccine potential against bovine diarrhea. Mice intraperitoneally (i.p.) immunized with this multivalent antigen developed anti-K99, anti-STa, and anti-BVDV antibodies. Moreover, elicited antibodies showed neutralization activities, as they inhibited adherence of K99 fimbrial E. coli, neutralized STa toxin, and prevented homologous BVDV viral infection in vitro. Results from this study suggest that this multiepitope fusion antigen can potentially be developed as a vaccine for broad protection against bovine diarrhea and that the multiepitope fusion strategy may be generally applied for multivalent vaccine development against heterogeneous pathogens.

  19. Force-induced globule-coil transition in laminin binding protein and its role for viral-cell membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris N; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Mikhaylov, Andrey G; Korneev, Denis V; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Karakouz, Tanya; Belavin, Pavel A; Netesova, Nina A; Protopopova, Elena V; Konovalova, Svetlana N; Dietler, Giovanni; Loktev, Valery B

    2014-12-01

    The specific interactions of the pairs laminin binding protein (LBP)-purified tick-borne encephalitis viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of this protein, as well as West Nile viral surface protein E and certain recombinant fragments of that protein, are studied by combined methods of single-molecule dynamic force spectroscopy (SMDFS), enzyme immunoassay and optical surface waves-based biosensor measurements. The experiments were performed at neutral pH (7.4) and acid pH (5.3) conditions. The data obtained confirm the role of LBP as a cell receptor for two typical viral species of the Flavivirus genus. A comparison of these data with similar data obtained for another cell receptor of this family, namely human αVβ3 integrin, reveals that both these receptors are very important. Studying the specific interaction between the cell receptors in question and specially prepared monoclonal antibodies against them, we could show that both interaction sites involved in the process of virus-cell interaction remain intact at pH 5.3. At the same time, for these acid conditions characteristic for an endosome during flavivirus-cell membrane fusion, SMDFS data reveal the existence of a force-induced (effective already for forces as small as 30-70 pN) sharp globule-coil transition for LBP and LBP-fragments of protein E complexes. We argue that this conformational transformation, being an analog of abrupt first-order phase transition and having similarity with the famous Rayleigh hydrodynamic instability, might be indispensable for the flavivirus-cell membrane fusion process. PMID:25319621

  20. A high throughput Cre-lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Anthony M; Cheung, Pamela; Swartz, Talia H; Li, Hongru; Tsibane, Tshidi; Durham, Natasha D; Basler, Christopher F; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Chen, Benjamin K

    2016-03-01

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes.

  1. Case report on a diver with type II decompression sickness and viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Beckman, T J; Mullins, M E; Matthews, M D

    1996-12-01

    A 33-yr-old man came to the emergency department with the chief complaint of a severe headache and decreased sensation in his right hand following a deep dive on scuba. Physical examination before recompression treatment was remarkable only for hypesthesia on the right hand. We diagnosed type II decompression sickness and the patient underwent standard recompression therapy. The patient experienced near-complete resolution of his symptoms, his only residual complaint being that of neck pain with head movement. To investigate other causes of headache, a computed tomography of the head was performed which was normal, and a lumbar puncture was performed which was consistent with viral meningitis. This is the first reported case of recompression treatment on a patient with viral meningitis and decompression sickness. PMID:8989855

  2. Some design aspects of laser fusion rocket(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, H.; Shoyama, H.; Nagamine, Y.; Fusuki, T.; Kanda, Y.; Yoshimi, N.; Nakao, Y.

    1996-05-01

    A rocket powered by a laser-induced fusion microexplosion is an attractive spacecraft for manned exploration of the solar system because of its potential advantages of high specific impulse and of large specific power. We here discuss some design aspects of a laser fusion rocket. Included are discussion on thrust conversion efficiency, plasma instability in a magnetic nozzle and DT igniter/D{sup 3}He fuel target design. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Viral gastroenteritis associated with genogroup II norovirus among U.S. military personnel in Turkey, 2009.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salwa F; Klena, John D; Mostafa, Manal; Dogantemur, Jessica; Middleton, Tracy; Hanson, James; Sebeny, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The present study demonstrates that multiple NoV genotypes belonging to genogroup II contributed to an acute gastroenteritis outbreak at a US military facility in Turkey that was associated with significant negative operational impact. Norovirus (NoV) is an important pathogen associated with acute gastroenteritis among military populations. We describe the genotypes of NoV outbreak occurred at a United States military facility in Turkey. Stool samples were collected from 37 out of 97 patients presenting to the clinic on base with acute gastroenteritis and evaluated for bacterial and viral pathogens. NoV genogroup II (GII) was identified by RT-PCR in 43% (16/37) stool samples. Phylogenetic analysis of a 260 base pair fragment of the NoV capsid gene from ten stool samples indicated the circulation of multiple and rare genotypes of GII NoV during the outbreak. We detected four GII.8 isolates, three GII.15, two GII.9 and a sole GII.10 NoV. Viral sequences could be grouped into four clusters, three of which have not been previously reported in Turkey. The fact that current NoV outbreak was caused by rare genotypes highlights the importance of norovirus strain typing. While NoV genogroup II is recognized as causative agent of outbreak, circulation of current genotypes has been rarely observed in large number of outbreaks.

  4. Amelioration of established Sendai viral pneumonia in the nude mouse using a monoclonal antibody to the virus fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carthew, P.; Riley, J.; Dinsdale, D.

    1989-01-01

    The pathological effect of parainfluenza type I (Sendai virus) is known to be a bronchopneumonia, which becomes a chronic pneumonia in the immunodeficient athymic (nude) mouse. The severity of this established chronic pneumonia can be dramatically altered by providing the nude mouse with humoral monoclonal antibodies which are neutralizing, and are directed against the fusion protein, of the virus. The alveolitis, which is a significant part of the pathology, is suppressed due to a reduction (greater than 90%) in the number of virus-infected alveolar macrophages present in the alveoli. This clearly identifies the infected alveolar macrophage as the primary effector cell in the pathogenesis of alveolitis caused by parainfluenza virus type I. The implications of using virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, which have little immunomodulatory toxicity, in the treatment of viral pneumonias are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2557882

  5. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C.; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J.

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  6. Biochemical studies on cell fusion. II. Control of fusion response by lipid alteration

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The preceding communication (Roos, D.S. and P.W. Choppin, 1985, J. Cell Biol. 101:1578-1590) described the lipid composition of a series of mouse fibroblast cell lines which vary in susceptibility to the fusogenic effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Two alterations in lipid content were found to be directly correlated with resistance to PEG-induced cell fusion: increases in fatty acyl chain saturation, and the elevation of neutral glycerides, including an unusual ether-linked compound. In this study, we have probed the association between lipid composition and cell fusion through the use of fatty acid supplements to the cellular growth medium, and show that the fusibility of cells can be controlled by altering their acyl chain composition. The parental Clone 1D cells contain moderately unsaturated fatty acids with a ratio of saturates to polyunsaturates (S/P) approximately 1 and fuse virtually to completion following a standard PEG treatment. By contrast, the lipids of a highly fusion-resistant mutant cell line, F40, are highly saturated (S/P approximately 4). When the S/P ratio of Clone 1D cells was increased to approximate that normally found in F40 cells by growth in the presence of high concentrations of saturated fatty acids, they became highly resistant to PEG. Reduction of the S/P ratio of F40 cells by growth in cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids rendered them susceptible to fusion. Cell lines F8, F16, etc., which are normally intermediate between Clone 1D and F40 in both lipid composition and fusion response, can be altered in either direction (towards either increased or decreased susceptibility to fusion) by the addition of appropriate fatty acids to the growth medium. Although trans-unsaturated fatty acids have phase-transition temperatures roughly similar to saturated compounds, and might therefore be expected to affect membrane fluidity in a similar manner, trans-unsaturated fatty acids exerted the same effect as cis-unsaturates on the control of PEG

  7. Dendritic cell preactivation impairs MHC class II presentation of vaccines and endogenous viral antigens

    PubMed Central

    Young, Louise J.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Schnorrer, Petra; Mount, Adele; Lundie, Rachel J.; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    When dendritic cells (DCs) encounter signals associated with infection or inflammation, they become activated and undergo maturation. Mature DCs are very efficient at presenting antigens captured in association with their activating signal but fail to present subsequently encountered antigens, at least in vitro. Such impairment of MHC class II (MHC II) antigen presentation has generally been thought to be a consequence of down-regulation of endocytosis, so it might be expected that antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves (for instance, viral antigens) would still be presented by mature DCs. Here, we show that DCs matured in vivo could still capture and process soluble antigens, but were unable to present peptides derived from these antigens. Furthermore, presentation of viral antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves was also severely impaired. Indeed, i.v. injection of pathogen mimics, which caused systemic DC activation in vivo, impaired the induction of CD4 T cell responses against subsequently encountered protein antigens. This immunosuppressed state could be reversed by adoptive transfer of DCs loaded exogenously with antigens, demonstrating that impairment of CD4 T cell responses was due to lack of antigen presentation rather than to overt suppression of T cell activation. The biochemical mechanism underlying this phenomenon was the down-regulation of MHC II–peptide complex formation that accompanied DC maturation. These observations have important implications for the design of prophylactic and therapeutic DC vaccines and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms causing immunosuppression during systemic blood infections. PMID:17978177

  8. Homopolar Gun for Pulsed Spheromak Fusion Reactors II

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T

    2004-06-14

    A homopolar gun is discussed that could produce the high currents required for pulsed spheromak fusion reactors even with unit current amplification and open field lines during injection, possible because close coupling between the gun and flux conserver reduces gun losses to acceptable levels. Example parameters are given for a gun compatible with low cost pulsed reactors and for experiments to develop the concept.

  9. Vaccinia mature virus fusion regulator A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 proteins of the viral entry fusion complex and dissociates from mature virions at low pH.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422-8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 protein and A26-A27 protein complexes of 70 kDa and 90 kDa to dissociate from mature virions, suggesting that the structure of A26 protein is acid sensitive.

  10. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  11. HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41: An NMR investigation of dodecyl phosphocholine embedded gp41 reveals a dynamic pre-fusion intermediate conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Kaufman, Joshua D.; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human immunodeficiency viral (HIV-1) fusion is mediated by the viral envelope gp120/gp41 complex (ENVelope glycoprotein). After gp120 shedding, gp41 is exposed and elicits membrane fusion via a cascade of conformational changes. In contrast to pre-fusion and post-fusion conformation, little is known about any intermediate conformation. We report on a solution NMR investigation of homotrimeric HIV-1 gp4127–194, comprising the transmembrane region and reconstituted in dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelles. The protein is mainly α-helical but experiences internal dynamics on the nanosecond and micro-to millisecond time scale and transient α-helical behavior for certain residues in the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR). Strong lipid interactions are observed, in particular for C-terminal residues of the NHR and imunodominant loop region connecting NHR and C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR). Our data indicate an extended conformation with features anticipated for a pre-fusion intermediate, presumably in exchange with a lowly populated post-fusion six-helical bundle conformation. PMID:25132083

  12. Different receptors binding to distinct interfaces on herpes simplex virus gD can trigger events leading to cell fusion and viral entry

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, Patricia G. . E-mail: p-spear@northwestern.edu; Manoj, Sharmila; Yoon, Miri; Jogger, Cheryl R.; Zago, Anna; Myscofski, Dawn

    2006-01-05

    One of the herpes simplex virus envelope glycoproteins, designated gD, is the principal determinant of cell recognition for viral entry. Other viral glycoproteins, gB, gH and gL, cooperate with gD to mediate the membrane fusion that is required for viral entry and cell fusion. Membrane fusion is triggered by the binding of gD to one of its receptors. These receptors belong to three different classes of cell surface molecules. This review summarizes recent findings on the structure and function of gD. The results presented indicate that gD may assume more than one conformation, one in the absence of receptor, another when gD is bound to the herpesvirus entry mediator, a member of the TNF receptor family, and a third when gD is bound to nectin-1, a cell adhesion molecule in the immunoglobulin superfamily. Finally, information and ideas are presented about a membrane-proximal region of gD that is required for membrane fusion, but not for receptor binding, and that may have a role in activating the fusogenic activity of gB, gH and gL.

  13. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  14. Analysis of Cathepsin and Furin Proteolytic Enzymes Involved in Viral Fusion Protein Activation in Cells of the Bat Reservoir Host

    PubMed Central

    El Najjar, Farah; Lampe, Levi; Baker, Michelle L.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing. PMID:25706132

  15. Influence of hydrophobic and electrostatic residues on SARS-coronavirus S2 protein stability: Insights into mechanisms of general viral fusion and inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Halil; Al-Khooly, Dina; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory disease caused by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS-CoV entry is facilitated by the spike protein (S), which consists of an N-terminal domain (S1) responsible for cellular attachment and a C-terminal domain (S2) that mediates viral and host cell membrane fusion. The SARS-CoV S2 is a potential drug target, as peptidomimetics against S2 act as potent fusion inhibitors. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and thermal stability experiments on electrostatic, hydrophobic, and polar residues to dissect their roles in stabilizing the S2 postfusion conformation was performed. It was shown that unlike the pH-independent retroviral fusion proteins, SARS-CoV S2 is stable over a wide pH range, supporting its ability to fuse at both the plasma membrane and endosome. A comprehensive SARS-CoV S2 analysis showed that specific hydrophobic positions at the C-terminal end of the HR2, rather than electrostatics are critical for fusion protein stabilization. Disruption of the conserved C-terminal hydrophobic residues destabilized the fusion core and reduced the melting temperature by 30°C. The importance of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues led us to identify a 42-residue substructure on the central core that is structurally conserved in all existing CoV S2 fusion proteins (root mean squared deviation = 0.4 Å). This is the first study to identify such a conserved substructure and likely represents a common foundation to facilitate viral fusion. We have discussed the role of key residues in the design of fusion inhibitors and the potential of the substructure as a general target for the development of novel therapeutics against CoV infections. PMID:24519901

  16. Dual Mutation Events in the Haemagglutinin-Esterase and Fusion Protein from an Infectious Salmon Anaemia Virus HPR0 Genotype Promote Viral Fusion and Activation by an Ubiquitous Host Protease

    PubMed Central

    Fourrier, Mickael; Lester, Katherine; Markussen, Turhan; Falk, Knut; Secombes, Christopher J.; McBeath, Alastair; Collet, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), deletions in the highly polymorphic region (HPR) in the near membrane domain of the haemagglutinin-esterase (HE) stalk, influence viral fusion. It is suspected that selected mutations in the associated Fusion (F) protein may also be important in regulating fusion activity. To better understand the underlying mechanisms involved in ISAV fusion, several mutated F proteins were generated from the Scottish Nevis and Norwegian SK779/06 HPR0. Co-transfection with constructs encoding HE and F were performed, fusion activity assessed by content mixing assay and the degree of proteolytic cleavage by western blot. Substitutions in Nevis F demonstrated that K276 was the most likely cleavage site in the protein. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions at three sites and two insertions, all slightly upstream of K276, increased fusion activity. Co-expression with HE harbouring a full-length HPR produced high fusion activities when trypsin and low pH were applied. In comparison, under normal culture conditions, groups containing a mutated HE with an HPR deletion were able to generate moderate fusion levels, while those with a full length HPR HE could not induce fusion. This suggested that HPR length may influence how the HE primes the F protein and promotes fusion activation by an ubiquitous host protease and/or facilitate subsequent post-cleavage refolding steps. Variations in fusion activity through accumulated mutations on surface glycoproteins have also been reported in other orthomyxoviruses and paramyxoviruses. This may in part contribute to the different virulence and tissue tropism reported for HPR0 and HPR deleted ISAV genotypes. PMID:26517828

  17. RSV fusion (F) protein DNA vaccine provides partial protection against viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongzhuan; Dennis, Vida A; Pillai, Shreekumar R; Singh, Shree R

    2009-10-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of a RSV F DNA vaccine incorporated with a mucosal adjuvant. Two DNA vaccine vectors (DRF-412 and DRF-412-P) were developed containing residues 412-524 of the RSV F gene. These antigenic regions were cloned into the phCMV1 DNA vaccine vector. One of the DNA vaccine vectors, DRF-412, contained the ctxA(2)B region of the cholera toxin gene as a mucosal adjuvant. The in vitro expressions of these DNA vectors were confirmed in Cos-7 cells by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. In vivo expression of the cloned gene was further confirmed in mouse muscle tissue by immunohistological analysis. The active transcription of the RSV F gene in mouse muscle cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The purified DRF-412 and DRF-412-P DNA vectors were used to immunize mice by intramuscular injections. Our results indicated that DRF-412 and DRF-412-P vaccine vectors were as effective as live RSV in inducing neutralization antibody, systemic Ab (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b) responses, and mucosal antibody responses (Ig A). The Th1 (TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, IFN-gamma, IL-2) and Th2 (IL-10, IL-6) cytokine profiles were analyzed after stimulation of spleen cells from mice immunized with purified RF-412 protein. We observed that mice inoculated with vector DRF-412 induced a higher mixed Th1/Th2 cytokine immune response than DRF-412-P. Reverse transcriptase and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that mice immunized with the DRF-412 vector contained less viral RNA in lung tissue and the lung immunohistology study confirmed that mice immunized with DRF-412 had better protection than those immunized with the DRF-412-P vector. These results indicate that the RSV DRF-412 vaccine vector, which contains the cholera toxin subunit ctxA2B as a mucosal adjuvant may provide a better DNA vaccination strategy against RSV. PMID:19540885

  18. Fusion-reactor plasmas with polarized nuclei. II

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Furth, H.P.; Valeo, E.J.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Post, D.E.; Goldhaber, M.; Happer, W.

    1982-11-01

    New techniques of bulk polarization could be used to fuel a reactor with polarized hydrogenic atoms, so as to form a plasma of polarized nuclei. Theoretical calculations indicate that, once the nuclei of the plasma are polarized in some preferred state, they can maintain this state with a probability near 100% during their lifetime in the reactor, including possible recycling. There are a number of practical advantages to be gained from the use of polarized plasma in a fusion reactor. The nuclear reaction rates can be increased or decreased, and/or the direction of emission of the reaction products can be controlled. The D-T reaction rate can be enhanced by as much as 50%, with the reaction products emitted perpendicular to the magnetic field. Alternatively, it is possible to direct the reaction products primarily along the field, with no enhancement. In this case of the D-D reaction, the theoretical predictions are somewhat less certain. Enhancement of the reaction rate by a factor of 1.5-2.5 is to be expected. In a different polarization state, suppression of D-D reactions may be feasible - a possibility that would be of interest for a neutron-free D-He/sup 3/ reactor. A quantitative discussion of the relevant nuclear physics as well as of the various mechanisms producing depolarization is given.

  19. HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion reactor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, R. W.

    1990-12-01

    The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-1 used liquid lithium. HYLIFE 2 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li2, BeF4) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-1. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required. In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-1, there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW times h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost.

  20. HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1990-12-14

    The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-1 used liquid lithium. HYLIFE 2 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-1. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required. In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-1, there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW{center dot}h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost. 15 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. HYLIFE-II inertial confinement: Fusion power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1990-12-14

    The HYLIFE-2 inertial fusion power plant design study uses a liquid fall, in the form of jets to protect the first structural wall from neutron damage, x rays, and blast to provide a 30-y lifetime. HYLIFE-1 used liquid lithium. HYLIFE 2 avoids the fire hazard of lithium by using a molten salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) called Flibe. Access for heavy-ion beams is provided. Calculations for assumed heavy-ion beam performance show a nominal gain of 70 at 5 MJ producing 350 MJ, about 5.2 times less yield than the 1.8 GJ from a driver energy of 4.5 MJ with gain of 400 for HYLIFE-1. The nominal 1 GWe of power can be maintained by increasing the repetition rate by a factor of about 5.2, from 1.5 to 8 Hz. A higher repetition rate requires faster re-establishment of the jets after a shot, which can be accomplished in part by decreasing the jet fall height and increasing the jet flow velocity. Multiple chambers may be required. In addition, although not considered for HYLIFE-1, there is undoubtedly liquid splash that must be forcibly cleared because gravity is too slow, especially at high repetition rates. Splash removal can be accomplished by either pulsed or oscillating jet flows. The cost of electricity is estimated to be 0.09 $/kW{center dot}h in constant 1988 dollars, about twice that of future coal and light water reactor nuclear power. The driver beam cost is about one-half the total cost. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Progress in accident analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-10-11

    The present work continues our effort to perform an integrated safety analysis for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design. Recently we developed a base case for a severe accident scenario in order to calculate accident doses for HYLIFE-II. It consisted of a total loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in which all the liquid flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) was lost at the beginning of the accident. Results showed that the off-site dose was below the limit given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for public protection in case of accident, and that his dose was dominated by the tritium released during the accident.

  3. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  4. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Gomez del Rio, J; Sanz, J

    2000-02-23

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental (S and E) aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work a set of computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) has been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here the authors consider a severe lost of coolant accident (LOCA) producing simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the containment) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and containment building it self). Even though containment failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product release and transport. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 6 mSv (0.6 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  5. Accident consequences analysis of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, S.; Latkowski, J. F.; Gomez del Rio, J.; Sanz, J.

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies of the safety and environmental aspects of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant design have used simplistic assumptions in order to estimate radioactivity releases under accident conditions. Conservatisms associated with these traditional analyses can mask the actual behavior of the plant and have revealed the need for more accurate modeling and analysis of accident conditions and radioactivity mobilization mechanisms. In the present work, computer codes traditionally used for magnetic fusion safety analyses (CHEMCON, MELCOR) have been applied for simulating accident conditions in a simple model of the HYLIFE-II IFE design. Here we consider a severe loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in conjunction with simultaneous failures of the beam tubes (providing a pathway for radioactivity release from the vacuum vessel towards the confinement) and of the two barriers surrounding the chamber (inner shielding and confinement building itself). Even though confinement failure would be a very unlikely event it would be needed in order to produce significant off-site doses. CHEMCON code allows calculation of long-term temperature transients in fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield structures resulting from decay heating. MELCOR is used to simulate a wide range of physical phenomena including thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, aerosol physics and fusion product transport and release. The results of these calculations show that the estimated off-site dose is less than 5 mSv (0.5 rem), which is well below the value of 10 mSv (1 rem) given by the DOE Fusion Safety Standards for protection of the public from exposure to radiation during off-normal conditions.

  6. TALE-PvuII fusion proteins--novel tools for gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Mert; Alzubi, Jamal; Lahaye, Thomas; Cathomen, Toni; Pingoud, Alfred; Wende, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) consist of zinc fingers as DNA-binding module and the non-specific DNA-cleavage domain of the restriction endonuclease FokI as DNA-cleavage module. This architecture is also used by TALE nucleases (TALENs), in which the DNA-binding modules of the ZFNs have been replaced by DNA-binding domains based on transcription activator like effector (TALE) proteins. Both TALENs and ZFNs are programmable nucleases which rely on the dimerization of FokI to induce double-strand DNA cleavage at the target site after recognition of the target DNA by the respective DNA-binding module. TALENs seem to have an advantage over ZFNs, as the assembly of TALE proteins is easier than that of ZFNs. Here, we present evidence that variant TALENs can be produced by replacing the catalytic domain of FokI with the restriction endonuclease PvuII. These fusion proteins recognize only the composite recognition site consisting of the target site of the TALE protein and the PvuII recognition sequence (addressed site), but not isolated TALE or PvuII recognition sites (unaddressed sites), even at high excess of protein over DNA and long incubation times. In vitro, their preference for an addressed over an unaddressed site is > 34,000-fold. Moreover, TALE-PvuII fusion proteins are active in cellula with minimal cytotoxicity.

  7. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  8. Reducing Effective Liquid Wall Thickness in a HYLIFE-II Fusion Breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Übeyli, Mustafa

    2004-09-01

    One of the major inertial fusion energy reactor designs is HYLIFE-II which uses protective flowing liquid wall between fusion plasma and solid first wall. The most attractive aspect of this reactor is that protective liquid wall eliminates the frequent replacement of the first wall structure during reactor lifetime. Liquid wall thickness must be at least the thickness required for supplying sufficient tritium for the deuterium-tritium (DT) driver and satisfying radiation damage on the first wall below the limits. Reducing this thickness results less pumping power requirements and cost of electricity. In this study, investigation on potential of utilizing refractory alloys (W-5Re, TZM and Nb-1Zr) as first wall to reduce effective liquid wall thickness in HYLIFE-II reactor using liquid wall of Flibe + 10 mol % UF4 mixture. Neutron transport calculations were carried out with the help of the SCALE4.3 system by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and a S8-P3 approximation. Numerical results showed that using W-5Re or TZM as first wall was effective in decreasing liquid wall thickness in contrast to Nb-1Zr.

  9. A single amino acid in the stalk region of the H1N1pdm influenza virus HA protein affects viral fusion, stability and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Christopher R; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2014-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 pandemic (H1N1pdm) viruses have evolved to contain an E47K substitution in the HA2 subunit of the stalk region of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. The biological significance of this single amino acid change was investigated by comparing A/California/7/2009 (HA2-E47) with a later strain, A/Brisbane/10/2010 (HA2-K47). The E47K change was found to reduce the threshold pH for membrane fusion from 5.4 to 5.0. An inter-monomer salt bridge between K47 in HA2 and E21 in HA1, a neighboring highly conserved residue, which stabilized the trimer structure, was found to be responsible for the reduced threshold pH for fusion. The higher structural and acid stability of the HA trimer caused by the E47K change also conferred higher viral thermal stability and infectivity in ferrets, suggesting a fitness advantage for the E47K evolutionary change in humans. Our study indicated that the pH of HA fusion activation is an important factor for influenza virus replication and host adaptation. The identification of this genetic signature in the HA stalk region that influences vaccine virus thermal stability also has significant implications for influenza vaccine production.

  10. Genetic fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) and a toxoid fusion of heat-stable toxin (STa) and heat-labile toxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) retain broad anti-CFA and antitoxin antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  11. Genetic fusions of a CFA/I/II/IV MEFA (multiepitope fusion antigen) and a toxoid fusion of heat-stable toxin (STa) and heat-labile toxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) retain broad anti-CFA and antitoxin antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Immunological heterogeneity has long been the major challenge in developing broadly effective vaccines to protect humans and animals against bacterial and viral infections. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains, the leading bacterial cause of diarrhea in humans, express at least 23 immunologically different colonization factor antigens (CFAs) and two distinct enterotoxins [heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxin type Ib (STa or hSTa)]. ETEC strains expressing any one or two CFAs and either toxin cause diarrhea, therefore vaccines inducing broad immunity against a majority of CFAs, if not all, and both toxins are expected to be effective against ETEC. In this study, we applied the multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) strategy to construct ETEC antigens and examined antigens for broad anti-CFA and antitoxin immunogenicity. CFA MEFA CFA/I/II/IV [CVI 2014, 21(2):243-9], which carried epitopes of seven CFAs [CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, CS3), CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, CS6)] expressed by the most prevalent and virulent ETEC strains, was genetically fused to LT-STa toxoid fusion monomer 3xSTaA14Q-dmLT or 3xSTaN12S-dmLT [IAI 2014, 82(5):1823-32] for CFA/I/II/IV-STaA14Q-dmLT and CFA/I/II/IV-STaN12S-dmLT MEFAs. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with either CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA developed antibodies specific to seven CFAs and both toxins, at levels equivalent or comparable to those induced from co-administration of the CFA/I/II/IV MEFA and toxoid fusion 3xSTaN12S-dmLT. Moreover, induced antibodies showed in vitro adherence inhibition activities against ETEC or E. coli strains expressing these seven CFAs and neutralization activities against both toxins. These results indicated CFA/I/II/IV-STa-toxoid-dmLT MEFA or CFA/I/II/IV MEFA combined with 3xSTaN12S-dmLT induced broadly protective anti-CFA and antitoxin immunity, and suggested their potential application in broadly effective ETEC vaccine development. This MEFA strategy may be generally used in multivalent

  12. Membrane-on-a-chip: microstructured silicon/silicon-dioxide chips for high-throughput screening of membrane transport and viral membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Ilja; van Oijen, Antoine M; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2014-04-22

    Screening of transport processes across biological membranes is hindered by the challenge to establish fragile supported lipid bilayers and the difficulty to determine at which side of the membrane reactants reside. Here, we present a method for the generation of suspended lipid bilayers with physiological relevant lipid compositions on microstructured Si/SiO2 chips that allow for high-throughput screening of both membrane transport and viral membrane fusion. Simultaneous observation of hundreds of single-membrane channels yields statistical information revealing population heterogeneities of the pore assembly and conductance of the bacterial toxin α-hemolysin (αHL). The influence of lipid composition and ionic strength on αHL pore formation was investigated at the single-channel level, resolving features of the pore-assembly pathway. Pore formation is inhibited by a specific antibody, demonstrating the applicability of the platform for drug screening of bacterial toxins and cell-penetrating agents. Furthermore, fusion of H3N2 influenza viruses with suspended lipid bilayers can be observed directly using a specialized chip architecture. The presented micropore arrays are compatible with fluorescence readout from below using an air objective, thus allowing high-throughput screening of membrane transport in multiwell formats in analogy to plate readers.

  13. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  14. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Gonzalo P.; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H.; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Vidal, Simon E.; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  15. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Gonzalo P; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L; Bignon, Eduardo A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Vidal, Simon E; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  16. Advanced control strategies for HVAC&R systems—An overview: Part II: Soft and fusion control

    SciTech Connect

    D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

    2011-04-01

    A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for HVAC&R is presented. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and the fusion or hybrid of hard and soft control techniques. Part I focused on hardcontrol strategies; Part II focuses on soft and fusion control and some future directions in HVA&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omissions of other works is purely unintentional.

  17. Nonreplicating viral vectors as potential vaccines: recombinant canarypox virus expressing measles virus fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (HA) glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J; Weinberg, R; Tartaglia, J; Richardson, C; Alkhatib, G; Briedis, D; Appel, M; Norton, E; Paoletti, E

    1992-03-01

    The development of canarypox virus (CPV) recombinants expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and fusion (F) glycoproteins of measles virus (MV) is described. Inoculation of the CPV-MV recombinants into avian or nonavian tissue culture substrates led to the expression of authentic MVF and MVHA as determined by radioimmunoprecipitation and surface immunofluorescence. In contrast to avian-derived tissue culture, no productive replication of the CPV recombinant was evident in tissue culture cells derived from nonavian origin. On inoculation of dogs, a species restricted for avipoxvirus replication, the recombinants elicited a protective immune response against a lethal canine distemper virus (CDV) challenge. The level of MV neutralizing antibodies and the level of protection induced against CDV challenge achieved by the host-restricted CPV vector were equivalent to that obtained by vaccinia virus vectors expressing the same MV antigens. PMID:1736535

  18. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway.

  19. Sulphated Polysaccharides from Ulva clathrata and Cladosiphon okamuranus Seaweeds both Inhibit Viral Attachment/Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion, in NDV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Briseño, José Alberto; Cruz-Suarez, Lucia Elizabeth; Sassi, Jean-François; Ricque-Marie, Denis; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Trejo-Avila, Laura María

    2015-01-01

    Sulphated polysaccharides (SP) extracted from seaweeds have antiviral properties and are much less cytotoxic than conventional drugs, but little is known about their mode of action. Combination antiviral chemotherapy may offer advantages over single agent therapy, increasing efficiency, potency and delaying the emergence of resistant virus. The paramyxoviridae family includes pathogens causing morbidity and mortality worldwide in humans and animals, such as the Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in poultry. This study aims at determining the antiviral activity and mechanism of action in vitro of an ulvan (SP from the green seaweed Ulva clathrata), and of its mixture with a fucoidan (SP from Cladosiphon okamuranus), against La Sota NDV strain. The ulvan antiviral activity was tested using syncytia formation, exhibiting an IC50 of 0.1 μg/mL; ulvan had a better anti cell-cell spread effect than that previously shown for fucoidan, and inhibited cell-cell fusion via a direct effect on the F0 protein, but did not show any virucidal effect. The mixture of ulvan and fucoidan showed a greater anti-spread effect than SPs alone, but ulvan antagonizes the effect of fucoidan on the viral attachment/entry. Both SPs may be promising antivirals against paramyxovirus infection but their mixture has no clear synergistic advantage. PMID:25629385

  20. Use of Clearance Indexes to Assess Waste Disposal Issues for the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Design

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Sanz, J

    2002-01-17

    Traditionally, waste management studies for fusion energy have used the Waste Disposal Rating (WDR) to evaluate if radioactive material from irradiated structures could qualify for shallow land burial. However, given the space limitations and the negative public perception of large volumes of waste, there is a growing international motivation to develop a fusion waste management system that maximizes the amount of material that can be cleared or recycled. In this work, we present an updated assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant, using the concept of Clearance Index (CI) for radioactive waste disposal. With that purpose, we have performed a detailed neutronics analysis of the HYLIFE-II design, using the TART and ACAB computer codes for neutron transport and activation, respectively. Whereas the traditional version of ACAB only provided the user with the WDR as an index for waste considerations, here we have modified the code to calculate Clearance Indexes using the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) clearance limits for radiological waste disposal. The results from the analysis are used to perform an assessment of the waste management options for the HYLIFE-II IFE design.

  1. Flibe Coolant Cleanup and Processing in the HYLIFE-II Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R W

    2001-03-23

    In the HYLIFE-II chamber design, a thick flowing blanket of molten-salt (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) called flibe is used to protect structures from radiation damage. Since it is directly exposed to the fusion target, the flibe will absorb the target debris. Removing the materials left over from target explosions at the rate of {approx}6/s and then recycling some of these materials poses a challenge for the inertial fusion energy power plant. The choice of target materials derives from multi-disciplinary criteria such as target performance, fabricability, safety and environment, corrosion, and cost of recycle. Indirect-drive targets require high-2 materials for the hohlraum. Gold and gadolinium are favorite target materials for laboratory experiments but cost considerations may preclude their use in power plants or at least requires cost effective recycle because a year's supply of gold and gadolinium is estimated at 520 M$ and 40 M$. Environmental and waste considerations alone require recycle of this material. Separation by volatility appears to be the most attractive (e.g., Hg and Xe); centrifugation (e.g., Pb) is acceptable with some problems (e.g., materials compatibility) and chemical separation is the least attractive (e.g. Gd and Hf). Mercury, hafnium and xenon might be substituted with equal target performance and have advantages in removal and recycle due to their high volatility, except for hafnium. Alternatively, lead, tungsten and xenon might be used due to the ability to use centrifugation and gaseous separation. Hafnium or tantalum form fluorides, which will complicate materials compatibility, corrosion and require sufficient volatility of the fluoride for separation. Further complicating the coolant cleanup and processing is the formation of free fluorine due to nuclear transformation of lithium and beryllium in the flibe, which requires chemical control of the fluoride level to minimize corrosion. The study of the choice of target materials and the

  2. A Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem for automated control of PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II accelerator shots

    SciTech Connect

    Spiller, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Shot Parameter Specification Subsystem (SPSS) is an integral part of the automatic control system developed for the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) by the Control Monitor (C/M) Software Development Team. This system has been designed to fully utilize the accelerator by tailoring shot parameters to the needs of the experimenters. The SPSS is the key to this flexibility. Automatic systems will be required on many pulsed power machines for the fastest turnaround, the highest reliability, and most cost effective operation. These systems will require the flexibility and the ease of use that is part of the SPSS. The PBFA II control system has proved to be an effective modular system, flexible enough to meet the demands of both the fast track construction of PBFA II and the control needs of Hermes III at the Simulation Technology Laboratory. This system is expected to meet the demands of most future machine changes.

  3. Epidemiological aspects of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus genotype II isolated from Baltic herring, Clupea harengus membras L.

    PubMed

    Gadd, T; Jakava-Viljanen, M; Tapiovaara, H; Koski, P; Sihvonen, L

    2011-07-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the role of wild fish, especially Baltic herring, Clupea harengus membras L., in the epidemiology of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in brackish water in Finland. Baltic herring with no visible signs of disease were collected from the Archipelago Sea, the Gulf of Bothnia and the eastern Gulf of Finland. In total, 7580 herring were examined by virus isolation as 758 pooled samples and 3029 wild salmonid broodfish as pooled samples during 2004-2006. VHSV was isolated from 51 pooled herring samples in bluegill fibroblast-2 cells, but not in epithelioma papulosum cyprini cells. The majority of isolations were from the coastal archipelago and from fish caught during the spawning season. Based on glycoprotein (G) gene sequences, the virus was classified as a member of genotype II of VHSV. Pairwise comparisons of the G gene regions of herring isolates revealed that all the isolates were closely related, with 98.8-100% nucleotide homology. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that they were closely related to the strains isolated previously from herring and sprat, Sprattus sprattus (L.), in Gotland and to the VHSV isolates from European river lamprey, Lampetra fluviatilis (L.), in the rivers that flow into the Bothnian Bay. The infection in Baltic herring is likely to be independent of the VHSV Id epidemic in farmed rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

  4. Reduced toxicity and broad spectrum resistance to viral and fungal infection in transgenic plants expressing pokeweed antiviral protein II.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Zoubenko, O; Tumer, N E

    1998-12-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein II (PAPII), a 30 kDa protein isolated from leaves of Phytolacca americana, inhibits translation by catalytically removing a specific adenine residue from the large rRNA of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. The protein sequence of PAPII shows only 41% identity to PAP and PAP-S, two other antiviral proteins isolated from pokeweed. We isolated a cDNA corresponding to PAPII and introduced it into tobacco plants. PAPII expressed in transgenic tobacco was correctly processed to the mature form as in pokeweed and accumulated to at least 10-fold higher levels than wild-type PAP. We had previously observed a significant decrease in transformation frequency with PAP and recovered only two transgenic lines expressing 1-2 ng per mg protein. In contrast, eight different transgenic lines expressing up to 250 ng/mg PAPII were recovered, indicating that PAPII is less toxic than PAP. Two symptomless transgenic lines expressing PAPII were resistant to tobacco mosaic virus, potato virus X and the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. The level of viral and fungal resistance observed correlated well with the amount of PAPII protein accumulated. Pathogenesis-related protein PR1 was constitutively expressed in transgenic lines expressing PAPII. Although PR1 was constitutively expressed, no increase in salicylic acid levels was detected, indicating that PAPII may elicit a salicylic acid-independent signal transduction pathway.

  5. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that hepatitis C virus E1 and pestivirus E2 envelope glycoproteins are truncated class II fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Garry, Robert F; Dash, Srikanta

    2003-03-15

    Class II fusion proteins encoded by tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), dengue virus, and Semliki Forest virus have a fusion peptide located at the end of a rod-like molecule comprised of three antiparallel beta sheet domains. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E1 and pestivirus envelope glycoprotein E2 are truncated class II fusion proteins. Similarities were also detected between the receptor-binding portion of TBEV E and HCV E2, and between TBEV small membrane protein precursor prM and pestivirus E1. The proposed models of Flaviviridae envelope proteins can facilitate drug and vaccine development.

  6. Simulations for experimental study of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy applications on NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bieniosek, F M; Friedman, A; Hay, M J; Henestroza, E; Logan, B G; More, R M; Ni, P A; Perkins, L J; Ng, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2010-03-19

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a {approx}3 MeV, {approx}30 A Li{sup +} ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The purpose of NDCX II is to carry out experimental studies of material in the warm dense matter regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. In preparation for this new machine, we have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of ion-beam-heated, metallic solid targets, connecting quantities related to observables, such as brightness temperature and expansion velocity at the critical frequency, with the simulated fluid density, temperature, and velocity. We examine how these quantities depend on two commonly used equations of state.

  7. Simulations for experimental study of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy applications on NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Friedman, A.; Hay, M.; Henestroza, E.; Logan, B.G.; More, R.M.; Ni, P.A.; Perkins, L. J.; Ng, S-F.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2009-09-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a {approx}3 MeV, {approx}30 A Li{sup +} ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and ransverse dimension of order 1 mm. The purpose of NDCX II is to carry out experimental studies of material in the warm dense matter regime, and ion beam/hydrodynamic coupling experiments relevant to heavy ion based inertial fusion energy. In preparation for this new machine, we have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of ion-beam-heated, metallic solid targets, connecting quantities related to observables, such as brightness temperature and expansion velocity at the critical frequency, with the simulated fluid density, temperature, and velocity. We examine how these quantities depend on two commonly used equations of state.

  8. Preclinical Assessment of Viral Vectored and Protein Vaccines Targeting the Duffy-Binding Protein Region II of Plasmodium Vivax.

    PubMed

    de Cassan, Simone C; Shakri, A Rushdi; Llewellyn, David; Elias, Sean C; Cho, Jee Sun; Goodman, Anna L; Jin, Jing; Douglas, Alexander D; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Nosten, François H; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce; Chitnis, Chetan E; Draper, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has largely focused on Plasmodium falciparum; however, a reawakening to the importance of Plasmodium vivax has spurred efforts to develop vaccines against this difficult to treat and at times severe form of relapsing malaria, which constitutes a significant proportion of human malaria cases worldwide. The almost complete dependence of P. vivax red blood cell invasion on the interaction of the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein region II (PvDBP_RII) with the human Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) makes this antigen an attractive vaccine candidate against blood-stage P. vivax. Here, we generated both preclinical and clinically compatible adenoviral and poxviral vectored vaccine candidates expressing the Salvador I allele of PvDBP_RII - including human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV5), chimpanzee adenovirus serotype 63 (ChAd63), and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors. We report on the antibody and T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines in mice or rabbits, either used alone in a viral vectored prime-boost regime or in "mixed-modality" adenovirus prime - protein-in--adjuvant boost regimes (using a recombinant PvDBP_RII protein antigen formulated in Montanide(®)ISA720 or Abisco(®)100 adjuvants). Antibodies induced by these regimes were found to bind to native parasite antigen from P. vivax infected Thai patients and were capable of inhibiting the binding of PvDBP_RII to its receptor DARC using an in vitro binding inhibition assay. In recent years, recombinant ChAd63 and MVA vectors have been quickly translated into human clinical trials for numerous antigens from P. falciparum as well as a growing number of other pathogens. The vectors reported here are immunogenic in small animals, elicit antibodies against PvDBP_RII, and have recently entered clinical trials, which will provide the first assessment of the safety and immunogenicity of the PvDBP_RII antigen in humans. PMID:26217340

  9. Fusion of Sendai virus with vesicles of oligomerizable lipids: a microcalorimetric analysis of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Ravoo, B J; Weringa, W D; Engberts, J B

    2000-01-01

    Sendai virus fuses efficiently with small and large unilamellar vesicles of the lipid 1,2-di-n-hexadecyloxypropyl-4- (beta-nitrostyryl) phosphate (DHPBNS) at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, as shown by lipid mixing assays and electron microscopy. However, fusion is strongly inhibited by oligomerization of the head groups of DHPBNS in the bilayer vesicles. The enthalpy associated with fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles was measured by isothermal titration microcalorimetry, comparing titrations of Sendai virus into (i) solutions of DHPBNS vesicles (which fuse with the virus) and (ii) oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles (which do not fuse with the virus), respectively. The observed heat effect of fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is strongly dependent on the buffer medium, reflecting a partial charge neutralization of the Sendai F and HN proteins upon insertion into the negatively-charged vesicle membrane. No buffer effect was observed for the titration of Sendai virus into oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles, indicating that inhibition of fusion is a result of inhibition of insertion of the fusion protein into the target membrane. Fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is endothermic and entropy-driven. The positive enthalpy term is dominated by heat effects resulting from merging of the protein-rich viral envelope with the lipid vesicle bilayers rather than by the fusion of the viral with the vesicle bilayers per se.

  10. Platelet aggregation responses and virus isolation from platelets in calves experimentally infected with type I or type II bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Walz, P H; Bell, T G; Grooms, D L; Kaiser, L; Maes, R K; Baker, J C

    2001-10-01

    Altered platelet function has been reported in calves experimentally infected with type II bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the ability of BVDV isolates to alter platelet function and to examine for the presence of a virus-platelet interaction during BVDV infection. Colostrum-deprived Holstein calves were obtained immediately after birth, housed in isolation, and assigned to 1 of 4 groups (1 control and 3 treatment groups). Control calves (n = 4) were sham inoculated, while calves in the infected groups (n = 4 for each group) were inoculated by intranasal instillation with 10(7) TCID50 of either BVDV 890 (type II), BVDV 7937 (type II), or BVDV TGAN (type I). Whole blood was collected prior to inoculation (day 0) and on days 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 after inoculation for platelet function testing by optical aggregometry by using adenosine diphosphate and platelet activating factor. The maximum percentage aggregation and the slope of the aggregation curve decreased over time in BVDV-infected calves; however, statistically significant differences (Freidman repeated measures ANOVA on ranks, P < 0.05) were only observed in calves infected with the type II BVDV isolates. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was not isolated from control calves, but was isolated from all calves infected with both type II BVDV isolates from days 4 through 12 after inoculation. In calves infected with type I BVDV, virus was isolated from 1 of 4 calves on days 4 and 12 after inoculation and from all calves on days 6 and 8 after inoculation. Altered platelet function was observed in calves infected with both type II BVDV isolates, but was not observed in calves infected with type I BVDV. Altered platelet function may be important as a difference in virulence between type I and type II BVDV infection.

  11. A review of potential image fusion methods for remote sensing-based irrigation management: Part II

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Satellite-based sensors provide data at either greater spectral and coarser spatial resolutions, or lower spectral and finer spatial resolutions due to complementary spectral and spatial characteristics of optical sensor systems. In order to overcome this limitation, image fusion has been suggested ...

  12. F-actin-myosin II inhibitors affect chromaffin granule plasma membrane distance and fusion kinetics by retraction of the cytoskeletal cortex.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, José; Torres, Vanesa; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina J; Garcia-Martinez, Virginia; López-Font, Inmaculada; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M

    2012-10-01

    Chromaffin cell catecholamines are released when specialized secretory vesicles undergo exocytotic membrane fusion. Evidence indicates that vesicle supply and fusion are controlled by the activity of the cortical F-actin-myosin II network. To study in detail cell cortex and vesicle interactions, we use fluorescent labeling with GFP-lifeact and acidotropic dyes in confocal and evanescent wave microscopy. These techniques provide structural details and dynamic images of chromaffin granules caged in a complex cortical structure. Both the movement of cortical structures and granule motion appear to be linked, and this motion can be restricted by the myosin II-specific inhibitor, blebbistatin, and the F-actin stabilizer, jasplakinolide. These treatments also affect the position of the vesicles in relation to the plasma membrane, increasing the distance between them and the fusion sites. Consequently, we observed slower single vesicle fusion kinetics in treated cells after neutralization of acridine orange-loaded granules during exocytosis. Increasing the distance between the granules and the fusion sites appears to be linked to the retraction of the F-actin cytoskeleton when treated with jasplakinolide. Thus, F-actin-myosin II inhibitors appear to slow granule fusion kinetics by altering the position of vesicles after relaxation of the cortical network.

  13. Replicative homeostasis II: Influence of polymerase fidelity on RNA virus quasispecies biology: Implications for immune recognition, viral autoimmunity and other "virus receptor" diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sallie, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Much of the worlds' population is in active or imminent danger from established infectious pathogens, while sporadic and pandemic infections by these and emerging agents threaten everyone. RNA polymerases (RNApol) generate enormous genetic and consequent antigenic heterogeneity permitting both viruses and cellular pathogens to evade host defences. Thus, RNApol causes more morbidity and premature mortality than any other molecule. The extraordinary genetic heterogeneity defining viral quasispecies results from RNApol infidelity causing rapid cumulative genomic RNA mutation a process that, if uncontrolled, would cause catastrophic loss of sequence integrity and inexorable quasispecies extinction. Selective replication and replicative homeostasis, an epicyclical regulatory mechanism dynamically linking RNApol fidelity and processivity with quasispecies phenotypic diversity, modulating polymerase fidelity and, hence, controlling quasispecies behaviour, prevents this happening and also mediates immune escape. Perhaps more importantly, ineluctable generation of broad phenotypic diversity after viral RNA is translated to protein quasispecies suggests a mechanism of disease that specifically targets, and functionally disrupts, the host cell surface molecules – including hormone, lipid, cell signalling or neurotransmitter receptors – that viruses co-opt for cell entry. This mechanism – "Viral Receptor Disease (VRD)" – may explain so-called "viral autoimmunity", some classical autoimmune disorders and other diseases, including type II diabetes mellitus, and some forms of obesity. Viral receptor disease is a unifying hypothesis that may also explain some diseases with well-established, but multi-factorial and apparently unrelated aetiologies – like coronary artery and other vascular diseases – in addition to diseases like schizophrenia that are poorly understood and lack plausible, coherent, pathogenic explanations. PMID:16115320

  14. Inhibition of iridovirus protein synthesis and virus replication by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides targeted to the major capsid protein, the 18 kDa immediate-early protein, and a viral homolog of RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, Robert; Bryan, Locke; Long, Scott; Majji, Sai; Hoskins, Glenn; Sinning, Allan; Olivier, Jake; Chinchar, V. Gregory . E-mail: vchinchar@microbio.umsmed.edu

    2007-02-20

    Frog virus 3 (FV3) is a large DNA virus that encodes {approx} 100 proteins. Although the general features of FV3 replication are known, the specific roles that most viral proteins play in the virus life cycle have not yet been elucidated. To address the question of viral gene function, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (asMOs) were used to transiently knock-down expression of specific viral genes and thus infer their role in virus replication. We designed asMOs directed against the major capsid protein (MCP), an 18 kDa immediate-early protein (18K) that was thought to be a viral regulatory protein, and the viral homologue of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (vPol-II{alpha}). All three asMOs successfully inhibited translation of the targeted protein, and two of the three asMOs resulted in marked phenotypic changes. Knock-down of the MCP resulted in a marked reduction in viral titer without a corresponding drop in the synthesis of other late viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that in cells treated with the anti-MCP MO assembly sites were devoid of viral particles and contained numerous aberrant structures. In contrast, inhibition of 18K synthesis did not block virion formation, suggesting that the 18K protein was not essential for replication of FV3 in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. Finally, consistent with the view that late viral gene expression is catalyzed by a virus-encoded or virus-modified Pol-II-like protein, knock-down of vPol-II{alpha} triggered a global decline in late gene expression and virus yields without affecting the synthesis of early viral genes. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of using asMOs to elucidate the function of FV3 proteins.

  15. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  16. Sensor fusion II: Human and machine strategies; Proceedings of the Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, Nov. 6-9, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, Paul S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on human and machine strategies in sensor fusion are presented. The general topics addressed include: active vision, measurement and analysis of visual motion, decision models for sensor fusion, implementation of sensor fusion algorithms, applying sensor fusion to image analysis, perceptual modules and their fusion, perceptual organization and object recognition, planning and the integration of high-level knowledge with perception, using prior knowledge and context in sensor fusion.

  17. Fatal viral infection-associated encephalopathy in two Chinese boys: a genetically determined risk factor of thermolabile carnitine palmitoyltransferase II variants.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chloe Miu; Lam, Ching-wan; Fong, Nai-chung; Siu, Wai-kwan; Lee, Han-chih Hencher; Siu, Tak-shing; Lai, Chi-kong; Law, Chun-yiu; Tong, Sui-fun; Poon, Wing-tat; Lam, David Shu-yan; Ng, Ho-leung; Yuen, Yuet-ping; Tam, Sidney; Que, Tak-lun; Kwong, Ngai-shan; Chan, Albert Yan-wo

    2011-08-01

    Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is a potentially fatal neurological complication of influenza infection usually in the presence of high and persistent fever. Thermolabile carnitine palmitoyltransferase II enzyme (CPT-II) predisposes IAE, so far only described in Japanese. As the genetic origins of Japanese and Chinese are alike, similar genetic risk factors in CPT-II are expected. We report the first two unrelated Chinese patients of thermolabile CPT-II variants that underlain the persistent high fever-triggered viral infection-associated encephalopathy, multi-organ failure and death. Elevated (C16:0+C18:1)/C2 acylcarnitines ratio and the CPT2 susceptibility variant allele [p.Phe352Cys; p.Val368Ile] were detected. The asymptomatic family members of one patient also had abnormal long-chain acylcarnitines. In our experience of biochemical genetics, the elevated (C16:0+C18:1)/C2 acylcarnitines ratio is unusual and specific for thermolabile CPT-II variants. Allele frequency of [p.Phe352Cys; p.Val368Ile] among Hong Kong Chinese was 0.104, similar to Japanese data, and [p.Phe352Cys] has not been reported in Caucasians. This may explain the Asian-specific phenomenon of thermolabile CPT-II-associated IAE. We successfully demonstrated the thermolabile CPT-II variants in patients with viral infection-associated encephalopathy in another Asian population outside Japanese. The condition is likely under-recognized. With our first cases, it is envisaged that more cases will be diagnosed in subsequent years. The exact pathogenic mechanism of how other factors interplay with thermolabile CPT-II variants and high fever leading to IAE, is yet to be elucidated. Fasting and decreased intake during illness may aggravate the disease. Further studies including high risk and neonatal screening are warranted to investigate its expressivity, penetrance and temperature-dependent behaviors in thermolabile CPT-II carriers. This may lead to discovery of the therapeutic golden window

  18. Statistical Mechanics of Viral Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaojun; Dudko, Olga K.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that have lipid-membrane envelopes infect cells by fusing with the cell membrane to release viral genes. Membrane fusion is known to be hindered by high kinetic barriers associated with drastic structural rearrangements—yet viral infection, which occurs by fusion, proceeds on remarkably short time scales. Here, we present a quantitative framework that captures the principles behind the invasion strategy shared by all enveloped viruses. The key to this strategy—ligand-triggered conformational changes in the viral proteins that pull the membranes together—is treated as a set of concurrent, bias field-induced activated rate processes. The framework results in analytical solutions for experimentally measurable characteristics of virus-cell fusion and enables us to express the efficiency of the viral strategy in quantitative terms. The predictive value of the theory is validated through simulations and illustrated through recent experimental data on influenza virus infection.

  19. Solar fusion cross sections II: the pp chain and CNO cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Adelberger, E G; Bemmerer, D; Bertulani, C A; Chen, J -W; Costantini, H; Couder, M; Cyburt, R; Davids, B; Freedman, S J; Gai, M; Garcia, A; Gazit, D; Gialanella, L; Greife, U; Hass, M; Heeger, K; Haxton, W C; Imbriani, G; Itahashi, T; Junghans, A; Kubodera, K; Langanke, K; Leitner, D; Leitner, M; Marcucci, L E; Motobayashi, T; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Nollett, Kenneth M; Nunes, F M; Park, T -S; Parker, P D; Prati, P; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Hamish Robertson, R G; Schiavilla, R; Simpson, E C; Snover, K A; Spitaleri, C; Strieder, F; Suemmerer, K; Trautvetter, R E; Tribble, R E; Typel, S; Uberseder, E; Vetter, P; Wiescher, M; Winslow, L

    2011-04-01

    The available data on nuclear fusion cross sections important to energy generation in the Sun and other hydrogen-burning stars and to solar neutrino production are summarized and critically evaluated. Recommended values and uncertainties are provided for key cross sections, and a recommended spectrum is given for 8B solar neutrinos. Opportunities for further increasing the precision of key rates are also discussed, including new facilities, new experimental techniques, and improvements in theory. This review, which summarizes the conclusions of a workshop held at the Institute for Nuclear Theory, Seattle, in January 2009, is intended as a 10-year update and supplement to 1998, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 1265.

  20. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Issues chapter contains a comprehensive list of engineering issues for fusion reactor nuclear components. The list explicitly defines the uncertainties associated with the engineering option of a fusion reactor and addresses the potential consequences resulting from each issue. The next chapter identifies the fusion nuclear technology testing needs up to the engineering demonstration stage. (MOW)

  1. Rho GTPases and the Downstream Effectors Actin-related Protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) Complex and Myosin II Induce Membrane Fusion at Self-contacts*

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Grant M.; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Actin regulation is required for membrane activities that drive cell adhesion and migration. The Rho GTPase family plays critical roles in actin and membrane dynamics; however, the roles of the Rho GTPase family are not limited to cell adhesion and migration. Using micron-sized obstacles to induce the formation of self-contacts in epithelial cells, we previously showed that self-adhesion is distinct from cell-to-cell adhesion in that self-contacts are eliminated by membrane fusion. In the current study, we identified Rho GTPases, RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42, as potential upstream regulators of membrane fusion. The RhoA downstream effector myosin II is required for fusion as the expression of mutant myosin light chain reduced membrane fusion. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the Arp2/3 complex, a downstream effector of Rac1 and Cdc42, also reduced self-contact-induced membrane fusion. At self-contacts, while the concentration of E-cadherin diminished, the intensity of GFP-tagged Arp3 rapidly fluctuated then decreased and stabilized after membrane fusion. Taken together, these data suggest that the Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization brings two opposing membranes into close apposition by possibly excluding E-cadherin from contact sites, thus promoting membrane fusion at self-contacts. PMID:25527498

  2. NMR structures of anti-HIV D-peptides derived from the N-terminus of viral chemokine vMIP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Mayuko; Liu Dongxiang; Kumar, Santosh; Huang Ziwei; E-mail: ziweihuang@burnham.org

    2005-09-30

    The viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has unique biological activities in that it blocks the cell entry by several different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains via chemokine receptors including CXCR4 and CCR5. In this paper, we report the solution structure of all-D-amino acid peptides derived from the N-terminus of vMIP-II, which have been shown to have strong CXCR4 binding activity and potently inhibit HIV-1 entry via CXCR4, by using long mixing time two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiments. Both of all-D-peptides vMIP-II (1-10) and vMIP-II (1-21), which are designated as DV3 and DV1, respectively, have higher CXCR4 binding ability than their L-peptide counterparts. They are partially structured in aqueous solution, displaying a turn-like structure over residues 5-8. The small temperature coefficients of His-6 amide proton for both peptides also suggest the formation of a small hydrophobic pocket centered on His-6. The structural features of DV3 are very similar to the reported solution structure of all-L-peptide vMIP-II (1-10) [M.P. Crump, E. Elisseeva, J. Gong, I. Clark-Lewis, B.D. Sykes, Structure/function of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II (1-71) and the antagonist N-terminal segment (1-10), FEBS Lett. 489 (2001) 171], which is consistent with the notion that D- and L-enantiomeric peptides can adopt mirror image conformations. The NMR structures of the D-peptides provide a structural basis to understand their mechanism of action and design new peptidomimetic analogs to further explore the structure-activity relationship of D-peptide ligand binding to CXCR4.

  3. Line-Tension Controlled Mechanism for Influenza Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, Herre Jelger; Smirnova, Yuliya G.; Grubmüller, Helmut; Marrink, Siewert Jan; Müller, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Our molecular simulations reveal that wild-type influenza fusion peptides are able to stabilize a highly fusogenic pre-fusion structure, i.e. a peptide bundle formed by four or more trans-membrane arranged fusion peptides. We rationalize that the lipid rim around such bundle has a non-vanishing rim energy (line-tension), which is essential to (i) stabilize the initial contact point between the fusing bilayers, i.e. the stalk, and (ii) drive its subsequent evolution. Such line-tension controlled fusion event does not proceed along the hypothesized standard stalk-hemifusion pathway. In modeled influenza fusion, single point mutations in the influenza fusion peptide either completely inhibit fusion (mutants G1V and W14A) or, intriguingly, specifically arrest fusion at a hemifusion state (mutant G1S). Our simulations demonstrate that, within a line-tension controlled fusion mechanism, these known point mutations either completely inhibit fusion by impairing the peptide’s ability to stabilize the required peptide bundle (G1V and W14A) or stabilize a persistent bundle that leads to a kinetically trapped hemifusion state (G1S). In addition, our results further suggest that the recently discovered leaky fusion mutant G13A, which is known to facilitate a pronounced leakage of the target membrane prior to lipid mixing, reduces the membrane integrity by forming a ‘super’ bundle. Our simulations offer a new interpretation for a number of experimentally observed features of the fusion reaction mediated by the prototypical fusion protein, influenza hemagglutinin, and might bring new insights into mechanisms of other viral fusion reactions. PMID:22761674

  4. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cameron R; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M; Wilson, Elizabeth B; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G; Horwitz, Marcus A; Bensinger, Steven J; Smale, Stephen T; Brooks, David G

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections.

  5. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cameron R; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M; Wilson, Elizabeth B; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G; Horwitz, Marcus A; Bensinger, Steven J; Smale, Stephen T; Brooks, David G

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections. PMID:26808628

  6. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Cameron R.; Champhekar, Ameya; Tullius, Michael V.; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Zhen, Anjie; de la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Herskovitz, Jonathan; Elsaesser, Heidi; Snell, Laura M.; Wilson, Elizabeth B.; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kitchen, Scott G.; Horwitz, Marcus A.; Bensinger, Steven J.; Smale, Stephen T.; Brooks, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV) to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs) during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I) then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections. PMID:26808628

  7. Transcription elongation regulator 1 (TCERG1) regulates competent RNA polymerase II-mediated elongation of HIV-1 transcription and facilitates efficient viral replication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Control of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) release from pausing has been proposed as a checkpoint mechanism to ensure optimal RNAPII activity, especially in large, highly regulated genes. HIV-1 gene expression is highly regulated at the level of elongation, which includes transcriptional pausing that is mediated by both viral and cellular factors. Here, we present evidence for a specific role of the elongation-related factor TCERG1 in regulating the extent of HIV-1 elongation and viral replication in vivo. Results We show that TCERG1 depletion diminishes the basal and viral Tat-activated transcription from the HIV-1 LTR. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of HIV-1, we found that TCERG1 modifies the levels of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of HIV-1. Most importantly, TCERG1 directly affects the elongation rate of RNAPII transcription in vivo. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcription by increasing the rate of RNAPII elongation through the phosphorylation of serine 2 within the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII and suggest a mechanism for the involvement of TCERG1 in relieving pausing. Finally, we show that TCERG1 is required for HIV-1 replication. Conclusions Our study reveals that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcriptional elongation by increasing the elongation rate of RNAPII and phosphorylation of Ser 2 within the CTD. Based on our data, we propose a general mechanism for TCERG1 acting on genes that are regulated at the level of elongation by increasing the rate of RNAPII transcription through the phosphorylation of Ser2. In the case of HIV-1, our evidence provides the basis for further investigation of TCERG1 as a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication PMID:24165037

  8. Viral pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S B

    1991-09-01

    Viral pneumonias are common in infants and young children but rare in adults. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and para-influenza viruses are the most frequent viral pathogens in infants and children. Influenza virus types A and B account for over one half of viral pneumonias in adults. Immunocompromised hosts are susceptible to pneumonias caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and other herpesviruses, as well as rubeola and adenovirus. Diagnosis of viral pneumonia depends on appropriate viral cultures and acute and convalescent sera for specific antibodies. Superinfection with bacteria is common in adults. Anti-viral therapy is available for several respiratory viruses. Ribavirin, amantadine/rimantadine, interferon alpha, and acyclovir are antiviral drugs that may be of benefit in treatment and prophylaxis. Prevention of viral pneumonia will depend upon improved viral immunization practices.

  9. Viral pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Pneumonia - viral; "Walking pneumonia" - viral Images Lungs Respiratory system References Lee FE, Treanor J. Viral infections. In: Mason RJ, VC Broaddus, Martin TR, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2010: ...

  10. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates interfere with the HIV-1 Tat–TAR RNA interaction critical for viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Malina, Jaroslav; Hannon, Michael J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat and TAR (transactivation responsive region) RNA, plays a critical role in HIV-1 transcription. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates were evaluated for their in vitro activity to inhibit Tat–TAR RNA interaction using UV melting studies, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and RNase A footprinting. The results demonstrate that iron(II) supramolecular helicates inhibit Tat-TAR interaction at nanomolar concentrations by binding to TAR RNA. These studies provide a new insight into the biological potential of metallosupramolecular helicates. PMID:27405089

  11. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates interfere with the HIV-1 Tat–TAR RNA interaction critical for viral replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malina, Jaroslav; Hannon, Michael J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat and TAR (transactivation responsive region) RNA, plays a critical role in HIV-1 transcription. Iron(II) supramolecular helicates were evaluated for their in vitro activity to inhibit Tat–TAR RNA interaction using UV melting studies, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and RNase A footprinting. The results demonstrate that iron(II) supramolecular helicates inhibit Tat-TAR interaction at nanomolar concentrations by binding to TAR RNA. These studies provide a new insight into the biological potential of metallosupramolecular helicates.

  12. Type C oncornavirus isolation studies in systemic lupus erythematosus. II. Attempted detection by viral RNA-dependent DNA polymerase assay.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, P E; Hargrave-Granda, R

    1978-01-01

    Isolation of type C oncornavirus was attempted from 20 tissues and cell cultures of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Chemical inducers, cocultivation and fusion with cells from multiple other species, prolonged subculturing, and the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase assay for virus detection were used. A type C virus was isolated, but was shown to be the endogenous rat virus. Thus the methods, although generally appropriate, were not specifically permissive for replication of a human type C virus. This agrees with the failure of other investigators to isolate a virus of undisputed human origin. Combining available evidence, a fundamental role for type C viruses in lupus erythematosus remains an attractive hypothesis. Images PMID:80159

  13. Improvements to the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion power plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1994-06-01

    If the present research program is successful, heavy-ion beams can be used to ignite targets and to produce high gain for yields of about 350 MJ. HYLIFE-II is a power plant design based on surrounding such targets with thick liquid (Flibe, Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) so that the chamber and other apparatus can not only stand up to these 350 MJ bursts of energy but do so without replacing components during the plant`s 30-year life. The capacity factor will be increased and the cost of component replacement will be decreased. Continuous improvements to the design are being made to increase safety, decrease the generation of radioactive material, and reduce the cost of electricity (COE). Improvements discussed in this paper decreased COE for each effect by the amount in parentheses: increased plant size (22%), increased capacity factor and reduced component replacement (20%), reduced remote maintenance equipment (3.2%), use of nonnuclear grade chamber, pumps and piping (2.9%), reduced tritium inventory by a factor of 2.4, reduced excess tritium production with attendant increase energy release in the blanket (1.8%), corrected treatment of Flibe inventory costs (3.4%).

  14. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  15. Viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Puigdomènech, Isabel; de Armas-Rillo, Laura; Machado, José-David

    2011-01-01

    Viruses have developed different survival strategies in host cells by crossing cell-membrane compartments, during different steps of their viral life cycle. In fact, the non-regenerative viral membrane of enveloped viruses needs to encounter the dynamic cell-host membrane, during early steps of the infection process, in which both membranes fuse, either at cell-surface or in an endocytic compartment, to promote viral entry and infection. Once inside the cell, many viruses accomplish their replication process through exploiting or modulating membrane traffic, and generating specialized compartments to assure viral replication, viral budding and spreading, which also serve to evade the immune responses against the pathogen. In this review, we have attempted to present some data that highlight the importance of membrane dynamics during viral entry and replicative processes, in order to understand how viruses use and move through different complex and dynamic cell-membrane structures and how they use them to persist. PMID:21966556

  16. Imaging multiple intermediates of single-virus membrane fusion mediated by distinct fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kye-Il; Tai, April; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wong, Clement; Wang, Pin

    2010-09-01

    Membrane fusion plays an essential role in the entry of enveloped viruses into target cells. The merging of viral and target cell membranes is catalyzed by viral fusion proteins, which involves multiple sequential steps in the fusion process. However, the fusion mechanisms mediated by different fusion proteins involve multiple transient intermediates that have not been well characterized. Here, we report a synthetic virus platform that allows us to better understand the different fusion mechanisms driven by the diverse types fusion proteins. The platform consists of lentiviral particles coenveloped with a surface antibody, which serves as the binding protein, along with a fusion protein derived from either influenza virus (HAmu) or Sindbis virus (SINmu). By using a single virus tracking technique, we demonstrated that both HAmu- and SINmu-bearing viruses enter cells through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but they required different endosomal trafficking routes to initiate viral fusion. Direct observation of single viral fusion events clearly showed that hemifusion mediated by SINmu upon exposure to low pH occurs faster than that mediated by HAmu. Monitoring sequential fusion processes by dual labeling the outer and inner leaflets of viral membranes also revealed that the SINmu-mediated hemifusion intermediate is relatively long-lived as compared with that mediated by HAmu. Taken together, we have demonstrated that the combination of this versatile viral platform with the techniques of single virus tracking can be a powerful tool for revealing molecular details of fusion mediated by various fusion proteins.

  17. Thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase fusion proteins and their use in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Sabine; Ghanem, Eman; Smith, Whitney; Sheeter, Dennis; Qin, Yidan; King, Olga; Polioudakis, Damon; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Swamy, Sajani; Kuersten, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2013-07-01

    Mobile group II introns encode reverse transcriptases (RTs) that function in intron mobility ("retrohoming") by a process that requires reverse transcription of a highly structured, 2-2.5-kb intron RNA with high processivity and fidelity. Although the latter properties are potentially useful for applications in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), group II intron RTs have been difficult to purify free of the intron RNA, and their utility as research tools has not been investigated systematically. Here, we developed general methods for the high-level expression and purification of group II intron-encoded RTs as fusion proteins with a rigidly linked, noncleavable solubility tag, and we applied them to group II intron RTs from bacterial thermophiles. We thus obtained thermostable group II intron RT fusion proteins that have higher processivity, fidelity, and thermostability than retroviral RTs, synthesize cDNAs at temperatures up to 81°C, and have significant advantages for qRT-PCR, capillary electrophoresis for RNA-structure mapping, and next-generation RNA sequencing. Further, we find that group II intron RTs differ from the retroviral enzymes in template switching with minimal base-pairing to the 3' ends of new RNA templates, making it possible to efficiently and seamlessly link adaptors containing PCR-primer binding sites to cDNA ends without an RNA ligase step. This novel template-switching activity enables facile and less biased cloning of nonpolyadenylated RNAs, such as miRNAs or protein-bound RNA fragments. Our findings demonstrate novel biochemical activities and inherent advantages of group II intron RTs for research, biotechnological, and diagnostic methods, with potentially wide applications. PMID:23697550

  18. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  19. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available.

  20. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gregory K; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, George Yancey; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Cripe, Timothy P

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:26436134

  1. Lipids in innate anti-viral defense

    PubMed Central

    Schoggins, John W.; Randall, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Summary It is becoming apparent that infections by a major class of viruses, those with envelopes, can be inhibited during their entry at the step of fusion with cellular membranes. In this review, we discuss multiple innate immune mechanisms that have evolved to modify the lipid composition of cellular and viral membranes to inhibit virion fusion of enveloped viruses. PMID:24139397

  2. Membrane fusion by an RGD-containing sequence from the core protein VP3 of hepatitis A virus and the RGA-analogue: implications for viral infection.

    PubMed

    Chávez, A; Pujol, M; Haro, I; Alsina, M A; Cajal, Y

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an RGD-containing epitope from the hepatitis A virus VP3 capsid protein and its RGA-analogue with lipid membranes was studied by biophysical methods. Two types of model membrane were used: vesicles and monolayers spread at the air/water interface, with a composition that closely resembles the lipid moiety of hepatocyte membranes: PC/SM/PE/PC (40:33:12:15; PC: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-sn-3-phosphocholine; SM: sphingomyelin from chicken egg yolk; PE, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine; PS: L-alpha-phosphatidyl-L-serine from bovine brain). In addition, zwitterionic PC/SM/PE (47:39:14) and cationic PC/SM/PE/DOTAP (40:33:12:15; DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) membranes were also prepared in order to dissect the electrostatic and hydrophobic components in the interaction. Changes in tryptophan fluorescence, acrylamide quenching, and resonance energy transfer experiments in the presence of vesicles, as well as the kinetics of insertion in monolayers, indicate that both peptides bind to the three types of membrane at neutral and acidic pH; however, binding is irreversible only at low pH. Membrane-destabilizing and fusogenic activities are triggered by acidification at pH 4-6, characteristic of the endosome. Fluorescence experiments show that VP3-RGD and VP3-RGA induce mixing of lipids and leakage or mixing of aqueous contents in anionic and cationic vesicles at pH 4-6, indicating leaky fusion. Interaction with zwitterionic vesicles (PC/SM/PE) results in leakage without lipid mixing, indicating pore formation. Replacement of aspartic acid in the RGD motif by alanine maintains the membrane-destabilizing properties of the peptide at low pH, but not its antigenicity. Since the RGD tripeptide is related to receptor-mediated cell adhesion and antigenicity, results suggest that receptor binding is not a molecular requirement for fusion. The possible involvement of peptide-induced membrane destabilization in the mechanism of hepatitis A

  3. Structure of a flavivirus envelope glycoprotein in its low-pH-induced membrane fusion conformation

    PubMed Central

    Bressanelli, Stéphane; Stiasny, Karin; Allison, Steven L; Stura, Enrico A; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Lescar, Julien; Heinz, Franz X; Rey, Félix A

    2004-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter cells via a membrane fusion reaction driven by conformational changes of specific viral envelope proteins. We report here the structure of the ectodomain of the tick-borne encephalitis virus envelope glycoprotein, E, a prototypical class II fusion protein, in its trimeric low-pH-induced conformation. We show that, in the conformational transition, the three domains of the neutral-pH form are maintained but their relative orientation is altered. Similar to the postfusion class I proteins, the subunits rearrange such that the fusion peptide loops cluster at one end of an elongated molecule and the C-terminal segments, connecting to the viral transmembrane region, run along the sides of the trimer pointing toward the fusion peptide loops. Comparison with the low-pH-induced form of the alphavirus class II fusion protein reveals striking differences at the end of the molecule bearing the fusion peptides, suggesting an important conformational effect of the missing membrane connecting segment. PMID:14963486

  4. Crystal Structure of Glycoprotein C from a Hantavirus in the Post-fusion Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Willensky, Shmuel; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Tischler, Nicole D.; Dessau, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are important emerging human pathogens and are the causative agents of serious diseases in humans with high mortality rates. Like other members in the Bunyaviridae family their M segment encodes two glycoproteins, GN and GC, which are responsible for the early events of infection. Hantaviruses deliver their tripartite genome into the cytoplasm by fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes in response to the reduced pH of the endosome. Unlike phleboviruses (e.g. Rift valley fever virus), that have an icosahedral glycoprotein envelope, hantaviruses display a pleomorphic virion morphology as GN and GC assemble into spikes with apparent four-fold symmetry organized in a grid-like pattern on the viral membrane. Here we present the crystal structure of glycoprotein C (GC) from Puumala virus (PUUV), a representative member of the Hantavirus genus. The crystal structure shows GC as the membrane fusion effector of PUUV and it presents a class II membrane fusion protein fold. Furthermore, GC was crystallized in its post-fusion trimeric conformation that until now had been observed only in Flavi- and Togaviridae family members. The PUUV GC structure together with our functional data provides intriguing evolutionary and mechanistic insights into class II membrane fusion proteins and reveals new targets for membrane fusion inhibitors against these important pathogens. PMID:27783673

  5. A bio-synthetic interface for discovery of viral entry mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Gutzler, Mike; Maar, Dianna; Negrete, Oscar; Hayden, Carl C.; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Wang, Julia

    2010-09-01

    Understanding and defending against pathogenic viruses is an important public health and biodefense challenge. The focus of our LDRD project has been to uncover the mechanisms enveloped viruses use to identify and invade host cells. We have constructed interfaces between viral particles and synthetic lipid bilayers. This approach provides a minimal setting for investigating the initial events of host-virus interaction - (i) recognition of, and (ii) entry into the host via membrane fusion. This understanding could enable rational design of therapeutics that block viral entry as well as future construction of synthetic, non-proliferating sensors that detect live virus in the environment. We have observed fusion between synthetic lipid vesicles and Vesicular Stomatitis virus particles, and we have observed interactions between Nipah virus-like particles and supported lipid bilayers and giant unilamellar vesicles.

  6. The influence of class II HLA type on the lymphoproliferative response of normal donors to a bcr-abl fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, A R; Christmas, S E; Clark, R E

    1996-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by a t(9;22) chromosomal translocation resulting in the expression of a novel bcr-abl fusion protein. The region spanning the fusion point is novel to the immune system and hence represents a potential leukemia-specific antigen. The ability of a 21-mer b3a2 fusion peptide to induce an in vitro lymphoproliferative response in a panel of 54 normal donors has been tested. This gave a mean stimulation index of 2.73 (95% CI 2.42-3.05) and 50/54 (93%) of donors gave responses that were greater than those with bcr or abl control peptides. The mean stimulation index relative to that of the control peptides was 1.80 (95% CI 1.63-1.97; p < 0.001). Responses were optimal at concentrations ranging from 0.3-150 micrograms/mL and in most cases peaked at 9 days. There was no clear relationship between level of responsiveness to the b3a2 fusion peptide and the presence of any single HLA-A, -B, -DR, or -DQ allele. HIA-DRB1*0404 was the only allele that was not associated with responsiveness. It is therefore likely that the b3a2 fusion peptide can be presented to T cells during a primary immune response in the context of several different class II HLA allelic products, albeit at low efficiency. The implications for specific active immunotherapy of CML patients are discussed.

  7. A single amino acid change resulting in loss of fluorescence of eGFP in a viral fusion protein confers fitness and growth advantage to the recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Phat X.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Phani B.; Das, Subash C.; Das, Anshuman; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    2012-10-25

    Using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus encoding eGFP fused in-frame with an essential viral replication protein, the phosphoprotein P, we show that during passage in culture, the virus mutates the nucleotide C289 within eGFP of the fusion protein PeGFP to A or T, resulting in R97S/C amino acid substitution and loss of fluorescence. The resultant non-fluorescent virus exhibits increased fitness and growth advantage over its fluorescent counterpart. The growth advantage of the non-fluorescent virus appears to be due to increased transcription and replication activities of the PeGFP protein carrying the R97S/C substitution. Further, our results show that the R97S/C mutation occurs prior to accumulation of mutations that can result in loss of expression of the gene inserted at the G-L gene junction. These results suggest that fitness gain is more important for the recombinant virus than elimination of expression of the heterologous gene.

  8. Constancy and diversity in the flavivirus fusion peptide

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    Background Flaviviruses include the mosquito-borne dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever and West Nile and the tick-borne encephalitis viruses. They are responsible for considerable world-wide morbidity and mortality. Viral entry is mediated by a conserved fusion peptide containing 16 amino acids located in domain II of the envelope protein E. Highly orchestrated conformational changes initiated by exposure to acidic pH accompany the fusion process and are important factors limiting amino acid changes in the fusion peptide that still permit fusion with host cell membranes in both arthropod and vertebrate hosts. The cell-fusing related agents, growing only in mosquitoes or insect cell lines, possess a different homologous peptide. Results Analysis of 46 named flaviviruses deposited in the Entrez Nucleotides database extended the constancy in the canonical fusion peptide sequences of mosquito-borne, tick-borne and viruses with no known vector to include more recently-sequenced viruses. The mosquito-borne signature amino acid, G104, was also found in flaviviruses with no known vector and with the cell-fusion related viruses. Despite the constancy in the canonical sequences in pathogenic flaviviruses, mutations were surprisingly frequent with a 27% prevalence of nonsynonymous mutations in yellow fever virus fusion peptide sequences, and 0 to 7.4% prevalence in the others. Six of seven yellow fever patients whose virus had fusion peptide mutations died. In the cell-fusing related agents, not enough sequences have been deposited to estimate reliably the prevalence of fusion peptide mutations. However, the canonical sequences homologous to the fusion peptide and the pattern of disulfide linkages in protein E differed significantly from the other flaviviruses. Conclusion The constancy of the canonical fusion peptide sequences in the arthropod-borne flaviviruses contrasts with the high prevalence of mutations in most individual viruses. The discrepancy may be the

  9. Spinal fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anterior spinal fusion; Spine surgery - spinal fusion; Low back pain - fusion; Herniated disk - fusion ... If you had chronic back pain before surgery, you will likely still have some pain afterward. Spinal fusion is unlikely to take away all your pain ...

  10. Viral Gastroenteritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. Several different viruses can cause viral gastroenteritis, which is highly contagious ... and last for 1 to 3 days. Some viruses cause symptoms that last longer. [ Top ] What are ...

  11. Viral arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Ohl CA, Forster D. Infectious arthritis of native joints. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ...

  12. Fusion of Enveloped Viruses in Endosomes.

    PubMed

    White, Judith M; Whittaker, Gary R

    2016-06-01

    Ari Helenius launched the field of enveloped virus fusion in endosomes with a seminal paper in the Journal of Cell Biology in 1980. In the intervening years, a great deal has been learned about the structures and mechanisms of viral membrane fusion proteins as well as about the endosomes in which different enveloped viruses fuse and the endosomal cues that trigger fusion. We now recognize three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria and four mechanisms of fusion triggering. After reviewing general features of viral membrane fusion proteins and viral fusion in endosomes, we delve into three characterized mechanisms for viral fusion triggering in endosomes: by low pH, by receptor binding plus low pH and by receptor binding plus the action of a protease. We end with a discussion of viruses that may employ novel endosomal fusion-triggering mechanisms. A key take-home message is that enveloped viruses that enter cells by fusing in endosomes traverse the endocytic pathway until they reach an endosome that has all of the environmental conditions (pH, proteases, ions, intracellular receptors and lipid composition) to (if needed) prime and (in all cases) trigger the fusion protein and to support membrane fusion.

  13. Enhanced activation of T lymphocytes by urease-deficient recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin producing heat shock protein 70-major membrane protein-II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Tetsu; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Matsuoka, Masanori; Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Makino, Masahiko

    2010-11-15

    To activate naive T cells convincingly using Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), recombinant BCG (BCG-D70M) that was deficient in urease, expressed with gene encoding the fusion of BCG-derived heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and Mycobacterium leprae-derived major membrane protein (MMP)-II, one of the immunodominant Ags of M. leprae, was newly constructed. BCG-D70M was more potent in activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets of naive T cells than recombinant BCGs including urease-deficient BCG and BCG-70M secreting HSP70-MMP-II fusion protein. BCG-D70M efficiently activated dendritic cells (DCs) to induce cytokine production and phenotypic changes and activated CD4(+) T cells even when macrophages were used as APCs. The activation of both subsets of T cells was MHC and CD86 dependent. Pretreatment of DCs with chloroquine inhibited both surface expression of MMP-II on DCs and the activation of T cells by BCG-D70M-infected APCs. The naive CD8(+) T cell activation was inhibited by treatment of DCs with brefeldin A and lactacystin so that the T cell was activated by TAP- and proteosome-dependent cytosolic cross-priming pathway. From naive CD8(+) T cells, effector T cells producing perforin and memory T cells having migration markers were produced by BCG-D70M stimulation. BCG-D70M primary infection in C57BL/6 mice produced T cells responsive to in vitro secondary stimulation with MMP-II and HSP70 and more efficiently inhibited the multiplication of subsequently challenged M. leprae than vector control BCG. These results indicate that the triple combination of HSP70, MMP-II, and urease depletion may provide a useful tool for inducing better activation of naive T cells.

  14. [Enhanced activation of T lymphocytes by urease-deficient recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin producing heat shock protein 70-major membrane protein-II fusion protein].

    PubMed

    Makino, Masahiko; Mukai, Tetsu

    2012-09-01

    To activate naïve T cells convincingly using Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), rBCG (BCG-D70M) that was deficient in urease, expressed with gene encoding the fusion of BCG-derived heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and Mycobacterium leprae-derived major membrane protein (MMP)-II, one of the immunodominant Ags of M. leprae, was newly constructed. BCG-D70M was more potent in activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets of naïve T cells than rBCGs including urease-deficient BCG and BCG-70M secreting HSP70-MMP-II fusion protein. BCG-D70M efficiently activated dendritic cells (DC) to induce cytokine production and phenotypic changes, and activated CD4+ T cells even when macrophages were used as APCs. The activation of both subsets of T cells was MHC and CD86 dependent. Pre-treatment of DC with chloroquine inhibited both surface expression of MMP-II on DC and the activation of T cells by BCG-D70M-infected APCs. The naïve CD8+ T cell activation was inhibited by treatment of DC with brefeldin A and lactacystin so that the T cells was activated by TAP- and proteosome-dependent cytosolic cross-priming pathway. From naïve CD8+ T cells, effector T cells producing perforin and memory T cells having migration markers, were produced by BCG-D70M stimulation. BCG-D70M primary infection in C57BL/6 mice produced T cells responsive to in vitro secondary stimulation with MMP-II and HSP70, and more efficiently inhibited the multiplication of subsequently challenged M. leprae than vector control BCG. These results indicate that the triple combination of HSP70, MMP-II and urease depletion may provide useful tool for inducing better activation of naïve T cells.

  15. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  16. A Recombinant Trivalent Fusion Protein F1-LcrV-HSP70(II) Augments Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses and Imparts Full Protection against Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shailendra K; Batra, Lalit; Tuteja, Urmil

    2016-01-01

    Plague is one of the most dangerous infections in humans caused by Yersinia pestis, a Gram-negative bacterium. Despite of an overwhelming research success, no ideal vaccine against plague is available yet. It is well established that F1/LcrV based vaccine requires a strong cellular immune response for complete protection against plague. In our earlier study, we demonstrated that HSP70(II) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates the humoral and cellular immunity of F1/LcrV vaccine candidates individually as well as in combinations in a mouse model. Here, we made two recombinant constructs caf1-lcrV and caf1-lcrV-hsp70(II). The caf1 and lcrV genes of Y. pestis and hsp70 domain II of M. tuberculosis were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Both the recombinant constructs caf1-lcrV and caf1-lcrV-hsp70(II) were cloned in pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant fusion proteins F1-LcrV and F1-LcrV-HSP70(II) were purified using Ni-NTA columns and formulated with alum to evaluate the humoral and cell mediated immune responses in mice. The protective efficacies of F1-LcrV and F1-LcrV-HSP70(II) were determined following challenge of immunized mice with 100 LD50 of Y. pestis through intraperitoneal route. Significant differences were noticed in the titers of IgG and it's isotypes, i.e., IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 in anti- F1-LcrV-HSP70(II) sera in comparison to anti-F1-LcrV sera. Similarly, significant differences were also noticed in the expression levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in splenocytes of F1-LcrV-HSP(II) immunized mice in comparison to F1-LcrV. Both F1-LcrV and F1-LcrV-HSP70(II) provided 100% protection. Our research findings suggest that F1-LcrV fused with HSP70 domain II of M. tuberculosis significantly enhanced the humoral and cellular immune responses in mouse model. PMID:27458447

  17. A Recombinant Trivalent Fusion Protein F1–LcrV–HSP70(II) Augments Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses and Imparts Full Protection against Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shailendra K.; Batra, Lalit; Tuteja, Urmil

    2016-01-01

    Plague is one of the most dangerous infections in humans caused by Yersinia pestis, a Gram-negative bacterium. Despite of an overwhelming research success, no ideal vaccine against plague is available yet. It is well established that F1/LcrV based vaccine requires a strong cellular immune response for complete protection against plague. In our earlier study, we demonstrated that HSP70(II) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates the humoral and cellular immunity of F1/LcrV vaccine candidates individually as well as in combinations in a mouse model. Here, we made two recombinant constructs caf1–lcrV and caf1–lcrV–hsp70(II). The caf1 and lcrV genes of Y. pestis and hsp70 domain II of M. tuberculosis were amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Both the recombinant constructs caf1–lcrV and caf1–lcrV–hsp70(II) were cloned in pET28a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant fusion proteins F1–LcrV and F1–LcrV–HSP70(II) were purified using Ni-NTA columns and formulated with alum to evaluate the humoral and cell mediated immune responses in mice. The protective efficacies of F1–LcrV and F1–LcrV–HSP70(II) were determined following challenge of immunized mice with 100 LD50 of Y. pestis through intraperitoneal route. Significant differences were noticed in the titers of IgG and it’s isotypes, i.e., IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 in anti- F1–LcrV–HSP70(II) sera in comparison to anti-F1–LcrV sera. Similarly, significant differences were also noticed in the expression levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in splenocytes of F1–LcrV–HSP(II) immunized mice in comparison to F1–LcrV. Both F1–LcrV and F1–LcrV–HSP70(II) provided 100% protection. Our research findings suggest that F1–LcrV fused with HSP70 domain II of M. tuberculosis significantly enhanced the humoral and cellular immune responses in mouse model. PMID:27458447

  18. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  19. Comparison of Anyplex II RV16 with the xTAG respiratory viral panel and Seeplex RV15 for detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ki; Oh, Sung-Hee; Yun, Kyung Ah; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na

    2013-04-01

    A novel multiplex real-time PCR approach (Anyplex II RV16 [RV16]; Seegene, South Korea) was compared with a multiplex endpoint PCR kit (Seeplex RV15 ACE detection kit [RV15]; Seegene) and a liquid bead-based assay (xTAG respiratory viral panel [xTAG]; Abbott, United States). Of nasopharyngeal swabs or aspirates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples submitted for RV15 testing, 199 retrospectively collected positive specimens and 283 prospectively collected specimens were further tested with RV16 and xTAG. A true-positive result was defined as a positive result from all three methods or RV16 and xTAG or RV15 and xTAG. For specimens with discrepant results, monoplex PCR and sequencing of the target viruses were performed. In total, 300 virus-positive specimens yielded 386 viruses. When the bocavirus results were excluded, the overall sensitivities of RV16, RV15, and xTAG were 95.2%, 93.3%, and 87.2%, respectively (95% confidence intervals, 93.0 to 97.4%, 90.8 to 95.8%, and 83.8 to 90.6%, respectively). RV16 was more sensitive than xTAG for coronavirus OC43/HKU1 (100% versus 26.1%; P < 0.0001) and adenovirus (100% versus 79.5%; P < 0.01) but was less sensitive than xTAG for rhinovirus/enterovirus (89.4% versus 97.9%; P < 0.05). RV16 demonstrated higher sensitivity than RV15 for the detection of adenovirus (100% versus 82.1%; P < 0.05). The specificities of all three methods ranged from 98.6% to 100%. Sequencing analysis of 64 rhinovirus-positive samples revealed that RV16 accurately differentiated between rhinovirus and enterovirus. RV16 most frequently missed rhinovirus C. In conclusion, the overall sensitivity of RV16 was better than that of xTAG. However, improvement of the sensitivity for rhinovirus is required.

  20. Two Novel Class II Hydrophobins from Trichoderma spp. Stimulate Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) when Expressed as Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Espino-Rammer, Liliana; Ribitsch, Doris; Przylucka, Agnieszka; Marold, Annemarie; Greimel, Katrin J.; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Guebitz, Georg M.; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) can be functionalized and/or recycled via hydrolysis by microbial cutinases. The rate of hydrolysis is however low. Here, we tested whether hydrophobins (HFBs), small secreted fungal proteins containing eight positionally conserved cysteine residues, are able to enhance the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of PET. Species of the fungal genus Trichoderma have the most proliferated arsenal of class II hydrophobin-encoding genes among fungi. To this end, we studied two novel class II HFBs (HFB4 and HFB7) of Trichoderma. HFB4 and HFB7, produced in Escherichia coli as fusions to the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase, exhibited subtle structural differences reflected in hydrophobicity plots that correlated with unequal hydrophobicity and hydrophily, respectively, of particular amino acid residues. Both proteins exhibited a dosage-dependent stimulation effect on PET hydrolysis by cutinase from Humicola insolens, with HFB4 displaying an adsorption isotherm-like behavior, whereas HFB7 was active only at very low concentrations and was inhibitory at higher concentrations. We conclude that class II HFBs can stimulate the activity of cutinases on PET, but individual HFBs can display different properties. The present findings suggest that hydrophobins can be used in the enzymatic hydrolysis of aromatic-aliphatic polyesters such as PET. PMID:23645195

  1. Human HLA class I- and HLA class II-restricted cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes identify a cluster of epitopes on the measles virus fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Binnendijk, R S; Versteeg-van Oosten, J P; Poelen, M C; Brugghe, H F; Hoogerhout, P; Osterhaus, A D; Uytdehaag, F G

    1993-01-01

    The transmembrane fusion (F) glycoprotein of measles virus is an important target antigen of human HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Genetically engineered F proteins and nested sets of synthetic peptides spanning the F protein were used to determine sequences of F recognized by a number of F-specific CTL clones. Combined N- and C-terminal deletions of the respective peptides revealed that human HLA class I and HLA class II-restricted CTL efficiently recognize nonapeptides or decapeptides representing epitopes of F. Three distinct sequences recognized by three different HLA class II (DQw1, DR2, and DR4/w53)-restricted CTL clones appear to cluster between amino acids 379 and 466 of F, thus defining an important T-cell epitope area of F. Within this same region, a nonamer peptide of F was found to be recognized by an HLA-B27-restricted CTL clone, as expected on the basis of the structural homology between this peptide and other known HLA-B27 binding peptides. PMID:7680390

  2. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs.

  3. [Viral superantigens].

    PubMed

    Us, Dürdal

    2016-07-01

    Superantigens (SAgs) are microbial proteins produced by various microorganisms that elicit excessive and strong stimulation of T cells via an unconventional mechanism. They cause polyclonal activation of T cells in a non-specific manner, by binding to a particular variable-beta (Vβ) chain of T-cell receptor (TCR) and MHC class II molecule, in unprocessed form and outside of peptide-binding cleft, forming a bridge between the antigen presenting cell and the T cell. SAgs are classified into three groups, namely 1) exogenous (soluble proteins and exotoxins secreted by microorganisms), 2) endogenous (transmembrane proteins encoded by viruses which are integrated into the genome) and 3) B-cell SAgs (proteins which stimulate predominantly B cells). The best characterized and mostly studied SAgs are staphylococcal and streptococcal exotoxins, however it is well-known that many other microorganisms also possess SAg activities. Despite the presence of several viruses that cause severe infections in humans, the number of viruses that have proteins identified with SAg property in their pathogenesis, is relatively low. To date, the defined viruses that encoded SAgs are as follows; mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) (Marrack, et al. 1991), rabies virus (Lafon, et al. 1992), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (Sutkowski, et al. 1996), human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) (Conrad, et al. 1997), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (Posnett, et al. 1995; Torres, et al. 1996; Townsley-Fuchs, et al. 1997) and Ebola virus (Leroy, et al. 2011). SAgs were first described in the MMTV, a polymorphic B-type retrovirus that is either contained in the genome as an endogenous provirus (germline transmission) or exogenous infectious virus that transmits vertically via breast milk. Both MMTV forms encode SAgs. The SAg-mediated massive T cell activation is required for the spread of exogenous MMTV from intestines to mammary glands, facilitating the transmission of infectious virus. On the other hand

  4. Big fusion, little fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Frank; ddtuttle

    2016-08-01

    In reply to correspondence from George Scott and Adam Costley about the Physics World focus issue on nuclear energy, and to news of construction delays at ITER, the fusion reactor being built in France.

  5. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D.; Rey, Félix A.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single “fusion loop”. We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal “tail” that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens. PMID:27783711

  6. Shutoff of RNA polymerase II transcription by poliovirus involves 3C protease-mediated cleavage of the TATA-binding protein at an alternative site: incomplete shutoff of transcription interferes with efficient viral replication.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Pallob; Raychaudhuri, Santanu; Tsai, Weimin; Dasgupta, Asim

    2005-08-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) plays a crucial role in cellular transcription catalyzed by all three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Previous studies have shown that TBP is targeted by the poliovirus (PV)-encoded protease 3C(pro) to bring about shutoff of cellular RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription in PV-infected cells. The processing of the majority of viral precursor proteins by 3C(pro) involves cleavages at glutamine-glycine (Q-G) sites. We present evidence that suggests that the transcriptional inactivation of TBP by 3C(pro) involves cleavage at the glutamine 104-serine 105 (Q104-S105) site of TBP and not at the Q18-G19 site as previously thought. The TBP Q104-S105 cleavage by 3C(pro) is greatly influenced by the presence of an aliphatic amino acid at the P4 position, a hallmark of 3C(pro)-mediated proteolysis. To examine the importance of host cell transcription shutoff in the PV life cycle, stable HeLa cell lines were created that express recombinant TBP resistant to cleavage by the viral proteases, called GG rTBP. Transcription shutoff was significantly impaired and delayed in GG rTBP cells upon infection with poliovirus compared with the cells that express wild-type recombinant TBP (wt rTBP). Infection of GG rTBP cells with poliovirus resulted in small plaques, significantly reduced viral RNA synthesis, and lower viral yields compared to the wt rTBP cell line. These results suggest that a defect in transcription shutoff can lead to inefficient replication of poliovirus in cultured cells.

  7. Deployment of membrane fusion protein domains during fusion.

    PubMed

    Bentz, J; Mittal, A

    2000-01-01

    It is clear that both viral and intracellular membrane fusion proteins contain a minimal set of domains which must be deployed at the appropriate time during the fusion process. An account of these domains and their functions is given here for the four best-described fusion systems: influenza HA, sendai virus F1, HIV gp120/41 and the neuronal SNARE core composed of synaptobrevin (syn), syntaxin (stx) and the N- and C-termini of SNAP25 (sn25), together with the Ca(2+)binding protein synaptotagmin (syt). Membrane fusion begins with the binding of the virion or vesicle to the target membrane via receptors. The committed step in influenza HA- mediated fusion begins with an aggregate of HAs (at least eight) with some of their HA2 N-termini, a.k.a. fusion peptides, embedded into the viral bilayer (Bentz, 2000 a). The hypothesis presented in Bentz (2000 b) is that the conformational change of HA to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptides from the viral bilayer. When this extraction occurs from the center of the site of restricted lipid flow, it exposes acyl chains and parts of the HA transmembrane domains to the aqueous media, i.e. a hydrophobic defect is formed. This is the 'transition state' of the committed step of fusion. It is stabilized by a 'dam' of HAs, which are inhibited from diffusing away by the rest of the HAs in the aggregate and because that would initially expose more acyl chains to water. Recruitment of lipids from the apposed target membrane can heal this hydrophobic defect, initiating lipid mixing and fusion. The HA transmembrane domains are required to be part of the hydrophobic defect, because the HA aggregate must be closely packed enough to restrict lipid flow. This hypothesis provides a simple and direct coupling between the energy released by the formation of the coiled coil to the energy needed to create and stabilize the high energy intermediates of fusion. Several of these essential domains have been described for the viral fusion

  8. [Viral flora (coliphages and human enteroviruses) found in river water after an urban district (Saint-Etienne). II. A virological and epidemiological survey (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gaudin, O G; Meley, B; Chomel, J J; Viac, J

    1976-01-01

    A survey was carried out from March 1972 to February 1973 to identify viral flora found in the river Furan ater St. Etienne. The 54 samples examined revealed the following data: 1) more accurate results are obtained when viral concentration values are expressed in terms of m3/sec., taking into account the flow of the river and eliminating the seasonal dilution factor; 2) rates of enteroviruses remain constant throughout the year, in spite of a relatively rapid spontaneous inactivation of the viruses; 3) rates of coliphages vary considerably according to seasons, with a notable increase in summer; 4) the two previous data are unrelated; 5) 147 enterovirus strains were isolated, of which 44% were polioviruses; 6) virulent and attenuated types 2 and 3 polioviruses were found simultaneously at certain periods; 7) only virulent strains of type 1 poliovirus were isolated; 8) this type of survey may be useful in controlling the endemic residual poliomyelitis in the region of St. Etienne.

  9. RAB-5- and DYNAMIN-1-Mediated Endocytosis of EFF-1 Fusogen Controls Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Smurova, Ksenia; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cell-cell fusion plays essential roles during fertilization and organogenesis. Previous studies in C. elegans led to the identification of the eukaryotic fusion protein (EFF-1 fusogen), which has structural homology to class II viral fusogens. Transcriptional repression of EFF-1 ensures correct fusion fates, and overexpression of EFF-1 results in embryonic lethality. EFF-1 must be expressed on the surface of both fusing cells; however, little is known regarding how cells regulate EFF-1 surface exposure. Here, we report that EFF-1 is actively removed from the plasma membrane of epidermal cells by dynamin- and RAB-5-dependent endocytosis and accumulates in early endosomes. EFF-1 was transiently localized to apical domains of fusion-competent cells. Effective cell-cell fusion occurred only between pairs of cell membranes in which EFF-1 localized. Downregulation of dynamin or RAB-5 caused EFF-1 mislocalization to all apical membrane domains and excessive fusion. Thus, internalization of EFF-1 is a safety mechanism preventing excessive cell fusion. PMID:26854231

  10. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume Delineation in Head-and-Neck Cancer Using PET/CT Fusion, Part II: The Impact of a Contouring Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Berson, Anthony M. Stein, Nicholas F.; Riegel, Adam C.; Destian, Sylvie; Ng, Tracy; Tena, Lawrence B.; Mitnick, Robin J.; Heiba, Sherif

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a gross tumor volume (GTV) contouring protocol on interobserver variability between 4 physicians in positron emission therapy/computed tomography (PET/CT) treatment planning of head-and-neck cancer. A GTV contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning was developed utilizing 4 stages: Preliminary contouring on CT alone, determination of appropriate PET windowing, accurate image registration, and modification of CT contouring with correctly formatted PET/CT display and rules for modality disagreement. Two neuroradiologists and 2 radiation oncologists (designated as A, B, C, and D, respectively) were given a tutorial of PET/CT coregistered imaging individualized to their skill level, which included a step-by-step explanation of the protocol with clinical examples. Opportunities for questions and hands-on practice were given. The physicians were asked to re-contour 16 head-and-neck patients from Part I on PET/CT fusion imaging. Differences in volume magnitude were analyzed for statistical significance by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap was analyzed for statistical significance using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests ({alpha} < 0.05). Volume overlap increased significantly from Part I to Part II (p < 0.05). One previously significant difference between physicians disappeared with the protocol in place. The mean fusion volume of Physician C, however, remained significantly larger than that of Physician D (p < 0.01). This result is unchanged from Part I. The multidisciplinary contouring protocol significantly improved the coincidence of GTVs contoured by multiple physicians. The magnitudes of the volumes showed marginal improvement in consistency. Developing an institutional contouring protocol for PET/CT treatment planning is highly recommended to reduce interobserver variability.

  11. Discovery of small-molecule HIV-1 fusion and integrase inhibitors oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: Part II. Integrase inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Huang, Sylvia; Huang, Philip Lin; Zhang Dawei; Lee, Jae Wook; Bao Ju; Sun Yongtao; Chang, Young-Tae; Zhang, John; Huang, Paul Lee . E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-23

    We report molecular modeling and functional confirmation of Ole and HT binding to HIV-1 integrase. Docking simulations identified two binding regions for Ole within the integrase active site. Region I encompasses the conserved D64-D116-E152 motif, while region II involves the flexible loop region formed by amino acid residues 140-149. HT, on the other hand, binds to region II. Both Ole and HT exhibit favorable interactions with important amino acid residues through strong H-bonding and van der Waals contacts, predicting integrase inhibition. To test and confirm modeling predictions, we examined the effect of Ole and HT on HIV-1 integrase activities including 3'-processing, strand transfer, and disintegration. Ole and HT exhibit dose-dependent inhibition on all three activities, with EC{sub 50}s in the nanomolar range. These studies demonstrate that molecular modeling of target-ligand interaction coupled with structural-activity analysis should facilitate the design and identification of innovative integrase inhibitors and other therapeutics.

  12. Viral Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Haeman; Boltz, David A.; Webster, Robert G.; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a debilitating neurological disorder characterized that affects 1-2% of the adult population over 55 years of age. For the vast majority of cases, the etiology of this disorder is unknown, although it is generally accepted that there is a genetic susceptibility to any number of environmental agents. One such agent may be viruses. It has been shown that numerous viruses can enter the nervous system, i.e. they are neurotropic, and induce a number of encephalopathies. One of the secondary consequences of these encephalopathies can be parkinsonism, that is both transient as well as permanent. One of the most highlighted and controversial cases of viral parkinsonism is that which followed the 1918 influenza outbreak and the subsequent induction of von Economo's encephalopathy. In this review, we discuss the neurological sequelae of infection by influenza virus as well as that of other viruses known to induce parkinsonism including Coxsackie, Japanese encephalitis B, St. Louis, West Nile and HIV viruses. PMID:18760350

  13. Viral evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Explaining the origin of viruses remains an important challenge for evolutionary biology. Previous explanatory frameworks described viruses as founders of cellular life, as parasitic reductive products of ancient cellular organisms or as escapees of modern genomes. Each of these frameworks endow viruses with distinct molecular, cellular, dynamic and emergent properties that carry broad and important implications for many disciplines, including biology, ecology and epidemiology. In a recent genome-wide structural phylogenomic analysis, we have shown that large-to-medium-sized viruses coevolved with cellular ancestors and have chosen the evolutionary reductive route. Here we interpret these results and provide a parsimonious hypothesis for the origin of viruses that is supported by molecular data and objective evolutionary bioinformatic approaches. Results suggest two important phases in the evolution of viruses: (1) origin from primordial cells and coexistence with cellular ancestors, and (2) prolonged pressure of genome reduction and relatively late adaptation to the parasitic lifestyle once virions and diversified cellular life took over the planet. Under this evolutionary model, new viral lineages can evolve from existing cellular parasites and enhance the diversity of the world’s virosphere. PMID:23550145

  14. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Bernard . E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2006-01-05

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors.

  15. Viral hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Deinhardt, F.; Gust, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Three forms of viral hepatitis can be recognized: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis non-A, non-B. Hepatitis A is caused by a picornavirus, is transmitted by the faceal—oral route, does not become chronic, and no chronic virus carriers exist. The virus can be grown in cell cultures, and killed as well as live attenuated virus vaccines are under development. Hepatitis B is caused by an enveloped virus containing a circular, double-stranded form of DNA. The disease is transmitted parenterally through inoculation of blood or blood products containing virus or through close personal contact with a virus-positive person. Hepatitis B becomes chronic in a certain number of cases and can lead to cirrhosis and primary liver cell carcinoma. The blood and certain body secretions of individuals with a persistent or chronic infection may remain infectious for many years. The hepatitis B virus cannot be grown in cell cultures but the entire genome has been sequenced and cloned in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. An inactivated virus vaccine has been prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen present in the plasma of hepatitis B virus carriers and further vaccines are under development. The agents of hepatitis non-A, non-B have not been identified. It is possible to distinguish between a predominantly parenterally transmitted and an orally transmitted form of hepatitis non-A, non-B. The latter is reported to be caused by a picornavirus that does not, however, have any antigenic relationship with hepatitis A virus. PMID:6817933

  16. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai,R.; Kar, K.; Anthony, K.; Gould, L.; Ledizet, M.; Fikrig, E.; Marasco, W.; Koski, R.; Modis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  17. Crystal structure of west nile virus envelope glycoprotein reveals viral surface epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Ryuta; Kar, Kalipada; Anthony, Karen; Gould, L Hannah; Ledizet, Michel; Fikrig, Erol; Marasco, Wayne A; Koski, Raymond A; Modis, Yorgo

    2006-11-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  18. Cellular and humoral immune reactions in chronic active liver disease. II. Lymphocyte subsets and viral antigens in liver biopsies of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, H F; Houthoff, H J; Huitema, S; Wolters, G; Poppema, S; Gips, C H

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate in liver biopsies of 25 patients with hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection were studied in relation to the distribution and expression of HBV antigens. Mononuclear subsets were characterized with monoclonal (OKT, OKM, Leu) antibodies to surface antigens. For the demonstration of viral antigens directly conjugated antibodies to surface (HBsAg), core (HBcAg) and 'e' (HBeAg) antigen were used. For the study of mutual relations all methods were performed on serial cut tissue sections. In chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B, n = 12) OKT8+ lymphocytes of T cell origin were the only cell type present in areas with liver cell degeneration and T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the only immune mechanism. In chronic persistent hepatitis B (CPH-B, n = 7) the only conspicuous feature was the presence of many Leu 3+ lymphocytes of the helper/inducer population in the portal tracts. In acute hepatitis B (AHB, n = 6) OKT8+ cells of non-T origin (OKT1-,3-) and Leu 7+ cells of presumed natural killer (NK) potential predominated in the areas with liver cell necrosis, and non-T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the predominant immune mechanism. In none of these disease entities a positive spatial relation could be established between the cytotoxic cells and the demonstrable expression of HBV antigens in hepatocytes. It is concluded that differences in immunological reaction pattern may explain the different course in the three forms of HBV infection studied. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6713726

  19. Hemagglutinin Spatial Distribution Shifts in Response to Cholesterol in the Influenza Viral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Domanska, Marta K.; Dunning, Rebecca A.; Dryden, Kelly A.; Zawada, Katarzyna E.; Yeager, Mark; Kasson, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus delivers its genome to the host cytoplasm via a process of membrane fusion mediated by the viral hemagglutinin protein. Optimal fusion likely requires multiple hemagglutinin trimers, so the spatial distribution of hemagglutinin on the viral envelope may influence fusion mechanism. We have previously shown that moderate depletion of cholesterol from the influenza viral envelope accelerates fusion kinetics even though it decreases fusion efficiency, both in a reversible manner. Here, we use electron cryo-microscopy to measure how the hemagglutinin lateral density in the viral envelope changes with cholesterol extraction. We extract this information by measuring the radial distribution function of electron density in >4000 viral images per sample, assigning hemagglutinin density by comparing images with and without anti-HA Fab bound. On average, hemagglutinin trimers move closer together: we estimate that the typical trimer-trimer spacing reduces from 94 to 84 Å when ∼90% of cholesterol is removed from the viral membrane. Upon restoration of viral envelope cholesterol, this spacing once again expands. This finding can qualitatively explain the observed changes to fusion kinetics: contemporary models from single-virus microscopy are that fusion requires the engagement of several hemagglutinin trimers in close proximity. If removing cholesterol increases the lateral density of hemagglutinin, this should result in an increase in the rate of fusion. PMID:26536268

  20. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Chazal, Nathalie; and others

    2015-02-15

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enhanced transcription of type I/II and type III interferon genes. Concomitantly, we show that despite viral particles internalization into Rab5-positive endosomes and efficient fusion of virus and cell membranes, keratinocytes poorly replicate CHIKV as attested by absence of nonstructural proteins and genomic RNA synthesis. Accordingly, human keratinocytes behave as an antiviral defense against CHIKV infection rather than as a primary targets for initial replication. This picture significantly differs from that reported for Dengue and West Nile mosquito-borne viruses. - Highlights: • Human keratinocytes support endocytosis of CHIKV and fusion of viral membranes. • CHIKV replication is blocked at a post entry step in these cells. • Infection upregulates type-I, –II and –III IFN genes expression. • Keratinocytes behave as immune sentinels against CHIKV.

  1. Viral quasispecies evolution.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Esteban; Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-06-01

    Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory.

  2. Viral Quasispecies Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Julie; Perales, Celia

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Evolution of RNA viruses occurs through disequilibria of collections of closely related mutant spectra or mutant clouds termed viral quasispecies. Here we review the origin of the quasispecies concept and some biological implications of quasispecies dynamics. Two main aspects are addressed: (i) mutant clouds as reservoirs of phenotypic variants for virus adaptability and (ii) the internal interactions that are established within mutant spectra that render a virus ensemble the unit of selection. The understanding of viruses as quasispecies has led to new antiviral designs, such as lethal mutagenesis, whose aim is to drive viruses toward low fitness values with limited chances of fitness recovery. The impact of quasispecies for three salient human pathogens, human immunodeficiency virus and the hepatitis B and C viruses, is reviewed, with emphasis on antiviral treatment strategies. Finally, extensions of quasispecies to nonviral systems are briefly mentioned to emphasize the broad applicability of quasispecies theory. PMID:22688811

  3. Nuclear Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, G.

    This chapter is devoted to the fundamental concepts of nuclear fusion. To be more precise, it is devoted to the theoretical basics of fusion reactions between light nuclei such as hydrogen, helium, boron, and lithium. The discussion is limited because our purpose is to focus on laboratory-scale fusion experiments that aim at gaining energy from the fusion process. After discussing the methods of calculating the fusion cross section, it will be shown that sustained fusion reactions with energy gain must happen in a thermal medium because, in beam-target experiments, the energy of the beam is randomized faster than the fusion rate. Following a brief introduction to the elements of plasma physics, the chapter is concluded with the introduction of the most prominent fusion reactions ongoing in the Sun.

  4. A dendritic nano-sized hexanuclear ruthenium(II) complex as a one- and two-photon luminescent tracking non-viral gene vector

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Kangqiang; Yu, Bole; Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Huang, Juanjuan; Zou, Shanshan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent tracking gene delivery could provide us with a better understanding of the critical steps in the transfection process. However, for in vivo tracking applications, a small diameter (<10 nm) is one of the rigorous requirements for tracking vectors. Herein, we have demonstrated a new paradigm for two-photon tracking gene delivery based on a dendritic nano-sized hexanuclear ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex. Because this metallodendrimer has a multivalent periphery, the complex, which is 6.1 nm, showed high stability and excellent dispersibility and could stepwise condense DNA in vitro. With the outstanding photochemical properties of Ru(II) polypyridyl, this complex could track gene delivery in vivo using one- and two-photon imaging. PMID:26185052

  5. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-04-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called `lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors.

  6. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called 'lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  7. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-07-05

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1{sup V12} or Cdc42{sup V12} could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA{sup L63} decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia.

  8. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.

  9. Viral Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. PMID:26612372

  10. Viral infection. II. Hemin induces overexpression of p67 as it partially prevents appearance of an active p67-deglycosylase in baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, D; Wu, S; Bose, A; Chatterjee, N; Chakraborty, A; Chatterjee, M; Gupta, N K

    1997-06-15

    The roles of p67-deglycosylase (p67-DG) in the regulation of protein synthesis in baculovirus-infected insect cells were studied. Like vaccinia viral infection, baculovirus infection of insect cells also induced the appearance of a p67-DG. However, p67-DG activity could not be detected because these cells do not contain a detectable level of p67. The baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), however, promotes significant expression of cloned p67-cDNA. The expression of p67 was significantly enhanced by the addition of hemin to the growth medium. Maximum enhancement was observed at 5 microM hemin. Data suggest that hemin prevents the activation of latent p67-DG inside the cell and does not have any effect on p67 gene transcription. To gain a better understanding of the mechanism of p67-DG activation and hemin stimulation of p67 synthesis, we have now purified p67-DG from baculovirus-infected insect cells. We prepared antibodies against this protein. These antibodies reacted with a 105-kDa protein in cell extracts from the uninfected insect cells (Sf9), KRC-7, and L929 (animal cells). In addition, these antibodies reacted with an additional 60-kDa protein in the cell extracts of baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells and vaccinia virus-infected KRC-7 and L929 cells. Data are also presented to show that the antibodies against p67-DG reacted more efficiently (40%) with the 60-kDa protein in both hemin-deficient reticulocyte lysate and hemin-deficient baculovirus-infected cells. We suggest that hemin prevents the conversion of an inactive p67-DG into an active form possibly by covalent modification such as protein phosphorylation or protein glycosylation. The active form is more efficiently recognized by the p67-DG antibodies since these antibodies were prepared against the active form of p67-DG. PMID:9186500

  11. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral(®)), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed.

  12. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral(®)), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  13. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral®), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  14. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  15. Transient domains induced by influenza haemagglutinin during membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, R; Pak, C C; Raviv, Y; Krumbiegel, M; Bergelson, L D; Morris, S J; Lowy, R J

    1995-01-01

    During low pH-induced fusion of influenza virus with erythrocytes we have observed differential dispersion of viral lipid and haemagglutinin (HA) into the erythrocyte membrane, and viral RNA into the erythrocyte using fluorescence video microscopy. The movement of both viral lipid and HA from virus to cell was restricted during the initial stages of fusion relative to free diffusion. This indicates the existence of relatively long-lived barriers to diffusion subsequent to fusion pore formation. Fluorescence anisotropy of phospholipid analogues incorporated into the viral membrane decreased when the pH was lowered to levels required for optimum fusion. This indicates that the restricted motion of viral membrane components was not due to rigidification of membrane lipids. The movement of HA from the fusion site was also assessed by photosensitized labelling by means of a fluorescent substrate (NBD-taurine) passing through the band 3 sialoglycoprotein (the erythrocyte anion transporter). We also examined the flow of lipid and aqueous markers during fusion of HA-expressing cells with labelled erythrocytes. During this cell-cell fusion, movement of lipid between fusing membranes begins before the fusion pore is wide enough to allow diffusion of aqueous molecules (M(r) > 500). The data indicate that HA is capable of creating domains in the membrane and controlling continuity of aqueous compartments which are bounded by such domains.

  16. Polycistronic viral vectors.

    PubMed

    de Felipe, P

    2002-09-01

    Traditionally, vectors for gene transfer/therapy experiments were mono- or bicistronic. In the latter case, vectors express the gene of interest coupled with a marker gene. An increasing demand for more complex polycistronic vectors has arisen in recent years to obtain complex gene transfer/therapy effects. In particular, this demand is stimulated by the hope of a more powerful effect from combined gene therapy than from single gene therapy in a process whose parallels lie in the multi-drug combined therapies for cancer or AIDS. In the 1980's we had only splicing signals and internal promoters to construct such vectors: now a new set of biotechnological tools enables us to design new and more reliable bicistronic and polycistronic vectors. This article focuses on the description and comparison of the strategies for co-expression of two genes in bicistronic vectors, from the oldest to the more recently described: internal promoters, splicing, reinitiation, IRES, self-processing peptides (e.g. foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A), proteolytic cleavable sites (e.g. fusagen) and fusion of genes. I propose a classification of these strategies based upon either the use of multiple transcripts (with transcriptional mechanisms), or single transcripts (using translational/post-translational mechanisms). I also examine the different attempts to utilize these strategies in the construction of polycistronic vectors and the main problems encountered. Several potential uses of these polycistronic vectors, both in basic research and in therapy-focused applications, are discussed. The importance of the study of viral gene expression strategies and the need to transfer this knowledge to vector design is highlighted.

  17. Fusion Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Schmidt

    2002-02-20

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans.

  18. Efficient activation of human T cells of both CD4 and CD8 subsets by urease-deficient recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG that produced a heat shock protein 70-M. tuberculosis-derived major membrane protein II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Tetsu; Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Makino, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of obtaining Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) capable of activating human naive T cells, urease-deficient BCG expressing a fusion protein composed of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived major membrane protein II (MMP-II) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) of BCG (BCG-DHTM) was produced. BCG-DHTM secreted the HSP70-MMP-II fusion protein and effectively activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) by inducing phenotypic changes and enhanced cytokine production. BCG-DHTM-infected DCs activated naive T cells of both CD4 and naive CD8 subsets, in an antigen (Ag)-dependent manner. The T cell activation induced by BCG-DHTM was inhibited by the pretreatment of DCs with chloroquine. The naive CD8(+) T cell activation was mediated by the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) and the proteosome-dependent cytosolic cross-priming pathway. Memory CD8(+) T cells and perforin-producing effector CD8(+) T cells were efficiently produced from the naive T cell population by BCG-DHTM stimulation. Single primary infection with BCG-DHTM in C57BL/6 mice efficiently produced T cells responsive to in vitro secondary stimulation with HSP70, MMP-II, and M. tuberculosis-derived cytosolic protein and inhibited the multiplication of subsequently aerosol-challenged M. tuberculosis more efficiently than did vector control BCG. These results indicate that the introduction of MMP-II and HSP70 into urease-deficient BCG may be useful for improving BCG for control of tuberculosis.

  19. Human keratinocytes restrict chikungunya virus replication at a post-fusion step.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Eric; Hamel, Rodolphe; Neyret, Aymeric; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Molès, Jean-Pierre; Simmons, Graham; Chazal, Nathalie; Desprès, Philippe; Missé, Dorothée; Briant, Laurence

    2015-02-01

    Transmission of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to humans is initiated by puncture of the skin by a blood-feeding Aedes mosquito. Despite the growing knowledge accumulated on CHIKV, the interplay between skin cells and CHIKV following inoculation still remains unclear. In this study we questioned the behavior of human keratinocytes, the predominant cell population in the skin, following viral challenge. We report that CHIKV rapidly elicits an innate immune response in these cells leading to the enhanced transcription of type I/II and type III interferon genes. Concomitantly, we show that despite viral particles internalization into Rab5-positive endosomes and efficient fusion of virus and cell membranes, keratinocytes poorly replicate CHIKV as attested by absence of nonstructural proteins and genomic RNA synthesis. Accordingly, human keratinocytes behave as an antiviral defense against CHIKV infection rather than as a primary targets for initial replication. This picture significantly differs from that reported for Dengue and West Nile mosquito-borne viruses.

  20. The Dark Side of Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Ruiz, Daniel; Van Hoesen, Kylie; Cohen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion is a physiological cellular process essential for fertilization, viral entry, muscle differentiation and placental development, among others. In this review, we will highlight the different cancer cell-cell fusions and the advantages obtained by these fusions. We will specially focus on the acquisition of metastatic features by cancer cells after fusion with bone marrow-derived cells. The mechanism by which cancer cells fuse with other cells has been poorly studied thus far, but the presence in several cancer cells of syncytin, a trophoblastic fusogen, leads us to a cancer cell fusion mechanism similar to the one used by the trophoblasts. The mechanism by which cancer cells perform the cell fusion could be an interesting target for cancer therapy. PMID:27136533

  1. Structural Basis for Broad Detection of Genogroup II Noroviruses by a Monoclonal Antibody That Binds to a Site Occluded in the Viral Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmana, Grant S.; Taylor, David W.; Smith, Thomas J.; McLellan, Jason S.; Georgiev, Ivelin; Tame, Jeremy R.H.; Park, Sam-Yong; Yamazaki, Makoto; Gondaira, Fumio; Miki, Motohiro; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Kwong, Peter D.

    2012-03-13

    Human noroviruses are genetically and antigenically highly divergent. Monoclonal antibodies raised in mice against one kind of norovirus virus-like particle (VLP), however, were found to have broad recognition. In this study, we present the crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) for one of these broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies, 5B18, in complex with the capsid-protruding domain from a genogroup II genotype 10 (GII.10) norovirus at 3.3-{angstrom} resolution and, also, the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the GII.10 VLP at {approx}10-{angstrom} resolution. The GII.10 VLP structure was more similar in overall architecture to the GV.1 murine norovirus virion than to the prototype GI.1 human norovirus VLP, with the GII.10 protruding domain raised {approx}15 {angstrom} off the shell domain and rotated {approx}40{sup o} relative to the GI.1 protruding domain. In the crystal structure, the 5B18 Fab bound to a highly conserved region of the protruding domain. Based on the VLP structure, this region is involved in interactions with other regions of the capsid and is buried in the virus particle. Despite the occluded nature of the recognized epitope in the VLP structure, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) binding suggested that the 5B18 antibody was able to capture intact VLPs. Together, the results provide evidence that the norovirus particle is capable of extreme conformational flexibility, which may allow for antibody recognition of conserved surfaces that would otherwise be buried on intact particles.

  2. Image fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: a system overview of the basic components of a system designed to improve the ability of a pilot to fly through low-visibility conditions such as fog; the role of visual sciences; fusion issues; sensor characterization; sources of information; image processing; and image fusion.

  3. The mechanism of lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transitions in phosphatidylethanolamine: implications for membrane fusion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D P; Epand, R M

    1997-12-01

    We studied the mechanism of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal (L alpha/H[II]) phase transition, using time-resolved cryotransmission electron microscopy (TRC-TEM), 31P-NMR, and differential scanning calorimetry. The transition was initiated in dispersions of large unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DiPoPE). We present evidence that the transition proceeds in three steps. First, many small connections form between apposed membranes. Second, the connections aggregate within the planes of the bilayers, forming arrays with hexagonal order in some projections. Third, these quasihexagonal structures elongate into small domains of H(II) phase, acquiring lipid molecules by diffusion from contiguous bilayers. A previously proposed membrane fusion mechanism rationalizes these results. The modified stalk theory predicts that the L alpha/H(II) phase transition involves some of the same intermediate structures as membrane fusion. The small interbilayer connections observed via TRC-TEM are compatible with the structure of a critical intermediate in the modified stalk mechanism: the trans monolayer contact (TMC). The theory predicts that 1) TMCs should form starting at tens of degrees below TH; 2) when TMCs become sufficiently numerous, they should aggregate into transient arrays like the quasihexagonal arrays observed here by TRC-TEM; and 3) these quasihexagonal arrays can then elongate directly into H(II) phase domains. These predictions rationalize the principal features of our data, which are incompatible with the other transition mechanisms proposed to date. Thus these results support the modified stalk mechanism for both membrane fusion and the L alpha/H(II) phase transition. We also discuss some implications of the modified stalk theory for fusion in protein-containing systems. Specifically, we point out that recent data on the effects of hydrophobic peptides and viral fusion peptides on lipid phase behavior are consistent with an effect of

  4. The mechanism of lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transitions in phosphatidylethanolamine: implications for membrane fusion mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, D P; Epand, R M

    1997-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal (L alpha/H[II]) phase transition, using time-resolved cryotransmission electron microscopy (TRC-TEM), 31P-NMR, and differential scanning calorimetry. The transition was initiated in dispersions of large unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DiPoPE). We present evidence that the transition proceeds in three steps. First, many small connections form between apposed membranes. Second, the connections aggregate within the planes of the bilayers, forming arrays with hexagonal order in some projections. Third, these quasihexagonal structures elongate into small domains of H(II) phase, acquiring lipid molecules by diffusion from contiguous bilayers. A previously proposed membrane fusion mechanism rationalizes these results. The modified stalk theory predicts that the L alpha/H(II) phase transition involves some of the same intermediate structures as membrane fusion. The small interbilayer connections observed via TRC-TEM are compatible with the structure of a critical intermediate in the modified stalk mechanism: the trans monolayer contact (TMC). The theory predicts that 1) TMCs should form starting at tens of degrees below TH; 2) when TMCs become sufficiently numerous, they should aggregate into transient arrays like the quasihexagonal arrays observed here by TRC-TEM; and 3) these quasihexagonal arrays can then elongate directly into H(II) phase domains. These predictions rationalize the principal features of our data, which are incompatible with the other transition mechanisms proposed to date. Thus these results support the modified stalk mechanism for both membrane fusion and the L alpha/H(II) phase transition. We also discuss some implications of the modified stalk theory for fusion in protein-containing systems. Specifically, we point out that recent data on the effects of hydrophobic peptides and viral fusion peptides on lipid phase behavior are consistent with an effect of

  5. Paramyxovirus membrane fusion: Lessons from the F and HN atomic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Robert A. . E-mail: ralamb@northwestern.edu; Paterson, Reay G.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2006-01-05

    Paramyxoviruses enter cells by fusion of their lipid envelope with the target cell plasma membrane. Fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane allows entry of the viral genome into the cytoplasm. For paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion occurs at neutral pH, but the trigger mechanism that controls the viral entry machinery such that it occurs at the right time and in the right place remains to be elucidated. Two viral glycoproteins are key to the infection process-an attachment protein that varies among different paramyxoviruses and the fusion (F) protein, which is found in all paramyxoviruses. For many of the paramyxoviruses (parainfluenza viruses 1-5, mumps virus, Newcastle disease virus and others), the attachment protein is the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) protein. In the last 5 years, atomic structures of paramyxovirus F and HN proteins have been reported. The knowledge gained from these structures towards understanding the mechanism of viral membrane fusion is described.

  6. Induction of cross-priming of naive CD8+ T lymphocytes by recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guerin that secretes heat shock protein 70-major membrane protein-II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Tetsu; Maeda, Yumi; Tamura, Toshiki; Matsuoka, Masanori; Tsukamoto, Yumiko; Makino, Masahiko

    2009-11-15

    Because Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) unconvincingly activates human naive CD8(+) T cells, a rBCG (BCG-70M) that secretes a fusion protein comprising BCG-derived heat shock protein (HSP)70 and Mycobacterium leprae-derived major membrane protein (MMP)-II, one of the immunodominant Ags of M. leprae, was newly constructed to potentiate the ability of activating naive CD8(+) T cells through dendritic cells (DC). BCG-70M secreted HSP70-MMP-II fusion protein in vitro, which stimulated DC to produce IL-12p70 through TLR2. BCG-70M-infected DC activated not only memory and naive CD8(+) T cells, but also CD4(+) T cells of both types to produce IFN-gamma. The activation of these naive T cells by BCG-70M was dependent on the MHC and CD86 molecules on BCG-70M-infected DC, and was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of DC with chloroquine. Both brefeldin A and lactacystin significantly inhibited the activation of naive CD8(+) T cells by BCG-70M through DC. Thus, the CD8(+) T cell activation may be induced by cross-presentation of Ags through a TAP- and proteosome-dependent cytosolic pathway. When naive CD8(+) T cells were stimulated by BCG-70M-infected DC in the presence of naive CD4(+) T cells, CD62L(low)CD8(+) T cells and perforin-producing CD8(+) T cells were efficiently produced. MMP-II-reactive CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells were efficiently produced in C57BL/6 mice by infection with BCG-70M. These results indicate that BCG-70M activated DC, CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells, and the combination of HSP70 and MMP-II may be useful for inducing better T cell activation.

  7. Vaccination with a Fusion Protein That Introduces HIV-1 Gag Antigen into a Multitrimer CD40L Construct Results in Enhanced CD8+ T Cell Responses and Protection from Viral Challenge by Vaccinia-Gag

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Termini, James M.; Raffa, Francesca N.; Williams, Cindi-Ann; Kornbluth, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) is a membrane protein that is important for the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and DC-induced CD8+ T cell responses. To be active, CD40L must cluster CD40 receptors on responding cells. To produce a soluble form of CD40L that clusters CD40 receptors necessitates the use of a multitrimer construct. With this in mind, a tripartite fusion protein was made from surfactant protein D (SPD), HIV-1 Gag as a test antigen, and CD40L, where SPD serves as a scaffold for the multitrimer protein complex. This SPD-Gag-CD40L protein activated CD40-bearing cells and bone marrow-derived DCs in vitro. Compared to a plasmid for Gag antigen alone (pGag), DNA vaccination of mice with pSPD-Gag-CD40L induced an increased number of Gag-specific CD8+ T cells with increased avidity for major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted Gag peptide and improved vaccine-induced protection from challenge by vaccinia-Gag virus. The importance of the multitrimeric nature of the complex was shown using a plasmid lacking the N terminus of SPD that produced a single trimer fusion protein. This plasmid, pTrimer-Gag-CD40L, was only weakly active on CD40-bearing cells and did not elicit strong CD8+ T cell responses or improve protection from vaccinia-Gag challenge. An adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vaccine incorporating SPD-Gag-CD40L was much stronger than Ad5 expressing Gag alone (Ad5-Gag) and induced complete protection (i.e., sterilizing immunity) from vaccinia-Gag challenge. Overall, these results show the potential of a new vaccine design in which antigen is introduced into a construct that expresses a multitrimer soluble form of CD40L, leading to strongly protective CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:24227853

  8. Viral assembly of oriented quantum dot nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Chuanbin; Flynn, Christine E.; Hayhurst, Andrew; Sweeney, Rozamond; Qi, Jifa; Georgiou, George; Iverson, Brent; Belcher, Angela M.

    2003-06-01

    The highly organized structure of M13 bacteriophage was used as an evolved biological template for the nucleation and orientation of semiconductor nanowires. To create this organized template, peptides were selected by using a pIII phage display library for their ability to nucleate ZnS or CdS nanocrystals. The successful peptides were expressed as pVIII fusion proteins into the crystalline capsid of the virus. The engineered viruses were exposed to semiconductor precursor solutions, and the resultant nanocrystals that were templated along the viruses to form nanowires were extensively characterized by using high-resolution analytical electron microscopy and photoluminescence. ZnS nanocrystals were well crystallized on the viral capsid in a hexagonal wurtzite or a cubic zinc blende structure, depending on the peptide expressed on the viral capsid. Electron diffraction patterns showed single-crystal type behavior from a polynanocrystalline area of the nanowire formed, suggesting that the nanocrystals on the virus were preferentially oriented with their [001] perpendicular to the viral surface. Peptides that specifically directed CdS nanocrystal growth were also engineered into the viral capsid to create wurtzite CdS virus-based nanowires. Lastly, heterostructured nucleation was achieved with a dual-peptide virus engineered to express two distinct peptides within the same viral capsid. This work represents a genetically controlled biological synthesis route to a semiconductor nanoscale heterostructure.

  9. Conceptual design of a laser-fusion power plant. Part II. Two technical options: 1. JADE reactor; 2. Heat transfer by heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    A laser fusion reactor concept is described that employs liquid metal walls. The concept envisions a porous medium, called the JADE, of specific geometry lining the reactor cavity. Some advantages and disadvantages of the concept are pointed out. The possibility of using heat pipes for passive cooling in ICF reactors is discussed. Some of the problems are outlined. (MOW)

  10. Mitochondrial dynamics and viral infections: A close nexus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohsin; Syed, Gulam Hussain; Kim, Seong-Jun; Siddiqui, Aleem

    2015-10-01

    Viruses manipulate cellular machinery and functions to subvert intracellular environment conducive for viral proliferation. They strategically alter functions of the multitasking mitochondria to influence energy production, metabolism, survival, and immune signaling. Mitochondria either occur as heterogeneous population of individual organelles or large interconnected tubular network. The mitochondrial network is highly susceptible to physiological and environmental insults, including viral infections, and is dynamically maintained by mitochondrial fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics in tandem with mitochondria-selective autophagy 'mitophagy' coordinates mitochondrial quality control and homeostasis. Mitochondrial dynamics impacts cellular homeostasis, metabolism, and innate-immune signaling, and thus can be major determinant of the outcome of viral infections. Herein, we review how mitochondrial dynamics is affected during viral infections and how this complex interplay benefits the viral infectious process and associated diseases.

  11. Viral Entry into Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2010-09-01

    Successful viral infection of a healthy cell requires complex host-pathogen interactions. In this talk we focus on the dynamics specific to the HIV virus entering a eucaryotic cell. We model viral entry as a stochastic engagement of receptors and coreceptors on the cell surface. We also consider the transport of virus material to the cell nucleus by coupling microtubular motion to the concurrent biochemical transformations that render the viral material competent for nuclear entry. We discuss both mathematical and biological consequences of our model, such as the formulation of an effective integrodifferential boundary condition embodying a memory kernel and optimal timing in maximizing viral probabilities.

  12. Japanese encephalitis virus activates autophagy as a viral immune evasion strategy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wandi; Cao, Shengbo; Chen, Rui; Jin, Hui; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaobo; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Gengfu

    2013-01-01

    In addition to manipulating cellular homeostasis and survivability, autophagy also plays a crucial role in numerous viral infections. In this study, we discover that Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection results in the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) protein and GFP-LC3 puncta in vitro and an increase in autophagosomes/autolysosomes in vivo. The fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes is essential for virus replication. Knockdown of autophagy-related genes reduced JEV replication in vitro, as indicated by viral RNA and protein levels. We also note that JEV infection in autophagy-impaired cells displayed active caspases cleavage and cell death. Moreover, we find that JEV induces higher type I interferon (IFN) activation in cells deficient in autophagy-related genes as the cells exhibited increased phosphorylation and dimerization of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) aggregation. Finally, we find that autophagy is indispensable for efficient JEV replication even in an IFN-defective background. Overall, our studies provide the first description of the mechanism of the autophagic innate immune signaling pathway during JEV infection.

  13. Fusion Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dingee, David A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the extraordinary potential, the technical difficulties, and the financial problems that are associated with research and development of fusion power plants as a major source of energy. (GA)

  14. Reciprocal Regulation of AKT and MAP Kinase Dictates Virus-Host Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nishi R.; Mani, Prashant; Nandwani, Neha; Mishra, Rajakishore; Rana, Ajay; Sarkar, Debi P.

    2010-01-01

    Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family bind to their host cells by using hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), which enhances fusion protein (F)-mediated membrane fusion. Although respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 5 of this family are suggested to trigger host cell signaling during infection, the virus-induced intracellular signals dictating virus-cell fusion await elucidation. Using an F- or HN-F-containing reconstituted envelope of Sendai virus, another paramyxovirus, we revealed the role and regulation of AKT1 and Raf/MEK/ERK cascades during viral fusion with liver cells. Our observation that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation promotes viral fusion via ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, whereas AKT1 attenuates fusion by promoting phosphorylation of F protein, indicates a counteractive regulation of viral fusion by reciprocal activation of AKT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, establishing a novel conceptual framework for a therapeutic strategy. PMID:20164223

  15. A generic screening platform for inhibitors of virus induced cell fusion using cellular electrical impedance

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Daniel; Robinson, Jodie; Chappell, Keith J.; Butler, Mark S.; Edwards, David J.; Fry, Scott R.; Bermingham, Imogen M.; Cooper, Matthew A.; Young, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membranes is an essential step in the life cycle of all enveloped viruses. Despite such a clear target for antiviral drug development, few anti-fusion drugs have progressed to market. One significant hurdle is the absence of a generic, high-throughput, reproducible fusion assay. Here we report that real time, label-free measurement of cellular electrical impedance can quantify cell-cell fusion mediated by either individually expressed recombinant viral fusion proteins, or native virus infection. We validated this approach for all three classes of viral fusion and demonstrated utility in quantifying fusion inhibition using antibodies and small molecule inhibitors specific for dengue virus and respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:26976324

  16. C-terminal tyrosine residues modulate the fusion activity of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Popa, Andreea; Pager, Cara Teresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2011-02-15

    The paramyxovirus family includes important human pathogens such as measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial virus, and the recently emerged, highly pathogenic Hendra and Nipah viruses. The viral fusion (F) protein plays critical roles in infection, promoting both the virus-cell membrane fusion events needed for viral entry as well as cell-cell fusion events leading to syncytia formation. We describe the surprising finding that addition of the short epitope HA tag to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Hendra virus F protein leads to a significant increase in the extent of cell-cell membrane fusion. This increase was not due to alterations in surface expression, cleavage state, or association with lipid microdomains. Addition of a Myc tag of similar length did not alter Hendra F protein fusion activity, indicating that the observed stimulation was not solely a result of lengthening the CT. Three tyrosine residues within the HA tag were critical for the increase in the extent of fusion, suggesting C-terminal tyrosines may modulate Hendra fusion activity. The effects of addition of the HA tag varied with other fusion proteins, as parainfluenza virus 5 F-HA showed a decreased level of surface expression and no stimulation of fusion. These results indicate that additions to the C-terminal end of the F protein CT can modulate protein function in a sequence specific manner, reinforcing the need for careful analysis of epitope-tagged glycoproteins. In addition, our results implicate C-terminal tyrosine residues in the modulation of the membrane fusion reaction promoted by these viral glycoproteins.

  17. Capsid-Targeted Viral Inactivation: A Novel Tactic for Inhibiting Replication in Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingcui; Jia, Renyong; Zhou, Jiakun; Wang, Mingshu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Capsid-targeted viral inactivation (CTVI), a conceptually powerful new antiviral strategy, is attracting increasing attention from researchers. Specifically, this strategy is based on fusion between the capsid protein of a virus and a crucial effector molecule, such as a nuclease (e.g., staphylococcal nuclease, Barrase, RNase HI), lipase, protease, or single-chain antibody (scAb). In general, capsid proteins have a major role in viral integration and assembly, and the effector molecule used in CTVI functions to degrade viral DNA/RNA or interfere with proper folding of viral key proteins, thereby affecting the infectivity of progeny viruses. Interestingly, such a capsid–enzyme fusion protein is incorporated into virions during packaging. CTVI is more efficient compared to other antiviral methods, and this approach is promising for antiviral prophylaxis and therapy. This review summarizes the mechanism and utility of CTVI and provides some successful applications of this strategy, with the ultimate goal of widely implementing CTVI in antiviral research. PMID:27657114

  18. Exosomes in Viral Disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique R; Kashanchi, Fatah; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Viruses have evolved many mechanisms by which to evade and subvert the immune system to ensure survival and persistence. However, for each method undertaken by the immune system for pathogen removal, there is a counteracting mechanism utilized by pathogens. The new and emerging role of microvesicles in immune intercellular communication and function is no different. Viruses across many different families have evolved to insert viral components in exosomes, a subtype of microvesicle, with many varying downstream effects. When assessed cumulatively, viral antigens in exosomes increase persistence through cloaking viral genomes, decoying the immune system, and even by increasing viral infection in uninfected cells. Exosomes therefore represent a source of viral antigen that can be used as a biomarker for disease and targeted for therapy in the control and eradication of these disorders. With the rise in the persistence of new and reemerging viruses like Ebola and Zika, exploring the role of exosomes become more important than ever. PMID:27324390

  19. Viral Disease Networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  20. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  1. The Art of Engineering Viral Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pokorski, Jonathan K.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2011-01-01

    Viral nanotechnology is an emerging and highly interdisciplinary field in which viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are applied in diverse areas such as electronics, energy and next-generation medical devices. VNPs have been developed as candidates for novel materials, and are often described as “programmable” because they can be modified and functionalized using a number of techniques. In this review, we discuss the concepts and methods that allow VNPs to be engineered, including (i) bioconjugation chemistries, (ii) encapsulation techniques, (iii) mineralization strategies, and (iv) film and hydrogel development. With all these techniques in hand, the potential applications of VNPs are limited only by the imagination. PMID:21047140

  2. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the size of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.

  3. Control of mechanically activated polymersome fusion: Factors affecting fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Henderson, Ian M.; Paxton, Walter F.

    2014-12-15

    Previously we have studied the mechanically-activated fusion of extruded (200 nm) polymer vesicles into giant polymersomes using agitation in the presence of salt. In this study we have investigated several factors contributing to this phenomenon, including the effects of (i) polymer vesicle concentration, (ii) agitation speed and duration, and iii) variation of the salt and its concentration. It was found that increasing the concentration of the polymer dramatically increases the production of giant vesicles through the increased collisions of polymersomes. Our investigations also found that increasing the frequency of agitation increased the efficiency of fusion, though ultimately limited the sizemore » of vesicle which could be produced due to the high shear involved. Finally it was determined that salt-mediation of the fusion process was not limited to NaCl, but is instead a general effect facilitated by the presence of solvated ionic compounds, albeit with different salts initiating fusion at different concentration.« less

  4. Conserved Eukaryotic Fusogens can Fuse Viral Envelopes to Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avinoam, Ori; Fridman, Karen; Valansi, Clari; Abutbul, Inbal; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Maurer, Ulrike E.; Sapir, Amir; Danino, Dganit; Grünewald, Kay; White, Judith M.; Podbilewicz, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans AFF-1 and EFF-1 (CeFFs) proteins are essential for developmental cell-to-cell fusion and can merge insect cells. To study the structure and function of AFF-1, we constructed Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) displaying AFF-1 on the viral envelope, substituting the native fusogen VSVG. Electron microscopy and tomography revealed that AFF-1 formed distinct supercomplexes resembling pentameric and hexameric flowers on pseudoviruses. Viruses carrying AFF-1 infected mammalian cells only when CeFFs were on the target cell surface. Furthermore, we identified Fusion Family proteins (FFs) within and beyond nematodes and divergent members from the human parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis and the chordate Branchiostoma floridae could also fuse mammalian cells. Thus FFs comprise an ancient family of cellular fusogens that can promote fusion when expressed on a viral particle. PMID:21436398

  5. Viruses and viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verdaguer, Nuria; Ferrero, Diego; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining the structures of viruses and viral proteins at atomic resolution. The information provided by these structures, which covers many important aspects of the viral life cycle such as cell-receptor recognition, viral entry, nucleic acid transfer and genome replication, has extensively enriched our vision of the virus world. Many of the structures available correspond to potential targets for antiviral drugs against important human pathogens. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of different structural aspects of the above-mentioned processes. PMID:25485129

  6. Laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, W.A.; Boskma, P.

    1980-12-01

    Unrestricted laser fusion offers nations an opportunity to circumvent arms control agreements and develop thermonuclear weapons. Early laser weapons research sought a clean radiation-free bomb to replace the fission bomb, but this was deceptive because a fission bomb was needed to trigger the fusion reaction and additional radioactivity was induced by generating fast neutrons. As laser-implosion experiments focused on weapons physics, simulating weapons effects, and applications for new weapons, the military interest shifted from developing a laser-ignited hydrogen bomb to more sophisticated weapons and civilian applications for power generation. Civilian and military research now overlap, making it possible for several countries to continue weapons activities and permitting proliferation of nuclear weapons. These countries are reluctant to include inertial confinement fusion research in the Non-Proliferation Treaty. 16 references. (DCK)

  7. Viral infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Kwon, Ja-Young; Racicot, Karen; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be 'immunosuppressed', the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

  8. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Links About VSPB (Viral Special Pathogens Branch) File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  9. VIRAL INFECTIONS DURING PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Silasi, Michelle; Cardenas, Ingrid; Racicot, Karen; Kwon, Ja-Young; Aldo, Paula; Mor, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections during pregnancy have long been considered benign conditions with a few notable exceptions, such as herpes virus. The recent Ebola outbreak and other viral epidemics and pandemics show how pregnant women suffer worse outcomes (such as preterm labor and adverse fetal outcomes) than the general population and non-pregnant women. New knowledge about the ways the maternal-fetal interface and placenta interact with the maternal immune system may explain these findings. Once thought to be “immunosuppressed”, the pregnant woman actually undergoes an immunological transformation, where the immune system is necessary to promote and support the pregnancy and growing fetus. When this protection is breached, as in a viral infection, this security is weakened and infection with other microorganisms can then propagate and lead to outcomes, such as preterm labor. In this manuscript, we review the major viral infections relevant to pregnancy, and offer potential mechanisms for the associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:25582523

  10. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalent among blacks as among whites. Viral Hepatitis Transmission People can be infected with the three most ... risk for HAV. • • New data suggest that sexual transmission of HCV among MSM with HIV occurs more ...

  11. Viral miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, more than 200 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered in double-stranded DNA viruses, mainly herpesviruses and polyomaviruses (Nucleic Acids Res 32:D109-D111, 2004). miRNAs are short 22  ±  3 nt RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTR) of target mRNAs, thereby inducing translational silencing and/or transcript degradation (Nature 431:350-355, 2004; Cell 116:281-297, 2004). Since miRNAs require only limited complementarity for binding, miRNA targets are difficult to determine (Mol Cell 27:91-105, 2007). To date, targets have only been experimentally verified for relatively few viral miRNAs, which either target viral or host cellular gene expression: For example, SV40 and related polyomaviruses encode miRNAs which target viral large T antigen expression (Nature 435:682-686, 2005; J Virol 79:13094-13104, 2005; Virology 383:183-187, 2009; J Virol 82:9823-9828, 2008) and miRNAs of α-, β-, and γ-herpesviruses have been implicated in regulating the transition from latent to lytic gene expression, a key step in the herpesvirus life cycle. Viral miRNAs have also been shown to target various host cellular genes. Although this field is just beginning to unravel the multiple roles of viral miRNA in biology and pathogenesis, the current data strongly suggest that virally encoded miRNAs are able to regulate fundamental biological processes such as immune recognition, promotion of cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and cell differentiation. This chapter aims to summarize our current knowledge of viral miRNAs, their targets and function, and the challenges lying ahead to decipher their role in viral biology, pathogenesis, and for γ-herepsvirus-encoded miRNAs, potentially tumorigenesis. PMID:21431678

  12. NCBI viral genomes resource.

    PubMed

    Brister, J Rodney; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Bao, Yiming; Blinkova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in virus genome sequencing that promises to fundamentally alter our understanding of viral biology and profoundly impact public health policy. Yet, any potential benefits from the billowing cloud of next generation sequence data hinge upon well implemented reference resources that facilitate the identification of sequences, aid in the assembly of sequence reads and provide reference annotation sources. The NCBI Viral Genomes Resource is a reference resource designed to bring order to this sequence shockwave and improve usability of viral sequence data. The resource can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genome/viruses/ and catalogs all publicly available virus genome sequences and curates reference genome sequences. As the number of genome sequences has grown, so too have the difficulties in annotating and maintaining reference sequences. The rapid expansion of the viral sequence universe has forced a recalibration of the data model to better provide extant sequence representation and enhanced reference sequence products to serve the needs of the various viral communities. This, in turn, has placed increased emphasis on leveraging the knowledge of individual scientific communities to identify important viral sequences and develop well annotated reference virus genome sets.

  13. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  14. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  15. Multiepitope fusion antigen induces broadly protective antibodies that prevent adherence of Escherichia coli strains expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Wollenberg, Katie M; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block adherence of ETEC strains that express immunologically heterogeneous CFA adhesins are expected to protect against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we created a CFA multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) carrying representative epitopes of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, and CS6), examined its immunogenicity in mice, and assessed the potential of this MEFA as an antiadhesin vaccine against ETEC. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with this CFA MEFA exhibited no adverse effects and developed immune responses to CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV adhesins. Moreover, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, ETEC or E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV adhesins were significantly inhibited in adherence to Caco-2 cells. Our results indicated this CFA MEFA elicited antibodies that not only cross-reacted to CFA/I, CFA/II and CFA/IV adhesins but also broadly inhibited adherence of E. coli strains expressing these seven adhesins and suggested that this CFA MEFA could be a candidate to induce broad-spectrum antiadhesin protection against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, this antigen construction approach (creating an MEFA) may be generally used in vaccine development against heterogenic pathogens. PMID:24351757

  16. Influenza Virus-Mediated Membrane Fusion: Determinants of Hemagglutinin Fusogenic Activity and Experimental Approaches for Assessing Virus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral protein that facilitates the entry of influenza viruses into host cells. This protein controls two critical aspects of entry: virus binding and membrane fusion. In order for HA to carry out these functions, it must first undergo a priming step, proteolytic cleavage, which renders it fusion competent. Membrane fusion commences from inside the endosome after a drop in lumenal pH and an ensuing conformational change in HA that leads to the hemifusion of the outer membrane leaflets of the virus and endosome, the formation of a stalk between them, followed by pore formation. Thus, the fusion machinery is an excellent target for antiviral compounds, especially those that target the conserved stem region of the protein. However, traditional ensemble fusion assays provide a somewhat limited ability to directly quantify fusion partly due to the inherent averaging of individual fusion events resulting from experimental constraints. Inspired by the gains achieved by single molecule experiments and analysis of stochastic events, recently-developed individual virion imaging techniques and analysis of single fusion events has provided critical information about individual virion behavior, discriminated intermediate fusion steps within a single virion, and allowed the study of the overall population dynamics without the loss of discrete, individual information. In this article, we first start by reviewing the determinants of HA fusogenic activity and the viral entry process, highlight some open questions, and then describe the experimental approaches for assaying fusion that will be useful in developing the most effective therapies in the future. PMID:22852045

  17. Fish viral infections in northwest of Spain.

    PubMed

    Ledo, A; Lupiani, B; Dopazo, C P; Toranzo, A E; Barja, J L

    1990-06-01

    During a three years survey, a total of 149 samples from 20 farms of rainbow trout, salmon and turbot were examined for the presence of virus with the purpose to study the viral infections affecting cultured fish and their incidence in the fishfarms of Northwestern Spain. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was the only viral agent isolated from salmonid fish. Fry and fingerlings of trout showed the highest infection rate (24%). This virus was not detected in broodstock or embryonated eggs, although it was isolated from ovaric and seminal fluids and from juvenile carriers. From 24 samples of salmon analyzed, IPNV was only detected in one sample of juveniles. Examination of turbot led the isolation of a new virus belonging to the reoviridae family, which affected to the ongrowing population. All of the IPNV tested belonged to serotype Sp regardless of the origin of the trout stocks. During the monitorization of imported embryonated eggs, no virus was detected from any of the samples. However, in some case, IPNV was isolated when testing the fry obtained in our laboratory from those samples of imported eggs. Our findings indicate that: i) the analysis of fingerlings increase the probability to detect viral infections allowing us an optimal control of importations, and ii) most of the viral infections of fish take place in the own fish farms. The detection of mixed viral and bacterial infections emphasize the importance of carrying out an integral microbiological analysis to determine the causal agent(s) of fish mortalities.

  18. HIV Entry and Envelope Glycoprotein-mediated Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Robert; Durell, Stewart; Viard, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    HIV entry involves binding of the trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 to cell surface receptors, which triggers conformational changes in Env that drive the membrane fusion reaction. The conformational landscape that the lipids and Env navigate en route to fusion has been examined by biophysical measurements on the microscale, whereas electron tomography, x-rays, and NMR have provided insights into the process on the nanoscale and atomic scale. However, the coupling between the lipid and protein pathways that give rise to fusion has not been resolved. Here, we discuss the known and unknown about the overall HIV Env-mediated fusion process. PMID:23043104

  19. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  20. Nosocomial viral respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Graman, P S; Hall, C B

    1989-12-01

    Nosocomial infections with respiratory tract viruses, particularly influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses, account for the majority of serious nosocomial viral disease. Chronically ill, immunocompromised, elderly, and very young hosts are especially vulnerable to potentially life-threatening involvement of the lower respiratory tract. Effective preventive strategies are based upon early accurate viral diagnosis and an appreciation of the epidemiology and mechanisms of transmission for each viral agent. Influenza viruses spread via airborne dispersion of small particle aerosols, resulting in explosive outbreaks; control measures emphasize immunization and chemoprophylaxis of susceptible patients and personnel, and isolation of those already infected. Transmission of respiratory syncytial virus, in contrast, seems to require closer contact, with virus passed on hands, fomites, or in large droplets inoculated into the eyes and nose at close range. Strategies for control of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus are designed to interrupt hand carriage and inoculation of virus onto mucous membranes.

  1. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  2. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  3. Viral vaccines: selected topics.

    PubMed

    Kańtoch, M

    1996-01-01

    Significant role of viruses in pathology, their dominating position in etiology of infectious diseases point at the special position of active prophylactic procedures based on vaccination. The real role and value of viral vaccines of classic and modern generations, the limitation of immune potency in suppression of defence mechanisms, some problems of immunization against virus vertical transmission are presented in the paper. The reader may find tables which cumulate selected but significant patterns of viral vaccines and vaccinations, and selected papers devoted to topics discussed. PMID:9017153

  4. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date.

  5. Viral infections in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Marlier, D; Vindevogel, H

    2006-07-01

    This review provides a current update on the major viral diseases of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica), based on scientific reports and clinical experience. Paramyxovirus 1, adenovirus, rotavirus, herpesvirus 1, poxvirus and circovirus infections are described according to common clinical signs and target tissues. Since pigeons are sometimes treated as if they were poultry, the review also summarises the common viral infections of poultry for which pigeons are considered resistant. It is hoped that the review will provide a useful reference for veterinarians and others and offer advice on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the major infectious diseases of pigeons.

  6. Failure of Viral Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, William S.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Michel, Jean-Philippe; Knobler, Charles M.; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    2006-12-01

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of the structural failure of viral shells under mechanical stress. We find that discontinuities in the force-indentation curve associated with failure should appear when the so-called Föppl von Kármán (FvK) number exceeds a critical value. A nanoindentation study of a viral shell subject to a soft-mode instability, where the stiffness of the shell decreases with increasing pH, confirms the predicted onset of failure as a function of the FvK number.

  7. Dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Y K; Singh, S; Singh, T

    1998-02-01

    Dengue viral infection produces a spectrum of disease. For example, mild dengue disease is characterized by biphasic fever, myalgia, arthralgia, leukopenia, and lymphadenopathy, while dengue hemorrhagic fever is an often fatal disease characterized by hemorrhages and shock syndrome. The disease, especially in its severe form, is seen more often among children than among adults. With focus upon India, dengue's etiology, epidemiology, pathology, pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever, clinical manifestations of both the mild and severe forms of dengue viral infection, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and prognosis are discussed.

  8. Emerging viral infections.

    PubMed

    Bale, James F

    2012-09-01

    Unique disorders appear episodically in human populations and cause life-threatening systemic or neurological disease. Historical examples of such disorders include von Economo encephalitis, a disorder of presumed viral etiology; acquired immune deficiency syndrome, caused by the human immunodeficiency virus; and severe acute respiratory syndrome, caused by a member of the coronavirus family. This article describes the factors that contribute to the emergence of infectious diseases and focuses on selected recent examples of emerging viral infections that can affect the nervous system of infants, children, and adolescents.

  9. Viral apoptotic mimicry.

    PubMed

    Amara, Ali; Mercer, Jason

    2015-08-01

    As opportunistic pathogens, viruses have evolved many elegant strategies to manipulate host cells for infectious entry and replication. Viral apoptotic mimicry, defined by the exposure of phosphatidylserine - a marker for apoptosis - on the pathogen surface, is emerging as a common theme used by enveloped viruses to promote infection. Focusing on the four best described examples (vaccinia virus, dengue virus, Ebola virus and pseudotyped lentivirus), we summarize our current understanding of apoptotic mimicry as a mechanism for virus entry, binding and immune evasion. We also describe recent examples of non-enveloped viruses that use this mimicry strategy, and discuss future directions and how viral apoptotic mimicry could be targeted therapeutically.

  10. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume II. Detailed technical plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    The four sections which comprise Part II describe in detail the technical basis for each of the four Program Elements (PE's) of the FWBS Engineering Technology Program (ETP). Each PE is planned to be executed in a number of phases. The purpose of the DTP's is to delineate detailed near-term research, development, and testing required to establish a FWBS engineering data base. Optimum testing strategies and construction of test facilities where needed are identified. The DTP's are based on guidelines given by Argonne National Laboratory which included the basic programmatic goals and the requirements for the types of tests and test conditions.

  11. BIOMARKERS OF VIRAL EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Viral and protozoan pathogens associated with raw sludge can cause encephalitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and a number of other diseases. Raw sludge that has been treated to reduce these pathogens can be used for land application according to the regulations spec...

  12. Viral Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, A.; Butterfield, M. C.

    2012-09-01

    Viral SSA takes advantage of the amateur astronomy community to provide an extremely low-cost and geographically-diverse network of optical SSA sites. In the spirit of programs such as DARPA's Grand Challenge and the National Weather Service's program of providing amateur meteorologists with weather stations linked to a central professional meteorological facility, we form a cooperative bond with a willing community of technically-minded individuals. We term this program "viral" because we will qualify an initial set of astronomers for SSA operation and then use word of mouth in the astronomy community, as well as an outreach program, to pull in new observers. The use of modern remote controlled telescopes allows the incorporation of certified amateur, university, and commercial telescope systems. The availability of the local Viral SSA member for troubleshooting eliminates most significant costs of operating a large network. In this talk, we discuss the key concepts of Viral SSA and the route to a network of 100+ sites in a three year or less timeframe.

  13. Leafhopper viral pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four newly discovered viral pathogens in leafhopper vectors of Pierce’s disease of grapes, have been shown to replicate in sharpshooter leafhoppers; the glassy-winged sharpshooter, GWSS, Homalodisca vitripennis, and Oncometopia nigricans (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The viruses were classified as memb...

  14. Assembly of Influenza Hemagglutinin Fusion Peptides in a Phospholipid Bilayer by Coarse-grained Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Collu, Francesca; Spiga, Enrico; Lorenz, Christian D.; Fraternali, Franca

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is critical to eukaryotic cellular function and crucial to the entry of enveloped viruses such as influenza and human immunodeficiency virus. Influenza viral entry in the host cell is mediated by a 20–23 amino acid long sequence, called the fusion peptide (FP). Recently, possible structures for the fusion peptide (ranging from an inverted V shaped α-helical structure to an α-helical hairpin, or to a complete α-helix) and their implication in the membrane fusion initiation have been proposed. Despite the large number of studies devoted to the structure of the FP, the mechanism of action of this peptide remains unclear with several mechanisms having been suggested, including the induction of local disorder, promoting membrane curvature, and/or altering local membrane composition. In recent years, several research groups have employed atomistic and/or coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the matter. In all previous works, the behavior of a single FP monomer was studied, while in this manuscript, we use a simplified model of a tripeptide (TP) monomer of FP (TFP) instead of a single FP monomer because each Influenza Hemagglutinin contains three FP molecules in the biological system. In this manuscript we report findings targeted at understanding the fusogenic properties and the collective behavior of these trimers of FP peptides on a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine model membrane. Here we show how the TFP monomers self-assemble into differently sized oligomers in the presence of the membrane. We measure the perturbation to the structure of the phospholipid membrane caused by the presence of these TFP oligomers. Our work (i) shows how self-assembly of TFP in the presence of the membrane induces non negligible deformation to the membrane and (ii) could be a useful starting point to stimulate discussion and further work targeted to fusion pore formation. PMID:26636093

  15. Protoplast Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Hara, Yasuhiro; Katagi, Hiroaki; Senda, Mitsugi

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the composition of the phospholipid molecular species in a cell membrane and the velocity of protoplast fusion was studied using cells cultured at a low temperature (10 C). Cells cultured at a low temperature contained larger proportions of phospholipids of low phase transition point, the 1,2-dilinoleoyl-type, than those cultured at a normal temperature (25 C). When treated with polyethylene glycol 6000, protoplasts from cells cultured at 10 C fused and progressed to the fused sphere stage more rapidly than did those from cells cultured at 25 C. PMID:16661339

  16. Splenogonadal fusion.

    PubMed

    Tsingoglou, S; Wilkinson, A W

    1976-04-01

    The fusion between splenic tissue and the left gonad or the derivatives of the left mesonephros is a rare congenital anomaly first described in detail by Pommer in 1887/9 and divided into two forms by Putschar and Manion in 1956. In the first or continuous type a cord of splenic or fibrous tissue connects the spleen and the gonadalmesonephric structures. In the second type the fused splenomesonephric structures have lost continuity with the main spleen. An example of the continuous form is presented and the previous reports are briefly reviewed.

  17. Cryomicroscopy provides structural snapshots of influenza virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Calder, Lesley J; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The lipid-enveloped influenza virus enters host cells during infection by binding cell-surface receptors and, after receptor-mediated endocytosis, fusing with the membrane of the endosome and delivering the viral genome and transcription machinery into the host cell. These events are mediated by the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. At the low pH of the endosome, an irreversible conformational change in the HA, including the exposure of the hydrophobic fusion peptide, activates membrane fusion. Here we used electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography to image the fusion of influenza virus with target membranes at low pH. We visualized structural intermediates of HA and their interactions with membranes during the course of membrane fusion as well as ultrastructural changes in the virus that accompany membrane fusion. Our observations are relevant to a wide range of protein-mediated membrane-fusion processes and demonstrate how dynamic membrane events may be studied by cryomicroscopy. PMID:27501535

  18. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Blood Donors; Blood Transfusion; HIV Infections; HIV-1; HIV-2; HTLV-I; HTLV-II; Retroviridae Infections; Hepatitis, Viral, Human; Hepatitis B; Hepacivirus; West Nile Virus

  19. Multi-unit inertial fusion plants based on HYLIFE-II, with shared heavy-ion RIA driver and target factory, producing electricity and hydrogen fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, G.; Moir, R.; Hoffman, M.

    1994-05-05

    Following is a modification of the IFEFUEL systems code, called IFEFUEL2, to treat specifically the HYLIFE-II target chamber concept. The same improved Recirculating Induction Accelerator (RIA) energy scaling model developed recently by Bieri is used in this survey of the economics of multi-unit IFE plants producing both electricity and hydrogen fuel. Reference cases will assume conventional HI-indirect target gains for a 2 mm spot, and improved HYLIFE-II BoP models as per Hoffman. Credits for improved plant availability and lower operating costs due to HYLIFE-II`s 30-yr target chamber lifetime are included, as well as unit cost reductions suggested by Delene to credit greater {open_quotes}learning curve{close_quotes} benefits for the duplicated portions of a multi-unit plant. To illustrate the potential impact of more advanced assumptions, additional {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} cases will consider the possible benefits of an MHD + Steam BoP, where direct MHD conversion of plasma from baseball-size LiH target blanket shells is assumed to be possible in a new (as yet undesigned) liquid Flibe-walled target chamber, together and separately, with advanced, higher-gain heavy-ion targets with Fast Ignitors. These runs may help decide the course of a possible future {open_quotes}HYLIFE-III{close_quotes} IFE study. Beam switchyard and final focusing system costs per target chamber are assumed to be consistent with single-sided illumination, for either {open_quotes}conventional{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} indirect target gain assumptions. Target costs are scaled according to the model by Woodworth. In all cases, the driver energy and rep rate for each chosen number of target chambers and total plant output will be optimized to minimize the cost of electricity (CoE) and the associated cost of hydrogen (CoH), using a relationship between CoE and CoH to be presented in the next section.

  20. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called ‘lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  1. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principle types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules (SGs), which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P-bodies, PBs), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts, thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This review discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three non-exclusive categories; i) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, ii) regulation of PKR activation and iii) co-opting RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral repression of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation. PMID:26958719

  2. An intramolecular transport metabolon: fusion of carbonic anhydrase II to the COOH terminus of the Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-)exchanger, AE1.

    PubMed

    Sowah, Daniel; Casey, Joseph R

    2011-08-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) is the plasma membrane Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger of erythrocytes. Carbonic anhydrases (CA) provide substrate for AE1 by catalyzing the reaction, H(2)O + CO(2) ↔ HCO(3)(-) + H(+). The physical complex of CAII with AE1 has been proposed to maximize anion exchange activity. To examine the effect of CAII catalysis on AE1 transport rate, we fused either CAII-wild type or catalytically inactive CAII-V143Y to the cytoplasmic COOH terminus of AE1 to form AE1.CAII and AE1.CAII-V143Y, respectively. When expressed in transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, AE1.CAII had a similar Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange activity to AE1 alone, as assessed by the flux of H(+) equivalents (87 ± 4% vs. AE1) or rate of change of intracellular Cl(-) concentration (93 ± 4% vs. AE1), suggesting that CAII does not activate AE1. In contrast, AE1.CAII-V143Y displayed transport rates for H(+) equivalents and Cl(-) of 55 ± 2% and of 40 ± 2%, versus AE1. Fusion of CAII to AE1 therefore reduces anion transport activity, but this reduction is compensated for during Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange by the presence of catalytically active CAII. Overexpression of free CAII-V143Y acts in a dominant negative manner to reduce AE1-mediated HCO(3)(-) transport by displacement of endogenous CAII-wild type from its binding site on AE1. To examine whether AE1.CAII bound endogenous CAII, we coexpressed CAII-V143Y along with AE1 or AE1.CAII. The bicarbonate transport activity of AE1 was inhibited by CAII-V143Y, whereas the activity of AE1.CAII was unaffected by CAII-V143Y, suggesting impaired transport activity upon displacement of functional CAII from AE1 but not AE1.CAII. Taken together, these data suggest that association of functional CAII with AE1 increases Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange activity, consistent with the HCO(3)(-) transport metabolon model.

  3. Fusion of HCV Nonstructural Antigen to MHC Class II–associated Invariant Chain Enhances T-cell Responses Induced by Vectored Vaccines in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Stefania; Naddeo, Mariarosaria; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Abbate, Adele; Grazioli, Fabiana; Del Gaudio, Annunziata; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Esposito, Maria Luisa; Ammendola, Virginia; Perretta, Gemma; Taglioni, Alessandra; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Folgori, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Despite viral vectors being potent inducers of antigen-specific T cells, strategies to further improve their immunogenicity are actively pursued. Of the numerous approaches investigated, fusion of the encoded antigen to major histocompatibility complex class II–associated invariant chain (Ii) has been reported to enhance CD8+ T-cell responses. We have previously shown that adenovirus vaccine encoding nonstructural (NS) hepatitis C virus (HCV) proteins induces potent T-cell responses in humans. However, even higher T-cell responses might be required to achieve efficacy against different HCV genotypes or therapeutic effect in chronically infected HCV patients. In this study, we assessed fusion of the HCV NS antigen to murine and human Ii expressed by the chimpanzee adenovirus vector ChAd3 or recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). A dramatic increase was observed in outbred mice in which vaccination with ChAd3 expressing the fusion antigen resulted in a 10-fold increase in interferon-γ+ CD8+ T cells. In NHPs, CD8+ T-cell responses were enhanced and accelerated with vectors encoding the Ii-fused antigen. These data show for the first time that the enhancement induced by vector vaccines encoding li-fused antigen was not species specific and can be translated from mice to NHPs, opening the way for testing in humans. PMID:24476798

  4. Calorimetric detection of influenza virus induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Nebel, S; Bartoldus, I; Stegmann, T

    1995-05-01

    Membrane fusion induced by the hemagglutinin glycoprotein of influenza virus has been extensively characterized, but the mechanism whereby the protein achieves the merger of the viral and target membrane lipids remains enigmatic. Various lipid intermediate structures have been proposed, and the energies required for their formation predicted. Here, we have analyzed the enthalpies of fusion of influenza with liposomes by titration calorimetry. If a small sample of virus in a weak neutral pH buffer was added to an excess of liposomes at low pH, a two-component reaction was seen, composed of an exothermic reaction and a slower endothermic reaction. The exothermic reaction was the result of acid-base reactions between the neutral pH virus sample and low pH buffer and low-pH-induced changes in the virus. The endothermic reaction was not observed in the absence of liposomes and much reduced if acid-inactivated virus, which had lost its fusion but not its binding activity, was added to liposomes. The endothermic reaction was more temperature dependent than the exothermic reaction; its pH dependence corresponded with that of fusion and its enthalpy was higher if fusion was more extensive. These data indicate that most of the endothermic reaction was due to membrane fusion. The experimentally determined enthalpy of fusion, 0.6-0.7 kcal per mol of viral phospholipids, is much higher than expected on the basis of current theories about the formation of lipid intermediates during membrane fusion.

  5. A Mechanistic Paradigm for Broad-Spectrum Antivirals that Target Virus-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hollmann, Axel; Tanner, Lukas B.; Akyol Ataman, Zeynep; Yun, Tatyana; Shui, Guanghou; Aguilar, Hector C.; Zhang, Dong; Meriwether, David; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Robinson, Lindsey R.; Juelich, Terry L.; Buczkowski, Hubert; Chou, Sunwen; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Wolf, Mike C.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Banyard, Ashley; Kielian, Margaret; Reddy, Srinivasa; Wenk, Markus R.; Selke, Matthias; Santos, Nuno C.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Jung, Michael E.; Lee, Benhur

    2013-01-01

    LJ001 is a lipophilic thiazolidine derivative that inhibits the entry of numerous enveloped viruses at non-cytotoxic concentrations (IC50≤0.5 µM), and was posited to exploit the physiological difference between static viral membranes and biogenic cellular membranes. We now report on the molecular mechanism that results in LJ001's specific inhibition of virus-cell fusion. The antiviral activity of LJ001 was light-dependent, required the presence of molecular oxygen, and was reversed by singlet oxygen (1O2) quenchers, qualifying LJ001 as a type II photosensitizer. Unsaturated phospholipids were the main target modified by LJ001-generated 1O2. Hydroxylated fatty acid species were detected in model and viral membranes treated with LJ001, but not its inactive molecular analog, LJ025. 1O2-mediated allylic hydroxylation of unsaturated phospholipids leads to a trans-isomerization of the double bond and concurrent formation of a hydroxyl group in the middle of the hydrophobic lipid bilayer. LJ001-induced 1O2-mediated lipid oxidation negatively impacts on the biophysical properties of viral membranes (membrane curvature and fluidity) critical for productive virus-cell membrane fusion. LJ001 did not mediate any apparent damage on biogenic cellular membranes, likely due to multiple endogenous cytoprotection mechanisms against phospholipid hydroperoxides. Based on our understanding of LJ001's mechanism of action, we designed a new class of membrane-intercalating photosensitizers to overcome LJ001's limitations for use as an in vivo antiviral agent. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies led to a novel class of compounds (oxazolidine-2,4-dithiones) with (1) 100-fold improved in vitro potency (IC50<10 nM), (2) red-shifted absorption spectra (for better tissue penetration), (3) increased quantum yield (efficiency of 1O2 generation), and (4) 10–100-fold improved bioavailability. Candidate compounds in our new series moderately but significantly (p≤0.01) delayed the

  6. CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF DERMATOPHAGOIDES PTERONYSSINUS GROUP 1 MAJOR ALLERGEN T CELL FUSION EPITOPE PEPTIDE VACCINE VECTOR BASED ON THE MHC II PATHWAY.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaopin; Zhao, Beibei; Jiang, Yuxin; Diao, Jidong; Li, Na; Lu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Antecedentes y objetivo: el Dermatophagoides peteronyssinus es uno de los principales ácaros del polvo doméstico responsables del asma alérgica que se pueden administrar provisionalmente para una inmunoterapia específica. El presente estudio busca construir un vector que codifique epítopos de células T del grupo de alérgenos principal, el Grupo 1 de Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus como una vacuna suministrada mediante la vía MHC de clase II. Métodos: se sintetizaron las secuencias de nucleótidos de los 3 genes objetivo, incluyendo TAT, IhC y el fragmento recombinante de Der p 1 encargado de codificar 3 epítopos de célula T. Después de la amplificación de los 3 fragmentos objetivo por PCR y digestión con endonucleasas de restricción correspondientes, el gen recombinante TAT-IhC-Der p 1-3T se ligó usando T4 DNA ligasa y se insertó en el vector de expresión procariota pET28a (+) para construir el plásmido recombinante pET 28a (+)-TAT-IHC-Der p 1-3T, que se confirmó por digestión con endonucleasas de restricción y secuenciación. El vector recombinante se transformó en E. coli cepa BL21 (DE3) y se indujo con IPTG, y la proteína inducida TATIHC- Der p1-3T se detectó mediante SDS-PAGE. Después de la purificación, la proteina recombinante se confirmó por análisis de inmunotransferencia (Western blot) y se probó su alergenicidad usando el ensayo de unión a IgE. Resultados: el plásmido recombinante pET-28a-TATIHCDer p1-3T se construyó con éxito, se confirmó por digestión con endonucleasas de restricción y la secuenciación y la expresión de la proteína recombinante TAT-IHCDer p1-3T fue inducida en E. coli. Purificación con éxito verificada mediante Western blot de la proteína objetivo, que mostró una capacidad de unión a IgE más fuerte que Der p1. Conclusión: hemos construido con éxito el vector de expresión recombinante pET-28a-TAT-IHC-Der p1-3T que expresa una vacuna de epítopo de células T administrada por vía MHC II con

  7. Viral Membrane Scission

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Jeremy S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Virus budding is a complex, multistep process in which viral proteins make specific alterations in membrane curvature. Many different viral proteins can deform the membrane and form a budding virion, but very few can mediate membrane scission to complete the budding process. As a result, enveloped viruses have developed numerous ways of facilitating membrane scission, including hijacking host cellular scission machinery and expressing their own scission proteins. These proteins mediate scission in very different ways, though the biophysical mechanics underlying their actions may be similar. In this review, we explore the mechanisms of membrane scission and the ways in which enveloped viruses use these systems to mediate the release of budding virions. PMID:24099087

  8. Public Relations on Fusion in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; van Oost, G.; Paris, P. J.

    2000-10-01

    A summary will be presented of PR efforts on fusion energy research in Europe. A 3-D movie of a fusion research experimental reactor has been realized at the start of this year. It has been made entirely on virtual animation basis. Two versions exists, a short version of 3 min., as a video clip, and a longer version of nearly 8 min. Both could be viewed in 3D, using special projections and passive glasses or in normal VHS video projections. A new CD-ROM for individual and classroom use will be presented, discussing (i) the different energy forms, (ii) general principles of fusion, (iii) current research efforts and (iv) future prospects of fusion. This CD-ROM is now produced in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese Several new brochures and leaflets intended to increase the public awareness on fusion in Europe will be on display.

  9. Efforts in Public Relations on Fusion in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; van Oost, G.

    2001-10-01

    An overview will be given of different published materials currently in use in Europe for public relations on fusion. We will also present a CD-ROM for individual and classroom use, containing (i) a general background on different energy forms, (ii) general principles of fusion, (iii) current research efforts and (iv) future prospects of fusion. This CD-ROM is currently in English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian. Fusion posters developed in collaboration with CPEP in Dutch, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese will be shown. Several new brochures and leaflets intended to increase the public awareness on fusion in Europe will be on display.

  10. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cristin C. W.; Olival, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007–2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  11. Optimizing Viral Discovery in Bats.

    PubMed

    Young, Cristin C W; Olival, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Viral discovery studies in bats have increased dramatically over the past decade, yet a rigorous synthesis of the published data is lacking. We extract and analyze data from 93 studies published between 2007-2013 to examine factors that increase success of viral discovery in bats, and specific trends and patterns of infection across host taxa and viral families. Over the study period, 248 novel viruses from 24 viral families have been described. Using generalized linear models, at a study level we show the number of host species and viral families tested best explained number of viruses detected. We demonstrate that prevalence varies significantly across viral family, specimen type, and host taxonomy, and calculate mean PCR prevalence by viral family and specimen type across all studies. Using a logistic model, we additionally identify factors most likely to increase viral detection at an individual level for the entire dataset and by viral families with sufficient sample sizes. Our analysis highlights major taxonomic gaps in recent bat viral discovery efforts and identifies ways to improve future viral pathogen detection through the design of more efficient and targeted sample collection and screening approaches. PMID:26867024

  12. Viral insertion in Evi12 causes expression of aberrant Grp94 mRNAs containing the viral gag myristylation motif

    SciTech Connect

    Akker, Eric van den; Aarts, Lambertus H.J.; Delwel, Ruud

    2007-09-30

    Ecotropic Virus Integration site 12 (Evi12) is a common virus insertion site (cVIS) in retrovirally induced murine models of leukemia and lymphoma, suggesting an important role for this locus in these hematopoietic disorders. Evi12 is located near the promoter of the ER chaperone protein and Hsp90 family member Grp94. Here we show that viral insertion in Evi12 results in the expression of aberrant Grp94 transcripts in Cas-Br-MuLV as well as in AKXD induced hematopoietic tumors, demonstrating that Grp94 is a common viral target gene. While most transcripts encode for truncated forms of Grp94, transcripts containing viral gag sequences were detected in the leukemia cell line NFS107. Interestingly, these fusion transcripts encode for myristylated viral-Grp94 fusion proteins that localize to the plasma membrane. Combined with recent evidence that myristylated forms of Hsp90 transform cells, our data suggest that myristylation of target genes may be an important mechanism in retrovirally mediated oncogenesis. Since retroviral insertion in Evi12 also affects the expression of a recently identified novel gene Grp94 neighboring nucleotidase (Gnn), located at the other side of Evi12, it appears that proviral insertion can lead to deregulation of two genes present in the same locus.

  13. Combating emerging viral threats

    PubMed Central

    Bekerman, Elena; Einav, Shirit

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Most approved antiviral therapeutics selectively inhibit proteins encoded by a single virus, thereby providing a “one drug-one bug” solution. As a result of this narrow spectrum of coverage and the high cost of drug development, therapies are currently approved for fewer than ten viruses out of the hundreds known to cause human disease. This perspective summarizes progress and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral therapies. These strategies include targeting enzymatic functions shared by multiple viruses and host cell machinery by newly discovered compounds or by repurposing approved drugs. These approaches offer new practical means for developing therapeutics against existing and emerging viral threats. PMID:25883340

  14. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  15. [Viral exanthematic childhood diseases].

    PubMed

    Allwinn, R; Doerr, H W

    1997-01-01

    Exanthem is defined as multiple, inflammatory skin alteration with a hematogenic, lymphogenic or neurogenic origin. Typically, so called exanthematic children's diseases are measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, erythema infectiosum (fifth disease) and in the past small pox. The pathogenesis of the viral-caused diseases primarily occurs in the vascular connective tissue. The cytopathogenetic effects result in inflammatory tissue reactions with activation of defence mechanism and producing of immune complexes. First symptoms are hyperemia, edema and inflammatory infiltrates with itchy swellings. Virological laboratory diagnosis are necessary especially for the progress of atypical infectious diseases, for persons with immunological or chronical illness and under chemotherapeutical or immunosuppressival treatment.

  16. Viral surveillance and discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, Walter Ian; Firth, Cadhla

    2014-01-01

    The field of virus discovery has burgeoned with the advent of high throughput sequencing platforms and bioinformatics programs that enable rapid identification and molecular characterization of known and novel agents, investments in global microbial surveillance that include wildlife and domestic animals as well as humans, and recognition that viruses may be implicated in chronic as well as acute diseases. Here we review methods for viral surveillance and discovery, strategies and pitfalls in linking discoveries to disease, and identify opportunities for improvements in sequencing instrumentation and analysis, the use of social media and medical informatics that will further advance clinical medicine and public health. PMID:23602435

  17. Equine viral arteritis.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2014-12-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV), the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), is a respiratory and reproductive disease that occurs throughout the world. EAV infection is highly species-specific and exclusively limited to members of the family Equidae, which includes horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras. EVA is an economically important disease and outbreaks could cause significant losses to the equine industry. The primary objective of this article is to summarize current understanding of EVA, specifically the disease, pathogenesis, epidemiology, host immune response, vaccination and treatment strategies, prevention and control measures, and future directions.

  18. Fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989 to 1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R and D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R and D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  19. Fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase.

  20. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, Anwar M.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D.; Sui, Jianhua; He, Runtao; Marasco, Wayne A.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  1. Human viral gastroenteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, M L

    1989-01-01

    During the last 15 years, several different groups of fastidious viruses that are responsible for a large proportion of acute viral gastroenteritis cases have been discovered by the electron microscopic examination of stool specimens. This disease is one of the most prevalent and serious clinical syndromes seen around the world, especially in children. Rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, and fastidious fecal adenoviruses account for much of the viral gastroenteritis in infants and young children, whereas the small caliciviruses and unclassified astroviruses, and possibly enteric coronaviruses, are responsible for significantly fewer cases overall. In addition to electron microscopy, enzyme immunoassays and other rapid antigen detection systems have been developed to detect rotaviruses and fastidious fecal adenoviruses in the stool specimens of both nonhospitalized patients and those hospitalized for dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Experimental rotavirus vaccines have also been developed, due to the prevalence and seriousness of rotavirus infection. The small, unclassified Norwalk virus and morphologically similar viruses are responsible for large and small outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis in older children, adolescents, and adults. Hospitalization of older patients infected with these viruses is usually not required, and their laboratory diagnoses have been limited primarily to research laboratories. Images PMID:2644024

  2. [Emergent viral infections].

    PubMed

    Galama, J M

    2001-03-31

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic infections such as dengue and hepatitis E, but also of hepatitis A, which is no longer endemic. Apart from import diseases new viruses have appeared (Nipah-virus and transfusion-transmitted virus). Existing viruses may suddenly cause more severe diseases, e.g. infection by enterovirus 71. The distribution area of a virus may change, e.g. in case of West Nile virus, an Egyptian encephalitis virus that appears to have established itself in the USA. Furthermore, there is no such thing as a completely new virus; it is always an existing virus that has adapted itself to another host or that was already present in humans but has only recently been discovered. A number of factors facilitate the emergence of new infectious diseases. These include intensive animal husbandry and the transport of animals. The unexpected appearance of West Nile virus in the western hemisphere was possibly due to animal transportation.

  3. Rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors, small molecule antiviral compounds against enveloped viruses

    PubMed Central

    St.Vincent, Mireille R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Muqadas, Muhammad; Joyce, Michael A.; Barsby, Nicola L.; Epand, Raquel F.; Epand, Richard M.; Khramyshev, Stanislav A.; Valueva, Olga A.; Korshun, Vladimir A.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J.; Schang, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    Antiviral drugs targeting viral proteins often result in prompt selection for resistance. Moreover, the number of viral targets is limited. Novel antiviral targets are therefore needed. The unique characteristics of fusion between virion envelopes and cell membranes may provide such targets. Like all fusing bilayers, viral envelopes locally adopt hourglass-shaped stalks during the initial stages of fusion, a process that requires local negative membrane curvature. Unlike cellular vesicles, however, viral envelopes do not redistribute lipids between leaflets, can only use the energy released by virion proteins, and fuse to the extracellular leaflets of cell membranes. Enrichment in phospholipids with hydrophilic heads larger than their hydrophobic tails in the convex outer leaflet of vesicles favors positive curvature, therefore increasing the activation energy barrier for fusion. Such phospholipids can increase the activation barrier beyond the energy provided by virion proteins, thereby inhibiting viral fusion. However, phospholipids are not pharmacologically useful. We show here that a family of synthetic rigid amphiphiles of shape similar to such phospholipids, RAFIs (rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors), inhibit the infectivity of several otherwise unrelated enveloped viruses, including hepatitis C and HSV-1 and -2 (lowest apparent IC50 48 nM), with no cytotoxic or cytostatic effects (selectivity index > 3,000) by inhibiting the increased negative curvature required for the initial stages of fusion. PMID:20823220

  4. Comprehensive analysis of HPV16 integration in OSCC reveals no significant impact of physical status on viral oncogene and virally disrupted human gene expression.

    PubMed

    Olthof, Nadine C; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Kolligs, Jutta; Haesevoets, Annick; Henfling, Mieke; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Preuss, Simon F; Drebber, Uta; Wieland, Ulrike; Silling, Steffi; Lam, Wan L; Vucic, Emily A; Kremer, Bernd; Klussmann, Jens-P; Huebbers, Christian U

    2014-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 is an independent risk factor for the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). However, it is unclear whether viral integration is an essential hallmark in the carcinogenic process of OSCC and whether HPV integration correlates with the level of viral gene transcription and influences the expression of disrupted host genes. We analyzed 75 patients with OSCC. HPV16-positivity was proven by p16(INK4A) immunohistochemistry, PCR and FISH. Viral integration was examined using DIPS- as well as APOT-PCR. Viral E2, E6 and E7 gene expression levels were quantified by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-q)PCR. Expression levels of 7 human genes disrupted by the virus were extracted from mRNA expression profiling data of 32 OSCCs. Viral copy numbers were assessed by qPCR in 73 tumors. We identified 37 HPV16-human fusion products indicating viral integration in 29 (39%) OSCC. In the remaining tumors (61%) only episome-derived PCR products were detected. When comparing OSCC with or without an integration-derived fusion product, we did not find significant differences in the mean RNA expression of viral genes E2, E6 and E7 or the viral copy numbers per cell, nor did the RNA expression of the HPV-disrupted genes differ from either group of OSCC. In conclusion, our data do not support the hypothesis that integration affects the levels of viral and/or HPV-disrupted human gene transcripts. Thus constitutive, rather than a high level, of expression of oncogene transcripts appears to be required in HPV-related OSCC. PMID:24586376

  5. Viral noncoding RNAs: more surprises

    PubMed Central

    Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Guo, Yang Eric; Lee, Nara; Moss, Walter N.; Vallery, Tenaya K.; Xie, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells produce several classes of long and small noncoding RNA (ncRNA). Many DNA and RNA viruses synthesize their own ncRNAs. Like their host counterparts, viral ncRNAs associate with proteins that are essential for their stability, function, or both. Diverse biological roles—including the regulation of viral replication, viral persistence, host immune evasion, and cellular transformation—have been ascribed to viral ncRNAs. In this review, we focus on the multitude of functions played by ncRNAs produced by animal viruses. We also discuss their biogenesis and mechanisms of action. PMID:25792595

  6. Residue-level resolution of alphavirus envelope protein interactions in pH-dependent fusion.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-02-17

    Alphavirus envelope proteins, organized as trimers of E2-E1 heterodimers on the surface of the pathogenic alphavirus, mediate the low pH-triggered fusion of viral and endosomal membranes in human cells. The lack of specific treatment for alphaviral infections motivates our exploration of potential antiviral approaches by inhibiting one or more fusion steps in the common endocytic viral entry pathway. In this work, we performed constant pH molecular dynamics based on an atomic model of the alphavirus envelope with icosahedral symmetry. We have identified pH-sensitive residues that cause the largest shifts in thermodynamic driving forces under neutral and acidic pH conditions for various fusion steps. A series of conserved interdomain His residues is identified to be responsible for the pH-dependent conformational changes in the fusion process, and ligand binding sites in their vicinity are anticipated to be potential drug targets aimed at inhibiting viral infections.

  7. Enterovirus 71-induced autophagy increases viral replication and pathogenesis in a suckling mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported that Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection activates autophagy, which promotes viral replication both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we further investigated whether EV71 infection of neuronal SK-N-SH cells induces an autophagic flux. Furthermore, the effects of autophagy on EV71-related pathogenesis and viral load were evaluated after intracranial inoculation of mouse-adapted EV71 (MP4 strain) into 6-day-old ICR suckling mice. Results We demonstrated that in EV71-infected SK-N-SH cells, EV71 structural protein VP1 and nonstructural protein 2C co-localized with LC3 and mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR, endosome marker) proteins by immunofluorescence staining, indicating amphisome formation. Together with amphisome formation, EV71 induced an autophagic flux, which could be blocked by NH4Cl (inhibitor of acidification) and vinblastine (inhibitor of fusion), as demonstrated by Western blotting. Suckling mice intracranially inoculated with EV71 showed EV71 VP1 protein expression (representing EV71 infection) in the cerebellum, medulla, and pons by immunohistochemical staining. Accompanied with these infected brain tissues, increased expression of LC3-II protein as well as formation of LC3 aggregates, autophagosomes and amphisomes were detected. Amphisome formation, which was confirmed by colocalization of EV71-VP1 protein or LC3 puncta and the endosome marker protein MPR. Thus, EV71-infected suckling mice (similar to EV71-infected SK-N-SH cells) also show an autophagic flux. The physiopathological parameters of EV71-MP4 infected mice, including body weight loss, disease symptoms, and mortality were increased compared to those of the uninfected mice. We further blocked EV71-induced autophagy with the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA), which attenuated the disease symptoms and decreased the viral load in the brain tissues of the infected mice. Conclusions In this study, we reveal that EV71 infection of suckling mice induces an

  8. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  9. [Update chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J

    2016-03-01

    More than 500,000 people in Germany have chronic viral hepatitis. The interferon-based treatments formerly used in hepatitis B have been widely replaced by life-long oral medication with nucleoside or nucleotide analogues. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C has been improved substantially by the development of new and very expensive drug combinations. Up to 90% of patients can now be cured with certainty, and one to two years after successful treatment there is no relevant risk of recurrence. These individuals expect to receive insurance cover under appropriate conditions. Vaccination programmes are very efficient at decreasing the incidence of hepatitis B, but no vaccine against hepatitis C is likely to become available in the next decade. PMID:27111951

  10. Dengue viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections. PMID:15466994

  11. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, G N; Fernando, S; Fernando, D J; Seneviratne, S L

    2004-10-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing this disease. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. This review outlines aspects of the epidemiology of dengue infections, the dengue virus and its mosquito vector, clinical features and pathogenesis of dengue infections, and the management and control of these infections.

  12. [Viral hemorrhagic fever].

    PubMed

    Kager, P A

    1998-02-28

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers, such as Lassa fever and yellow fever, cause tens of thousands of deaths annually outside the Netherlands. The viruses are mostly transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks or via excreta of rodents. Important to travellers are yellow fever, dengue and Lassa and Ebola fever. For yellow fever there is an efficacious vaccine. Dengue is frequently observed in travellers; prevention consists in avoiding mosquito bites, the treatment is symptomatic. Lassa and Ebola fever are extremely rare among travellers; a management protocol can be obtained from the Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports. Diagnostics of a patient from the tropics with fever and haemorrhagic diathesis should be aimed at treatable disorders such as malaria, typhoid fever, rickettsiosis or bacterial sepsis, because the probability of such a disease is much higher than that of Lassa or Ebola fever.

  13. Perspectives on Magnetized Target Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    One approach to Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) builds upon the ongoing experimental effort (FRX-L) to generate a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma suitable for translation and cylindrical-liner (i.e., converging flux conserver) implosion. Numerical modeling is underway to elucidate key performance drivers for possible future power-plant extrapolations. The fusion gain, Q (ratio of DT fusion yield to the sum of initial liner kinetic energy plus plasma formation energy), sets the power-plant duty cycle for a nominal design electric power [ e.g. 1,000 MWe(net)]. A pulsed MTF power plant of this type derives from the historic Fast Liner Reactor (FLR) concept and shares attributes with the recent Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) Z-pinch and laser-driven pellet HYLIFE-II conceptual designs.

  14. Viral RNA Degradation and Diffusion Act as a Bottleneck for the Influenza A Virus Infection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jolmes, Fabian; Welke, Robert-William; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Flöttmann, Max

    2016-01-01

    After endocytic uptake, influenza viruses transit early endosomal compartments and eventually reach late endosomes. There, the viral glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) triggers fusion between endosomal and viral membrane, a critical step that leads to release of the viral segmented genome destined to reach the cell nucleus. Endosomal maturation is a complex process involving acidification of the endosomal lumen as well as endosome motility along microtubules. While the pH drop is clearly critical for the conformational change and membrane fusion activity of HA, the effect of intracellular transport dynamics on the progress of infection remains largely unclear. In this study, we developed a comprehensive mathematical model accounting for the first steps of influenza virus infection. We calibrated our model with experimental data and challenged its predictions using recombinant viruses with altered pH sensitivity of HA. We identified the time point of virus-endosome fusion and thereby the diffusion distance of the released viral genome to the nucleus as a critical bottleneck for efficient virus infection. Further, we concluded and supported experimentally that the viral RNA is subjected to cytosolic degradation strongly limiting the probability of a successful genome import into the nucleus. PMID:27780209

  15. Structural changes of envelope proteins during alphavirus fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Jose, Joyce; Xiang, Ye; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-12-08

    Alphaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have a diameter of about 700 {angstrom} and can be lethal human pathogens. Entry of virus into host cells by endocytosis is controlled by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2. The E2-E1 heterodimers form 80 trimeric spikes on the icosahedral virus surface, 60 with quasi-three-fold symmetry and 20 coincident with the icosahedral three-fold axes arranged with T = 4 quasi-symmetry. The E1 glycoprotein has a hydrophobic fusion loop at one end and is responsible for membrane fusion. The E2 protein is responsible for receptor binding and protects the fusion loop at neutral pH. The lower pH in the endosome induces the virions to undergo an irreversible conformational change in which E2 and E1 dissociate and E1 forms homotrimers, triggering fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane and then releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Here we report the structure of an alphavirus spike, crystallized at low pH, representing an intermediate in the fusion process and clarifying the maturation process. The trimer of E2-E1 in the crystal structure is similar to the spikes in the neutral pH virus except that the E2 middle region is disordered, exposing the fusion loop. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of E2 each form immunoglobulin-like folds, consistent with the receptor attachment properties of E2.

  16. Pushing the Envelope: Dengue Viral Membrane Coaxed into Shape by Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Marzinek, Jan K; Holdbrook, Daniel A; Huber, Roland G; Verma, Chandra; Bond, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Dengue virus is a flavivirus responsible for millions of infections per year. Its surface contains a phospholipid bilayer, within which are embedded the envelope (E) and membrane (M) proteins, arranged with icosahedral geometry. Exposure to low pH triggers the E proteins to undergo conformational changes, which precede fusion with the host cell membrane and release of the viral genome. The flavivirus membrane exhibits significant local curvature and deformation, as revealed by cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM), but its precise structure and interactions with envelope components remain unclear. We now report simulations of the dengue viral particle that refine its envelope structure in unprecedented detail. Our final models are morphologically consistent with cryo-EM data, and reveal the structural basis for membrane curvature. Electrostatic interactions increased envelope complex stability; this coupling has potential functional significance in the context of the viral fusion mechanism and infective states. PMID:27396828

  17. Metagenomics-based analysis of viral communities in dairy lagoon wastewater.

    PubMed

    Alhamlan, F S; Ederer, M M; Brown, C J; Coats, E R; Crawford, R L

    2013-02-15

    Microbial populations, especially those of viruses, are poorly studied in dairy wastewater treatment operations. Here we report signature nucleic acid metagenomic sequences obtained by pyrosequencing viromes of virus-like particles that were extracted from two dairy waste treatment lagoons. The lagoons are operated in series, with Lagoon I being used as the primary stage and Lagoon II as the secondary stage of wastewater treatment. An average of 2000 sequences was obtained from each lagoon. More than 300 signatures from each lagoon matched sequences in the virus database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). We utilized a bioinformatics approach and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the viral diversity and presence of potential viral pathogens within the lagoons. Our results showed differences in viral community compositions between Lagoon I and Lagoon II, suggesting that the viral community changes significantly in the transition of water between the two lagoons. Furthermore, the diverse viral community in the lagoon samples contained signature sequences of a variety of bacterial, plant, and animal viruses. Bacteriophage sequences dominated the viral community metagenomes in both lagoons. Ultimately these results can be used to identify viral bioindicators to rapidly assess wastewater treatment quality and the potential impacts of dairy operations on watersheds. Our viral metagenomic sequences have been submitted to GenBank (GPID 65805) and can provide insight into the composition and structure of viral communities within wastewaters of dairy lagoon systems.

  18. Magneto-Inertial Fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Wurden, G. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Intrator, T. P.; Grabowski, T. C.; Degnan, J. H.; Domonkos, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Sinars, D. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; et al

    2015-11-17

    In this community white paper, we describe an approach to achieving fusion which employs a hybrid of elements from the traditional magnetic and inertial fusion concepts, called magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). The status of MIF research in North America at multiple institutions is summarized including recent progress, research opportunities, and future plans.

  19. Hot and cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This article presents an overview of research in cold fusion research and development in cold fusion at the Tokomak Fusion Test Reactor at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, and at the inertial containment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. is described.

  20. A cytoplasmic RNA virus generates functional viral small RNAs and regulates viral IRES activity in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Kuo-Feng; Hung, Chuan-Tien; Hsieh, Po-Ting; Li, Mei-Ling; Chen, Guang-Wu; Kung, Yu-An; Huang, Peng-Nien; Kuo, Rei-Lin; Chen, Li-Lien; Lin, Jing-Yi; Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Chen, Shu-Jen; Tang, Petrus; Horng, Jim-Tong; Huang, Hsing-I; Wang, Jen-Ren; Ojcius, David M.; Brewer, Gary; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2014-01-01

    The roles of virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) have been studied in plants and insects. However, the generation and function of small RNAs from cytoplasmic RNA viruses in mammalian cells remain unexplored. This study describes four vsRNAs that were detected in enterovirus 71-infected cells using next-generation sequencing and northern blots. Viral infection produced substantial levels (>105 copy numbers per cell) of vsRNA1, one of the four vsRNAs. We also demonstrated that Dicer is involved in vsRNA1 generation in infected cells. vsRNA1 overexpression inhibited viral translation and internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) activity in infected cells. Conversely, blocking vsRNA1 enhanced viral yield and viral protein synthesis. We also present evidence that vsRNA1 targets stem-loop II of the viral 5′ untranslated region and inhibits the activity of the IRES through this sequence-specific targeting. Our study demonstrates the ability of a cytoplasmic RNA virus to generate functional vsRNA in mammalian cells. In addition, we also demonstrate a potential novel mechanism for a positive-stranded RNA virus to regulate viral translation: generating a vsRNA that targets the IRES. PMID:25352551

  1. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused ...

  2. Bone graft substitutes for spine fusion: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashim; Kukkar, Nitin; Sharif, Kevin; Main, Benjamin J; Albers, Christine E; El-Amin III, Saadiq F

    2015-01-01

    Bone graft substitutes are widely used in the field of orthopedics and are extensively used to promote vertebral fusion. Fusion is the most common technique in spine surgery and is used to treat morbidities and relieve discomfort. Allograft and autograft bone substitutes are currently the most commonly used bone grafts to promote fusion. These approaches pose limitations and present complications to the patient. Numerous alternative bone graft substitutes are on the market or have been developed and proposed for application. These options have attempted to promote spine fusion by enhancing osteogenic properties. In this review, we reviewed biology of spine fusion and the current advances in biomedical materials and biological strategies for application in surgical spine fusion. Our findings illustrate that, while many bone graft substitutes perform well as bone graft extenders, only osteoinductive proteins (recombinant bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and osteogenic protein-1) provide evidence for use as both bone enhancers and bone substitutes for specific types of spinal fusion. Tissue engineered hydrogels, synthetic polymer composites and viral based gene therapy also holds the potential to be used for spine fusion in future, though warrants further investigation to be used in clinical practice. PMID:26191491

  3. Viral dark matter and virus-host interactions resolved from publicly available microbial genomes.

    PubMed

    Roux, Simon; Hallam, Steven J; Woyke, Tanja; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2015-07-22

    The ecological importance of viruses is now widely recognized, yet our limited knowledge of viral sequence space and virus-host interactions precludes accurate prediction of their roles and impacts. In this study, we mined publicly available bacterial and archaeal genomic data sets to identify 12,498 high-confidence viral genomes linked to their microbial hosts. These data augment public data sets 10-fold, provide first viral sequences for 13 new bacterial phyla including ecologically abundant phyla, and help taxonomically identify 7-38% of 'unknown' sequence space in viromes. Genome- and network-based classification was largely consistent with accepted viral taxonomy and suggested that (i) 264 new viral genera were identified (doubling known genera) and (ii) cross-taxon genomic recombination is limited. Further analyses provided empirical data on extrachromosomal prophages and coinfection prevalences, as well as evaluation of in silico virus-host linkage predictions. Together these findings illustrate the value of mining viral signal from microbial genomes.

  4. Theoretical basis of a beneficial role for vitamin D in viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lương, Khanh vinh quốc; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal bone metabolism and dysfunction of the calcium-parathyroid hormone-vitamin D axis have been reported in patients with viral hepatitis. Some studies suggested a relationship between vitamin D and viral hepatitis. Genetic studies have provided an opportunity to identify the proteins that link vitamin D to the pathology of viral hepatitis (i.e., the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, the vitamin D receptor, cytochrome P450, the renin-angiotensin system, apolipoprotein E, liver X receptor, toll-like receptor, and the proteins regulated by the Sp1 promoter gene). Vitamin D also exerts its effects on viral hepatitis via non-genomic factors, i.e., matrix metalloproteinase, endothelial vascular growth factor, prostaglandins, cyclooxygenase-2, and oxidative stress. In conclusion, vitamin D could have a beneficial role in viral hepatitis. Calcitriol is best used for viral hepatitis because it is the active form of the vitamin D3 metabolite. PMID:23082050

  5. Immunization Against Viral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wehrle, Paul F.

    1965-01-01

    Means are now at hand, if properly employed, to virtually eliminate clinical poliomyelitis and measles from this country. If such control is to be accomplished, more effective means are required to reach virtually all of the four million infants born each year in this country. Influenza can be suppressed, and improvements in influenza vaccine have been achieved in recent years. It seems likely at this time that at least several of the more important viral diseases can be controlled by utilizing antigens based on the biologic characteristics of the agent, and directed toward the reservoir of infection and the conditions favoring transmission of the infection. The theoretical problem of the effects in man of viruses that are oncogenic in rodents and are derived from various tissue culture systems deserves serious attention. However, this consideration, that of antigenic potency, and other problems reviewed should not be allowed to subvert efforts to solve the real problems that face us, the disability and death resulting from these common infections. PMID:14347979

  6. DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

  7. Dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  8. Viral BLIP dynamics during HAART.

    SciTech Connect

    Markowitz, M.; Louie, M.; Hurley, A.; Ho, David D.; Perelson, Alan S.,; Di Mascio, M.

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent episodes of low-level viremia (blips) are often observed in well-suppressed, HAART-treated patients. It has been reported that viral blips do not correlate with the emergence of new HAART-related mutations; however, increased frequency of blips correlates with slower decay of latently infected cells. Since blips are transient and unpredictable, detailed knowledge about them is difficult to obtain. We present an analysis of the dynamics of viral blips from viral load (VL) measurements on 123 patients for a period of 809k480d (21-1817d) and sampled every 31{+-}12d for a total of 26{+-}15 samples per patient.

  9. Enhanced chemical weapon warning via sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Michael; Pritchett, Daniel; Cothren, Brian; Schwaiger, James

    2011-05-01

    Torch Technologies Inc., is actively involved in chemical sensor networking and data fusion via multi-year efforts with Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The objective of these efforts is to develop innovative concepts and advanced algorithms that enhance our national Chemical Warfare (CW) test and warning capabilities via the fusion of traditional and non-traditional CW sensor data. Under Phase I, II, and III Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) contracts with DPG, Torch developed the Advanced Chemical Release Evaluation System (ACRES) software to support non real-time CW sensor data fusion. Under Phase I and II SBIRs with DTRA in conjunction with the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Torch is using the DPG ACRES CW sensor data fuser as a framework from which to develop the Cloud state Estimation in a Networked Sensor Environment (CENSE) data fusion system. Torch is currently developing CENSE to implement and test innovative real-time sensor network based data fusion concepts using CW and non-CW ancillary sensor data to improve CW warning and detection in tactical scenarios.

  10. Methodologies in the study of cell-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F S; Melikyan, G B

    1998-10-01

    The process of membrane fusion has been profitably studied by fusing cells that express fusion proteins on their surfaces to the membranes of target cells. Primary methods for monitoring the occurrence of fusion between cells are measurement of formation of heterokaryons, measurement of activation of reporter genes, measurement of transfer of lipidic and aqueous fluorescent dyes, and electrophysiological recording of fusion pores. Fluorescence and electrical methods have been well developed for fusion of a nucleated cell expressing viral fusion proteins to red blood cell targets. These techniques are now being extended to the study of fusion between two nucleated cells. Microscopic observation of spread of fluorescent dyes from one cell to another is a sensitive and convenient means of detecting fusion on the level of single events. In such studies, both the membrane and the aqueous continuities that occur as a result of fusion can be measured in the same experiment. By following spread of aqueous dyes of different sizes from one cell to another, the growth of a fusion pore can also be followed. By labeling cells with fluorescent probes, a state of hemifusion can be identified if probes in outer membrane leaflets transfer but probes in inner leaflets or aqueous spaces do not. Electrical measurements-both capacitance and double-whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques-are the most sensitive methods yet developed for detecting the formation of pores and for quantifying their growth. These powerful single-event methodologies should be directly applicable to further advances in expressing nonviral fusion proteins on cell surfaces. PMID:9790869

  11. MFR, a Putative Receptor Mediating the Fusion of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saginario, Charles; Sterling, Hyacinth; Beckers, Cornelius; Kobayashi, Ruji; Solimena, Michele; Ullu, Elisabetta; Vignery, Agnès

    1998-01-01

    We had previously identified a macrophage surface protein whose expression is highly induced, transient, and specific, as it is restricted to actively fusing macrophages in vitro and in vivo. This protein is recognized by monoclonal antibodies that block macrophage fusion. We have now purified this protein and cloned its corresponding cDNA. This protein belongs to the superfamily of immunoglobulins and is similar to immune antigen receptors such as the T-cell receptor, B-cell receptor, and viral receptors such as CD4. We have therefore named this protein macrophage fusion receptor (MFR). We show that the extracellular domain of MFR prevents fusion of macrophages in vitro and therefore propose that MFR belongs to the fusion machinery of macrophages. MFR is identical to SHPS-1 and BIT and is a homologue of P84, SIRPα, and MyD-1, all of which have been recently cloned and implicated in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction events. PMID:9774638

  12. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors.

  13. Herpesvirus Replication Compartments Originate with Single Incoming Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kobiler, O.; Brodersen, P.; Taylor, M. P.; Ludmir, E. B.; Enquist, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously we described a method to estimate the average number of virus genomes expressed in an infected cell. By analyzing the color spectrum of cells infected with a mixture of isogenic pseudorabies virus (PRV) recombinants expressing three fluorophores, we estimated that fewer than seven incoming genomes are expressed, replicated, and packaged into progeny per cell. In this report, we expand this work and describe experiments demonstrating the generality of the method, as well as providing more insight into herpesvirus replication. We used three isogenic PRV recombinants, each expressing a fluorescently tagged VP26 fusion protein (VP26 is a capsid protein) under the viral VP26 late promoter. We calculated a similar finite limit on the number of expressed viral genomes, indicating that this method is independent of the promoter used to transcribe the fluorophore genes, the time of expression of the fluorophore (early versus late), and the insertion site of the fluorophore gene in the PRV genome (UL versus US). Importantly, these VP26 fusion proteins are distributed equally in punctate virion assembly structures in each nucleus, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio when determining the color spectrum of each cell. To understand how the small number of genomes are distributed among the replication compartments, we used a two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization assay. Most viral replication compartments in the nucleus occupy unique nuclear territories, implying that they arose from single genomes. Our experiments suggest a correlation between the small number of expressed viral genomes and the limited number of replication compartments. PMID:22186611

  14. The fusion breeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Ralph W.

    1982-10-01

    The fusion breeder is a fusion reactor designed with special blankets to maximize the transmutation by 14 MeV neutrons of uranium-238 to plutonium or thorium to uranium-233 for use as a fuel for fission reactors. Breeding fissile fuels has not been a goal of the U.S. fusion energy program. This paper suggests it is time for a policy change to make the fusion breeder a goal of the U.S. fusion program and the U.S. nuclear energy program. There is wide agreement that many approaches will work and will produce fuel for five equal-sized LWRs, and some approach as many as 20 LWRs at electricity costs within 20% of those at today's price of uranium (30/lb of U3O8). The blankets designed to suppress fissioning, called symbiotes, fusion fuel factories, or just fusion breeders, will have safety characteristics more like pure fusion reactors and will support as many as 15 equal power LWRs. The blankets designed to maximize fast fission of fertile material will have safety characteristics more like fission reactors and will support 5 LWRs. This author strongly recommends development of the fission suppressed blanket type, a point of view not agreed upon by everyone. There is, however, wide agreement that, to meet the market price for uranium which would result in LWR electricity within 20% of today's cost with either blanket type, fusion components can cost severalfold more than would be allowed for pure fusion to meet the goal of making electricity alone at 20% over today's fission costs. Also widely agreed is that the critical-path-item for the fusion breeder is fusion development itself; however, development of fusion breeder specific items (blankets, fuel cycle) should be started now in order to have the fusion breeder by the time the rise in uranium prices forces other more costly choices.

  15. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed

    Nassi, Jonathan J; Cepko, Constance L; Born, Richard T; Beier, Kevin T

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and extending

  16. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    PubMed Central

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cepko, Constance L.; Born, Richard T.; Beier, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist’s toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and

  17. Understanding HIV-1 viral load.

    PubMed

    Paxton, W B

    1995-01-01

    HIV viral markers, such as p24 antigen and viral RNA, measure how much virus is present. Studies are showing a relationship between RNA levels and clinical outcomes, which can help doctors evaluate the efficacy of drug therapy. Eventually, it is believed, RNA will replace T-cell counts as the marker of choice. The challenge is to interpret what the results of a viral load test mean for a specific patient. Currently, the two main viral load tests commercially available do not have a one-to-one linear relationship, so tests should not be switched. Doctors are advised not to over-interpret minor changes because of the ten to thirty percent variation in individual test results. These tests are not FDA-approved but are available at commercial reference labs. PMID:11362660

  18. Aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis.

    PubMed

    Irani, David N

    2008-08-01

    Meningitis and myelitis represent common and very infrequent viral infections of the central nervous system, respectively. The number of cases of viral meningitis that occurs annually exceeds the total number of meningitis cases caused by all other etiologies combined. Focal central nervous system infections, such as occur in the spinal cord with viral myelitis, are much less common and may be confused with noninfectious disorders that cause acute flaccid paralysis. This article reviews some of the important clinical features, epidemiology, diagnostic approaches, and management strategies for patients with aseptic meningitis and viral myelitis. Particular focus is placed on the diseases caused by enteroviruses, which as a group account for most aseptic meningitis cases and many focal infections of the spinal cord.

  19. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    SciTech Connect

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.; Gauster, W.B.; Gordon, J.D.; Mattas, R.F.; Morgan, G.D.; Ulrickson, M.A,; Watson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G,

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted.

  20. Viral Control of Mitochondrial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Eugenia; Touat, Zahia; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Throughout the process of pathogen–host co-evolution, viruses have developed a battery of distinct strategies to overcome biochemical and immunological defenses of the host. Thus, viruses have acquired the capacity to subvert host cell apoptosis, control inflammatory responses, and evade immune reactions. Since the elimination of infected cells via programmed cell death is one of the most ancestral defense mechanisms against infection, disabling host cell apoptosis might represent an almost obligate step in the viral life cycle. Conversely, viruses may take advantage of stimulating apoptosis, either to kill uninfected cells from the immune system, or to induce the breakdown of infected cells, thereby favoring viral dissemination. Several viral polypeptides are homologs of host-derived apoptosis-regulatory proteins, such as members of the Bcl-2 family. Moreover, viral factors with no homology to host proteins specifically target key components of the apoptotic machinery. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the viral modulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, by focusing in particular on the mechanisms by which viral proteins control the host cell death apparatus. PMID:18516228

  1. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  2. Materials research for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to <2 MeV on average for fission neutrons) releases significant amounts of hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  3. Visualization of Content Release from Cell Surface-Attached Single HIV-1 Particles Carrying an Extra-Viral Fluorescent pH-Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Chetan; Marin, Mariana; Mason, Caleb S.; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 fusion leading to productive entry has long been thought to occur at the plasma membrane. However, our previous single virus imaging data imply that, after Env engagement of CD4 and coreceptors at the cell surface, the virus enters into and fuses with intracellular compartments. We were unable to reliably detect viral fusion at the plasma membrane. Here, we implement a novel virus labeling strategy that biases towards detection of virus fusion that occurs in a pH-neutral environment—at the plasma membrane or, possibly, in early pH-neutral vesicles. Virus particles are co-labeled with an intra-viral content marker, which is released upon fusion, and an extra-viral pH sensor consisting of ecliptic pHluorin fused to the transmembrane domain of ICAM-1. This sensor fully quenches upon virus trafficking to a mildly acidic compartment, thus precluding subsequent detection of viral content release. As an interesting secondary observation, the incorporation of the pH-sensor revealed that HIV-1 particles occasionally shuttle between neutral and acidic compartments in target cells expressing CD4, suggesting a small fraction of viral particles is recycled to the plasma membrane and re-internalized. By imaging viruses bound to living cells, we found that HIV-1 content release in neutral-pH environment was a rare event (~0.4% particles). Surprisingly, viral content release was not significantly reduced by fusion inhibitors, implying that content release was due to spontaneous formation of viral membrane defects occurring at the cell surface. We did not measure a significant occurrence of HIV-1 fusion at neutral pH above this defect-mediated background loss of content, suggesting that the pH sensor may destabilize the membrane of the HIV-1 pseudovirus and, thus, preclude reliable detection of single virus fusion events at neutral pH. PMID:26863211

  4. Visualization of Content Release from Cell Surface-Attached Single HIV-1 Particles Carrying an Extra-Viral Fluorescent pH-Sensor.

    PubMed

    Sood, Chetan; Marin, Mariana; Mason, Caleb S; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 fusion leading to productive entry has long been thought to occur at the plasma membrane. However, our previous single virus imaging data imply that, after Env engagement of CD4 and coreceptors at the cell surface, the virus enters into and fuses with intracellular compartments. We were unable to reliably detect viral fusion at the plasma membrane. Here, we implement a novel virus labeling strategy that biases towards detection of virus fusion that occurs in a pH-neutral environment-at the plasma membrane or, possibly, in early pH-neutral vesicles. Virus particles are co-labeled with an intra-viral content marker, which is released upon fusion, and an extra-viral pH sensor consisting of ecliptic pHluorin fused to the transmembrane domain of ICAM-1. This sensor fully quenches upon virus trafficking to a mildly acidic compartment, thus precluding subsequent detection of viral content release. As an interesting secondary observation, the incorporation of the pH-sensor revealed that HIV-1 particles occasionally shuttle between neutral and acidic compartments in target cells expressing CD4, suggesting a small fraction of viral particles is recycled to the plasma membrane and re-internalized. By imaging viruses bound to living cells, we found that HIV-1 content release in neutral-pH environment was a rare event (~0.4% particles). Surprisingly, viral content release was not significantly reduced by fusion inhibitors, implying that content release was due to spontaneous formation of viral membrane defects occurring at the cell surface. We did not measure a significant occurrence of HIV-1 fusion at neutral pH above this defect-mediated background loss of content, suggesting that the pH sensor may destabilize the membrane of the HIV-1 pseudovirus and, thus, preclude reliable detection of single virus fusion events at neutral pH.

  5. Fusion and quality analysis for remote sensing images using contourlet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2013-05-01

    Recent developments in remote sensing technologies have provided various images with high spatial and spectral resolutions. However, multispectral images have low spatial resolution and panchromatic images have low spectral resolution. Therefore, image fusion techniques are necessary to improve the spatial resolution of spectral images by injecting spatial details of high-resolution panchromatic images. The objective of image fusion is to provide useful information by improving the spatial resolution and the spectral information of the original images. The fusion results can be utilized in various applications, such as military, medical imaging, and remote sensing. This paper addresses two issues in image fusion: i) image fusion method and ii) quality analysis of fusion results. First, a new contourlet-based image fusion method is presented, which is an improvement over the wavelet-based fusion. This fusion method is then applied to a case study to demonstrate its fusion performance. Fusion framework and scheme used in the study are discussed in detail. Second, quality analysis for the fusion results is discussed. We employed various quality metrics in order to analyze the fusion results both spatially and spectrally. Our results indicate that the proposed contourlet-based fusion method performs better than the conventional wavelet-based fusion methods.

  6. Measuring Experiential Avoidance in Adults: The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Jonathan E.; Murrell, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    To date, general levels of experiential avoidance are primarily measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), but it includes items of questionable comprehensibility. The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), previously validated as a measure of experiential avoidance with children and adolescents, was…

  7. Test design description for the Fusion Materials Open Test Assembly (Fusion MOTA-2A): Volume 1A, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    This document encompasses the test requirements, hardware design, fabrication, and safety analysis for the Fusion Materials Open Test Assembly experiment for irradiation in FFTF Cycle 11 (Fusion MOTA-2A). Fusion MOTA is equally shared by the US Fusion Material (DOE), Japanese Fusion Materials (MONBUSHO), and BEATRIX-II (IEA) programs. In the interest of providing optimum use of the irradiation space in the Fusion MOTA-2A and LMR MOTA-1G, eight of the Fusion MOTA canisters will be placed in MOTA-1G and an equal number of LMR canisters placed in Fusion MOTA-2A (Powell/Doran 1988). This eliminates the need to process Fusion MOTA-2A through the IEM cell prior to insertion for FFTF Cycle 11A. The LMR MOTA design and safety analysis (Greenslade 1984) is the basis for much of this design and safety analysis report. This design description and safety analysis for the Fusion MOTA-2A is presented per the outline given in Chapter IV of the FTR User`s Guide (Taylor 1978). 35 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. [Neuropsychiatric sequelae of viral meningitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Jesper; Hjerrild, Simon; Renvillard, Signe Groth; Leutscher, Peter Derek Christian

    2011-10-10

    Viral meningitis is considered to be a benign illness with only mild symptoms. In contrast to viral encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, the prognosis is usually good. However, retrospective studies have demonstrated that patients suffering from viral meningitis may experience cognitive impairment following the acute course of infection. Larger controlled studies are needed to elucidate the potential neuropsychiatric adverse outcome of viral meningitis.

  9. Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armour, Edward A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Muon catalyzed fusion is a process in which a negatively charged muon combines with two nuclei of isotopes of hydrogen, e.g, a proton and a deuteron or a deuteron and a triton, to form a muonic molecular ion in which the binding is so tight that nuclear fusion occurs. The muon is normally released after fusion has taken place and so can catalyze further fusions. As the muon has a mean lifetime of 2.2 microseconds, this is the maximum period over which a muon can participate in this process. This article gives an outline of the history of muon catalyzed fusion from 1947, when it was first realised that such a process might occur, to the present day. It includes a description of the contribution that Drachrnan has made to the theory of muon catalyzed fusion and the influence this has had on the author's research.

  10. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution.

  11. FUSION-COMPETENT STATE INDUCED BY A C-TERMINAL HIV-1 FUSION PEPTIDE IN CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative cycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 begins after fusion of the viral and target-cell membranes. The envelope glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit contains conserved hydrophobic domains that engage and perturb the merging lipid bilayers. In this work, we have characterized the fusion-committed state generated in vesicles by CpreTM, a synthetic peptide derived from the sequence connecting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41. Pre-loading cholesterol-rich vesicles with CpreTM rendered them competent for subsequent lipid-mixing with fluorescently-labeled target vesicles. Highlighting the physiological relevance of the lasting fusion-competent state, the broadly neutralizing antibody 4E10 bound to the CpreTM-primed vesicles and inhibited lipid-mixing. Heterotypic fusion assays disclosed dependence on the lipid composition of the vesicles that acted either as virus or cell membrane surrogates. Lipid-mixing exhibited above all a critical dependence on the cholesterol content in those experiments. We infer that the fusion-competent state described herein resembles bona-fide perturbations generated by the pre-hairpin MPER-TMD connection within the viral membrane. PMID:25617671

  12. Fusion facility siting considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussell, G. T.

    1985-02-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. An important consideration in this regard is site selection. Major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion are examined.

  13. Status of fusion maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission.

  14. Fusion: The controversy continues

    SciTech Connect

    1989-07-01

    Nuclear fusion-the power of the stars that promises mankind an inexhaustible supply of energy-seems concurrently much closer and still distant this month. The recent flurry of announcements concerning the achievement of a cold fusion reaction has-if nothing else-underscored the historic importance of the basic fusion reaction which uses hydrogen ions to fuel an energy-producing reaction.

  15. Peptide and non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Zhao, Qian; Debnath, Asim K

    2002-01-01

    Fusion of the HIV envelope with the target cell membrane is a critical step of HIV entry into the target cell. The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays an important role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV fusion inhibitors. The extracellular domain of gp41 contains three important functional regions, i.e. fusion peptide (FP), N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). The FP region is composed of hydrophobic, glycine-rich residues that are essential for the initial penetration of the target cell membrane. NHR and CHR regions consist of hydrophobic residues, which have the tendency to form alpha-helical coiled coils. During the process of fusion of HIV or HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells, FP inserts into the target cell membrane and subsequently the NHR and CHR regions change conformations and associate with each other to form a fusion-active gp41 core. Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions, designated N- and C-peptides, respectively, have potent inhibitory activity against HIV fusion by binding to the CHR and NHR regions, respectively, to prevent the formation of the fusion-active gp41 core. C-peptide may also bind to FP, thereby blocking its insertion into the target cell membrane. One of the C-peptides, T-20, which is in the phase III clinical trials, has potent in vivo activity against HIV infection and is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion. Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having a mechanism of action similar to the C-peptides. One of the approaches in identifying the inhibitors is to use an immunological assay to screen chemical libraries for the compounds that potentially block the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form a fusion

  16. The herpes simplex virus host shutoff RNase degrades cellular and viral mRNAs made before infection but not viral mRNA made after infection.

    PubMed

    Taddeo, Brunella; Zhang, Weiran; Roizman, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    A herpes simplex virus tegument protein brought into the cell during infection and designated the virion host shutoff protein (VHS) is an endoribonuclease that degrades mRNA. The prevailing view for many years has been that the VHS-RNase does not discriminate between cellular and viral RNAs and that the viruses prevail because the accumulation of viral transcripts outpaces their degradation. Here we report the following. (i) The degradation of viral mRNA made during infection of Vero or HEp-2 cells proceeds at a much-reduced rate compared to that of cellular mRNA. In effect, viral mRNAs are largely stable, whereas cellular mRNAs are rapidly degraded or, in the case of AU-rich mRNA, cleaved and rendered dysfunctional. (ii) In contrast to viral mRNAs made after infection, viral mRNAs expressed by plasmids transfected into cells prior to infection are degraded after infection at a rate comparable to that of cellular mRNAs. Moreover, the mRNA encoded by the transfected plasmid is hyperadenylated in the infected cell. Hyperadenylation but not degradation of mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D. The results indicate that VHS-mRNA discriminates between viral and cellular mRNA but only in the context of infection and that discrimination is not based on the sequence of the mRNA but most likely on one or more viral factors expressed in the infected cell.

  17. Performance analysis of image fusion methods in transform domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoonsuk; Sharifahmadian, Ershad; Latifi, Shahram

    2013-05-01

    Image fusion involves merging two or more images in such a way as to retain the most desirable characteristics of each. There are various image fusion methods and they can be classified into three main categories: i) Spatial domain, ii) Transform domain, and iii) Statistical domain. We focus on the transform domain in this paper as spatial domain methods are primitive and statistical domain methods suffer from a significant increase of computational complexity. In the field of image fusion, performance analysis is important since the evaluation result gives valuable information which can be utilized in various applications, such as military, medical imaging, remote sensing, and so on. In this paper, we analyze and compare the performance of fusion methods based on four different transforms: i) wavelet transform, ii) curvelet transform, iii) contourlet transform and iv) nonsubsampled contourlet transform. Fusion framework and scheme are explained in detail, and two different sets of images are used in our experiments. Furthermore, various performance evaluation metrics are adopted to quantitatively analyze the fusion results. The comparison results show that the nonsubsampled contourlet transform method performs better than the other three methods. During the experiments, we also found out that the decomposition level of 3 showed the best fusion performance, and decomposition levels beyond level-3 did not significantly affect the fusion results.

  18. Cellular sensing of viral DNA and viral evasion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Orzalli, Megan H; Knipe, David M

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells detect foreign DNA introduced as free DNA or as a result of microbial infection, leading to the induction of innate immune responses that block microbial replication and the activation of mechanisms that epigenetically silence the genes encoded by the foreign DNA. A number of DNA sensors localized to a variety of sites within the cell have been identified, and this review focuses on the mechanisms that detect viral DNA and how the resulting responses affect viral infections. Viruses have evolved mechanisms that inhibit these host sensors and signaling pathways, and the study of these antagonistic viral strategies has provided insight into the mechanisms of these host responses. The field of cellular sensing of foreign DNA is in its infancy, but our currently limited knowledge has raised a number of important questions for study.

  19. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  20. Meteorite fusion crust variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaisen, Kevin G.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2009-06-01

    Two assumptions commonly employed in meteorite interpretation are that fusion crust compositions represent the bulk-rock chemistry of the interior meteorite and that the vesicles within the fusion crust result from the release of implanted solar wind volatiles. Electron microprobe analyses of thin sections from lunar meteorite Miller Range (MIL) 05035 and eucrite Bates Nunataks (BTN) 00300 were performed to determine if the chemical compositions of the fusion crust varied and/or represented the published bulk rock composition. It was determined that fusion crust compositions are significantly influenced by the incorporation of fragments from the substrate, and by the composition and grain size of those minerals. Because of compositional heterogeneities throughout the meteorite, one cannot assume that fusion crust composition represents the bulk rock composition. If the compositional variability within the fusion crust and mineralogical differences among thin sections goes unnoticed, then the perceived composition and petrogenetic models of formation will be incorrect. The formation of vesicles within these fusion crusts were also compared to current theories attributing vesicles to a solar wind origin. Previous work from the STONE-5 experiment, where terrestrial rocks were exposed on the exterior of a spacecraft heatshield, produced a vesicular fusion crust without prolonged exposure to solar wind suggesting that the high temperatures experienced by a meteorite during passage through the Earth's atmosphere are sufficient to cause boiling of the melt. Therefore, the assumption that all vesicles found within a fusion crust are due to the release of implanted volatiles of solar wind may not be justified.

  1. Rabies Virus Infection Induces the Formation of Stress Granules Closely Connected to the Viral Factories

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Jovan; Civas, Ahmet; Lagaudrière-Gesbert, Cécile; Blondel, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are membrane-less dynamic structures consisting of mRNA and protein aggregates that form rapidly in response to a wide range of environmental cellular stresses and viral infections. They act as storage sites for translationally silenced mRNAs under stress conditions. During viral infection, SG formation results in the modulation of innate antiviral immune responses, and several viruses have the ability to either promote or prevent SG assembly. Here, we show that rabies virus (RABV) induces SG formation in infected cells, as revealed by the detection of SG-marker proteins Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein 1 (G3BP1), T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA-1) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) in the RNA granules formed during viral infection. As shown by live cell imaging, RABV-induced SGs are highly dynamic structures that increase in number, grow in size by fusion events, and undergo assembly/disassembly cycles. Some SGs localize in close proximity to cytoplasmic viral factories, known as Negri bodies (NBs). Three dimensional reconstructions reveal that both structures remain distinct even when they are in close contact. In addition, viral mRNAs synthesized in NBs accumulate in the SGs during viral infection, revealing material exchange between both compartments. Although RABV-induced SG formation is not affected in MEFs lacking TIA-1, TIA-1 depletion promotes viral translation which results in an increase of viral replication indicating that TIA-1 has an antiviral effect. Inhibition of PKR expression significantly prevents RABV-SG formation and favors viral replication by increasing viral translation. This is correlated with a drastic inhibition of IFN-B gene expression indicating that SGs likely mediate an antiviral response which is however not sufficient to fully counteract RABV infection. PMID:27749929

  2. Computational mechanics of viral capsids.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Melissa M; Perotti, Luigi E; Klug, William S

    2015-01-01

    Viral capsids undergo significant mechanical deformations during their assembly, maturation, and infective life-span. In order to characterize the mechanics of viral capsids, their response to applied external forces is analyzed in several experimental studies using, for instance, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) indentation experiments. In recent years, a broader approach to study the mechanics of viral capsids has leveraged the theoretical tools proper of continuum mechanics. Even though the theory of continuum elasticity is most commonly used to study deformable bodies at larger macroscopic length scales, it has been shown that this very rich theoretical field can still offer useful insights into the mechanics of viral structures at the nanometer scale. Here we show the construction of viral capsid continuum mechanics models starting from different forms of experimental data. We will discuss the kinematics assumptions, the issue of the reference configuration, the material constitutive laws, and the numerical discretization necessary to construct a complete Finite Element capsid mechanical model. Some examples in the second part of the chapter will show the predictive capabilities of the constructed models and underline useful practical aspects related to efficiency and accuracy. We conclude each example by collecting several key findings discovered by simulating AFM indentation experiments using the constructed numerical models.

  3. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  4. Inhibition of cdk9 during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Impedes Viral Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Mark; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2013-01-01

    During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection there is a loss of the serine-2 phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) found in elongation complexes. This occurs in part because RNAP II undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation during times of highly active viral transcription, which may result from stalled elongating complexes. In addition, a viral protein, ICP22, was reported to trigger a loss of serine-2 RNAP II. These findings have led to some speculation that the serine-2 phosphorylated form of RNAP II may not be required for HSV-1 transcription, although this form is required for cellular transcription elongation and RNA processing. Cellular kinase cdk9 phosphorylates serine-2 in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAP II. To determine if serine-2 phosphorylated RNAP II is required for HSV-1 transcription, we inhibited cdk9 during HSV-1 infection and measured viral gene expression. Inhibition was achieved by adding cdk9 inhibitors 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazone-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (DRB) or flavopiridol (FVP) or by expression of a dominant–negative cdk9 or HEXIM1, which in conjunction with 7SK snRNA inhibits cdk9 in complex with cyclin 1. Here we report that inhibition of cdk9 resulted in decreased viral yields and levels of late proteins, poor formation of viral transcription-replication compartments, reduced levels of poly(A)+ mRNA and decreased RNA synthesis as measured by uptake of 5-bromouridine into nascent RNA. Importantly, a global reduction in viral mRNAs was seen as determined by microarray analysis. We conclude that serine-2 phosphorylation of the CTD of RNAP II is required for HSV-1 transcription. PMID:24205359

  5. Progress toward fusion with light ions

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    New results in target design, beam generation and transport, and pulse power technology have led to a program shift stressing light ion-driven inertial confinement fusion. According to present estimates, a gain ten fusion pellet will require at least one megajoule and approx. 100 TW power input. Progress in ion sources has resulted in beam power density of approx. 1 TW/cm/sup 2/, a factor of ten increase over the last year, and cylindrical implosion experiments have been performed. Other experiments have demonstrated the ability to transport ion and electron beams with high efficiency and have confirmed numerical predictions on the properties of beam transport channels converging at a target. These developments together with improvements in pulse power technology allow us to project that the 72 beam, 100 TW Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator, PBFA-II will attain target output energy equal to stored energy in the accelerator.

  6. Fusion peptide of HIV-1 as a site of vulnerability to neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rui; Xu, Kai; Zhou, Tongqing; Acharya, Priyamvada; Lemmin, Thomas; Liu, Kevin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Soto, Cinque; Taft, Justin D; Bailer, Robert T; Cale, Evan M; Chen, Lei; Choi, Chang W; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Gorman, Jason; Huang, Jinghe; Joyce, M Gordon; Louder, Mark K; Ma, Xiaochu; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Pancera, Marie; Yang, Yongping; Blanchard, Scott C; Mothes, Walther; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C; Connors, Mark; Ward, Andrew B; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R

    2016-05-13

    The HIV-1 fusion peptide, comprising 15 to 20 hydrophobic residues at the N terminus of the Env-gp41 subunit, is a critical component of the virus-cell entry machinery. Here, we report the identification of a neutralizing antibody, N123-VRC34.01, which targets the fusion peptide and blocks viral entry by inhibiting conformational changes in gp120 and gp41 subunits of Env required for entry. Crystal structures of N123-VRC34.01 liganded to the fusion peptide, and to the full Env trimer, revealed an epitope consisting of the N-terminal eight residues of the gp41 fusion peptide and glycan N88 of gp120, and molecular dynamics showed that the N-terminal portion of the fusion peptide can be solvent-exposed. These results reveal the fusion peptide to be a neutralizing antibody epitope and thus a target for vaccine design. PMID:27174988

  7. The heads of the measles virus attachment protein move to transmit the fusion-triggering signal

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K; Oezguen, Numan; Rupp, Levi; Kay, Leah; Leonard, Vincent HJ; Braun, Werner; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The measles virus entry system, constituted of attachment (hemagglutinin, H) and fusion proteins, operates based on a variety of natural and targeted receptors. However, the mechanism triggering fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane is not understood. Here we tested a model considering that the two heads of an H-dimer, which are covalently linked at their base, after binding two receptor molecules, move relative to each other to transmit the fusion-triggering signal. Indeed, stabilizing the H-dimer interface by additional inter-molecular disulfide bonds prevented membrane fusion, an effect reversed by a reducing agent. Moreover, a membrane-anchored designated receptor efficiently triggered fusion, provided it engaged the H-dimer at locations proximal to where the natural receptors bind, and distal to the H-dimer interface. We discuss how receptors may force H-heads to switch partners and transmit the fusion-triggering signal. PMID:21217701

  8. Structure of the uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus (hPIV3) fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Paterson, Reay G.; Wen, Xiaolin; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2005-01-01

    Class I viral fusion proteins share common mechanistic and structural features but little sequence similarity. Structural insights into the protein conformational changes associated with membrane fusion are based largely on studies of the influenza virus hemagglutinin in pre- and postfusion conformations. Here, we present the crystal structure of the secreted, uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus, human parainfluenza virus 3 fusion (F) protein, a member of the class I viral fusion protein group. The secreted human parainfluenza virus 3 F forms a trimer with distinct head, neck, and stalk regions. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals a six-helix bundle associated with the postfusion form of F, suggesting that the anchor-minus ectodomain adopts a conformation largely similar to the postfusion state. The transmembrane anchor domains of F may therefore profoundly influence the folding energetics that establish and maintain a metastable, prefusion state. PMID:15964978

  9. Structure of the uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus (hPIV3) fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Paterson, Reay G.; Wen, Xiaolin; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    Class I viral fusion proteins share common mechanistic and structural features but little sequence similarity. Structural insights into the protein conformational changes associated with membrane fusion are based largely on studies of the influenza virus hemagglutinin in pre- and postfusion conformations. Here, we present the crystal structure of the secreted, uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus, human parainfluenza virus 3 fusion (F) protein, a member of the class I viral fusion protein group. The secreted human parainfluenza virus 3 F forms a trimer with distinct head, neck, and stalk regions. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals a six-helix bundle associated with the postfusion form of F, suggesting that the anchor-minus ectodomain adopts a conformation largely similar to the postfusion state. The transmembrane anchor domains of F may therefore profoundly influence the folding energetics that establish and maintain a metastable, prefusion state.

  10. Noncoding RNPs of viral origin.

    PubMed

    Steitz, Joan; Borah, Sumit; Cazalla, Demian; Fok, Victor; Lytle, Robin; Mitton-Fry, Rachel; Riley, Kasandra; Samji, Tasleem

    2011-03-01

    Like their host cells, many viruses produce noncoding (nc)RNAs. These show diversity with respect to time of expression during viral infection, length and structure, protein-binding partners and relative abundance compared with their host-cell counterparts. Viruses, with their limited genomic capacity, presumably evolve or acquire ncRNAs only if they selectively enhance the viral life cycle or assist the virus in combating the host's response to infection. Despite much effort, identifying the functions of viral ncRNAs has been extremely challenging. Recent technical advances and enhanced understanding of host-cell ncRNAs promise accelerated insights into the RNA warfare mounted by this fascinating class of RNPs. PMID:20719877

  11. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-05-15

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  12. Observation of incomplete fusion reactions at l < l {sub crit}

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Abhishek Sharma, Vijay R. Singh, Devendra P. Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Bala, Indu; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Sharma, M. K.

    2014-08-14

    In order to understand the presence of incomplete fusion at low energies i.e. 4-7MeV/nucleon and also to study its dependence on various entrance-channel parameters, the two type of measurements (i) excitation function for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb, and (ii) forward recoil ranges for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb systems have been performed. The experimentally measured excitation functions have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus decay using statistical model code PACE4. Analysis of data suggests the production of xn/px)n-channels via complete fusion, as these are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, while, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of α-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones, which has been attributed due to the incomplete fusion processes. Further, the incomplete fusion events observed in case of forward recoil range measurements have been explained on the basis of the breakup fusion model, where these events may be attributed to the fusion of {sup 8}Be and/or {sup 4}He from {sup 12}C projectile to the target nucleus. In the present work, the SUMRULE model calculations are found to highly underestimate the observed incomplete fusion cross-sections which indicate that the l-values lower than l {sub crit} (limit of complete fusion) significantly contribute to the incomplete fusion reactions.

  13. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B.; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge—a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry. PMID:26730950

  14. Induction of Cell-Cell Fusion by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein: Low pH Is Not a Trigger.

    PubMed

    Markosyan, Ruben M; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Melikyan, Gregory B; Liu, Shan-Lu; Cohen, Fredric S

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans and animals. Currently, how EBOV fuses its envelope membrane within an endosomal membrane to cause infection is poorly understood. We successfully measure cell-cell fusion mediated by the EBOV fusion protein, GP, assayed by the transfer of both cytoplasmic and membrane dyes. A small molecule fusion inhibitor, a neutralizing antibody, as well as mutations in EBOV GP known to reduce viral infection, all greatly reduce fusion. By monitoring redistribution of small aqueous dyes between cells and by electrical capacitance measurements, we discovered that EBOV GP-mediated fusion pores do not readily enlarge-a marked difference from the behavior of other viral fusion proteins. EBOV GP must be cleaved by late endosome-resident cathepsins B or L in order to become fusion-competent. Cleavage of cell surface-expressed GP appears to occur in endosomes, as evidenced by the fusion block imposed by cathepsin inhibitors, agents that raise endosomal pH, or an inhibitor of anterograde trafficking. Treating effector cells with a recombinant soluble cathepsin B or thermolysin, which cleaves GP into an active form, increases the extent of fusion, suggesting that a fraction of surface-expressed GP is not cleaved. Whereas the rate of fusion is increased by a brief exposure to acidic pH, fusion does occur at neutral pH. Importantly, the extent of fusion is independent of external pH in experiments in which cathepsin activity is blocked and EBOV GP is cleaved by thermolysin. These results imply that low pH promotes fusion through the well-known pH-dependent activity of cathepsins; fusion induced by cleaved EBOV GP is a process that is fundamentally independent of pH. The cell-cell fusion system has revealed some previously unappreciated features of EBOV entry, which could not be readily elucidated in the context of endosomal entry.

  15. [Emerging viral diseases in Europe].

    PubMed

    Löbermann, M; Gürtler, L G; Eichler-Löbermann, B; Reisinger, E C

    2012-04-01

    Emergence of viral agents in Europe is influenced by various factors. Climatic changes influencing possible vectors, insufficient vaccination, and travel of man and goods are among the most important reasons to explain these changes. Fever and arthralgia are the leading symptoms in infection with Dengue, Sindbis, or Chikungunya virus. In contrast, tick-born encephalitis (TBE), Toscana, or West Nile virus infections mainly lead to meningo-encephalitis. In Europe, hemorrhagic fever is caused by Crimean Congo and Hanta virus. Protective vaccines are available for emerging viral agents like TBE, influenza and measles.

  16. Viral IAPs, then and now.

    PubMed

    Clem, Rollie J

    2015-03-01

    The identification, now more than 20 years ago, of the first iap genes in baculoviruses subsequently led to many important discoveries concerning the regulation of apoptosis and other important biological processes in insects and mammals. Currently there are more than 200 known viral IAP homologs in baculoviruses and other families of invertebrate DNA viruses. This review begins with a personal account of the events leading up to the discovery of the first iap genes, followed by a summary of what is currently known about the different types of viral IAPs and their functions in regulating apoptosis, and possibly other cellular processes.

  17. Coatings for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1981-12-18

    Optical coatings are used in lasers systems for fusion research to control beam propagation and reduce surface reflection losses. The performance of coatings is important in the design, reliability, energy output, and cost of the laser systems. Significant developments in coating technology are required for future lasers for fusion research and eventual power reactors.

  18. Fusion Science Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, C. A.; DIII-D Education Group

    1996-11-01

    This presentation will focus on education outreach activities at General Atomics that have been expanded to include the general population on science education with a focus on fusion energy. Outreach materials are distributed upon request both nationally and internationally. These materials include a notebook containing copies of DIII--D tour panels, fusion poster, new fusion energy video, new fusion energy brochure, and the electromagnetic spectrum curriculum. The 1996 Fusion Forum (held in the House Caucus Room) included a student/ teacher lunch with Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary and a private visit to the Forum exhibits. The continuing partnership with Kearny High School includes lectures, job shadowing, internship, equipment donations and an award-winning electric car-racing program. Development of distribution by CD of the existing interactive fusion energy kiosk and a virtual reality tour of the DIII--D facility are underway. The DIII--D fusion education WWW site includes e-mail addresses to ``Ask the Wizard,'' and/or receive GA's outreach materials. Steve Rodecker, a local science teacher, aided by DIII--D fusion staff, won his second Tapestry Award; he also was named the ``1995 National Science Teacher of the Year'' and will be present to share his experiences with the DIII--D educational outreach program.

  19. Controlled Nuclear Fusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasstone, Samuel

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by The United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Importance of Fusion Energy; Conditions for Nuclear Fusion; Thermonuclear Reactions in Plasmas; Plasma Confinement by Magnetic Fields; Experiments With Plasmas; High-Temperature…

  20. Two Horizons of Fusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Mun Ling; Chik, Pakey Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to differentiate the internal and external horizons of "fusion." "Fusion" in the internal horizon relates to the structure and meaning of the object of learning as experienced by the learner. It clarifies the interrelationships among an object's critical features and aspects. It also illuminates the…

  1. Detection of viral infections using colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentzen, Elizabeth L.; House, Frances S.; Utley, Thomas J.; Crowe, James E., Jr.; Wright, David W.

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence is a tool widely employed in biological assays. Fluorescent semiconducting nanocrystals, quantum dots (QDs), are beginning to find their way into the tool box of many biologist, chemist and biochemist. These quantum dots are an attractive alternative to the traditional organic dyes due to their broad excitation spectra, narrow emission spectra and photostability. Quantum dots were used to detect and monitor the progession of viral glycoproteins, F (fusion) and G (attachment), from Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in HEp-2 cells. Additionally, oligo-Qdot RNA probes have been developed for identification and detection of mRNA of the N(nucleocapsid) protein for RSV. The use of quantum dot-FISH probes provides another confirmatory route to diagnostics as well as a new class of probes for monitoring the flux and fate of viral RNA RSV is the most common cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. Antiviral therapy is available for treatment of RSV but is only effective if given within the first 48 hours of infection. Existing test methods require a virus level of at least 1000-fold of the amount needed for infection of most children and require several days to weeks to obtain results. The use of quantum dots may provide an early, rapid method for detection and provide insight into the trafficking of viral proteins during the course of infection.

  2. Cdc42 controls the dilation of the exocytotic fusion pore by regulating membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Bretou, Marine; Jouannot, Ouardane; Fanget, Isabelle; Pierobon, Paolo; Larochette, Nathanaël; Gestraud, Pierre; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina; Gasman, Stéphane; Desnos, Claire; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Darchen, François

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion underlies multiple processes, including exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membrane fusion starts with the formation of a narrow fusion pore. Radial expansion of this pore completes the process and allows fast release of secretory compounds, but this step remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibiting the expression of the small GTPase Cdc42 or preventing its activation with a dominant negative Cdc42 construct in human neuroendocrine cells impaired the release process by compromising fusion pore enlargement. Consequently the mode of vesicle exocytosis was shifted from full-collapse fusion to kiss-and-run. Remarkably, Cdc42-knockdown cells showed reduced membrane tension, and the artificial increase of membrane tension restored fusion pore enlargement. Moreover, inhibiting the motor protein myosin II by blebbistatin decreased membrane tension, as well as fusion pore dilation. We conclude that membrane tension is the driving force for fusion pore dilation and that Cdc42 is a key regulator of this force. PMID:25143404

  3. Viral subversion of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, Melanie L; Mata, Miguel A; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2014-02-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Because of its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, whereas viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. As viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. This review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens.

  4. Asian citrus psyllid viral pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly discovered viral pathogen of Asian citrus psyllid, AsCP, Diaphorina citri, Kuwayama (Psyllidae: Hemiptera) was classified as a Reoviridae. This virus may serve as a biological control agent for AsCP. The AsCP is an efficient vector of the plant-infecting bacterium (Candidatus Liberibacter as...

  5. Viral Subversion of Nucleocytoplasmic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Mata, Miguel A.; Sakthivel, Ramanavelan; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of proteins and RNA into and out of the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to its critical function in many cellular processes, the NPC and transport factors are common targets of several viruses that disrupt key constituents of the machinery to facilitate viral replication. Many viruses such as poliovirus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus inhibit protein import into the nucleus, while viruses such as influenza A virus target and disrupt host mRNA nuclear export. Current evidence indicates that these viruses may employ such strategies to avert the host immune response. Conversely, many viruses co-opt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to facilitate transport of viral RNAs. Since viral proteins interact with key regulators of the host nuclear transport machinery, viruses have served as invaluable tools of discovery that led to the identification of novel constituents of nuclear transport pathways. In addition, this review explores the importance of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to viral pathogenesis as these studies revealed new antiviral therapeutic strategies and exposed previously unknown cellular mechanisms. Further understanding of nuclear transport pathways will determine whether such therapeutics will be useful treatments for important human pathogens. PMID:24289861

  6. The Paradigm of Viral Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welker, Carl B.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces the concepts of idea viruses and viral communication, a technology-based communication that spreads ideas quickly. Explains its applicability in the area of direct marketing and discusses a technology platform that provides the opportunity of sending a message to a large number of people and emotional or pecuniary incentives to…

  7. Nosocomial Spread of Viral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Celia; Jeffries, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are important causes of nosocomial infection, but the fact that hospital outbreaks often result from introduction(s) from community-based epidemics, together with the need to initiate specific laboratory testing, means that there are usually insufficient data to allow the monitoring of trends in incidences. The most important defenses against nosocomial transmission of viruses are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. Protocols must be available to assist in the management of patients with suspected or confirmed viral infection in the health care setting. In this review, we present details on general measures to prevent the spread of viral infection in hospitals and other health care environments. These include principles of accommodation of infected patients and approaches to good hygiene and patient management. They provide detail on individual viral diseases accompanied in each case with specific information on control of the infection and, where appropriate, details of preventive and therapeutic measures. The important areas of nosocomial infection due to blood-borne viruses have been extensively reviewed previously and are summarized here briefly, with citation of selected review articles. Human prion diseases, which present management problems very different from those of viral infection, are not included. PMID:11432812

  8. ConnesFusionTensorProduct/Photon GluonFusion in Mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wh-Maksoed, Prodi Of Physics Ui, Depok 16415-Indonesia; Ssi, Wh-Maksoed

    2016-05-01

    As in AJ Wassermann distinguished of classical invariant theory & quantum invariant theory subfactor, in S. Palcoux:``From Neveu-Schwarz Subfactors & Connes Fusion'' described the subfactor theory & Witt-algebra whereas Andreas Thom's explanation about ConnesFusionTensorProduct/CFTP related Connes fusion to composition of homomorphism (i). classical tensor product O-X adds the changes,(ii). Relative tensor product H-X preserve the changes. For photonGluonFusion/PGF defined:''photon is the gauge boson of QED, the simplest of all boson'' devotes to CFT as ``quantum field theory which are invariant under conformal transformation & in 2D there are infinite dimensional algebra. Alain Connes states theirselves Connes fusion as ``associative tensor operation'' to be in coincidences with ``their dynamic behavior driven by the balance in mitochondrial fusion & fission (Carveney, 2007) from Peter Alexander Williams: ``Retinal neuronal remodeling in a model of Optic Atrophy'', Dec, 2011. Great acknowledged to the VicePresident of the R.I, HE.Mr. Drs. M. JUSUF KALLA.

  9. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  10. Autistic disorder and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Libbey, Jane E; Sweeten, Thayne L; McMahon, William M; Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-02-01

    Autistic disorder (autism) is a behaviorally defined developmental disorder with a wide range of behaviors. Although the etiology of autism is unknown, data suggest that autism results from multiple etiologies with both genetic and environmental contributions, which may explain the spectrum of behaviors seen in this disorder. One proposed etiology for autism is viral infection very early in development. The mechanism, by which viral infection may lead to autism, be it through direct infection of the central nervous system (CNS), through infection elsewhere in the body acting as a trigger for disease in the CNS, through alteration of the immune response of the mother or offspring, or through a combination of these, is not yet known. Animal models in which early viral infection results in behavioral changes later in life include the influenza virus model in pregnant mice and the Borna disease virus model in newborn Lewis rats. Many studies over the years have presented evidence both for and against the association of autism with various viral infections. The best association to date has been made between congenital rubella and autism; however, members of the herpes virus family may also have a role in autism. Recently, controversy has arisen as to the involvement of measles virus and/or the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in the development of autism. Biological assays lend support to the association between measles virus or MMR and autism whereas epidemiologic studies show no association between MMR and autism. Further research is needed to clarify both the mechanisms whereby viral infection early in development may lead to autism and the possible involvement of the MMR vaccine in the development of autism.

  11. Fusion Physics Toward ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambaugh, R. D.

    2006-04-01

    Stars are powered by fusion, the energy released by fusing together light nuclei, using gravitational confinement of plasma. Fusion on earth will be done in a 100 million degree plasma made of deuterium and tritium and confined by magnetic fields or inertia. The worldwide fusion research community will construct ITER, the first experiment that will burn a DT plasma by copious fusion reactions. ITER's nominal goal is to create 500 MW of fusion power. An energy gain of 10 will mean the plasma is dominantly self-heated by the fusion-produced alpha particles. ITER's all superconducting magnet technology and steady-state heat removal technology will enable nominal 400 s pulses to allow the study of burning plasmas on the longest intrinsic timescale of the confined plasma - diffusive redistribution of the electrical currents in the plasma. The advances in magnetic confinement physics that have led to this opportunity will be described, as well as the research opportunities afforded by ITER. The physics of confining stable plasmas and heating them will produce the high gain state in ITER. Sustained burn will come from the physics of controlling currents in plasmas and how the hot plasma is interfaced to its room temperature surroundings. ITER will provide our first experience with how fusion plasma self-heating will profoundly affect the complex, interlinked physical processes that occur in confined plasmas.

  12. Fusion Studies in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    A new strategic energy plan decided by the Japanese Cabinet in 2014 strongly supports the steady promotion of nuclear fusion development activities, including the ITER project and the Broader Approach activities from the long-term viewpoint. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in Japan formulated the Third Phase Basic Program so as to promote an experimental fusion reactor project. In 2005 AEC has reviewed this Program, and discussed on selection and concentration among many projects of fusion reactor development. In addition to the promotion of ITER project, advanced tokamak research by JT-60SA, helical plasma experiment by LHD, FIREX project in laser fusion research and fusion engineering by IFMIF were highly prioritized. Although the basic concept is quite different between tokamak, helical and laser fusion researches, there exist a lot of common features such as plasma physics on 3-D magnetic geometry, high power heat load on plasma facing component and so on. Therefore, a synergetic scenario on fusion reactor development among various plasma confinement concepts would be important.

  13. Characterization of Potent Fusion Inhibitors of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rowse, Michael; Qiu, Shihong; Tsao, Jun; Xian, Tongmei; Khawaja, Sarah; Yamauchi, Yohei; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Guoxin; Luo, Ming

    2015-01-01

    New inhibitors of influenza viruses are needed to combat the potential emergence of novel human influenza viruses. We have identified a class of small molecules that inhibit replication of influenza virus at picomolar concentrations in plaque reduction assays. The compound also inhibits replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. Time of addition and dilution experiments with influenza virus indicated that an early time point of infection was blocked and that inhibitor 136 tightly bound to virions. Using fluorescently labeled influenza virus, inhibition of viral fusion to cellular membranes by blocked lipid mixing was established as the mechanism of action for this class of inhibitors. Stabilization of the neutral pH form of hemagglutinin (HA) was ruled out by trypsin digestion studies in vitro and with conformation specific HA antibodies within cells. Direct visualization of 136 treated influenza virions at pH 7.5 or acidified to pH 5.0 showed that virions remain intact and that glycoproteins become disorganized as expected when HA undergoes a conformational change. This suggests that exposure of the fusion peptide at low pH is not inhibited but lipid mixing is inhibited, a different mechanism than previously reported fusion inhibitors. We hypothesize that this new class of inhibitors intercalate into the virus envelope altering the structure of the viral envelope required for fusion to cellular membranes. PMID:25803288

  14. An Anti-Influenza Virus Antibody Inhibits Viral Infection by Reducing Nucleus Entry of Influenza Nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Aerin; Yi, Kye Sook; Chang, So Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Song, Manki; Choi, Jung Ah; Bourgeois, Melissa; Hossain, M Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Donis, Ruben O; Kim, Hyori; Lee, Yujean; Hwang, Do Been; Min, Ji-Young; Chang, Shin Jae; Chung, Junho

    2015-01-01

    To date, four main mechanisms mediating inhibition of influenza infection by anti-hemagglutinin antibodies have been reported. Anti-globular-head-domain antibodies block either influenza virus receptor binding to the host cell or progeny virion release from the host cell. Anti-stem region antibodies hinder the membrane fusion process or induce antibody-dependent cytotoxicity to infected cells. In this study we identified a human monoclonal IgG1 antibody (CT302), which does not inhibit both the receptor binding and the membrane fusion process but efficiently reduced the nucleus entry of viral nucleoprotein suggesting a novel inhibition mechanism of viral infection by antibody. This antibody binds to the subtype-H3 hemagglutinin globular head domain of group-2 influenza viruses circulating throughout the population between 1997 and 2007. PMID:26512723

  15. An Anti-Influenza Virus Antibody Inhibits Viral Infection by Reducing Nucleus Entry of Influenza Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Aerin; Yi, Kye Sook; Chang, So Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Song, Manki; Choi, Jung Ah; Bourgeois, Melissa; Hossain, M. Jaber; Chen, Li-Mei; Donis, Ruben O.; Kim, Hyori; Lee, Yujean; Hwang, Do Been; Min, Ji-Young; Chang, Shin Jae; Chung, Junho

    2015-01-01

    To date, four main mechanisms mediating inhibition of influenza infection by anti-hemagglutinin antibodies have been reported. Anti-globular-head-domain antibodies block either influenza virus receptor binding to the host cell or progeny virion release from the host cell. Anti-stem region antibodies hinder the membrane fusion process or induce antibody-dependent cytotoxicity to infected cells. In this study we identified a human monoclonal IgG1 antibody (CT302), which does not inhibit both the receptor binding and the membrane fusion process but efficiently reduced the nucleus entry of viral nucleoprotein suggesting a novel inhibition mechanism of viral infection by antibody. This antibody binds to the subtype-H3 hemagglutinin globular head domain of group-2 influenza viruses circulating throughout the population between 1997 and 2007. PMID:26512723

  16. Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases 2016 Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral infections of the avian gastrointestinal tract negatively impact poultry production; however, determining the complex etiologies of the viral enteric diseases in poultry has been difficult. Project scientists are continuing to investigate the species specificity, molecular phylogenetics, and p...

  17. Exploring the viral world through metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Karyna; Breitbart, Mya

    2011-10-01

    Viral metagenomics, or shotgun sequencing of purified viral particles, has revolutionized the field of environmental virology by allowing the exploration of viral communities in a variety of sample types throughout the biosphere. The introduction of viral metagenomics has demonstrated that dominant viruses in environmental communities are not well-represented by the cultured viruses in existing sequence databases. Viral metagenomic studies have provided insights into viral ecology by elucidating the genetic potential, community structure, and biogeography of environmental viruses. In addition, viral metagenomics has expanded current knowledge of virus-host interactions by uncovering genes that may allow viruses to manipulate their hosts in unexpected ways. The intrinsic potential for virus discovery through viral metagenomics can help advance a wide array of disciplines including evolutionary biology, pathogen surveillance, and biotechnology.

  18. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  19. Replication of parainfluenza (Sendai) virus in isolated rat pulmonary type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, W. L.; Northrop, P. J.; McAllister, P. K.

    1989-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were to determine whether alveolar type II epithelial cells isolated from rat lung and maintained in tissue culture would support productive replication of parainfluenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and to determine whether isolated type II cells from neonatal (5-day-old) rats that are more susceptible to viral-induced alveolar dysplasia supported viral replication to a greater extent than those from weanling (25-day-old) rats. Isolated and cultured type II cells from neonatal and weanling rats that were inoculated with Sendai virus supported productive replication as indicated by ultrastructural identification of budding virions and viral nucleocapsids in type II cells and by demonstration of rising titers of infectious virus from inoculated type II cell cultures. Alveolar macrophages from neonatal and weanling rats also supported viral replication, although infectious viral titers in macrophage cultures were lower than those from type II cell cultures. Only minor differences were detected between viral titers from neonatal and weanling type II epithelial cell cultures. Higher densities of viral nucleocapsids were observed in neonatal type II cells than in those from weanling rats. The results indicate that isolated type II alveolar epithelial cells support productive replication of parainfluenza virus and that type II cells are probably more efficient in supporting productive viral replication than are alveolar macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2541612

  20. Magnetic systems for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, C.D.

    1985-02-01

    Mirror experiments have led the way in applying superconductivity to fusion research because of unique requirements for high and steady magnetic fields. The first significant applications were Baseball II at LLNL and IMP at ORNL. More recently, the MFTF-B yin-yang coil was successfully tested and the entire tandem configuration is nearing completion. Tokamak magnets have also enjoyed recent success with the large coil project tests at ORNL, preceded by single coil tests in Japan and Germany. In the USSR, the T-7 Tokamak has been operational for many years and the T-15 Tokamak is under construction, with the TF coils nearing completion. Also the Tore Supra is being built in France.

  1. Dynamics of filamentous viral RNPs prior to egress.

    PubMed

    Santangelo, Philip J; Bao, Gang

    2007-01-01

    The final step in the maturation of paramyxoviruses, orthomyxoviruses and viruses of several other families, entails the budding of the viral nucleocapsid through the plasma membrane of the host cell. Many medically important viruses, such as influenza, parainfluenza, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Ebola, can form filamentous particles when budding. Although filamentous virions have been previously studied, details of how viral filaments bud from the plasma membrane remain largely unknown. Using molecular beacon (MB)-fluorescent probes to image the viral genomic RNA (vRNA) of human RSV (hRSV) in live Vero cells, the dynamics of assembled viral filaments was observed to consist of three primary types of motion prior to egress from the plasma membrane: (i) filament projection and rotation, (ii) migration and (iii) non-directed motion. In addition, from information gained by imaging the 3D distribution of cellular vRNA, observing and characterizing vRNA dynamics, imaging vRNA/Myosin Va colocalization, and studying the effects of cytochalasin D (actin depolymerizing agent) exposure, a model for filamentous virion egress is presented.

  2. Characterization of HCoV-229E fusion core: Implications for structure basis of coronavirus membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Cheng; Feng Youjun; Gao Feng; Zhang Qiangmin; Wang Ming . E-mail: vetdean@cau.edu.cn

    2006-07-07

    Human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E), a member of group I coronaviruses, has been identified as one of the major viral agents causing respiratory tract diseases in humans for nearly 40 years. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of the membrane fusion mediated by the spike (S) protein of HCoV-229E remains elusive. Here, we report, for the first time, a rationally designed fusion core of HCoV-229E (HR1-SGGRGG-HR2), which was in vitro produced in GST prokaryotic expression system. Multiple lines of experimental data including gel-filtration, chemical cross-linking, and circular diagram (CD) demonstrated that the HCoV-229E fusion core possesses the typical properties of the trimer of coiled-coil heterodimer (six {alpha}-helix bundle). 3D structure modeling presents its most-likely structure, similar to those of coronaviruses that have been well-documented. Collectively, HCoV-229E S protein belongs to the type I fusion protein, which is characterized by the existence of two heptad-repeat regions (HR1 and HR2), furthermore, the available knowledge concerning HCoV-229E fusion core may make it possible to design small molecule or polypeptide drugs targeting the membrane fusion, a crucial step of HCoV-229E infection.

  3. Some new inequalities for continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Yun-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs which are extensions of discrete fusion frames and continuous frames. The study of equalities and inequalities for various frames has seen great achievements. In this paper, using operator methods we establish some new inequalities for continuous fusion frames and fusion pairs. Our results extend and improve ones obtained by Balan, Casazza and Găvruţa. PMID:27652173

  4. Relating influenza virus membrane fusion kinetics to stoichiometry of neutralizing antibodies at the single-particle level.

    PubMed

    Otterstrom, Jason J; Brandenburg, Boerries; Koldijk, Martin H; Juraszek, Jarek; Tang, Chan; Mashaghi, Samaneh; Kwaks, Ted; Goudsmit, Jaap; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H E; van Oijen, Antoine M

    2014-12-01

    The ability of antibodies binding the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) protein to neutralize viral infectivity is of key importance in the design of next-generation vaccines and for prophylactic and therapeutic use. The two antibodies CR6261 and CR8020 have recently been shown to efficiently neutralize influenza A infection by binding to and inhibiting the influenza A HA protein that is responsible for membrane fusion in the early steps of viral infection. Here, we use single-particle fluorescence microscopy to correlate the number of antibodies or antibody fragments (Fab) bound to an individual virion with the capacity of the same virus particle to undergo membrane fusion. To this end, individual, infectious virus particles bound by fluorescently labeled antibodies/Fab are visualized as they fuse to a planar, supported lipid bilayer. The fluorescence intensity arising from the virus-bound antibodies/Fab is used to determine the number of molecules attached to viral HA while a fluorescent marker in the viral membrane is used to simultaneously obtain kinetic information on the fusion process. We experimentally determine that the stoichiometry required for fusion inhibition by both antibody and Fab leaves large numbers of unbound HA epitopes on the viral surface. Kinetic measurements of the fusion process reveal that those few particles capable of fusion at high antibody/Fab coverage display significantly slower hemifusion kinetics. Overall, our results support a membrane fusion mechanism requiring the stochastic, coordinated action of multiple HA trimers and a model of fusion inhibition by stem-binding antibodies through disruption of this coordinated action.

  5. Limonium sinense and gallic acid suppress hepatitis C virus infection by blocking early viral entry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Chan; Chang, Shun-Pang; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Li, Chia-Lin; Richardson, Christopher D; Lin, Chun-Ching; Lin, Liang-Tzung

    2015-06-01

    A preventive vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains unavailable and newly developed drugs against viral replication are complicated by potential drug-resistance and high cost. These issues justify the need to develop alternative antiviral agents and expand the scope of strategies for the treatment of hepatitis C, such as targeting viral entry. In this study, we explore the bioactivity of Limonium sinense (L. sinense) and its purified constituents against HCV life cycle using subgenomic replicon and infectious HCV culture systems. Data indicated that the water extract from the underground part of L. sinense (LS-UW) exhibited potent inhibitory activity against HCV at non-cytotoxic concentrations. LS-UW targeted early HCV infection without affecting viral replication, translation, and cell-to-cell transmission, and blocked viral attachment and post-attachment entry/fusion steps. Bioactivity analysis of major constituents from LS-UW through viral infectivity/entry assays revealed that gallic acid (GA) also inhibits HCV entry. Furthermore, both LS-UW and GA could suppress HCV infection of primary human hepatocytes. Due to their potency and ability to target HCV early viral entry, LS-UW and GA may be of value for further development as prospective antivirals against HCV.

  6. Limonium sinense and gallic acid suppress hepatitis C virus infection by blocking early viral entry.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Chan; Chang, Shun-Pang; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Li, Chia-Lin; Richardson, Christopher D; Lin, Chun-Ching; Lin, Liang-Tzung

    2015-06-01

    A preventive vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains unavailable and newly developed drugs against viral replication are complicated by potential drug-resistance and high cost. These issues justify the need to develop alternative antiviral agents and expand the scope of strategies for the treatment of hepatitis C, such as targeting viral entry. In this study, we explore the bioactivity of Limonium sinense (L. sinense) and its purified constituents against HCV life cycle using subgenomic replicon and infectious HCV culture systems. Data indicated that the water extract from the underground part of L. sinense (LS-UW) exhibited potent inhibitory activity against HCV at non-cytotoxic concentrations. LS-UW targeted early HCV infection without affecting viral replication, translation, and cell-to-cell transmission, and blocked viral attachment and post-attachment entry/fusion steps. Bioactivity analysis of major constituents from LS-UW through viral infectivity/entry assays revealed that gallic acid (GA) also inhibits HCV entry. Furthermore, both LS-UW and GA could suppress HCV infection of primary human hepatocytes. Due to their potency and ability to target HCV early viral entry, LS-UW and GA may be of value for further development as prospective antivirals against HCV. PMID:25865056

  7. Sulfated polysaccharide, curdlan sulfate, efficiently prevents entry/fusion and restricts antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection in vitro: a possible candidate for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Koji; Gopala Reddy, Sindhoora Bhargavi; Zhang, Li Feng; Chin, Wei Xin; Muschin, Tegshi; Heinig, Lars; Suzuki, Youichi; Nanjundappa, Haraprasad; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Ryo, Akihide; Nomura, Nobuo; Ooi, Eng Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Yoshida, Takashi; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Curdlan sulfate (CRDS), a sulfated 1→3-β-D glucan, previously shown to be a potent HIV entry inhibitor, is characterized in this study as a potent inhibitor of the Dengue virus (DENV). CRDS was identified by in silico blind docking studies to exhibit binding potential to the envelope (E) protein of the DENV. CRDS was shown to inhibit the DENV replication very efficiently in different cells in vitro. Minimal effective concentration of CRDS was as low as 0.1 µg/mL in LLC-MK2 cells, and toxicity was observed only at concentrations over 10 mg/mL. CRDS can also inhibit DENV-1, 3, and 4 efficiently. CRDS did not inhibit the replication of DENV subgenomic replicon. Time of addition experiments demonstrated that the compound not only inhibited viral infection at the host cell binding step, but also at an early post-attachment step of entry (membrane fusion). The direct binding of CRDS to DENV was suggested by an evident reduction in the viral titers after interaction of the virus with CRDS following an ultrafiltration device separation, as well as after virus adsorption to an alkyl CRDS-coated membrane filter. The electron microscopic features also showed that CRDS interacted directly with the viral envelope, and caused changes to the viral surface. CRDS also potently inhibited DENV infection in DC-SIGN expressing cells as well as the antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV-2 infection. Based on these data, a probable binding model of CRDS to DENV E protein was constructed by a flexible receptor and ligand docking study. The binding site of CRDS was predicted to be at the interface between domains II and III of E protein dimer, which is unique to this compound, and is apparently different from the β-OG binding site. Since CRDS has already been tested in humans without serious side effects, its clinical application can be considered.

  8. Viral dynamics in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, M A; Bonhoeffer, S; Hill, A M; Boehme, R; Thomas, H C; McDade, H

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine leads to a rapid decline in plasma viremia and provides estimates for crucial kinetic constants of HBV replication. We find that in persistently infected patients, HBV particles are cleared from the plasma with a half-life of approximately 1.0 day, which implies a 50% daily turnover of the free virus population. Total viral release into the periphery is approximately 10(11) virus particles per day. Although we have no direct measurement of the infected cell mass, we can estimate the turnover rate of these cells in two ways: (i) by comparing the rate of viral production before and after therapy or (ii) from the decline of hepatitis B antigen during treatment. These two independent methods give equivalent results: we find a wide distribution of half-lives for virus-producing cells, ranging from 10 to 100 days in different patients, which may reflect differences in rates of lysis of infected cells by immune responses. Our analysis provides a quantitative understanding of HBV replication dynamics in vivo and has implications for the optimal timing of drug treatment and immunotherapy in chronic HBV infection. This study also represents a comparison for recent findings on the dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The total daily production of plasma virus is, on average, higher in chronic HBV carriers than in HIV-infected patients, but the half-life of virus-producing cells is much shorter in HIV. Most strikingly, there is no indication of drug resistance in HBV-infected patients treated for up to 24 weeks. PMID:8633078

  9. Inertial fusion commercial power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, B. Grant

    1994-09-01

    This presentation discusses the motivation for inertial fusion energy, a brief synopsis of five recently-completed inertial fusion power plant designs, some general conclusions drawn from these studies, and an exmaple of an IEE hydrogen synfuel plant to suggest that future fusion studies consider broadening fusion use to low-emission fuels production as well as electricity.

  10. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  11. Fusion-power demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, C. D.; Logan, B. G.; Carlson, G. A.; Neef, W. S.; Moir, R. W.; Campbell, R. B.; Botwin, R.; Clarkson, I. R.; Carpenter, T. J.

    1983-03-01

    As a satellite to the MARS (Mirror Advanced Reactor Study) a smaller, near-term device has been scoped, called the FPD (Fusion Power Demonstration). Envisioned as the next logical step toward a power reactor, it would advance the mirror fusion program beyond MFTF-B and provide an intermediate step toward commercial fusion power. Breakeven net electric power capability would be the goal such that no net utility power would be required to sustain the operation. A phased implementation is envisioned, with a deuterium checkout first to verify the plasma systems before significant neutron activation has occurred. Major tritium-related facilities would be installed with the second phase to produce sufficient fusion power to supply the recirculating power to maintain the neutral beams, ECRH, magnets and other auxiliary equipment.

  12. Spinal fusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles hold the graft in place until it fuses with the vertebrae. A fusion will setup within ... hollow threaded titanium or carbon fiber cylinder to fuse two vertebrae together. The diseased disk is removed ...

  13. Magnetized Target Fusion collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) may be a low cost path to fusion, in a regime that is intermediate between magnetic and inertial fusion energy. It requires compression of a magnetized target plasma and consequent heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserver. We hope to demonstrate the physics basis for MTF, with a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma to be translated axially to a compression region. We show recent and improved FRC formation data, example deformable liner implosions, and a conceptual design for the upcoming translation experiments, and describe a multi institution collaboration. The FRC is an elongated, compact toroid equilibrium that is extreme among magnetic configurations, and relaxed to a non force free state. There is high plasma beta, small toroidal field, cross-field diamagnetic current and flows, vanishing rotational transform, magnetic shear, helicity and anomalously large resistivity. Scientific issues include MTF with and without FRC's, and fundamental plasma physics beyond MHD, relevant to geophysical and astrophysical phenomena.

  14. Cold nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E. N.

    2012-02-15

    Recent accelerator experiments on fusion of various elements have clearly demonstrated that the effective cross-sections of these reactions depend on what material the target particle is placed in. In these experiments, there was a significant increase in the probability of interaction when target nuclei are imbedded in a conducting crystal or are a part of it. These experiments open a new perspective on the problem of so-called cold nuclear fusion.

  15. ITER Fusion Energy

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. Norbert Holtkamp

    2016-07-12

    ITER (in Latin “the way”) is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier over one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen – deuterium and tritium – fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q ? 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). The ITER Organization was officially established in Cadarache, France, on 24 October 2007. The seven members engaged in the project – China, the European Union, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the United States – represent more than half the world’s population. The costs for ITER are shared by the seven members. The cost for the construction will be approximately 5.5 billion Euros, a similar amount is foreseen for the twenty-year phase of operation and the subsequent decommissioning.

  16. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  17. RTNS-II: irradiations at the Rotating Target Neutron Source-II. 1983 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This is the second annual report summarizing irradiation experiments and operations at RTNS-II. It covers calendar year 1983 and includes reports on all irradiations, non-fusion as well as fusion, and on utilization of Monbusho's transmission electron microscope (TEM) a RTNS-II. Each summary article has been submitted by the investigator and has been altered only to meet the style and format requirements of this report.

  18. [Emergence of "new" viral zoonoses].

    PubMed

    Greiser-Wilke, I; Haas, L

    1999-08-01

    In the last two to three decades a significant increase of viral zoonotic infections was observed. These zoonoses are not only newly (or previously unrecognized) emerging diseases, but also due to the reappearance of diseases thought to have been defeated (re-emerging diseases). "New" viral diseases can arise when viruses broaden their host-range (monkey poxvirus; equine morbillivirus), or can be a consequence of intrinsic properties of the virus itself, such as high mutation rates (influenza A virus). Most new or reemerging viral zoonoses are due to infections with hemorrhagic viruses. Many of them are transmitted by insects (arboviruses, e.g. yellow fever virus) or by rodents (e.g. Hanta viruses), others by contact with patients and nosocomial infections (e.g. Ebola virus). The emergence and increase of these diseases are a consequence of anthropogenic environmental changes, such as distortions of the ecological balance and changes in agriculture. In addition, the uncontrolled growth of the cities in tropical and subtropical regions without improvement of the public health measures and the increasing international animal trade and travel also favour the spread and recurrence of these diseases.

  19. Problems in diagnosing viral hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, F; Colloredo Mels, G; Bellati, G; Ideo, G; Oliveri, F; Colombatto, P; Brunetto, M R

    1993-01-01

    The most reliable method of making a specific aetiological diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis would be to identify virus specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes responsible for the killing of virus infected hepatocytes in each patient's liver. Unfortunately, this can not be proposed for routine diagnosis and surrogate tests are required. The detection of virus markers, and even of the virus itself, does not imply that liver damage is caused by virus infection. Indirect markers of the host's antiviral immunoresponse have to be used to confirm more specifically the diagnosis of viral hepatitis. IgM antibodies against viral antigens implicated in the elimination of the virus seem to be suitable alternative candidates. Significant changes in the serum values of viraemia and aminotransferases occur within a few days, while a significant variation in liver histology takes much longer. Only the kinetics of the highly variable parameters can be used for an appropriate study of the relationship between viraemia, antiviral immunoresponse, and liver cell necrosis. Quantitative and dynamic analyses of hepatitis virus markers seem the most suitable and reliable methods of monitoring the patients eligible for antiviral treatment and identifying the most appropriate time to start this. PMID:8314490

  20. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  1. Sudden Deafness: Is It Viral?

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Saumil N.; Durand, Marlene L.; Adams, Joe C.

    2008-01-01

    A number of theories have been proposed to explain the etiopathogenesis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), including viral infection, vascular occlusion, breaks of labyrinthine membranes, immune-mediated mechanisms and abnormal cellular stress responses within the cochlea. In the present paper, we provide a critical review of the viral hypothesis of ISSHL. The evidence reviewed includes published reports of epidemiological and serological studies, clinical observations and results of antiviral therapy, morphological and histopathological studies, as well as results of animal experiments. The published evidence does not satisfy the majority of the Henle-Koch postulates for viral causation of an infectious disease. Possible explanations as to why these postulates remain unfulfilled are reviewed, and future studies that may provide more insight are described. We also discuss other mechanisms that have been postulated to explain ISSHL. Our review indicates that vascular occlusion, labyrinthine membrane breaks and immune-mediated mechanisms are unlikely to be common causes of ISSHL. Finally, we review our recently proposed theory that abnormal cellular stress responses within the cochlea may be responsible for ISSHL. PMID:18235206

  2. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma. PMID:26766408

  3. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral–host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab) GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition. PMID:27005655

  4. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  5. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma.

  6. The Role of Phlebovirus Glycoproteins in Viral Entry, Assembly and Release

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Martin; Plegge, Teresa; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are enveloped viruses with a tripartite RNA genome that can pose a serious threat to animal and human health. Members of the Phlebovirus genus of the family Bunyaviridae are transmitted by mosquitos and ticks to humans and include highly pathogenic agents like Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) as well as viruses that do not cause disease in humans, like Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). Phleboviruses and other bunyaviruses use their envelope proteins, Gn and Gc, for entry into target cells and for assembly of progeny particles in infected cells. Thus, binding of Gn and Gc to cell surface factors promotes viral attachment and uptake into cells and exposure to endosomal low pH induces Gc-driven fusion of the viral and the vesicle membranes. Moreover, Gn and Gc facilitate virion incorporation of the viral genome via their intracellular domains and Gn and Gc interactions allow the formation of a highly ordered glycoprotein lattice on the virion surface. Studies conducted in the last decade provided important insights into the configuration of phlebovirus Gn and Gc proteins in the viral membrane, the cellular factors used by phleboviruses for entry and the mechanisms employed by phlebovirus Gc proteins for membrane fusion. Here, we will review our knowledge on the glycoprotein biogenesis and the role of Gn and Gc proteins in the phlebovirus replication cycle. PMID:27455305

  7. The Role of Phlebovirus Glycoproteins in Viral Entry, Assembly and Release.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Martin; Plegge, Teresa; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are enveloped viruses with a tripartite RNA genome that can pose a serious threat to animal and human health. Members of the Phlebovirus genus of the family Bunyaviridae are transmitted by mosquitos and ticks to humans and include highly pathogenic agents like Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) as well as viruses that do not cause disease in humans, like Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). Phleboviruses and other bunyaviruses use their envelope proteins, Gn and Gc, for entry into target cells and for assembly of progeny particles in infected cells. Thus, binding of Gn and Gc to cell surface factors promotes viral attachment and uptake into cells and exposure to endosomal low pH induces Gc-driven fusion of the viral and the vesicle membranes. Moreover, Gn and Gc facilitate virion incorporation of the viral genome via their intracellular domains and Gn and Gc interactions allow the formation of a highly ordered glycoprotein lattice on the virion surface. Studies conducted in the last decade provided important insights into the configuration of phlebovirus Gn and Gc proteins in the viral membrane, the cellular factors used by phleboviruses for entry and the mechanisms employed by phlebovirus Gc proteins for membrane fusion. Here, we will review our knowledge on the glycoprotein biogenesis and the role of Gn and Gc proteins in the phlebovirus replication cycle. PMID:27455305

  8. Unraveling a Three-Step Spatiotemporal Mechanism of Triggering of Receptor-Induced Nipah Virus Fusion and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Stone, Jacquelyn A.; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Dabundo, Jeffrey; Benavides Montano, Javier A.; Santos-Montanez, Jennifer; Biering, Scott B.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Iorio, Ronald M.; Lu, Xiaonan; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion is essential for entry of the biomedically-important paramyxoviruses into their host cells (viral-cell fusion), and for syncytia formation (cell-cell fusion), often induced by paramyxoviral infections [e.g. those of the deadly Nipah virus (NiV)]. For most paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion requires two viral glycoproteins. Upon receptor binding, the attachment glycoprotein (HN/H/G) triggers the fusion glycoprotein (F) to undergo conformational changes that merge viral and/or cell membranes. However, a significant knowledge gap remains on how HN/H/G couples cell receptor binding to F-triggering. Via interdisciplinary approaches we report the first comprehensive mechanism of NiV membrane fusion triggering, involving three spatiotemporally sequential cell receptor-induced conformational steps in NiV-G: two in the head and one in the stalk. Interestingly, a headless NiV-G mutant was able to trigger NiV-F, and the two head conformational steps were required for the exposure of the stalk domain. Moreover, the headless NiV-G prematurely triggered NiV-F on virions, indicating that the NiV-G head prevents premature triggering of NiV-F on virions by concealing a F-triggering stalk domain until the correct time and place: receptor-binding. Based on these and recent paramyxovirus findings, we present a comprehensive and fundamentally conserved mechanistic model of paramyxovirus membrane fusion triggering and cell entry. PMID:24278018

  9. DNA-AuNP networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier to inhibit viral attachment, entry and budding.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Mei; Zheng, Lin Ling; Yang, Xiao Xi; Wan, Xiao Yan; Wu, Wen Bi; Zhen, Shu Jun; Li, Yuan Fang; Luo, Ling Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have caused numerous diseases and deaths worldwide. Due to the emergence of new viruses and frequent virus variation, conventional antiviral strategies that directly target viral or cellular proteins are limited because of the specificity, drug resistance and rapid clearance from the human body. Therefore, developing safe and potent antiviral agents with activity against viral infection at multiple points in the viral life cycle remains a major challenge. In this report, we propose a new modality to inhibit viral infection by fabricating DNA conjugated gold nanoparticle (DNA-AuNP) networks on cell membranes as a protective barrier. The DNA-AuNPs networks were found, via a plaque formation assay and viral titers, to have potent antiviral ability and protect host cells from human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Confocal immunofluorescence image analysis showed 80 ± 3.8% of viral attachment, 91.1 ± 0.9% of viral entry and 87.9 ± 2.8% of viral budding were inhibited by the DNA-AuNP networks, which were further confirmed by real-time fluorescence imaging of the RSV infection process. The antiviral activity of the networks may be attributed to steric effects, the disruption of membrane glycoproteins and limited fusion of cell membrane bilayers, all of which play important roles in viral infection. Therefore, our results suggest that the DNA-AuNP networks have not only prophylactic effects to inhibit virus attachment and entry, but also therapeutic effects to inhibit viral budding and cell-to-cell spread. More importantly, this proof-of-principle study provides a pathway for the development of a universal, broad-spectrum antiviral therapy.

  10. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jonathan D.; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion. PMID:26082488

  11. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jonathan D; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-07-24

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion.

  12. Localization of a Region in the Fusion Protein of Avian Metapneumovirus That Modulates Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongwei; Feng, Kurtis; Yao, Xiangjie; Cai, Hui; Li, Junan; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae of the family Paramyxoviridae includes two members, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), causing respiratory tract infections in humans and birds, respectively. Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Membrane fusion of hMPV appears to be unique, in that fusion of some hMPV strains requires low pH. Here, we show that the fusion (F) proteins of aMPV promote fusion in the absence of the attachment protein and low pH is not required. Furthermore, there are notable differences in cell-cell fusion among aMPV subtypes. Trypsin was required for cell-cell fusion induced by subtype B but not subtypes A and C. The F protein of aMPV subtype A was highly fusogenic, whereas those from subtypes B and C were not. By construction and evaluation of chimeric F proteins composed of domains from the F proteins of subtypes A and B, we localized a region composed of amino acid residues 170 to 338 in the F protein that is responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype of the F from subtype A. Further mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues R295, G297, and K323 in this region collectively contributed to the hyperfusogenicity. Taken together, we have identified a region in the aMPV F protein that modulates the extent of membrane fusion. A model for fusion consistent with these data is presented. PMID:22915815

  13. Extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Marc R; Andrew White, K

    2007-08-01

    The analysis of viral RNA is a fundamental aspect of plant RNA virus research. Studies that focus on viral RNAs often involve virus infections of plant protoplasts (see UNITS 16D.1-16D.4). Protoplast offer the advantage of simultaneous initiation of infections, which allows for superior temporal and quantitative analyses of viral RNAs. The efficient isolation of intact viral RNA is key to any such investigations. This unit describes two basic protocols for extracting viral RNAs from plant protoplasts. An approach for preparing double-stranded viral RNA from total RNA pools is also provided. The viral RNA prepared by using these techniques can be used for further analyses such as primer extension, reverse transcription-PCR, and northern blotting.

  14. Viral-templated Palladium Nanocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cuixian

    Despite recent progress on nanocatalysis, there exist several critical challenges in simple and readily controllable nanocatalyst synthesis including the unpredictable particle growth, deactivation of catalytic activity, cumbersome catalyst recovery and lack of in-situ reaction monitoring. In this dissertation, two novel approaches are presented for the fabrication of viral-templated palladium (Pd) nanocatalysts, and their catalytic activities for dichromate reduction reaction and Suzuki Coupling reaction were thoroughly studied. In the first approach, viral template based bottom-up assembly is employed for the Pd nanocatalyst synthesis in a chip-based format. Specifically, genetically displayed cysteine residues on each coat protein of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) templates provide precisely spaced thiol functionalities for readily controllable surface assembly and enhanced formation of catalytically active Pd nanoparticles. Catalysts with the chip-based format allow for simple separation and in-situ monitoring of the reaction extent. Thorough examination of synthesis-structure-activity relationship of Pd nanoparticles formed on surface-assembled viral templates shows that Pd nanoparticle size, catalyst loading density and catalytic activity of viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts can be readily controlled simply by tuning the synthesis conditions. The viral-templated Pd nanocatalysts with optimized synthesis conditions are shown to have higher catalytic activity per unit Pd mass than the commercial Pd/C catalysts. Furthermore, tunable and selective surface assembly of TMV biotemplates is exploited to control the loading density and location of Pd nanocatalysts on solid substrates via preferential electroless deposition. In addition, the catalytic activities of surface-assembled TMV-templated Pd nanocatalysts were also investigated for the ligand-free Suzuki Coupling reaction under mild reaction conditions. The chip-based format enables simple catalyst separation and

  15. Fusion/Astrophysics Teacher Research Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Donald

    2005-10-01

    In order to engage California high school science teachers in the area of plasma physics and fusion research, LLNL's Fusion Energy Program has partnered with the UC Davis Edward Teller Education Center, ETEC (http://etec.ucdavis.edu), the Stanford University Solar Center (http://solar-center.stanford.edu) and LLNL's Science / Technology Education Program, STEP (http://education.llnl.gov). A four-level ``Fusion & Astrophysics Research Academy'' has been designed to give teachers experience in conducting research using spectroscopy with their students. Spectroscopy, and its relationship to atomic physics and electromagnetism, provides for an ideal plasma `bridge' to the CA Science Education Standards (http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/scphysics.asp). Teachers attend multiple-day professional development workshops to explore new research activities for use in the high school science classroom. A Level I, 3-day program consists of two days where teachers learn how plasma researchers use spectrometers followed by instructions on how to use a research grade spectrometer for their own investigations. A 3rd day includes touring LLNL's SSPX (http://www.mfescience.org/sspx/) facility to see spectrometry being used to measure plasma properties. Spectrometry classroom kits are made available for loaning to participating teachers. Level I workshop results (http://education.llnl.gov/fusion&_slash;astro/) will be presented along with plans being developed for Level II (one week advanced SKA's), Level III (pre-internship), and Level IV (summer internship) research academies.

  16. Profiling of Viral Proteins Expressed from the Genomic RNA of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Using a Panel of 15 Region-Specific Polyclonal Rabbit Antisera: Implications for Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sang-Im; Yun, Gil-Nam; Byun, Sung-June; Lee, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is closely related to West Nile (WN), yellow fever (YF), and dengue (DEN) viruses. Its plus-strand genomic RNA carries a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein that is cleaved into three structural (C, prM/M, and E) and at least seven nonstructural (NS1/NS1', NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5) proteins, based on previous work with WNV, YFV, and DENV. Here, we aimed to profile experimentally all the viral proteins found in JEV-infected cells. We generated a collection of 15 JEV-specific polyclonal antisera covering all parts of the viral protein-coding regions, by immunizing rabbits with 14 bacterially expressed glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins (for all nine viral proteins except NS2B) or with a chemically synthesized oligopeptide (for NS2B). In total lysates of JEV-infected BHK-21 cells, immunoblotting with these antisera revealed: (i) three mature structural proteins (~12-kDa C, ~8-kDa M, and ~53-kDa E), a precursor of M (~24-kDa prM) and three other M-related proteins (~10-14 kDa); (ii) the predicted ~45-kDa NS1 and its frameshift product, ~58-kDa NS1', with no evidence of the predicted ~25-kDa NS2A; (iii) the predicted but hardly detectable ~14-kDa NS2B and an unexpected but predominant ~12-kDa NS2B-related protein; (iv) the predicted ~69-kDa NS3 plus two major cleavage products (~34-kDa NS3N-term and ~35-kDa NS3C-term), together with at least nine minor proteins of ~16-52 kDa; (v) the predicted ~14-kDa NS4A; (vi) two NS4B-related proteins (~27-kDa NS4B and ~25-kDa NS4B'); and (vii) the predicted ~103-kDa NS5 plus at least three other NS5-related proteins (~15 kDa, ~27 kDa, and ~90 kDa). Combining these data with confocal microscopic imaging of the proteins’ intracellular localization, our study is the first to provide a solid foundation for the study of JEV gene expression, which is crucial for elucidating the regulatory mechanisms of JEV genome replication and pathobiology

  17. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There is little doubt that humans will attempt to explore and develop the solar system in this century. A large amount of energy will be required for accomplishing this. The need for fusion propulsion is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important thermodynamical attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For human exploration and development of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion can produce exhaust velocity up to about 5 km/s. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the energy to heat a hydrogen propellant increases the exhaust velocity by only a factor of about two. Alternatively the energy can be converted into electricity which is then used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. The necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment, however, increases the mass of the propulsion system for the same jet power by more than two orders of magnitude over chemical system, thus greatly limits the thrust-to-weight ratio attainable. The principal advantage of the fission process is that its development is relatively mature and is available right now. If fusion can be developed, fusion appears to have the best of all worlds in terms of propulsion - it can provide the absolute amount, the propellant exhaust velocity, and the high specific jet power. An intermediate step towards pure fusion propulsion is a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. The technical issues related to fusion for space propulsion are discussed. The technical priorities for developing and applying fusion for propulsion are

  18. New Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors Targeting Hemagglutinin-Mediated Influenza A Virus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Wang, Minxiu; Li, Bing; Mills, Debra M.; Ames, Jessica A.; Nash, Peter J.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Prichard, Mark N.; Keith, Kathy A.; Barnard, Dale L.; Caffrey, Michael; Rong, Lijun; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are a major public health threat worldwide, and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The influenza virus glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) plays critical roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, making it a potential target for the development of anti-influenza drugs. Using pseudotype virus-based high-throughput screens, we have identified several new small molecules capable of inhibiting influenza virus entry. We prioritized two novel inhibitors, MBX2329 and MBX2546, with aminoalkyl phenol ether and sulfonamide scaffolds, respectively, that specifically inhibit HA-mediated viral entry. The two compounds (i) are potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 0.3 to 5.9 μM); (ii) are selective (50% cytotoxicity concentration [CC50] of >100 μM), with selectivity index (SI) values of >20 to 200 for different influenza virus strains; (iii) inhibit a wide spectrum of influenza A viruses, which includes the 2009 pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1/2009, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/H5N1, and oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 strains; (iv) exhibit large volumes of synergy with oseltamivir (36 and 331 μM2 % at 95% confidence); and (v) have chemically tractable structures. Mechanism-of-action studies suggest that both MBX2329 and MBX2546 bind to HA in a nonoverlapping manner. Additional results from HA-mediated hemolysis of chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), competition assays with monoclonal antibody (MAb) C179, and mutational analysis suggest that the compounds bind in the stem region of the HA trimer and inhibit HA-mediated fusion. Therefore, MBX2329 and MBX2546 represent new starting points for chemical optimization and have the potential to provide valuable future therapeutic options and research tools to study the HA-mediated entry process. PMID:24198411

  19. Human Metapneumovirus Is Capable of Entering Cells by Fusion with Endosomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Reagan G.; Mainou, Bernardo A.; Johnson, Monika; Hastings, Andrew K.; Schuster, Jennifer E.; Dermody, Terence S.; Williams, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a leading cause of lower respiratory illness. Although receptor binding is thought to initiate fusion at the plasma membrane for paramyxoviruses, the entry mechanism for HMPV is largely uncharacterized. Here we sought to determine whether HMPV initiates fusion at the plasma membrane or following internalization. To study the HMPV entry process in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells, we used fluorescence microscopy, an R18-dequenching fusion assay, and developed a quantitative, fluorescence microscopy assay to follow virus binding, internalization, membrane fusion, and visualize the cellular site of HMPV fusion. We found that HMPV particles are internalized into human bronchial epithelial cells before fusing with endosomes. Using chemical inhibitors and RNA interference, we determined that HMPV particles are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a dynamin-dependent manner. HMPV fusion and productive infection are promoted by RGD-binding integrin engagement, internalization, actin polymerization, and dynamin. Further, HMPV fusion is pH-independent, although infection with rare strains is modestly inhibited by RNA interference or chemical inhibition of endosomal acidification. Thus, HMPV can enter via endocytosis, but the viral fusion machinery is not triggered by low pH. Together, our results indicate that HMPV is capable of entering host cells by multiple pathways, including membrane fusion from endosomal compartments. PMID:26629703

  20. Improvements of image fusion methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Shoshan, Yotam; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-03-01

    Fusion of images from different imaging modalities, obtained by conventional fusion methods, may cause artifacts, including destructive superposition and brightness irregularities, in certain cases. This paper proposes two methods for improving image multimodal fusion quality. Based on the finding that a better fusion can be achieved when the images have a more positive correlation, the first method is a decision algorithm that runs at the preprocessing fusion stage and determines whether a complementary gray level of one of the input images should be used instead of the original one. The second method is suitable for multiresolution fusion, and it suggests choosing only one image from the lowest-frequency sub-bands in the pyramids, instead of combining values from both sub-bands. Experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion enhancement can reduce fusion artifacts. Quantitative fusion quality measures that support this conclusion are shown.

  1. A soluble form of Epstein-Barr virus gH/gL inhibits EBV-induced membrane fusion and does not function in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Connolly, Sarah A.; Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-02-05

    We investigated whether soluble EBV gH/gL (sgH/gL) functions in fusion and made a series of truncations of gH/gL domains based on the gH/gL crystal structure. We found sgH/gL failed to mediate cell-cell fusion both when co-expressed with the other entry glycoproteins and when added exogenously to fusion assays. Interestingly, sgH/gL inhibited cell-cell fusion in a dose dependent manner when co-expressed. sgH/gL from HSV was unable to inhibit EBV fusion, suggesting the inhibition was specific to EBV gH/gL. sgH/gL stably binds gp42, but not gB nor gH/gL. The domain mutants, DI/gL, DI-II/gL and DI-II-III/gL were unable to bind gp42. Instead, DI-II/gL, DI-II-III/gL and sgH/gL but not DI/gL decreased the expression of gp42, resulting in decreased overall fusion. Overall, our results suggest that domain IV may be required for proper folding and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of EBV gH/gL are required for the most efficient fusion.

  2. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-05-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  3. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-05-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  4. Bacterial CRISPR/Cas DNA endonucleases: A revolutionary technology that could dramatically impact viral research and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas systems mediate bacterial adaptive immune responses that evolved to protect bacteria from bacteriophage and other horizontally transmitted genetic elements. Several CRISPR/Cas systems exist but the simplest variant, referred to as Type II, has a single effector DNA endonuclease, called Cas9, which is guided to its viral DNA target by two small RNAs, the crRNA and the tracrRNA. Initial efforts to adapt the CRISPR/Cas system for DNA editing in mammalian cells, which focused on the Cas9 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes (Spy), demonstrated that Spy Cas9 can be directed to DNA targets in mammalian cells by tracrRNA:crRNA fusion transcripts called single guide RNAs (sgRNA). Upon binding, Cas9 induces DNA cleavage leading to mutagenesis as a result of error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Recently, the Spy Cas9 system has been adapted for high throughput screening of genes in human cells for their relevance to a particular phenotype and, more generally, for the targeted inactivation of specific genes, in cell lines and in vivo in a number of model organisms. The latter aim seems likely to be greatly enhanced by the recent development of Cas9 proteins from bacterial species such as Neisseria meningitidis and Staphyloccus aureus that are small enough to be expressed using adeno-associated (AAV)-based vectors that can be readily prepared at very high titers. The evolving Cas9-based DNA editing systems therefore appear likely to not only impact virology by allowing researchers to screen for human genes that affect the replication of pathogenic human viruses of all types but also to derive clonal human cell lines that lack individual gene products that either facilitate or restrict viral replication. Moreover, high titer AAV-based vectors offer the possibility of directly targeting DNA viruses that infect discrete sites in the human body, such as herpes simplex virus and hepatitis B virus, with the hope that the entire population of viral DNA genomes

  5. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-12-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  6. Myoblast fusion in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Haralalka, Shruti; Abmayr, Susan M.

    2010-11-01

    The body wall musculature of a Drosophila larva is composed of an intricate pattern of 30 segmentally repeated muscle fibers in each abdominal hemisegment. Each muscle fiber has unique spatial and behavioral characteristics that include its location, orientation, epidermal attachment, size and pattern of innervation. Many, if not all, of these properties are dictated by founder cells, which determine the muscle pattern and seed the fusion process. Myofibers are then derived from fusion between a specific founder cell and several fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fusing with as few as 3-5 FCMs in the small muscles on the most ventral side of the embryo and as many as 30 FCMs in the larger muscles on the dorsal side of the embryo. The focus of the present review is the formation of the larval muscles in the developing embryo, summarizing the major issues and players in this process. We have attempted to emphasize experimentally-validated details of the mechanism of myoblast fusion and distinguish these from the theoretically possible details that have not yet been confirmed experimentally. We also direct the interested reader to other recent reviews that discuss myoblast fusion in Drosophila, each with their own perspective on the process . With apologies, we use gene nomenclature as specified by Flybase (http://flybase.org) but provide Table 1 with alternative names and references.

  7. Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexander; Girardi, Federico; Sama, Andrew; Lebl, Darren; Cammisa, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) is a relatively new technique that allows the surgeon to access the intervertebral space from a direct lateral approach either anterior to or through the psoas muscle. This approach provides an alternative to anterior lumbar interbody fusion with instrumentation, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for anterior column support. LLIF is minimally invasive, safe, better structural support from the apophyseal ring, potential for coronal plane deformity correction, and indirect decompression, which have has made this technique popular. LLIF is currently being utilized for a variety of pathologies including but not limited to adult de novo lumbar scoliosis, central and foraminal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and adjacent segment degeneration. Although early clinical outcomes have been good, the potential for significant neurological and vascular vertebral endplate complications exists. Nevertheless, LLIF is a promising technique with the potential to more effectively treat complex adult de novo scoliosis and achieve predictable fusion while avoiding the complications of traditional anterior surgery and posterior interbody techniques. PMID:26713134

  8. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  9. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C

    2016-04-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  10. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  11. Analysis of the dose-response relationship between high-risk human papillomavirus viral load and cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Zhu; Li, Hong-Bo; Nie, Xin-Min; Jiang, Xiao-Man; Ming, Hui; Li, Deng-Qing; Wu, Xin-Yin

    2009-08-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the dose-response relationship between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) load and cervical lesions; the relationship between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions; and the clinical application of the hybrid capture II (HC-II) system in the secondary prevention of cervical cancer. HrHPV viral load was detected by the HC-II system and cervical lesions were diagnosed from biopsied tissue. Curve estimation and Mantel trend analysis were used to explore the dose-response relationship between hrHPV viral load and cervical lesions. Spearman's rank correlation analysis and ordinal regression model were used for the analysis of hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions. Curve estimation showed good correlation between cervical lesion rates and hrHPV viral load (r=0.775, P=0.008); the rate of cervical lesions increased with hrHPV viral load (chi(trend)=8.000, P<0.001). Medium intensity rank correlation was found between hrHPV viral load grades and the severity of cervical lesions (r(s)=0.321, P<0.001); a correlation appeared between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions (P<0.001). These results suggest a dose-response relationship between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions. This dependence has important clinical applications and shows the potential value of the HC-II system in cervical cancer prevention.

  12. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  13. Drug Sanctuaries, Low Steady State Viral Loads and Viral Blips.

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.,; Callaway, D.; Pomerantz, R. J.; Chen, H. Y.; Markowitz, M.; Ho, David D.; Di Mascio, M.

    2002-01-01

    Patients on HAART for long periods of time obtain viral loads (VLs) below 50 copies/ml. Ultrasensitive VL assays show that some of these patients obtain a low steady state VL, while others continue to exhibit VL declines to below 5 copies/ml. Low steady states can be explained by two-compartment models that incorporate a drug sanctuary. Interestingly, when patients exhibit continued declines below 50 copies/ml the rate of decline has a half-life of {approx} 6 months, consistent with some estimates of the rate of latent cell decline. Some patients, despite having sustained undetectable VLs show periods of transient viremia (blips). I will present some statistical characterization of the blips observed in a set of 123 patients, suggesting that blips are generated largely by random processes, that blips tend to correspond to periods of a few weeks in which VLs are elevated, and that VL decay from the peak of a blip may have two-phases. Using new results suggesting that the viral burst size, N {approx} 5 x 10{sup 4}, we estimate the number of cells needed to produce a blip.

  14. Autophagy-associated dengue vesicles promote viral transmission avoiding antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Wei; Mettling, Clément; Wu, Shang-Rung; Yu, Chia-Yi; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Yea-Lih

    2016-01-01

    One of the major defense mechanisms against virus spread in vivo is the blocking of viral infectibility by neutralizing antibodies. We describe here the identification of infectious autophagy-associated dengue vesicles released from infected cells. These vesicles contain viral proteins E, NS1, prM/M, and viral RNA, as well as host lipid droplets and LC3-II, an autophagy marker. The viral RNA can be protected within the autophagic organelles since anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies do not have an effect on the vesicle-mediated transmission that is able to initiate a new round of infection in target cells. Importantly, such infectious vesicles were also detected in a patient serum. Our study suggests that autophagy machinery plays a new role in dengue virus transmission. This discovery explains the inefficiency of neutralizing antibody upon dengue infection as a potential immune evasion mechanism in vivo. PMID:27558165

  15. Autophagy-associated dengue vesicles promote viral transmission avoiding antibody neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan-Wei; Mettling, Clément; Wu, Shang-Rung; Yu, Chia-Yi; Perng, Guey-Chuen; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Yea-Lih

    2016-01-01

    One of the major defense mechanisms against virus spread in vivo is the blocking of viral infectibility by neutralizing antibodies. We describe here the identification of infectious autophagy-associated dengue vesicles released from infected cells. These vesicles contain viral proteins E, NS1, prM/M, and viral RNA, as well as host lipid droplets and LC3-II, an autophagy marker. The viral RNA can be protected within the autophagic organelles since anti-dengue neutralizing antibodies do not have an effect on the vesicle-mediated transmission that is able to initiate a new round of infection in target cells. Importantly, such infectious vesicles were also detected in a patient serum. Our study suggests that autophagy machinery plays a new role in dengue virus transmission. This discovery explains the inefficiency of neutralizing antibody upon dengue infection as a potential immune evasion mechanism in vivo. PMID:27558165

  16. Viral proteases as targets for drug design.

    PubMed

    Skoreński, Marcin; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    In order to productively infect a host, viruses must enter the cell and force host cell replication mechanisms to produce new infectious virus particles. The success of this process unfortunately results in disease progression and, in the case of infection with many viral species, may cause mortality. The discoveries of Louis Pasteur and Edward Jenner led to one of the greatest advances in modern medicine - the development of vaccines that generate long-lasting memory immune responses to combat viral infection. Widespread use of vaccines has reduced mortality and morbidity associated with viral infection and, in some cases, has completely eradicated virus from the human population. Unfortunately, several viral species maintain a significant ability to mutate and "escape" vaccine-induced immune responses. Thus, novel anti-viral agents are required for treatment and prevention of viral disease. Targeting proteases that are crucial in the viral life cycle has proven to be an effective method to control viral infection, and this avenue of investigation continues to generate anti-viral treatments. Herein, we provide the reader with a brief history as well as a comprehensive review of the most recent advances in the design and synthesis of viral protease inhibitors. PMID:23016690

  17. [Cell analogs of viral proteins].

    PubMed

    Blinov, V M; Gaĭsler, V; Krasnov, G S; Shargunov, A V; Shurdov, M A; Zverev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes between viruses and their hosts played an important role in the evolution of various eukaryotes including contemporary mammals as well as the pathogens themselves. Elements of viruses of various types can be found in the genome of animals. Endogenous retroviral elements composing up to 8% of human genome length not only determine its high flexibility and rapid adaptation potential. Many of virus genes such as Fv1, Lv1, Lv2 being analogues of capsid and other proteins determine effective suppression of viral replication after cell penetration by the causative agent. Introduction of these elements into genome of a wide variety of animals from fish to primates could have taken place against the background of global natural cataclysms of viral origin. Integration of retrovirus genes coding surface glycoproteins with immunosuppressing domains into genetic apparatus of animals served as an impetus to the development of viviparity and spread ofplacental mammals. Their cell analogs syncytins perform a dual function: take direct part in the formation of syncytiotrophoblast layer of placenta and ensure tolerance of immune system of mother to embryo. The acquisition of cell genes by viruses also played an important role in their evolution: various interleukins and other modulators of immune response introduced into viral genome from cell genetic apparatus became one of the most important factors of pathogenicity of a wide variety of causative agents including poxviruses, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and many others. Evolutionary pathways of the virus and host are thus inseparable from each other, and character of one of these directions is largely dictated by the vector of another. PMID:25051706

  18. Bacterial and viral superantigens: roles in autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Acha-Orbea, H

    1993-01-01

    Superantigens are bacterial, viral, or retroviral proteins which can activate specifically a large proportion of T cells. In contrast with classical peptide antigen recognition, superantigens do not require processing to small peptides but act as complete or partially processed proteins. They can bind to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and stimulate T cells expressing particular T cell receptor V beta chains. The other polymorphic parts of the T cell receptor, which are crucial for classical antigen recognition, are not important for this interaction. When this strategy is used a large proportion of the host immune system can be activated shortly after infection. The activated cells have a wide variety of antigen specificities. The ability to stimulate polyclonal B (IgG) as well as T cell responses raises possibilities of a role for superantigens in the induction of autoimmune diseases. Superantigens have been a great tool in the hands of immunologists in unravelling some of the basic mechanisms of tolerance and immunity. PMID:8481060

  19. RTNS-II 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    RTNS-II was built to provide a deuterium-tritium neutron source for the study of fusion neutron effects. In the quest to apply fusion to commercial power production, the specific mission of RTNS-II is threefold: to acquire direct engineering data for near-term confinement experiments and for materials that will see moderate neutron dose in future reactor systems; to measure production rates of transmutants and to develop appropriate radiation-resistant instrumentation for fusion systems; and to study the radiation-induced property changes caused by fusion neutrons. RTNS-II comprises two independent sources of 14-MeV neutrons. This is the third annual report summarizing irradiation experiments at RTNS-II. It covers calendar year 1983, and includes reports of all irradiation results, both fusion and non-fusion related. These comprise both secondary (or ''add-on'') and primary irradiations. Each summary article has been submitted by the investigator and has been altered only to meet the style and format requirements of this report.

  20. Ceramics for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications.

  1. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  2. Simulation of Fusion Plasmas

    ScienceCinema

    Holland, Chris [UC San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

    2016-07-12

    The upcoming ITER experiment (www.iter.org) represents the next major milestone in realizing the promise of using nuclear fusion as a commercial energy source, by moving into the “burning plasma” regime where the dominant heat source is the internal fusion reactions. As part of its support for the ITER mission, the US fusion community is actively developing validated predictive models of the behavior of magnetically confined plasmas. In this talk, I will describe how the plasma community is using the latest high performance computing facilities to develop and refine our models of the nonlinear, multiscale plasma dynamics, and how recent advances in experimental diagnostics are allowing us to directly test and validate these models at an unprecedented level.

  3. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-04-04

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  4. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  5. CRYOGENICS FOR FUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Dauguet, P.; Bonneton, M.; Fauve, E.; Bernhardt, J. M.; Beauvisage, J.; Andrieu, F.; Gistau-Baguer, G. M.; Boissin, J. C.

    2008-03-16

    Fusion of Hydrogen to produce energy is one of the technologies under study to meet the mankind raising need in energy and as a substitute to fossil fuels for the future. This technology is under investigation for more than 30 years already, with, for example, the former construction of the experimental reactors Tore Supra, DIII-D and JET. With the construction of ITER to start, the next step to 'fusion for energy' will be done. In these projects, an extensive use of cryogenic systems is requested. Air Liquide has been involved as cryogenic partner in most of former and presently constructed fusion reactors. In the present paper, a review of the cryogenic systems we delivered to Tore Supra, JET, IPR and KSTAR will be presented.

  6. Desensitized Optimal Filtering and Sensor Fusion Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc., has developed a software toolkit that filters and processes navigational data from multiple sensor sources. A key component of the toolkit is a trajectory optimization technique that reduces the sensitivity of Kalman filters with respect to model parameter uncertainties. The sensor fusion toolkit also integrates recent advances in adaptive Kalman and sigma-point filters for non-Gaussian problems with error statistics. This Phase II effort provides new filtering and sensor fusion techniques in a convenient package that can be used as a stand-alone application for ground support and/or onboard use. Its modular architecture enables ready integration with existing tools. A suite of sensor models and noise distribution as well as Monte Carlo analysis capability are included to enable statistical performance evaluations.

  7. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  8. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  9. Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schmidt, George R.; Santarius, John F.; Turchi, Peter J.; Siemon, Richard E.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The need for fusion propulsion for interplanetary flights is discussed. For a propulsion system, there are three important system attributes: (1) The absolute amount of energy available, (2) the propellant exhaust velocity, and (3) the jet power per unit mass of the propulsion system (specific power). For efficient and affordable human exploration of the solar system, propellant exhaust velocity in excess of 100 km/s and specific power in excess of 10 kW/kg are required. Chemical combustion obviously cannot meet the requirement in propellant exhaust velocity. Nuclear fission processes typically result in producing energy in the form of heat that needs to be manipulated at temperatures limited by materials to about 2,800 K. Using the fission energy to heat a low atomic weight propellant produces propellant velocity of the order of 10 kinds. Alternatively the fission energy can be converted into electricity that is used to accelerate particles to high exhaust velocity. However, the necessary power conversion and conditioning equipment greatly increases the mass of the propulsion system. Fundamental considerations in waste heat rejection and power conditioning in a fission electric propulsion system place a limit on its jet specific power to the order of about 0.2 kW/kg. If fusion can be developed for propulsion, it appears to have the best of all worlds - it can provide the largest absolute amount of energy, the propellant exhaust velocity (> 100 km/s), and the high specific jet power (> 10 kW/kg). An intermediate step towards fusion propulsion might be a bimodal system in which a fission reactor is used to provide some of the energy to drive a fusion propulsion unit. There are similarities as well as differences between applying fusion to propulsion and to terrestrial electrical power generation. The similarities are the underlying plasma and fusion physics, the enabling component technologies, the computational and the diagnostics capabilities. These physics and

  10. Atomic data for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  11. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  12. T cell exhaustion during persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Shannon M; Wherry, E John; Zajac, Allan J

    2015-05-01

    Although robust and highly effective anti-viral T cells contribute to the clearance of many acute infections, viral persistence is associated with the development of functionally inferior, exhausted, T cell responses. Exhaustion develops in a step-wise and progressive manner, ranges in severity, and can culminate in the deletion of the anti-viral T cells. This disarming of the response is consequential as it compromises viral control and potentially serves to dampen immune-mediated damage. Exhausted T cells are unable to elaborate typical anti-viral effector functions. They are characterized by the sustained upregulation of inhibitory receptors and display a gene expression profile that distinguishes them from prototypic effector and memory T cell populations. In this review we discuss the properties of exhausted T cells; the virological and immunological conditions that favor their development; the cellular and molecular signals that sustain the exhausted state; and strategies for preventing and reversing exhaustion to favor viral control.

  13. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F.; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P.; Chiocca, E. Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem–like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  14. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition enhances oncolytic viral replication in glioma.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Wang, Pin-Yi; Nguyen, Tran; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Kasai, Kazue; Okemoto, Kazuo; Otsuki, Akihiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Fernandez, Soledad; Goins, William F; Grandi, Paola; Glorioso, Joseph C; Lawler, Sean; Cripe, Timothy P; Chiocca, E Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, which uses genetically engineered tumor-targeting viruses, is being increasingly used in cancer clinical trials due to the direct cytolytic effects of this treatment that appear to provoke a robust immune response against the tumor. As OVs enter tumor cells, intrinsic host defenses have the potential to hinder viral replication and spread within the tumor mass. In this report, we show that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in tumor cells appears to alter the trafficking of post-entry OVs from the nucleus toward lysosomes. In glioma cell lines and glioma-stem-like cells, HDAC6 inhibition (HDAC6i) by either pharmacologic or genetic means substantially increased replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). Moreover, HDAC6i increased shuttling of post-entry oHSV to the nucleus. In addition, electron microscopic analysis revealed that post-entry oHSVs are preferentially taken up into glioma cells through the endosomal pathway rather than via fusion at the cell surface. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism of glioma cell defense against an incoming infection by oHSV and identify possible approaches to enhance oHSV replication and subsequent lysis of tumor cells. PMID:26524593

  15. Sequencing Needs for Viral Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Lam, M; Mulakken, N J; Torres, C L; Smith, J R; Slezak, T

    2004-01-26

    We built a system to guide decisions regarding the amount of genomic sequencing required to develop diagnostic DNA signatures, which are short sequences that are sufficient to uniquely identify a viral species. We used our existing DNA diagnostic signature prediction pipeline, which selects regions of a target species genome that are conserved among strains of the target (for reliability, to prevent false negatives) and unique relative to other species (for specificity, to avoid false positives). We performed simulations, based on existing sequence data, to assess the number of genome sequences of a target species and of close phylogenetic relatives (''near neighbors'') that are required to predict diagnostic signature regions that are conserved among strains of the target species and unique relative to other bacterial and viral species. For DNA viruses such as variola (smallpox), three target genomes provide sufficient guidance for selecting species-wide signatures. Three near neighbor genomes are critical for species specificity. In contrast, most RNA viruses require four target genomes and no near neighbor genomes, since lack of conservation among strains is more limiting than uniqueness. SARS and Ebola Zaire are exceptional, as additional target genomes currently do not improve predictions, but near neighbor sequences are urgently needed. Our results also indicate that double stranded DNA viruses are more conserved among strains than are RNA viruses, since in most cases there was at least one conserved signature candidate for the DNA viruses and zero conserved signature candidates for the RNA viruses.

  16. Population Dynamics of Viral Inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Krista; Li, Dong; Behrens, Manja; Streletzky, Kiril; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    We have investigated the population dynamics of viral inactivation in vitrousing time-resolved cryo electron microscopy combined with light and X-ray scattering techniques. Using bacteriophage λ as a model system for pressurized double-stranded DNA viruses, we found that virions incubated with their cell receptor eject their genome in a stochastic triggering process. The triggering of DNA ejection occurs in a non synchronized manner after the receptor addition, resulting in an exponential decay of the number of genome-filled viruses with time. We have explored the characteristic time constant of this triggering process at different temperatures, salt conditions, and packaged genome lengths. Furthermore, using the temperature dependence we determined an activation energy for DNA ejections. The dependences of the time constant and activation energy on internal DNA pressure, affected by salt conditions and encapsidated genome length, suggest that the triggering process is directly dependent on the conformational state of the encapsidated DNA. The results of this work provide insight into how the in vivo kinetics of the spread of viral infection are influenced by intra- and extra cellular environmental conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1252522.

  17. Commercialization of veterinary viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Flore, P H

    2004-12-01

    If vaccines are to reliably prevent disease, they must be developed, produced and quality-controlled according to very strict regulations and procedures. Veterinary viral vaccine registrations are governed by different rules in different countries, but these rules all emphasize that the quality of the raw materials--the cells, eggs, animals or plants that are used in production--need to be carefully controlled. The veterinary vaccine business is also very cost-conscious. Emphasis over the last 5-10 years has therefore been to develop culture systems that minimize labor and sterility problems and thus provide for reliable and cost-effective production. Implementing these often more complex systems in a production environment takes considerable effort, first in scale-up trials and further down the line in convincing production personnel to change their familiar system for something new and possibly untried. To complete scale-up trials successfully, it is absolutely necessary to understand the biochemistry of the cells and the influence of the virus on the cells under scale-up and later production conditions. Once a viral product can be produced on a large scale, it is imperative that the quality of the end-product is controlled in an intelligent way. One needs to know whether the end-product performs in the animal as was intended during its conception in the research and development department. The development of the appropriate tests to demonstrate this plays an important role in the successful development of a vaccine.

  18. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  19. Passive-sensor data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolitz, Stephan E.

    1991-08-01

    are made, when sensor data is integrated over a 60 s time period. With higher-resolution sensors, better results are achievable in less time. The results of the data fusion from three or more sensors over such a period of time provide a rich source of information for the estimation of target states. The algorithms are fast (O(n ln n)); for approximately 100 targets, the average processing per scan in the multi-scan three-sensor methodology takes approximately a second of computational time on a Mac II.

  20. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    PubMed

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  1. A novel procedure for the localization of viral RNAs in protoplasts and whole plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengli; Simon, Anne E

    2003-09-01

    Analysis of virus spread using co-expressed reporter proteins has provided important details on cell-to-cell and long-distance movement of viruses in plants. However, most viruses cannot tolerate insertion of large non-viral segments or loss of any open-reading frames, procedures required to detect viruses non-evasively. A technique used to localize mRNAs intracellularly in yeast has been modified for detection of viral RNAs in whole plants. The technique makes use of the binding of the coat protein of MS2 bacteriophage (CPMS2) to a 19 base hairpin (hp). A fusion protein, consisting of the CPMS2, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and a nuclear localization signal (NLS), was nuclear-localized upon transient expression in protoplasts. However, addition of the hp to the 3' untranslated region of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV-hp) and co-transfection of the virus and fusion protein construct into protoplasts resulted in the re-location of GFP to the cytoplasm. Neither the insertion of the hp nor the interaction with the fusion protein impaired any viral functions. Transgenic plants expressing the GFP-NLS-CPMS2 fusion protein were generated, and GFP was detected in nuclei of young plant cells. Foci of GFP cytoplasmic fluorescence were detected in TCV-hp-inoculated leaves at 2 days post-inoculation. Later, GFP was detected in young leaves near the midvein and in the base (support) cells of trichomes in the vicinity of secondary and tertiary veins. In older leaves, cytoplasmic GFP could be visualized throughout many of the leaves. This technique should be amenable for detection of any virus with a transformable plant (or animal) host and may also prove useful for localizing properly engineered host RNAs.

  2. Fusion engineering device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  3. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  4. [Clinical aspects of viral respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Pescetti, G; Gozzelino, F

    1980-12-01

    The Authors deal with some clinical aspect of the commonest types of respiratory tract viral infections. After a description of the characteristics of the most important diseases (common cold, ARD, influenza, viral pneumonia) they deal with some particular problem difficult in resolution, both from a pathogenetic and clinical viewpoint and quite constant bacterial over infection, the cardiac complications, th possible evolution to fibrosis and the relationship between viral infections and asthma. The nowadays problem of immunological and chemotherapeutic prevention of viral infections, particularly of type A influenza, is also discussed.

  5. Mosquito Defense Strategies against Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Penghua; Xiao, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Mosquito-borne viral diseases are a major concern of global health and result in significant economic losses in many countries. As natural vectors, mosquitoes are very permissive to and allow systemic and persistent arbovirus infection. Intriguingly, persistent viral propagation in mosquito tissues neither results in dramatic pathological sequelae nor impairs the vectorial behavior or lifespan, indicating that mosquitoes have evolved mechanisms to tolerate persistent infection and developed efficient antiviral strategies to restrict viral replication to nonpathogenic levels. Here we provide an overview of recent progress in understanding mosquito antiviral immunity and advances in the strategies by which mosquitoes control viral infection in specific tissues.

  6. Charge-surrounded pockets and electrostatic interactions with small ions modulate the activity of retroviral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Daniel; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W; van Aalten, Daan M F; Brighty, David W

    2011-02-03

    Refolding of viral class-1 membrane fusion proteins from a native state to a trimer-of-hairpins structure promotes entry of viruses into cells. Here we present the structure of the bovine leukaemia virus transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) and identify a group of asparagine residues at the membrane-distal end of the trimer-of-hairpins that is strikingly conserved among divergent viruses. These asparagines are not essential for surface display of pre-fusogenic envelope. Instead, substitution of these residues dramatically disrupts membrane fusion. Our data indicate that, through electrostatic interactions with a chloride ion, the asparagine residues promote assembly and profoundly stabilize the fusion-active structures that are required for viral envelope-mediated membrane fusion. Moreover, the BLV TM structure also reveals a charge-surrounded hydrophobic pocket on the central coiled coil and interactions with basic residues that cluster around this pocket are critical to membrane fusion and form a target for peptide inhibitors of envelope function. Charge-surrounded pockets and electrostatic interactions with small ions are common among class-1 fusion proteins, suggesting that small molecules that specifically target such motifs should prevent assembly of the trimer-of-hairpins and be of value as therapeutic inhibitors of viral entry.

  7. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  8. Direct Visualization of Ebola Virus Fusion Triggering in the Endocytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jennifer S.; Krause, Tyler B.; Mittler, Eva; Jangra, Rohit K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) makes extensive and intricate use of host factors in the cellular endosomal/lysosomal pathway to release its genome into the cytoplasm and initiate infection. Following viral internalization into endosomes, host cysteine proteases cleave the EBOV fusion glycoprotein (GP) to unmask the binding site for its intracellular receptor, the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). GP-NPC1 interaction is required for viral entry. Despite these and other recent discoveries, late events in EBOV entry following GP-NPC1 binding and culminating in GP-catalyzed fusion between viral and cellular lipid bilayers remain enigmatic. A mechanistic understanding of EBOV membrane fusion has been hampered by the failure of previous efforts to reconstitute fusion in vitro or at the cell surface. This report describes an assay to monitor initial steps directly in EBOV membrane fusion—triggering of GP and virus-cell lipid mixing—by single virions in live cells. Fusogenic triggering of GP occurs predominantly in Rab7-positive (Rab7+) endosomes, absolutely requires interaction between proteolytically primed GP and NPC1, and is blocked by key GP-specific neutralizing antibodies with therapeutic potential. Unexpectedly, cysteine protease inhibitors do not inhibit lipid mixing by virions bearing precleaved GP, even though they completely block cytoplasmic entry by these viruses, as shown previously. These results point to distinct cellular requirements for different steps in EBOV membrane fusion and suggest a model in which host cysteine proteases are dispensable for GP fusion triggering after NPC1 binding but are required for the formation of fusion pores that permit genome delivery. PMID:26861015

  9. Discovering and understanding oncogenic gene fusions through data intensive computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Latysheva, Natasha S.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    Although gene fusions have been recognized as important drivers of cancer for decades, our understanding of the prevalence and function of gene fusions has been revolutionized by the rise of next-generation sequencing, advances in bioinformatics theory and an increasing capacity for large-scale computational biology. The computational work on gene fusions has been vastly diverse, and the present state of the literature is fragmented. It will be fruitful to merge three camps of gene fusion bioinformatics that appear to rarely cross over: (i) data-intensive computational work characterizing the molecular biology of gene fusions; (ii) development research on fusion detection tools, candidate fusion prioritization algorithms and dedicated fusion databases and (iii) clinical research that seeks to either therapeutically target fusion transcripts and proteins or leverages advances in detection tools to perform large-scale surveys of gene fusion landscapes in specific cancer types. In this review, we unify these different—yet highly complementary and symbiotic—approaches with the view that increased synergy will catalyze advancements in gene fusion identification, characterization and significance evaluation. PMID:27105842

  10. A live attenuated human metapneumovirus vaccine strain provides complete protection against homologous viral infection and cross-protection against heterologous viral infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Shu, Zhou; Qin, Xian; Dou, Ying; Zhao, Yao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    A live attenuated vaccine candidate strain (M2) of human metapneumovirus (hMPV) was generated by removing the N-linked carbohydrate at amino acid 172 in the fusion (F) protein. Previously, replication of M2 in mouse lungs could be detected by molecular assays but not by viral titration. In the present study, the protective effects of M2 against infection by homologous or heterologous viruses were evaluated in BALB/c mice. Immunization with M2 produced a high titer of serum virus-neutralizing antibodies in BALB/c mice at 4 and 8 weeks postimmunization, with the titers against the homologous virus being higher than those against the heterologous virus. Challenges at 4 and 8 weeks postinoculation with M2 or wild-type virus led to no replication when mice were challenged with a homologous virus and extremely reduced replication when mice were challenged with a heterologous virus, as determined by the detection of viral genomic RNA copies in the lungs, as well as significantly milder pulmonary pathology. Thus, M2, with only one N-linked carbohydrate removed in the F protein, provides complete protection from homologous virus infection and substantial cross-protection from heterologous virus infection for at least 56 days after inoculation. This vaccine strain may therefore be a candidate for further preclinical study. Furthermore, this attenuating strategy (changing the glycosylation of a major viral protein) may be useful in the development of other viral vaccines.

  11. Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar welding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Yonghao; Ding, Xianfei; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-09-15

    Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of a weld joint were investigated in a 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar weldment. The results showed that there were two alternately distributed typical fusion boundaries, a narrow random boundary (possessed 15% in length) with a clear sharp interface and an epitaxial fusion one with (100){sub BM}//(100){sub WM} at the joint interface. The composition transition, microstructure and hardness across the fusion boundary strongly depended on the type of the fusion boundary. For the random boundary, there was a clear sharp interface and the composition transition with a width of 100 μm took place symmetrically across the grain boundary. For the epitaxial fusion one, however, there were Type-I and Type-II grain boundaries perpendicular and parallel to the epitaxial fusion boundary, respectively. The composition transition took place in the Inconel 182 weld side. Σ3 boundaries in the HAZ of 316SS side and Σ5 grain boundaries in weld metal were usually observed, despite the type of fusion boundary, however the former was much more in epitaxial fusion boundary. Microhardness was continuously decreased across the random fusion boundary from the side of Inconel 182 to 316SS, but a hardening phenomenon appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary zone because of its fine cellular microstructure. - Highlights: • Two typical fusion boundaries alternately distributed in the fusion interface • The microstructure, composition and hardness across fusion boundary depended on its type. • Different regions in welded joint have different special CSL value boundaries. • Hardening phenomenon only appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary.

  12. Human-Centered Fusion Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; White, Amanda M.; Beagley, Nathaniel

    2007-05-16

    In recent years the benefits of fusing signatures extracted from large amounts of distributed and/or heterogeneous data sources have been largely documented in various problems ranging from biological protein function prediction to cyberspace monitoring. In spite of significant progress in information fusion research, there is still no formal theoretical framework for defining various types of information fusion systems, defining and analyzing relations among such types, and designing information fusion systems using a formal method approach. Consequently, fusion systems are often poorly understood, are less than optimal, and/or do not suit user needs. To start addressing these issues, we outline a formal humancentered fusion framework for reasoning about fusion strategies. Our approach relies on a new taxonomy for fusion strategies, an alternative definition of information fusion in terms of parameterized paths in signature related spaces, an algorithmic formalization of fusion strategies and a library of numeric and dynamic visual tools measuring the impact as well as the impact behavior of fusion strategies. Using a real case of intelligence analysis we demonstrate that the proposed framework enables end users to rapidly 1) develop and implement alternative fusion strategies, 2) understand the impact of each strategy, 3) compare the various strategies, and 4) perform the above steps without having to know the mathematical foundations of the framework. We also demonstrate that the human impact on a fusion system is critical in the sense that small changes in strategies do not necessarily correspond to small changes in results.

  13. A fusion of minds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corfield, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Mystery still surrounds the visit of the astronomer Sir Bernard Lovell to the Soviet Union in 1963. But his collaboration - and that of other British scientists - eased geopolitical tensions at the height of the Cold War and paved the way for today's global ITER fusion project, as Richard Corfield explains.

  14. Bubble fusion: Preliminary estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    The collapse of a gas-filled bubble in disequilibrium (i.e., internal pressure {much_lt} external pressure) can occur with a significant focusing of energy onto the entrapped gas in the form of pressure-volume work and/or acoustical shocks; the resulting heating can be sufficient to cause ionization and the emission of atomic radiations. The suggestion that extreme conditions necessary for thermonuclear fusion to occur may be possible has been examined parametrically in terms of the ratio of initial bubble pressure relative to that required for equilibrium. In this sense, the disequilibrium bubble is viewed as a three-dimensional ``sling shot`` that is ``loaded`` to an extent allowed by the maximum level of disequilibrium that can stably be achieved. Values of this disequilibrium ratio in the range 10{sup {minus}5}--10{sup {minus}6} are predicted by an idealized bubble-dynamics model as necessary to achieve conditions where nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium might be observed. Harmonic and aharmonic pressurizations/decompressions are examined as means to achieve the required levels of disequilibrium required to create fusion conditions. A number of phenomena not included in the analysis reported herein could enhance or reduce the small levels of nuclear fusions predicted.

  15. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.; Buchholtz, B.; Ward, P.; Freuh, J.; Jensen, E.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium. Helium can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  16. Multilevel fusion exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Perry C.; Dasarathy, Belur V.; McCullough, Claire L.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes a project that was sponsored by the U.S. Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (USASSDC) to develop, test, and demonstrate sensor fusion algorithms for target recognition. The purpose of the project was to exploit the use of sensor fusion at all levels (signal, feature, and decision levels) and all combinations to improve target recognition capability against tactical ballistic missile (TBM) targets. These algorithms were trained with simulated radar signatures to accurately recognize selected TBM targets. The simulated signatures represent measurements made by two radars (S-band and X- band) with the targets at a variety of aspect and roll angles. Two tests were conducted: one with simulated signatures collected at angles different from those in the training database and one using actual test data. The test results demonstrate a high degree of recognition accuracy. This paper describes the training and testing techniques used; shows the fusion strategy employed; and illustrates the advantages of exploiting multi-level fusion.

  17. Mars manned fusion spaceship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedrick, James; Buchholtz, Brent; Ward, Paul; Freuh, Jim; Jensen, Eric

    1991-01-01

    Fusion Propulsion has an enormous potential for space exploration in the near future. In the twenty-first century, a usable and efficient fusion rocket will be developed and in use. Because of the great distance between other planets and Earth, efficient use of time, fuel, and payload is essential. A nuclear spaceship would provide greater fuel efficiency, less travel time, and a larger payload. Extended missions would give more time for research, experiments, and data acquisition. With the extended mission time, a need for an artificial environment exists. The topics of magnetic fusion propulsion, living modules, artificial gravity, mass distribution, space connection, and orbital transfer to Mars are discussed. The propulsion system is a magnetic fusion reactor based on a tandem mirror design. This allows a faster, shorter trip time and a large thrust to weight ratio. The fuel proposed is a mixture of deuterium and helium-3. Helium-3 can be obtained from lunar mining. There will be minimal external radiation from the reactor resulting in a safe, efficient propulsion system.

  18. Fusion reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  19. The stability analysis of a general viral infection model with distributed delays and multi-staged infected progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinliang; Liu, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an in-host model with general incidence and removal rate, as well as distributed delays in virus infections and in productions. By employing Lyapunov functionals and LaSalle's invariance principle, we define and prove the basic reproductive number R0 as a threshold quantity for stability of equilibria. It is shown that if R0 > 1 , then the infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable, while if R0 ⩽ 1 , then the infection free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable under some reasonable assumptions. Moreover, n + 1 distributed delays describe (i) the time between viral entry and the transcription of viral RNA, (ii) the n - 1 -stage time needed for activated infected cells between viral RNA transcription and viral release, and (iii) the time necessary for the newly produced viruses to be infectious (maturation), respectively. The model can describe the viral infection dynamics of many viruses such as HIV-1, HCV and HBV.

  20. Generation of monoclonal antibodies specific of the postfusion conformation of the Pneumovirinae fusion (F) protein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura; Olmedillas, Eduardo; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Terrón, María C; Luque, Daniel; Palomo, Concepción; Melero, José A

    2015-11-01

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires fusion of the viral and cell membranes mediated by one of the major virus glycoproteins, the fusion (F) glycoprotein which transits from a metastable pre-fusion conformation to a highly stable post-fusion structure during the membrane fusion process. F protein refolding involves large conformational changes of the protein trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) from each protomer into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of the Pneumovirinae F proteins, and as extension of previous work (Palomo et al., 2014), a general strategy was designed to obtain polyclonal and particularly monoclonal antibodies specific of the 6HB motif of the Pneumovirinae fusion protein. The antibodies reported here should assist in the characterization of the structural changes that the F protein of human metapneumovirus or respiratory syncytial virus experiences during the process of membrane fusion. PMID:26275682

  1. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  2. Addressing viral resistance through vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Catherine; Schleif, Amanda; Heilman, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious healthcare concern affecting millions of people around the world. Antiviral resistance has been viewed as a lesser threat than antibiotic resistance, but it is important to consider approaches to address this growing issue. While vaccination is a logical strategy, and has been shown to be successful many times over, next generation viral vaccines with a specific goal of curbing antiviral resistance will need to clear several hurdles including vaccine design, evaluation and implementation. This article suggests that a new model of vaccination may need to be considered: rather than focusing on public health, this model would primarily target sectors of the population who are at high risk for complications from certain infections. PMID:26604979

  3. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  4. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  5. Crystal structure of the conserved herpes virus fusion regulator complex gH-gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, Tirumala K; Cairns, Tina M; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Heldwein, Ekaterina E

    2010-09-13

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  6. Crystal structure of the conserved herpesvirus fusion regulator complex gH—gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Cairns, Tina M.; Atanasiu, Doina; Cohen, Gary H.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2015-02-09

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH–gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH–gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH–gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB–gH–gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB–gH–gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Conserved Herpes Virus Fusion Regulator Complex gH–gL

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdary, T.; Cairns, T; Atanasiu, D; Cohen, G; Eisenberg, R; Heldwein, E

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses, which cause many incurable diseases, infect cells by fusing viral and cellular membranes. Whereas most other enveloped viruses use a single viral catalyst called a fusogen, herpesviruses, inexplicably, require two conserved fusion-machinery components, gB and the heterodimer gH-gL, plus other nonconserved components. gB is a class III viral fusogen, but unlike other members of its class, it does not function alone. We determined the crystal structure of the gH ectodomain bound to gL from herpes simplex virus 2. gH-gL is an unusually tight complex with a unique architecture that, unexpectedly, does not resemble any known viral fusogen. Instead, we propose that gH-gL activates gB for fusion, possibly through direct binding. Formation of a gB-gH-gL complex is critical for fusion and is inhibited by a neutralizing antibody, making the gB-gH-gL interface a promising antiviral target.

  8. Enhanced image capture through fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Peter J.; Hanna, Keith; Kolczynski, Raymond J.

    1993-01-01

    Image fusion may be used to combine images from different sensors, such as IR and visible cameras, to obtain a single composite with extended information content. Fusion may also be used to combine multiple images from a given sensor to form a composite image in which information of interest is enhanced. We present a general method for performing image fusion and show that this method is effective for diverse fusion applications. We suggest that fusion may provide a powerful tool for enhanced image capture with broad utility in image processing and computer vision.

  9. Accelerators for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1985-10-01

    Large fusion devices will almost certainly produce net energy. However, a successful commercial fusion energy system must also satisfy important engineering and economic constraints. Inertial confinement fusion power plants driven by multi-stage, heavy-ion accelerators appear capable of meeting these constraints. The reasons behind this promising outlook for heavy-ion fusion are given in this report. This report is based on the transcript of a talk presented at the Symposium on Lasers and Particle Beams for Fusion and Strategic Defense at the University of Rochester on April 17-19, 1985.

  10. Canine distemper virus persistence in demyelinating encephalitis by swift intracellular cell-to-cell spread in astrocytes is controlled by the viral attachment protein.

    PubMed

    Wyss-Fluehmann, Gaby; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Vandevelde, Marc; Plattet, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    The mechanism of viral persistence, the driving force behind the chronic progression of inflammatory demyelination in canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, is associated with non-cytolytic viral cell-to-cell spread. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms of viral spread of a recombinant fluorescent protein-expressing virulent CDV in primary canine astrocyte cultures. Time-lapse video microscopy documented that CDV spread was very efficient using cell processes contacting remote target cells. Strikingly, CDV transmission to remote cells could occur in less than 6 h, suggesting that a complete viral cycle with production of extracellular free particles was not essential in enabling CDV to spread in glial cells. Titration experiments and electron microscopy confirmed a very low CDV particle production despite higher titers of membrane-associated viruses. Interestingly, confocal laser microscopy and lentivirus transduction indicated expression and functionality of the viral fusion machinery, consisting of the viral fusion (F) and attachment (H) glycoproteins, at the cell surface. Importantly, using a single-cycle infectious recombinant H-knockout, H-complemented virus, we demonstrated that H, and thus potentially the viral fusion complex, was necessary to enable CDV spread. Furthermore, since we could not detect CD150/SLAM expression in brain cells, the presence of a yet non-identified glial receptor for CDV was suggested. Altogether, our findings indicate that persistence in CDV infection results from intracellular cell-to-cell transmission requiring the CDV-H protein. Viral transfer, happening selectively at the tip of astrocytic processes, may help the virus to cover long distances in the astroglial network, "outrunning" the host's immune response in demyelinating plaques, thus continuously eliciting new lesions.

  11. Inhibition of endosomal fusion activity of influenza virus by Rheum tanguticum (da-huang).

    PubMed

    Lin, Ta-Jen; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Ming-Chung; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Rhubarb (Rheum tanguticum; da-huang in Chinese medicine) is a herbal medicine that has been used widely for managing fever and removing toxicity. In this study, we investigated how rhubarb inhibits influenza virus during the early stage of the infectious cycle using different functional assays. A non-toxic ethanolic extract of rhubarb (Rex) inhibited several H1N1 subtypes of influenza A viruses in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, including strains that are clinically resistant to oseltamivir. Time course analysis of Rex addition showed that viral entry was one of the steps that was inhibited by Rex. We also confirmed that Rex effectively inhibited viral attachment and penetration into the host cells. The inhibition of red blood cell haemolysis and cell-cell fusion by Rex suggests that Rex may block haemagglutinin-mediated fusion (virus-endosome fusion) during the fusion/uncoating step. Rex has the capacity to inhibit influenza viruses by blocking viral endocytosis. Thus, rhubarb might provide an alternative therapeutic approach when resistant viruses become more prevalent. PMID:27302738

  12. Differences in dispersion of influenza virus lipids and proteins during fusion.

    PubMed

    Lowy, R J; Sarkar, D P; Whitnall, M H; Blumenthal, R

    1995-02-01

    Digitally enhanced low-light-level fluorescence video microscopy and immunochemical staining were used to examine influenza virus envelope lipid and protein redistribution during pH-induced fusion. Video microscopy was performed using viruses labeled with either the lipid analogue octadecylrhodamine B (R18) or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) covalently linked to envelope proteins. Viruses were bound to human red blood cells, and the pattern and intensity of fluorescence were monitored for 30 min while cell-virus complexes were perfused with pH 7.4 or 4.8 media at temperatures either above or below 20 degrees C. R18 showed complete redistribution and dequenching by 30 min at all incubation temperatures, confirming reports that viral fusion occurs at subphysiological temperatures. FITC-labeled protein showed spatial redistribution at 28 degrees C but no change at low temperature. Electron microscopy observations of immunochemical staining of viral proteins confirmed both that protein redistribution at 37 degrees C was slower than R18 and the failure of movement within 30 min at 16 degrees C. Video microscopy monitoring of RNA staining by acridine orange of virus-cell complexes showed redistribution to the RBCs at all temperatures but only after low pH-induced fusion. The results are consistent with differential dispersion of viral components into the RBC and the existence of relatively long-lived barriers to diffusion subsequent to fusion pore formation.

  13. Inhibition of endosomal fusion activity of influenza virus by Rheum tanguticum (da-huang)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ta-Jen; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Ming-Chung; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Rhubarb (Rheum tanguticum; da-huang in Chinese medicine) is a herbal medicine that has been used widely for managing fever and removing toxicity. In this study, we investigated how rhubarb inhibits influenza virus during the early stage of the infectious cycle using different functional assays. A non-toxic ethanolic extract of rhubarb (Rex) inhibited several H1N1 subtypes of influenza A viruses in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells, including strains that are clinically resistant to oseltamivir. Time course analysis of Rex addition showed that viral entry was one of the steps that was inhibited by Rex. We also confirmed that Rex effectively inhibited viral attachment and penetration into the host cells. The inhibition of red blood cell haemolysis and cell–cell fusion by Rex suggests that Rex may block haemagglutinin-mediated fusion (virus–endosome fusion) during the fusion/uncoating step. Rex has the capacity to inhibit influenza viruses by blocking viral endocytosis. Thus, rhubarb might provide an alternative therapeutic approach when resistant viruses become more prevalent. PMID:27302738

  14. The path to fusion power.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn Smith, Chris; Ward, David

    2007-04-15

    Fusion is potentially an environmentally responsible and intrinsically safe source of essentially limitless power. It should be possible to build viable fusion power stations, and it looks as if the cost of fusion power will be reasonable. But time is needed to further develop the technology and to test in power station conditions the materials that would be used in their construction. Assuming no major adverse surprises, an orderly fusion development programme could lead to a prototype fusion power station putting electricity into the grid within 30 years, with commercial fusion power following some 10 or more years later. In the second half of the century, fusion could therefore be an important part of the portfolio of measures that are needed to cope with rising demand for energy in an environmentally responsible manner. In this paper, we describe the basics of fusion, its potential attractions, the status of fusion R&D, the remaining challenges and how they will be tackled at the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor and the proposed International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, and the timetable for the subsequent commercialization of fusion power. PMID:17272246

  15. Recombinant measles virus incorporating heterologous viral membrane proteins for use as vaccines.

    PubMed

    Swett-Tapia, Cindy; Bogaert, Lies; de Jong, Pascal; van Hoek, Vladimir; Schouten, Theo; Damen, Irma; Spek, Dirk; Wanningen, Patrick; Radošević, Katarina; Widjojoatmodjo, Myra N; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Roy, Soumitra

    2016-09-01

    Recombinant measles virus (rMV) vectors expressing heterologous viral membrane protein antigens are potentially useful as vaccines. Genes encoding the mumps virus haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (MuV-HN), the influenza virus haemagglutinin (Flu-HA) or the respiratory syncytial virus fusion (RSV-F) proteins were inserted into the genome of a live attenuated vaccine strain of measles virus. Additionally, in this case rMV with the MuV-HN or the influenza HA inserts, chimeric constructs were created that harboured the measles virus native haemagglutinin or fusion protein cytoplasmic domains. In all three cases, sucrose-gradient purified preparations of rMV were found to have incorporated the heterologous viral membrane protein on the viral membrane. The possible utility of rMV expressing RSV-F (rMV.RSV-F) as a vaccine was tested in a cotton rat challenge model. Vaccination with rMV.RSV-F efficiently induced neutralizing antibodies against RSV and protected animals from infection with RSV in the lungs. PMID:27311834

  16. The Need for Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassibry, Jason

    2005-01-01

    Fusion propulsion is inevitable if the human race remains dedicated to exploration of the solar system. There are fundamental reasons why fusion surpasses more traditional approaches to routine crewed missions to Mars, crewed missions to the outer planets, and deep space high speed robotic missions, assuming that reduced trip times, increased payloads, and higher available power are desired. A recent series of informal discussions were held among members from government, academia, and industry concerning fusion propulsion. We compiled a sufficient set of arguments for utilizing fusion in space. If the U.S. is to lead the effort and produce a working system in a reasonable amount of time, NASA must take the initiative, relying on, but not waiting for, DOE guidance. In this talk those arguments for fusion propulsion are presented, along with fusion enabled mission examples, fusion technology trade space, and a proposed outline for future efforts.

  17. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viral replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.

  18. Structure of viral B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1990-01-01

    Four categories of viral epitopes can be distinguished that have been designated cryptotopes, neotopes, metatopes and neutralization epitopes. Specific examples of each epitope type are presented and the methods used for locating their positions in viral proteins are described. The epitopes of four well-characterized viruses, namely poliovirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, influenza virus and tobacco mosaic virus are briefly described.

  19. The conformational specificity of viral epitopes.

    PubMed

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1992-12-15

    Four types of antigenic sites found in viruses are discussed: cryptotopes, neotopes, metatopes and neutralization epitopes. The role played by conformation on the specificity of viral epitopes is illustrated in the case of tobacco mosaic virus and influenza virus. It appears that mechanisms reminiscent of induced fit contribute to the recognition of viral epitopes by antibodies.

  20. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  1. Virosome engineering of colloidal particles and surfaces: bioinspired fusion to supported lipid layers.

    PubMed

    Fleddermann, J; Diamanti, E; Azinas, S; Košutić, M; Dähne, L; Estrela-Lopis, I; Amacker, M; Donath, E; Moya, S E

    2016-04-21

    Immunostimulating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) are liposomes with functional viral envelope glycoproteins: influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase intercalated in the phospholipid bilayer. Here we address the fusion of IRIVs to artificial supported lipid membranes assembled on polyelectrolyte multilayers on both colloidal particles and planar substrates. The R18 assay is used to prove the IRIV fusion in dependence of pH, temperature and HA concentration. IRIVs display a pH-dependent fusion mechanism, fusing at low pH in analogy to the influenza virus. The pH dependence is confirmed by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance technique. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging shows that at low pH virosomes are integrated in the supported membrane displaying flattened features and a reduced vertical thickness. Virosome fusion offers a new strategy for transferring biological functions on artificial supported membranes with potential applications in targeted delivery and sensing. PMID:27006101

  2. Crystal Structure of Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Fusion Glycoprotein Reveals a Class 1 Postfusion Architecture with Extensive Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Parsy, Marie-Laure; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2013-01-01

    Guanarito virus (GTOV) is an emergent and deadly pathogen. We present the crystal structure of the glycosylated GTOV fusion glycoprotein to 4.1-Å resolution in the postfusion conformation. Our structure reveals a classical six-helix bundle and presents direct verification that New World arenaviruses exhibit class I viral membrane fusion machinery. The structure provides visualization of an N-linked glycocalyx coat, and consideration of glycan dynamics reveals extensive coverage of the underlying protein surface, following virus-host membrane fusion. PMID:24049182

  3. Implementation of multispectral image fusion system based on SoPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lingfei; Wang, Zhihui

    2013-10-01

    Combining the theory of wavelet transform based image fusion and SOPC design method, the authors uses SOPC as the core device to design and implement a image fusion system. The fusion system adopts the Verilog hardware description language, Dsp builder and Quartus II development platform together with macro module to complete the logic design and timing control of each module. In the fusion system, we can achieve simple pixel-level image fusion of two registered images. This design not only builds up an image fusion system based on SOPC in accident, but also provides a hardware design principle in SoPC for the future design and Implementation of more comprehensive function of image processing.

  4. Ethical Considerations in Research Participation Virality.

    PubMed

    Ellis-Barton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    This article seeks to commence and encourage discussion around the upcoming ethical challenges of virality in network structures. When the call for participation in a research project on lupus in Ireland went from an advertisement in a newsletter to a meme (unit of transmissible information) on a closed Facebook page, the ethical considerations of virality were raised. The article analyzes the Association of Internet Researchers guidelines, Facebook policies, and the context of privacy in relation to virality. Virality creates the leverage for methodological pluralism. The nature of the inquiry can determine the method rather than the other way around. Viral ethical considerations are evolving due to the cyber world becoming the primary meme of communication, with flexibility in the researcher's protocol providing opportunities for efficient, cost-effective, and diverse recruitment.

  5. Ethical Considerations in Research Participation Virality.

    PubMed

    Ellis-Barton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    This article seeks to commence and encourage discussion around the upcoming ethical challenges of virality in network structures. When the call for participation in a research project on lupus in Ireland went from an advertisement in a newsletter to a meme (unit of transmissible information) on a closed Facebook page, the ethical considerations of virality were raised. The article analyzes the Association of Internet Researchers guidelines, Facebook policies, and the context of privacy in relation to virality. Virality creates the leverage for methodological pluralism. The nature of the inquiry can determine the method rather than the other way around. Viral ethical considerations are evolving due to the cyber world becoming the primary meme of communication, with flexibility in the researcher's protocol providing opportunities for efficient, cost-effective, and diverse recruitment. PMID:27534590

  6. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Liang, Eliza; Jain, Komal; Hitchens, Peta L.; Che, Xiaoyu; Soloyvov, Alexander; Hicks, Allison L.; Ojeda-Flores, Rafael; Zambrana-Torrelio, Carlos; Ulrich, Werner; Rostal, Melinda K.; Petrosov, Alexandra; Garcia, Joel; Haider, Najmul; Wolfe, Nathan; Goldstein, Tracey; Morse, Stephen S.; Rahman, Mahmudur; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Mazet, Jonna K.; Daszak, Peter; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unclear whether changes in viral communities will ever be predictable. Here we investigate whether viral communities in wildlife are inherently structured (inferring predictability) by looking at whether communities are assembled through deterministic (often predictable) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes to some portion of a viral community, however there will always be some portion for which prediction will be unlikely. PMID:26391192

  7. Importance of SARS-CoV spike protein Trp-rich region in viral infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yanning; Neo, T.L.; Liu, D.Xi.; Tam, James P.

    2008-07-04

    SARS-CoV entry is mediated by spike glycoprotein. During the viral and host cellular membrane fusion, HR1 and HR2 form 6-helix bundle, positioning the fusion peptide closely to the C-terminal region of ectodomain to drive apposition and subsequent membrane fusion. Connecting to the HR2 region is a Trp-rich region which is absolutely conserved in members of coronaviruses. To investigate the importance of Trp-rich region in SARS-CoV entry, we produced different mutated S proteins using Alanine scan strategy. SARS-CoV pseudotyped with mutated S protein was used to measure viral infectivity. To restore the aromaticity of Ala-mutants, we performed rescue experiments using phenylalanine substitutions. Our results show that individually substituted Ala-mutants substantially decrease infectivity by >90%, global Ala-mutants totally abrogated infectivity. In contrast, Phe-substituted mutants are able to restore 10-25% infectivity comparing to the wild-type. The results suggest that the Trp-rich region of S protein is essential for SARS-CoV infectivity.

  8. Viral dark matter and virus–host interactions resolved from publicly available microbial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Simon; Hallam, Steven J; Woyke, Tanja; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    The ecological importance of viruses is now widely recognized, yet our limited knowledge of viral sequence space and virus–host interactions precludes accurate prediction of their roles and impacts. In this study, we mined publicly available bacterial and archaeal genomic data sets to identify 12,498 high-confidence viral genomes linked to their microbial hosts. These data augment public data sets 10-fold, provide first viral sequences for 13 new bacterial phyla including ecologically abundant phyla, and help taxonomically identify 7–38% of ‘unknown’ sequence space in viromes. Genome- and network-based classification was largely consistent with accepted viral taxonomy and suggested that (i) 264 new viral genera were identified (doubling known genera) and (ii) cross-taxon genomic recombination is limited. Further analyses provided empirical data on extrachromosomal prophages and coinfection prevalences, as well as evaluation of in silico virus–host linkage predictions. Together these findings illustrate the value of mining viral signal from microbial genomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08490.001 PMID:26200428

  9. Helium cryopumping for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1988-05-01

    Large quantities of helium and hydrogen isotopes will be exhausted continuously from fusion power reactors. This paper summarizes two development programs undertaken to address vacuum pumping for this application: (i) A continuous duty cryopump for pumping helium and/or hydrogen species using charcoal sorbent and (ii) a cryopump configuration with an alternative shielding arrangement using charcoal sorbent or argon spray. A test program evaluated automatic pumping of helium, helium pumping by charcoal cryosorption and with argon spray, and cryosorption of helium/hydrogen mixtures. The continuous duty cryopump pumped helium continuously and conveniently. Helium pumping speed was 7.7 l/s/cm/sup 2/ of charcoal, compared to 5.8 l/s/cm/sup 2/ for the alternative pump. Helium speed using argon spray was 18% of that obtained by charcoal cryosorption in the same (W-panel) pump. During continuous duty cryopump mixture tests with helium and hydrogen copumped on charcoal, gas was released sporadically. Testing was insufficient to explain this unacceptable event.

  10. An unexpected twist in viral capsid maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Gertsman, Ilya; Gan, Lu; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Duda, Robert L.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Johnson, John E.

    2009-04-14

    Lambda-like double-stranded (ds) DNA bacteriophage undergo massive conformational changes in their capsid shell during the packaging of their viral genomes. Capsid shells are complex organizations of hundreds of protein subunits that assemble into intricate quaternary complexes that ultimately are able to withstand over 50 atm of pressure during genome packaging. The extensive integration between subunits in capsids requires the formation of an intermediate complex, termed a procapsid, from which individual subunits can undergo the necessary refolding and structural rearrangements needed to transition to the more stable capsid. Although various mature capsids have been characterized at atomic resolution, no such procapsid structure is available for a dsDNA virus or bacteriophage. Here we present a procapsid X-ray structure at 3.65 {angstrom} resolution, termed prohead II, of the lambda-like bacteriophage HK97, the mature capsid structure of which was previously solved to 3.44 {angstrom}. A comparison of the two largely different capsid forms has unveiled an unprecedented expansion mechanism that describes the transition. Crystallographic and hydrogen/deuterium exchange data presented here demonstrate that the subunit tertiary structures are significantly different between the two states, with twisting and bending motions occurring in both helical and -sheet regions. We also identified subunit interactions at each three-fold axis of the capsid that are maintained throughout maturation. The interactions sustain capsid integrity during subunit refolding and provide a fixed hinge from which subunits undergo rotational and translational motions during maturation. Previously published calorimetric data of a closely related bacteriophage, P22, showed that capsid maturation was an exothermic process that resulted in a release of 90 kJ mol{sup -1} of energy. We propose that the major tertiary changes presented in this study reveal a structural basis for an exothermic

  11. Unconventional approaches to fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Brunelli, B.; Leotta, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to unconventional approaches to fusionthose thermonuclear reactors that, in comparison with Tokamak and other main lines, have received little attention in the worldwide scientific community. Many of the approaches considered are still in the embryonic stages. The authors-an international group of active nuclear scientists and engineers-focus on the parameters achieved in the use of these reactors and on the meaning of the most recent physical studies and their implications for the future. They also compare these approaches with conventional ones, the Tokamak in particular, stressing the non-plasma-physics requirements of fusion reactors. Unconventional compact toroids, linear systems, and multipoles are considered, as are the ''almost conventional'' fusion machines: stellarators, mirrors, reversed-field pinches, and EBT.

  12. Fusion Data Grid Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Wang, Nanbor

    2004-11-01

    Simulations and experiments in the fusion and plasma physics community generate large datasets at remote sites. Visualization and analysis of these datasets are difficult because of the incompatibility among the various data formats adopted by simulation, experiments, and analysis tools, and the large sizes of analyzed data. Grids and Web Services technologies are capable of providing solutions for such heterogeneous settings, but need to be customized to the field-specific needs and merged with distributed technologies currently used by the community. This paper describes how we are addressing these issues in the Fusion Grid Service under development. We also present performance results of relevant data transfer mechanisms including binary SOAP, DIME, GridFTP and MDSplus and CORBA. We will describe the status of data converters (between HDF5 and MDSplus data types), developed in collaboration with MIT (J. Stillerman). Finally, we will analyze bottlenecks of MDSplus data transfer mechanism (work performed in collaboration with General Atomics (D. Schissel and M. Qian).

  13. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Experiments in cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-03-28

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models.

  15. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  16. Modular Aneutronic Fusion Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Pajer, Yosef Razin, Michael Paluszek, A.H. Glasser and Samuel Cohen

    2012-05-11

    NASA's JUNO mission will arrive at Jupiter in July 2016, after nearly five years in space. Since operational costs tend to rise with mission time, minimizing such times becomes a top priority. We present the conceptual design for a 10MW aneutronic fusion engine with high exhaust velocities that would reduce transit time for a Jupiter mission to eighteen months and enable more challenging exploration missions in the solar system and beyond. __________________________________________________

  17. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  18. (Fusion energy research)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  19. Fusion development and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  20. A capsid protein of nonenveloped Bluetongue virus exhibits membrane fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Forzan, Mario; Wirblich, Christoph; Roy, Polly

    2004-02-17

    The outer capsid layer of Bluetongue virus, a member of the nonenveloped Reoviridae family, is composed of two proteins, a receptor-binding protein, VP2, and a second protein, VP5, which shares structural features with class I fusion proteins of enveloped viruses. In the replication cycle of Bluetongue virus VP5 acts as a membrane permeabilization protein that mediates release of viral particles from endosomal compartments into the cytoplasm. Here, we show that VP5 can also act as a fusion protein and induce syncytium formation when it is fused to a transmembrane anchor and expressed on the cell surface. Fusion activity is strictly pH-dependent and is triggered by short exposure to low pH. No cell-cell fusion is observed at neutral pH. Deletion of the first 40 amino acids, which can fold into two amphipathic helices, abolishes fusion activity. Syncytium formation by VP5 is inhibited in the presence of VP2 when it is expressed in a membrane-anchored form. The data indicate an interaction between the outer capsid protein VP2 and VP5 and show that VP5 undergoes pH-dependent conformational changes that render it capable of interacting with cellular membranes. More importantly, our data show that a membrane permeabilization protein of a nonenveloped virus can evolve into a fusion protein by the addition of an appropriate transmembrane anchor. The results strongly suggest that the mechanism of membrane permeabilization by VP5 and membrane fusion by viral fusion proteins require similar structural features and conformational changes.